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Sample records for archaebacterium pyrococcus furiosus

  1. Characterization of amylolytic enzyme activities associated with the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.H.; Costantino, H.R.; Kelly, R.M. Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore )

    1990-07-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus produces several amylolytic enzymes in response to the presence of complex carbohydrates in the growth medium. These enzyme activities, {alpha}-glucosidase, pullulanase, and {alpha}-amylase, were detected in both cell extracts and culture supernatants. All activities were characterized by temperature optima of at least 100{degree}C as well as a high degree of thermostability. The existence of this collection of activities in P. furiosus suggests that polysaccharide availability in its growth environment is a significant aspect of the niche from which it was isolated.

  2. A novel and remarkably thermostable ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Aono, S; Bryant, F O; Adams, M W

    1989-01-01

    The archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus is a strict anaerobe that grows optimally at 100 degrees C by a fermentative-type metabolism in which H2 and CO2 are the only detectable products. A ferredoxin, which functions as the electron donor to the hydrogenase of this organism was purified under anaerobic reducing conditions. It had a molecular weight of approximately 12,000 and contained 8 iron atoms and 8 cysteine residues/mol but lacked histidine or arginine residues. Reduction and oxidation of the ferredoxin each required 2 electrons/mol, which is consistent with the presence of two [4Fe-4S] clusters. The reduced protein gave rise to a broad rhombic electronic paramagnetic resonance spectrum, with gz = 2.10, gy = 1.86, gx = 1.80, and a midpoint potential of -345 mV (at pH 8). However, this spectrum represented a minor species, since it quantitated to only approximately 0.3 spins/mol. P. furiosus ferredoxin is therefore distinct from other ferredoxins in that the bulk of its iron is not present as iron-sulfur clusters with an S = 1/2 ground state. The apoferredoxin was reconstituted with iron and sulfide to give a protein that was indistinguishable from the native ferredoxin by its iron content and electron paramagnetic resonance properties, which showed that the novel iron-sulfur clusters were not artifacts of purification. The reduced ferredoxin also functioned as an electron donor for H2 evolution catalyzed by the hydrogenase of the mesophilic eubacterium Clostridium pasteurianum. P. furiosus ferredoxin was resistant to denaturation by sodium dodecyl sulfate (20%, wt/vol) and was remarkably thermostable. Its UV-visible absorption spectrum and electron carrier activity to P. furiosus hydrogenase were unaffected by a 12-h incubation of 95 degrees C. PMID:2542225

  3. Solution-state structure by NMR of zinc-substituted rubredoxin from the marine hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Blake, P. R.; Park, J. B.; Zhou, Z. H.; Hare, D. R.; Adams, M. W.; Summers, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional solution-state structure is reported for the zinc-substituted form of rubredoxin (Rd) from the marine hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus, an organism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C. Structures were generated with DSPACE by a hybrid distance geometry (DG)-based simulated annealing (SA) approach that employed 403 nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE)-derived interproton distance restraints, including 67 interresidue, 124 sequential (i-j = 1), 75 medium-range (i-j = 2-5), and 137 long-range (i-j > 5) restraints. All lower interproton distance bounds were set at the sum of the van Der Waals radii (1.8 A), and upper bounds of 2.7 A, 3.3 A, and 5.0 A were employed to represent qualitatively observed strong, medium, and weak NOE cross peak intensities, respectively. Twenty-three backbone-backbone, six backbone-sulfur (Cys), two backbone-side chain, and two side chain-side chain hydrogen bond restraints were include for structure refinement, yielding a total of 436 nonbonded restraints, which averages to > 16 restraints per residue. A total of 10 structures generated from random atom positions and 30 structures generated by molecular replacement using the backbone coordinates of Clostridium pasteurianum Rd converged to a common conformation, with the average penalty (= sum of the square of the distance bounds violations; +/- standard deviation) of 0.024 +/- 0.003 A2 and a maximum total penalty of 0.035 A2. Superposition of the backbone atoms (C, C alpha, N) of residues A1-L51 for all 40 structures afforded an average pairwise root mean square (rms) deviation value (+/- SD) of 0.42 +/- 0.07 A. Superposition of all heavy atoms for residues A1-L51, including those of structurally undefined external side chains, afforded an average pairwise rms deviation of 0.72 +/- 0.08 A. Qualitative comparison of back-calculated and experimental two-dimensional NOESY spectra indicate that the DG/SA structures are consistent with the experimental

  4. Determinants of protein hyperthermostability: Purification and amino acid sequence of rubredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus and secondary structure of the zinc adduct by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, P.R.; Summers, M.F. ); Park, J.B.; Bryant, F.O.; Aono, Shigetoshi; Adams, M.W.W. ); Magnuson, J.K.; Eccleston, E.; Howard, J.B. )

    1991-11-12

    The purification, amino acid sequence, and two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR results are reported for the rubredoxin (Rd) from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus, an organism that grows optimally at 100C. The molecular mass (5397 Da), iron content UV-vis spectrophotometric properties, and amino acid sequence are found to be typical of this class of redox protein. However, P. furiosus Rd is remarkably thermostable, being unaffected after incubation for 24 h at 95C. One- and two-dimensional {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the oxidized (Fe(III)Rd) and reduced (Fe(II)Rd) forms of P. furiosus Rd exhibited substantial paramagnetic line broadening, and this precluded detailed 3D structural studies. The apoprotein was not readily amenable to NMR studies due to apparent protein oxidation involving the free cysteine sulfhydryls. Secondary structural elements were determined from qualitative analysis of 2D Overhauser effect spectra. These structural elements are similar to those observed by X-ray crystallography for native Rd from the mesophile C. pasteurianum. From analysis of the secondary structure, potentially stabilizing electrostatic interactions involving the charged groups of residues Ala(1), Glu(14), and Glu(52) are proposed. These interactions, which are not present in rubredoxins from mesophilic organisms, may prevent the {beta}-sheet from unzipping' at elevated temperatures.

  5. X-ray crystal structures of the oxidized and reduced forms of the rubredoxin from the marine hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Day, M. W.; Hsu, B. T.; Joshua-Tor, L.; Park, J. B.; Zhou, Z. H.; Adams, M. W.; Rees, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The structures of the oxidized and reduced forms of the rubredoxin from the archaebacterium, Pyrococcus furiosus, an organism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C, have been determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.8 A. Crystals of this rubredoxin grow in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with room temperature cell dimensions a = 34.6 A, b = 35.5 A, and c = 44.4 A. Initial phases were determined by the method of molecular replacement using the oxidized form of the rubredoxin from the mesophilic eubacterium, Clostridium pasteurianum, as a starting model. The oxidized and reduced models of P. furiosus rubredoxin each contain 414 nonhydrogen protein atoms comprising 53 residues. The model of the oxidized form contains 61 solvent H2O oxygen atoms and has been refined with X-PLOR and TNT to a final R = 0.178 with root mean square (rms) deviations from ideality in bond distances and bond angles of 0.014 A and 2.06 degrees, respectively. The model of the reduced form contains 37 solvent H2O oxygen atoms and has been refined to R = 0.193 with rms deviations from ideality in bond lengths of 0.012 A and in bond angles of 1.95 degrees. The overall structure of P. furiosus rubredoxin is similar to the structures of mesophilic rubredoxins, with the exception of a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network in the beta-sheet region and multiple electrostatic interactions (salt bridge, hydrogen bonds) of the Glu 14 side chain with groups on three other residues (the amino-terminal nitrogen of Ala 1; the indole nitrogen of Trp 3; and the amide nitrogen group of Phe 29). The influence of these and other features upon the thermostability of the P. furiosus protein is discussed. PMID:1303768

  6. Operon prediction in Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thao T.; Dam, Phuongan; Su, Zhengchang; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Zhou, G. Tong; Xu, Ying

    2007-01-01

    Identification of operons in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus represents an important step to understanding the regulatory mechanisms that enable the organism to adapt and thrive in extreme environments. We have predicted operons in P.furiosus by combining the results from three existing algorithms using a neural network (NN). These algorithms use intergenic distances, phylogenetic profiles, functional categories and gene-order conservation in their operon prediction. Our method takes as inputs the confidence scores of the three programs, and outputs a prediction of whether adjacent genes on the same strand belong to the same operon. In addition, we have applied Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway information to improve the accuracy of our algorithm. The parameters of this NN predictor are trained on a subset of all experimentally verified operon gene pairs of Bacillus subtilis. It subsequently achieved 86.5% prediction accuracy when applied to a subset of gene pairs for Escherichia coli, which is substantially better than any of the three prediction programs. Using this new algorithm, we predicted 470 operons in the P.furiosus genome. Of these, 349 were validated using DNA microarray data. PMID:17148478

  7. Pyrococcus furiosus strains and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, Gina L; Farkas, Joel Andrew; Adams, Michael W. W.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-06

    Provided herein are methods for transforming a Pyrococcus furiosus with a polynucleotide. In one embodiment, the method includes contacting a P. furiosus with a polynucleotide under conditions suitable for uptake of the polynucleotide by the P. furiosus, and identifying transformants at a frequency of, for instance, at least 10.sup.3 transformants per microgram DNA. Also provided are isolated Pyrococcus furiosus having the characteristics of Pyrococcus furiosus COM1, and plasmids that include an origin of replication that functions in a Pyrococcus furiosus. The plasmid is stable in a recipient P. furiosus without selection for more than 100 generations and is structurally unchanged after replication in P. furiosus for more than 100 generations.

  8. Regulation of Iron Metabolism by Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yixuan; Kumar, Sunil; Menon, Angeli L.; Scott, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and many of its iron-containing enzymes have been characterized. How iron assimilation is regulated, however, is unknown. The genome sequence contains genes encoding two putative iron-responsive transcription factors, DtxR and Fur. Global transcriptional profiles of the dtxR deletion mutant (ΔDTXR) and the parent strain under iron-sufficient and iron-limited conditions indicated that DtxR represses the expression of the genes encoding two putative iron transporters, Ftr1 and FeoAB, under iron-sufficient conditions. Under iron limitation, DtxR represses expression of the gene encoding the iron-containing enzyme aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a putative ABC-type transporter. Analysis of the dtxR gene sequence indicated an incorrectly predicted translation start site, and the corrected full-length DtxR protein, in contrast to the truncated version, specifically bound to the promoters of ftr1 and feoAB, confirming its role as a transcription regulator. Expression of the gene encoding Ftr1 was dramatically upregulated by iron limitation, but no phenotype was observed for the ΔFTR1 deletion mutant under iron-limited conditions. The intracellular iron concentrations of ΔFTR1 and the parent strain were similar, suggesting that under the conditions tested, Ftr1 is not an essential iron transporter despite its response to iron. In contrast to DtxR, the Fur protein appears not to be a functional regulator in P. furiosus, since it did not bind to the promoters of any of the iron-regulated genes and the deletion mutant (ΔFUR) revealed no transcriptional responses to iron availability. DtxR is therefore the key iron-responsive transcriptional regulator in P. furiosus. PMID:23504018

  9. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity's growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed. PMID:26543406

  10. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity’s growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus ,more » a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed.« less

  11. Unusual fatty acid compositions of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed Central

    Carballeira, N M; Reyes, M; Sostre, A; Huang, H; Verhagen, M F; Adams, M W

    1997-01-01

    The fatty acid compositions of the hyperthermophilic microorganisms Thermotoga maritima and Pyrococcus furiosus were studied and compared. A total of 37 different fatty acids were identified in T. maritima, including the novel 13,14-dimethyloctacosanedioic acid. In contrast, a total of 18 different fatty acids were characterized, as minor components, in P. furiosus, and these included saturated, monounsaturated, and dicarboxylic acids. This is the first report of fatty acids from an archaeon. PMID:9098079

  12. Pyrococcus Furiosus Genome Supplementary Data from the Adams Laboratory at the University of Georgia

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adams, Michael W.W.; Weinberg, Michael V.; Schut, Gerrit J.; Brehm, Scott; Datta, Susmitta; Zhou, J.

    The research in the Adams Laboratory focuses on the physiology of hyperthermophilic organisms with an emphasis on metal-containing enzymes in the hyperthermophilic marine archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Three of the many articles from this University of Georgia lab have supplementary materials that are available on the Adams Lab website. All three sets of data are Open Reading Frames (ORFs) used for DNA microarray experiments and the changes in signal intensities. The full citations for the three articles are: 1) Weinberg, M. V., Schut, G. J., Brehm, S., Datta, S. and Adams, M. W. W. (2005) Cold shock of a hyperthermophilic archaeon: Pyrococcus furiosus exhibits multiple responses to a suboptimal growth temperature with a key role for membrane-bound glycoproteins. J Bacteriol. 187, 336-348; 2) Schut, G. J., Brehm, S. D., Datta, S. and Adams, M. W. W. (2003) "Whole genome DNA microarray analysis of a hyperthermophile and an archaeon: Pyrococcus furiosus grown on carbohydrates or peptides" J. Bacteriol. 185, 3935-3947; Schut, G. J., Zhou, J. and Adams, M. W. W. (2001) "DNA microarray analysis of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus evidence for a new type of sulfur-reducing enzyme" J. Bacteriol. 183, 7027-7036. Note that these articles are copyrighted by the Journal of Bacteriology.

  13. Purification and characterization of a proteasome from the hyperthermophilic archaeon pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, M.W.; Bauer, S.H.; Kelly, R.M.

    1997-03-01

    A 640-kDa proteasome consisting of {alpha} (25-kDa) and {beta} (22-kDa) subunits, and with a temperature optimum of 95{degrees}C, was purified from crude cell extracts of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus. Although this is the fourth member of the kingdom Euryarchaeota (and the first hyperthermophile) found to contain a proteasome, none has been identified among the members of the kingdom Crenarchaeota. 38 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Identification of two [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing hydro-lyases from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    van Vugt-Lussenburg, Barbara M A; van der Weel, Laura; Hagen, Wilfred R; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2009-09-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a strict anaerobe. It is therefore not expected to use the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy transduction. Nonetheless, its genome encodes more putative TCA cycle enzymes than the closely related Pyrococcus horikoshii and Pyrococcus abyssi, including an aconitase (PF0201). Furthermore, a two-subunit fumarase (PF1755 and PF1754) is encoded on the Pyr. furiosus genome. In the present study, these three genes were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli to enable characterization of the enzymes. PF1755 and PF1754 were shown to form a [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing heterodimeric enzyme, able to catalyse the reversible hydratation of fumarate. The aconitase PF0201 also contained an Fe-S cluster, and catalysed the conversion from citrate to isocitrate. The fumarase belongs to the class of two-subunit, [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing fumarate hydratases exemplified by MmcBC from Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum; the aconitase belongs to the aconitase A family. Aconitase probably plays a role in amino acid synthesis when the organism grows on carbohydrates. However, the function of the seemingly metabolically isolated fumarase in Pyr. furiosus has yet to be established.

  15. Random mutagenesis of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using in vitro mariner transposition and natural transformation

    PubMed Central

    Guschinskaya, Natalia; Brunel, Romain; Tourte, Maxime; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Oger, Philippe; Charpentier, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Transposition mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify the function of genes, reveal essential genes and generally to unravel the genetic basis of living organisms. However, transposon-mediated mutagenesis has only been successfully applied to a limited number of archaeal species and has never been reported in Thermococcales. Here, we report random insertion mutagenesis in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The strategy takes advantage of the natural transformability of derivatives of the P. furiosus COM1 strain and of in vitro Mariner-based transposition. A transposon bearing a genetic marker is randomly transposed in vitro in genomic DNA that is then used for natural transformation of P. furiosus. A small-scale transposition reaction routinely generates several hundred and up to two thousands transformants. Southern analysis and sequencing showed that the obtained mutants contain a single and random genomic insertion. Polyploidy has been reported in Thermococcales and P. furiosus is suspected of being polyploid. Yet, about half of the mutants obtained on the first selection are homozygous for the transposon insertion. Two rounds of isolation on selective medium were sufficient to obtain gene conversion in initially heterozygous mutants. This transposition mutagenesis strategy will greatly facilitate functional exploration of the Thermococcales genomes. PMID:27824140

  16. Characterization of the glycolytic enzyme enolase which is abundant in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.; Stevens, F.J.; Blamey, J.; Mai, X.; Zhou, Z.H.; Adams, M.W.W.

    1993-12-31

    High enolase activity, as measured by the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolphyruvate, was found in the cytoplasm of Pyrococcus (an anaerobic, hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100{degree}C). In this organism, the enzyme probably functions in a sugar fermentation pathway. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It had a temperature optimum of >90 {degree}C, and a pH optimum of 8.1. The enzyme was extremely thermostable with a half time for inactivation at 100{degree}C of 40 min. In contrast, an enolase from yeast was inactivated in 1 min at 88{degree}C. Both the P. furiosus and yeast enzymes required a metal ion for activity, but whereas the yeast enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg{sup ++} the P. furiosus enolase was equally active in the presence of Mn{sup ++}. Both enzymes were competitively inhibited by citrate. P. furiosus enolase, as for mesophilic enolases, probably has a homodimeric structure with subunit M{sub r} greater than 45,000. A highly conserved sequence of eight amino acids in the N-terminal region was found in enolases from P. furiosus and a wide range of other organisms including bacteria, yeast, birds, and mammals.

  17. Extreme resistance to thermally induced DNA backbone breaks in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Peak, M J; Robb, F T; Peak, J G

    1995-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus is a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100 degrees C. It is not conceivable that these organisms could survive with genomic DNA that was subject to thermal destruction, yet the mechanisms protecting the genomes of this and other hyperthermophiles against such destruction are obscure. We have determined the effect of elevated temperatures up to 110 degrees C on the molecular weight of DNA in intact P. furiosus cells, compared with the effect of elevated temperatures on DNA in the mesothermophilic bacterium Escherichia coli. At 100 degrees C, DNA in P. furiosus cells is about 20 times more resistant to thermal breakage than that in E. coli cells, and six times fewer breaks were found in P. furiosus DNA after exposure to 110 degrees C for 30 min than in E. coli DNA at 95 degrees C. Our hypothesis for this remarkable stability of DNA in a hyperthermophile is that this hyperthermophile possesses DNA-binding proteins that protect against hydrolytic damage, as well as other endogenous protective mechanisms and DNA repair enzyme systems. PMID:7592404

  18. Heterologous production of an energy-conserving carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex in the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGES

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; ...

    2016-01-29

    In this study, carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificialmore » chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100° C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80° C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.« less

  19. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms. PMID:26858706

  20. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Paravidino, Monica; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S; Wolterbeek, Hubert Th; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2015-06-01

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes (32)P and (76)As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption by the ferritin. Thermostable ferritin proved to be an excellent system for rapid phosphate and arsenate removal from aqueous solutions down to residual concentrations at the picomolar level. These very low concentrations make thermostable ferritin a potential tool to considerably mitigate industrial biofouling by phosphate limitation or to remove arsenate from drinking water.

  1. Repair of extensive ionizing-radiation DNA damage at 95 degrees C in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    DiRuggiero, J; Santangelo, N; Nackerdien, Z; Ravel, J; Robb, F T

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus for DNA repair by measuring survival at high levels of 60Co gamma-irradiation. The P. furiosus 2-Mb chromosome was fragmented into pieces ranging from 500 kb to shorter than 30 kb at a dose of 2,500 Gy and was fully restored upon incubation at 95 degrees C. We suggest that recombination repair could be an extremely active repair mechanism in P. furiosus and that it might be an important determinant of survival of hyperthermophiles at high temperatures. PMID:9226280

  2. A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Derrick L; Notey, Jaspreet S; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Loder, Andrew J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targeted gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.

  3. A novel domain arrangement in a monomeric cyclodextrin-hydrolyzing enzyme from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Song, Hyung-Nam; Jung, Tae-Yang; Lee, Myoung-Hee; Park, Sung-Goo; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    PFTA (Pyrococcus furiosus thermostable amylase) is a hyperthermophilic amylase isolated from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This enzyme possesses characteristics of both α-amylase- and cyclodextrin (CD)-hydrolyzing enzymes, allowing it to degrade pullulan, CD and acarbose-activities that are absent in most α-amylases-without the transferring activity that is common in CD-hydrolyzing enzymes. The crystal structure of PFTA revealed a unique monomeric subunit with an extended N-terminal region and an N'-domain folded into its own active site-a significantly altered domain configuration relative to that of the conventional dimeric CD-hydrolyzing amylases in glycoside hydrolase family 13. The active site is formed by the interface of the N'-domain and the catalytic domain and exhibits a broad and wide-open geometry without the concave pocket that is commonly found in the active sites of maltogenic amylases. The mutation of a residue (Gly415 to Glu) located at the domain interface between the N'- and catalytic domains yielded an enzyme that produced a significantly higher purity maltoheptaose (G7) from β-CD, supporting the involvement of this interface in substrate recognition and indicating that this mutant enzyme is a suitable candidate for the production of pure G7. The unique configuration of the active site distinguishes this archaic monomeric enzyme from classical bacterial CD-hydrolyzing amylases and provides a molecular basis for its enzymatic characteristics and for its potential use in industrial applications.

  4. Ethanol production by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by expression of bacterial bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthew W; Lipscomb, Gina L; Nguyen, Diep M; Crowley, Alexander T; Schut, Gerrit J; Scott, Israel; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-02-14

    Ethanol is an important target for the renewable production of liquid transportation fuels. It can be produced biologically from pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylase, or from acetyl-CoA, by alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE). Thermophilic bacteria utilize AdhE, which is a bifunctional enzyme that contains both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Many of these organisms also contain a separate alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) that generates ethanol from acetaldehyde, although the role of AdhA in ethanol production is typically not clear. As acetyl-CoA is a key central metabolite that can be generated from a wide range of substrates, AdhE can serve as a single gene fuel module to produce ethanol through primary metabolic pathways. The focus here is on the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows by fermenting sugar to acetate, CO2 and H2 . Previously, by the heterologous expression of adhA from a thermophilic bacterium, P. furiosus was shown to produce ethanol by a novel mechanism from acetate, mediated by AdhA and the native enzyme aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR). In this study, the AOR gene was deleted from P. furiosus to evaluate ethanol production directly from acetyl-CoA by heterologous expression of the adhE gene from eight thermophilic bacteria. Only AdhEs from two Thermoanaerobacter strains showed significant activity in cell-free extracts of recombinant P. furiosus and supported ethanol production in vivo. In the AOR deletion background, the highest amount of ethanol (estimated 61% theoretical yield) was produced when adhE and adhA from Thermoanaerobacter were co-expressed.

  5. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  6. Preparation and properties of gelatin-immobilized beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Hidetaka; Matsushita, Yoh-ichi; Sugamoto, Kazuhiro; Matsui, Takanao

    2005-01-01

    Hyperthermostable beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus was enclosed in gelatin gel by cross-linking with transglutaminase. Gelatin-immobilized beta-glucosidase was considerably more thermostable than the native enzyme. Lyophilized immobilisate was stored at 90 degrees C for 1 month without loss of activity. The immobilized beta-glucosidase catalyzed transglucosylation of 5-phenylpentanol with 10.0 equivalent of cellobiose at pH 5.0 and 70 degrees C for 12 h to afford 5-phenylpentyl beta-D-glucopyranoside in 41% yield. The immobilized enzyme was more effective than the native one in transglucosylation. The gelatin-immobilized Pfu-beta-glucosidase recovered from the first run of the reaction was reusable on successive runs.

  7. Crystal structure of a novel carboxypeptidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Joseph W; Hao, Bing; Ramakrishnan, Vijay; Cheng, Timothy; Chan, Sunney I; Chan, Michael K

    2002-02-01

    The structure of Pyrococcus furiosus carboxypeptidase (PfuCP) has been determined to 2.2 A resolution using multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) methods. PfuCP represents the first structure of the new M32 family of carboxypeptidases. The overall structure is comprised of a homodimer. Each subunit is mostly helical with its most pronounced feature being a deep substrate binding groove. The active site lies at the bottom of this groove and contains an HEXXH motif that coordinates the metal ion required for catalysis. Surprisingly, the structure is similar to the recently reported rat neurolysin. Comparison of these structures as well as sequence analyses with other homologous proteins reveal several conserved residues. The roles for these conserved residues in the catalytic mechanism are inferred based on modeling and their location.

  8. Bioenergetic studies of sulfur reduction in the hyperthermophilic archaebacteria Pyrodictium brockii and Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Schicho, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    The central focus of this work was the investigation of the central energy generating pathways of two hyperthermophilic sulfidogenic archaebacteria, Pyrodictium brockii and Pyrococcus furiosus. A potential application of these organisms in the desulfurization of coals was investigated. An effective ;means of removing elemental sulfur (S[degrees]) was developed. Analytical and processing applications are discussed. The rates of sulfur removal by the hyperthermophiles were 5 fold those measured of the mesophile, Thiobacillus thiooxidans. The primary energy generating pathway of Pyrodicutium brockii has been termed hydrogen-sulfur autotrophy and is characterized by the oxidation of H[sub 2] and reduction of S[degrees]. The goals of this part of the work were to quantify the stoichiometry of this organism and to estimate Y[sub s[sup MAX

  9. Comparative Analysis of Barophily-Related Amino Acid Content in Protein Domains of Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Yafremava, Liudmila S.; Di Giulio, Massimo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid substitution patterns between the nonbarophilic Pyrococcus furiosus and its barophilic relative P. abyssi confirm that hydrostatic pressure asymmetry indices reflect the extent to which amino acids are preferred by barophilic archaeal organisms. Substitution patterns in entire protein sequences, shared protein domains defined at fold superfamily level, domains in homologous sequence pairs, and domains of very ancient and very recent origin now provide further clues about the environment that led to the genetic code and diversified life. The pyrococcal proteomes are very similar and share a very early ancestor. Relative amino acid abundance analyses showed that biases in the use of amino acids are due to their shared fold superfamilies. Within these repertoires, only two of the five amino acids that are preferentially barophilic, aspartic acid and arginine, displayed this preference significantly and consistently across structure and in domains appearing in the ancestor. The more primordial asparagine, lysine and threonine displayed a consistent preference for nonbarophily across structure and in the ancestor. Since barophilic preferences are already evident in ancient domains that are at least ~3 billion year old, we conclude that barophily is a very ancient trait that unfolded concurrently with genetic idiosyncrasies in convergence towards a universal code. PMID:24187517

  10. Hydrolysis of isoflavone glycosides by a thermostable β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Bi-Na; Kim, Yeong-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2012-02-15

    The recombinant β-glucosidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was purified with a specific activity of 330 U/mg for genistin by His-trap chromatography. The specific activity of the purified enzyme followed the order genistin > daidzin > glycitin> malonyl glycitin > malonyl daidzin > malonyl genistin. The hydrolytic activity for genistin was highest at pH 6.0 and 95 °C with a half-life of 59 h, a K(m) of 0.5 mM, and a k(cat) of 6050 1/s. The enzyme completely hydrolyzed 1.0 mM genistin, daidzin, and glycitin within 100, 140, and 180 min, respectively. The soybean flour extract at 7.5% (w/v) contained 1.0 mM genistin, 0.9 mM daidzin, and 0.3 mM glycitin. Genistin, daidzin, and glycitin in the soybean flour extract were completely hydrolyzed after 60, 75, and 120 min, respectively. Of the reported β-glucosidases, P. furiosusβ-glucosidase exhibited the highest thermostability, k(cat), k(cat)/K(m), yield, and productivity for hydrolyzing genistin. These results suggest that this enzyme may be useful for the industrial hydrolysis of isoflavone glycosides.

  11. Kinetic study of the thermal denaturation of a hyperthermostable extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Brown, I; Dafforn, T R; Fryer, P J; Cox, P W

    2013-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic enzymes are of industrial importance and interest, especially due to their denaturation kinetics at commercial sterilisation temperatures inside safety indicating time-temperature integrators (TTIs). The thermal stability and irreversible thermal inactivation of native extracellular Pyrococcus furiosus α-amylase were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Denaturation of the amylase was irreversible above a Tm of approximately 106°C and could be described by a one-step irreversible model. The activation energy at 121°C was found to be 316kJ/mol. Using CD and FT-IR spectroscopy it was shown that folding and stability greatly increase with temperature. Under an isothermal holding temperature of 121°C, the structure of the PFA changes during denaturation from an α-helical structure, through a β-sheet structure to an aggregated protein. Such data reinforces the use of P. furiosus α-amylase as a labile species in TTIs.

  12. Anaerobic desulfurization of ground rubber with the thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus--a new method for rubber recycling.

    PubMed

    Bredberg, K; Persson, J; Christiansson, M; Stenberg, B; Holst, O

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic sulfur-reducing archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated regarding its capacity to desulfurize rubber material. The microorganism's sensitivity towards common rubber elastomers and additives was tested and several were shown to be toxic to P. furiosus. The microorganism was shown to utilize sulfur in vulcanized natural rubber and an increase in cell density was obtained when cultivated in the presence of spent tire rubber. Ethanol-leached cryo-ground tire rubber treated with P. furiosus for 10 days was vulcanized together with virgin rubber material (15% w/w) and the mechanical properties of the resulting material were determined. The increase in the stress at break value and the decrease in swell ratio and stress relaxation rate obtained for material containing microbially treated rubber (compared to untreated material) show the positive effects of microbial desulfurization on rubber.

  13. Bioprocessing analysis of Pyrococcus furiosus strains engineered for CO2-based 3-hydroxypropionate production

    DOE PAGES

    Hawkins, Aaron B.; Lian, Hong; Zeldes, Benjamin M.; ...

    2015-06-11

    In this paper, metabolically engineered strains of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt 95–100°C), designed to produce 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP) from maltose and CO2 using enzymes from the Metallosphaera sedula (Topt 73°C) carbon fixation cycle, were examined with respect to the impact of heterologous gene expression on metabolic activity, fitness at optimal and sub-optimal temperatures, gas-liquid mass transfer in gas-intensive bioreactors, and potential bottlenecks arising from product formation. Transcriptomic comparisons of wild-type P. furiosus, a genetically-tractable, naturally-competent mutant (COM1), and COM1-based strains engineered for 3HP production revealed numerous differences after being shifted from 95°C to 72°C, where product formation catalyzed by themore » heterologously-produced M. sedula enzymes occurred. At 72°C, significantly higher levels of metabolic activity and a stress response were evident in 3HP-forming strains compared to the non-producing parent strain (COM1). Gas–liquid mass transfer limitations were apparent, given that 3HP titers and volumetric productivity in stirred bioreactors could be increased over 10-fold by increased agitation and higher CO2 sparging rates, from 18 mg/L to 276 mg/L and from 0.7 mg/L/h to 11 mg/L/h, respectively. 3HP formation triggered transcription of genes for protein stabilization and turnover, RNA degradation, and reactive oxygen species detoxification. Lastly, the results here support the prospects of using thermally diverse sources of pathways and enzymes in metabolically engineered strains designed for product formation at sub-optimal growth temperatures.« less

  14. Bioprocessing analysis of Pyrococcus furiosus strains engineered for CO₂-based 3-hydroxypropionate production.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Aaron B; Lian, Hong; Zeldes, Benjamin M; Loder, Andrew J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Schut, Gerrit J; Keller, Matthew W; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-08-01

    Metabolically engineered strains of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (T(opt) 95-100°C), designed to produce 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP) from maltose and CO2 using enzymes from the Metallosphaera sedula (T(opt) 73°C) carbon fixation cycle, were examined with respect to the impact of heterologous gene expression on metabolic activity, fitness at optimal and sub-optimal temperatures, gas-liquid mass transfer in gas-intensive bioreactors, and potential bottlenecks arising from product formation. Transcriptomic comparisons of wild-type P. furiosus, a genetically-tractable, naturally-competent mutant (COM1), and COM1-based strains engineered for 3HP production revealed numerous differences after being shifted from 95°C to 72°C, where product formation catalyzed by the heterologously-produced M. sedula enzymes occurred. At 72°C, significantly higher levels of metabolic activity and a stress response were evident in 3HP-forming strains compared to the non-producing parent strain (COM1). Gas-liquid mass transfer limitations were apparent, given that 3HP titers and volumetric productivity in stirred bioreactors could be increased over 10-fold by increased agitation and higher CO2 sparging rates, from 18 mg/L to 276 mg/L and from 0.7 mg/L/h to 11 mg/L/h, respectively. 3HP formation triggered transcription of genes for protein stabilization and turnover, RNA degradation, and reactive oxygen species detoxification. The results here support the prospects of using thermally diverse sources of pathways and enzymes in metabolically engineered strains designed for product formation at sub-optimal growth temperatures.

  15. Electricity generation by Pyrococcus furiosus in microbial fuel cells operated at 90 °C.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Narendran; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W W; Ramasamy, Ramaraja P

    2017-02-20

    Hyperthermophiles are microorganisms that thrive in extremely hot environments with temperatures near and even above 100 (°) C. They are the most deeply rooted microorganisms on phylogenetic trees suggesting they may have evolved to survive in the early hostile earth. The simple respiratory systems of some of these hyperthermophiles made them potential candidates to develop microbial fuel cells (MFC) that can generate power at temperatures approaching the boiling point. We explored extracellular electron transfer ability of a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) by studying its ability to generate electricity in a two-chamber MFC. Pf growing in defined medium functioned as an anolyte in a MFC operated at 90 (°) C, generating a maximum current density of 2 A m(-2) and a peak power density of 225 mW m(-2) without the addition of any external redox mediator. Electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the anode with the attached Pf biofilm demonstrated bio-electrochemical behavior that led to electricity generation in MFC via direct electron transfer. This proof of concept study reveals for the first time that a hyperthermophile such as Pf can generate electricity in MFC at extreme temperatures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystal structure and functional implications of Pyrococcus furiosus hef helicase domain involved in branched DNA processing.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tatsuya; Komori, Kayoko; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-01-01

    DNA and RNA frequently form various branched intermediates that are important for the transmission of genetic information. Helicases play pivotal roles in the processing of these transient intermediates during nucleic acid metabolism. The archaeal Hef helicase/ nuclease is a representative protein that processes flap- or fork-DNA structures, and, intriguingly, its C-terminal half belongs to the XPF/Mus81 nuclease family. Here, we report the crystal structure of the helicase domain of the Hef protein from Pyrococcus furiosus. The structure reveals a novel helical insertion between the two conserved helicase core domains. This positively charged extra region, structurally similar to the "thumb" domain of DNA polymerase, plays critical roles in fork recognition. The Hef helicase/nuclease exhibits sequence similarity to the Mph1 helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae; XPF/Rad1, involved in DNA repair; and a putative Hef homolog identified in mammals. Hence, our findings provide a structural basis for the functional mechanisms of this helicase/nuclease family.

  17. A cryo-crystallographic time course for peroxide reduction by rubrerythrin from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, Bret D.; Demick, Jonathan M.; Adams, Michael W.W.; Lanzilotta, William N.

    2011-09-06

    High-resolution crystal structures of Pyrococcus furiosus rubrerythrin (PfRbr) in the resting (all-ferrous) state and at time points following exposure of the crystals to hydrogen peroxide are reported. This approach was possible because of the relativity slow turnover of PfRbr at room temperature. To this end, we were able to perform time-dependent peroxide treatment of the fully reduced enzyme, under strictly anaerobic conditions, in the crystalline state. In this work we demonstrate, for the first time, that turnover of a thermophilic rubrerythrin results in approximately 2-{angstrom} movement of one iron atom in the diiron site from a histidine to a carboxylate ligand. These results confirm that, despite the domain-swapped architecture, the hyperthermophilic rubrerythrins also utilize the classic combination of iron sites together with redox-dependent iron toggling to selectively reduce hydrogen peroxide over dioxygen. In addition, we have identified previously unobserved intermediates in the reaction cycle and observed structural changes that may explain the enzyme precipitation observed for the all-iron form of PfRbr upon oxidation to the all-ferric state.

  18. Preliminary neutron crystallographic analysis of selectively CH3-protonated, deuterated rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Kevin L; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew; Myles, Dean A A

    2008-01-01

    Neutron crystallography is used to locate hydrogen atoms in biological materials and can distinguish between negatively scattering hydrogen and positively scattering deuterium substituted positions in isomorphous neutron structures. Recently, Hauptman and Langs (2003) have shown that neutron diffraction data can be used to solve macromolecular structures by direct methods and that solution is aided by the presence of negatively scattering hydrogen atoms in the structure. Selective labeling protocols allow the design and production of H/D-labeled macromolecular structures in which the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium atoms can be precisely controlled. We have applied methyl-selective labeling protocols to introduce (1H-delta methyl)-leucine and (1H-gamma methyl)-valine into deuterated rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfRd). Here we report on the production, crystallization, and preliminary neutron analysis of the selectively CH3-protonated, deuterated PfRd sample, which provided a high quality neutron data set extending to 1.75 resolution at the new LADI-III instrument at the Insititut Laue-Langevin. Preliminary analysis of neutron density maps allows unambiguous assignment of the positions of hydrogen atoms at the methyl groups of the valine and leucine residues in the otherwise deuterated rubredoxin structure.

  19. A new strategy to express the extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Peili; Tian, Jian; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chang, Meihui; Chu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Ningfeng

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFA) shows great starch-processing potential for industrial application due to its thermostability, long half-life and optimal activity at low pH; however, it is difficult to produce in large quantities. In contrast, α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA) can be produced in larger quantities, but shows lower stability at high temperatures and low pH. Here, we describe a BAA protein expression pattern-mimicking strategy to express PFA in B. amyloliquefaciens using the expression and secretion elements of BAA, including the codon usage bias and mRNA structure of gene, promoter, signal peptide, host and cultivation conditions. This design was assessed to be successful by comparing the various genes (mpfa and opfa), promoters (PamyA and P43), and strains (F30, F31, F32 and F30-∆amyA). The final production of PFA yielded 2714 U/mL, about 3000- and 14-fold that reportedly produced in B. subtilis or E. coli, respectively. The recombinant PFA was optimally active at ~100 °C and pH 5 and did not require Ca2+ for activity or thermostability, and >80% of the enzyme activity was retained after treatment at 100 °C for 4 h. PMID:26916714

  20. A new strategy to express the extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Peili; Tian, Jian; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chang, Meihui; Chu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Ningfeng

    2016-02-26

    Extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFA) shows great starch-processing potential for industrial application due to its thermostability, long half-life and optimal activity at low pH; however, it is difficult to produce in large quantities. In contrast, α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA) can be produced in larger quantities, but shows lower stability at high temperatures and low pH. Here, we describe a BAA protein expression pattern-mimicking strategy to express PFA in B. amyloliquefaciens using the expression and secretion elements of BAA, including the codon usage bias and mRNA structure of gene, promoter, signal peptide, host and cultivation conditions. This design was assessed to be successful by comparing the various genes (mpfa and opfa), promoters (PamyA and P43), and strains (F30, F31, F32 and F30-∆amyA). The final production of PFA yielded 2714 U/mL, about 3000- and 14-fold that reportedly produced in B. subtilis or E. coli, respectively. The recombinant PFA was optimally active at ~100 °C and pH 5 and did not require Ca(2+) for activity or thermostability, and >80% of the enzyme activity was retained after treatment at 100 °C for 4 h.

  1. Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a DNA-guided nuclease that targets cognate DNA

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Daan C.; Hegge, Jorrit W.; Hinojo, Ismael; Shiimori, Masami; Ellis, Michael A.; Dumrongkulraksa, Justin; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; van der Oost, John

    2015-01-01

    Functions of prokaryotic Argonautes (pAgo) have long remained elusive. Recently, Argonautes of the bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Thermus thermophilus were demonstrated to be involved in host defense. The Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PfAgo) belongs to a different branch in the phylogenetic tree, which is most closely related to that of RNA interference-mediating eukaryotic Argonautes. Here we describe a functional and mechanistic characterization of PfAgo. Like the bacterial counterparts, archaeal PfAgo contributes to host defense by interfering with the uptake of plasmid DNA. PfAgo utilizes small 5′-phosphorylated DNA guides to cleave both single stranded and double stranded DNA targets, and does not utilize RNA as guide or target. Thus, with respect to function and specificity, the archaeal PfAgo resembles bacterial Argonautes much more than eukaryotic Argonautes. These findings demonstrate that the role of Argonautes is conserved through the bacterial and archaeal domains of life and suggests that eukaryotic Argonautes are derived from DNA-guided DNA-interfering host defense systems. PMID:25925567

  2. Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a DNA-guided nuclease that targets cognate DNA.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Daan C; Hegge, Jorrit W; Hinojo, Ismael; Shiimori, Masami; Ellis, Michael A; Dumrongkulraksa, Justin; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P; van der Oost, John

    2015-05-26

    Functions of prokaryotic Argonautes (pAgo) have long remained elusive. Recently, Argonautes of the bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Thermus thermophilus were demonstrated to be involved in host defense. The Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PfAgo) belongs to a different branch in the phylogenetic tree, which is most closely related to that of RNA interference-mediating eukaryotic Argonautes. Here we describe a functional and mechanistic characterization of PfAgo. Like the bacterial counterparts, archaeal PfAgo contributes to host defense by interfering with the uptake of plasmid DNA. PfAgo utilizes small 5'-phosphorylated DNA guides to cleave both single stranded and double stranded DNA targets, and does not utilize RNA as guide or target. Thus, with respect to function and specificity, the archaeal PfAgo resembles bacterial Argonautes much more than eukaryotic Argonautes. These findings demonstrate that the role of Argonautes is conserved through the bacterial and archaeal domains of life and suggests that eukaryotic Argonautes are derived from DNA-guided DNA-interfering host defense systems.

  3. Cloning, expression, and molecular characterization of the gene encoding an extremely thermostable [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Heltzel, A; Smith, E T; Zhou, Z H; Blamey, J M; Adams, M W

    1994-01-01

    The gene for ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The coding region confirmed the determined amino acid sequence. Putative archaeon-type transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. The fdxA gene appears to be an independent transcriptional unit. Recombinant ferredoxin was indistinguishable from the protein purified from P. furiosus in its thermal stability and in the potentiometric and spectroscopic properties of its [4Fe-4S] cluster. PMID:8045914

  4. Flagella of Pyrococcus furiosus: multifunctional organelles, made for swimming, adhesion to various surfaces, and cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Näther, Daniela J; Rachel, Reinhard; Wanner, Gerhard; Wirth, Reinhard

    2006-10-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus ("rushing fireball") was named for the ability of this archaeal coccus to rapidly swim at its optimal growth temperature, around 100 degrees C. Early electron microscopic studies identified up to 50 cell surface appendages originating from one pole of the coccus, which have been called flagella. We have analyzed these putative motility organelles and found them to be composed primarily (>95%) of a glycoprotein that is homologous to flagellins from other archaea. Using various electron microscopic techniques, we found that these flagella can aggregate into cable-like structures, forming cell-cell connections between ca. 5% of all cells during stationary growth phase. P. furiosus cells could adhere via their flagella to carbon-coated gold grids used for electron microscopic analyses, to sand grains collected from the original habitat (Porto di Levante, Vulcano, Italy), and to various other surfaces. P. furiosus grew on surfaces in biofilm-like structures, forming microcolonies with cells interconnected by flagella and adhering to the solid supports. Therefore, we concluded that P. furiosus probably uses flagella for swimming but that the cell surface appendages also enable this archaeon to form cable-like cell-cell connections and to adhere to solid surfaces.

  5. Flagella of Pyrococcus furiosus: Multifunctional Organelles, Made for Swimming, Adhesion to Various Surfaces, and Cell-Cell Contacts†

    PubMed Central

    Näther, Daniela J.; Rachel, Reinhard; Wanner, Gerhard; Wirth, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus (“rushing fireball”) was named for the ability of this archaeal coccus to rapidly swim at its optimal growth temperature, around 100°C. Early electron microscopic studies identified up to 50 cell surface appendages originating from one pole of the coccus, which have been called flagella. We have analyzed these putative motility organelles and found them to be composed primarily (>95%) of a glycoprotein that is homologous to flagellins from other archaea. Using various electron microscopic techniques, we found that these flagella can aggregate into cable-like structures, forming cell-cell connections between ca. 5% of all cells during stationary growth phase. P. furiosus cells could adhere via their flagella to carbon-coated gold grids used for electron microscopic analyses, to sand grains collected from the original habitat (Porto di Levante, Vulcano, Italy), and to various other surfaces. P. furiosus grew on surfaces in biofilm-like structures, forming microcolonies with cells interconnected by flagella and adhering to the solid supports. Therefore, we concluded that P. furiosus probably uses flagella for swimming but that the cell surface appendages also enable this archaeon to form cable-like cell-cell connections and to adhere to solid surfaces. PMID:16980494

  6. Heterologous production of an energy-conserving carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex in the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-01-29

    In this study, carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100° C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80° C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  7. Coupled TLC and MALDI-TOF/MS Analyses of the Lipid Extract of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Angelini, Roberto; Vitale, Rita; Huber, Harald; Müller, Volker; Corcelli, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The lipidome of the marine hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was studied by means of combined thin-layer chromatography and MALDI-TOF/MS analyses of the total lipid extract. 80–90% of the major polar lipids were represented by archaeol lipids (diethers) and the remaining part by caldarchaeol lipids (tetraethers). The direct analysis of lipids on chromatography plate showed the presence of the diphytanylglycerol analogues of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol, the N-acetylglucosamine-diphytanylglycerol phosphate plus some caldarchaeol lipids different from those previously described. In addition, evidence for the presence of the dimeric ether lipid cardiolipin is reported, suggesting that cardiolipins are ubiquitous in archaea. PMID:23193375

  8. The CRISPR-associated Csx1 protein of Pyrococcus furiosus is an adenosine-specific endoribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Nolan F.; Glover, Claiborne V.C.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes are frequently exposed to potentially harmful invasive nucleic acids from phages, plasmids, and transposons. One method of defense is the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune system. Diverse CRISPR-Cas systems form distinct ribonucleoprotein effector complexes that target and cleave invasive nucleic acids to provide immunity. The Type III-B Cmr effector complex has been found to target the RNA and DNA of the invader in the various bacterial and archaeal organisms where it has been characterized. Interestingly, the gene encoding the Csx1 protein is frequently located in close proximity to the Cmr1-6 genes in many genomes, implicating a role for Csx1 in Cmr function. However, evidence suggests that Csx1 is not a stably associated component of the Cmr effector complex, but is necessary for DNA silencing by the Cmr system in Sulfolobus islandicus. To investigate the function of the Csx1 protein, we characterized the activity of recombinant Pyrococcus furiosus Csx1 against various nucleic acid substrates. We show that Csx1 is a metal-independent, endoribonuclease that acts selectively on single-stranded RNA and cleaves specifically after adenosines. The RNA cleavage activity of Csx1 is dependent upon a conserved HEPN motif located within the C-terminal domain of the protein. This motif is also key for activity in other known ribonucleases. Collectively, the findings indicate that invader silencing by Type III-B CRISPR-Cas systems relies both on RNA and DNA nuclease activities from the Cmr effector complex as well as on the affiliated, trans-acting Csx1 endoribonuclease. PMID:26647461

  9. A mutant (‘lab strain’) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Derrick L.; Notey, Jaspreet S.; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; ...

    2014-12-04

    In this paper, a mutant (‘lab strain’) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targetedmore » gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Finally, electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.« less

  10. Relationship between glycosyl hydrolase inventory and growth physiology of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus on carbohydrate-based media.

    PubMed

    Driskill, L E; Kusy, K; Bauer, M W; Kelly, R M

    1999-03-01

    Utilization of a range of carbohydrates for growth by the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated by examining the spectrum of glycosyl hydrolases produced by this microorganism and the thermal labilities of various saccharides. Previously, P. furiosus had been found to grow in batch cultures on several alpha-linked carbohydrates and cellobiose but not on glucose or other beta-linked sugars. Although P. furiosus was not able to grow on any nonglucan carbohydrate or any form of cellulose in this study (growth on oat spelt arabinoxylan was attributed to glucan contamination of this substrate), significant growth at 98 degrees C occurred on beta-1,3- and beta-1,3-beta-1,4-linked glucans. Oligosaccharides generated by digestion with a recombinant laminarinase derived from P. furiosus were the compounds that were most effective in stimulating growth of the microorganism. In several cases, periodic addition of beta-glucan substrates to fed-batch cultures limited adverse thermochemical modifications of the carbohydrates (i.e., Maillard reactions and caramelization) and led to significant increases (as much as two- to threefold) in the cell yields. While glucose had only a marginally positive effect on growth in batch culture, the final cell densities nearly tripled when glucose was added by the fed-batch procedure. Nonenzymatic browning reactions were found to be significant at 98 degrees C for saccharides with degrees of polymerization (DP) ranging from 1 to 6; glucose was the most labile compound on a mass basis and the least labile compound on a molar basis. This suggests that for DP of 2 or greater protection of the nonreducing monosaccharide component may be a factor in substrate availability. For P. furiosus, carbohydrate utilization patterns were found to reflect the distribution of the glycosyl hydrolases which are known to be produced by this microorganism.

  11. A thermostable hybrid cluster protein from Pyrococcus furiosus: effects of the loss of a three helix bundle subdomain.

    PubMed

    Overeijnder, Marieke L; Hagen, Wilfred R; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2009-06-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus hybrid cluster protein (HCP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. This is the first archaeal and thermostable HCP to be isolated. Compared with the protein sequences of previously characterized HCPs from mesophiles, the protein sequence of P. furiosus HCP exhibits a deletion of approximately 13 kDa as a single amino acid stretch just after the N-terminal cysteine motif, characteristic for class-III HCPs from (hyper)thermophilic archaea and bacteria. The protein was expressed as a thermostable, soluble homodimeric protein. Hydroxylamine reductase activity of P. furiosus HCP showed a K(m) value of 0.40 mM and a k(cat) value of 3.8 s(-1) at 70 degrees C and pH 9.0. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showed evidence for the presence of a spin-admixed, S = 3/2 [4Fe-4S](+) cubane cluster and of the hybrid cluster. The cubane cluster of P. furiosus HCP is presumably coordinated by a CXXC-X(7)-C-X(5)-C motif close to the N-terminus, which is similar to the CXXC-X(8)-C-X(5)-C motif of the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfovibrio vulgaris HCPs. Amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling of P. furiosus HCP reveal that the deletion results in a loss of one of the two three-helix bundles of domain 1. Clearly the loss of one of the three-helix bundles of domain 1 does not diminish the hydroxylamine reduction activity and the incorporation of the iron-sulfur clusters.

  12. N-Linked Glycans Are Assembled on Highly Reduced Dolichol Phosphate Carriers in the Hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Michelle M.; Imperiali, Barbara; Eichler, Jerry; Guan, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    In all three domains of life, N-glycosylation begins with the assembly of glycans on phosphorylated polyisoprenoid carriers. Like eukaryotes, archaea also utilize phosphorylated dolichol for this role, yet whereas the assembled oligosaccharide is transferred to target proteins from dolichol pyrophosphate in eukaryotes, archaeal N-linked glycans characterized to date are derived from a dolichol monophosphate carrier, apart from a single example. In this study, glycan-charged dolichol phosphate from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was identified and structurally characterized. Normal and reverse phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the existence of dolichol phosphate charged with the heptasaccharide recently described in in vitro studies of N-glycosylation on this species. As with other described archaeal dolichol phosphates, the α- and ω-terminal isoprene subunits of the P. furiosus lipid are saturated, in contrast to eukaryal phosphodolichols that present only a saturated α-position isoprene subunit. Interestingly, an additional 1-4 of the 12-14 isoprene subunits comprising P. furiosus dolichol phosphate are saturated, making this lipid not only the longest archaeal dolichol phosphate described to date but also the most highly saturated. PMID:26098850

  13. N-Linked Glycans Are Assembled on Highly Reduced Dolichol Phosphate Carriers in the Hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michelle M; Imperiali, Barbara; Eichler, Jerry; Guan, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    In all three domains of life, N-glycosylation begins with the assembly of glycans on phosphorylated polyisoprenoid carriers. Like eukaryotes, archaea also utilize phosphorylated dolichol for this role, yet whereas the assembled oligosaccharide is transferred to target proteins from dolichol pyrophosphate in eukaryotes, archaeal N-linked glycans characterized to date are derived from a dolichol monophosphate carrier, apart from a single example. In this study, glycan-charged dolichol phosphate from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was identified and structurally characterized. Normal and reverse phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the existence of dolichol phosphate charged with the heptasaccharide recently described in in vitro studies of N-glycosylation on this species. As with other described archaeal dolichol phosphates, the α- and ω-terminal isoprene subunits of the P. furiosus lipid are saturated, in contrast to eukaryal phosphodolichols that present only a saturated α-position isoprene subunit. Interestingly, an additional 1-4 of the 12-14 isoprene subunits comprising P. furiosus dolichol phosphate are saturated, making this lipid not only the longest archaeal dolichol phosphate described to date but also the most highly saturated.

  14. Characterization of Ten Heterotetrameric NDP-Dependent Acyl-CoA Synthetases of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGES

    Scott, Joseph W.; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Tmore » he hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows by fermenting peptides and carbohydrates to organic acids. In the terminal step, acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) isoenzymes convert acyl-CoA derivatives to the corresponding acid and conserve energy in the form of ATP. ACS1 and ACS2 were previously purified from P. furiosus and have α 2 β 2 structures but the genome contains genes encoding three additional α -subunits.he ten possible combinations of α and β genes were expressed in E. coli and each resulted in stable and active α 2 β 2 isoenzymes.he α -subunit of each isoenzyme determined CoA-based substrate specificity and between them they accounted for the CoA derivatives of fourteen amino acids.he β -subunit determined preference for adenine or guanine nucleotides.he GTP-generating isoenzymes are proposed to play a role in gluconeogenesis by producing GTP for GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and for other GTP-dependent processes.ranscriptional and proteomic data showed that all ten isoenzymes are constitutively expressed indicating that both ATP and GTP are generated from the metabolism of most of the amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the ACSs of P. furiosus and other members of thehermococcales are evolutionarily distinct from those found throughout the rest of biology, including those of other hyperthermophilic archaea.« less

  15. Mutations of Asp540 and the domain-connecting residues synergistically enhance Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2014-01-21

    The structure of Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase (PfuLig), which architecturally resembles human DNA ligase I (hLigI), revealed that the C-terminal helix stabilizes the closed conformation through several ionic interactions between two domains (adenylylation domain (AdD) and C-terminal OB-fold domain (OBD)). This helix is oriented differently in DNA-bound hLigI, suggesting that the disruption of its interactions with AdD facilitates DNA binding. Previously, we demonstrated that the replacement of Asp540 with arginine improves the ligation activity. Here we report that the combination of the Asp540-replacement and the elimination of ionic residues in the helix, forming interactions with AdD, effectively enhanced the activity.

  16. Analyzing the binding of Co(II)-specific inhibitors to the methionyl aminopeptidases from Escherichia coli and Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sanghamitra; Sheppard, George; Wang, Jieyi; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2009-05-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) represent a unique class of protease that is capable of the hydrolytic removal of an N-terminal methionine residue from nascent polypeptide chains. MetAPs are physiologically important enzymes; hence, there is considerable interest in developing inhibitors that can be used as antiangiogenic and antimicrobial agents. A detailed kinetic and spectroscopic study has been performed to probe the binding of a triazole-based inhibitor and a bestatin-based inhibitor to both Mn(II)- and Co(II)-loaded type-I (Escherichia coli) and type-II (Pyrococcus furiosus) MetAPs. Both inhibitors were found to be moderate competitive inhibitors. The triazole-type inhibitor was found to interact with both active-site metal ions, while the bestatin-type inhibitor was capable of switching its mode of binding depending on the metal in the active site and the type of MetAP enzyme.

  17. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  18. Expression cloning and characterization of a novel gene that encodes the RNA-binding protein FAU-1 from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Akio; Oida, Hanako; Matsuura, Nana; Doi, Hirofumi

    2003-05-15

    We systematically screened a genomic DNA library to identify proteins of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using an expression cloning method. One gene product, which we named FAU-1 (P. furiosus AU-binding), demonstrated the strongest binding activity of all the genomic library-derived proteins tested against an AU-rich RNA sequence. The protein was purified to near homogeneity as a 54 kDa single polypeptide, and the gene locus corresponding to this FAU-1 activity was also sequenced. The FAU-1 gene encoded a 472-amino-acid protein that was characterized by highly charged domains consisting of both acidic and basic amino acids. The N-terminal half of the gene had a degree of similarity (25%) with RNase E from Escherichia coli. Five rounds of RNA-binding-site selection and footprinting analysis showed that the FAU-1 protein binds specifically to the AU-rich sequence in a loop region of a possible RNA ligand. Moreover, we demonstrated that the FAU-1 protein acts as an oligomer, and mainly as a trimer. These results showed that the FAU-1 protein is a novel heat-stable protein with an RNA loop-binding characteristic.

  19. Crystal structure and nucleic acid-binding activity of the CRISPR-associated protein Csx1 of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Kwan; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2013-02-01

    In many prokaryotic organisms, chromosomal loci known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (CAS) genes comprise an acquired immune defense system against invading phages and plasmids. Although many different Cas protein families have been identified, the exact biochemical functions of most of their constituents remain to be determined. In this study, we report the crystal structure of PF1127, a Cas protein of Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 that is composed of 480 amino acids and belongs to the Csx1 family. The C-terminal domain of PF1127 has a unique β-hairpin structure that protrudes out of an α-helix and contains several positively charged residues. We demonstrate that PF1127 binds double-stranded DNA and RNA and that this activity requires an intact β-hairpin and involve the homodimerization of the protein. In contrast, another Csx1 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 that is composed of 377 amino acids does not have the β-hairpin structure and exhibits no DNA-binding properties under the same experimental conditions. Notably, the C-terminal domain of these two Csx1 proteins is greatly diversified, in contrast to the conserved N-terminal domain, which appears to play a common role in the homodimerization of the protein. Thus, although P. furiosus Csx1 is identified as a nucleic acid-binding protein, other Csx1 proteins are predicted to exhibit different individual biochemical activities.

  20. Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, functions as a CoA-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Hutchins, A; Sung, S J; Adams, M W

    1997-09-02

    Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) has been previously purified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, an organism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C by fermenting carbohydrates and peptides. The enzyme contains thiamine pyrophosphate and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO2 and reduces P. furiosus ferredoxin. Here we show that this enzyme also catalyzes the formation of acetaldehyde from pyruvate in a CoA-dependent reaction. Desulfocoenzyme A substituted for CoA showing that the cofactor plays a structural rather than a catalytic role. Ferredoxin was not necessary for the pyruvate decarboxylase activity of POR, nor did it inhibit acetaldehyde production. The apparent Km values for CoA and pyruvate were 0.11 mM and 1.1 mM, respectively, and the optimal temperature for acetaldehyde formation was above 90 degrees C. These data are comparable to those previously determined for the pyruvate oxidation reaction of POR. At 80 degrees C (pH 8.0), the apparent Vm value for pyruvate decarboxylation was about 40% of the apparent Vm value for pyruvate oxidation rate (using P. furiosus ferredoxin as the electron acceptor). Tentative catalytic mechanisms for these two reactions are presented. In addition to POR, three other 2-keto acid ferredoxin oxidoreductases are involved in peptide fermentation by hyperthermophilic archaea. It is proposed that the various aldehydes produced by these oxidoreductases in vivo are used by two aldehyde-utilizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase, the physiological roles of which were previously unknown.

  1. Characterization and Low-Resolution Structure of an Extremely Thermostable Esterase of Potential Biotechnological Interest from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, F; Gonçalves, T A; Gandin, C A; Oliveira, A C P; Oliveira Neto, M; Squina, F M

    2016-11-01

    Enzymes isolated from extremophiles often exhibit superior performance and potential industrial applications. There are several advantages performing biocatalysis at elevated temperatures, including enhanced reaction rates, increased substrate solubility and decreased risks of contamination. Furthermore, thermophilic enzymes usually exhibit high resistance against many organic solvents and detergents, and are also more resistant to proteolytic attack. In this study, we subcloned and characterized an esterase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf_Est) that exhibits optimal activity around 80 °C using naphthol-derived substrates and p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP). According to the circular dichroism spectra, the secondary structure of P. furiosus esterase, which is predominantly formed by a β-sheet structure, is very stable, even after incubation at 120°C. We performed SAXS to determine the low-resolution structure of Pf_Est, which is monomeric in solution at 80 °C and has a molecular weight of 28 kDa. The Km and V max values for this esterase acting on pNPP were 0.53 mmol/L and 6.5 × 10(-3) U, respectively. Pf_Est was most active in the immiscible solvents and retained more than 50 % in miscible solvents. Moreover, Pf_Est possesses transesterification capacity, presenting better results when isobutanol was used as an acyl acceptor (2.69 ± 0.14 × 10(-2) μmol/min mg) and the highest hydrolytic activity toward olive oil among different types of oils testes in this study. Collectively, these biophysical and catalytic properties are of interest for several biotechnological applications that require harsh conditions, including high temperature and the presence of organic solvents.

  2. DNA targeting by the type I-G and type I-A CRISPR–Cas systems of Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua; Deighan, Trace; Westpheling, Jan; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems silence plasmids and viruses in prokaryotes. CRISPR–Cas effector complexes contain CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that include sequences captured from invaders and direct CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to destroy corresponding invader nucleic acids. Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) harbors three CRISPR–Cas immune systems: a Cst (Type I-G) system with an associated Cmr (Type III-B) module at one locus, and a partial Csa (Type I-A) module (lacking known invader sequence acquisition and crRNA processing genes) at another locus. The Pfu Cmr complex cleaves complementary target RNAs, and Csa systems have been shown to target DNA, while the mechanism by which Cst complexes silence invaders is unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of the Cst as well as Csa system in Pfu strains harboring a single CRISPR–Cas system. Plasmid transformation assays revealed that the Cst and Csa systems both function by DNA silencing and utilize similar flanking sequence information (PAMs) to identify invader DNA. Silencing by each system specifically requires its associated Cas3 nuclease. crRNAs from the 7 shared CRISPR loci in Pfu are processed for use by all 3 effector complexes, and Northern analysis revealed that individual effector complexes dictate the profile of mature crRNA species that is generated. PMID:26519471

  3. Hydrolase and glycosynthase activity of endo-1,3-β-glucanase from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Van Lieshout, J.; Faijes, M.; Nieto, J.; Van Der Oost, J.; Planas, A.

    2004-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus laminarinase (LamA, PF0076) is an endo-glycosidase that hydrolyzes β-1,3-gluco-oligosaccharides, but not β-1,4-gluco-oligosaccharides. We studied the specificity of LamA towards small saccharides by using 4-methylumbelliferyl β-glucosides with different linkages. Besides endo-activity, wild-type LamA has some exo-activity, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of mixed-linked oligosaccharides (Glcβ4Glcβ3Glcβ-MU (Glc = glucosyl, MU = 4-methylumbelliferyl)) with both β-1,4 and β-1,3 specificities. The LamA mutant E170A had severely reduced hydrolytic activity, which is consistent with Glu170 being the catalytic nucleophile. The E170A mutant was active as a glycosynthase, catalyzing the condensation of α-laminaribiosyl fluoride to different acceptors. The best condensation yields were found at pH 6.5 and 50 °C, but did not exceed 30%. Depending on the acceptor, the synthase generated either a β-1,3 or a β-1,4 linkage. PMID:15810439

  4. Homology modelling of two subtilisin-like proteases from the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermococcus stetteri.

    PubMed

    Voorhorst, W G; Warner, A; de Vos, W M; Siezen, R J

    1997-08-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus produces an extracellular, glycosylated hyperthermostable subtilisin-like serine protease, termed pyrolysin (Voorhorst,W.G.B., Eggen,R.I.L., Geerling,A.C.M., Platteeuw,C., Siezen,R.J. and de Vos,W.M. (1996) J. Biol. Chem., 271, 20426-20431). Based on the pyrolysin coding sequence, a pyrolysin-like gene fragment was cloned and characterized from the extreme thermophilic archaeon Thermococcus stetteri. Like pyrolysin, the deduced sequence of this serine protease, designated stetterlysin, contains a catalytic domain with high homology with other subtilases, allowing homology modelling starting from known crystal structures. Comparison of the predicted three-dimensional models of the catalytic domain of stetterlysin and pyrolysin with the crystal structure of subtilases from mesophilic and thermophilic origin, i.e. subtilisin BPN' and thermitase, and the homology model of subtilisin S41 from psychrophilic origin, led to the identification of features that could be related to protein stabilization. Higher thermostability was found to be correlated with an increased number of residues involved in pairs and networks of charge-charge and aromatic-aromatic interactions. These highly thermostable proteases have several extra surface loops and inserts with a relatively high frequency of aromatic residues and Asn residues. The latter are often present in putative N-glycosylation sites. Results from modelling of known substrates in the substrate-binding region support the broad substrate range and the autocatalytic activation previously suggested for pyrolysin.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the hyperthermostable serine protease, pyrolysin, and its gene from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Voorhorst, W G; Eggen, R I; Geerling, A C; Platteeuw, C; Siezen, R J; Vos, W M

    1996-08-23

    The hyperthermostable serine protease pyrolysin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was purified from membrane fractions. Two proteolytically active fractions were obtained, designated high (HMW) and low (LMW) molecular weight pyrolysin, that showed immunological cross-reaction and identical NH2-terminal sequences in which the third residue could be glycosylated. The HMW pyrolysin showed a subunit mass of 150 kDa after acid denaturation. Incubation of HMW pyrolysin at 95 degrees C resulted in the formation of LMW pyrolysin, probably as a consequence of COOH-terminal autoproteolysis. The 4194-base pair pls gene encoding pyrolysin was isolated and characterized, and its transcription initiation site was identified. The deduced pyrolysin sequence indicated a prepro-enzyme organization, with a 1249-residue mature protein composed of an NH2-terminal catalytic domain with considerable homology to subtilisin-like serine proteases and a COOH-terminal domain that contained most of the 32 possible N-glycosylation sites. The archaeal pyrolysin showed highest homology with eucaryal tripeptidyl peptidases II on the amino acid level but a different cleavage specificity as shown by its endopeptidase activity toward caseins, casein fragments including alphaS1-casein and synthetic peptides.

  6. Expression and Characterization of a Novel Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterase from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 That Possesses Lysophospholipase D Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fanghua; Lai, Linhui; Liu, Yanhua; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases (GDPD) are enzymes which degrade various glycerophosphodiesters to produce glycerol-3-phosphate and the corresponding alcohol moiety. Apart from this, a very interesting finding is that this enzyme could be used in the degradation of toxic organophosphorus esters, which has resulted in much attention on the biochemical and application research of GDPDs. In the present study, a novel GDPD from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 (pfGDPD) was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. This enzyme hydrolyzed bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate, one substrate analogue of organophosphorus diester, with an optimal reaction temperature 55 °C and pH 8.5. The activity of pfGDPD was strongly dependent on existing of bivalent cations. It was strongly stimulated by Mn2+ ions, next was Co2+ and Ni2+ ions. Further investigations were conducted on its substrate selectivity towards different phospholipids. The results indicated that except of glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC), this enzyme also possessed lysophospholipase D activity toward both sn1-lysophosphatidylcholine (1-LPC) and sn2-lysophosphatidylcholine (2-LPC). Higher activity was found for 1-LPC than 2-LPC; however, no hydrolytic activity was found for phosphatidylcholine (PC). Molecular docking based on the 3D-modeled structure of pfGDPD was conducted in order to provide a structural foundation for the substrate selectivity. PMID:27248999

  7. Improving the Thermostability and Optimal Temperature of a Lipase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by Covalent Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Roberta V.; Gutarra, Melissa L. E.; Freire, Denise M. G.; Almeida, Rodrigo V.; Palomo, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant thermostable lipase (Pf2001Δ60) from the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PFUL) was immobilized by hydrophobic interaction on octyl-agarose (octyl PFUL) and by covalent bond on aldehyde activated-agarose in the presence of DTT at pH = 7.0 (one-point covalent attachment) (glyoxyl-DTT PFUL) and on glyoxyl-agarose at pH 10.2 (multipoint covalent attachment) (glyoxyl PFUL). The enzyme's properties, such as optimal temperature and pH, thermostability, and selectivity, were improved by covalent immobilization. The highest enzyme stability at 70°C for 48 h incubation was achieved for glyoxyl PFUL (around 82% of residual activity), whereas glyoxyl-DTT PFUL maintained around 69% activity, followed by octyl PFUL (27% remaining activity). Immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose improved the optimal temperature to 90°C, while the optimal temperature of octyl PFUL was 70°C. Also, very significant changes in activity with different substrates were found. In general, the covalent bond derivatives were more active than octyl PFUL. The E value also depended substantially on the derivative and the conditions used. It was observed that the reaction of glyoxyl-DTT PFUL using methyl mandelate as a substrate at pH 7 presented the best results for enantioselectivity (E = 22) and enantiomeric excess (ee (%) = 91). PMID:25839031

  8. X-ray crystalline structures of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and its cys-free mutant.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Chinami, M; Mizushima, T; Ogasahara, K; Ota, M; Tsukihara, T; Yutani, K

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of the thermostability of proteins from hyperthermophiles, X-ray crystalline structures of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus (PfPCP), and its mutant protein with Ser substituted at Cys142 and Cys188 were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 A resolution, respectively. The obtained structures were compared with those previously reported for pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidases from a hyperthermophilie, Thermococcus litoralis (TlPCP), and from a mesophile, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BaPCP). The PfPCP structure is a tetramer of four identical subunits similar to that of the TlPCP and BaPCP. The largest structural changes among the three PCPs were detected in the C-terminal protrusion, which interacts with that of another subunit. A comparison of the three structures indicated that the high stability of PfPCP is caused by increases in hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds, the formation of an intersubunit ion-pair network, and improvement to an ideal conformation. On the basis of the structures of the three proteins, it can be concluded that PfPCP does not have any special factors responsible for its extremely high stability and that the conformational structure of PfPCP is superior in its combination of positive and negative stabilizing factors compared with BaPCP.

  9. Structures of the Signal Recognition Particle Receptor From the Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus: Implications for the Targeting Step at the Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Egea, P.F.; Tsuruta, H.; Leon, G.P.de; Napetschnig, J.; Walter, P.; Stroud, R.M.

    2009-05-18

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP {center_dot} magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP {center_dot} SR targeting complexes.

  10. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W.; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  11. Whole-Genome DNA Microarray Analysis of a Hyperthermophile and an Archaeon: Pyrococcus furiosus Grown on Carbohydrates or Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Brehm, Scott D.; Datta, Susmita; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2003-01-01

    The first complete-genome DNA microarray was constructed for a hyperthermophile or a nonhalophilic archaeon by using the 2,065 open reading frames (ORFs) that have been annotated in the genome of Pyrococcus furiosus (optimal growth temperature, 100°C). This was used to determine relative transcript levels in cells grown at 95°C with either peptides or a carbohydrate (maltose) used as the primary carbon source. Approximately 20% (398 of 2065) of the ORFs did not appear to be significantly expressed under either growth condition. Of the remaining 1,667 ORFs, the expression of 125 of them (8%) differed by more than fivefold between the two cultures, and 82 of the 125 (65%) appear to be part of operons, indicating extensive coordinate regulation. Of the 27 operons that are regulated, 5 of them encode (conserved) hypothetical proteins. A total of 18 operons are up-regulated (greater than fivefold) in maltose-grown cells, including those responsible for maltose transport and for the biosynthesis of 12 amino acids, of ornithine, and of citric acid cycle intermediate products. A total of nine operons are up-regulated (greater than fivefold) in peptide-grown cells, including those encoding enzymes involved in the production of acyl and aryl acids and 2-ketoacids, which are used for energy conservation. Analyses of the spent growth media confirmed the production of branched-chain and aromatic acids during growth on peptides. In addition, six nonlinked enzymes in the pathways of sugar metabolism were regulated more than fivefold—three in maltose-grown cells that are unique to the unusual glycolytic pathway and three in peptide-grown cells that are unique to gluconeogenesis. The catalytic activities of 16 metabolic enzymes whose expression appeared to be highly regulated in the two cell types correlated very well with the microarray data. The degree of coordinate regulation revealed by the microarray data was unanticipated and shows that P. furiosus can readily adapt to a

  12. Structural Basis of Thermal Stability of the Tungsten Cofactor Synthesis Protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Havarushka, Nastassia; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Schwarz, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT) by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB) has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15°C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50°C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface. PMID:24465852

  13. The L7Ae protein binds to two kink-turns in the Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Stella M.; Lai, Lien B.; Foster, Mark P.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein L7Ae, known for its role in translation (as part of ribosomes) and RNA modification (as part of sn/oRNPs), has also been identified as a subunit of archaeal RNase P, a ribonucleoprotein complex that employs an RNA catalyst for the Mg2+-dependent 5′ maturation of tRNAs. To better understand the assembly and catalysis of archaeal RNase P, we used a site-specific hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting strategy to pinpoint the binding sites of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) L7Ae on its cognate RNase P RNA (RPR). L7Ae derivatives with single-Cys substitutions at residues in the predicted RNA-binding interface (K42C/C71V, R46C/C71V, V95C/C71V) were modified with an iron complex of EDTA-2-aminoethyl 2-pyridyl disulfide. Upon addition of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate, these L7Ae-tethered nucleases were expected to cleave the RPR at nucleotides proximal to the EDTA-Fe–modified residues. Indeed, footprinting experiments with an enzyme assembled with the Pfu RPR and five protein cofactors (POP5, RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and L7Ae–EDTA-Fe) revealed specific RNA cleavages, localizing the binding sites of L7Ae to the RPR's catalytic and specificity domains. These results support the presence of two kink-turns, the structural motifs recognized by L7Ae, in distinct functional domains of the RPR and suggest testable mechanisms by which L7Ae contributes to RNase P catalysis. PMID:25361963

  14. A mutant (‘lab strain’) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Derrick L.; Notey, Jaspreet S.; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Loder, Andrew J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper, a mutant (‘lab strain’) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targeted gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Finally, electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.

  15. Characterization of Amylolytic Enzymes, Having Both α-1,4 and α-1,6 Hydrolytic Activity, from the Thermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermococcus litoralis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephen H.; Kelly, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular pullulanases were purified from cell-free culture supernatants of the marine thermophilic archaea Thermococcus litoralis (optimal growth temperature, 90°C) and Pyrococcus furiosus (optimal growth temperature, 98°C). The molecular mass of the T. litoralis enzyme was estimated at 119,000 Da by electrophoresis, while the P. furiosus enzyme exhibited a molecular mass of 110,000 Da under the same conditions. Both enzymes tested positive for bound sugar by the periodic acid-Schiff technique and are therefore glycoproteins. The thermoactivity and thermostability of both enzymes were enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca2+, and under these conditions, enzyme activity could be measured at temperatures of up to 130 to 140°C. The addition of Ca2+ also affected substrate binding, as evidenced by a decrease in Km for both enzymes when assayed in the presence of this metal. Each of these enzymes was able to hydrolyze, in addition to the α-1,6 linkages in pullulan, α-1,4 linkages in amylose and soluble starch. Neither enzyme possessed activity against maltohexaose or other smaller α-1,4-linked oligosaccharides. The enzymes from T. litoralis and P. furiosus appear to represent highly thermostable amylopullulanases, versions of which have been isolated from less-thermophilic organisms. The identification of these enzymes further defines the saccharide-metabolizing systems possessed by these two organisms. PMID:16349019

  16. Enhancing Heat Tolerance of the Little Dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with Introduction of a Superoxide Reductase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xing-Min; Liu, Xiang; Ji, Mikyoung; Hoffmann, William A.; Grunden, Amy; Xiang, Qiu-Yun J.

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR. PMID:26858741

  17. Normal mode analysis of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin via nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and resonance raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J; Smith, Matt C; Adams, Michael W W; Jenney, Francis E; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Y; Dey, Abishek; Solomon, Edward I; Cramer, Stephen P

    2005-10-26

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(S(cys))(4) site in reduced and oxidized rubredoxin (Rd) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf). The oxidized form has also been investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy. In the oxidized Rd NRVS, strong asymmetric Fe-S stretching modes are observed between 355 and 375 cm(-1); upon reduction these modes shift to 300-320 cm(-1). This is the first observation of Fe-S stretching modes in a reduced Rd. The peak in S-Fe-S bend mode intensity is at approximately 150 cm(-1) for the oxidized protein and only slightly lower in the reduced case. A third band occurs near 70 cm(-1) for both samples; this is assigned primarily as a collective motion of entire cysteine residues with respect to the central Fe. The (57)Fe partial vibrational density of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. The three main bands were qualitatively reproduced using a D(2)(d) Fe(SC)(4) model. A C(1) Fe(SCC)(4) model based on crystallographic coordinates was then used to simulate the splitting of the asymmetric stretching band into at least 3 components. Finally, a model employing complete cysteines and 2 additional neighboring atoms was used to reproduce the detailed structure of the PVDOS in the Fe-S stretch region. These results confirm the delocalization of the dynamic properties of the redox-active Fe site. Depending on the molecular model employed, the force constant K(Fe-S) for Fe-S stretching modes ranged from 1.24 to 1.32 mdyn/A. K(Fe-S) is clearly diminished in reduced Rd; values from approximately 0.89 to 1.00 mdyn/A were derived from different models. In contrast, in the final models the force constants for S-Fe-S bending motion, H(S-Fe-S), were 0.18 mdyn/A for oxidized Rd and 0.15 mdyn/A for reduced Rd. The NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins.

  18. DNA polymerases BI and D from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus both bind to proliferating cell nuclear antigen with their C-terminal PIP-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Tori, Kazuo; Kimizu, Megumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-08-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp that is essential for the high processivity of DNA synthesis during DNA replication. Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, has at least two DNA polymerases, polymerase BI (PolBI) and PolD. Both of the two DNA polymerases interact with the archaeal P. furiosus PCNA (PfuPCNA) and perform processive DNA synthesis in vitro. This phenomenon, in addition to the fact that both enzymes display 3'-5' exonuclease activity, suggests that both DNA polymerases work in replication fork progression. We demonstrated here that both PolBI and PolD functionally interact with PfuPCNA at their C-terminal PIP boxes. The mutant PolBI and PolD enzymes lacking the PIP-box sequence do not respond to the PfuPCNA at all in an in vitro primer extension reaction. This is the first experimental evidence that the PIP-box motif, located at the C termini of the archaeal DNA polymerases, is actually critical for PCNA binding to form a processive DNA-synthesizing complex.

  19. Bioprocessing analysis of Pyrococcus furiosus strains engineered for CO2-based 3-hydroxypropionate production

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, Aaron B.; Lian, Hong; Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Loder, Andrew J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Schut, Gerrit J.; Keller, Matthew W.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-06-11

    In this paper, metabolically engineered strains of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt 95–100°C), designed to produce 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP) from maltose and CO2 using enzymes from the Metallosphaera sedula (Topt 73°C) carbon fixation cycle, were examined with respect to the impact of heterologous gene expression on metabolic activity, fitness at optimal and sub-optimal temperatures, gas-liquid mass transfer in gas-intensive bioreactors, and potential bottlenecks arising from product formation. Transcriptomic comparisons of wild-type P. furiosus, a genetically-tractable, naturally-competent mutant (COM1), and COM1-based strains engineered for 3HP production revealed numerous differences after being shifted from 95°C to 72°C, where product formation catalyzed by the heterologously-produced M. sedula enzymes occurred. At 72°C, significantly higher levels of metabolic activity and a stress response were evident in 3HP-forming strains compared to the non-producing parent strain (COM1). Gas–liquid mass transfer limitations were apparent, given that 3HP titers and volumetric productivity in stirred bioreactors could be increased over 10-fold by increased agitation and higher CO2 sparging rates, from 18 mg/L to 276 mg/L and from 0.7 mg/L/h to 11 mg/L/h, respectively. 3HP formation triggered transcription of genes for protein stabilization and turnover, RNA degradation, and reactive oxygen species detoxification. Lastly, the results here support the prospects of using thermally diverse sources of pathways and enzymes in metabolically engineered strains designed for product formation at sub-optimal growth temperatures.

  20. Uncovering the stoichiometry of Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P, a multi-subunit catalytic ribonucleoprotein complex, by surface-induced dissociation and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Lai, Lien B; Lai, Stella M; Tanimoto, Akiko; Foster, Mark P; Wysocki, Vicki H; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate that surface-induced dissociation (SID) coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a powerful tool for determining the stoichiometry of a multi-subunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex assembled in a solution containing Mg(2+). We investigated Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P, an archaeal RNP that catalyzes tRNA 5' maturation. Previous step-wise, Mg(2+)-dependent reconstitutions of Pfu RNase P with its catalytic RNA subunit and two interacting protein cofactor pairs (RPP21⋅RPP29 and POP5⋅RPP30) revealed functional RNP intermediates en route to the RNase P enzyme, but provided no information on subunit stoichiometry. Our native MS studies with the proteins showed RPP21⋅RPP29 and (POP5⋅RPP30)2 complexes, but indicated a 1:1 composition for all subunits when either one or both protein complexes bind the cognate RNA. These results highlight the utility of SID and IM-MS in resolving conformational heterogeneity and yielding insights on RNP assembly.

  1. Laboratory evolution of Pyrococcus furiosus alcohol dehydrogenase to improve the production of (2S,5S)-hexanediol at moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Machielsen, Ronnie; Leferink, Nicole G H; Hendriks, Annemarie; Brouns, Stan J J; Hennemann, Hans-Georg; Daussmann, Thomas; van der Oost, John

    2008-07-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of enantioselective alcohol dehydrogenases for the production of enantio- and diastereomerically pure diols, which are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and fine chemicals. Due to the need for a stable alcohol dehydrogenase with activity at low-temperature process conditions (30 degrees C) for the production of (2S,5S)-hexanediol, we have improved an alcohol dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (AdhA). A stable S-selective alcohol dehydrogenase with increased activity at 30 degrees C on the substrate 2,5-hexanedione was generated by laboratory evolution on the thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase AdhA. One round of error-prone PCR and screening of approximately 1,500 mutants was performed. The maximum specific activity of the best performing mutant with 2,5-hexanedione at 30 degrees C was tenfold higher compared to the activity of the wild-type enzyme. A 3D-model of AdhA revealed that this mutant has one mutation in the well-conserved NADP(H)-binding site (R11L), and a second mutation (A180V) near the catalytic and highly conserved threonine at position 183.

  2. 'Super-perfect' enzymes: Structural stabilities and activities of recombinant triose phosphate isomerases from Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermococcus onnurineus produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prerna; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2015-05-08

    Triose phosphate isomerases (TIMs) are considered to be 'kinetically perfect' enzymes, limited in their activity only by the rates of diffusion of substrate and product molecules. Most studies conducted thus far have been on mesophile-derived TIMs. Here, we report studies of two extremophile-derived TIMs produced in Escherichia coli: (i) TonTIM, sourced from the genome of the thermophile archaeon, Thermococcus onnurineus, and (ii) PfuTIM, sourced from the genome of the hyperthermophile archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (PfuTIM). Although these enzymes are presumed to have evolved to function optimally at temperatures close to the boiling point of water, we find that TonTIM and PfuTIM display second-order rate-constants of activity (k(cat)/K(m) values) comparable to mesophile-derived TIMs, at 25 °C. At 90 °C, TonTIM and PfuTIM reach maximum velocities of reaction of ∼ 10(6)-10(7) μmol/s/mg, and display k(cat)/K(m) values in the range of ∼ 10(10)-10(11) M(-1) s(-1), which are three orders of magnitude higher than those reported for mesophile TIMs. Further, the two enzymes display no signs of having undergone any structural unfolding at 90 °C. Such enzymes could thus probably be called 'super-perfect' enzymes.

  3. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, I; Morikawa, K; Ishino, Y

    1999-12-15

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purified. The in vitro analyses using the purified proteins also showed the interaction between DP1 and RadB. The deletion mutant analysis of DP1 revealed that a region important for binding with RadB is located in the central part of the sequence (amino acid residues 206-498). This region has an overlap to the C-terminal half (amino acids 334-613), which is highly conserved among euryarchaeal DP1s and is essential for the activity of PolD. Our results suggest that, although RadB does not noticeably affect the primer extension ability of PolD in vitro, PolD may utilize the RadB protein in DNA synthesis under certain conditions.

  4. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    PubMed

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  5. Exploitation of the S-layer self-assembly system for site directed immobilization of enzymes demonstrated for an extremophilic laminarinase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Tschiggerl, Helga; Breitwieser, Andreas; de Roo, Guy; Verwoerd, Theo; Schäffer, Christina; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2008-02-01

    A fusion protein based on the S-layer protein SbpA from Bacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 and the enzyme laminarinase (LamA) from Pyrococcus furiosus was designed and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Due to the construction principle, the S-layer fusion protein fully retained the self-assembly capability of the S-layer moiety, while the catalytic domain of LamA remained exposed at the outer surface of the formed protein lattice. The enzyme activity of the S-layer fusion protein monolayer obtained upon recrystallization on silicon wafers, glass slides and different types of polymer membranes was determined colorimetrically and related to the activity of sole LamA that has been immobilized with conventional techniques. LamA aligned within the S-layer fusion protein lattice in a periodic and orientated fashion catalyzed twice the glucose release from the laminarin polysaccharide substrate in comparison to the randomly immobilized enzyme. In combination with the good shelf-life and the high resistance towards temperature and diverse chemicals, these novel composites are regarded a promising approach for site-directed enzyme immobilization.

  6. Observation of terahertz vibrations in Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin via impulsive coherent vibrational spectroscopy and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy--interpretation by molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Xiao, Yuming; Cannistraro, Salvatore; Ichiye, Toshiko; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Adams, Michael W W; Jenney, Francis E; Cramer, Stephen P

    2007-03-01

    We have used impulsive coherent vibrational spectroscopy (ICVS) to study the Fe(S-Cys)(4) site in oxidized rubredoxin (Rd) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf). In this experiment, a 15 fs visible laser pulse is used to coherently pump the sample to an excited electronic state, and a second <10 fs pulse is used to probe the change in transmission as a function of the time delay. PfRd was observed to relax to the ground state by a single exponential decay with time constants of approximately 255-275 fs. Superimposed on this relaxation are oscillations caused by coherent excitation of vibrational modes in both excited and ground electronic states. Fourier transformation reveals the frequencies of these modes. The strongest ICV mode with 570 nm excitation is the symmetric Fe-S stretching mode near 310 cm(-1), compared to 313 cm(-1) in the low temperature resonance Raman. If the rubredoxin is pumped at 520 nm, a set of strong bands occurs between 20 and 110 cm(-1). Finally, there is a mode at approximately 500 cm(-1) which is similar to features near 508 cm(-1) in blue Cu proteins that have been attributed to excited state vibrations. Normal mode analysis using 488 protein atoms and 558 waters gave calculated spectra that are in good agreement with previous nuclear resonance vibrational spectra (NRVS) results. The lowest frequency normal modes are identified as collective motions of the entire protein or large segments of polypeptide. Motion in these modes may affect the polar environment of the redox site and thus tune the electron transfer functions in rubredoxins.

  7. TrmBL2 from Pyrococcus furiosus Interacts Both with Double-Stranded and Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wierer, Sebastian; Daldrop, Peter; Ud Din Ahmad, Misbha; Boos, Winfried; Drescher, Malte; Welte, Wolfram; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In many hyperthermophilic archaea the DNA binding protein TrmBL2 or one of its homologues is abundantly expressed. TrmBL2 is thought to play a significant role in modulating the chromatin architecture in combination with the archaeal histone proteins and Alba. However, its precise physiological role is poorly understood. It has been previously shown that upon binding TrmBL2 covers double-stranded DNA, which leads to the formation of a thick and fibrous filament. Here we investigated the filament formation process as well as the stabilization of DNA by TrmBL2 from Pyroccocus furiosus in detail. We used magnetic tweezers that allow to monitor changes of the DNA mechanical properties upon TrmBL2 binding on the single-molecule level. Extended filaments formed in a cooperative manner and were considerably stiffer than bare double-stranded DNA. Unlike Alba, TrmBL2 did not form DNA cross-bridges. The protein was found to bind double- and single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. In mechanical disruption experiments of DNA hairpins this led to stabilization of both, the double- (before disruption) and the single-stranded (after disruption) DNA forms. Combined, these findings suggest that the biological function of TrmBL2 is not limited to modulating genome architecture and acting as a global repressor but that the protein acts additionally as a stabilizer of DNA secondary structure. PMID:27214207

  8. Characterization of the celB gene coding for beta-glucosidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and its expression and site-directed mutation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Voorhorst, W G; Eggen, R I; Luesink, E J; de Vos, W M

    1995-01-01

    The celB gene encoding the cellobiose-hydrolyzing enzyme beta-glucosidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been identified, cloned, and sequenced. The transcription and translation gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, resulting in high-level (up to 20% of total protein) production of beta-glucosidase that could be purified by a two-step purification procedure. The beta-glucosidase produced by E. coli had kinetic and stability properties similar to those of the beta-glucosidase purified from P. furiosus. The deduced amino acid sequence of CelB showed high similarity with those of beta-glycosidases that belong to glycosyl hydrolase family 1, implicating a conserved structure. Replacement of the conserved glutamate 372 in the P. furiosus beta-glucosidase by an aspartate or a glutamine led to a high reduction in specific activity (200- or 1,000-fold, respectively), indicating that this residue is the active site nucleophile involved in catalysis above 100 degrees C. PMID:8522516

  9. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    deep hydrothermal vent in the Okinawa Trough in the northeastern Pacific Ocean and from a shallow marine solfatara at Vulcano Island off the coast of... hydrothermal vent at the Okinawa Trough,” Extremophiles, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 123–130, 1998. [2] G. Fiala and K. O. Stetter, “Pyrococcus furiosus sp. nov

  10. Expression, refolding, and purification of active diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Mine, Shouhei; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Uegaki, Koichi

    2012-08-01

    A chitinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus degrades chitin to produce diacetylchitobiose [(GlcNAc)(2)] as the end product. To further investigate the degradation mechanism of (GlcNAc)(2) in Pyrococcus spp., we cloned the gene of PH0499 from Pyrococcus horikoshii, which encodes a protein homologous to the diacetylchitobiose deacetylase of Thermococcus kodakaraensis. The deacetylase (Ph-Dac) was overexpressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) pLys. The insoluble inclusion body was solubilized and reactivated through a refolding procedure. After several purification steps, 40 mg of soluble, thermostable (up to 80°C) Ph-Dac was obtained from 1L of culture. The apparent molecular mass of the refolded Ph-Dac was 180 kDa, indicating Ph-Dac to be a homohexamer. The refolded Ph-Dac also exhibited deacetylase activity toward (GlcNAc)(2), and the deacetylation site was revealed to be specific to the nonreducing end residue of (GlcNAc)(2). These expression and purification systems are useful for further characterization of Ph-Dac.

  11. Structural Analysis and Bioengineering of Thermostable Pyrococcus Furiosus Prolidase for Optimization of Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Detoxification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    1980). Positive selection for loss of tetracycline resistance. J Bacteriol. 143(2): 926-33. Booth, M ., P . V. Jennings, I. Ni Fhaolain and G. O’Cuinn...Chem 258(10): 6147-54. 24 Burley, S. K., P . R. David, R. M . Sweet, A. Taylor, and W. N. Lipscomb (1992). Structure determination and refinement of...prolidase and molecular analyses of prolidase deficiency. J Inherit Metab Dis 12(3): 351-4. Fernandez-Espla, M . D., M . C. Martin-Hernandez and P . F

  12. Features for instantaneous emissions of low-level infrared signals of glucokinase enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sergio; Mella, Héctor; Reyes, Claudio; Meza, Pablo; Gallardo, Maria J; Staforelli, Juan P

    2015-03-10

    A noncontact infrared (IR) imaging-based methodology and signal recovery tools are applied on an enzyme reaction as a test target. The method is implemented by a long-wave (8-12 μm) IR microbolometer imaging array and a germanium-based IR optical vision. The reaction is carried out by the glucokinase, which produces a rapid exothermal release of energy that is weak, and, even worse, the IR video captured by the uncooled microbolometer detector is affected by spatial and temporal noise with specific complexities. Hitherto, IR-based signal recovery tools have worked with a standard acquisition frequency, which is clearly beyond the time scale of a real scenario. The implications of this (and similar) rapid reactions motivate the designs of a signal recovery method using prior information of the processes to extract and quantify the spontaneity of the enzymatic reaction in a three-dimensional (space and time) single and noncontact online measurement.

  13. Evaluation of sulfur-reducing microorganisms for organic desulfurization. [Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    Because of substantial portion of the sulfur in Illinois coal is organic, microbial desulfurization of sulfidic and thiophenic functionalities could hold great potential for completing pyritic sulfur removal. We are testing the hypothesis that organic sulfur can be reductively removed as H{sub 2}S through the activities of anaerobic microorganisms. Our objectives for this year include the following: (1) To obtain cultures that will reductively desulfurize thiophenic model compounds. In addition to crude oil enrichments begun last year, we sampled municipal sewage sludge. (2) To continue to work toward optimizing the activity of the DBDS-reducing cultures obtained during the previous year. (3) To expand coal desulfurization work to include other coals including Illinois Basin Coal 101 and a North Dakota lignite, which might be more susceptible to the dibenzyldisulfide reducing cultures due to its lower rank. (4) To address the problem of sulfide sorption, by investigating the sorption capacity of coals in addition to Illinois Basin Coal 108.

  14. Energy metabolism of a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium,Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakagi, Takayoshi; Oshima, Tairo

    1987-09-01

    To elucidate the phylogenic status of the archaebacterium and mechanisms of acidophily, membrane bound ATPase, cytochromes and NADH dehydrogenase of a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium,Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, were studied. Typea cytochrome was found in the membrane. The organism was sensitive to cyanide and azide, and though cytochromec is lacking in this organism, these respiratory poisons inhibited a terminal oxidase, when assayed with cytochromec from other sources. NADH dehydrogenase was highly purified from the crude extract of the cells. The enzyme was able to transfer electrons from NADH to caldariellaquinone, a unique benzothiophenequinone in the genusSulfolobus. Thus, the enzyme is a possible member of the respiratory chain. Membrane fraction contained two types of ATPase, one was active at neutral pH and slightly activated by sulfate; the other was an acid apyrase and inhibited by sulfate. Typical characteristics of F0F1ATPase could not be found in these enzymes. These results suggest that (1) the thermoacidophilic archaebacteria are phylogenically distant from both eubacteria and eukaryotes, (2) the archaebacterial thermoacidophiles can be classified in a different subgroup from methanogens and extreme halophiles, and (3) in spite of the aerobic nature of the organism, the energy yielding mechanisms appear quite unique, when compared to those of other aerobes and mitochondria.

  15. Replication slippage of the thermophilic DNA polymerases B and D from the Euryarchaeota Pyrococcus abyssi

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Lizardo, Melissa; Henneke, Ghislaine; Viguera, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Replication slippage or slipped-strand mispairing involves the misalignment of DNA strands during the replication of repeated DNA sequences, and can lead to genetic rearrangements such as microsatellite instability. Here, we show that PolB and PolD replicative DNA polymerases from the archaeal model Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) slip in vitro during replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure and short direct repeats. We find that this occurs in both their wild-type (exo+) and exonuclease deficient (exo-) forms. The slippage behavior of PabPolB and PabPolD, probably due to limited strand displacement activity, resembles that observed for the high fidelity P. furiosus (Pfu) DNA polymerase. The presence of PabPCNA inhibited PabPolB and PabPolD slippage. We propose a model whereby PabPCNA stimulates strand displacement activity and polymerase progression through the hairpin, thus permitting the error-free replication of repetitive sequences. PMID:25177316

  16. Replication slippage of the thermophilic DNA polymerases B and D from the Euryarchaeota Pyrococcus abyssi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Lizardo, Melissa; Henneke, Ghislaine; Viguera, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Replication slippage or slipped-strand mispairing involves the misalignment of DNA strands during the replication of repeated DNA sequences, and can lead to genetic rearrangements such as microsatellite instability. Here, we show that PolB and PolD replicative DNA polymerases from the archaeal model Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) slip in vitro during replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure and short direct repeats. We find that this occurs in both their wild-type (exo+) and exonuclease deficient (exo-) forms. The slippage behavior of PabPolB and PabPolD, probably due to limited strand displacement activity, resembles that observed for the high fidelity P. furiosus (Pfu) DNA polymerase. The presence of PabPCNA inhibited PabPolB and PabPolD slippage. We propose a model whereby PabPCNA stimulates strand displacement activity and polymerase progression through the hairpin, thus permitting the error-free replication of repetitive sequences.

  17. Chromosome map of the thermophilic archaebacterium Thermococcus celer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. M.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    A physical map for the chromosome of the thermophilic archaebacterium Thermococcus celer Vu13 has been constructed. Thirty-four restriction endonucleases were tested for their ability to generate large restriction fragments from the chromosome of T. celer. Of these, the enzymes NheI, SpeI, and XbaI yielded the fewest fragments when analyzed by pulsed-field electrophoresis. NheI and SpeI each gave 5 fragments, while XbaI gave 12. The size of the T. celer chromosome was determined from the sum of the apparent sizes of restriction fragments derived from single and double digests by using these enzymes and was found to be 1,890 +/- 27 kilobase pairs. Partial and complete digests allowed the order of all but three small (less than 15 kilobase pairs) fragments to be deduced. These three fragments were assigned positions by using hybridization probes derived from these restriction fragments. The positions of the other fragments were confirmed by using hybridization probes derived in the same manner. The positions of the 5S, 16S, and 23S rRNA genes as well as the 7S RNA gene were located on this map by using cloned portions of these genes as hybridization probes. The 5S rRNA gene was localized 48 to 196 kilobases from the 5' end of the 16S gene. The 7S RNA gene was localized 190 to 504 kilobases from the 3' end of the 23S gene. These analyses demonstrated that the chromosome of T. celer is a single, circular DNA molecule. This is the first such demonstration of the structure of an archaebacterial chromosome.

  18. Ribonucleases from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium S. solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Fusi, P; Tedeschi, G; Aliverti, A; Ronchi, S; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1993-01-15

    A purification procedure consisting of DEAE-Sephacel chromatography, heparin-Sepharose CL-6B chromatography and Mono-S chromatography led to the isolation of three proteins endowed with RNase activity from the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. They were referred to as p1, p2 and p3, according to their elution order from the Mono-S column. Complete amino acid sequence of p2 and partial sequence of p3 displayed high sequence similarity to the 7-kDa DNA-binding proteins previously isolated in Sulfolobus strains [Choli, T., Wittman-Liebold, B. & Reinhardt, R. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 7087-7093]. The molecular mass of p2, calculated from sequence data, was 7.02 kDa, which compares fairly well with the value of 7.4 kDa determined by SDS/PAGE. Gel filtration of the molecule under native conditions displayed, however, a largely prevailing form with an assessed molecular mass of 13.0 kDa, which points to a dimeric structure. Kinetic characterization of protein p2 showed a broad pH optimum in the range 6.7-7.6 using yeast RNA as substrate; also, it was shown that activity was unaffected by EDTA, Mg2+ and phosphate. The enzyme did not accept as substrate any homopolyribonucleotide, which points to a rather narrow substrate specificity. This was also confirmed by incubating p2 with tRNA(fMet)Met (fMet, N-formylmethionine) from Escherichia coli: the hydrolysis products were thus identified as 3'-phosphooligonucleotides.

  19. Cell-free transcription at 95 degrees: thermostability of transcriptional components and DNA topology requirements of Pyrococcus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Hethke, C; Bergerat, A; Hausner, W; Forterre, P; Thomm, M

    1999-01-01

    Cell-free transcription of archaeal promoters is mediated by two archaeal transcription factors, aTBP and TFB, which are orthologues of the eukaryotic transcription factors TBP and TFIIB. Using the cell-free transcription system described for the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by Hethke et al., the temperature limits and template topology requirements of archaeal transcription were investigated. aTBP activity was not affected after incubation for 1 hr at 100 degrees. In contrast, the half-life of RNA polymerase activity was 23 min and that of TFB activity was 3 min. The half-life of a 328-nt RNA product was 10 min at 100 degrees. Best stability of RNA was observed at pH 6, at 400 mm K-glutamate in the absence of Mg(2+) ions. Physiological concentrations of K-glutamate were found to stabilize protein components in addition, indicating that salt is an important extrinsic factor contributing to thermostability. Both RNA and proteins were stabilized by the osmolyte betaine at a concentration of 1 m. The highest activity for RNA synthesis at 95 degrees was obtained in the presence of 1 m betaine and 400 mm K-glutamate. Positively supercoiled DNA, which was found to exist in Pyrococcus cells, can be transcribed in vitro both at 70 degrees and 90 degrees. However, negatively supercoiled DNA was the preferred template at all temperatures tested. Analyses of transcripts from plasmid topoisomers harboring the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter and of transcription reactions conducted in the presence of reverse gyrase indicate that positive supercoiling of DNA inhibits transcription from this promoter. PMID:10430563

  20. Substrate specificity engineering of beta-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus by exchange of unique active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kaper, Thijs; van Heusden, Hester H; van Loo, Bert; Vasella, Andrea; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M

    2002-03-26

    A beta-mannosidase gene (PH0501) was identified in the Pyrococcus horikoshii genome and cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purified enzyme (BglB) was most specific for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-mannopyranoside (pNP-Man) (Km: 0.44 mM) with a low turnover rate (kcat: 4.3 s(-1)). The beta-mannosidase has been classified as a member of family 1 of glycoside hydrolases. Sequence alignments and homology modeling showed an apparent conservation of its active site region with, remarkably, two unique active site residues, Gln77 and Asp206. These residues are an arginine and asparagine residue in all other known family 1 enzymes, which interact with the catalytic nucleophile and equatorial C2-hydroxyl group of substrates, respectively. The unique residues of P. horikoshii BglB were introduced in the highly active beta-glucosidase CelB of Pyrococcus furiosus and vice versa, yielding two single and one double mutant for each enzyme. In CelB, both substitutions R77Q and N206D increased the specificity for mannosides and reduced hydrolysis rates 10-fold. In contrast, BglB D206N showed 10-fold increased hydrolysis rates and 35-fold increased affinity for the hydrolysis of glucosides. In combination with inhibitor studies, it was concluded that the substituted residues participate in the ground-state binding of substrates with an equatorial C2-hydroxyl group, but contribute most to transition-state stabilization. The unique activity profile of BglB seems to be caused by an altered interaction between the enzyme and C2-hydroxyl of the substrate and a specifically increased affinity for mannose that results from Asp206.

  1. Structural Analysis and Bioengineering of Thermostable Pyrococcus furiosus Prolidase for the Optimization of Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Detoxification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-26

    findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision...used in this project to design a prolidase mutant with two integral metal sites, which will relieve the requirement for exogenous metal and improve...its efficacy in OP nerve agent detoxification. In addition, a Ph prolidase homolog has been identified and has been biochemically characterized to

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a conserved domain in plants and prokaryotes from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Linyen; Nakano, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fujimoto, Satoru; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakamura, Shota; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2005-04-01

    A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 3}22. A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has previously been found in AT-hook motif nuclear localized protein 1 (AHL1) localized in the nuclear matrix of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAHL1). AtAHL1 has a DNA-binding function. Mutation analyses of AtAHL1 has previously revealed that the hydrophobic region of the PPC domain is essential for its nuclear localization. In this study, the PPC of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPPC) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.69, c = 159.2 Å. Data were obtained at 100 K, with diffraction being observed to a resolution of 1.7 Å. A complete data set from crystals of the SeMet-substituted protein was also obtained.

  3. Extracellular Ca2(+)-dependent inducible alkaline phosphatase from extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, S; Hecht, K; Eisenberg, H; Mevarech, M

    1990-01-01

    When starved of inorganic phosphate, the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui produces the enzyme alkaline phosphatase and secretes it to the medium. This inducible extracellular enzyme is a glycoprotein whose subunit molecular mass is 160 kDa, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. The native form of the enzyme is heterogeneous and composed of multiple oligomeric forms. The enzymatic activity of the halophilic alkaline phosphatase is maximal at pH 8.5, and the enzyme is inhibited by phosphate. Unlike most alkaline phosphatases, the halobacterial enzyme requires Ca2+ and not Zn2+ ions for its activity. Both calcium ions (in the millimolar range) and NaCl (in the molar range) are required for the stability of the enzyme. Images PMID:2123861

  4. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  5. Some Biochemical Properties of an Acido-Thermophilic Archae-Bacterium Sulfolobus Acidocaldarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Tairo; Ohba, Masayuki; Wagaki, Takayoshi

    1984-12-01

    To elucidate the phylogenic status of archaebacteria, some basic cellular components of an acido-thermophilic archaebacterium,Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, were studied. Poly(A) containing RNA was present in the cells, and performed the role of mRNA in a cell-free extract of reticulocyte or the archaebacteria. Poly(A) containing RNA was also found in other archaebacterial cells. The absence of cap structure was suggested in these RNAs. The cell-free protein synthesis using the archaebacterial extract was inhibited by anisomycin, a specific inhibitor for eukaryotic ribosomes. Two unique membrane-bound ATPases were detected. Based on resistance to H+-ATPase inhibitors, these enzymes seemed not to be F0F1-ATPase.

  6. Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase) from a halophilic archaebacterium, Haloarcula vallismortis: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, V; Altekar, W

    1994-01-01

    Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase [EC 2.7.1.3]), detected for the first time in a prokaryote, i.e., the extreme halophile Haloarcula vallismortis, was isolated and characterized from the same archaebacterium. This enzyme was characterized with respect to its molecular mass, amino acid composition, salt dependency, immunological cross-reactivity, and kinetic properties. Gel filtration and sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed a native molecular mass of 100 kDa for halobacterial ketohexokinase, which is larger than its mammalian counterpart. The enzyme could be labeled by UV irradiation in the presence of [ gamma-32P]ATP, suggesting the involvement of a phosphoenzyme intermediate. Other catalytic features of the enzyme were similar to those of its mammalian counterparts. No antigenic cross-reactivity could be detected between the H. vallismortis ketohexokinase and the ketohexokinases from different rat tissues. Images PMID:8071229

  7. Comparison of small- and large-scale expression of selected Pyrococcus furiosus genes as an aid to high-throughput protein production.

    PubMed

    Sugar, Frank J; Jenney, Francis E; Poole, Farris L; Brereton, Phillip S; Izumi, Michi; Shah, Claudia; Adams, Michael W W

    2005-01-01

    As the natural extension of the genomic sequencing projects, the goal of the various world-wide Structural Genomics projects is development of techniques for high throughput (HTP) cloning, protein overexpression, purification and structural determination, with the ultimate goal of determining all possible protein structures. Rapid (small-scale) screening of potential expression clones under different growth conditions is presumed to be possible and a viable way to increase throughput of protein expression. In order to test the utility of screening for soluble, heterologous protein expression, we have compared the production of recombinant proteins on a small scale (1 ml cultures in 96-well plates) in Escherichia coli under two growth conditions [a rich medium and a defined (minimal) medium] using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against the affinity tag, with the amount of recombinant protein produced during the large-scale (500 ml) growth of E. coli. The large-scale expression products were examined after a single step affinity purification by visualization on SDS-PAGE gels. Of the open reading frames that were successfully expressed on the 1 ml scale as judged by immunodetection, 80% of them successfully scaled-up to 500 ml in a rich medium and 81% of them scaled-up in a defined medium. This is significantly higher than would be expected by a randomly selected expression condition and validates the use of small-scale expression as a screening tool for more efficient protein production.

  8. The evolution of energy-transducing systems. Studies with an extremely halophilic archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1992-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of eubacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaebacteria are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution. From studies of members of all three major groups of archaebacteria - the halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles - it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. Amino acid sequences of critical regions of the enzyme were to be determined, as well as immunoreactions of single subunits in the search for common epitopes. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complexes, and possibly deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  9. An 8.5-kDa ribonuclease from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Fusi, P; Grisa, M; Tedeschi, G; Negri, A; Guerritore, A; Tortora, P

    1995-02-27

    Protein p3, a ribonuclease we previously isolated from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus [P. Fusi et al. (1993) Eur. J. Biochem. 211, 305-310], was subjected to complete amino acid sequencing. It consisted of 75 residues, with a calculated M(r) of 8582, a pI of 10.1, and had some degree of monomethylation at Lys-4 and Lys-6. p2, a previously sequenced, 62-residue ribonuclease from the same organism, had an identical sequence for 57 consecutive residues starting from the N-terminus. p2 and p3 also showed a striking similarity to five other proteins previously isolated from Sulfolobus strains and identified as DNA-binding proteins. However, the C-terminus, 10 residue region of p3 did not show any similarity to these proteins; in contrast, it was significantly similar to stretches in three eubacterial ribonucleases from Bacillus strains. No difference between p2 and p3 has so far been detected as regards their catalytic properties. Available data suggest that these molecules have a narrow substrate specificity and probably play specific roles in RNA processing.

  10. Acquired thermotolerance and heat shock in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus sp. strain B12.

    PubMed

    Trent, J D; Osipiuk, J; Pinkau, T

    1990-03-01

    The extreme thermophile Sulfolobus sp. strain B12 exhibits an acquired thermotolerance response. Thus, survival of cells from a 70 degrees C culture at the lethal temperature of 92 degrees C was enhanced by as much as 6 orders of magnitude over a 2-h period if the culture was preheated to 88 degrees C for 60 min or longer before being exposed to the lethal temperature. In eubacteria and eucaryotes, acquired thermotolerance correlates with the induced synthesis of a dozen or so proteins known as heat shock proteins. In this Sulfolobus species, it correlates with the preferential synthesis of primarily one major protein (55 kilodaltons) and, to a much lesser extent, two minor proteins (28 and 35 kilodaltons). Since the synthesis of all other proteins was radically reduced and these proteins were apparently not degraded or exported, their relative abundance within the cell increased during the time the cells were becoming thermotolerant. They could not yet be related to known heat shock proteins. In immunoassays, they were not cross-reactive with antibodies against heat shock proteins from Escherichia coli (DnaK and GroE), which are highly conserved between eubacteria and eucaryotes. However, it appears that if acquired thermotolerance depends on the synthesis of protective proteins, then in this extremely thermophilic archaebacterium it depends primarily on one protein.

  11. Acquired thermotolerance and heat shock in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus sp. strain B12

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Osipiuk, J.; Pinkau, T. )

    1990-03-01

    The extreme thermophile Sulfolobus sp. strain B12 exhibits an acquired thermotolerance response. Thus, survival of cells from a 70{degrees}C culture at the lethal temperature of 92{degrees}C was enhanced by as much as 6 orders of magnitude over a 2-h period if the culture was preheated to 88{degrees}C for 60 min or longer before being exposed to the lethal temperature. In eubacteria and eucaryotes, acquired thermotolerance correlates with the induced synthesis of a dozen or so proteins known as heat shock proteins. In this Sulfolobus species, it correlates with the preferential synthesis of primarily one major protein (55 kilodaltons) and, to a much lesser extent, two minor proteins (28 and 35 kilodaltons). Since the synthesis of all other proteins was radically reduced and these proteins were apparently not degraded or exported, their relative abundance within the cell increased during the time the cells were becoming thermotolerant. They could not yet be related to known heat shock proteins. In immunoassays, they were not cross-reactive with antibodies against heat shock proteins from Escherichia coli (DnaK and GroE), which are highly conserved between eubacteria and eucaryotes. However, it appears that if acquired thermotolerance depends on the synthesis of protective proteins, then in this extremely thermophilic archaebacterium it depends primarily on one protein.

  12. The Evolution of Energy-Transducing Systems. Studies with an Extremely Halophilic Archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1997-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria (1). Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaea (formerly called archaebacteria) are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution (2). From studies of members of all three major groups of archaea, the halophiles, methanogens and thermoacidophiles, it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase, which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complex, and possibly a deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  13. Structural features responsible for kinetic thermal stability of a carboxypeptidase from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Villa, A; Zecca, L; Fusi, P; Colombo, S; Tedeschi, G; Tortora, P

    1993-01-01

    Investigations were performed on the structural features responsible for kinetic thermal stability of a thermostable carboxypeptidase from the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus which had been purified previously and identified as a zinc metalloprotease [Colombo, D'Auria, Fusi, Zecca, Raia and Tortora (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 206, 349-357]. Removal of Zn2+ by dialysis led to reversible activity loss, which was promptly restored by addition of 80 microM ZnCl2 to the assay mixture. For the first-order irreversible thermal inactivation the metal-depleted enzyme showed an activation energy value of 205.6 kJ.mol-1, which is considerably lower than that of the holoenzyme (494.4 kJ.mol-1). The values of activation free energies, enthalpies and entropies also dropped with metal removal. Thermal inactivation of the apoenzyme was very quick at 80 degrees C, whereas the holoenzyme was stable at the same temperature. These findings suggest a major stabilizing role for the bivalent cation. Chaotropic salts strongly destabilized the holoenzyme, showing that hydrophobic interactions are involved in maintaining the native conformation of the enzyme. However, the inactivation rate was also increased by sodium sulphate, acetate and chloride, which are not chaotropes, indicating that one or more salt bridges concur in stabilizing the active enzyme. Furthermore, at the extremes of the pH-stability curve, NaCl did not affect the inactivation rate, confirming the stabilizing role of intramolecular ionic bonds, as a pH-dependent decrease in stability is likely to occur from breaking of salt bridges involved in maintaining the native conformation of the protein. PMID:8240298

  14. A heat-stable serine proteinase from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Magnani, P; Villa, A; Macchi, F; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1992-08-21

    A proteinase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from crude extracts of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. Molecular mass values assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration were 54 and 118 kDa, respectively, which points to a dimeric structure of the molecule. An isoelectric point of 5.6 was also determined. The enzyme behaved as a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase, as shown by the inhibitory effects exerted by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethyl ketone and chymostatin. Consistently with the inhibition pattern, the enzyme cleaved chromogenic substrates at the carboxyl side of aromatic or bulky aliphatic amino acids; however, it effectively attacked only a small number of such substrates, thus, displaying a specificity much narrower than and clearly different from that of chymotrypsin. This was confirmed by its inability to digest a set of natural substrate proteins, as well as insulin chains A and B; only after alkylation casein was degraded to some extent. Proteinase activity was significantly stimulated by Mn2+ which acted as a mixed-type nonessential activator. The enzyme also displayed a broad pH optimum in the range 6.5-8.0. Furthermore, it was completely stable up to 90 degrees C; above this temperature it underwent first-order thermal inactivation with half-lives ranging from 342 min (92 degrees C) to 7 min (101 degrees C). At 50 degrees C it could withstand 6 M urea and, to some extent, different organic solvents; however, at 95 degrees C it was extensively inactivated by all of these compounds. None of the chemical physical properties of the enzyme, including amino-acid analysis, provided evidence of a possible relation to other well-known microbial serine proteinases.

  15. Structural features responsible for kinetic thermal stability of a carboxypeptidase from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Villa, A; Zecca, L; Fusi, P; Colombo, S; Tedeschi, G; Tortora, P

    1993-11-01

    Investigations were performed on the structural features responsible for kinetic thermal stability of a thermostable carboxypeptidase from the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus which had been purified previously and identified as a zinc metalloprotease [Colombo, D'Auria, Fusi, Zecca, Raia and Tortora (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 206, 349-357]. Removal of Zn2+ by dialysis led to reversible activity loss, which was promptly restored by addition of 80 microM ZnCl2 to the assay mixture. For the first-order irreversible thermal inactivation the metal-depleted enzyme showed an activation energy value of 205.6 kJ.mol-1, which is considerably lower than that of the holoenzyme (494.4 kJ.mol-1). The values of activation free energies, enthalpies and entropies also dropped with metal removal. Thermal inactivation of the apoenzyme was very quick at 80 degrees C, whereas the holoenzyme was stable at the same temperature. These findings suggest a major stabilizing role for the bivalent cation. Chaotropic salts strongly destabilized the holoenzyme, showing that hydrophobic interactions are involved in maintaining the native conformation of the enzyme. However, the inactivation rate was also increased by sodium sulphate, acetate and chloride, which are not chaotropes, indicating that one or more salt bridges concur in stabilizing the active enzyme. Furthermore, at the extremes of the pH-stability curve, NaCl did not affect the inactivation rate, confirming the stabilizing role of intramolecular ionic bonds, as a pH-dependent decrease in stability is likely to occur from breaking of salt bridges involved in maintaining the native conformation of the protein.

  16. Purification and characterization of a thermostable carboxypeptidase from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; D'Auria, S; Fusi, P; Zecca, L; Raia, C A; Tortora, P

    1992-06-01

    A carboxypeptidase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. Molecular masses assessed by SDS/PAGE and gel filtration were 42 kDa and 170 kDa, respectively, which points to a tetrameric structure for the molecule. An isoelectric point of 5.9 was also determined. The enzyme was proven to be a metalloprotease, as shown by the inhibitory effects exerted by EDTA and o-phenanthroline; furthermore, dialysis against EDTA led to a complete loss of activity, which could be restored by addition of Zn2+ in the micromolar range, and, to a lesser extent, by Co2+. The enzyme was endowed with a broad substrate specificity, as shown by its ability to release basic, acidic and aromatic amino acids from the respective benzoylglycylated and benzyloxycarbonylated amino acids. An esterase activity of the carboxypeptidase was also demonstrated on different esterified amino acids and dipeptides blocked at the N-terminus. The enzyme displayed broad pH optima ranging over 5.5-7.0, or 5.5-9.0, when using an acidic or a basic benzyloxycarbonylated amino acid, respectively. With regard to thermostability, it was proven to be completely stable on incubation for 15 min at 85 degrees C. Furthermore, thanks to its relatively low activation energy, i.e. 31.0 kJ/mol, it was still significantly active at room temperature. At 40 degrees C, the enzyme could withstand 0.1% SDS and different organic solvents: particularly ethanol up to 99%. Amino acid and N-terminal sequence analyses did not evidence any similarity to carboxypeptidases A nor thermolysin. A weak similarity was only found with bovine carboxypeptidase B.

  17. Purification and characterization of the hydrogen uptake hydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrodictium brockii.

    PubMed Central

    Pihl, T D; Maier, R J

    1991-01-01

    Pyrodictium brockii is a hyperthermophilic archaebacterium with an optimal growth temperature of 105 degrees C. P. brockii is also a chemolithotroph, requiring H2 and CO2 for growth. We have purified the hydrogen uptake hydrogenase from membranes of P. brockii by reactive red affinity chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The molecular mass of the holoenzyme was 118,000 +/- 19,000 Da in sucrose gradients. The holoenzyme consisted of two subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The large subunit had a molecular mass of 66,000 Da, and the small subunit had a molecular mass of 45,000 Da. Colorometric analysis of Fe and S content in reactive red-purified hydrogenase revealed 8.7 +/- 0.6 mol of Fe and 6.2 +/- 1.2 mol of S per mol of hydrogenase. Growth of cells in 63NiCl2 resulted in label incorporation into reactive red-purified hydrogenase. Growth of cells in 63NiCl2 resulted in label incorporation into reactive red-purified hydrogenase. Temperature stability studies indicated that the membrane-bound form of the enzyme was more stable than the solubilized purified form over a period of minutes with respect to temperature. However, the membranes were not able to protect the enzyme from thermal inactivation over a period of hours. The artificial electron acceptor specificity of the pure enzyme was similar to that of the membrane-bound form, but the purified enzyme was able to evolve H2 in the presence of reduced methyl viologen. The Km of membrane-bound hydrogenase for H2 was approximately 19 microM with methylene blue as the electron acceptor, whereas the purified enzyme had a higher Km value. Images PMID:1900502

  18. Cover preference of the Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus), an imperiled, indemic southeastern stream fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, S.R.; Aday, D.D.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Gross, K.

    2010-01-01

    In a laboratory setting, we investigated cover preference of the Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus), an imperiled, endemic southeastern USA stream fish. Fish were tested individually and given 24 hours to make a selection from four cover options, including rock, leaf pack, mussel shell, and an artificial cover unit. Among 30 trials, Carolina madtom preferred the artificial cover unit, selecting it 63% of the time. Rock was selected 23% of the time, and leaf pack 13%. Mussel shells were not selected during any trial.

  19. Cover preference of the Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus), an imperiled, endemic southeastern stream fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, S.R.; Aday, D.D.; Kwak, T.J.; Gross, K.

    2010-01-01

    In a laboratory setting, we investigated cover preference of the Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus), an imperiled, endemic southeastern USA stream fish. Fish were tested individually and given 24 hours to make a selection from four cover options, including rock, leaf pack, mussel shell, and an artificial cover unit. Among 30 trials, Carolina madtom preferred the artificial cover unit, selecting it 63% of the time. Rock was selected 23% of the time, and leaf pack 13%. Mussel shells were not selected during any trial.

  20. Analysis of the complete genome sequence of the archaeon Pyrococcus chitonophagus DSM 10152 (formerly Thermococcus chitonophagus).

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Baharidis, Panagiotis K; Georgoulis, Anastasios; Engel, Marion; Louka, Maria; Karamolegkou, Georgia; Tsoka, Aggeliki; Blom, Jochen; Pot, Bruno; Malecki, Piotr; Rypniewski, Wojciech; Huber, Harald; Schloter, Michael; Vorgias, Constantinos

    2016-05-01

    Here we analyze the first complete genome sequence of Pyrococcus chitonophagus. The archaeon was previously suggested to belong to the Thermococcus rather than the Pyrococcus genus. Whole genome phylogeny as well as whole proteome comparisons using all available complete genomes in Thermococcales clearly showed that the species belongs to the Pyrococcus genus. P. chitonophagus was originally isolated from a hydrothermal vent site and it has been described to effectively degrade chitin debris, and therefore is considered to play a major role in the sea water ecology and metabolic activity of microbial consortia within hot sea water ecosystems. Indeed, an obvious feature of the P. chitonophagus genome is that it carries proteins showing complementary activities for chitin degradation, i.e. endo- and exo-chitinase, diacetylchitobiose deacetylase and exo-β-D glucosaminidase activities. This finding supports the hypothesis that compared to other Thermococcales species P. chitonophagus is adapted to chitin degradation.

  1. Cloning and sequencing of an acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming) gene from the amitochondriate protist, Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L B; Morrison, H G; Sogin, M L; Müller, M

    1999-06-11

    A Giardia lamblia gene, Glacs, was cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escheria Coli. This gene codes for a 726 residue long acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming). This enzyme is responsible for the formation of acetate, a metabolic endproduct of G. lamblia. It is known from only two Type I amitochondriate eukaryotes, G. lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica and from the archaebacterium, Pyrococcus furiosus. With Glacs as query, homologous unidentified open reading frames were detected in the complete genomes of only a few archaebacteria and eubacteria. These form a new protein family present in all three domains of life, which probably plays a central role in the acyl-CoA metabolism but is of restricted taxonomic distribution.

  2. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding P2 ribonuclease from the extreme thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus in mesophylic hosts.

    PubMed

    Fusi, P; Grisa, M; Mombelli, E; Consonni, R; Tortora, P; Vanoni, M

    1995-02-27

    This work reports the molecular cloning and expression of a synthetic gene encoding P2, a 7-kDa ribonuclease (RNase) previously isolated in our laboratory from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus [Fusi et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 211 (1993) 305-310]. The P2-encoding synthetic gene was expressed in E. coli and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant (re-) protein was produced to approx. 1.5% of the total protein content in S. cerevisiae using the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter and to 3% (tac/lac tandem promoters) or 6.5% (T7 promoter) in E. coli as judged by immunological and biochemical criteria. E. coli-produced P2 was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity through a one-step procedure, i.e., DEAE-Sephacel chromatography at pH 9.3. S. cerevisiae-produced P2 additionally required filtration through a Centricon-10 microconcentrator to obtain the same purity. The re-P2 was found to be indistinguishable from the Su. solfataricus enzyme on the basis of heat stability, pH optimum and RNA digestion pattern. Furthermore, monodimensional nuclear magnetic resonance showed that the E. coli- and Su. solfataricus-produced enzymes were structurally identical, the only exceptions being that Lys4 and Lys6 were not methylated in the re-enzyme, thus showing that lysine methylation does not play a role in P2 thermostabilization.

  3. Analysis of drug resistance in the archaebacterium Methanococcus voltae with respect to potential use in genetic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Possot, O.; Gernhardt, P.; Klein, A.; Sibold, L.

    1988-03-01

    The sensitivity of the methanogenic archaebacterium Methanococcus voltae to 12 inhibitors was tested in liquid medium. Four compounds appeared to be inhibitors of growth. Their MICs were as follows: pseudomonic acid, 0.1 ..mu..g/ml (0.19 ..mu..M); puromycin, 2 ..mu..g/ml (3.6 ..mu..M); methionine sulfoximine, 30 ..mu..g/ml (170 ..mu..M); and fusidic acid, 100 ..mu..g/ml (170 ..mu..M). On solid medium, the MICs were similar and the frequency of spontaneous resistance was found to be 5 x 10/sup -5/ (methionine sulfoximine), 10/sup -7/ (pseudomonic acid), and <10/sup -7/ (puromycin and fusidic acid). Pseudomonic acid was found to inhibit isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase activity as measured by the in vitro aminoacylation of M. voltae tRAN with L-(U-/sup 14/C) isoleucine. Fusidic acid and puromycin were shown to inhibit poly(U)-dependent polyphenylalanine synthesis in S30 extracts. Acetylpuromycin was inhibitory at much higher concentrations both in vivo and in vitro for M. voltae. Thus, the pac gene of Streptomyces alboniger, which is responsible for acetylation of puromycin and which conferred resistance to puromycin when introduced in eubacterian and eucaryotes, is a potential selective marker in gene transfer experiments with M. voltae. The latter was recently shown to be transformable. The same would be true for the cat gene of Tn9, which enodes resistance to fusidic acid in eubacteria in addition to resistance to chloramphenicol.

  4. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    PubMed Central

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins. PMID:27250364

  5. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  6. Structural and functional exchangeability of 5 S RNA species from the eubacterium E.coli and the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Teixidò, J; Altamura, S; Londei, P; Amils, R

    1989-01-01

    The role of 5 S RNA within the large ribosomal subunit of the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus has been analysed by means of in vitro reconstitution procedures. It is shown that Sulfolobus 50 S subunits reconstituted in the absence of 5 S RNA are inactive in protein synthesis and lack 2-3 ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, it has been determined that in the course of the in vitro assembly process Sulfolobus 5 S RNA can be replaced by the correspondent RNA species of E.coli; Sulfolobus reconstituted particles containing the eubacterial 5 S molecule are stable and active in polypeptide synthesis at high temperatures. Images PMID:2493632

  7. Pyrococcus kukulkanii sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic, piezophilic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Callac, Nolwenn; Oger, Philippe; Lesongeur, Françoise; Rattray, Jayne E; Vannier, Pauline; Michoud, Grégoire; Beauverger, Mickael; Gayet, Nicolas; Rouxel, Olivier; Jebbar, Mohamed; Godfroy, Anne

    2016-08-01

    A novel hyperthermophilic, piezophilic, anaerobic archaeon, designated NCB100T, was isolated from a hydrothermal vent flange fragment collected in the Guaymas basin at the hydrothermal vent site named 'Rebecca's Roost' at a depth of 1997 m. Enrichment and isolation were performed at 100 °C under atmospheric pressure. Cells of strain NCB100T were highly motile, irregular cocci with a diameter of ~1 µm. Growth was recorded at temperatures between 70 and 112 °C (optimum 105 °C) and hydrostatic pressures of 0.1-80 MPa (optimum 40-50 MPa). Growth was observed at pH 3.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7) and with 1.5-7 % NaCl (optimum at 2.5-3 %). Strain NCB100T was a strictly anaerobic chemo-organoheterotroph and grew on complex proteinaceous substrates such as yeast extract, peptone and tryptone, as well as on glycogen and starch. Elemental sulfur was required for growth and was reduced to hydrogen sulfide. The fermentation products from complex proteinaceous substrates were CO2 and H2. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 41.3 %. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain NCB100T belongs to the genus Pyrococcus, showing 99 % similarity with the other described species of the genus Pyrococcus. On the basis of physiological characteristics, DNA G+C content, similarity level between ribosomal proteins and an average nucleotide identity value of 79 %, strain NCB100T represents a novel species for which the name Pyrococcus kukulkanii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NCB100T (=DSM 101590T=Souchothèque de Bretagne BG1337T).

  8. Maltose-forming α-amylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. ST04.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2014-03-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence from a gene of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. ST04 (Py04_0872) contained a conserved glycoside hydrolase family 57 (GH57) motif, but showed <13% sequence identity with other known Pyrococcus GH57 enzymes, such as 4-α-glucanotransferase (EC 2.4.1.25), amylopullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41), and branching enzyme (EC 2.4.1.18). This gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant product (Pyrococcus sp. ST04 maltose-forming α-amylase, PSMA) was a novel 70-kDa maltose-forming α-amylase. PSMA only recognized maltose (G2) units with α-1,4 and α-1,6 linkages in polysaccharides (e.g., starch, amylopectin, and glycogen) and hydrolyzed pullulan very poorly. G2 was the primary end product of hydrolysis. Branched cyclodextrin (CD) was only hydrolyzed along its branched maltooligosaccharides. 6-O-glucosyl-β-cyclodextrin (G1-β-CD) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) were resistant to PSMA suggesting that PSMA is an exo-type glucan hydrolase with α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucan hydrolytic activities. The half-saturation value (Km) for the α-1,4 linkage of maltotriose (G3) was 8.4 mM while that of the α-1,6 linkage of 6-O-maltosyl-β-cyclodextrin (G2-β-CD) was 0.3 mM. The kcat values were 381.0 min(-1) for G3 and 1,545.0 min(-1) for G2-β-CD. The enzyme was inhibited competitively by the reaction product G2, and the Ki constant was 0.7 mM. PSMA bridges the gap between amylases that hydrolyze larger maltodextrins and α-glucosidase that feeds G2 into glycolysis by hydrolyzing smaller glucans into G2 units.

  9. Pyrococcus horikoshii TET2 Peptidase Assembling Process and Associated Functional Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Appolaire, Alexandre; Rosenbaum, Eva; Durá, M. Asunción; Colombo, Matteo; Marty, Vincent; Savoye, Marjolaine Noirclerc; Godfroy, Anne; Schoehn, Guy; Girard, Eric; Gabel, Frank; Franzetti, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahedral (TET) aminopeptidases are large polypeptide destruction machines present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, the rules governing their assembly into hollow 12-subunit tetrahedrons are addressed by using TET2 from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhTET2) as a model. Point mutations allowed the capture of a stable, catalytically active precursor. Small angle x-ray scattering revealed that it is a dimer whose architecture in solution is identical to that determined by x-ray crystallography within the fully assembled TET particle. Small angle x-ray scattering also showed that the reconstituted PhTET2 dodecameric particle displayed the same quaternary structure and thermal stability as the wild-type complex. The PhTET2 assembly intermediates were characterized by analytical ultracentrifugation, native gel electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. They revealed that PhTET2 assembling is a highly ordered process in which hexamers represent the main intermediate. Peptide degradation assays demonstrated that oligomerization triggers the activity of the TET enzyme toward large polypeptidic substrates. Fractionation experiments in Pyrococcus and Halobacterium cells revealed that, in vivo, the dimeric precursor co-exists together with assembled TET complexes. Taken together, our observations explain the biological significance of TET oligomerization and suggest the existence of a functional regulation of the dimer-dodecamer equilibrium in vivo. PMID:23696647

  10. Archaeal homologs of eukaryotic methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs: lessons from the Pyrococcus genomes.

    PubMed

    Gaspin, C; Cavaillé, J; Erauso, G; Bachellerie, J P

    2000-04-07

    Ribose methylation is a prevalent type of nucleotide modification in rRNA. Eukaryotic rRNAs display a complex pattern of ribose methylations, amounting to 55 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and about 100 in vertebrates. Ribose methylations of eukaryotic rRNAs are each guided by a cognate small RNA, belonging to the family of box C/D antisense snoRNAs, through transient formation of a specific base-pairing at the rRNA modification site. In prokaryotes, the pattern of rRNA ribose methylations has been fully characterized in a single species so far, Escherichia coli, which contains only four ribose methylated rRNA nucleotides. However, the hyperthermophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus contains, like eukaryotes, a large number of (yet unmapped) rRNA ribose methylations and homologs of eukaryotic box C/D small nucleolar ribonuclear proteins have been identified in archaeal genomes. We have therefore searched archaeal genomes for potential homologs of eukaryotic methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs, by combining searches for structured motifs with homology searches. We have identified a family of 46 small RNAs, conserved in the genomes of three hyperthermophile Pyrococcus species, which we have experimentally characterized in Pyrococcus abyssi. The Pyrococcus small RNAs, the first reported homologs of methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs in organisms devoid of a nucleus, appear as a paradigm of minimalist box C/D antisense RNAs. They differ from their eukaryotic homologs by their outstanding structural homogeneity, extended consensus box motifs and the quasi-systematic presence of two (instead of one) rRNA antisense elements. Remarkably, for each small RNA the two antisense elements always match rRNA sequences close to each other in rRNA structure, suggesting an important role in rRNA folding. Only a few of the predicted P. abyssi rRNA ribose methylations have been detected so far. Further analysis of these archaeal small RNAs could provide new insights into

  11. The crystal structure of a novel SAM-dependent methyltransferase PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Xu, X.; Pavlova, M.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Christendat, D.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network

    2005-01-01

    The S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases represent a diverse and biologically important class of enzymes. These enzymes utilize the ubiquitous methyl donor SAM as a cofactor to methylate proteins, small molecules, lipids, and nucleic acids. Here we present the crystal structure of PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a predicted SAM-dependent methyltransferase. This protein belongs to the Cluster of Orthologous Group 1092, and the presented crystal structure is the first representative structure of this protein family. Based on sequence and 3D structure analysis, we have made valuable functional insights that will facilitate further studies for characterizing this group of proteins. Specifically, we propose that PH1915 and its orthologs are rRNA- or tRNA-specific methyltransferases.

  12. Structure of an octameric form of the minichromosome maintenance protein from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Giuseppe; Visentin, Silvia; Palud, Adeline; Henneke, Ghislaine; Spagnolo, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Cell division is a complex process that requires precise duplication of genetic material. Duplication is concerted by replisomes. The Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) replicative helicase is a crucial component of replisomes. Eukaryotic and archaeal MCM proteins are highly conserved. In fact, archaeal MCMs are powerful tools for elucidating essential features of MCM function. However, while eukaryotic MCM2-7 is a heterocomplex made of different polypeptide chains, the MCM complexes of many Archaea form homohexamers from a single gene product. Moreover, some archaeal MCMs are polymorphic, and both hexameric and heptameric architectures have been reported for the same polypeptide. Here, we present the structure of the archaeal MCM helicase from Pyrococcus abyssi in its single octameric ring assembly. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a full-length octameric MCM helicase. PMID:28176822

  13. [Cloning, expression and biochemical characterization of a novel diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Ni, Jin-Feng; Shen, Yu-Long

    2006-04-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant organic compound in nature and the degradation of this biomass is an important process in the recycling of nutrients in the environments. Several biodegradation pathway of chitin have been classified in eukaryotes and bacteria, and a unique chitin degradation pathway was proposed according to recent studies on hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis. In the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii, several ORFs show high homology to the chitin-degrading related genes from T. kodakararaensis, therefore P. horikoshii is likely to have the same chitin degrading pathway as that of T. kodakaraensis. In order to further characterize the novel chitin degrading pathway in thermophilic archaea, a diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from P. horikoshii (Dacph) was studied in the present study. Dacph belongs to the LmbE-like protein family and the amino sequence is not related to the other deacetylases studied before (except that in T. kodakararaensis). The gene (Dacph, PH0499) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. horikoshii was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, cloned into expression vector pET15b, and expressed in E. coli BL21-codonPlus (DE3)-RIL. A soluble fraction of Dacph (31.6kDa) was obtained as shown by SDS-PAGE. TLC analysis showed that Dacph is able to deacetylate one acetyl group of GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc. By the concerted reaction with the Exo-beta-D-Glucosaminid-ase (BglAph), it is also able to convert GlcNAc2 into GlcN. It is concluded that PH0499 is a diacetylchit-obiose deacetylase. By reaction together with Exo-beta-D-Glucosaminidase in P. horikoshii, Dacph probably plays a key role in the new chitin degradation pathway in hyperthermophilic archaea (the genera Thermococcus and Pyrococcus).

  14. Minimal Amino Acid Requirements of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, Isolated from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents

    PubMed Central

    Watrin, L.; Martin-Jezequel, V.; Prieur, D.

    1995-01-01

    A minimal growth medium containing only nine amino acids and vitamins as the sole carbon and energy sources allowed the growth of Pyrococcus abyssi GE 5, a novel hyperthermophilic sulfur-metabolizing archaeon isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The generation time in this medium was about 40 min, and cell densities up to 5 x 10(sup8) cells ml(sup-1) were attained. These results are similar to those obtained previously with complex proteinaceous media. PMID:16534963

  15. Electrogenic Cation Binding in the Electroneutral Na+/H+ Antiporter of Pyrococcus abyssi.

    PubMed

    Călinescu, Octavian; Linder, Mark; Wöhlert, David; Yildiz, Özkan; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Fendler, Klaus

    2016-12-23

    Na(+)/H(+) antiporters in the CPA1 branch of the cation proton antiporter family drive the electroneutral exchange of H(+) against Na(+) ions and ensure pH homeostasis in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Although their transport cycle is overall electroneutral, specific partial reactions are electrogenic. Here, we present an electrophysiological study of the PaNhaP Na(+)/H(+) antiporter from Pyrococcus abyssi reconstituted into liposomes. Positive transient currents were recorded upon addition of Na(+) to PaNhaP proteoliposomes, indicating a reaction where positive charge is rapidly displaced into the proteoliposomes with a rate constant of k >200 s(-1) We attribute the recorded currents to an electrogenic reaction that includes Na(+) binding and possibly occlusion. Subsequently, positive charge is transported out of the cell associated with H(+) binding, so that the overall reaction is electroneutral. We show that the differences in pH profile and Na(+) affinity of PaNhaP and the related MjNhaP1 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii can be attributed to an additional negatively charged glutamate residue in PaNhaP. The results are discussed in the context of the physiological function of PaNhaP and other microbial Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. We propose that both, electroneutral and electrogenic Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, represent a carefully tuned self-regulatory system, which drives the cytoplasmic pH back to neutral after any deviation.

  16. Electrogenic Cation Binding in the Electroneutral Na+/H+ Antiporter of Pyrococcus abyssi*

    PubMed Central

    Călinescu, Octavian; Linder, Mark; Wöhlert, David; Yildiz, Özkan; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Na+/H+ antiporters in the CPA1 branch of the cation proton antiporter family drive the electroneutral exchange of H+ against Na+ ions and ensure pH homeostasis in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Although their transport cycle is overall electroneutral, specific partial reactions are electrogenic. Here, we present an electrophysiological study of the PaNhaP Na+/H+ antiporter from Pyrococcus abyssi reconstituted into liposomes. Positive transient currents were recorded upon addition of Na+ to PaNhaP proteoliposomes, indicating a reaction where positive charge is rapidly displaced into the proteoliposomes with a rate constant of k >200 s−1. We attribute the recorded currents to an electrogenic reaction that includes Na+ binding and possibly occlusion. Subsequently, positive charge is transported out of the cell associated with H+ binding, so that the overall reaction is electroneutral. We show that the differences in pH profile and Na+ affinity of PaNhaP and the related MjNhaP1 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii can be attributed to an additional negatively charged glutamate residue in PaNhaP. The results are discussed in the context of the physiological function of PaNhaP and other microbial Na+/H+ exchangers. We propose that both, electroneutral and electrogenic Na+/H+ antiporters, represent a carefully tuned self-regulatory system, which drives the cytoplasmic pH back to neutral after any deviation. PMID:27821589

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of galactokinase from Pyrococcus horikoshii

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Eiji; Sakamoto, Keiko; Obayashi, Naomi; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kuroishi, Chizu; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shinkai, Akeo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2006-02-01

    Galactokinase from P. horikoshii has been crystallized in both the apo form and as a ternary complex with α-d-galactose and an ATP analogue. The crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. Galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of α-d-galactose to α-d-galactose-1-phosphate, in an additional metabolic branch of glycolysis. The apo-form crystal structure of the enzyme has not yet been elucidated. Crystals of galactokinase from Pyrococcus horikoshii were prepared in both the apo form and as a ternary complex with α-d-galactose and an ATP analogue. Diffraction data sets were collected to 1.24 Å resolution for the apo form and to 1.7 Å for the ternary complex form using synchrotron radiation. The apo-form crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 108.08, b = 38.91, c = 81.57 Å, β = 109.8°. The ternary complex form was isomorphous with the apo form, except for the length of the a axis. The galactokinase activity of the enzyme was confirmed and the kinetic parameters at 323 K were determined.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04, Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F.; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na+ gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  19. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2012-08-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na(+) gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential.

  20. Identification and Characterization of an Archaeal Kojibiose Catabolic Pathway in the Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F.

    2014-01-01

    A unique gene cluster responsible for kojibiose utilization was identified in the genome of Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04. The proteins it encodes hydrolyze kojibiose, a disaccharide product of glucose caramelization, and form glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in two steps. Heterologous expression of the kojibiose-related enzymes in Escherichia coli revealed that two genes, Py04_1502 and Py04_1503, encode kojibiose phosphorylase (designated PsKP, for Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 kojibiose phosphorylase) and β-phosphoglucomutase (PsPGM), respectively. Enzymatic assays show that PsKP hydrolyzes kojibiose to glucose and β-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P). The Km values for kojibiose and phosphate were determined to be 2.53 ± 0.21 mM and 1.34 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. PsPGM then converts β-G1P into G6P in the presence of 6 mM MgCl2. Conversion activity from β-G1P to G6P was 46.81 ± 3.66 U/mg, and reverse conversion activity from G6P to β-G1P was 3.51 ± 0.13 U/mg. The proteins are highly thermostable, with optimal temperatures of 90°C for PsKP and 95°C for PsPGM. These results indicate that Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 converts kojibiose into G6P, a substrate of the glycolytic pathway. This is the first report of a disaccharide utilization pathway via phosphorolysis in hyperthermophilic archaea. PMID:24391053

  1. Crystal Structure of Pyridoxal Biosynthesis Lyase PdxS from Pyrococcus horikoshii

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Atsushi; Yoon, Ji Young; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hyung Ho; Suh, Se Won

    2012-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) is the biologically active form of vitamin B6 and is de novo synthesized from three substrates, dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), riburose 5-phosphate (RBP), and ammonia hydrolysed from glutamine. Glutamine amidotransferase (PdxT) catalyzes the production of ammonia from glutamine, while PdxS catalyzes the following condensation of ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P), and ammonia. PdxS exists as a hexamer or dodecamer depending on species and makes a 1:1 complex with PdxT. Pyrococcus horikoshii PdxS has a 37 amino acids insertion region, which is found in some archaeal PdxS proteins, but its structure and function are unknown. To provide further structural information on the role of the insertion region, the oligomeric state, and ligand binding mode of P. horikoshii PdxS, the crystal structure of PdxS from P. horikoshii was solved in two forms: (i) apo form, (ii) r ibose 5-phosphate (R5P) complex and the quaternary structure of PdxS in solution was determined by analytical gel filtration. P. horikoshii PdxS forms hexamer in solution based on analytical gel filtration data. When we superimpose the structure of P. horikoshii PdxS with other dodecamer structures of PdxS, the additional insertion is located apart from the active site and induces a steric clash on the hexamer-hexamer interface of PdxS proteins. Our results suggest that the additional insertion perturbs dodecamer formation of P. horikoshii PdxS. PMID:23104439

  2. Characterization of the archaeal ribonuclease P proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    PubMed

    Terada, Atsushi; Honda, Takashi; Fukuhara, Hideo; Hada, Kazumasa; Kimura, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Our earlier study revealed that RNase P RNA (pRNA) and five proteins (PhoPop5, PhoRpp38, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, and PhoRpp30) in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 reconstituted RNase P activity that exhibits enzymatic properties like those of the authentic enzyme. In present study, we investigated involvement of the individual proteins in RNase P activity. Two particles (R-3Ps), in which pRNA was mixed with three proteins, PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38 or PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp21 showed a detectable RNase P activity, and five reconstituted particles (R-4Ps) composed of pRNA and four proteins exhibited RNase P activity, albeit at reduced level compared to that of the reconstituted particle (R-5P) composed of pRNA and five proteins. Time-course analysis of the RNase P activities of R-4Ps indicated that the R-4Ps lacking PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, or PhoRpp30 had virtually reduced activity, while omission of PhoRpp29 or PhoRpp38 had a slight effect on the activity. The results indicate that the proteins contribute to RNase P activity in order of PhoPop5 > PhoRpp30 > PhoRpp21 > PhoRpp29 > PhoRpp38. It was further found that R-4Ps showed a characteristic Mg2+ ion dependency approximately identical to that of R-5P. However, R-4Ps had optimum temperature of around at 55 degrees C which is lower than 70 degrees C for R-5P. Together, it is suggested that the P. horikoshii RNase P proteins are predominantly involved in optimization of the pRNA conformation, though they are individually dispensable for RNase P activity in vitro.

  3. Pyrococcus yayanosii sp. nov., an obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Birrien, Jean-Louis; Zeng, Xiang; Jebbar, Mohamed; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Quérellou, Joël; Oger, Philippe; Bienvenu, Nadège; Xiao, Xiang; Prieur, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    An obligate piezophilic anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, designated strain CH1(T), was isolated from a hydrothermal vent site named 'Ashadze', which is located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at a depth of 4100 m. Enrichment and isolation of the strain were carried out at 95 °C under a hydrostatic pressure of 42 MPa. Cells of strain CH1(T) were highly motile irregular cocci with a diameter of ~1-1.5 µm. Growth was recorded at 80-108 °C (optimum 98 °C) and at pressures of 20-120 MPa (optimum 52 MPa). No growth was observed under atmospheric pressures at 60-110 °C. Growth was observed at pH 6.0-9.5 (optimum 7.5-8.0) and in 2.5-5.5% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3.5%). Strain CH1(T) was strictly anaerobic and grew on complex proteinaceous substrates, such as yeast extract, Peptone, and casein, as well as on sucrose, starch, chitin, pyruvate, acetate and glycerol without electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 49.0±0.5 mol%. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain CH1(T) belongs to the genus Pyrococcus. Based on its physiological properties and similarity levels between ribosomal proteins, strain CH1(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Pyrococcus yayanosii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CH1(T) (=JCM 16557). This strain is also available by request from the Souchothèque de Bretagne (catalogue LMBE) culture collection (collection no. 3310).

  4. Biochemical and phylogenetic characterization of a novel terrestrial hyperthermophilic archaeon pertaining to the genus Pyrococcus from an Algerian hydrothermal hot spring.

    PubMed

    Kecha, Mouloud; Benallaoua, Said; Touzel, Jean Pierre; Bonaly, Roger; Duchiron, Francis

    2007-01-01

    A hyperthermophilic anaerobic archeon, strain HT3, was isolated from hydrothermal hot spring in Northeast Algeria. The strain is a regular coccus, highly motile, obligatory anaerobic, heterotrophic. It utilizes proteinaceous complex media (peptone, tryptone or yeast extract). Sulfur is reduced to Hydrogen sulfide and enhances growth. It shares with other Pyrococcus species the heterotrophic mode of nutrition, the hyperthermophily, the ability to utilize amino acids as sole carbon and nitrogen sources and the ether lipid composition. The optimal growth occurs at 80-85 degrees C, pH 7.5 and 1.5% NaCl. The G + C content was 43 mol%. Considering its morphology, physiological properties, nutritional features and phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, this strain is described as a new terrestrial isolate pertaining to the genus Pyrococcus.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Piezophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus kukulkanii NCB100 Isolated from the Rebecca's Roost Hydrothermal Vent in the Guaymas Basin.

    PubMed

    Oger, Philippe M; Callac, Nolwenn; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin; Jebbar, Mohamed; Godfroy, Anne

    2017-02-16

    Members of the order Thermococcales are common inhabitants of high-temperature hydrothermal vent systems (black smokers) that are represented in clone libraries mostly by isolates from the Thermococcus genus. We report the complete sequence of a novel species from the Pyrococcus genus, P. kukulkanii strain NCB100, which has been isolated from a flange fragment of the Rebecca's Roost hydrothermal vent system in the Guaymas Basin.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Piezophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus kukulkanii NCB100 Isolated from the Rebecca’s Roost Hydrothermal Vent in the Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    Callac, Nolwenn; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the order Thermococcales are common inhabitants of high-temperature hydrothermal vent systems (black smokers) that are represented in clone libraries mostly by isolates from the Thermococcus genus. We report the complete sequence of a novel species from the Pyrococcus genus, P. kukulkanii strain NCB100, which has been isolated from a flange fragment of the Rebecca’s Roost hydrothermal vent system in the Guaymas Basin. PMID:28209839

  7. Structural basis for the transglycosylase activity of a GH57-type glycogen branching enzyme from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Na, Soohui; Park, Minjeong; Jo, Inseong; Cha, Jaeho; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2017-03-18

    Glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) catalyzes the formation of α-1,6-branching points during glycogenesis by cleaving α-1,4 bonds and making new α-1,6 bonds. Most GBEs belong to the glycoside hydrolase 13 family (GH13), but new GBEs in the GH57 family have been isolated from Archaea. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a GH57 GBE from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhGBE) at a resolution of 2.3 Å. PhGBE exhibits both α-1,6-branching activity and endo-α-1,4 hydrolytic activity. PhGBE has a central (β/α)7-barrel domain that contains an embedded helix domain and an α-helix-rich C-terminal domain. The active-site cleft is located at the interface of the central and C-terminal domains. Amino acid substitution at Trp22, which is separate from the catalytic nucleophilic residue, abolished both enzymatic activities, indicating that Trp22 might be responsible for substrate recognition. We also observed that shortening of the flexible loop near the catalytic residue changed branched chain lengths of the reaction products with increased hydrolytic activity. Taken together, our findings propose a molecular mechanism for how GH57 GBEs exhibit the two activities and where the substrate binds the enzyme.

  8. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a penicillin-binding protein homologue from Pyrococcus abyssi

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Mayer, Claudine

    2005-11-01

    The crystallization of a hypothetical penicillin-binding protein from the archaeon P. abyssi in space group C2 by hanging-drop vapour diffusion is reported. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains a gene (pab0087) encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) homologue. This sequence consists of 447 residues and shows significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight PBPs and class C β-lactamases. The Pab0087 protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution. Both crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 160.59, b = 135.74, c = 113.02 Å, β = 117.36° and a = 166.97, b = 131.25, c = 189.39 Å, β = 113.81°, respectively. The asymmetric unit contains four and eight molecules, respectively, with fourfold non-crystallographic symmetry.

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kunishima, Naoki

    2006-04-01

    RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with ATP. Both crystal forms belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21 and diffract X-rays to 2.0 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. Circadian (daily) protein clocks are found in cyanobacteria, where a complex of the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins generates circadian rhythms. The 28.09 kDa KaiC homologue PH0284 protein from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned and expressed and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data from the crystal were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.06, c = 298.90 Å. Assuming the presence of one hexamer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 47.9%. A cocrystal with ATP was prepared and a diffraction data set was collected at 2.3 Å resolution.

  10. Crystal structure of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD: archaeon specificity and catalytic mechanism of adenylate formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, E; Moulinier, L; Fujiwara, S; Imanaka, T; Thierry, J C; Moras, D

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis was solved at 1.9 A resolution. The sequence and three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain are highly homologous to those of eukaryotic AspRSs. In contrast, the N-terminal domain, whose function is to bind the tRNA anticodon, is more similar to that of eubacterial enzymes. Its structure explains the unique property of archaeal AspRSs of accommodating both tRNAAsp and tRNAAsn. Soaking the apo-enzyme crystals with ATP and aspartic acid both separately and together allows the adenylate formation to be followed. Due to the asymmetry of the dimeric enzyme in the crystalline state, different steps of the reaction could be visualized within the same crystal. Four different states of the aspartic acid activation reaction could thus be characterized, revealing the functional correlation of the observed conformational changes. The binding of the amino acid substrate induces movement of two invariant loops which secure the position of the peptidyl moiety for adenylate formation. An unambiguous spatial and functional assignment of three magnesium ion cofactors can be made. This study shows the important role of residues present in both archaeal and eukaryotic AspRSs, but absent from the eubacterial enzymes. PMID:9724658

  11. Characterization of the PH1704 protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 and the critical functions of Tyr120.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Dongling; Bai, Aixi; Yu, Lei; Han, Weiwei; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The PH1704 protease from hyperthermophilic archaean Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 is a member of DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily with diverse functional subclasses. The recombinant PH1704 was efficiently purified and was systematically characterized by a combination of substrate specificity analysis, steady-state kinetics study and molecular docking research. The homogeneous protease was obtained as a presumed dodecamer with molecular weight of ∼240 kDa. Iodoacetamide strongly inhibited the peptidase activity, confirming that Cys100 is a nucleophilic residue. The recombinant protein was identified as both an aminopeptidase and an endopeptidase. Experimental data showed that L-R-amc was the best substrate of PH1704. Structural interaction fingerprint analysis (SIFt) indicated the binding pose of PH1704 and showed that Tyr120 is important in substrate binding. Kinetic parameters Kcat and Kcat/Km of the Y120P mutant with L-R-amc was about 7 and 7.8 times higher than that of the wild type (WT). For the endopeptidase Y120P with AAFR-amc, Kcat and Kcat/Km is 10- and 21-fold higher than that of WT. Experimental data indicate the important functions of Tyr120: involvement in enzyme activity to form a hydrogen bond with Cys100 and as an entrance gate of the substrate with Lys43. The results of this study can be used to investigate the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily.

  12. Purification, crystallization and initial X-ray crystallographic analysis of the putative GTPase PH0525 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lokanath, Neratur K.; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Matsunaga, Emiko; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-10-01

    The putative GTPase PH0525 from P. horikoshii OT3 was crystallized using the microbatch method. Crystals were formed under two different conditions, providing two distinct crystal forms. Diffraction data from the two forms were measured to resolution limits of 2.30 and 2.40 Å and processed in space groups P2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1}, respectively. GTPases are involved in diverse cellular functions including cell proliferation, cytoskeleton organization and intracellular traffic. The putative GTPase PH0525 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Two distinct crystal forms were grown by the microbatch method at 291 K using a very high protein concentration (80 mg ml{sup −1}). Native data sets extending to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.4 Å have been collected and processed in space groups P2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1}, respectively. Assuming the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit gives V{sub M} values of 2.6 and 2.4 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} for the P2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1} forms, respectively, which is consistent with dynamic light-scattering experiments, which show a monomeric state of the protein in solution.

  13. Genomewide and biochemical analyses of DNA-binding activity of Cdc6/Orc1 and Mcm proteins in Pyrococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Fujihiko; Glatigny, Annie; Mucchielli-Giorgi, Marie-Hélène; Agier, Nicolas; Delacroix, Hervé; Marisa, Laetitia; Durosay, Patrice; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Aggerbeck, Lawrence; Forterre, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The origin of DNA replication (oriC) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains multiple ORB and mini-ORB repeats that show sequence similarities to other archaeal ORB (origin recognition box). We report here that the binding of Cdc6/Orc1 to a 5 kb region containing oriC in vivo was highly specific both in exponential and stationary phases, by means of chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with hybridization on a whole genome microarray (ChIP-chip). The oriC region is practically the sole binding site for the Cdc6/Orc1, thereby distinguishing oriC in the 1.8 M bp genome. We found that the 5 kb region contains a previously unnoticed cluster of ORB and mini-ORB repeats in the gene encoding the small subunit (dp1) for DNA polymerase II (PolD). ChIP and the gel retardation analyses further revealed that Cdc6/Orc1 specifically binds both of the ORB clusters in oriC and dp1. The organization of the ORB clusters in the dp1 and oriC is conserved during evolution in the order Thermococcales, suggesting a role in the initiation of DNA replication. Our ChIP-chip analysis also revealed that Mcm alters the binding specificity to the oriC region according to the growth phase, consistent with its role as a licensing factor.

  14. Subunit interaction and regulation of activity through terminal domains of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y; Tang, X-F; Matsui, E; Matsui, I

    2004-04-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) has recently been found in the Euryarchaeota subdomain of Archaea. Its genes are adjacent to several other genes related to DNA replication, repair and recombination in the genome, suggesting that this enzyme may be the major DNA replicase in Euryarchaeota. We successfully cloned, expressed, and purified the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PolDPho). By site-directed mutagenesis, we identified amino acid residues Asp-1122 and Asp-1124 of a large subunit as the essential residues responsible for DNA-polymerizing activity. We analysed the domain structure using proteins truncated at the N- and C-termini of both small and large subunits (DP1Pho and DP2Pho), and identified putative regions responsible for subunit interaction, oligomerization and regulation of the 3'-5' exonuclease activity in PolDPho. It was also found that the internal region of the putative zinc finger motif (cysteine cluster II) at the C-terminal of DP2Pho is involved in the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Using gel filtration analysis, we determined the molecular masses of the recombinant PolDPho and the N-terminal putative dimerization domain of the large subunit, and proposed that PolD from P. horikoshii probably forms a heterotetrameric structure in solution. Based on these results, a model regarding the subunit interaction and regulation of activity of PolDPho is proposed.

  15. Overproduction and preliminary crystallographic study of a human kynurenine aminotransferase II homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Chon, Hyongi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Shimizu, Shoko; Maeda, Nao; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2005-03-01

    A human kynurenine aminotransferase II homologue from P. horikoshii OT3 has been overproduced in E. coli, purified, and characterized. Crystals of this protein have been obtained and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 genome contains a gene encoding a human kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II) homologue, which consists of 428 amino-acid residues and shows an amino-acid sequence identity of 30% to human KAT II. This gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein (Ph-KAT II) was purified. Gel-filtration chromatography showed that Ph-KAT II exists as a homodimer. Ph-KAT II exhibited enzymatic activity that catalyzes the transamination of l-kynurenine to produce kynurenic acid. Crystals of Ph-KAT II were grown using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and native X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation from station BL44XU at SPring-8. The crystals belong to the centred orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.75, b = 86.84, c = 137.30 Å. Assuming one molecule per asymmetric unit, the V{sub M} value was 2.19 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was 43.3%.

  16. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Glycoconjugates by Transgalactosylation with Recombinant Thermostable β-Glycosidase from Pyrococcus

    PubMed Central

    Henze, Manja; Merker, Dorothee; Elling, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    The potential of the hyperthermophilic β-glycosidase from Pyrococcus woesei (DSM 3773) for the synthesis of glycosides under microwave irradiation (MWI) at low temperatures was investigated. Transgalactosylation reactions with β-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine as acceptor substrate (GlcNAc-linker-tBoc) under thermal heating (TH, 85 °C) and under MWI at 100 and 300 W resulted in the formation of (Galβ(1,4)GlcNAc-linker-tBoc) as the main product in all reactions. Most importantly, MWI at temperatures far below the temperature optimum of the hyperthermophilic glycosidase led to higher product yields with only minor amounts of side products β(1,6-linked disaccharide and trisaccharides). At high acceptor concentrations (50 mM), transgalactosylation reactions under MWI at 300 W gave similar product yields when compared to TH at 85 °C. In summary, we demonstrate that MWI is useful as a novel experimental set-up for the synthesis of defined galacto-oligosaccharides. In conclusion, glycosylation reactions under MWI at low temperatures have the potential as a general strategy for regioselective glycosylation reactions of hyperthermophilic glycosidases using heat-labile acceptor or donor substrates. PMID:26861292

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Nip7 proteins from the marine deep- and shallow-water Pyrococcus species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of the mechanisms of adaptation of protein structures to extreme environmental conditions is a challenging task of structural biology. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Nip7 protein involved in RNA processing from the shallow-water (P. furiosus) and the deep-water (P. abyssi) marine hyperthermophylic archaea at different temperatures (300 and 373 K) and pressures (0.1, 50 and 100 MPa). The aim was to disclose similarities and differences between the deep- and shallow-sea protein models at different temperatures and pressures. Results The current results demonstrate that the 3D models of the two proteins at all the examined values of pressures and temperatures are compact, stable and similar to the known crystal structure of the P. abyssi Nip7. The structural deviations and fluctuations in the polypeptide chain during the MD simulations were the most pronounced in the loop regions, their magnitude being larger for the C-terminal domain in both proteins. A number of highly mobile segments the protein globule presumably involved in protein-protein interactions were identified. Regions of the polypeptide chain with significant difference in conformational dynamics between the deep- and shallow-water proteins were identified. Conclusions The results of our analysis demonstrated that in the examined ranges of temperatures and pressures, increase in temperature has a stronger effect on change in the dynamic properties of the protein globule than the increase in pressure. The conformational changes of both the deep- and shallow-sea protein models under increasing temperature and pressure are non-uniform. Our current results indicate that amino acid substitutions between shallow- and deep-water proteins only slightly affect overall stability of two proteins. Rather, they may affect the interactions of the Nip7 protein with its protein or RNA partners. PMID:25315147

  18. Presence of a structurally novel type ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, S; Maeda, N; Kishimoto, T; Atomi, H; Imanaka, T

    1999-02-19

    We have characterized the gene encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. The gene encoded a protein consisting of 444 amino acid residues, corresponding in size to the large subunit of previously reported Rubiscos. Rubisco of P. kodakaraensis KOD1 (Pk-Rubisco) showed only 51.4% similarity with the large subunit of type I Rubisco from spinach and 47.3% with that of type II Rubisco from Rhodospirillum rubrum, suggesting that the enzyme was not a member of either type. Active site residues identified from type I and type II Rubiscos were conserved. We expressed the gene in Escherichia coli, and we obtained a soluble protein with the expected molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence. Purification of the recombinant protein revealed that Pk-Rubisco was an L8 type homo-octamer. Pk-Rubisco showed highest specific activity of 19.8 x 10(3) nmol of CO2 fixed per min/mg, and a tau value of 310 at 90 degreesC, both higher than any previously characterized Rubisco. The optimum pH was 8.3, and the enzyme possessed extreme thermostability, with a half-life of 15 h at 80 degreesC. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the gene was transcribed in P. kodakaraensis KOD1. Furthermore, Western blot analysis with cell-free extract of P. kodakaraensis KOD1 clearly indicated the presence of Pk-Rubisco in the native host cells.

  19. An Extended Network of Genomic Maintenance in the Archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi Highlights Unexpected Associations between Eucaryotic Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Pluchon, Pierre-François; Fouqueau, Thomas; Crezé, Christophe; Laurent, Sébastien; Briffotaux, Julien; Hogrel, Gaëlle; Palud, Adeline; Henneke, Ghislaine; Godfroy, Anne; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Nicolas, Jacques; Flament, Didier

    2013-01-01

    In Archaea, the proteins involved in the genetic information processing pathways, including DNA replication, transcription, and translation, share strong similarities with those of eukaryotes. Characterizations of components of the eukaryotic-type replication machinery complex provided many interesting insights into DNA replication in both domains. In contrast, DNA repair processes of hyperthermophilic archaea are less well understood and very little is known about the intertwining between DNA synthesis, repair and recombination pathways. The development of genetic system in hyperthermophilic archaea is still at a modest stage hampering the use of complementary approaches of reverse genetics and biochemistry to elucidate the function of new candidate DNA repair gene. To gain insights into genomic maintenance processes in hyperthermophilic archaea, a protein-interaction network centred on informational processes of Pyrococcus abyssi was generated by affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry. The network consists of 132 interactions linking 87 proteins. These interactions give insights into the connections of DNA replication with recombination and repair, leading to the discovery of new archaeal components and of associations between eucaryotic homologs. Although this approach did not allow us to clearly delineate new DNA pathways, it provided numerous clues towards the function of new molecular complexes with the potential to better understand genomic maintenance processes in hyperthermophilic archaea. Among others, we found new potential partners of the replication clamp and demonstrated that the single strand DNA binding protein, Replication Protein A, enhances the transcription rate, in vitro, of RNA polymerase. This interaction map provides a valuable tool to explore new aspects of genome integrity in Archaea and also potentially in Eucaryotes. PMID:24244547

  20. Crystal structure of product-bound complex of UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Pampa, K.J.; Lokanath, N.K.; Girish, T.U.; Kunishima, N.; Rai, V.R.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Determined the structure of UDP-D-ManNAcADH to a resolution of 1.55 Å. • First complex structure of PhUDP-D-ManNAcADH with UDP-D-ManMAcA. • The monomeric structure consists of three distinct domains. • Cys258 acting as catalytic nucleophilic and Lys204 acts as acid/base catalyst. • Oligomeric state plays an important role for the catalytic function. - Abstract: UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase (UDP-D-ManNAcDH) belongs to UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose dehydrogenase family and catalyzes Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (UDP-D-ManNAc) to Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid (UDP-D-ManNAcA) through twofold oxidation of NAD{sup +}. In order to reveal the structural features of the Pyrococcus horikoshii UDP-D-ManNAcADH, we have determined the crystal structure of the product-bound enzyme by X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.55 Å. The protomer folds into three distinct domains; nucleotide binding domain (NBD), substrate binding domain (SBD) and oligomerization domain (OD, involved in the dimerization). The clear electron density of the UDP-D-ManNAcA is observed and the residues binding are identified for the first time. Crystal structures reveal a tight dimeric polymer chains with product-bound in all the structures. The catalytic residues Cys258 and Lys204 are conserved. The Cys258 acts as catalytic nucleophile and Lys204 as acid/base catalyst. The product is directly interacts with residues Arg211, Thr249, Arg244, Gly255, Arg289, Lys319 and Arg398. In addition, the structural parameters responsible for thermostability and oligomerization of the three dimensional structure are analyzed.

  1. Experimental silicification of the extremophilic Archaea Pyrococcus abyssi and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: applications in the search for evidence of life in early Earth and extraterrestrial rocks.

    PubMed

    Orange, F; Westall, F; Disnar, J-R; Prieur, D; Bienvenu, N; Le Romancer, M; Défarge, Ch

    2009-09-01

    Hydrothermal activity was common on the early Earth and associated micro-organisms would most likely have included thermophilic to hyperthermophilic species. 3.5-3.3 billion-year-old, hydrothermally influenced rocks contain silicified microbial mats and colonies that must have been bathed in warm to hot hydrothermal emanations. Could they represent thermophilic or hyperthermophilic micro-organisms and if so, how were they preserved? We present the results of an experiment to silicify anaerobic, hyperthermophilic micro-organisms from the Archaea Domain Pyrococcus abyssi and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, that could have lived on the early Earth. The micro-organisms were placed in a silica-saturated medium for periods up to 1 year. Pyrococcus abyssi cells were fossilized but the M. jannaschii cells lysed naturally after the exponential growth phase, apart from a few cells and cell remains, and were not silicified although their extracellular polymeric substances were. In this first simulated fossilization of archaeal strains, our results suggest that differences between species have a strong influence on the potential for different micro-organisms to be preserved by fossilization and that those found in the fossil record represent probably only a part of the original diversity. Our results have important consequences for biosignatures in hydrothermal or hydrothermally influenced deposits on Earth, as well as on early Mars, as environmental conditions were similar on the young terrestrial planets and traces of early Martian life may have been similarly preserved as silicified microfossils.

  2. An Integrative Genomic Island Affects the Adaptations of the Piezophilic Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus yayanosii to High Temperature and High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Li, Xuegong; Xiao, Xiang; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by high hydrostatic pressure and sharp temperature and chemical gradients. Horizontal gene transfer is thought to play an important role in the microbial adaptation to such an extreme environment. In this study, a 21.4-kb DNA fragment was identified as a genomic island, designated PYG1, in the genomic sequence of the piezophilic hyperthermophile Pyrococcus yayanosii. According to the sequence alignment and functional annotation, the genes in PYG1 could tentatively be divided into five modules, with functions related to mobility, DNA repair, metabolic processes and the toxin-antitoxin system. Integrase can mediate the site-specific integration and excision of PYG1 in the chromosome of P. yayanosii A1. Gene replacement of PYG1 with a SimR cassette was successful. The growth of the mutant strain ΔPYG1 was compared with its parent strain P. yayanosii A2 under various stress conditions, including different pH, salinity, temperature, and hydrostatic pressure. The ΔPYG1 mutant strain showed reduced growth when grown at 100°C, while the biomass of ΔPYG1 increased significantly when cultured at 80 MPa. Differential expression of the genes in module III of PYG1 was observed under different temperature and pressure conditions. This study demonstrates the first example of an archaeal integrative genomic island that could affect the adaptation of the hyperthermophilic piezophile P. yayanosii to high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27965650

  3. Structural features underlying the selective cleavage of a novel exo-type maltose-forming amylase from Pyrococcus sp. ST04.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myeong-Eun; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2014-06-01

    A novel maltose-forming α-amylase (PSMA) was recently found in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. ST04. This enzyme shows <13% amino-acid sequence identity to other known α-amylases and displays a unique enzymatic property in that it hydrolyzes both α-1,4-glucosidic and α-1,6-glucosidic linkages of substrates, recognizing only maltose units, in an exo-type manner. Here, the crystal structure of PSMA at a resolution of 1.8 Å is reported, showing a tight ring-shaped tetramer with monomers composed of two domains: an N-domain (amino acids 1-341) with a typical GH57 family (β/α)7-barrel fold and a C-domain (amino acids 342-597) composed of α-helical bundles. A small closed cavity observed in proximity to the catalytic residues Glu153 and Asp253 at the domain interface has the appropriate volume and geometry to bind a maltose unit, accounting for the selective exo-type maltose hydrolysis of the enzyme. A narrow gate at the putative subsite +1 formed by residue Phe218 and Phe452 is essential for specific cleavage of glucosidic bonds. The closed cavity at the active site is connected to a short substrate-binding channel that extends to the central hole of the tetramer, exhibiting a geometry that is significantly different from classical maltogenic amylases or β-amylases. The structural features of this novel exo-type maltose-forming α-amylase provide a molecular basis for its unique enzymatic characteristics and for its potential use in industrial applications and protein engineering.

  4. Identification of a novel amino acid racemase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 induced by D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohmori, Taketo; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    To date, there have been few reports analyzing the amino acid requirement for growth of hyperthermophilic archaea. We here found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 requires Thr, Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, Trp, His and Arg in the medium for growth, and shows slow growth in medium lacking Met or Ile. This largely corresponds to the presence, or absence, of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis in its genome, though there are exceptions. The amino acid requirements were dramatically lost by addition of D-isomers of Met, Leu, Val, allo-Ile, Phe, Tyr, Trp and Arg. Tracer analysis using (14)C-labeled D-Trp showed that D-Trp in the medium was used as a protein component in the cells, suggesting the presence of D-amino acid metabolic enzymes. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent racemase activity toward Met, Leu and Phe was detected in crude extract of P. horikoshii and was enhanced in cells grown in the medium supplemented with D-amino acids, especially D-allo-Ile. The gene encoding the racemase was narrowed down to one open reading frame on the basis of enzyme purification from P. horikoshii cells, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited PLP-dependent racemase activity toward several amino acids, including Met, Leu and Phe, but not Pro, Asp or Glu. This is the first report showing the presence in a hyperthermophilic archaeon of a PLP-dependent amino acid racemase with broad substrate specificity that is likely responsible for utilization of D-amino acids for growth.

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding glutamine synthetase I from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei: anomalous phylogenies inferred from analysis of archaeal and bacterial glutamine synthetase I sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tiboni, O; Cammarano, P; Sanangelantoni, A M

    1993-01-01

    The gene glnA encoding glutamine synthetase I (GSI) from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced with the Sulfolobus solfataricus glnA gene as the probe. An operon reading frame of 448 amino acids was identified within a DNA segment of 1,528 bp. The encoded protein was 49% identical with the GSI of Methanococcus voltae and exhibited conserved regions characteristic of the GSI family. The P. woesei GSI was aligned with available homologs from other archaea (S. solfataricus, M. voltae) and with representative sequences from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and gram-positive bacteria. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from both the amino acid and the nucleotide sequence alignments. In accordance with the sequence similarities, archaeal and bacterial sequences did not segregate on a phylogeny. On the basis of sequence signatures, the GSI trees could be subdivided into two ensembles. One encompassed the GSI of cyanobacteria and proteobacteria, but also that of the high-G + C gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor (all of which are regulated by the reversible adenylylation of the enzyme subunits); the other embraced the GSI of the three archaea as well as that of the low-G + C gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium acetobutilycum, Bacillus subtilis) and Thermotoga maritima (none of which are regulated by subunit adenylylation). The GSIs of the Thermotoga and the Bacillus-Clostridium lineages shared a direct common ancestor with that of P. woesei and the methanogens and were unrelated to their homologs from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and S. coelicolor. The possibility is presented that the GSI gene arose among the archaea and was then laterally transferred from some early methanogen to a Thermotoga-like organism. However, the relationship of the cyanobacterial-proteobacterial GSIs to the Thermotoga GSI and the GSI of low-G+C gram-positive bacteria remains unexplained. PMID:8098326

  6. Replication factor C from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi does not need ATP hydrolysis for clamp-loading and contains a functionally conserved RFC PCNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Henneke, Ghislaine; Gueguen, Yannick; Flament, Didier; Azam, Philippe; Querellou, Joël; Dietrich, Jacques; Hübscher, Ulrich; Raffin, Jean-Paul

    2002-11-08

    The molecular organization of the replication complex in archaea is similar to that in eukaryotes. Only two proteins homologous to subunits of eukaryotic replication factor C (RFC) have been detected in Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab). The genes encoding these two proteins are arranged in tandem. We cloned these two genes and co-expressed the corresponding recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Two inteins present in the gene encoding the small subunit (PabRFC-small) were removed during cloning. The recombinant protein complex was purified by anion-exchange and hydroxyapatite chromatography. Also, the PabRFC-small subunit could be purified, while the large subunit (PabRFC-large) alone was completely insoluble. The highly purified PabRFC complex possessed an ATPase activity, which was not enhanced by DNA. The Pab proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) activated the PabRFC complex in a DNA-dependent manner, but the PabRFC-small ATPase activity was neither DNA-dependent nor PCNA-dependent. The PabRFC complex was able to stimulate PabPCNA-dependent DNA synthesis by the Pabfamily D heterodimeric DNA polymerase. Finally, (i) the PabRFC-large fraction cross-reacted with anti-human-RFC PCNA-binding domain antibody, corroborating the conservation of the protein sequence, (ii) the human PCNA stimulated the PabRFC complex ATPase activity in a DNA-dependent way and (iii) the PabRFC complex could load human PCNA onto primed single-stranded circular DNA, suggesting that the PCNA-binding domain of RFC has been functionally conserved during evolution. In addition, ATP hydrolysis was not required either for DNA polymerase stimulation or PCNA-loading in vitro.

  7. Survival and growth of two heterotrophic hydrothermal vent archaea, Pyrococcus strain GB-D and Thermococcus fumicolans, under low pH and high sulfide concentrations in combination with high temperature and pressure regimes.

    PubMed

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Molyneaux, Stephen J; Böer, Simone; Wirsen, Carl O; Saito, Mak; Atkins, Michael S; Lloyd, Karen; Teske, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    Growth and survival of hyperthermophilic archaea in their extreme hydrothermal vent and subsurface environments are controlled by chemical and physical key parameters. This study examined the effects of elevated sulfide concentrations, temperature, and acidic pH on growth and survival of two hydrothermal vent archaea (Pyrococcus strain GB-D and Thermococcus fumicolans) under high temperature and pressure regimes. These two strains are members of the Thermococcales, a family of hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, sulfur-reducing archaea that occur in high densities at vent sites. As actively growing cells, these two strains tolerated regimes of pH, pressure, and temperature that were in most cases not tolerated under severe substrate limitation. A moderate pH of 5.5-7 extends their survival and growth range over a wider range of sulfide concentrations, temperature and pressure, relative to lower pH conditions. T. fumicolans and Pyrococcus strain GB-D grew under very high pressures that exceeded in-situ pressures typical of hydrothermal vent depths, and included deep subsurface pressures. However, under the same conditions, but in the absence of carbon substrates and electron acceptors, survival was generally lower, and decreased rapidly when low pH stress was combined with high pressure and high temperature.

  8. Discovery of a novel restriction endonuclease by genome comparison and application of a wheat-germ-based cell-free translation assay: PabI (5'-GTA/C) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ken; Watanabe, Miki; Kuroita, Toshihiro; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Kawakami, Bunsei; Tanokura, Masaru; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2005-07-21

    To search for restriction endonucleases, we used a novel plant-based cell-free translation procedure that bypasses the toxicity of these enzymes. To identify candidate genes, the related genomes of the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus horikoshii were compared. In line with the selfish mobile gene hypothesis for restriction-modification systems, apparent genome rearrangement around putative restriction genes served as a selecting criterion. Several candidate restriction genes were identified and then amplified in such a way that they were removed from their own translation signal. During their cloning into a plasmid, the genes became connected with a plant translation signal. After in vitro transcription by T7 RNA polymerase, the mRNAs were separated from the template DNA and translated in a wheat-germ-based cell-free protein synthesis system. The resulting solution could be directly assayed for restriction activity. We identified two deoxyribonucleases. The novel enzyme was denoted as PabI, purified and found to recognize 5'-GTAC and leave a 3'-TA overhang (5'-GTA/C), a novel restriction enzyme-generated terminus. PabI is active up to 90 degrees C and optimally active at a pH of around 6 and in NaCl concentrations ranging from 100 to 200 mM. We predict that it has a novel 3D structure.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin protein ligase complex from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Bagautdinova, Svetlana; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-04-01

    A truncated form of biotin carboxyl carrier protein containing the C-terminal half fragment (BCCPΔN76) and the biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the mutation R48A (BPL*) or the double mutation R48A K111A (BPL**) were successfully cocrystallized in the presence of ATP and biotin. The BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} and diffract X-rays to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Biotin protein ligase (BPL) catalyses the biotinylation of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. To elucidate the exact details of the protein–protein interactions in the biotinylation function, the C-terminal half fragment of BCCP (BCCPΔN76), the R48A mutant of BPL (BPL*) and the R48A K111A double mutant of BPL (BPL**), all of which are from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, have been expressed, purified and successfully cocrystallized. Cocrystals of the BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 complexes as well as crystals of BPL*, BPL** and BCCPΔN76 were obtained by the oil-microbatch method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant at 295 K. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets for BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals were collected at 100 K to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with similar unit-cell parameters a = 69.85, b = 63.12, c = 75.64 Å, β = 95.9°. Assuming two subunits of the complex per asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.45 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 50%.

  10. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  11. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W.W.; Jenney, Francis; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Fe-S protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. PMID:26052177

  12. The Nitrogenase in a Methanogenic Archaebacterium and Its Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-02

    synthesis and activity, and to compare results obtained with those from eubacteria . ACCOMPLISHMENTS. 1. Growth physiology. The initial phases of the project...energetically costly to strain 227 as it is to eubacteria , causing a halving of growth yield and rates. Molybdate at levels as low as 10 nM stimulated...bands in SDS gels. This pattern has not been seen in all eubacteria exhibiting ammonium switch-off. 4 We have examined strain 227 for similar patterns of

  13. Engineering Hydrogen Gas Production from Formate in a Hyperthermophile by Heterologous Production of an 18-Subunit Membrane-bound Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Gina L.; Schut, Gerrit J.; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Nixon, William J.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Biohydrogen gas has enormous potential as a source of reductant for the microbial production of biofuels, but its low solubility and poor gas mass transfer rates are limiting factors. These limitations could be circumvented by engineering biofuel production in microorganisms that are also capable of generating H2 from highly soluble chemicals such as formate, which can function as an electron donor. Herein, the model hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 °C by fermenting sugars to produce H2, has been engineered to also efficiently convert formate to H2. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome vector, the 16.9-kb 18-gene cluster encoding the membrane-bound, respiratory formate hydrogen lyase complex of Thermococcus onnurineus was inserted into the P. furiosus chromosome and expressed as a functional unit. This enabled P. furiosus to utilize formate as well as sugars as an H2 source and to do so at both 80° and 95 °C, near the optimum growth temperature of the donor (T. onnurineus) and engineered host (P. furiosus), respectively. This accomplishment also demonstrates the versatility of P. furiosus for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24318960

  14. Bioenergetic and physiological studies of hyperthermophilic archaea. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    This project focuses on physiological and bioenergetic characteristics of two representative hyperthermophilic archaea: Thermococcus litoralis (T{sub opt} 88 C) and Pyrococcus furiosus (T{sub opt} 98 C). Both are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs which grow in the presence or absence of reducible sulfur compounds. T. litoralis was studied in relation to information previously developed for P. furiosus: effect of sulfur reduction on bioenergetics, preferred fermentation patterns, tungsten requirement, etc. A defined medium was developed for T. litoralis consisting of amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides. This serves as the basis for continuous culture studies probing metabolic response to media changes. P. furiosus and T. litoralis have also been found to produce a polysaccharide in the presence of maltose and yeast extract. The composition and chemical structure of this polysaccharide was investigated as well as the metabolic motivation for its production. A novel and, perhaps, primitive intracellular proteolytic complex (previously designated as protease S66) in P. furiosus was isolated and the gene encoding the subunit of the complex was cloned, sequenced and the protease expressed in active form in Eschericia coli. Among other issues, the role of this complex in protein turnover and stress response was examined in the context of this organism in addition to comparing it to other complexes in eubacterial and eukaryotic cells. Biochemical characteristics of the protease have been measured in addition to examining other proteolytic species in P. furiosus.

  15. Updating carbamoylphosphate synthase (CPS) phylogenies: occurrence and phylogenetic identity of archaeal CPS genes.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, Piero; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Johann, Andre

    2002-08-01

    Among Bacteria the carA and carB genes encoding the small (CarA) and large (CarB) subunits of carbamoylphosphate synthase (CPS) have been lost in certain symbionts (Haemophylus influenzae) and in most obligate intracellular parasites (Chlamydiae, Spirochaetes, Mycoplasmatales, Rickettsiae) having genome sizes in the 0.7- to 1.1-Mb range. Compared to Bacteria, Archaea exhibit a more varied pattern of CPS gene losses and an unusual propensity to incorporate CPS genes derived from both Bacteria and other Archaea. Schematically they fall into three groups. Group 1 taxa (the crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and the euryarchaea Pyrococcus horikoshi and Pyrococcus abyssii) lack CPS genes altogether. Group 2 taxa (comprising Halobacteriales, Thermoplasmales, Methanococcales, Methanomicrobiales, Archaeoglobales) harbor CPS genes whose encoded CarB and CarA subunit proteins are ostensibly bacterial in origin; that is, they are intermixed with bacterial homologues on a phylogeny of concatenated CarA and CarB sequences and are not distinguishable from bacterial sequences after searching for domain-specific amino acid residue positions. Group 3 taxa (the crenarchaea Pyrobaculum aerophilum, Sulfolobus solfataricus, and Sulfolobus tokodaii and the euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus) harbor CPS genes whose encoded proteins appear to be archaeal: consistent with an archaeal origin, the CarA and CarB sequences in this group possess both unique signatures and signatures affiliating them to Eukarya. Based on the topology of the clade comprising the four Group 3 taxa, we argue that CPS genes of P. furiosus (a euryarchaeon) and those of the crenarchaea P. aerophilum, S. solfataricus, and S. tokodaii are of a single type, resulting from the two genes being laterally transferred from a crenarchaeon to P. furiosus.

  16. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  17. Use of cellobiohydrolase-free cellulase blends for the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose and sugarcane bagasse pretreated by either ball milling or ionic liquid [Emim][Ac].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant'Ana; Kim, Han-Woo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Endo, Takashi; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Bon, Elba P S

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the requirement of cellobiohydrolases (CBH) for saccharification of microcrystalline cellulose and sugarcane bagasse pretreated either by ball milling (BM) or by ionic liquid (IL) [Emim][Ac]. Hydrolysis was done using CBH-free blends of Pyrococcus horikoshii endoglucanase (EG) plus Pyrococcus furiosus β-glucosidase (EGPh/BGPf) or Optimash™ BG while Acremonium Cellulase was used as control. IL-pretreated substrates were hydrolyzed more effectively by CBH-free enzymes than were the BM-pretreated substrates. IL-treatment decreased the crystallinity and increased the specific surface area (SSA), whereas BM-treatment decreased the crystallinity without increasing the SSA. The hydrolysis of IL-treated cellulose by EGPh/BGPf showed a saccharification rate of 3.92 g/Lh and a glucose yield of 81% within 9h. These results indicate the efficiency of CBH-free enzymes for the hydrolysis of IL-treated substrates.

  18. Combining biomass wet disk milling and endoglucanase/β-glucosidase hydrolysis for the production of cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant'Ana; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Kim, Han-Woo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Endo, Takashi; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Bon, Elba P S

    2015-09-05

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), a biomaterial with high added value, were obtained from pure cellulose, Eucalyptus holocellulose, unbleached Kraft pulp, and sugarcane bagasse, by fibrillating these biomass substrates using wet disk milling (WDM) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis using endoglucanase/β-glucosidase. The hydrolysis experiments were conducted using the commercial enzyme OptimashBG or a blend of Pyrococcus horikoshii endoglucanase and Pyrococcus furiosus β-glucosidase. The fibrillated materials and CNCs were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and the specific surface area (SSA) was measured. WDM resulted in the formation of long and twisted microfibers of 1000-5000 nm in length and 4-35 nm in diameter, which were hydrolyzed into shorter and straighter CNCs of 500-1500 nm in length and 4-12 nm in diameter, with high cellulose crystallinity. Therefore, the CNC's aspect ratio was successfully adjusted by endoglucanases under mild reaction conditions, relative to the reported acidic hydrolysis method.

  19. Characterization of a P-type ATPase of the archaebacterium Methanococcus voltae.

    PubMed

    Dharmavaram, R M; Konisky, J

    1989-08-25

    The vanadate-sensitive ATPase of Methanococcus voltae has been purified by a procedure which includes, purification of the cytoplasmic membrane by sucrose gradient centrifugation, solubilization with Triton X-100, and DEAE-Sephadex and Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. While the DEAE-Sephadex step provided a preparation consisting of two polypeptides (74 and 52 kDa), the Sephacryl S-300 step yields a product with a subunit of 74 kDa. Incubation of either membranes or purified ATPase with [gamma-32P]ATP followed by acidic (pH 2.4) lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the vanadate-sensitive labeling of a 74-kDa acyl phosphate intermediate. These results indicate that the M. voltae ATPase is of the P-type.

  20. A serine proteinase of an archaebacterium, Halobacterium mediterranei. A homologue of eubacterial subtilisins.

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, V M; Rudenskaya, G N; Revina, L P; Gryaznova, Y B; Lysogorskaya, E N; Filippova IYu; Ivanova, I I

    1992-01-01

    A homogeneous serine proteinase secreted by the extreme halophilic bacterium Halobacterium mediterranei 1538 was isolated by affinity chromatography on bacitracin-Sepharose with a yield of 48% (260-fold purification). The enzyme reveals an optimum for pyroglutamyl-Ala-Ala-Leu p-nitroanilide hydrolysis at pH 8.0-8.5 (Km 0.14 mM; k(cat). 36.9 s-1). Its activity increases linearly with NaCl concentration over the range 2-5 M. The substrate specificity of the enzyme is comparable with that of secretory subtilisins, the extent of protein degradation approaching that attained with proteinase K. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 41 kDa and a pI of 7.5. The N-terminal sequence of H. mediterranei serine proteinase reveals a 50% identity with that of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris serine proteinases, indicating that the enzyme belongs to the subtilisin family. Hence the serine proteinase secreted by the halophilic bacterium should be considered as a functional analogue, and a structural homologue, of eubacterial serine proteinases (subtilisins). Images Fig. 3. PMID:1637313

  1. Characterisation and purification of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from heterotrophically grown halophilic archaebacterium, Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, R; Altekar, W

    1994-04-15

    The CO2-fixing enzyme of Calvin cycle ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase has been isolated from a halophilic bacterium, Haloferax mediterranei grown heterotrophically. A homogeneous preparation was obtained from sonicated extract of the cells by three steps, resulting in a specific activity of 52 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1. The physicochemical and catalytic properties of the enzyme were studied. The halobacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase is an oligomer of 54-kDa and 14-kDa subunits as detected by SDS/PAGE. By sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated as approximately 500 kDa indicating a hexadecameric nature. No evidence for an additional form of the enzyme devoid of small subunits was obtained. The enzyme required Mg2+ for activity, KCl for activity and stability, and an optimal pH of 7.8. In contrast to many halophilic proteins, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from H. mediterranei is not an acidic protein. From the comparison of amino acid composition of halobacterial enzyme with its counterparts from a few eukaryotic and eubacterial sources, the S delta Q values showed that these proteins share some compositional similarities.

  2. Molecular cloning of the cytochrome aa3 gene from the archaeon (Archaebacterium) Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Denda, K; Fujiwara, T; Seki, M; Yoshida, M; Fukumori, Y; Yamanaka, T

    1991-11-27

    A novel aa3-type cytochrome oxidase from the extremely halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium halobium, differs significantly from those of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytochrome oxidases (Fujiwara, T., Fukumori, Y., and Yamanaka, T. (1989) J. Biochem. 105, 287-292). In the present study, we cloned and sequenced the gene which encodes the cytochrome aa3 by using the polymerase chain reaction methods. The deduced amino acid sequence of subunit I of H. halobium cytochrome aa3 was more similar to that of subunit I of the eukaryotic cytochrome (44%, maize mitochondria) than that of the cytochrome from other bacteria (36%, Paracoccus denitrificans). The consensus sequence in putative metal binding residues is well-conserved also in H. halobium cytochrome aa3.

  3. Phytanyl-glycerol ethers and squalenes in the archaebacterium Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, T. G.; Wolfe, R. S.; Balch, W. E.; Holzer, G.; Fox, G. E.; Oro, J.

    1978-01-01

    Gas chromatographic and mass- and infrared-spectrometric techniques are used to assay the lipids of a thermophilic chemolithotroph, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Of the chloroform-soluble lipids, 79% are polar and 21% non-polar. Attention is given to the detection of squalene and hydrosqualene derivatives, which, coupled with 16S r-RNA sequence homologies, indicate that the extreme halophiles and the methanogens share a common ancestor.

  4. Analysis of thermally-stable electron transport factors from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrodictium brockii. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The mechanisms by which hyperthermophilic archaebacteria grow and carry out metabolic functions at elevated temperatures have yet to be determined. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the metabolic characteristics of, and the electron transport enzymes involved in, hydrogen/sulfur transformation by hyperthermophilic archaebacteria. Efforts focus on the autotrophic H{sub 2}-oxidizing bacterium, Pyrodictium brockii which has an optimum growth temperature of 105{degrees}C. Biochemical and genetic characterization of enzymes involved in hydrogen oxidizing electron transport pathway. These including investigating the role of the membrane lipids in protecting the hydrogenase enzyme from thermal inactivation, characterization of a quinone and a c-type cytochrome, and analysis of the topology in the membrane in the net energy generating components are reported. The long-term goal is to understand some of the factors contributing to the biochemical basis of extreme thermophily.

  5. Immunochemical identification of three proteinic determinants on the archaebacterium Methanococcus vannielii by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    de Macario, E.C.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Archaebacteria evolved independently from Eubacteria and Eukaryotes and present unique biochemical features. One group, the methanogens, show a variety of cell-walls paralleling their own evolutionary diversity. Chemical analyses revealed proteins in the cell-wall of Methanococcacea but no murein or pseudomurein. Immunochemical studies were begun using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against M. vannielii SB and quantitative micro-immunoenzymatic methods developed for this purpose. Direct binding and inhibition-blocking assays using sugars and aminosugars also indicated absence of these residues in the SB's cell-wall. Three antibodies, however, recognized three different antigenic determinants involving amino acids: Lys, Phe and Thr (antibody 5A); Ser, Try and Tyr (antibody 5B); and Arg, Lys and Phe (antibody 5F). Each site was recognized by one antibody only, and vice versa. These results agree with those provided by well established chemical methods and support the notion that SB possesses a peculiar cell-wall with proteins only. The data also show the resolution power and reliability of monoclonal probes for structural analysis of the bacterial envelope.

  6. Analysis of thermally-stable electron transport factors from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrodictium brockii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The mechanisms by which hyperthermophilic archaebacteria grow and carry out metabolic functions at elevated temperatures have yet to be determined. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the metabolic characteristics of, and the electron transport enzymes involved in, hydrogen/sulfur transformation by hyperthermophilic archaebacteria. Efforts focus on the autotrophic H{sub 2}-oxidizing bacterium, Pyrodictium brockii which has an optimum growth temperature of 105{degrees}C. Biochemical and genetic characterization of enzymes involved in hydrogen oxidizing electron transport pathway. These including investigating the role of the membrane lipids in protecting the hydrogenase enzyme from thermal inactivation, characterization of a quinone and a c-type cytochrome, and analysis of the topology in the membrane in the net energy generating components are reported. The long-term goal is to understand some of the factors contributing to the biochemical basis of extreme thermophily.

  7. Isolation, characterization, and cellular insertion of the flagella from two strains of the archaebacterium Methanospirillum hungatei.

    PubMed Central

    Southam, G; Kalmokoff, M L; Jarrell, K F; Koval, S F; Beveridge, T J

    1990-01-01

    In high (45 mM)-phosphate medium, Methanospirillum hungatei strains GP1 and JF1 grew as very long, nonmotile chains of cells that did not possess flagella. However, growth in lower (3 or 30 mM)-phosphate medium resulted in the production of mostly single cells and short chains that were motile by means of two polar tufts of flagella, which transected the multilayered terminal plug of the cell. Electron microscopy of negatively stained whole mounts revealed a flagellar filament diameter of approximately 10 nm. Flagellar filaments were isolated from either culture fluid or concentrated cell suspensions that were subjected to shearing. Flagellar filaments were sensitive to treatment with both Triton X-100 and Triton X-114 at concentrations as low as 0.1% (vol/vol). The filaments of both strains were composed of two flagellins of Mr 24,000 and 25,000. However, variations in trace element composition of the medium resulted in the production of a third flagellin in strain JF1. This additional flagellin appeared as a ladderlike smear on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gels with a center of intensity of Mr 35,000 and cross-reacted with antisera produced from filaments containing only the Mr-24,000 and -25,000 flagellins. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, all flagellins stained by the thymol-sulfuric acid and Alcian blue methods, suggesting that they were glycosylated. This was further supported by chemical deglycosylation of the strain JF1 flagellins, which resulted in a reduction in their apparent molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gels. Heterologous reactions to sera raised against the flagella from each strain were limited to the Mr-24,000 flagellins. Images PMID:2345143

  8. The rhodopsin-like pigments of halobacteria - Light-energy and signal transducers in an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeckenius, W.

    1985-01-01

    Three, small retinylidene proteins observed in halobacteria are described. The characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), which is synthesized during low O2 tension and intense illumination, and the role of bR in the cyclic photoreactions that translocate protons are examined. The detected light-driven chloride influx pigment, halorhodopsin (hR), is also capable of light-driven ion translocation; the hR transport reactions which are chloride dependent and involve isomerization are studied. The sensory photosystem of halobacteria and the receptor functions of the retinal pigment slow rhodopsin are discussed. The similarity of the choromphore structure and photoreactions, and the evolutionary relation between halobacteria and animal pigments are considered.

  9. The purification and subunit structure of a membrane-bound ATPase from the Archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Kristjansson, Hordur; Altekar, Wijaya

    1987-01-01

    The procedure for the isolation and 70-fold purification of membrane-bound cold-sensitive ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum is described. Upon exposure to cold, the enzyme dissociates into two major subunits, I (87 kDa) and II (60 kDa), and two minor subunits, III (29 kDa) and IV (20 kDa). The stoichiometry of the enzyme is proposed to be I2.II2.III.IV; the molecular mass of such a complex would be 343 kDa, which is in good agreement with the value of 350 kDa obtained by gel filtration. The structure of the ATPase from H. saccharovorum makes it unlike any previously described ATPase.

  10. The evolution of energy-transducing systems. Studies with an extremely halophilic archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1991-01-01

    The halobacterial ATPase was labeled with C-14-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and subunit 2 of the enzyme was prepared by electroelution. Subunit 2 was cleaved by several chemical and enzymatic procedures for further preparation of peptides. Immunoreactions (Western blotting) of halobacterial membranes were performed with an antiserum against subunit A of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa. A 85 K band (subunit 1) from the membranes of H saccharovorum and from two halobacterial isolates, which were isolated from Permian salt sediments, reacted strongly with the antiserum. The ATPase from the latter isolates resembled the ATPase from H saccharovorum, but had a higher content of acidic amino acids. If it can be verified that the age of the bacterial isolates is in the same range as when deposition of salt occurred, an extremely interesting system for the study of evolutionary questions would be available, since the salt-embedded bacteria presumably did not undergo mutational and selectional events.

  11. Heterologous Expression and Maturation of an NADP-Dependent [NiFe]-Hydrogenase: A Key Enzyme in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenney, Francis E.; McTernan, Patrick M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a major biofuel and is metabolized by a wide range of microorganisms. Microbial hydrogen production is catalyzed by hydrogenase, an extremely complex, air-sensitive enzyme that utilizes a binuclear nickel-iron [NiFe] catalytic site. Production and engineering of recombinant [NiFe]-hydrogenases in a genetically-tractable organism, as with metalloprotein complexes in general, has met with limited success due to the elaborate maturation process that is required, primarily in the absence of oxygen, to assemble the catalytic center and functional enzyme. We report here the successful production in Escherichia coli of the recombinant form of a cytoplasmic, NADP-dependent hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus, an anaerobic hyperthermophile. This was achieved using novel expression vectors for the co-expression of thirteen P. furiosus genes (four structural genes encoding the hydrogenase and nine encoding maturation proteins). Remarkably, the native E. coli maturation machinery will also generate a functional hydrogenase when provided with only the genes encoding the hydrogenase subunits and a single protease from P. furiosus. Another novel feature is that their expression was induced by anaerobic conditions, whereby E. coli was grown aerobically and production of recombinant hydrogenase was achieved by simply changing the gas feed from air to an inert gas (N2). The recombinant enzyme was purified and shown to be functionally similar to the native enzyme purified from P. furiosus. The methodology to generate this key hydrogen-producing enzyme has dramatic implications for the production of hydrogen and NADPH as vehicles for energy storage and transport, for engineering hydrogenase to optimize production and catalysis, as well as for the general production of complex, oxygen-sensitive metalloproteins. PMID:20463892

  12. Engineering a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon for Temperature-Dependent Product Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Sun, JS; Adams, MWW

    2012-02-24

    Microorganisms growing near the boiling point have enormous biotechnological potential but only recently have molecular engineering tools become available for them. We have engineered the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100 degrees C, to switch its end products of fermentation in a temperature-controlled fashion without the need for chemical inducers. The recombinant strain (LAC) expresses a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase from the moderately thermophilic Caldicellulosiruptor bescii (optimal growth temperature [T-opt] of 78 degrees C) controlled by a "cold shock" promoter that is upregulated when cells are transferred from 98 degrees C to 72 degrees C. At 98 degrees C, the LAC strain fermented sugar to produce acetate and hydrogen as end products, and lactate was not detected. When the LAC strain was grown at 72 degrees C, up to 3 mM lactate was produced instead. Expression of a gene from a moderately thermophilic bacterium in a hyperthermophilic archaeon at temperatures at which the hyperthermophile has low metabolic activity provides a new perspective to engineering microorganisms for bioproduct and biofuel formation. IMPORTANCE Extremely thermostable enzymes from microorganisms that grow near or above the boiling point of water are already used in biotechnology. However, the use of hyperthermophilic microorganisms themselves for biotechnological applications has been limited by the lack of their genetic accessibility. Recently, a genetic system for Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 degrees C, was developed in our laboratory. In this study, we present the first heterologous protein expression system for a microorganism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C, a first step towards the potential expression of genes involved in biomass degradation or biofuel production in hyperthermophiles. Moreover, we developed the first system for specific gene induction in P. furiosus. As the cold shock promoter

  13. Additivity in both thermodynamic stability and thermal transition temperature for rubredoxin chimeras via hybrid native partitioning.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Hernández, Griselda

    2005-08-01

    Given any operational definition of pairwise interaction, the set of residues that differ between two structurally homologous proteins can be uniquely partitioned into subsets of clusters for which no such interactions occur between clusters. Although hybrid protein sequences that preserve such clustering are consistent with tertiary structures composed of only parental native-like interactions, the stability of such predicted structures will depend upon the physical robustness of the assumed interaction potential. A simple distance cutoff criterion was applied to the most thermostable protein known to predict such a seven-residue cluster in the metal binding site region of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin and a mesophile homolog. Both conformational stability and thermal transition temperature measurements demonstrate that 39% of the differential stability arises from these seven residues.

  14. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  15. Microbial metalloproteomes explored using MIRAGE.

    PubMed

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Hagen, Wilfred R; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2012-09-01

    Metalloproteomics is a rapidly developing field of science that involves the comprehensive analysis of all metal-containing or metal-binding proteins in a biological sample. The purpose of this review is to offer an overview of the research involving Metal Isotope native RadioAutography in Gel Electrophoresis (MIRAGE), a powerful new method to visualize and study the proteome of a particular metal ion. MIRAGE involves four steps: i) labelling of target proteins with a radioisotope; ii) separation of intact holo-proteins using native isoelectric focusing (1D) combined with Blue Native PAGE (2D); iii) spot visualization and quantification using autoradiography; and iv) protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry. MIRAGE Investigations of the soluble Cu, Zn, and Fe metalloproteomes of Escherichia coli, and of the soluble Mo and W proteomes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus are reviewed.

  16. Directed evolution of the tryptophan synthase β-subunit for stand-alone function recapitulates allosteric activation

    PubMed Central

    Buller, Andrew R.; Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Romney, David K.; Herger, Michael; Murciano-Calles, Javier; Arnold, Frances H.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes in heteromeric, allosterically regulated complexes catalyze a rich array of chemical reactions. Separating the subunits of such complexes, however, often severely attenuates their catalytic activities, because they can no longer be activated by their protein partners. We used directed evolution to explore allosteric regulation as a source of latent catalytic potential using the β-subunit of tryptophan synthase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTrpB). As part of its native αββα complex, TrpB efficiently produces tryptophan and tryptophan analogs; activity drops considerably when it is used as a stand-alone catalyst without the α-subunit. Kinetic, spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic data show that this lost activity can be recovered by mutations that reproduce the effects of complexation with the α-subunit. The engineered PfTrpB is a powerful platform for production of Trp analogs and for further directed evolution to expand substrate and reaction scope. PMID:26553994

  17. POLYPEPTIDE AND POLYSACCHARIDE PROCESSING IN HYPERTHERMOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, ROBERT M.

    2008-12-22

    This project focused on the microbial physiology and biochemistry of heterotrophic hyperthermophiles with respect to mechanisms by which these organisms process polypeptides and polysaccharides under normal and stressed conditions. Emphasis is on two model organisms, for which completed genome sequences are available: Pyrococcus furiosus (growth Topt of 98°C), an archaeon, and Thermotoga maritima (growth Topt of 80°C), a bacterium. Both organisms are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs that reduce sulfur facultatively. Whole genome cDNA spotted microarrays were used to follow transcriptional response to a variety of environmental conditions in order to identify genes encoding proteins involved in the acquisition, synthesis, processing and utilization of polypeptides and polysaccharides. This project provided new insights into the physiological aspects of hyperthermophiles as these relate to microbial biochemistry and biological function in high temperature habitats. The capacity of these microorganisms to produce biohydrogen from renewable feedstocks makes them important for future efforts to develop biofuels.

  18. Thermostability in rubredoxin and its relationship to mechanical rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    The source of increased stability in proteins from organisms that thrive in extreme thermal environments is not well understood. Previous experimental and theoretical studies have suggested many different features possibly responsible for such thermostability. Many of these thermostabilizing mechanisms can be accounted for in terms of structural rigidity. Thus a plausible hypothesis accounting for this remarkable stability in thermophilic enzymes states that these enzymes have enhanced conformational rigidity at temperatures below their native, functioning temperature. Experimental evidence exists to both support and contradict this supposition. We computationally investigate the relationship between thermostability and rigidity using rubredoxin as a case study. The mechanical rigidity is calculated using atomic models of homologous rubredoxin structures from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and mesophile Clostridium pasteurianum using the FIRST software. A global increase in structural rigidity (equivalently a decrease in flexibility) corresponds to an increase in thermostability. Locally, rigidity differences (between mesophilic and thermophilic structures) agree with differences in protection factors.

  19. Residue cluster additivity of thermodynamic stability in the hydrophobic core of mesophile vs. hyperthermophile rubredoxins.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Hernández, Griselda

    2007-02-01

    The branched sidechain residues 24 and 33 in the hydrophobic core of rubredoxin differ between the Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp) and Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) sequences. Their X-ray structures indicate that these two sidechains are in van der Waals contact with each other, while neither appears to significantly interact with the other nonconserved residues. The simultaneous interchange of residues 24 and 33 between the Cp and Pf rubredoxin sequences yield a complementary pair of hybrid proteins for which the sum of their thermodynamic stabilities equals that of the parental rubredoxins. The 1.2 kcal/mol change arising from this two residues interchange accounts for 21% of the differential thermodynamic stability between the mesophile and hyperthermophile proteins. The additional interchange of the sole nonconserved aromatic residue in the hydrophobic core yields a 0.78 kcal/mol deviation from thermodynamic additivity.

  20. DNA replication in thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Majerník, A I; Jenkinson, E R; Chong, J P J

    2004-04-01

    DNA replication enzymes in the thermophilic Archaea have previously attracted attention due to their obvious use in methods such as PCR. The proofreading ability of the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase has resulted in a commercially successful product (Pfu polymerase). One of the many notable features of the Archaea is the fact that their DNA processing enzymes appear on the whole to be more like those found in eukaryotes than bacteria. These proteins also appear to be simpler versions of those found in eukaryotes. For these reasons, archaeal organisms make potentially interesting model systems to explore the molecular mechanisms of processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination. Why archaeal DNA-manipulation systems were adopted over bacterial systems by eukaryotic cells remains a most interesting question that we suggest may be linked to thermophily.

  1. Phylogenetic and Comparative Sequence Analysis of Thermostable Alpha Amylases of kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Huma, Tayyaba; Maryam, Arooma; Rehman, Shahid Ur; Qamar, Muhammad Tahir Ul; Shaheen, Tayyaba; Haque, Asma; Shaheen, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Alpha amylase family is generally defined as a group of enzymes that can hydrolyse and transglycosylase α-(1, 4) or α-(1, 6) glycosidic bonds along with the preservation of anomeric configuration. For the comparative analysis of alpha amylase family, nucleotide sequences of seven thermo stable organisms of Kingdom Archea i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Kingdom Prokaryotes i.e. Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C), Bacillus subtilis (70°C) and Bacillus KSM K38 (55°C) and Eukaryotes i.e. Aspergillus oryzae (60°C) were selected from NCBI. Primary structure composition analysis and Conserved sequence analysis were conducted through Bio Edit tools. Results from BioEdit shown only three conserved regions of base pairs and least similarity in MSA of the above mentioned alpha amylases. In Mega 5.1 Phylogeny of thermo stable alpha amylases of Kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryote was handled by Neighbor-Joining (NJ) algorithm. Mega 5.1 phylogenetic results suggested that alpha amylases of thermo stable organisms i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C) are more distantly related as compared to less thermo stable organisms. By keeping in mind the characteristics of most thermo stable alpha amylases novel and improved features can be introduced in less thermo stable alpha amylases so that they become more thermo tolerant and productive for industry.

  2. Active-site models for complexes of quinolinate synthase with substrates and intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Soriano, Erika V.; Zhang, Yang; Colabroy, Keri L.; Sanders, Jennie M.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2013-09-01

    Structural studies of quinolinate synthase suggest a model for the enzyme–substrate complex and an enzyme–intermediate complex with a [4Fe–4S] cluster. Quinolinate synthase (QS) catalyzes the condensation of iminoaspartate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form quinolinate, the universal precursor for the de novo biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QS has been difficult to characterize owing either to instability or lack of activity when it is overexpressed and purified. Here, the structure of QS from Pyrococcus furiosus has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure is a homodimer consisting of three domains per protomer. Each domain shows the same topology with a four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by four α-helices, suggesting that the domains are the result of gene triplication. Biochemical studies of QS indicate that the enzyme requires a [4Fe–4S] cluster, which is lacking in this crystal structure, for full activity. The organization of domains in the protomer is distinctly different from that of a monomeric structure of QS from P. horikoshii [Sakuraba et al. (2005 ▶), J. Biol. Chem.280, 26645–26648]. The domain arrangement in P. furiosus QS may be related to protection of cysteine side chains, which are required to chelate the [4Fe–4S] cluster, prior to cluster assembly.

  3. Quantitative assessment of the preferences for the amino acid residues flanking archaeal N-linked glycosylation sites.

    PubMed

    Igura, Mayumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide to an asparagine residue in polypeptide chains. Using positional scanning peptide libraries, we assessed the effects of amino acid variations on the in vitro glycosylation efficiency within and adjacent to an N-glycosylation consensus, Asn-X-Ser/Thr, with an archaeal OST from Pyrococcus furiosus. The amino acid variations at the X(-2), X(-1) and X(+1) positions in the sequence X(-2)-X(-1)-Asn-X-Ser/Thr-X(+1) strongly influenced the glycosylation efficiency to a similar extent at position X. The rank orders of the amino acid preferences were unique at each site. We experimentally confirmed that the archaeal OST does not require an acidic residue at the -2 position, unlike the eubacterial OSTs. Pro was disfavored at the -1 and +1 positions, although the exclusion was not as strict as that at X, whereas Pro was the most favored amino acid residue among those studied at the -2 position. The overall amino acid preferences are correlated with a conformational propensity to extend around the sequon. The results of the library experiments revealed that the optimal acceptor sequence was PYNVTK, with a K(m) of 10 µM. The heat-stable, single-subunit OST of P. furiosus is a potential candidate enzyme for the production of recombinant glycoproteins in bacterial cells. Quantitative assessment of the amino acid preferences of the OST enzyme will facilitate the proper design of a production system.

  4. Crystal Structure and Function of 5-Formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; White, Robert H.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-08-06

    Purine biosynthesis requires 10 enzymatic steps in higher organisms, while prokaryotes require an additional enzyme for step 6. In most organisms steps 9 and 10 are catalyzed by the purH gene product, a bifunctional enzyme with both 5-formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (FAICAR) synthase and inosine monophosphate (IMP) cyclohydrolase activity. Recently it was discovered that Archaea utilize different enzymes to catalyze steps 9 and 10. An ATP-dependent FAICAR synthetase is encoded by the purP gene, and IMP cyclohydrolase is encoded by the purO gene. We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of FAICAR synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii complexed with various ligands, including the tertiary substrate complex and product complex. The enzyme belongs to the ATP grasp superfamily and is predicted to use a formyl phosphate intermediate formed by an ATP-dependent phosphorylation. In addition, we have determined the structures of a PurP orthologue from Pyrococcus furiosus, which is functionally unclassified, in three crystal forms. With approximately 50% sequence identity, P. furiosus PurP is structurally homologous to M. jannaschii PurP. A phylogenetic analysis was performed to explore the possible role of this functionally unclassified PurP.

  5. A new crystal form of a hyperthermophilic endocellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-06-18

    The hyperthermostable endocellulase from P. furiosus was crystallized at pH 5.5. The new crystal form has symmetry consistent with space group C2 and exhibits a structure different from that of the protein crystallized at pH 9.0. The hyperthermophilic glycoside hydrolase family endocellulase 12 from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (EGPf; Gene ID PF0854; EC 3.2.1.4) catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of the β-1,4-glucosidic linkage in β-glucan in lignocellulose biomass. A crystal of EGPf was previously prepared at pH 9.0 and its structure was determined at an atomic resolution of 1.07 Å. This article reports the crystallization of EGPf at the more physiologically relevant pH of 5.5. Structure determination showed that this new crystal form has the symmetry of space group C2. Two molecules of the enzyme are observed in the asymmetric unit. Crystal packing is weak at pH 5.5 owing to two flexible interfaces between symmetry-related molecules. Comparison of the EGPf structures obtained at pH 9.0 and pH 5.5 reveals a significant conformational difference at the active centre and in the surface loops. The interfaces in the vicinity of the flexible surface loops impact the quality of the EGPf crystal.

  6. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J.; Nguyen, Diep M.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Benn, Robert A.; Prybol, Cameron J.; Vaccaro, Brian J.; Poole, Farris L.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 °C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways. PMID:25368184

  7. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the CRISPR-Cas RNA-silencing Cmr complex.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Takuo; Inanaga, Hideko; Numata, Tomoyuki

    2015-06-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-derived RNA (crRNA) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute a prokaryotic adaptive immune system (CRISPR-Cas system) that targets and degrades invading genetic elements. The type III-B CRISPR-Cas Cmr complex, composed of the six Cas proteins (Cmr1-Cmr6) and a crRNA, captures and cleaves RNA complementary to the crRNA guide sequence. Here, a Cmr1-deficient functional Cmr (CmrΔ1) complex composed of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2-Cmr3, Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cmr4-Cmr5-Cmr6 and the 39-mer P. furiosus 7.01-crRNA was prepared. The CmrΔ1 complex was cocrystallized with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) complementary to the crRNA guide by the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystals belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.5, b = 76.2, c = 139.2 Å, α = 90.3, β = 104.8, γ = 118.6°. The asymmetric unit of the crystals is expected to contain one CmrΔ1-ssDNA complex, with a Matthews coefficient of 2.03 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 39.5%.

  9. A euryarchaeal histone modulates strand displacement synthesis by replicative DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Huang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, the two main lineages of the domain Archaea, encode different chromatin proteins and differ in the use of replicative DNA polymerases. Crenarchaea possess a single family B DNA polymerase (PolB), which is capable of strand displacement modulated by the chromatin proteins Cren7 and Sul7d. Euryarchaea have two distinct replicative DNA polymerases, PolB and PolD, a family D DNA polymerase. Here we characterized the strand displacement activities of PolB and PolD from the hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and investigated the influence of HPfA1, a homolog of eukaryotic histones from P. furiosus, on these activities. We showed that both PolB and PolD were efficient in strand displacement. HPfA1 inhibited DNA strand displacement by both DNA polymerases but exhibited little effect on the displacement of a RNA strand annealed to single-stranded template DNA. This is consistent with the finding that HPfA1 bound more tightly to double-stranded DNA than to a RNA:DNA hybrid. Our results suggest that, although crenarchaea and euryarchaea differ in chromosomal packaging, they share similar mechanisms in modulating strand displacement by DNA polymerases during lagging strand DNA synthesis.

  10. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  11. Bipartite recognition of target RNAs activates DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR–Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua R.; Sheppard, Nolan F.; Ramia, Nancy; Deighan, Trace; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems eliminate nucleic acid invaders in bacteria and archaea. The effector complex of the Type III-B Cmr system cleaves invader RNAs recognized by the CRISPR RNA (crRNA ) of the complex. Here we show that invader RNAs also activate the Cmr complex to cleave DNA. As has been observed for other Type III systems, Cmr eliminates plasmid invaders in Pyrococcus furiosus by a mechanism that depends on transcription of the crRNA target sequence within the plasmid. Notably, we found that the target RNA per se induces DNA cleavage by the Cmr complex in vitro. DNA cleavage activity does not depend on cleavage of the target RNA but notably does require the presence of a short sequence adjacent to the target sequence within the activating target RNA (rPAM [RNA protospacer-adjacent motif]). The activated complex does not require a target sequence (or a PAM) in the DNA substrate. Plasmid elimination by the P. furiosus Cmr system also does not require the Csx1 (CRISPR-associated Rossman fold [CARF] superfamily) protein. Plasmid silencing depends on the HD nuclease and Palm domains of the Cmr2 (Cas10 superfamily) protein. The results establish the Cmr complex as a novel DNA nuclease activated by invader RNAs containing a crRNA target sequence and a rPAM. PMID:26848045

  12. Pressure Stabilization of Proteins from Extreme Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Derek J.; Clark, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the stabilization by pressure of enzymes, including a hydrogenase from Methanococcus jannaschii, an extremely thermophilic deep-sea methanogen. This is the first published report of proteins from thermophiles being stabilized by pressure. Inactivation studies of partially purified hydrogenases from an extreme thermophile (Methanococcus igneus), a moderate thermophile (Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus), and a mesophile (Methanococcus maripaludis), all from shallow marine sites, show that pressure stabilization is not unique to enzymes isolated from high-pressure environments. These studies suggest that pressure stabilization of an enzyme may be related to its thermophilicity. Further experiments comparing the effects of increased pressure on the stability of α-glucosidases from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae support this possibility. We have also examined pressure effects on several highly homologous glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases from mesophilic and thermophilic sources and a rubredoxin from P. furiosus. The results suggest that hydrophobic interactions, which have been implicated in the stabilization of many thermophilic proteins, contribute to the pressure stabilization of enzymes from thermophiles. PMID:16349220

  13. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J; Nguyen, Diep M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Benn, Robert A; Prybol, Cameron J; Vaccaro, Brian J; Poole, Farris L; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 °C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  14. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a carboxypeptidase-encoding gene from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, S; Toietta, G; Zecca, L; Vanoni, M; Tortora, P

    1995-01-01

    Mammalian metallocarboxypeptidases play key roles in major biological processes, such as digestive-protein degradation and specific proteolytic processing. A Sulfolobus solfataricus gene (cpsA) encoding a recently described zinc carboxypeptidase with an unusually broad substrate specificity was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Despite the lack of overall sequence homology with known carboxypeptidases, seven homology blocks, including the Zn-coordinating and catalytic residues, were identified by multiple alignment with carboxypeptidases A, B, and T. S. solfataricus carboxypeptidase expressed in E. coli was found to be enzymatically active, and both its substrate specificity and thermostability were comparable to those of the purified S. solfataricus enzyme. PMID:7559343

  15. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a carboxypeptidase-encoding gene from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Toietta, G; Zecca, L; Vanoni, M; Tortora, P

    1995-10-01

    Mammalian metallocarboxypeptidases play key roles in major biological processes, such as digestive-protein degradation and specific proteolytic processing. A Sulfolobus solfataricus gene (cpsA) encoding a recently described zinc carboxypeptidase with an unusually broad substrate specificity was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Despite the lack of overall sequence homology with known carboxypeptidases, seven homology blocks, including the Zn-coordinating and catalytic residues, were identified by multiple alignment with carboxypeptidases A, B, and T. S. solfataricus carboxypeptidase expressed in E. coli was found to be enzymatically active, and both its substrate specificity and thermostability were comparable to those of the purified S. solfataricus enzyme.

  16. An extreme-halophile archaebacterium possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase characteristic of the Gram-positive eubacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. A.; d'Amato, T. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1988-01-01

    The focal point of phenylalanine biosynthesis is a dehydratase reaction which in different organisms may be prephenate dehydratase, arogenate dehydratase, or cyclohexadienyl dehydratase. Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and cyanobacterial divisions of the eubacterial kingdom exhibit different dehydratase patterns. A new extreme-halophile isolate, which grows on defined medium and is tentatively designated as Halobacterium vallismortis CH-1, possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase present in Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the conventional sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine, the phenomenon of metabolic interlock was exemplified by the sensitivity of prephenate dehydratase to allosteric effects produced by extra-pathway (remote) effectors. Thus, L-tryptophan inhibited activity while L-tyrosine, L-methionine, L-leucine and L-isoleucine activated the enzyme. L-Isoleucine and L-phenylalanine were effective at micromolar levels; other effectors operated at mM levels. A regulatory mutant selected for resistance to growth inhibition caused by beta-2-thienylalanine possessed an altered prephenate dehydratase in which a phenomenon of disproportionately low activity at low enzyme concentration was abolished. Inhibition by L-tryptophan was also lost, and activation by allosteric activators was diminished. Not only was sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine lost, but the mutant enzyme was now activated by this amino acid (a mutation type previously observed in Bacillus subtilis). It remains to be seen whether this type of prephenate dehydratase will prove to be characteristic of all archaebacteria or of some archaebacterial subgroup cluster.

  17. Effects of Hyperbaric Pressure on a Deep-Sea Archaebacterium in Stainless Steel and Glass-Lined Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Chad M.; Schuppenhauer, Michael R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of hyperbaric helium pressures on the growth and metabolism of the deep-sea isolate ES4 were investigated. In a stainless steel reactor, cell growth was completely inhibited but metabolic gas production was observed. From 85 to 100°C, CO2 production proceeded two to three times faster at 500 atm (1 atm = 101.29 kPa) than at 8 atm. At 105°C, no CO2 was produced until the pressure was increased to 500 atm. Hydrogen and H2S were also produced biotically but were not quantifiable at pressures above 8 atm because of the high concentration of helium. In a glass-lined vessel, growth occurred but the growth rate was not accelerated by pressure. In most cases at temperatures below 100°C, the growth rate was lower at elevated pressures; at 100°C, the growth rates at 8, 250, and 500 atm were nearly identical. Unlike in the stainless steel vessel, CO2 production was exponential during growth and continued for only a short time after growth. In addition, relatively little H2 was produced in the glass-lined vessel, and there was no growth or gas production at 105°C at any pressure. The behavior of ES4 as a function of temperature and pressure was thus very sensitive to the experimental conditions. PMID:16348606

  18. Draft genome sequence of Methanobacterium formicicum DSM 3637, an Archaebacterium isolated from the methane producer amoeba Pelomyxa palustris.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Gabriel

    2012-12-01

    Here is reported the draft genome sequence of Methanobacterium formicicum DSM 3637, which was isolated from the methane-producing amoeba Pelomyxa palustris. This bacterium was determined to be an endosymbiont living in the cytoplasm of P. palustris and the source of methane; however, the global characteristics of its genome suggest a free-living lifestyle rather than an endosymbiotic one.

  19. Exploiting microbial hyperthermophilicity to produce an industrial chemical, using hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthew W; Schut, Gerrit J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Menon, Angeli L; Iwuchukwu, Ifeyinwa J; Leuko, Therese T; Thorgersen, Michael P; Nixon, William J; Hawkins, Aaron S; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2013-04-09

    Microorganisms can be engineered to produce useful products, including chemicals and fuels from sugars derived from renewable feedstocks, such as plant biomass. An alternative method is to use low potential reducing power from nonbiomass sources, such as hydrogen gas or electricity, to reduce carbon dioxide directly into products. This approach circumvents the overall low efficiency of photosynthesis and the production of sugar intermediates. Although significant advances have been made in manipulating microorganisms to produce useful products from organic substrates, engineering them to use carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas has not been reported. Herein, we describe a unique temperature-dependent approach that confers on a microorganism (the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally on carbohydrates at 100°C) the capacity to use carbon dioxide, a reaction that it does not accomplish naturally. This was achieved by the heterologous expression of five genes of the carbon fixation cycle of the archaeon Metallosphaera sedula, which grows autotrophically at 73°C. The engineered P. furiosus strain is able to use hydrogen gas and incorporate carbon dioxide into 3-hydroxypropionic acid, one of the top 12 industrial chemical building blocks. The reaction can be accomplished by cell-free extracts and by whole cells of the recombinant P. furiosus strain. Moreover, it is carried out some 30°C below the optimal growth temperature of the organism in conditions that support only minimal growth but maintain sufficient metabolic activity to sustain the production of 3-hydroxypropionate. The approach described here can be expanded to produce important organic chemicals, all through biological activation of carbon dioxide.

  20. Exploiting microbial hyperthermophilicity to produce an industrial chemical, using hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, MW; Schut, GJ; Lipscomb, GL; Menon, AL; Iwuchukwu, IJ; Leuko, TT; Thorgersen, MP; Nixon, WJ; Hawkins, AS; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2013-04-09

    Microorganisms can be engineered to produce useful. products, including chemicals and fuels from sugars derived from renewable feedstocks, such as plant biomass. An alternative method is to use low potential reducing power from nonbiomass sources, such as hydrogen gas or electricity, to reduce carbon dioxide directly into products. This approach circumvents the overall low efficiency of photosynthesis and the production of sugar intermediates. Although significant advances have been made in manipulating microorganisms to produce useful products from organic substrates, engineering them to use carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas has not been reported. Herein, we describe a unique temperature-dependent approach that confers on a microorganism (the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally on carbohydrates at 100 degrees C) the capacity to use carbon dioxide, a reaction that it does not accomplish naturally. This was achieved by the heterologous expression of five genes of the carbon fixation cycle of the archaeon Metallosphaera sedula, which grows autotrophically at 73 degrees C. The engineered P. furiosus strain is able to use hydrogen gas and incorporate carbon dioxide into 3-hydroxypropionic acid, one of the top 12 industrial chemical building blocks. The reaction can be accomplished by cell-free extracts and by whole cells of the recombinant P. furiosus strain. Moreover, it is carried out some 30 degrees C below the optimal growth temperature of the organism in conditions that support only minimal growth but maintain sufficient metabolic activity to sustain the production of 3-hydroxypropionate. The approach described here can be expanded to produce important organic chemicals, all through biological activation of carbon dioxide.

  1. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  2. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5′-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  3. The intein of the Thermoplasma A-ATPase A subunit: Structure, evolution and expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Senejani, Alireza G; Hilario, Elena; Gogarten, J Peter

    2001-01-01

    Background Inteins are selfish genetic elements that excise themselves from the host protein during post translational processing, and religate the host protein with a peptide bond. In addition to this splicing activity, most reported inteins also contain an endonuclease domain that is important in intein propagation. Results The gene encoding the Thermoplasma acidophilum A-ATPase catalytic subunit A is the only one in the entire T. acidophilum genome that has been identified to contain an intein. This intein is inserted in the same position as the inteins found in the ATPase A-subunits encoding gene in Pyrococcus abyssi, P. furiosus and P. horikoshii and is found 20 amino acids upstream of the intein in the homologous vma-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the other inteins in catalytic ATPase subunits, the T. acidophilum intein does not contain an endonuclease domain. T. acidophilum has different codon usage frequencies as compared to Escherichia coli. Initially, the low abundance of rare tRNAs prevented expression of the T. acidophilum A-ATPase A subunit in E. coli. Using a strain of E. coli that expresses additional tRNAs for rare codons, the T. acidophilum A-ATPase A subunit was successfully expressed in E. coli. Conclusions Despite differences in pH and temperature between the E. coli and the T. acidophilum cytoplasms, the T. acidophilum intein retains efficient self-splicing activity when expressed in E. coli. The small intein in the Thermoplasma A-ATPase is closely related to the endonuclease containing intein in the Pyrococcus A-ATPase. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that this intein was horizontally transferred between Pyrococcus and Thermoplasma, and that the small intein has persisted in Thermoplasma apparently without homing. PMID:11722801

  4. Activation of a Chimeric Rpb5/RpoH Subunit Using Library Selection

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Bettina; Waege, Ingrid; Pöllmann, David; Seitz, Tobias; Thomm, Michael; Sterner, Reinhard; Hausner, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    Rpb5 is a general subunit of all eukaryotic RNA polymerases which consists of a N-terminal and a C-terminal domain. The corresponding archaeal subunit RpoH contains only the conserved C-terminal domain without any N-terminal extensions. A chimeric construct, termed rp5H, which encodes the N-terminal yeast domain and the C-terminal domain from Pyrococcus furiosus is unable to complement the lethal phenotype of a yeast rpb5 deletion strain (Δrpb5). By applying a random mutagenesis approach we found that the amino acid exchange E197K in the C-terminal domain of the chimeric Rp5H, either alone or with additional exchanges in the N-terminal domain, leads to heterospecific complementation of the growth deficiency of Δrpb5. Moreover, using a recently described genetic system for Pyrococcus we could demonstrate that the corresponding exchange E62K in the archaeal RpoH subunit alone without the eukaryotic N-terminal extension was stable, and growth experiments indicated no obvious impairment in vivo. In vitro transcription experiments with purified RNA polymerases showed an identical activity of the wild type and the mutant Pyrococcus RNA polymerase. A multiple alignment of RpoH sequences demonstrated that E62 is present in only a few archaeal species, whereas the great majority of sequences within archaea and eukarya contain a positively charged amino acid at this position. The crystal structures of the Sulfolobus and yeast RNA polymerases show that the positively charged arginine residues in subunits RpoH and Rpb5 most likely form salt bridges with negatively charged residues from subunit RpoK and Rpb1, respectively. A similar salt bridge might stabilize the interaction of Rp5H-E197K with a neighboring subunit of yeast RNA polymerase and thus lead to complementation of Δrpb5. PMID:24489922

  5. Evolution of mal ABC transporter operons in the Thermococcales and Thermotogales

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The mal genes that encode maltose transporters have undergone extensive lateral transfer among ancestors of the archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus. Bacterial hyperthermophiles of the order Thermotogales live among these archaea and so may have shared in these transfers. The genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima bears evidence of extensive acquisition of archaeal genes, so its ancestors clearly had the capacity to do so. We examined deep phylogenetic relationships among the mal genes of these hyperthermophiles and their close relatives to look for evidence of shared ancestry. Results We demonstrate that the two maltose ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter operons now found in Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus (termed mal and mdx genes, respectively) are not closely related to one another. The Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus mal genes are most closely related to bacterial mal genes while their respective mdx genes are archaeal. The genes of the two mal operons in Tt. maritima are not related to genes in either of these archaeal operons. They are highly similar to one another and belong to a phylogenetic lineage that includes mal genes from the enteric bacteria. A unique domain of the enteric MalF membrane spanning proteins found also in these Thermotogales MalF homologs supports their relatively close relationship with these enteric proteins. Analyses of genome sequence data from other Thermotogales species, Fervidobacterium nodosum, Thermosipho melanesiensis, Thermotoga petrophila, Thermotoga lettingae, and Thermotoga neapolitana, revealed a third apparent mal operon, absent from the published genome sequence of Tt. maritima strain MSB8. This third operon, mal3, is more closely related to the Thermococcales' bacteria-derived mal genes than are mal1 and mal2. F. nodosum, Ts. melanesiensis, and Tt. lettingae have only one of the mal1-mal2 paralogs. The mal2 operon from an unknown species of Thermotoga appears to have been horizontally

  6. Domain topology of the DNA polymerase D complex from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Feng; Shen, Yulong; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-09-21

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a recently found DNA polymerase extensively existing in Euryarchaeota of Archaea. Here, we report the domain function of PolD in oligomerization and interaction with other proteins, which were characterized with the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assays. A proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PhoPCNA, interacted with the N-terminus of the small subunit, DP1(1-200). Specific interaction between the remaining part of the small subunit, DP1(201-622), and the N-terminus of the large subunit, DP2(1-300), was detected by the Y2H assay. The SPR assay also indicated the intrasubunit interaction within the N-terminus, DP2(1-100), and the C-terminus, DP2(792-1163), of the large subunit. A synthetic 21 amino acid peptide corresponding to the sequence from cysteine cluster II, DP2(1290-1310), tightly interacted (a dissociation constant K(D) = 4.3 nM) with the N-terminus of the small subunit, DP1(1-200). Since the peptide could increase the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of DP1 [Shen et al. (2004) Nucleic Acids Res. 32, 158], the short region DP2(1290-1310) seems to play dual roles to form the PhoPolD complex and to regulate the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of DP1 through interaction with DP1(1-200). Furthermore, DP2(792-1163) containing the catalytic residues for DNA polymerization, Asp1122 and Asp1124, interacted with the intrasubunit domain, DP2(1-100), and the intersubunit domain, DP1(1-200). DP2(792-1163) probably forms the most important domain deeply involved in both the catalysis of DNA polymerization and stabilization of the PhoPolD complex through these multiple interactions.

  7. Comparative analysis of three hyperthermophilic GH1 and GH3 family members with industrial potential.

    PubMed

    Cota, Junio; Corrêa, Thamy L R; Damásio, André R L; Diogo, José A; Hoffmam, Zaira B; Garcia, Wanius; Oliveira, Leandro C; Prade, Rolf A; Squina, Fabio M

    2015-01-25

    Beta-glucosidases (BGLs) are enzymes of great potential for several industrial processes, since they catalyze the cleavage of glucosidic bonds in cellobiose and other short cellooligosaccharides. However, features such as good stability to temperature, pH, ions and chemicals are required characteristics for industrial applications. This work aimed to provide a comparative biochemical analysis of three thermostable BGLs from Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermotoga petrophila. The genes PfBgl1 (GH1 from P. furiosus), TpBgl1 (GH1 from T. petrophila) and TpBgl3 (GH3 from T. petrophila) were cloned and proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes are hyperthermophilic, showing highest activity at temperatures above 80°C at acidic (TpBgl3 and PfBgl1) and neutral (TpBgl1) pHs. The BGLs showed greatest stability to temperature mainly at pH 6.0. Activities using a set of different substrates suggested that TpBgl3 (GH3) is more specific than GH1 family members. In addition, the influence of six monosaccharides on BGL catalysis was assayed. While PfBgl1 and TpBgl3 seemed to be weakly inhibited by monosaccharides, TpBgl1 was activated, with xylose showing the strongest activation. Under the conditions tested, TpBgl1 showed the highest inhibition constant (Ki=1100.00mM) when compared with several BGLs previously characterized. The BGLs studied have potential for industrial use, specifically the enzymes belonging to the GH1 family, due to its broad substrate specificity and weak inhibition by glucose and other saccharides.

  8. A c subunit with four transmembrane helices and one ion (Na+)-binding site in an archaeal ATP synthase: implications for c ring function and structure.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Florian; Leone, Vanessa; Langer, Julian D; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Müller, Volker

    2012-11-16

    The ion-driven membrane rotors of ATP synthases consist of multiple copies of subunit c, forming a closed ring. Subunit c typically comprises two transmembrane helices, and the c ring features an ion-binding site in between each pair of adjacent subunits. Here, we use experimental and computational methods to study the structure and specificity of an archaeal c subunit more akin to those of V-type ATPases, namely that from Pyrococcus furiosus. The c subunit was purified by chloroform/methanol extraction and determined to be 15.8 kDa with four predicted transmembrane helices. However, labeling with DCCD as well as Na(+)-DCCD competition experiments revealed only one binding site for DCCD and Na(+), indicating that the mature c subunit of this A(1)A(O) ATP synthase is indeed of the V-type. A structural model generated computationally revealed one Na(+)-binding site within each of the c subunits, mediated by a conserved glutamate side chain alongside other coordinating groups. An intriguing second glutamate located in-between adjacent c subunits was ruled out as a functional Na(+)-binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the c ring of P. furiosus is highly Na(+)-specific under in vivo conditions, comparable with the Na(+)-dependent V(1)V(O) ATPase from Enterococcus hirae. Interestingly, the same holds true for the c ring from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, whose c subunits also feature a V-type architecture but carry two Na(+)-binding sites instead. These findings are discussed in light of their physiological relevance and with respect to the mode of ion coupling in A(1)A(O) ATP synthases.

  9. Gene Transfer & Hybridization Studies in Hyperthermophilic Species

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karen E.

    2005-10-14

    A. ABSTRACT The importance of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microbial species has become increasingly evident with each completed microbial genome sequence. Most significantly, the genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8, a hyperthermophilic bacterium isolated by Karl Stetter and workers from Vulcano Italy in 1986, and sequenced at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville Maryland in 1999, revealed extensive LGT between % . this bacterium and members of the archaeal domain (in particular Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyracoccus frcriosus species). Based on whole genome comparisons, it was estimated that 24% of the genetic information in this organism was acquired by genetic exchange with archaeal species, Independent analyses including periodicity analysis of the T. maritimu genomic DNA sequence, phylogenetic reconstruction based on genes that appear archaeal-like, and codon and amino acid usage, have provided additional evidence for LGT between T. maritima and the archaea. More recently, DiRuggiero and workers have identified a very recent LGT event between two genera of hyperthermophilic archaea, where a nearly identical DNA fragment of 16 kb in length flanked by insertion sequence (IS) elements, exists. Undoubtedly, additional examples of LGT will be identified as more microbial genomes are completed. For the present moment however, the genome sequence of T. maritima and other hyperthermophiles including P. furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Pyrococcus abyssi, A. fulgidus, and Aquifex aeolicus, have significantly increased out awareness of evolution being a web of life rather than a tree of life, as suggested by single gene phylogenies. In this proposal, we will aim to determine the extent of LGT across the hyperthemophiles, employing iY maritima as the model organism. A variety of biochemical techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions will allow for a detailed and thorough characterization of the extent of LGT in this species. The

  10. Characterization of Two Members among the Five ADP-Forming Acyl Coenzyme A (Acyl-CoA) Synthetases Reveals the Presence of a 2-(Imidazol-4-yl)Acetyl-CoA Synthetase in Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Awano, Tomotsugu; Wilming, Anja; Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Fukui, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Thermococcus kodakarensis, along with those of most Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species, harbors five paralogous genes encoding putative α subunits of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-forming acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases. The substrate specificities of the protein products for three of these paralogs have been clarified through studies on the individual enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and T. kodakarensis. Here we have examined the biochemical properties of the remaining two acyl-CoA synthetase proteins from T. kodakarensis. The TK0944 and TK2127 genes encoding the two α subunits were each coexpressed with the β subunit-encoding TK0943 gene. In both cases, soluble proteins with an α2β2 structure were obtained and their activities toward various acids in the ADP-forming reaction were examined. The purified TK0944/TK0943 protein (ACS IIITk) accommodated a broad range of acids that corresponded to those generated in the oxidative metabolism of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Cys. In contrast, the TK2127/TK0943 protein exhibited relevant levels of activity only toward 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate, a metabolite of His degradation, and was thus designated 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase (ICSTk), a novel enzyme. Kinetic analyses were performed on both proteins with their respective substrates. In T. kodakarensis, we found that the addition of histidine to the medium led to increases in intracellular ADP-forming 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate was detected in the culture medium, suggesting that ICSTk participates in histidine catabolism. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, have clarified the substrate specificities of all five known NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase proteins in the Thermococcales. PMID:24163338

  11. Biochemical and structural characterization of a novel family of cystathionine beta-synthase domain proteins fused to a Zn ribbon-like domain

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Michael; Sanders, Stephen A.; Singer, Alex; Zhang, Rongguang; Brown, Greg; Binkowski, Andrew; Xu, Linda; Lukin, Jonathan A.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Savchenko, Alexei V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a novel family of proteins, in which the N-terminal Cystathionine Beta-Synthase (CBS) domain is fused to the C-terminal Zn ribbon domain. Four proteins were over-expressed in E. coli and purified: TA0289 from Thermoplasma acidophilum, TV1335 from Thermoplasma vulcanum, PF1953 from Pyrococcus furiosus, and PH0267 from Pyrococcus horikoshii. The purified proteins had red/purple color in solution and an absorption spectrum typical of rubredoxins. Metal analysis of purified proteins revealed the presence of several metals with iron and zinc being the most abundant metals (2 to 67% of iron and 12 to 74% of zinc). Crystal structures of both mercury- and iron-bound TA0289 (1.5–2.0 Å resolution) revealed a dimeric protein whose inter-subunit contacts are formed exclusively by the α helices of two CBS sub-domains, whereas the C-terminal domain has a classical Zn-ribbon planar architecture. All proteins were reversibly reduced by chemical reductants (ascorbate or dithionite) or by the general rubredoxin reductase NorW from E. coli in the presence of NADH. Reduced TA0289 was found to be able to transfer electrons to cytochrome C from horse heart. Likewise, the purified Zn ribbon protein KTI11 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae had purple color in solution and a rubredoxin-like absorption spectrum, contained both iron and zinc, and was reduced by the rubredoxin reductase NorW from E. coli. Thus, recombinant Zn ribbon domains from archaea and yeast demonstrate a rubredoxin-like electron carrier activity in vitro. We suggest that in vivo some Zn ribbon domains might also bind iron and therefore possess an electron carrier activity adding another physiological role to this large family of important proteins. PMID:18021800

  12. A comparison of an ATPase from the archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the F1 moiety from the Escherichia coli ATP Synthase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1989-01-01

    A purified ATPase associated with membranes from Halobacterium saccharovorum was compared with the F sub 1 moiety from the Escherichia coli ATP Synthase. The halobacterial enzyme was composed of two major (I and II) and two minor subunits (III and IV), whose molecular masses were 87 kDa, 60 kDa, 29 kDa, and 20 kDa, respectively. The isoelectric points of these subunits ranged from 4.1 to 4.8, which in the case of the subunits I and II was consistent with the presence of an excess of acidic amino acids (20 to 22 Mol percent). Peptide mapping of sodium dodecylsulfate-denatured subunits I and II showed no relationship between the primary structures of the individual halobacterial subunits or similarities to the subunits of the F sub 1 ATPase (EC 3.6.1.34) from E. coli. Trypsin inactivation of the halobacterial ATPase was accompanied by the partial degradation of the major subunits. This observation, taken in conjunction with molecular masses of the subunits and the native enzyme, was consistent with the previously proposed stoichiometry of 2:2:1:1. These results suggest that H. saccharovorum, and possibly, Halobacteria in general, possess an ATPase which is unlike the ubiquitous F sub o F sub 1 - ATP Synthase.

  13. Crystal structure of the MJ0490 gene product of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Methanococcus jannaschii, a novel member of the lactate/malate family of dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, B I; Chang, C; Cho, S J; Eom, S H; Kim, K K; Yu, Y G; Suh, S W

    2001-04-13

    The MJ0490 gene, one of the only two genes of Methanococcus jannaschii showing sequence similarity to the lactate/malate family of dehydrogenases, was classified initially as coding for a putative l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). It has been re-classified as a malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene, because it shows significant sequence similarity to MT0188, MDH II from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain DeltaH. The three-dimensional structure of its gene product has been determined in two crystal forms: a "dimeric" structure in the orthorhombic crystal at 1.9 A resolution and a "tetrameric" structure in the tetragonal crystal at 2.8 A. These structures share a similar subunit fold with other LDHs and MDHs. The tetrameric structure resembles typical tetrameric LDHs. The dimeric structure is equivalent to the P-dimer of tetrameric LDHs, unlike dimeric MDHs, which correspond to the Q-dimer. The structure reveals that the cofactor NADP(H) is bound at the active site, despite the fact that it was not intentionally added during protein purification and crystallization. The preference of NADP(H) over NAD(H) has been supported by activity assays. The cofactor preference is explained by the presence of a glycine residue in the cofactor binding pocket (Gly33), which replaces a conserved aspartate (or glutamate) residue in other NAD-dependent LDHs or MDHs. Preference for NADP(H) is contributed by hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the monophosphate group and the ribose sugar of adenosine in NADP(H) and the side-chains of Ser9, Arg34, His36, and Ser37. The MDH activity of MJ0490 is made possible by Arg86, which is conserved in MDHs but not in LDHs. The enzymatic assay showed that the MJ0490 protein possesses the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate-activated LDH activity (reduction). Thus the MJ0490 gene product appears to be a novel member of the lactate/malate dehydrogenase family, displaying an LDH scaffold and exhibiting a relaxed substrate and cofactor specificities in NADP(H) and NAD(H)-dependent malate and lactate dehydrogenase reactions.

  14. Hydrogen Production and Enzyme Activities in the Hyperthermophile Thermococcus paralvinellae Grown on Maltose, Tryptone, and Agricultural Waste

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Sarah A.; Moreira, Emily; Holden, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermococcus may be an important alternative source of H2 in the hot subseafloor in otherwise low H2 environments such as some hydrothermal vents and oil reservoirs. It may also be useful in industry for rapid agricultural waste treatment and concomitant H2 production. Thermococcus paralvinellae grown at 82°C without sulfur produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L−1 at rates of 5–36 fmol H2 cell−1 h−1 on 0.5% (wt vol−1) maltose, 0.5% (wt vol−1) tryptone, and 0.5% maltose + 0.05% tryptone media. Two potentially inhibiting conditions, the presence of 10 mM acetate and low pH (pH 5) in maltose-only medium, did not significantly affect growth or H2 production. Growth rates, H2 production rates, and cell yields based on H2 production were the same as those for Pyrococcus furiosus grown at 95°C on the same media for comparison. Acetate, butyrate, succinate, isovalerate, and formate were also detected as end products. After 100 h, T. paralvinellae produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L−1 of medium when grown on up to 70% (vol vol−1) waste milk from cows undergoing treatment for mastitis with the bacterial antibiotic Ceftiofur and from untreated cows. The amount of H2 produced by T. paralvinellae increased with increasing waste concentrations, but decreased in P. furiosus cultures supplemented with waste milk above 1% concentration. All mesophilic bacteria from the waste milk that grew on Luria Bertani, Sheep's Blood (selective for Staphylococcus, the typical cause of mastitis), and MacConkey (selective for Gram-negative enteric bacteria) agar plates were killed by heat during incubation at 82°C. Ceftiofur, which is heat labile, was below the detection limit following incubation at 82°C. T. paralvinellae also produced up to 6 mmol of H2 L−1 of medium when grown on 0.1–10% (wt vol−1) spent brewery grain while P. furiosus produced < 1 mmol of H2 L−1. Twelve of 13 enzyme activities in T. paralvinellae showed significant (p < 0.05) differences across six different

  15. Hydrogen Production and Enzyme Activities in the Hyperthermophile Thermococcus paralvinellae Grown on Maltose, Tryptone, and Agricultural Waste.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Sarah A; Moreira, Emily; Holden, James F

    2016-01-01

    Thermococcus may be an important alternative source of H2 in the hot subseafloor in otherwise low H2 environments such as some hydrothermal vents and oil reservoirs. It may also be useful in industry for rapid agricultural waste treatment and concomitant H2 production. Thermococcus paralvinellae grown at 82°C without sulfur produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L(-1) at rates of 5-36 fmol H2 cell(-1) h(-1) on 0.5% (wt vol(-1)) maltose, 0.5% (wt vol(-1)) tryptone, and 0.5% maltose + 0.05% tryptone media. Two potentially inhibiting conditions, the presence of 10 mM acetate and low pH (pH 5) in maltose-only medium, did not significantly affect growth or H2 production. Growth rates, H2 production rates, and cell yields based on H2 production were the same as those for Pyrococcus furiosus grown at 95°C on the same media for comparison. Acetate, butyrate, succinate, isovalerate, and formate were also detected as end products. After 100 h, T. paralvinellae produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L(-1) of medium when grown on up to 70% (vol vol(-1)) waste milk from cows undergoing treatment for mastitis with the bacterial antibiotic Ceftiofur and from untreated cows. The amount of H2 produced by T. paralvinellae increased with increasing waste concentrations, but decreased in P. furiosus cultures supplemented with waste milk above 1% concentration. All mesophilic bacteria from the waste milk that grew on Luria Bertani, Sheep's Blood (selective for Staphylococcus, the typical cause of mastitis), and MacConkey (selective for Gram-negative enteric bacteria) agar plates were killed by heat during incubation at 82°C. Ceftiofur, which is heat labile, was below the detection limit following incubation at 82°C. T. paralvinellae also produced up to 6 mmol of H2 L(-1) of medium when grown on 0.1-10% (wt vol(-1)) spent brewery grain while P. furiosus produced < 1 mmol of H2 L(-1). Twelve of 13 enzyme activities in T. paralvinellae showed significant (p < 0.05) differences across six different growth

  16. Structural and functional analyses of an archaeal XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease: asymmetric DNA binding and cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tatsuya; Komori, Kayoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-08-01

    XPF/Rad1/Mus81/Hef proteins recognize and cleave branched DNA structures. XPF and Rad1 proteins cleave the 5' side of nucleotide excision repair bubble, while Mus81 and Hef cleave similar sites of the nicked Holliday junction, fork, or flap structure. These proteins all function as dimers and consist of catalytic and helix-hairpin-helix DNA binding (HhH) domains. We have determined the crystal structure of the HhH domain of Pyrococcus furiosus Hef nuclease (HefHhH), which revealed the distinct mode of protein dimerization. Our structural and biochemical analyses also showed that each of the catalytic and HhH domains binds to distinct regions within the fork-structured DNA: each HhH domain from two separate subunits asymmetrically binds to the arm region, while the catalytic domain binds near the junction center. Upon binding to DNA, Hef nuclease disrupts base pairs near the cleavage site. It is most likely that this bipartite binding mode is conserved in the XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease family.

  17. Structure of a (Cys3His) zinc ribbon, a ubiquitous motif in archaeal and eucaryal transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H. T.; Legault, P.; Glushka, J.; Omichinski, J. G.; Scott, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is an essential component in the formation of the transcription initiation complex in eucaryal and archaeal transcription. TFIIB interacts with a promoter complex containing the TATA-binding protein (TBP) to facilitate interaction with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) and the associated transcription factor IIF (TFIIF). TFIIB contains a zinc-binding motif near the N-terminus that is directly involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF and plays a crucial role in selecting the transcription initiation site. The solution structure of the N-terminal residues 2-59 of human TFIIB was determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a nearly tetrahedral Zn(Cys)3(His)1 site confined by type I and "rubredoxin" turns, three antiparallel beta-strands, and disordered loops. The structure is similar to the reported zinc-ribbon motifs in several transcription-related proteins from archaea and eucarya, including Pyrococcus furiosus transcription factor B (PfTFB), human and yeast transcription factor IIS (TFIIS), and Thermococcus celer RNA polymerase II subunit M (TcRPOM). The zinc-ribbon structure of TFIIB, in conjunction with the biochemical analyses, suggests that residues on the beta-sheet are involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF, while the zinc-binding site may increase the stability of the beta-sheet. PMID:11045620

  18. Molecular basis of transcription initiation in Archaea.

    PubMed

    De Carlo, Sacha; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hoenger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Compared with eukaryotes, the archaeal transcription initiation machinery-commonly known as the Pre-Initiation Complex-is relatively simple. The archaeal PIC consists of the TFIIB ortholog TFB, TBP, and an 11-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP). The relatively small size of the entire archaeal PIC makes it amenable to structural analysis. Using purified RNAP, TFB, and TBP from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, we assembled the biochemically active PIC at 65ºC. The intact archaeal PIC was isolated by implementing a cross-linking technique followed by size-exclusion chromatography, and the structure of this 440 kDa assembly was determined using electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction techniques. Combining difference maps with crystal structure docking of various sub-domains, TBP and TFB were localized within the macromolecular PIC. TBP/TFB assemble near the large RpoB subunit and the RpoD/L "foot" domain behind the RNAP central cleft. This location mimics that of yeast TBP and TFIIB in complex with yeast RNAP II. Collectively, these results define the structural organization of the archaeal transcription machinery and suggest a conserved core PIC architecture.

  19. Crystal structure of the human angiotensin-converting enzyme-lisinopril complex.

    PubMed

    Natesh, Ramanathan; Schwager, Sylva L U; Sturrock, Edward D; Acharya, K Ravi

    2003-01-30

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has a critical role in cardiovascular function by cleaving the carboxy terminal His-Leu dipeptide from angiotensin I to produce a potent vasopressor octapeptide, angiotensin II. Inhibitors of ACE are a first line of therapy for hypertension, heart failure, myocardial infarction and diabetic nephropathy. Notably, these inhibitors were developed without knowledge of the structure of human ACE, but were instead designed on the basis of an assumed mechanistic homology with carboxypeptidase A. Here we present the X-ray structure of human testicular ACE and its complex with one of the most widely used inhibitors, lisinopril (N2-[(S)-1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-L-lysyl-L-proline; also known as Prinivil or Zestril), at 2.0 A resolution. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of ACE shows that it bears little similarity to that of carboxypeptidase A, but instead resembles neurolysin and Pyrococcus furiosus carboxypeptidase--zinc metallopeptidases with no detectable sequence similarity to ACE. The structure provides an opportunity to design domain-selective ACE inhibitors that may exhibit new pharmacological profiles.

  20. Unwinding of primer-templates by archaeal family-B DNA polymerases in response to template-strand uracil.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tomas T; Wu, Xiaohua; Keith, Brian J; Heslop, Pauline; Jones, Anita C; Connolly, Bernard A

    2013-02-01

    Archaeal family-B DNA polymerases bind tightly to deaminated bases and stall replication on encountering uracil in template strands, four bases ahead of the primer-template junction. Should the polymerase progress further towards the uracil, for example, to position uracil only two bases in front of the junction, 3'-5' proof-reading exonuclease activity becomes stimulated, trimming the primer and re-setting uracil to the +4 position. Uracil sensing prevents copying of the deaminated base and permanent mutation in 50% of the progeny. This publication uses both steady-state and time-resolved 2-aminopurine fluorescence to show pronounced unwinding of primer-templates with Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) polymerase-DNA complexes containing uracil at +2; much less strand separation is seen with uracil at +4. DNA unwinding has long been recognized as necessary for proof-reading exonuclease activity. The roles of M247 and Y261, amino acids suggested by structural studies to play a role in primer-template unwinding, have been probed. M247 appears to be unimportant, but 2-aminopurine fluorescence measurements show that Y261 plays a role in primer-template strand separation. Y261 is also required for full exonuclease activity and contributes to the fidelity of the polymerase.

  1. Structural Determinant for Switching between the Polymerase and Exonuclease Modes in the PCNA-Replicative DNA Polymerase Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Hirokazu; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is responsible for the processivity of DNA polymerase. We determined the crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase (PfuPol) complexed with a cognate monomeric PCNA, which allowed us to construct a convincing model of the polymerase-PCNA ring interaction. Electron microscopy analyses confirmed that this complex structure exists among the multiple functional configurations in solution. Together with data from mutational analyses, this structural study indicated that the novel interaction between a stretched loop of PCNA and the PfuPol Thumb domain is quite important, in addition to the authentic PCNA-polymerase recognition site (PIP box). A comparison of the present structures with the previously reported structures of polymerases complexed with DNA suggested that the second interaction site plays a crucial role in switching between the polymerase and exonuclease modes, by stabilizing only the polymerase mode. This proposed mechanism of fidelity control of replicative DNA polymerases was supported by experiments, in which a mutation within the second interaction site caused an enhancement in the exonuclease activity in the presence of PCNA.

  2. Structure of a hexameric form of RadA recombinase from Methanococcus voltae.

    PubMed

    Du, Liqin; Luo, Yu

    2012-05-01

    Archaeal RadA proteins are close homologues of eukaryal Rad51 and DMC1 proteins and are remote homologues of bacterial RecA proteins. For the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA, these recombinases promote a pivotal strand-exchange reaction between homologous single-stranded and double-stranded DNA substrates. This DNA-repair function also plays a key role in the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and in the resistance of bacterial cells to antibiotics. A hexameric form of a truncated Methanococcus voltae RadA protein devoid of its small N-terminal domain has been crystallized. The RadA hexamers further assemble into two-ringed assemblies. Similar assemblies can be observed in the crystals of Pyrococcus furiosus RadA and Homo sapiens DMC1. In all of these two-ringed assemblies the DNA-interacting L1 region of each protomer points inward towards the centre, creating a highly positively charged locus. The electrostatic characteristics of the central channels can be utilized in the design of novel recombinase inhibitors.

  3. Insights on how the activity of an endoglucanase is affected by physical properties of insoluble celluloses.

    PubMed

    Bragatto, Juliano; Segato, Fernando; Cota, Junio; Mello, Danilo B; Oliveira, Marcelo M; Buckeridge, Marcos S; Squina, Fabio M; Driemeier, Carlos

    2012-05-31

    Cellulose physical properties like crystallinity, porosity, and particle size are known to influence cellulase activity, but knowledge is still insufficient for activity prediction from such measurable substrate characteristics. With the aim of illuminating enzyme-substrate relationships, this work evaluates a purified hyperthermophilic endo-1,4-beta-glucanase (from Pyrococcus furiosus) acting on 13 celluloses characterized for crystallinity and crystal width (by X-ray diffraction), wet porosity (by thermoporometry), and particle size (by light scattering). Activities are analyzed by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic equation, which is justified by low enzyme-substrate affinity. Michaelis-Menten coefficients K(m) and k(cat) are reinterpreted in the context of heterogeneous cellulose hydrolysis. For a set of as-received and milled microcrystalline celluloses, activity is successfully described as a function of accessible substrate concentration, with accessibility proportional to K(m)(-1). Accessibility contribution from external particle areas, pore areas, and crystalline packing are discriminated to have comparable magnitudes, implying that activity prediction demands all these substrate properties to be considered. Results additionally suggest that looser crystalline packing increases the lengths of released cello-oligomers as well as the maximum endoglucanase specific activity (k(cat)).

  4. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP{sup +} requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H{sub 2}ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H{sub 2}. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H{sub 2}ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP{sup +} for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally stable enzymes are underway.

  5. Crystal Structure of the First Eubacterial Mre11 Nuclease Reveals Novel Features that may Discriminate Substrates During DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Moiani, Davide; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Miller, Mitchell D.; McMullan, Daniel; Jin, Kevin K.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ernst, Dustin; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Tainer, John A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Mre11 nuclease plays a central role in the repair of cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). As x-ray structural information has only been available for the Pyrococcus furiosus enzyme (PfMre11), the conserved and variable features of this nuclease across the domains of life have not been experimentally defined. Our crystal structure and biochemical studies demonstrate that TM1635 from Thermotoga maritima, originally annotated as a putative nuclease, is the Mre11 endo/exonuclease from T. maritima (TmMre11) and the first such structure from eubacteria. TmMre11 and PfMre11 display similar overall structures, despite sequence identity in the twilight zone of only ∼20%. However, they differ substantially in their DNA specificity domains and in their dimeric organization. Residues in the nuclease domain are highly conserved, but those in the DNA specificity domain are not. The structural differences likely affect how Mre11s from different organisms recognize and interact with single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and DNA hairpin structures during DNA repair. The TmMre11 nuclease active site has no bound metal ions, but is conserved in sequence and structure with exception of a histidine that is important in PfMre11 nuclease activity. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization confirms that TmMre11 possesses both endonuclease and exonuclease activities on ssDNA and dsDNA substrates, respectively. PMID:20122942

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a hyperthermophilic Rieske protein variant (SDX-triple) with an engineered rubredoxin-like mononuclear iron site

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Toshio Kounosu, Asako; Ohmori, Daijiro; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2006-10-01

    A hyperthermophilic archaeal Rieske iron–sulfur protein (sulredoxin) variant, SDX-triple (H44I/A45C/H64C), having a rationally designed rubredoxin-like mononuclear iron site in place of a Rieske [2Fe–2S] centre, has been crystallized. The P1 crystals of the SDX-triple variant diffract to 1.63 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. In place of the Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster, an archetypal mononuclear iron site has rationally been designed into a hyperthermophilic archaeal Rieske [2Fe–2S] protein (sulredoxin) from Sulfolobus tokodaii by three residue replacements with reference to the Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin sequence. The resulting sulredoxin variant, SDX-triple (H44I/A45C/H64C), has been purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 65%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol, 0.025 M citric acid and 0.075 M sodium acetate trihydrate pH 4.3. The crystals diffract to 1.63 Å resolution and belong to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.56, b = 76.54, c = 80.28 Å, α = 88.12, β = 78.82, γ = 73.46°. The asymmetric unit contains eight protein molecules.

  7. Cas6 is an endoribonuclease that generates guide RNAs for invader defense in prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Carte, Jason; Wang, Ruiying; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2010-11-09

    An RNA-based gene silencing pathway that protects bacteria and archaea from viruses and other genome invaders is hypothesized to arise from guide RNAs encoded by CRISPR loci and proteins encoded by the cas genes. CRISPR loci contain multiple short invader-derived sequences separated by short repeats. The presence of virus-specific sequences within CRISPR loci of prokaryotic genomes confers resistance against corresponding viruses. The CRISPR loci are transcribed as long RNAs that must be processed to smaller guide RNAs. Here we identified Pyrococcus furiosus Cas6 as a novel endoribonuclease that cleaves CRISPR RNAs within the repeat sequences to release individual invader targeting RNAs. Cas6 interacts with a specific sequence motif in the 5{prime} region of the CRISPR repeat element and cleaves at a defined site within the 3{prime} region of the repeat. The 1.8 angstrom crystal structure of the enzyme reveals two ferredoxin-like folds that are also found in other RNA-binding proteins. The predicted active site of the enzyme is similar to that of tRNA splicing endonucleases, and concordantly, Cas6 activity is metal-independent. cas6 is one of the most widely distributed CRISPR-associated genes. Our findings indicate that Cas6 functions in the generation of CRISPR-derived guide RNAs in numerous bacteria and archaea.

  8. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  9. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, A; Alonso, J; Muñoz, D; Marcano, L; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A; Fernández de Luis, R; Orue, I; Mathon, O; Muela, A; Fdez-Gubieda, M L

    2016-01-14

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.

  10. Selective control of oligosaccharide transfer efficiency for the N-glycosylation sequon by a point mutation in oligosaccharyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Igura, Mayumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2011-04-15

    Asn-linked glycosylation is the most ubiquitous posttranslational protein modification in eukaryotes and archaea, and in some eubacteria. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. Inefficient oligosaccharide transfer results in glycoprotein heterogeneity, which is particularly bothersome in pharmaceutical glycoprotein production. Amino acid variation at the X position of the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon is known to modulate the glycosylation efficiency. The best amino acid at X is valine, for an archaeal Pyrococcus furiosus OST. We performed a systematic alanine mutagenesis study of the archaeal OST to identify the essential and dispensable amino acid residues in the three catalytic motifs. We then investigated the effects of the dispensable mutations on the amino acid preference in the N-glycosylation sequon. One residue position was found to selectively affect the amino acid preference at the X position. This residue is located within the recently identified DXXKXXX(M/I) motif, suggesting the involvement of this motif in N-glycosylation sequon recognition. In applications, mutations at this position may facilitate the design of OST variants adapted to particular N-glycosylation sites to reduce the heterogeneity of glycan occupancy. In fact, a mutation at this position led to 9-fold higher activity relative to the wild-type enzyme, toward a peptide containing arginine at X in place of valine. This mutational approach is potentially applicable to eukaryotic and eubacterial OSTs for the production of homogenous glycoproteins in engineered mammalian and Escherichia coli cells.

  11. New oligosaccharyltransferase assay method.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2007-11-01

    We developed a new in vitro assay for oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), which catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. The asparagine residues reside in the sequon, Asn-X-Thr/Ser, where X can be any amino acid residue except Pro. We demonstrate the potency of our assay using the OST from yeast. In our method, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to separate the glycopeptide products from the peptide substrates. The substrate peptide is fluorescently labeled and the formation of glycopeptides is analyzed by fluorescence gel imaging. Two in vitro OST assay methods are now widely used, but both the methods depend on previous knowledge of the oligosaccharide moiety: One method uses lectin binding as the separation mechanism and the other method uses biosynthetically or chemoenzymatically synthesized lipid-linked oligosaccharides as donors. N-linked protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life, but little is known about the N-glycosylation in Archaea. Thus, our new assay, which does not require a priori knowledge of the oligosaccharides, will be useful in such cases. Indeed, we have detected the OST activity in the membrane fraction from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus.

  12. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  13. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  14. Development of Novel Sugar Isomerases by Optimization of Active Sites in Phosphosugar Isomerases for Monosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yeong-Su

    2013-01-01

    Phosphosugar isomerases can catalyze the isomerization of not only phosphosugar but also of monosaccharides, suggesting that the phosphosugar isomerases can be used as sugar isomerases that do not exist in nature. Determination of active-site residues of phosphosugar isomerases, including ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium difficile (CDRPI), mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Bacillus subtilis (BSMPI), and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFGPI), was accomplished by docking of monosaccharides onto the structure models of the isomerases. The determinant residues, including Arg133 of CDRPI, Arg192 of BSMPI, and Thr85 of PFGPI, were subjected to alanine substitutions and found to act as phosphate-binding sites. R133D of CDRPI, R192 of BSMPI, and T85Q of PFGPI displayed the highest catalytic efficiencies for monosaccharides at each position. These residues exhibited 1.8-, 3.5-, and 4.9-fold higher catalytic efficiencies, respectively, for the monosaccharides than the wild-type enzyme. However, the activities of these 3 variant enzymes for phosphosugars as the original substrates disappeared. Thus, R133D of CDRPI, R192 of BSMPI, and T85Q of PFGPI are no longer phosphosugar isomerases; instead, they are changed to a d-ribose isomerase, an l-ribose isomerase, and an l-talose isomerase, respectively. In this study, we used substrate-tailored optimization to develop novel sugar isomerases which are not found in nature based on phosphosugar isomerases. PMID:23204422

  15. Growth requirements of hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophic archaea isolated from a shallow submarine geothermal system with reference to their essential amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Hoaki, T; Nishijima, M; Kato, M; Adachi, K; Mizobuchi, S; Hanzawa, N; Maruyama, T

    1994-01-01

    Three hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophs were isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal system at an inlet of Kodakara-jima island, Kagoshima, Japan. The isolates grew at 60 to 97 degrees C, with the optimum temperatures at 85 to 90 degrees C. Sensitivity to rifampin and the existence of ether lipids indicated that the isolates are hyperthermophilic archaea. Partial sequencing of the genes coding for 16S rRNA showed that the three isolates are closely related to the genus Thermococcus. They grew on proteinaceous mixtures, such as yeast extract, Casamino Acids, and purified proteins (e.g., casein and gelatin), but not on carbohydrates or organic acids as sole carbon and energy sources. Nine amino acids were essential for growth of isolate KS-1 (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, His, Tyr, and Arg). Isolate KS-2 required Lys in addition to the nine amino acids, and KS-8 required Lys instead of Tyr. In comparative studies, it was shown that Thermococcus celer DSM 2476 required 10 amino acids (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, Tyr, Trp, Lys, and Arg) while Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 required only Ile and Val. The hyperthermophilic fermentative eubacterium Thermotoga neapolitana DSM 4359 did not require any amino acids for growth. Images PMID:8085828

  16. Transcription Start Site Associated RNAs (TSSaRNAs) Are Ubiquitous in All Domains of Life

    PubMed Central

    ten-Caten, Felipe; Baliga, Nitin S.; Koide, Tie

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of non-coding RNAs has been discovered using high-resolution transcriptomics tools, indicating that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation is much more complex than previously appreciated. Small RNAs associated with transcription start sites of annotated coding regions (TSSaRNAs) are pervasive in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Here, we provide evidence for existence of TSSaRNAs in several archaeal transcriptomes including: Halobacterium salinarum, Pyrococcus furiosus, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Sulfolobus solfataricus. We validated TSSaRNAs from the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by deep sequencing two independent small-RNA enriched (RNA-seq) and a primary-transcript enriched (dRNA-seq) strand-specific libraries. We identified 652 transcripts, of which 179 were shown to be primary transcripts (∼7% of the annotated genome). Distinct growth-associated expression patterns between TSSaRNAs and their cognate genes were observed, indicating a possible role in environmental responses that may result from RNA polymerase with varying pausing rhythms. This work shows that TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous across all domains of life. PMID:25238539

  17. Probing the mechanism of rubredoxin thermal unfolding in the absence of salt bridges by temperature jump experiments.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Bárbara J; Saraiva, Lígia M; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2005-08-05

    Rubredoxins are the simplest type of iron-sulphur proteins and in recent years they have been used as model systems in protein folding and stability studies, especially the proteins from thermophilic sources. Here, we report our studies on the rubredoxin from the hyperthermophile Methanococcus jannaschii (T opt = 85 degrees C), which was investigated in respect to its thermal unfolding kinetics by temperature jump experiments. Different spectroscopic probes were used to monitor distinct structural protein features during the thermal transition: the integrity of the iron-sulphur centre was monitored by visible absorption spectroscopy, whereas tertiary structure was followed by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and exposure of protein hydrophobic patches was sensed by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate fluorescence. The studies were performed at acidic pH conditions in which any stabilising contributions from salt bridges are annulled due to protonation of protein side chain groups. In these conditions, M. jannaschii rubredoxin assumes a native-like, albeit more flexible and open conformation, as indicated by a red shift in the tryptophan emission maximum and 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate binding. Temperature jumps were monitored by the three distinct techniques and showed that the protein undergoes thermal denaturation via a simple two step mechanism, as loss of tertiary structure, hydrophobic collapse, and disintegration of the iron-sulphur centre are concomitant processes. The proposed mechanism is framed with the multiphasic one proposed for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, showing that a common thermal unfolding mechanism is not observed between these two closely related thermophilic rubredoxins.

  18. Role of Mn2+ and compatible solutes in the radiation resistance of thermophilic bacteria and archaea.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kimberly M; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn(2+)-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  19. Production of chitooligosaccharides from Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL2710 cells by chitosanase digestion.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Maria; Shinya, Shoko; Masaki, Eiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Brzezinski, Ryszard; Mazumder, Tapan K; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Narihiro, Kazue; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2014-01-13

    The intact cells of Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL2710, whose cell walls are abundant source of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucosamine (GlcN), were digested with three chitinolytic enzymes, a GH-46 chitosanase from Streptomyces sp. N174 (CsnN174), a chitinase from Pyrococcus furiosus, and a chitinase from Trichoderma viride, respectively. Solubilization of the intact cells by CsnN174 was found to be the most efficient from solid state CP/MAS (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Chitosanase products from Rhizopus cells were purified by cation exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-25 and gel-filtration on Cellulofine Gcl-25m. NMR and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses of the purified products revealed that GlcN-GlcNAc, (GlcN)2-GlcNAc, and (GlcN)2 were produced by the enzymatic digestion of the intact cells. The chitosanase digestion of Rhizopus cells was found to be an excellent system for the conversion of fungal biomass without any environmental impact.

  20. An extra dimension in protein tagging by quantifying universal proteotypic peptides using targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vandemoortele, Giel; Staes, An; Gonnelli, Giulia; Samyn, Noortje; De Sutter, Delphine; Vandermarliere, Elien; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart; Eyckerman, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein tagging to facilitate detailed characterization of target proteins has not only revolutionized cell biology, but also enabled biochemical analysis through efficient recovery of the protein complexes wherein the tagged proteins reside. The endogenous use of these tags for detailed protein characterization is widespread in lower organisms that allow for efficient homologous recombination. With the recent advances in genome engineering, tagging of endogenous proteins is now within reach for most experimental systems, including mammalian cell lines cultures. In this work, we describe the selection of peptides with ideal mass spectrometry characteristics for use in quantification of tagged proteins using targeted proteomics. We mined the proteome of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus to obtain two peptides that are unique in the proteomes of all known model organisms (proteotypic) and allow sensitive quantification of target proteins in a complex background. By combining these ’Proteotypic peptides for Quantification by SRM’ (PQS peptides) with epitope tags, we demonstrate their use in co-immunoprecipitation experiments upon transfection of protein pairs, or after introduction of these tags in the endogenous proteins through genome engineering. Endogenous protein tagging for absolute quantification provides a powerful extra dimension to protein analysis, allowing the detailed characterization of endogenous proteins. PMID:27264994

  1. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, I.; Hooper, Sean; Lykidis, A; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Background Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  2. Assessing the Chemical Accuracy of Protein Structures via Peptide Acidity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Janet S.; Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the protein native state is a Boltzmann conformational ensemble, practical applications often require a representative model from the most populated region of that distribution. The acidity of the backbone amides, as reflected in hydrogen exchange rates, is exquisitely sensitive to the surrounding charge and dielectric volume distribution. For each of four proteins, three independently determined X-ray structures of differing crystallographic resolution were used to predict exchange for the static solvent-exposed amide hydrogens. The average correlation coefficients range from 0.74 for ubiquitin to 0.93 for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, reflecting the larger range of experimental exchange rates exhibited by the latter protein. The exchange prediction errors modestly correlate with the crystallographic resolution. MODELLER 9v6-derived homology models at ~60% sequence identity (36% identity for chymotrypsin inhibitor CI2) yielded correlation coefficients that are ~0.1 smaller than for the cognate X-ray structures. The most recently deposited NOE-based ubiquitin structure and the original NMR structure of CI2 fail to provide statistically significant predictions of hydrogen exchange. However, the more recent RECOORD refinement study of CI2 yielded predictions comparable to the X-ray and homology model-based analyses. PMID:23182463

  3. Structural determinant for switching between the polymerase and exonuclease modes in the PCNA-replicative DNA polymerase complex

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Hirokazu; Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Sato, Yuichi; Oyama, Takuji; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is responsible for the processivity of DNA polymerase. We determined the crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase (PfuPol) complexed with the cognate monomeric PCNA, which allowed us to construct a convincing model of the polymerase-PCNA ring interaction, with unprecedented configurations of the two molecules. Electron microscopic analyses indicated that this complex structure exists in solution. Our structural study revealed that an interaction occurs between a stretched loop of PCNA and the PfuPol Thumb domain, in addition to the authentic PCNA-polymerase recognition site (PIP box). Comparisons of the present structure with the previously reported structures of polymerases complexed with DNA, suggested that the second interaction plays a crucial role in switching between the polymerase and exonuclease modes, by inducing a PCNA-polymerase complex configuration that favors synthesis over editing. This putative mechanism for fidelity control of replicative DNA polymerases is supported by experiments, in which mutations at the second interaction site caused enhancements in the exonuclease activity in the presence of PCNA. PMID:19934045

  4. Characterization of PCR products from bacilli using electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Muddiman, D.C.; Liu, C.; Pasa-Tolic, L.; Anderson, G.A.; Smith, R.D.; Wunschel, D.S.; Fox, K.F.; Fox, A.

    1996-11-01

    A procedure for rapid purification of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products allowing precise molecular weight determination using electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry is described. PCR amplification utilized the DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) which , unlike Taq, does not incorporate a nontemplated terminal deoxyadenosine phosphate. An 89-base pair nucleotide portion of the spacer region between the 16S and 23S ribosomal rRNA genes was amplified from the genome of three members of Bacillus cereus group and a 114 nucleotide region from the Bacillus subtilis. PCR involves polymerization of nucleotide precursors using two oligonucleotide primers and an amplification enzyme, as well as the presence of metal ions. The molecular weights of the PCR products determined by nucleotide sequence and MS analysis were in excellent agreement, and several PCR products were analyzed where mass differences corresponding to single base substitutions could be accurately assigned. These assignments were possible due to the high mass precision, accuracy, and resolution FTICR inherently affords. This constitutes the first report demonstrating the ionization and detection of PCR products by mass spectrometry with mass precision and accuracy for assignment of such modifications or substitutions. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Proton Inventory and Dynamics in the Nia-S to Nia-C Transition of a [NiFe] Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vansuch, Gregory E; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2016-03-29

    Hydrogenases (H2ases) represent one of the most striking examples of biological proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) chemistry, functioning in facile proton reduction and H2 oxidation involving long-range proton and electron transport. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of the [NiFe] H2ases have identified several catalytic intermediates, but the details of their interconversion are still a matter of debate. Here we use steady state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, sensitive to the CO ligand of the active site iron, as a probe of the proton inventory as well as electron and proton transfer dynamics in the soluble hydrogenase I from Pyrococcus furiosus. Subtle shifts in infrared signatures associated with the Nia-C and Nia-S states as a function of pH revealed an acid-base equilibrium associated with an ionizable amino acid near the active site. Protonation of this residue was found to correlate with the photoproduct distribution that results from hydride photolysis of the Nia-C state, in which one of the two photoproduct states becomes inaccessible at low pH. Additionally, the ability to generate Nia-S via PCET from Nia-C was weakened at low pH, suggesting prior protonation of the proton acceptor. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of electron and proton transfer with respect to the various proton inventories was utilized to develop a chemical model for reversible hydride oxidation involving two intermediates differing in their hydrogen bonding character.

  6. The Achilles' Heel of "Ultrastable" Hyperthermophile Proteins: Submillimolar Concentrations of SDS Stimulate Rapid Conformational Change, Aggregation, and Amyloid Formation in Proteins Carrying Overall Positive Charge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed M; Sharma, Prerna; Arora, Kanika; Kishor, Nitin; Kaila, Pallavi; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-07-19

    Low concentrations (<3.0 mM) of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid fibers in more than 20 different mesophile-derived proteins in the cationic state. It is not known whether SDS has similar effects on hyperthermophile-derived proteins, which are otherwise thought to be "ultrastable" and inordinately resistant to structural perturbations at room temperature. Here, we show that low (<4.5 mM) concentrations of SDS rapidly induce the formation of aggregates and amyloid fibers in five different ultrastable Pyrococcus furiosus proteins in the cationic state. We also show that amyloid formation is accompanied by the development of a characteristic, negative circular dichroism band at ∼230 nm. These effects are not seen if the proteins have a net negative charge or when higher concentrations of SDS are used (which induce helix formation instead). Our results appear to reveal a potential weakness or "Achilles' heel" in ultrastable proteins from hyperthermophiles. They also provide very strong support for the view that SDS initially interacts with proteins through electrostatic interactions, and not hydrophobic interactions, eliciting similar effects entirely regardless of protein molecular weight, or structural features such as quaternary structure or tertiary structural stability.

  7. Anaerobic High-Throughput Cultivation Method for Isolation of Thermophiles Using Biomass-Derived Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Allman, Steve L; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Elkins, James G

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) techniques have been developed for sorting mesophilic organisms, but the difficulty increases if the target microbes are thermophilic anaerobes. We demonstrate a reliable, high-throughput method of screening thermophilic anaerobic organisms using FCM and 96-well plates for growth on biomass-relevant substrates. The method was tested using the cellulolytic thermophiles Clostridium ther- mocellum (Topt = 55 C), Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis (Topt = 78 C) and the fermentative hyperthermo- philes, Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt = 100 C) and Thermotoga maritima (Topt = 80 C). Multi-well plates were incubated at various temperatures for approximately 72 120 h and then tested for growth. Positive growth resulting from single cells sorted into individual wells containing an anaerobic medium was verified by OD600. Depending on the growth substrate, up to 80 % of the wells contained viable cultures, which could be transferred to fresh media. This method was used to isolate thermophilic microbes from Rabbit Creek, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming. Substrates for enrichment cultures including crystalline cellulose (Avicel), xylan (from Birchwood), pretreated switchgrass and Populus were used to cultivate organisms that may be of interest to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  8. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Kimberly M.; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell. PMID:23209374

  9. Crystal structure and CRISPR RNA-binding site of the Cmr1 subunit of the Cmr interference complex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiali; Jeon, Jae-Hyun; Shin, Minsang; Shin, Ho-Chul; Oh, Byung-Ha; Kim, Jeong-Sun

    2014-02-01

    A multi-subunit ribonucleoprotein complex termed the Cmr RNA-silencing complex recognizes and destroys viral RNA in the CRISPR-mediated immune defence mechanism in many prokaryotes using an as yet unclear mechanism. In Archaeoglobus fulgidus, this complex consists of six subunits, Cmr1-Cmr6. Here, the crystal structure of Cmr1 from A. fulgidus is reported, revealing that the protein is composed of two tightly associated ferredoxin-like domains. The domain located at the N-terminus is structurally most similar to the N-terminal ferredoxin-like domain of the CRISPR RNA-processing enzyme Cas6 from Pyrococcus furiosus. An ensuing mutational analysis identified a highly conserved basic surface patch that binds single-stranded nucleic acids specifically, including the mature CRISPR RNA, but in a sequence-independent manner. In addition, this subunit was found to cleave single-stranded RNA. Together, these studies elucidate the structure and the catalytic activity of the Cmr1 subunit.

  10. A New Class of Tungsten-Containing Oxidoreductase in Caldicellulosiruptor, a Genus of Plant Biomass-Degrading Thermophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scott, Israel M; Rubinstein, Gabe M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J; Rhaesa, Amanda M; Lancaster, W Andrew; Poole, Farris L; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-10-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor bescii grows optimally at 78°C and is able to decompose high concentrations of lignocellulosic plant biomass without the need for thermochemical pretreatment. C. bescii ferments both C5 and C6 sugars primarily to hydrogen gas, lactate, acetate, and CO2 and is of particular interest for metabolic engineering applications given the recent availability of a genetic system. Developing optimal strains for technological use requires a detailed understanding of primary metabolism, particularly when the goal is to divert all available reductant (electrons) toward highly reduced products such as biofuels. During an analysis of the C. bescii genome sequence for oxidoreductase-type enzymes, evidence was uncovered to suggest that the primary redox metabolism of C. bescii has a completely uncharacterized aspect involving tungsten, a rarely used element in biology. An active tungsten utilization pathway in C. bescii was demonstrated by the heterologous production of a tungsten-requiring, aldehyde-oxidizing enzyme (AOR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Furthermore, C. bescii also contains a tungsten-based AOR-type enzyme, here termed XOR, which is phylogenetically unique, representing a completely new member of the AOR tungstoenzyme family. Moreover, in C. bescii, XOR represents ca. 2% of the cytoplasmic protein. XOR is proposed to play a key, but as yet undetermined, role in the primary redox metabolism of this cellulolytic microorganism.

  11. An archaeal immune system can detect multiple protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) to target invader DNA.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Susan; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stoll, Britta; Brendel, Jutta; Fischer, Eike; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2012-09-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system provides adaptive and heritable immunity against foreign genetic elements in most archaea and many bacteria. Although this system is widespread and diverse with many subtypes, only a few species have been investigated to elucidate the precise mechanisms for the defense of viruses or plasmids. Approximately 90% of all sequenced archaea encode CRISPR/Cas systems, but their molecular details have so far only been examined in three archaeal species: Sulfolobus solfataricus, Sulfolobus islandicus, and Pyrococcus furiosus. Here, we analyzed the CRISPR/Cas system of Haloferax volcanii using a plasmid-based invader assay. Haloferax encodes a type I-B CRISPR/Cas system with eight Cas proteins and three CRISPR loci for which the identity of protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) was unknown until now. We identified six different PAM sequences that are required upstream of the protospacer to permit target DNA recognition. This is only the second archaeon for which PAM sequences have been determined, and the first CRISPR group with such a high number of PAM sequences. Cells could survive the plasmid challenge if their CRISPR/Cas system was altered or defective, e.g. by deletion of the cas gene cassette. Experimental PAM data were supplemented with bioinformatics data on Haloferax and Haloquadratum.

  12. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    DOE PAGES

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in themore » hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.« less

  13. Solution Structure of Pfu RPP21, a Component of the Archaeal RNase P Holoenzyme, and Interactions with its RPP29 Protein Partner

    PubMed Central

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2009-01-01

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5′-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentration, four proteins subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with Pfu RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step towards understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  14. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  15. PCNA is involved in the EndoQ-mediated DNA repair process in Thermococcales

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Miyako; Ishino, Sonoko; Yoshida, Kotaro; Yamagami, Takeshi; Cann, Isaac; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    To maintain genome integrity for transfer to their offspring, and to maintain order in cellular processes, all living organisms have DNA repair systems. Besides the well-conserved DNA repair machineries, organisms thriving in extreme environments are expected to have developed efficient repair systems. We recently discovered a novel endonuclease, which cleaves the 5′ side of deoxyinosine, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus. The novel endonuclease, designated as Endonulcease Q (EndoQ), recognizes uracil, abasic site and xanthine, as well as hypoxanthine, and cuts the phosphodiester bond at their 5′ sides. To understand the functional process involving EndoQ, we searched for interacting partners of EndoQ and identified Proliferating Cell Nuclear Angigen (PCNA). The EndoQ activity was clearly enhanced by addition of PCNA in vitro. The physical interaction between the two proteins through a PIP-motif of EndoQ and the toroidal structure of PCNA are critical for the stimulation of the endonuclease activity. These findings provide us a clue to elucidate a unique DNA repair system in Archaea. PMID:27150116

  16. Thermostable single domain antibody-maltose binding protein fusion for Bacillus anthracis spore protein BclA detection.

    PubMed

    Walper, Scott A; Battle, Shawna R; Audrey Brozozog Lee, P; Zabetakis, Dan; Turner, Kendrick B; Buckley, Patricia E; Calm, Alena M; Welsh, Heather S; Warner, Candice R; Zacharko, Melody A; Goldman, Ellen R; Anderson, George P

    2014-02-15

    We constructed a genetic fusion of a single domain antibody (sdAb) with the thermal stable maltose binding protein from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (PfuMBP). Produced in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm with high yield, it proved to be a rugged and effective immunoreagent. The sdAb-A5 binds BclA, a Bacillus anthracis spore protein, with high affinity (K(D) ∼ 50 pM). MBPs, including the thermostable PfuMBP, have been demonstrated to be excellent folding chaperones, improving production of many recombinant proteins. A three-step purification of E. coli shake flask cultures of PfuMBP-sdAb gave a yield of approximately 100mg/L highly purified product. The PfuMBP remained stable up to 120 °C, whereas the sdAb-A5 portion unfolded at approximately 68 to 70 °C but could refold to regain activity. This fusion construct was stable to heating at 1mg/ml for 1h at 70 °C, retaining nearly 100% of its binding activity; nearly one-quarter (24%) activity remained after 1h at 90 °C. The PfuMBP-sdAb construct also provides a stable and effective method to coat gold nanoparticles. Most important, the construct was found to provide enhanced detection of B. anthracis Sterne strain (34F2) spores relative to the sdAb-A5 both as a capture reagent and as a detection reagent.

  17. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Recombinant Pfu DNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Qingsong; Bi, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Pfu DNA polymerase (Pfu) is a DNA polymerase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. With its excellent thermostability and high fidelity, Pfu is well known as one of the enzymes widely used in the polymerase chain reaction. In this study, the recombinant plasmid pLysS His6-tagged Pfu-pET28a was constructed. His-tagged Pfu was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) competent cells and then successfully purified with the ÄKTAprime plus compact one-step purification system by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography after optimization of the purification conditions. The authenticity of the purified Pfu was further confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. A bio-assay indicated that its activity in the polymerase chain reaction was equivalent to that of commercial Pfu and its isoelectric point was found to be between 6.85 and 7.35. These results will be useful for further studies on Pfu and its wide application in the future.

  18. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-02-08

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn(2+), hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co(2+). Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites.

  19. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in the hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-02-01

    The biotin–protein ligase from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5′-AMP. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} and diffract to beyond 1.6 Å resolution.

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of the [Fe(His)(4)(Cys)] site in 2Fe-superoxide reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Clay, Michael D; Emerson, Joseph P; Coulter, Eric D; Kurtz, Donald M; Johnson, Michael K

    2003-07-01

    The electronic and vibrational properties of the [Fe(His)(4)(Cys)] site (Center II) responsible for catalysis of superoxide reduction in the two-iron superoxide reductase (2Fe-SOR) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris have been investigated using the combination of EPR, resonance Raman, UV/visible/near-IR absorption, CD, and VTMCD spectroscopies. Deconvolution of the spectral contributions of Center II from those of the [Fe(Cys)(4)] site (Center I) has been achieved by parallel investigations of the C13S variant, which does not contain Center I. The resonance Raman spectrum of ferric Center II has been assigned based on isotope shifts for (34)S and (15)N globally labeled proteins. As for the [Fe(His)(4)(Cys)] active site in 1Fe-SOR from Pyrococcus furiosus, the spectroscopic properties of ferric and ferrous Center II in D. vulgaris 2Fe-SOR are indicative of distorted octahedral and square-pyramidal coordination geometries, respectively. Differences in the properties of the ferric [Fe(His)(4)(Cys)] sites in 1Fe- and 2Fe-SORs are apparent in the rhombicity of the S=5/2 ground state ( E/ D=0.06 and 0.28 in 1Fe- and 2Fe-SORs, respectively), the energy of the CysS(-)(p(pi))-->Fe(3+)(d(pi)) CT transition (15150+/-150 cm(-1) and 15600+/-150 cm(-1) in 1Fe- and 2Fe-SORs, respectively) and in changes in the Fe-S stretching region of the resonance Raman spectrum indicative of a weaker Fe-S(Cys) bond in 2Fe-SORs. These differences are interpreted in terms of small structural perturbations in the Fe coordination sphere with changes in the Fe-S(Cys) bond strength resulting from differences in the peptide N-H.S(Cys) hydrogen bonding within a tetrapeptide bidentate "chelate". Observation of the characteristic intervalence charge transfer transition of a cyano-bridged [Fe(III)-NC-Fe(II)(CN)(5)] unit in the near-IR VTMCD spectra of ferricyanide-oxidized samples of both P. furiosus 1Fe-SOR and D. vulgaris 2Fe-SOR has confirmed the existence of novel ferrocyanide adducts of the ferric [Fe

  2. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Prieto, A.; Alonso, J.; Muñoz, D.; Marcano, L.; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A.; Fernández de Luis, R.; Orue, I.; Mathon, O.; Muela, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM

  3. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive chemical potential

  4. Role of native-state structure in rubredoxin native-state hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Anderson, Janet S; Hernández, Griselda

    2006-08-22

    Amide exchange rates were measured for Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) rubredoxin substituted with either Zn(II), Ga(III), or Ge(IV). Base-catalyzed exchange rate constants increase up to 3000-fold per unit charge for the highly protected amides surrounding the active site metal, yielding apparent residue-specific conformational energy decreases of more than 8 kcal/mol in a comparison of the Zn(II)- and Ge(IV)-substituted proteins. However, the exchange kinetics for many of the other amides of the protein are insensitive to these metal substitutions. These differential rates are inversely correlated with the distance between the amide nitrogen and the metal in the X-ray structure, out to a distance of at least 12 A, consistent with an electrostatic potential-dependent shifting of the amide nitrogen pK. This strongly correlated distance dependence is consistent with a nativelike structure for the exchange-competent conformations. The electric field potential within the interior of the rubredoxin structure gives rise to a change of as much as a million-fold in the rate for the exchange-competent state of the individual amide hydrogens. Nevertheless, the strength of these electrostatic interactions in Pf rubredoxin appears to be comparable to those previously reported within other proteins. As a result, contrary to the conventional analysis of hydrogen exchange data, for exchange processes that occur via nonglobal transitions, the residual conformational structure will often modulate the observed rates. Although this necessarily complicates the estimation of the conformational equilibria of these exchange-competent states, this dependence on residual structure can provide insight into the conformation of these transient states.

  5. Absence of kinetic thermal stabilization in a hyperthermophile rubredoxin indicated by 40 microsecond folding in the presence of irreversible denaturation.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Tang, Jianzhong; Hernández, Griselda

    2004-10-01

    The striking kinetic stability of many proteins derived from hyperthermophilic organisms has led to the proposal that such stability may result from a heightened activation barrier for unfolding independent of a corresponding increase in the thermodynamic stability. This in turn implies a corresponding retardation of the folding reaction. A commonly cited model for kinetic thermal stabilization is the rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf), which exhibits an irreversible denaturation lifetime at 100 degrees C of nearly a week. Utilizing protein resonances shifted well outside of the random coil chemical shift envelope, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical exchange measurements on Pf rubredoxin as well as on the mesophile Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp) rubredoxin demonstrate reversible thermal transition temperatures of 144 degrees C (137 degrees C for the N-terminal modified A2K variant) and 104 degrees C, respectively, with similar (un)folding rates of approximately 25,000 s(-1), only modestly slower than the diffusion controlled rate. The absence of a substantial activation barrier to rubredoxin folding as well as the similar folding kinetics of the mesophile protein indicate that kinetic stabilization has not been utilized by the hyperthermophile rubredoxin in achieving its extreme thermal stability. The two-state folding kinetics observed for Pf rubredoxin contradict a previous assertion of multiphasic folding based on hydrogen exchange data extrapolated to an estimated midpoint of transition temperature (T(m)) of nearly 200 degrees C. This discrepancy is resolved by the observation that the base-catalyzed hydrogen exchange of the model dipeptide (N-acetyl-L-cysteine-N-methylamide)4-Cd2+ is 23-fold slower than that of the free cysteine model dipeptide used to normalize the Pf rubredoxin hydrogen exchange data.

  6. Self-assembly Is Prerequisite for Catalysis of Fe(II) Oxidation by Catalytically Active Subunits of Ferritin*

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Fe(III) storage by ferritin is an essential process of the iron homeostasis machinery. It begins by translocation of Fe(II) from outside the hollow spherical shape structure of the protein, which is formed as the result of self-assembly of 24 subunits, to a di-iron binding site, the ferroxidase center, buried in the middle of each active subunit. The pathway of Fe(II) to the ferroxidase center has remained elusive, and the importance of self-assembly for the functioning of the ferroxidase center has not been investigated. Here we report spectroscopic and metal ion binding studies with a mutant of ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfFtn) in which self-assembly was abolished by a single amino acid substitution. We show that in this mutant metal ion binding to the ferroxidase center and Fe(II) oxidation at this site was obliterated. However, metal ion binding to a conserved third site (site C), which is located in the inner surface of each subunit in the vicinity of the ferroxidase center and is believed to be the path for Fe(II) to the ferroxidase center, was not disrupted. These results are the basis of a new model for Fe(II) translocation to the ferroxidase center: self-assembly creates channels that guide the Fe(II) ions toward the ferroxidase center directly through the protein shell and not via the internal cavity and site C. The results may be of significance for understanding the molecular basis of ferritin-related disorders such as neuroferritinopathy in which the 24-meric structure with 432 symmetry is distorted. PMID:26370076

  7. Prokaryotic Chaperonins as Experimental Models for Elucidating Structure-Function Abnormalities of Human Pathogenic Mutant Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Conway de Macario, Everly; Robb, Frank T.; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    2017-01-01

    All archaea have a chaperonin of Group II (thermosome) in their cytoplasm and some have also a chaperonin of Group I (GroEL; Cpn60; Hsp60). Conversely, all bacteria have GroEL, some in various copies, but only a few have, in addition, a chaperonin (tentatively designated Group III chaperonin) very similar to that occurring in all archaea, i.e., the thermosome subunit, and in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, named CCT. Thus, nature offers a range of prokaryotic organisms that are potentially useful as experimental models to study the human CCT and its abnormalities. This is important because many diseases, the chaperonopathies, have been identified in which abnormal chaperones, including mutant CCT, are determinant etiologic-pathogenic factors and, therefore, research is needed to elucidate their pathologic features at the molecular level. Such research should lead to the clarification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathologic lesions observed in the tissues and organs of patients with chaperonopathies. Information on these key issues is necessary to make progress in diagnosis and treatment. Some of the archaeal organisms as well as some of the bacterial models suitable for studying molecular aspects pertinent to human mutant chaperones are discussed here, focusing on CCT. Results obtained with the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus model to investigate the impact of a pathogenic CCT5 mutation on molecular properties and chaperoning functions are reviewed. The pathogenic mutation examined weakens the ability of the chaperonin subunit to form stable hexadecamers and as a consequence, the chaperoning functions of the complex are impaired. The future prospect is to find means for stabilizing the hexadecamer, which should lead to a recovering of chaperone function and the improving of lesions and clinical condition. PMID:28119916

  8. The Investigation and Characterization of the Group 3 [Nickel-Iron]-Hydrogenases Using Protein Film Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chelsea Lee

    Hydrogenases, the enzymes that reversibly convert protons and electrons to hydrogen, are used in all three domains of life. [NiFe]-hydrogenases are considered best suited for biotechnological applications because of their reversible inactivation with oxygen. Phylogenetically, there are four groups of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The best characterized group, "uptake" hydrogenases, are membrane-bound and catalyze hydrogen oxidation in vivo. In contrast, the group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases are heteromultimeric, bifunctional enzymes that fulfill various cellular roles. In this dissertation, protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is used to characterize the catalytic properties of two group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases: HoxEFUYH from Synechocystsis sp. PCC 6803 and SHI from Pyrococcus furiosus. First, HoxEFUYH is shown to be biased towards hydrogen production. Upon exposure to oxygen, HoxEFUYH inactivates to two states, both of which can be reactivated on the timescale of seconds. Second, we show that PfSHI is the first example of an oxygen tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase that produces two inactive states upon exposure to oxygen. Both inactive states are analogous to those characterized for HoxEFUYH, but oxygen exposed PfSHI produces a greater fraction that reactivates at high potentials, enabling hydrogen oxidation in the presence of oxygen. Third, it is shown that removing the NAD(P)-reducing subunits from PfSHI leads to a decrease in bias towards hydrogen oxidation and renders the enzyme oxygen sensitive. Both traits are likely due to impaired intramolecular electron transfer. Mechanistic hypotheseses for these functional differences are considered.

  9. The enzymology of alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) isoforms from Hordeum vulgare and other organisms, and the HvAlaAT crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Duff, Stephen M G; Rydel, Timothy J; McClerren, Amanda L; Zhang, Wenlan; Li, Jimmy Y; Sturman, Eric J; Halls, Coralie; Chen, Songyang; Zeng, Jiamin; Peng, Jiexin; Kretzler, Crystal N; Evdokimov, Artem

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we describe the expression, purification, kinetics and biophysical characterization of alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) from the barley plant (Hordeum vulgare). This dimeric PLP-dependent enzyme is a pivotal element of several key metabolic pathways from nitrogen assimilation to carbon metabolism, and its introduction into transgenic plants results in increased yield. The enzyme exhibits a bi-bi ping-pong reaction mechanism with a K(m) for alanine, 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate and pyruvate of 3.8, 0.3, 0.8 and 0.2 mM, respectively. Barley AlaAT catalyzes the forward (alanine-forming) reaction with a k(cat) of 25.6 s(-1), the reverse (glutamate-forming) reaction with k(cat) of 12.1 s(-1) and an equilibrium constant of ~0.5. The enzyme is also able to utilize aspartate and oxaloacetate with ~10% efficiency as compared to the native substrates, which makes it much more specific than related bacterial/archaeal enzymes (that also have lower K(m) values). We have crystallized barley AlaAT in complex with PLP and l-cycloserine and solved the structure of this complex at 2.7 Å resolution. This is the first example of a plant AlaAT structure, and it reveals a canonical aminotransferase fold similar to structures of the Thermotoga maritima, Pyrococcus furiosus, and human enzymes. This structure bridges our structural understanding of AlaAT mechanism between three kingdoms of life and allows us to shed some light on the specifics of the catalysis performed by these proteins.

  10. Anomalous behavior of water inside the SecY translocon.

    PubMed

    Capponi, Sara; Heyden, Matthias; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Tobias, Douglas J; White, Stephen H

    2015-07-21

    The heterotrimeric SecY translocon complex is required for the cotranslational assembly of membrane proteins in bacteria and archaea. The insertion of transmembrane (TM) segments during nascent-chain passage through the translocon is generally viewed as a simple partitioning process between the water-filled translocon and membrane lipid bilayer, suggesting that partitioning is driven by the hydrophobic effect. Indeed, the apparent free energy of partitioning of unnatural aliphatic amino acids on TM segments is proportional to accessible surface area, which is a hallmark of the hydrophobic effect [Öjemalm K, et al. (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(31):E359-E364]. However, the apparent partitioning solvation parameter is less than one-half the value expected for simple bulk partitioning, suggesting that the water in the translocon departs from bulk behavior. To examine the state of water in a SecY translocon complex embedded in a lipid bilayer, we carried out all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations of the Pyrococcus furiosus SecYE, which was determined to be in a "primed" open state [Egea PF, Stroud RM (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(40):17182-17187]. Remarkably, SecYE remained in this state throughout our 450-ns simulation. Water molecules within SecY exhibited anomalous diffusion, had highly retarded rotational dynamics, and aligned their dipoles along the SecY transmembrane axis. The translocon is therefore not a simple water-filled pore, which raises the question of how anomalous water behavior affects the mechanism of translocon function and, more generally, the partitioning of hydrophobic molecules. Because large water-filled cavities are found in many membrane proteins, our findings may have broader implications.

  11. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Lakshmi, Lakshmi Dharmarajan; Rodriquez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, I.; Ulrich, Luke; Mavromatis, K; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B; Whitman, W. B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Background Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. Results The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. Conclusion The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  12. Geochemical Constraints on Archaeal Diversity in the Vulcano Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, K. L.; Amend, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    The shallow marine hydrothermal system of Vulcano, Italy hosts a wide diversity of cultured thermophilic Archaea, including Palaeococcus helgesonii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to name a few. However, recent studies have revealed a plethora of uncultured archaeal lineages in the Vulcano system. For example, a 16S rRNA gene survey of an onshore geothermal well identified a diverse archaeal community including deeply-branching uncultured Crenarchaeota, Korarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Additionally, culture-independent hybridization techniques suggested that Archaea account for nearly half of the microbial community in the Vulcano system. Furthermore, geochemical characterization of fluids revealed numerous lithotrophic and heterotrophic exergonic reactions that could support as yet uncultured organisms. Archaeal diversity throughout the Vulcano hydrothermal system was investigated using 16S rRNA gene surveys at five submarine vents and an onshore sediment seep. Overall, archaeal diversity was higher (10 groups) at submarine vents with moderate temperatures (59°C) compared with higher temperature (94°C) vents (4 groups). Archaeal communities at the moderately thermal vents were dominated by Thermococcales and also contained Archaeoglobales, Thermoproteales, and uncultured archaea among the Korarchaeota, Marine Group I, and the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE). Fluid composition also affects the microbial community structure. At two high-temperature sites variations in archaeal diversity can be attributed to differences in iron and hydrogen concentrations, and pH. Comparing sites with similar temperature and pH conditions suggests that the presence of Desulfurococcales is limited to sites at which metabolic energy yields exceed 10 kJ per mole of electrons transferred. The Vulcano hydrothermal system hosts diverse archaeal communities, containing both cultured and uncultured species, whose distribution appears to be constrained by

  13. Identification of a gene sequence encoding a putative pyruvate oxidoreductase in Serpulina pilosicoli.

    PubMed

    Rayment, S J; Lee, B J; Hampson, D J; Livesley, M A

    1998-09-01

    Serpulina pilosicoli is a recently described species of intestinal spirochaete which can be identified using a species-specific monoclonal antibody BJL/AC1 reactive with a 29-kDa protein located in the cell envelope. A genomic library of the type strain of S. pilosicoli P43/6/78T was created in lambda zap express and screened using BJL/AC1. Single positive clones were isolated and excised into the phagemid vector pBK-CMV. Phagemid DNA was purified and a single clone was selected for sequencing. The size of spirochaetal DNA insert was determined by digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI and PstI as being approximately 2.6 kb. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the protein with which the antibody reacted was determined by cycle sequencing. The insert contained an open reading frame of 285 nucleotides. Translation of the nucleotide sequence into amino acid (aa) residues showed a sequence of 275 aa. Comparison of this sequence with databases revealed homology to pyruvate oxidoreductases from various organisms found in the gastroinestinal tract. These included the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) alpha submit of Helicobacter pylori (38.8% identity in 250 aa), pyruvate-flavodoxin oxidoreductase of Escherichia coli (28.7% identify in 258 aa) and Giardia intestinalis (25.1% identity in 251 aa). A significant level of homology was also observed with hyperthermophilic bacteria such as the POR of Thermatoga maritima (38.6% in 254 aa) and the 2-ketovalerate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of Pyrococcus furiosus (34% in 262 aa).

  14. Crystal structure of TBP-interacting protein (Tk-TIP26) and implications for its inhibition mechanism of the interaction between TBP and TATA-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takahiko; Matsuda, Tomoki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Morikawa, Masaaki; Kanaya, Shigenori; Kai, Yasushi

    2006-01-01

    TATA-binding protein (TBP)-interacting protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis strain KOD1 (Tk-TIP26) is a possible transcription regulatory protein in Thermococcales. Here, we report the crystal structure of Tk-TIP26 determined at 2.3 Å resolution with multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method. The overall structure of Tk-TIP26 consists of two domains. The N-terminal domain forms an α/β structure, in which three α-helices enclose the central β-sheet. The topology of this domain is similar to that of holliday junction resolvase Hjc from Pyrococcus furiosus. The C-terminal domain comprises three α-helices, six β-strands, and two 310-helices. In the dimer structure of Tk-TIP26, two molecules are related with the crystallographic twofold axis, and these molecules rigidly interact with each other via hydrogen bonds. The complex of Tk-TIP26/Tk-TBP is isolated and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration column chromatography, resulting in a stoichiometric ratio of the interaction between Tk-TIP26 and Tk-TBP of 4:2, i.e., two dimer molecules of Tk-TIP26 formed a complex with one dimeric TBP. The electrostatic surfaces of Tk-TIP26 and TBP from Pyrocuccus woesei (PwTBP) allowed us to build a model of the Tk-TIP26/TBP complex, and to propose the inhibition mechanism where two dimer molecules of Tk-TIP26 bind to a dimeric TBP, preventing its binding to TATA-DNA. PMID:16322571

  15. Creation of active TIM barrel enzymes through genetic fusion of half-barrel domain constructs derived from two distantly related glycosyl hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prerna; Kaila, Pallavi; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-12-01

    Diverse unrelated enzymes that adopt the beta/alpha (or TIM) barrel topology display similar arrangements of beta/alpha units placed in a radial eight-fold symmetry around the barrel's axis. The TIM barrel was originally thought to be a single structural domain; however, it is now thought that TIM barrels arose from duplication and fusion of smaller half-barrels consisting of four beta/alpha units. We describe here the design, expression and purification, as well as characterization of folding, activity and stability, of chimeras of two TIM barrel glycosyl hydrolases, made by fusing different half-barrel domains derived from an endoglucanase from Clostridium cellulolyticum, CelCCA and a beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus, CelB. We show that after refolding following purification from inclusion bodies, the two half-barrel fusion chimeras (CelCCACelB and CelBCelCCA) display catalytic activity although they assemble into large soluble oligomeric aggregated species containing chains of mixed beta and alpha structure. CelBCelCCA displays hyperthermophile-like structural stability as well as significant stability to chemical denaturation (Cm of 2.6 m guanidinium hydrochloride), whereas CelCCACelB displays mesophile-like stability (Tm of ~ 71 °C). The endoglucanase activities of both chimeras are an order of magnitude lower than those of CelB or CelCCA, whereas the beta-glucosidase activity of CelBCelCCA is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of CelB. The chimera CelCCACelB shows no beta-glucosidase activity. Our results demonstrate that half-barrel domains from unrelated sources can fold, assemble and function, with scope for improvement.

  16. Enhanced thermal stability achieved without increased conformational rigidity at physiological temperatures: spatial propagation of differential flexibility in rubredoxin hybrids.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Tang, Jianzhong; Paredes, Diana I; Hernández, Griselda

    2005-11-15

    The extreme thermal stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms is widely believed to arise from an increased conformational rigidity in the native state. In apparent contrast to this paradigm, both Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) rubredoxin, the most thermostable protein characterized to date, and its Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp) mesophile homolog undergo a transient conformational opening of their multi-turn segments, which is more favorable in hyperthermophile proteins below room temperature. Substitution of the hyperthermophile multi-turn sequence into the mesophile protein sequence yields a hybrid, (14-33(Pf)) Cp, that exhibits a 12 degrees increase in its reversible thermal unfolding transition midpoint. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnetization transfer-based hydrogen exchange was used to monitor backbone conformational dynamics in the subsecond time regime. Despite the substantially increased thermostability, flexibility throughout the entire main chain of the more thermostable hybrid is equal to or greater than that of the wild type mesophile rubredoxin near its normal growth temperature. In comparison to the identical core residues of the (14-33(Pf)) Cp rubredoxin hybrid, six spatially clustered residues in the parental mesophile protein exhibit a substantially larger temperature dependence of exchange. The exchange behavior of these six residues closely matches that observed in the multi-turn segment, consistent with a more extensive conformational process. These six core residues exhibit a much weaker temperature dependence of exchange in the (14-33(Pf)) Cp hybrid, similar to that observed for the multi-turn segment in its parental Pf rubredoxin. These results suggest that differential temperature dependence of flexibility can underlie variations in thermostability observed for mesophile versus hyperthermophile homologs.

  17. Identification of 2D-gel proteins : a comparison of MALDI/TOF peptide mass mapping to {mu} LC-ESI tandem mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.; Hays, L. G.; Eng, J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Giometti, C. S.; Holden, J. F.; Adams, M. W. W.; Reich, C. I.; Olsen, G. J.; Yates, J. R.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Georgia; Univ. of Illinois

    2003-09-01

    A comparative analysis of protein identification for a total of 162 protein spots separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis from two fully sequenced archaea, Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, using MALDI-TOF peptide mass mapping (PMM) and mu LC-MS/MS is presented. 100% of the gel spots analyzed were successfully matched to the predicted proteins in the two corresponding open reading frame databases by mu LC-MS/MS while 97% of them were identified by MALDI-TOF PMM. The high success rate from the PMM resulted from sample desalting/concentrating with ZipTip(C18) and optimization of several PMM search parameters including a 25 ppm average mass tolerance and the application of two different protein molecular weight search windows. By using this strategy, low-molecular weight (<23 kDa) proteins could be identified unambiguously with less than 5 peptide matches. Nine percent of spots were identified as containing multiple proteins. By using mu LC-MS/MS, 50% of the spots analyzed were identified as containing multiple proteins. mu LC-MS/MS demonstrated better protein sequence coverage than MALDI-TOF PMM over the entire mass range of proteins identified. MALDI-TOF and PMM produced unique peptide molecular weight matches that were not identified by mu LC-MS/MS. By incorporating amino acid sequence modifications into database searches, combined sequence coverage obtained from these two complimentary ionization methods exceeded 50% for approximately 70% of the 162 spots analyzed. This improved sequence coverage in combination with enzymatic digestions of different specificity is proposed as a method for analysis of post-translational modification from 2D-gel separated proteins.

  18. Topography of the euryarchaeal transcription initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael S; Thomm, Michael; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2004-02-13

    Transcription in the Archaea is carried out by RNA polymerases and transcription factors that are highly homologous to their eukaryotic counterparts, but little is known about the structural organization of the archaeal transcription complex. To address this, transcription initiation complexes have been formed with Pyrococcus furiosus transcription factors (TBP and TFB1), RNA polymerase, and a linear DNA fragment containing a strong promoter. The arrangement of proteins from base pair -35 to +20 (relative to the transcriptional start site) has been analyzed by photochemical protein-DNA cross-linking. TBP cross-links to the TATA box and TFB1 cross-links both upstream and downstream of the TATA box, as expected, but the sites of most prominent TFB1 cross-linking are located well downstream of the TATA box, reaching as far as the start site of transcription, suggesting a role for TFB1 in initiation of transcription that extends beyond polymerase recruitment. These cross-links indicate the transcription factor orientation in the initiation complex. The pattern of cross-linking of four RNA polymerase subunits (B, A', A", and H) to the promoter suggests a path for promoter DNA relative to the RNA polymerase surface in this archaeal transcription initiation complex. In addition, an unidentified protein approximately the size of TBP cross-links to the non-transcribed DNA strand near the upstream edge of the transcription bubble. Cross-linking is specific to the polymerase-containing initiation complex and requires the gdh promoter TATA box. The location of this protein suggests that it, like TFB1, could also have a role in transcription initiation following RNA polymerase recruitment.

  19. Archaea box C/D enzymes methylate two distinct substrate rRNA sequences with different efficiency.

    PubMed

    Graziadei, Andrea; Masiewicz, Pawel; Lapinaite, Audrone; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    RNA modifications confer complexity to the 4-nucleotide polymer; nevertheless, their exact function is mostly unknown. rRNA 2'-O-ribose methylation concentrates to ribosome functional sites and is important for ribosome biogenesis. The methyl group is transferred to rRNA by the box C/D RNPs: The rRNA sequence to be methylated is recognized by a complementary sequence on the guide RNA, which is part of the enzyme. In contrast to their eukaryotic homologs, archaeal box C/D enzymes can be assembled in vitro and are used to study the mechanism of 2'-O-ribose methylation. In Archaea, each guide RNA directs methylation to two distinct rRNA sequences, posing the question whether this dual architecture of the enzyme has a regulatory role. Here we use methylation assays and low-resolution structural analysis with small-angle X-ray scattering to study the methylation reaction guided by the sR26 guide RNA fromPyrococcus furiosus We find that the methylation efficacy at sites D and D' differ substantially, with substrate D' turning over more efficiently than substrate D. This observation correlates well with structural data: The scattering profile of the box C/D RNP half-loaded with substrate D' is similar to that of the holo complex, which has the highest activity. Unexpectedly, the guide RNA secondary structure is not responsible for the functional difference at the D and D' sites. Instead, this difference is recapitulated by the nature of the first base pair of the guide-substrate duplex. We suggest that substrate turnover may occur through a zip mechanism that initiates at the 5'-end of the product.

  20. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, iain J.; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B.; Whitman, William B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-09-05

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced - Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  1. Broadening the cofactor specificity of a thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase using rational protein design introduces novel kinetic transient behavior.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elliot; Wheeldon, Ian R; Banta, Scott

    2010-12-01

    Cofactor specificity in the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily has been well studied, and several groups have reported the rational alteration of cofactor specificity in these enzymes. Although most efforts have focused on mesostable AKRs, several putative AKRs have recently been identified from hyperthermophiles. The few that have been characterized exhibit a strong preference for NAD(H) as a cofactor, in contrast to the NADP(H) preference of the mesophilic AKRs. Using the design rules elucidated from mesostable AKRs, we introduced two site-directed mutations in the cofactor binding pocket to investigate cofactor specificity in a thermostable AKR, AdhD, which is an alcohol dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus. The resulting double mutant exhibited significantly improved activity and broadened cofactor specificity as compared to the wild-type. Results of previous pre-steady-state kinetic experiments suggest that the high affinity of the mesostable AKRs for NADP(H) stems from a conformational change upon cofactor binding which is mediated by interactions between a canonical arginine and the 2'-phosphate of the cofactor. Pre-steady-state kinetics with AdhD and the new mutants show a rich conformational behavior that is independent of the canonical arginine or the 2'-phosphate. Additionally, experiments with the highly active double mutant using NADPH as a cofactor demonstrate an unprecedented transient behavior where the binding mechanism appears to be dependent on cofactor concentration. These results suggest that the structural features involved in cofactor specificity in the AKRs are conserved within the superfamily, but the dynamic interactions of the enzyme with cofactors are unexpectedly complex.

  2. PspGI, a type II restriction endonuclease from the extreme thermophile Pyrococcus sp.: structural and functional studies to investigate an evolutionary relationship with several mesophilic restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pingoud, Vera; Conzelmann, Charlotte; Kinzebach, Steffen; Sudina, Anna; Metelev, Valeri; Kubareva, Elena; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Lurz, Rudi; Lüder, Gerhild; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Pingoud, Alfred

    2003-06-20

    We present here the first detailed biochemical analysis of an archaeal restriction enzyme. PspGI shows sequence similarity to SsoII, EcoRII, NgoMIV and Cfr10I, which recognize related DNA sequences. We demonstrate here that PspGI, like SsoII and unlike EcoRII or NgoMIV and Cfr10I, interacts with and cleaves DNA as a homodimer and is not stimulated by simultaneous binding to two recognition sites. PspGI and SsoII differ in their basic biochemical properties, viz. stability against chemical denaturation and proteolytic digestion, DNA binding and the pH, MgCl(2) and salt-dependence of their DNA cleavage activity. In contrast, the results of mutational analyses and cross-link experiments show that PspGI and SsoII have a very similar DNA binding site and catalytic center as NgoMIV and Cfr10I (whose crystal structures are known), and presumably also as EcoRII, in spite of the fact that these enzymes, which all recognize variants of the sequence -/CC-GG- (/ denotes the site of cleavage), are representatives of different subgroups of type II restriction endonucleases. A sequence comparison of all known restriction endonuclease sequences, furthermore, suggests that several enzymes recognizing other DNA sequences also share amino acid sequence similarities with PspGI, SsoII and EcoRII in the region of the presumptive active site. These results are discussed in an evolutionary context.

  3. Modeling the Growth of Hyperthermophiles in Deep-sea Hydrothermal Diffuse Fluids and Sulfide Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ver Eecke, H. C.; Oslowski, D. M.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.; Lilley, M. D.; Holden, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008 and 2009, 534 hydrothermal fluid samples and 5 actively-venting black smoker chimneys were collected using Alvin for correlative microbiological and chemical analyses as part of the Endeavour Segment and Axial Volcano Geochemistry and Ecology Research (EAGER) program. Hyperthermophilic, autotrophic Fe(III) oxide reducers, methanogens, and sulfur-reducing heterotrophs were enriched for at 85 and 95°C using most-probable-number estimates from 28 diffuse fluid and 8 chimney samples. Heterotrophs were the most abundant of the three groups in both diffuse fluids and black-smoker chimneys. Iron reducers were more abundant than methanogens, and more abundant in sulfide-hosted vents than in basalt-hosted vents. Fluid chemistry suggests that there is net biogenic methanogenesis at the Marker 113/62 diffuse vent at Axial Volcano but nowhere else sampled. The growth of hyperthermophilic methanogens and heterotrophs was modeled in the lab using pure cultures. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii grew at 82°C in a 2-liter reactor with continuous gas flow at H2 concentrations between 20 and 225 µM with a H2 km of 100 µM. Correlating H2 end-member mixing curves from vent fluids and seawater with our laboratory modeling study suggests that H2 concentrations are limiting for Methanocaldococcus growth at most Mothra, Main Field, and High Rise vent sites at Endeavour but sufficient to support growth at some Axial Volcano vents. Therefore, hyperthermophilic methanogens may depend on H2 syntrophy at low H2 sites. Twenty-one pure hyperthermophilic heterotroph strains each grew on α-1,4 and β-1,4 linked sugars and polypeptides with concomitant H2 production. The H2 production rate (cell-1 doubling-1) for Pyrococcus furiosus at 95°C without sulfur was 29 fmol, 36 fmol, and 53 fmol for growth on α-1,4 sugars, β-1,4 sugars, and peptides, respectively. The CH4 production rate for M. jannaschii was 390 fmol cell-1 doubling-1; therefore, we estimate that it would take approximately

  4. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on superoxide reductase: role of the axial thiolate in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Johnson, Michael K; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-10-17

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a non-heme iron enzyme that reduces superoxide to peroxide at a diffusion-controlled rate. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to investigate the ground-state electronic structure of the resting high-spin and CN- bound low-spin FeIII forms of the 1Fe SOR from Pyrococcus furiosus. A computational model with constrained imidazole rings (necessary for reproducing spin states), H-bonding interaction to the thiolate (necessary for reproducing Fe-S bond covalency of the high-spin and low-spin forms), and H-bonding to the exchangeable axial ligand (necessary to reproduce the ground state of the low-spin form) was developed and then used to investigate the enzymatic reaction mechanism. Reaction of the resting ferrous site with superoxide and protonation leading to a high-spin FeIII-OOH species and its subsequent protonation resulting in H2O2 release is calculated to be the most energetically favorable reaction pathway. Our results suggest that the thiolate acts as a covalent anionic ligand. Replacing the thiolate with a neutral noncovalent ligand makes protonation very endothermic and greatly raises the reduction potential. The covalent nature of the thiolate weakens the FeIII bond to the proximal oxygen of this hydroperoxo species, which raises its pKa by an additional 5 log units relative to the pKa of a primarily anionic ligand, facilitating its protonation. A comparison with cytochrome P450 indicates that the stronger equatorial ligand field from the porphyrin results in a low-spin FeIII-OOH species that would not be capable of efficient H2O2 release due to a spin-crossing barrier associated with formation of a high-spin 5C FeIII product. Additionally, the presence of the dianionic porphyrin pi ring in cytochrome P450 allows O-O heterolysis, forming an FeIV-oxo porphyrin radical species, which is calculated to be extremely unfavorable for the non-heme SOR ligand environment. Finally, the 5C FeIII site that results

  5. Characterization of the denatured structure of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile under nondenaturing conditions: role of the C-terminal alpha-helix of the protein in folding and stability.

    PubMed

    Iimura, Satoshi; Umezaki, Taro; Takeuchi, Makoto; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Yagi, Hiromasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Akutsu, Hideo; Noda, Yasuo; Segawa, Shin-ichi; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2007-03-27

    The cysteine-free pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase (PCP-0SH) from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, can be trapped in the denatured state under nondenaturing conditions, corresponding to the denatured structure that exists in equilibrium with the native state under physiological conditions. The denatured state is the initial state (D1 state) in the refolding process but differs from the completely denatured state (D2 state) in the concentrated denaturant. Also, it has been found that the D1 state corresponds to the heat-denatured state. To elucidate the structural basis of the D1 state, H/D exchange experiments with PCP-0SH were performed at pD 3.4 and 4 degrees C. The results indicated that amide protons in the C-terminal alpha6-helix region hardly exchanged in the D1 state with deuterium even after 7 days, suggesting that the alpha6-helix (from Ser188 to Glu205) of PCP-0SH was stably formed in the D1 state. In order to examine the role of the alpha6-helix in folding and stability, H/D exchange experiments with a mutant, A199P, at position 199 in the alpha6-helix region were performed. The alpha6-helix region of A199P in the D1 state was partially unprotected, while some hydrophobic residues were protected against the H/D exchange, although these hydrophobic residues were unprotected in the wild-type protein. These results suggest that the structure of A199P in the D1 state formed a temporary stable denatured structure with a non-native hydrophobic cluster and the unstructured alpha6-helix. Both the stability and the refolding rate decreased by the substitution of Pro for Ala199. We can conclude that the native-like helix (alpha6-helix) of PCP-0SH is already constructed in the D1 state and is necessary for efficient refolding into the native structure and stabilization of PCP-0SH.

  6. 4-Demethylwyosine synthase from Pyrococcus abyssi is a radical-S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzyme with an additional [4Fe-4S](+2) cluster that interacts with the pyruvate co-substrate.

    PubMed

    Perche-Letuvée, Phanélie; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Berggren, Gustav; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Maurel, Vincent; Douki, Thierry; Armengaud, Jean; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Gambarelli, Serge; Atta, Mohamed

    2012-11-30

    Wybutosine and its derivatives are found in position 37 of tRNA encoding Phe in eukaryotes and archaea. They are believed to play a key role in the decoding function of the ribosome. The second step in the biosynthesis of wybutosine is catalyzed by TYW1 protein, which is a member of the well established class of metalloenzymes called "Radical-SAM." These enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster, chelated by three cysteines in a CX(3)CX(2)C motif, and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates various chemically challenging reactions. Sequence analysis of TYW1 proteins revealed, in the N-terminal half of the enzyme beside the Radical-SAM cysteine triad, an additional highly conserved cysteine motif. In this study we show by combining analytical and spectroscopic methods including UV-visible absorption, Mössbauer, EPR, and HYSCORE spectroscopies that these additional cysteines are involved in the coordination of a second [4Fe-4S] cluster displaying a free coordination site that interacts with pyruvate, the second substrate of the reaction. The presence of two distinct iron-sulfur clusters on TYW1 is reminiscent of MiaB, another tRNA-modifying metalloenzyme whose active form was shown to bind two iron-sulfur clusters. A possible role for the second [4Fe-4S] cluster in the enzyme activity is discussed.

  7. Novel structure of an N-terminal domain that is crucial for the dimeric assembly and DNA-binding of an archaeal DNA polymerase D large subunit from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Ikuo; Urushibata, Yuji; Shen, Yulong; Matsui, Eriko; Yokoyama, Hideshi

    2011-02-04

    Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase forms a heterotetramer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. The N-terminal (1-300) domain structure of the large subunit was determined by X-ray crystallography, although ∼50 N-terminal residues were disordered. The determined structure consists of nine alpha helices and three beta strands. We also identified the DNA-binding ability of the domain by SPR measurement. The N-terminal (1-100) region plays crucial roles in the folding of the large subunit dimer by connecting the ∼50 N-terminal residues with their own catalytic region (792-1163).

  8. An unusual 5S rRNA, from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and its implications for a general 5S rRNA structure.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, D A; Luehrsen, K R; Woese, C R; Pace, N R

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was determined. The high degree of evident secondary structure in the molecule has implications for the common higher order structure of other 5S rRNAs, both bacterial and eukaryotic. Images PMID:6273825

  9. Bacteriophage-like Particles Associated with the Gene Transfer Agent of Methanococcus Voltale PS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertani, G.; Eiserling, F.; Pushkin, A.; Gingery, M.

    1999-01-01

    The methanogenic archaebacterium Methanococus voltae (strain PS) is known to produce a filterable, DNase resistant agent (called VTA, for voltae transfer agent), which carries very small fragments (4,400 base pairs) of bacterial DNA and is able to transduce bacterial genes between derivatives of the strain.

  10. Genetic Analysis of Hyperthermophilic Archaebacterial Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius . Prior studies with these organisms were limited to those that could be done in liquid culture. This was a serious limitation...techniques for the study of the extremely hypertherthophiiic archaebacteriwn, Sulfolcbus acidocaldarius . APPROACH: Develop, refine and use genetic...resulted in several major advances in the development and analysis of genetics systems in the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium, Sulfolobus a

  11. Three new restriction endonucleases MaeI, MaeII and MaeIII from Methanococcus aeolicus.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, K; Thomm, M; Laminet, A; Laue, F G; Kessler, C; Stetter, K O; Schmitt, R

    1984-01-01

    Three type II restriction endonucleases, MaeI, MaeII and MaeIII, with novel site specificities have been isolated and purified from the archaebacterium Methanococcus aeolicus PL-15/H. The recognition sequences of these enzymes are (formula: see text) with the sites of cleavage as indicated by the arrows. The sequences were confirmed by restriction and computer analyses on sequenced DNA's of plasmid pBR322, bacteriophages lambda and phi X174 and virus SV40. Images PMID:6324124

  12. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  13. A possible biochemical missing link among archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, Laurie; Woese, Carl R.; Stetter, Karl O.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of the newly discovered strain of archaebacteria, VC-16, the only archaebacterium known to reduce sulfate, suggest that VC-16 might represent a transitional form between an anaerobic thermophilic sulfur-based type of metabolism and methanogenesis. It is shown here, using a matrix of evolutionary distances derived from an alignment of various archaebacterial 16S rRNAs and the phylogenetic tree derived from these evolutionary distances, that the lineage represented by strain VC-16 arises from the archaebacterial tree precisely where such an interpretation would predict that it would, between the Methanococcus lineage and that of Thermococcus.

  14. Relationship of the membrane ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum to vacuolar ATPases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Bowman, Emma J.

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal antiserum against subunit A (67 kDa) of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa reacted with subunit I (87 kDa) from a membrane ATPase of the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum. The halobacterial ATPase was inhibited by nitrate and N-ethylmaleimide; the extent of the latter inhibition was diminished in the presence of adenosine di- or triphosphates. 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan inhibited the halobacterial ATPase also in a nucleotide-protectable manner; the bulk of inhibitor was associated with subunit II (60 kDa). The data suggest that this halobacterial ATPase may have conserved structural features from both the vacuolar and the F-type ATPases.

  15. Relationship of the Membrane ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum to Vacuolar ATPases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Bowman, Emma J.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal antiserum against subunit A (67 kDa) of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa reacted with subunit I (87 kDa) from a membrane ATPase of the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum. The halobacterial ATPase was inhibited by nitrate and N-ethylmaleimide; the extent of the latter inhibition was diminished in the presence of adenosine di- or triphosphates. 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan in- hibited the hatobacterial ATPase also in a nucleotide- protectable manner; the bulk of inhibitor was associated with subunit II (60 kDa). The data suggested that this halobacterial ATPase may have conserved structural features from both the vacuotar and the F-type ATPases.

  16. The chimeric eukaryote: Origin of the nucleus from the karyomastigont in amitochondriate protists

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Lynn; Dolan, Michael F.; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    We present a testable model for the origin of the nucleus, the membrane-bounded organelle that defines eukaryotes. A chimeric cell evolved via symbiogenesis by syntrophic merger between an archaebacterium and a eubacterium. The archaebacterium, a thermoacidophil resembling extant Thermoplasma, generated hydrogen sulfide to protect the eubacterium, a heterotrophic swimmer comparable to Spirochaeta or Hollandina that oxidized sulfide to sulfur. Selection pressure for speed swimming and oxygen avoidance led to an ancient analogue of the extant cosmopolitan bacterial consortium “Thiodendron latens.” By eubacterial-archaebacterial genetic integration, the chimera, an amitochondriate heterotroph, evolved. This “earliest branching protist” that formed by permanent DNA recombination generated the nucleus as a component of the karyomastigont, an intracellular complex that assured genetic continuity of the former symbionts. The karyomastigont organellar system, common in extant amitochondriate protists as well as in presumed mitochondriate ancestors, minimally consists of a single nucleus, a single kinetosome and their protein connector. As predecessor of standard mitosis, the karyomastigont preceded free (unattached) nuclei. The nucleus evolved in karyomastigont ancestors by detachment at least five times (archamoebae, calonymphids, chlorophyte green algae, ciliates, foraminifera). This specific model of syntrophic chimeric fusion can be proved by sequence comparison of functional domains of motility proteins isolated from candidate taxa. PMID:10860956

  17. The chimeric eukaryote: origin of the nucleus from the karyomastigont in amitochondriate protists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Dolan, M. F.; Guerrero, R.

    2000-01-01

    We present a testable model for the origin of the nucleus, the membrane-bounded organelle that defines eukaryotes. A chimeric cell evolved via symbiogenesis by syntrophic merger between an archaebacterium and a eubacterium. The archaebacterium, a thermoacidophil resembling extant Thermoplasma, generated hydrogen sulfide to protect the eubacterium, a heterotrophic swimmer comparable to Spirochaeta or Hollandina that oxidized sulfide to sulfur. Selection pressure for speed swimming and oxygen avoidance led to an ancient analogue of the extant cosmopolitan bacterial consortium "Thiodendron latens." By eubacterial-archaebacterial genetic integration, the chimera, an amitochondriate heterotroph, evolved. This "earliest branching protist" that formed by permanent DNA recombination generated the nucleus as a component of the karyomastigont, an intracellular complex that assured genetic continuity of the former symbionts. The karyomastigont organellar system, common in extant amitochondriate protists as well as in presumed mitochondriate ancestors, minimally consists of a single nucleus, a single kinetosome and their protein connector. As predecessor of standard mitosis, the karyomastigont preceded free (unattached) nuclei. The nucleus evolved in karyomastigont ancestors by detachment at least five times (archamoebae, calonymphids, chlorophyte green algae, ciliates, foraminifera). This specific model of syntrophic chimeric fusion can be proved by sequence comparison of functional domains of motility proteins isolated from candidate taxa.

  18. Biogeography and evolution of Thermococcus isolates from hydrothermal vent systems of the Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Price, Mark T.; Fullerton, Heather; Moyer, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Thermococcus is a genus of hyperthermophilic archaea that is ubiquitous in marine hydrothermal environments growing in anaerobic subsurface habitats but able to survive in cold oxygenated seawater. DNA analyses of Thermococcus isolates were applied to determine the relationship between geographic distribution and relatedness focusing primarily on isolates from the Juan de Fuca Ridge and South East Pacific Rise. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to resolve genomic differences in 90 isolates of Thermococcus, making biogeographic patterns and evolutionary relationships apparent. Isolates were differentiated into regionally endemic populations however there was also evidence in some lineages of cosmopolitan distribution. The biodiversity identified in Thermococcus isolates and presence of distinct lineages within the same vent site suggests the utilization of varying ecological niches in this genus. In addition to resolving biogeographic patterns in Thermococcus, this study has raised new questions about the closely related Pyrococcus genus. The phylogenetic placement of Pyrococcus type strains shows the close relationship between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus and the unresolved divergence of these two genera. PMID:26441901

  19. Drastic differences in glycosylation of related S-layer glycoproteins from moderate and extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Mengele, R; Sumper, M

    1992-04-25

    The outer surface of the moderate halophilic archaebacterium Haloferax volcanii (formerly named Halobacterium volcanii) is covered with a hexagonally packed surface (S) layer glycoprotein. The polypeptide (794 amino acid residues) contains 7 N-glycosylation sites. Four of these sites were isolated as glycopeptides and the structure of one of the corresponding saccharides was determined. Oligosaccharides consisting of beta-1,4-linked glucose residues are attached to the protein via the linkage unit asparaginyl-glucose. In the related glycoprotein from the extreme halophile Halobacterium halobium, the glucose residues are replaced by sulfated glucuronic acid residues, causing a drastic increase in surface charge density. This is discussed in terms of a recent model explaining the stability of halophilic proteins.

  20. Regulation of the synthesis and assembly of the plant vacuolar H sup + -ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.

    1992-01-01

    During the past three years we have focused on four main areas: the characterization of the 5{prime}-upstream sequence of the gene for the V-ATPase 70 kDa (A) subunit gene, the generation of V-ATPase-deficient mutants using antisense constructs of the A subunit cDNA, analysis of V-ATPase ultrastructure by negative staining and the characterization of organelle-specific isoforms of the A subunit of carrot. In addition we have extended our studies on the cellular distribution of the V-ATPase and we have continued our investigation of the evolution of the V-ATPases by characterizing the A and B subunits of two species of the archaebacterium, Methanococcus.

  1. Regulation of the synthesis and assembly of the plant vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase. Progress report, [April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.

    1992-04-01

    During the past three years we have focused on four main areas: the characterization of the 5{prime}-upstream sequence of the gene for the V-ATPase 70 kDa (A) subunit gene, the generation of V-ATPase-deficient mutants using antisense constructs of the A subunit cDNA, analysis of V-ATPase ultrastructure by negative staining and the characterization of organelle-specific isoforms of the A subunit of carrot. In addition we have extended our studies on the cellular distribution of the V-ATPase and we have continued our investigation of the evolution of the V-ATPases by characterizing the A and B subunits of two species of the archaebacterium, Methanococcus.

  2. Nucleotide-Protectable Labeling of Sulfhydryl Groups in Subunit I of the ATPhase from Halobacterium Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzner, Michael; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    A membrane-bound ATPase from the archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum is inhibited by N-ethyl-maleimide in a nucleotide-protectable manner. When the enzyme was incubated with N-[C-14]jethylmaleimide, the bulk of radioactivity was as- sociated with the 87,000-Da subunit (subunit 1). ATP, ADP, or AMP reduced incorporation of the inhibitor. No charge shift of subunit I was detected following labeling with N-ethylmaleimide, indicating an electroneutral reaction. The results are consistent with the selective modification of sulfhydryl groups in subunit I at or near the catalytic site and are further evidence of a resemblance between this archaebacterial ATPase and the vacuolar-type ATPases.

  3. Generation of a large, protonophore-sensitive proton motive force and pH difference in the acidophilic bacteria Thermoplasma acidophilum and Bacillus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed Central

    Michels, M; Bakker, E P

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which acidophilic bacteria generate and maintain their cytoplasmic pH close to neutrality was investigated. For this purpose we determined the components of proton motive force in the eubacterium Bacillus acidocaldarius and the archaebacterium Thermoplasma acidophilum. After correction for probe binding, the proton motive force of untreated cells was 190 to 240 mV between external pH 2 and 4. Anoxia diminished total proton motive force and the transmembrane pH difference by 60 to 80 mV. The protonophore 2,4-dinitrophenol abolished the total proton motive force almost completely and diminished the transmembrane pH difference by at least two units. However, even after correction for probe binding, protonophore-treated cells maintained a pH difference of approximately one unit. PMID:2981803

  4. Sulfide ameliorates metal toxicity for deep-sea hydrothermal vent archaea.

    PubMed

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Molyneaux, Stephen J; Saito, Mak A; Lloyd, Karen; Böer, Simone; Wirsen, Carl O; Atkins, Michael S; Teske, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    The chemical stress factors for microbial life at deep-sea hydrothermal vents include high concentrations of heavy metals and sulfide. Three hyperthermophilic vent archaea, the sulfur-reducing heterotrophs Thermococcus fumicolans and Pyrococcus strain GB-D and the chemolithoautotrophic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, were tested for survival tolerance to heavy metals (Zn, Co, and Cu) and sulfide. The sulfide addition consistently ameliorated the high toxicity of free metal cations by the formation of dissolved metal-sulfide complexes as well as solid precipitates. Thus, chemical speciation of heavy metals with sulfide allows hydrothermal vent archaea to tolerate otherwise toxic metal concentrations in their natural environment.

  5. Crystal Structures of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster-Dependent Quinolinate Synthase in Complex with Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate, Iminoaspartate Analogues, and Quinolinate

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2016-07-12

    The quinolinate synthase of prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, NadA, contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster with unknown function. We report crystal structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii NadA in complex with dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), iminoaspartate analogues, and quinolinate. DHAP adopts a nearly planar conformation and chelates the [4Fe-4S] cluster via its keto and hydroxyl groups. The active site architecture suggests that the cluster acts as a Lewis acid in enediolate formation, like zinc in class II aldolases. The DHAP and putative iminoaspartate structures suggest a model for a condensed intermediate. The ensemble of structures suggests a two-state system, which may be exploited in early steps.

  6. The Thy Pol-2 intein of Thermococcus hydrothermalis is an isoschizomer of PI-TliI and PI-TfuII endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Saves, Isabelle; Eleaume, Heïdy; Dietrich, Jacques; Masson, Jean-Michel

    2000-01-01

    Thy Pol-2 intein, from Thermococcus hydrothermalis, belongs to the same allelic family as Tli Pol-2 (PI-TliI), Tfu Pol-2 (PI-TfuII) and TspTY Pol-3 mini-intein, all inserted at the pol-c site of archaeal DNA polymerase genes. This new intein was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The intein is a specific endonuclease (PI-ThyI) which cleaves the inteinless sequence of the Thy DNA pol gene. Moreover, PI-TliI, PI-TfuII and PI-ThyI are very similar endonucleases which cleave DNA in the same optimal conditions at 70°C yielding similar 3′-hydroxyl overhangs of 4 bp and the reaction is subject to product inhibition. The three enzymes are able to cleave the three DNA sequences spanning the pol-c site and a 24 bp consensus cleavage site was defined for the three isoschizomers. However, the exact size of the minimal cleavage site depends both on the substrate sequence and the endonuclease. The inability of the isoschizomers to cleave the inteinless DNA polymerase gene from Pyrococcus spp. KOD is due to point substitutions on the 5′ side of the pol-c site, suggesting that the absence of inteins of this allelic family in DNA polymerase genes from Pyrococcus spp. can be linked to small differences in the target site sequence. PMID:11058140

  7. Effects of dissolved sulfide, pH, and temperature on growth and survival of marine hyperthermophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Karen G; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Molyneaux, Stephen J; Böer, Simone; Wirsen, Carl O; Atkins, Michael S; Teske, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    The ability of metabolically diverse hyperthermophilic archaea to withstand high temperatures, low pHs, high sulfide concentrations, and the absence of carbon and energy sources was investigated. Close relatives of our study organisms, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Archaeoglobus profundus, Thermococcus fumicolans, and Pyrococcus sp. strain GB-D, are commonly found in hydrothermal vent chimney walls and hot sediments and possibly deeper in the subsurface, where highly dynamic hydrothermal flow patterns and steep chemical and temperature gradients provide an ever-changing mosaic of microhabitats. These organisms (with the possible exception of Pyrococcus strain GB-D) tolerated greater extremes of low pH, high sulfide concentration, and high temperature when actively growing and metabolizing than when starved of carbon sources and electron donors/acceptors. Therefore these organisms must be actively metabolizing in the hydrothermal vent chimneys, sediments, and subsurface in order to withstand at least 24 h of exposure to extremes of pH, sulfide, and temperature that occur in these environments.

  8. Diphthamide biosynthesis requires an Fe-S enzyme-generated organic radical

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Xuling; Torelli, Andrew T.; Lee, Michael; Dzikovski, Boris; Koralewski, Rachel M.; Wang, Eileen; Freed, Jack; Krebs, Carsten; Ealick, Steven E.; Lin, Hening

    2010-01-01

    Summary Archaeal and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 contain a unique posttranslationally modified histidine residue called “diphthamide”, the target of diphtheria toxin. The biosynthesis of diphthamide were proposed to involve three steps, with the first step being the formation of a C-C bond between the histidine residue and the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). However, details of the biosynthesis have remained unknown. Here we present structural and biochemical evidence showing that the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii uses a novel iron-sulfur cluster enzyme, Dph2. Dph2 is a homodimer and each monomer contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical data suggest that unlike the enzymes in the radical SAM superfamily, Dph2 does not form the canonical 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical. Instead, it breaks the Cγ,Met-S bond of SAM and generates a 3-amino-3-carboxylpropyl radical. This work suggests that Pyrococcus horikoshii Dph2 represents a novel SAM-dependent [4Fe-4S]-containing enzyme that catalyzes unprecedented chemistry. PMID:20559380

  9. Box C/D RNA guides for the ribose methylation of archaeal tRNAs. The tRNATrp intron guides the formation of two ribose-methylated nucleosides in the mature tRNATrp

    PubMed Central

    d’Orval, Béatrice Clouet; Bortolin, Marie-Line; Gaspin, Christine; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Following a search of the Pyrococcus genomes for homologs of eukaryotic methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs, we have experimentally identified in Pyrococcus abyssi four novel box C/D small RNAs predicted to direct 2′-O-ribose methylations onto the first position of the anticodon in tRNALeu(CAA), tRNALeu(UAA), elongator tRNAMet and tRNATrp, respectively. Remarkably, one of them corresponds to the intron of its presumptive target, pre-tRNATrp. This intron is predicted to direct in cis two distinct ribose methylations within the unspliced tRNA precursor, not only onto the first position of the anticodon in the 5′ exon but also onto position 39 (universal tRNA numbering) in the 3′ exon. The two intramolecular RNA duplexes expected to direct methylation, which both span an exon–intron junction in pre-tRNATrp, are phylogenetically conserved in euryarchaeotes. We have experimentally confirmed the predicted guide function of the box C/D intron in halophile Haloferax volcanii by mutagenesis analysis, using an in vitro splicing/RNA modification assay in which the two cognate ribose methylations of pre-tRNATrp are faithfully reproduced. Euryarchaeal pre-tRNATrp should provide a unique system to further investigate the molecular mechanisms of RNA-guided ribose methylation and gain new insights into the origin and evolution of the complex family of archaeal and eukaryotic box C/D small RNAs. PMID:11713301

  10. A new class of DNA photolyases present in various organisms including aplacental mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, A; Eker, A P; Yasuhira, S; Yajima, H; Kobayashi, T; Takao, M; Oikawa, A

    1994-01-01

    DNA photolyase specifically repairs UV light-induced cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers in DNA through a light-dependent reaction mechanism. We have obtained photolyase genes from Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), Oryzias latipes (killifish) and the marsupial Potorous tridactylis (rat kangaroo), the first photolyase gene cloned from a mammalian species. The deduced amino acid sequences of these higher eukaryote genes show only limited homology with microbial photolyase genes. Together with the previously cloned Carassius auratus (goldfish) gene they form a separate group of photolyase genes. A new classification for photolyases comprising two distantly related groups is proposed. For functional analysis P.tridactylis photolyase was expressed and purified as glutathione S-transferase fusion protein from Escherichia coli cells. The biologically active protein contained FAD as light-absorbing cofactor, a property in common with the microbial class photolyases. Furthermore, we found in the archaebacterium Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum a gene similar to the higher eukaryote photolyase genes, but we could not obtain evidence for the presence of a homologous gene in the human genome. Our results suggest a divergence of photolyase genes in early evolution. Images PMID:7813451

  11. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin

    PubMed Central

    Martin, William F.; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-01-01

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. PMID:26323761

  12. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-09-26

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe.

  13. Phylogenomic evidence for the presence of a flagellum and cbb(3) oxidase in the free-living mitochondrial ancestor.

    PubMed

    Sassera, Davide; Lo, Nathan; Epis, Sara; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Montagna, Matteo; Comandatore, Francesco; Horner, David; Peretó, Juli; Luciano, Alberto Maria; Franciosi, Federica; Ferri, Emanuele; Crotti, Elena; Bazzocchi, Chiara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Sacchi, Luciano; Moya, Andres; Latorre, Amparo; Bandi, Claudio

    2011-12-01

    The initiation of the intracellular symbiosis that would give rise to mitochondria and eukaryotes was a major event in the history of life on earth. Hypotheses to explain eukaryogenesis fall into two broad and competing categories: those proposing that the host was a phagocytotic proto-eukaryote that preyed upon the free-living mitochondrial ancestor (hereafter FMA), and those proposing that the host was an archaebacterium that engaged in syntrophy with the FMA. Of key importance to these hypotheses are whether the FMA was motile or nonmotile, and the atmospheric conditions under which the FMA thrived. Reconstructions of the FMA based on genome content of Rickettsiales representatives-generally considered to be the closest living relatives of mitochondria-indicate that it was nonmotile and aerobic. We have sequenced the genome of Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii, a novel and phylogenetically divergent member of the Rickettsiales. We found that it possesses unique gene sets found in no other Rickettsiales, including 26 genes associated with flagellar assembly, and a cbb(3)-type cytochrome oxidase. Phylogenomic analyses show that these genes were inherited in a vertical fashion from an ancestral α-proteobacterium, and indicate that the FMA possessed a flagellum, and could undergo oxidative phosphorylation under both aerobic and microoxic conditions. These results indicate that the FMA played a more active and potentially parasitic role in eukaryogenesis than currently appreciated and provide an explanation for how the symbiosis could have evolved under low levels of oxygen.

  14. Mass production of C50 carotenoids by Haloferax mediterranei in using extruded rice bran and starch under optimal conductivity of brined medium.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Will; Hsu, Shu-hui; Lin, Ming-Tse; Hsu, Yi-hui

    2015-12-01

    Microbial carotenoids have potentially healthcare or medical applications. Haloferax mediterranei was difficult to economically grow into a large quantities as well as producing a valuable pigment of carotenoids. This study reports a novel investigation into the optimal conductivity on the mass production of carotenoids from H. mediterranei. The major component at about 52.4% in the extracted red pigment has been confirmed as bacterioruberin, a C50 carotenoids, by liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry analysis. By maintaining higher conductivity of 40 S/m in the brined medium, the cell concentration attained to 7.73 × 10(9) cells/L with low pigments concentration of 125 mg/L. When the conductivity was controlled at about 30 S/m, we obtained the highest cell concentration to 1.29 × 10(10) cells/L with pigments of 361.4 mg/L. When the conductivity was maintained at optimal 25 S/m, the pigments can be increased to maximum value of 555.6 mg/L at lower cell concentration of 9.22 × 10(9) cells/L. But conductivity below 20 S/m will cause the significant decrease in cell concentration as well as pigments due to the osmotic stress around the cells. Red pigment of carotenoids from an extremely halophilic archaebacterium could be efficiently produced to a high concentration by applying optimal conductivity control in the brined medium with extruded low-cost rice bran and corn starch.

  15. Amphipathic polymers: tools to fold integral membrane proteins to their active form.

    PubMed

    Pocanschi, Cosmin L; Dahmane, Tassadite; Gohon, Yann; Rappaport, Fabrice; Apell, Hans-Jürgen; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2006-11-28

    Among the major obstacles to pharmacological and structural studies of integral membrane proteins (MPs) are their natural scarcity and the difficulty in overproducing them in their native form. MPs can be overexpressed in the non-native state as inclusion bodies, but inducing them to achieve their functional three-dimensional structure has proven to be a major challenge. We describe here the use of an amphipathic polymer, amphipol A8-35, as a novel environment that allows both beta-barrel and alpha-helical MPs to fold to their native state, in the absence of detergents or lipids. Amphipols, which are extremely mild surfactants, appear to favor the formation of native intramolecular protein-protein interactions over intermolecular or protein-surfactant ones. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated using as models OmpA and FomA, two outer membrane proteins from the eubacteria Escherichia coli and Fusobacterium nucleatum, respectively, and bacteriorhodopsin, a light-driven proton pump from the plasma membrane of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarium.

  16. Halococcus salifodinae sp. nov., an Archaeal Isolate from an Austrian Salt Mine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denner, Ewald B. M.; McGenity, Terry J.; Busse, Hans-Jurgen; Grant, William D.; Wanner, Gerhard; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1994-01-01

    A novel extremely halophilic archaeon (archaebacterium) was isolated from rock salt obtained from an Austrian salt mine. The deposition of the salt is thought to have occurred during the Permian period (225 x 106 to 280 x 10(exp 6) years ago). This organism grew over a pH range of 6.8 to 9.5. Electron microscopy revealed cocci in tetrads or larger clusters. The partial 16S rRNA sequences, polar lipid composition, and menaquinone content suggested that this organism was related to members of the genus Halococcus, while the whole-cell protein patterns, the presence of several unknown lipids, and the presence of pink pigmentation indicated that it was different from previously described coccoid halophiles. We propose that this isolate should be recognized as a new species and should be named Halococcus salifodinae. The type strain is Bl(sub p) (= ATCC 51437 = DSM 8989). A chemotaxonomically similar microorganism was isolated from a British salt mine.

  17. Evolution of the vacuolar H sup + -ATPase: Implications for the origin of eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Gogarten, J.P.; Kibak, H.; Dittrich, P.; Taiz, L.; Bowman, E.J.; Bowman, B.J. ); Manolson, M.F.; Poole, R.J. ); Date, Takayasu ); Oshima, Tairo; Konishi, Jin; Denda, Kimitoshi; Yoshida, Masasuke )

    1989-09-01

    Active transport across the vaculoar components of the eukaryotic endomembrane system is energized by a specific vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase. The amino acid sequences of the 70- and 60-kDa subunits of the vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase are {approx}25% identical to the {beta} and {alpha} subunits, respectively, of the eubacterial-type F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPases. The authors now report that the same vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase subunits are {approx}50% identical to the {alpha} and {beta} subunits, respectively, of the sulfur-metabolizing Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, an archaebacterium (Archaeobacterium). Moreover, the homologue of an 88-amino acid stretch near the amino-terminal end of the 70-kDa subunit is absent from the F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase {beta} subunit but is present in the {alpha} subunit of Sulfolobus. Since the two types of subunits are homologous to each other, they must have arisen by a gene duplication that occurred prior to the last common ancestor of the eubacteria, eukaryotes, and Sulfolobus. Thus, the phylogenetic tree of the subunits can be rooted at the site where the gene duplication occurred. The inferred evolutionary tree contains two main branches: a eubacterial branch and an eocyte branch that gave rise to Sulfolobus and the eukaryotic host cell. The implication is that the vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase of eukaryotes arose by the internalization of the plasma membrane H{sup +}-ATPase of an archaebacterial-like ancestral cell.

  18. An ecto-enzyme from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain 7 which catalyzes hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate, ATP, and ADP: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Wakagi, T; Oshima, T

    1993-09-01

    Membranes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium, show novel enzymatic activities to hydrolyze PPi, ATP, and ADP at an optimal pH of 3, equal to the growth optimum. The activity increased by about 2-fold on addition of PPi and/or Pi to the growth medium, when yeast extract and casamino acids were removed. The enzyme which hydrolyzes PPi at pH 3 was solubilized and purified by successive chromatographies. The final preparation showed a 26 kDa single band on SDS-PAGE, and a molecular mass of 35 kDa on gel permeation chromatography. The Km and Vmax for PPi were 0.16 mM and 33 mumol Pi released/min/mg at 55 degrees C. ATP and ADP were also good substrates. Divalent cations were not essential for activity. Substrate inhibition at more than 5 mM PPi, ATP or ADP was observed. AMP, glucose-6-phosphate, and p-nitrophenyl phosphate were not hydrolyzed at all. The activity was 4-fold stimulated by addition of the lipid fraction extracted from the organism.

  19. Pressure and Temperature Effects on Growth and Methane Production of the Extreme Thermophile Methanococcus jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jay F.; Shah, Nilesh N.; Nelson, Chad M.; Ludlow, Jan M.; Clark, Douglas S.

    1988-01-01

    The marine archaebacterium Methanococcus jannaschii was studied at high temperatures and hyperbaric pressures of helium to investigate the effect of pressure on the behavior of a deep-sea thermophile. Methanogenesis and growth (as measured by protein production) at both 86 and 90°C were accelerated by pressure up to 750 atm (1 atm = 101.29kPa), but growth was not observed above 90°C at either 7.8 or 250 atm. However, growth and methanogenesis were uncoupled above 90°C, and the high-temperature limit for methanogenesis was increased by pressure. Substantial methane formation was evident at 98°C and 250 atm, whereas no methane formation was observed at 94°C and 7.8 atm. In contrast, when argon was substituted for helium as the pressurizing gas at 250 atm, no methane was produced at 86°C. Methanogenesis was also suppressed at 86°C and 250 atm when the culture was pressurized with a 4:1 mix of H2 and CO2, although limited methanogenesis did occur when the culture was pressurized with H2. PMID:16347794

  20. Electrophysiological characterization of the archaeal transporter NCX_Mj using solid supported membrane technology

    PubMed Central

    Barthmes, Maria; Liao, Jun; Jiang, Youxing; Brüggemann, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Sodium–calcium exchangers (NCXs) are membrane transporters that play an important role in Ca2+ homeostasis and Ca2+ signaling. The recent crystal structure of NCX_Mj, a member of the NCX family from the archaebacterium Methanococcus jannaschii, provided insight into the atomistic details of sodium–calcium exchange. Here, we extend these findings by providing detailed functional data on purified NCX_Mj using solid supported membrane (SSM)–based electrophysiology, a powerful but unexploited tool for functional studies of electrogenic transporter proteins. We show that NCX_Mj is highly selective for Na+, whereas Ca2+ can be replaced by Mg2+ and Sr2+ and that NCX_Mj can be inhibited by divalent ions, particularly Cd2+. By directly comparing the apparent affinities of Na+ and Ca2+ for NCX_Mj with those for human NCX1, we show excellent agreement, indicating a strong functional similarity between NCX_Mj and its eukaryotic isoforms. We also provide detailed instructions to facilitate the adaption of this method to other electrogenic transporter proteins. Our findings demonstrate that NCX_Mj can serve as a model for the NCX family and highlight several possible applications for SSM-based electrophysiology. PMID:27241699

  1. N. sup. var epsilon. -acetyl-. beta. -lysine: An osmolyte synthesized by mothanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sowers, K.R.; Gunsalus, R.P. ); Robertson, D.E.; Noll, D.; Roberts, M.F. )

    1990-12-01

    Methanosarcina thermophila, a nonmarine methanogenic archaebacterium, can grow in a range of saline concentrations. At less than 0.4 M NaCl, Ms. thermophila accumulated glutamate in response to increasing osmotic stress. At greater than 0.4 M NaCl, this organism synthesized a modified {beta}-amino acid that was identified as N{sup {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine by NMR spectroscopy and ion-exchange HPLC. This {beta}-amino acid derivative accumulated to high intracellular concentrations (up to 0.6 M) in Ms. thermophila and in another methanogen examined - Methanogenium cariaci, a marine species. The compound has features that are characteristic of a compatible solute: it is neutrally charged at physiological pH and it is highly soluble. When the cells were grown in the presence of exogenous glycine betaine, a physiological pH and it is highly soluble. When the cells were grown in the presence of exogenous glycine betaine, a physiological compatible solute, N{sup {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine synthesis was repressed and glycine betaine was accumulated. N{sup {var epsilon}}-Acetyl-{beta}-lysine was synthesized by species from three phylogenetic families when grown in high solute concentrations, suggesting that it may be ubiquitous among the methanogens. The ability to control the biosynthesis of N{sup {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine in response to extracellular solute concentration indicates that the methanogenic archaebacteria have a unique {beta}-amino acid biosynthetic pathway that is osmotically regulated.

  2. Determining divergence times with a protein clock: update and reevaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, D. F.; Cho, G.; Doolittle, R. F.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    A recent study of the divergence times of the major groups of organisms as gauged by amino acid sequence comparison has been expanded and the data have been reanalyzed with a distance measure that corrects for both constraints on amino acid interchange and variation in substitution rate at different sites. Beyond that, the availability of complete genome sequences for several eubacteria and an archaebacterium has had a great impact on the interpretation of certain aspects of the data. Thus, the majority of the archaebacterial sequences are not consistent with currently accepted views of the Tree of Life which cluster the archaebacteria with eukaryotes. Instead, they are either outliers or mixed in with eubacterial orthologs. The simplest resolution of the problem is to postulate that many of these sequences were carried into eukaryotes by early eubacterial endosymbionts about 2 billion years ago, only very shortly after or even coincident with the divergence of eukaryotes and archaebacteria. The strong resemblances of these same enzymes among the major eubacterial groups suggest that the cyanobacteria and Gram-positive and Gram-negative eubacteria also diverged at about this same time, whereas the much greater differences between archaebacterial and eubacterial sequences indicate these two groups may have diverged between 3 and 4 billion years ago.

  3. Identification and characterization of an SPO11 homolog in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Guillemain, C; de Massy, B

    2000-01-01

    The SPO11/TOPVIA family includes proteins from archaebacteria and eukaryotes. The protein member from the archaebacterium Sulfulobus shibatae is the catalytic subunit of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, SPO11 is required for meiotic recombination, suggesting a conserved mechanism for the initiation step of this process. Indeed, S. cerevisiae SPO11 has been shown to be directly involved in the formation of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks that initiate meiotic recombination. Here, we report the identification of a Mus musculus Spo11 cDNA, which encodes a protein closely related to all members of the SPO11/TOPVIA family. cDNAs resulting from alternative splicing were detected, suggesting that there are potential variants of the mouse SPO11 protein. By RNA-blotting analysis, expression of the mouse Spo11 gene was detected only in the testis, in agreement with its predicted function in the initiation of meiotic recombination. We mapped the mouse Spo11 gene to chromosome 2, band H2-H4.

  4. A simple procedure to determine the infectivity and host range of viruses infecting anaerobic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Gorlas, Aurore; Geslin, Claire

    2013-03-01

    Plaque assay is the method traditionally used to isolate and purify lytic viruses, to determine the viral titer and host range. Whereas most bacterioviruses are either temperate or lytic, the majority of known archeoviruses are not lytic (i.e. they are temperate or chronic). In view of the widespread occurrence of such viruses in extreme environments, we designed an original method, called the inverted spot test, to determine the host range and infectivity of viruses isolated from anaerobic hyperthermophilic and sulfur-reducing microorganisms. Here, we used this approach to prove for the first time the infectivity of Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1) and to confirm the host range of Thermococcus prieurii virus 1 (TPV1), the only two viruses isolated so far from any of the described marine hyperthermophilic archaea (Euryarchaeota phylum, Thermococcales order).

  5. An archaeal peptidase assembles into two different quaternary structures: A tetrahedron and a giant octahedron.

    PubMed

    Schoehn, Guy; Vellieux, Frédéric M D; Asunción Durá, M; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Fabry, Céline M S; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Ebel, Christine; Roussel, Alain; Franzetti, Bruno

    2006-11-24

    Cellular proteolysis involves large oligomeric peptidases that play key roles in the regulation of many cellular processes. The cobalt-activated peptidase TET1 from the hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhTET1) was found to assemble as a 12-subunit tetrahedron and as a 24-subunit octahedral particle. Both quaternary structures were solved by combining x-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy data. The internal organization of the PhTET1 particles reveals highly self-compartmentalized systems made of networks of access channels extended by vast catalytic chambers. The two edifices display aminopeptidase activity, and their organizations indicate substrate navigation mechanisms different from those described in other large peptidase complexes. Compared with the tetrahedron, the octahedron forms a more expanded hollow structure, representing a new type of giant peptidase complex. PhTET1 assembles into two different quaternary structures because of quasi-equivalent contacts that previously have only been identified in viral capsids.

  6. Refinement of the Central Steps of Substrate Transport by the Aspartate Transporter GltPh: Elucidating the Role of the Na2 Sodium Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, SanthoshKannan; Saha, Kusumika; Sohail, Azmat; Sandtner, Walter; Freissmuth, Michael; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Sitte, Harald H.; Stockner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate homeostasis in the brain is maintained by glutamate transporter mediated accumulation. Impaired transport is associated with several neurological disorders, including stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Crystal structures of the homolog transporter GltPh from Pyrococcus horikoshii revealed large structural changes. Substrate uptake at the atomic level and the mechanism of ion gradient conversion into directional transport remained enigmatic. We observed in repeated simulations that two local structural changes regulated transport. The first change led to formation of the transient Na2 sodium binding site, triggered by side chain rotation of T308. The second change destabilized cytoplasmic ionic interactions. We found that sodium binding to the transiently formed Na2 site energized substrate uptake through reshaping of the energy hypersurface. Uptake experiments in reconstituted proteoliposomes confirmed the proposed mechanism. We reproduced the results in the human glutamate transporter EAAT3 indicating a conserved mechanics from archaea to humans. PMID:26485255

  7. Orientation of growing crystals of Co- or Gd-containing L-threonine dehydrogenase by magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Syou; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2009-12-01

    L-Threonine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (TDH) is a water-soluble metalloenzyme, the molecular structure of which has been unknown until recently. The Zn 2+ ion in the native TDH, prepared as a recombinant protein, is replaced artificially with Co 2+, Ni 2+ or Gd 3+. These samples are crystallized in homogeneous magnetic fields of 2-10 T. Half of the Co- or Gd-substituted crystals show magnetic orientation in a field of 2 T at 278 K whereas the crystals of the native TDH require a 4 T magnetic field for half orientation. The sensitivity to magnetic orientation can thus be increased by metal substitution. On the other hand, we cannot assign clear changes in the size, number, and quality of the native and metal-substituted crystals with and without the presence of the magnetic field.

  8. The Lrp family of transcription regulators in archaea.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel

    2010-11-30

    Archaea possess a eukaryotic-type basal transcription apparatus that is regulated by bacteria-like transcription regulators. A universal and abundant family of transcription regulators are the bacterial/archaeal Lrp-like regulators. The Lrp family is one of the best studied regulator families in archaea, illustrated by investigations of proteins from the archaeal model organisms: Sulfolobus, Pyrococcus, Methanocaldococcus, and Halobacterium. These regulators are extremely versatile in their DNA-binding properties, response to effector molecules, and molecular regulatory mechanisms. Besides being involved in the regulation of the amino acid metabolism, they also regulate central metabolic processes. It appears that these regulatory proteins are also involved in large regulatory networks, because of hierarchical regulations and the possible combinatorial use of different Lrp-like proteins. Here, we discuss the recent developments in our understanding of this important class of regulators.

  9. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; ...

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus , the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus , and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima . An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putativemore » proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.« less

  10. Diversity of CRISPR systems in the euryarchaeal Pyrococcales

    PubMed Central

    Norais, Cédric; Moisan, Annick; Gaspin, Christine; Clouet-d'Orval, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    Pyrococcales are members of the order Thermococcales, a group of hyperthermophilic euryarchaea that are frequently found in deep sea hydrothermal vents. Infectious genetic elements, such as plasmids and viruses, remain a threat even in this remote environment and these microorganisms have developed several ways to fight their genetic invaders. Among these are the recently discovered CRISPR systems. In this review, we have combined and condensed available information on genetic elements infecting the Thermococcales and on the multiple CRISPR systems found in the Pyrococcales to fight them. Their organization and mode of action will be presented with emphasis on the Type III-B system that is the only CRISPR system known to target RNA molecules in a process reminiscent of RNA interference. The intriguing case of Pyrococcus abyssi, which is among the rare strains to present a CRISPR system devoid of the universal cas1 and cas2 genes, is also discussed. PMID:23422322

  11. Evolution of translational elongation factor (EF) sequences: reliability of global phylogenies inferred from EF-1 alpha(Tu) and EF-2(G) proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Creti, R; Ceccarelli, E; Bocchetta, M; Sanangelantoni, A M; Tiboni, O; Palm, P; Cammarano, P

    1994-01-01

    The EF-2 coding genes of the Archaea Pyrococcus woesei and Desulfurococcus mobilis were cloned and sequenced. Global phylogenies were inferred by alternative tree-making methods from available EF-2(G) sequence data and contrasted with phylogenies constructed from the more conserved but shorter EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequences. Both the monophyly (sensu Hennig) of Archaea and their subdivision into the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota are consistently inferred by analysis of EF-2(G) sequences, usually at a high bootstrap confidence level. In contrast, EF-1 alpha(Tu) phylogenies tend to be inconsistent with one another and show low bootstrap confidence levels. While evolutionary distance and DNA maximum parsimony analyses of EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequences do show archaeal monophyly, protein parsimony and DNA maximum-likelihood analyses of these data do not. In no case, however, do any of the tree topologies inferred from EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequence analyses receive significant bootstrap support. PMID:8159735

  12. Cloning of Giardia lamblia heat shock protein HSP70 homologs: implications regarding origin of eukaryotic cells and of endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, R S; Aitken, K; Falah, M; Singh, B

    1994-01-01

    The genes for two different 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) homologs have been cloned and sequenced from the protozoan Giardia lamblia. On the basis of their sequence features, one of these genes corresponds to the cytoplasmic form of HSP70. The second gene, on the basis of its characteristic N-terminal hydrophobic signal sequence and C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention sequence (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu), is the equivalent of ER-resident GRP78 or the Bip family of proteins. Phylogenetic trees based on HSP70 sequences show that G. lamblia homologs show the deepest divergence among eukaryotic species. The identification of a GRP78 or Bip homolog in G. lamblia strongly suggests the existence of ER in this ancient eukaryote. Detailed phylogenetic analyses of HSP70 sequences by boot-strap neighbor-joining and maximum-parsimony methods show that the cytoplasmic and ER homologs form distinct subfamilies that evolved from a common eukaryotic ancestor by gene duplication that occurred very early in the evolution of eukaryotic cells. It is postulated that because of the essential "molecular chaperone" function of these proteins in translocation of other proteins across membranes, duplication of their genes accompanied the evolution of ER or nucleus in the eukaryotic cell ancestor. The presence in all eukaryotic cytoplasmic HSP70 homologs (including the cognate, heat-induced, and ER forms) of a number of autapomorphic sequence signatures that are not present in any prokaryotic or organellar homologs provides strong evidence regarding the monophyletic nature of eukaryotic lineage. Further, all eukaryotic HSP70 homologs share in common with the Gram-negative group of eubacteria a number of sequence features that are not present in any archaebacterium or Gram-positive bacterium, indicating their evolution from this group of organisms. Some implications of these findings regarding the evolution of eukaryotic cells and ER are discussed. Images PMID:8159675

  13. Transduction-Like Gene Transfer in the Methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 × 10−5 (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10−3 (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae. PMID:10321998

  14. Evolution of the vacuolar H+-ATPase: implications for the origin of eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, J P; Kibak, H; Dittrich, P; Taiz, L; Bowman, E J; Bowman, B J; Manolson, M F; Poole, R J; Date, T; Oshima, T

    1989-01-01

    Active transport across the vacuolar components of the eukaryotic endomembrane system is energized by a specific vacuolar H+-ATPase. The amino acid sequences of the 70- and 60-kDa subunits of the vacuolar H+-ATPase are approximately equal to 25% identical to the beta and alpha subunits, respectively, of the eubacterial-type F0F1-ATPases. We now report that the same vacuolar H+-ATPase subunits are approximately equal to 50% identical to the alpha and beta subunits, respectively, of the sulfur-metabolizing Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, an archaebacterium (Archaeobacterium). Moreover, the homologue of an 88-amino acid stretch near the amino-terminal end of the 70-kDa subunit is absent from the F0F1-ATPase beta subunit but is present in the alpha subunit of Sulfolobus. Since the two types of subunits (alpha and beta subunits; 60- and 70-kDa subunits) are homologous to each other, they must have arisen by a gene duplication that occurred prior to the last common ancestor of the eubacteria, eukaryotes, and Sulfolobus. Thus, the phylogenetic tree of the subunits can be rooted at the site where the gene duplication occurred. The inferred evolutionary tree contains two main branches: a eubacterial branch and an eocyte branch that gave rise to Sulfolobus and the eukaryotic host cell. The implication is that the vacuolar H+-ATPase of eukaryotes arose by the internalization of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase of an archaebacterial-like ancestral cell. Images PMID:2528146

  15. Protein Phylogenies and Signature Sequences: A Reappraisal of Evolutionary Relationships among Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, and Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhey S.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of shared conserved insertion or deletions (indels) in protein sequences is a special type of signature sequence that shows considerable promise for phylogenetic inference. An alternative model of microbial evolution based on the use of indels of conserved proteins and the morphological features of prokaryotic organisms is proposed. In this model, extant archaebacteria and gram-positive bacteria, which have a simple, single-layered cell wall structure, are termed monoderm prokaryotes. They are believed to be descended from the most primitive organisms. Evidence from indels supports the view that the archaebacteria probably evolved from gram-positive bacteria, and I suggest that this evolution occurred in response to antibiotic selection pressures. Evidence is presented that diderm prokaryotes (i.e., gram-negative bacteria), which have a bilayered cell wall, are derived from monoderm prokaryotes. Signature sequences in different proteins provide a means to define a number of different taxa within prokaryotes (namely, low G+C and high G+C gram-positive, Deinococcus-Thermus, cyanobacteria, chlamydia-cytophaga related, and two different groups of Proteobacteria) and to indicate how they evolved from a common ancestor. Based on phylogenetic information from indels in different protein sequences, it is hypothesized that all eukaryotes, including amitochondriate and aplastidic organisms, received major gene contributions from both an archaebacterium and a gram-negative eubacterium. In this model, the ancestral eukaryotic cell is a chimera that resulted from a unique fusion event between the two separate groups of prokaryotes followed by integration of their genomes. PMID:9841678

  16. Sensory rhodopsins I and II modulate a methylation/demethylation system in Halobacterium halobium phototaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, E.N.; Takahashi, T.; Spudich, J.L. )

    1989-10-01

    This work demonstrates that phototaxis stimuli in the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium control a methylation/demethylation system in vivo through photoactivation of sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) in either its attractant or repellent signaling form as well as through the repellent receptor sensory rhodopsin II (SR-II, also called phoborhodopsin). The effects of positive stimuli that suppress swimming reversals (i.e., an increase in attractant or decrease in repellent light) and negative stimuli that induce swimming reversals (i.e., a decrease in attractant or increase in repellent light) through each photoreceptor were monitored by assaying release of volatile (3H)methyl groups. This assay has been used to measure (3H)methanol produced during the process of adaptation to chemotactic stimuli in eubacteria. In H. halobium positive photostimuli produce a transient increase in the rate of demethylation followed by a decrease below the unstimulated value, whereas negative photostimuli cause an increase followed by a rate similar to that of the unstimulated value. Photoactivation of the SR-I attractant and simultaneous photoactivation of the SR-II repellent receptors cancel in their effects on demethylation, demonstrating the methylation system is regulated by an integrated signal. Analysis of mutants indicates that the source for the volatile methyl groups is intrinsic membrane proteins distinct from the chromoproteins that share the membrane. A methyl-accepting protein (94 kDa) previously correlated in amount with the SR-I chromoprotein (25 kDa) is shown here to be missing in a recently isolated SR-I-SR-II+ mutant (Flx3b), thus confirming the association of this protein with SR-I. Photoactivated SR-II in mutant Flx3b controls demethylation, predicting the existence of a photomodulated methyl-accepting component distinct from the 94-kDa protein of SR-I.

  17. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  18. The Assembly Motif of a Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of ∼100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85–104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly90, Leu91, Leu93, Ile94, Gly97, and Val98), defining a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in ∼2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  19. Halophilic class I aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: some salt-dependent structural features.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, G; Altekar, W

    1993-01-26

    Aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula vallismortis are stable only in high concentrations of KCl present within the physiological environment. Data concerning the structural changes in the two enzymes as a result of lowering of salt concentration and changes in pH were obtained by monitoring the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of quenchers. When the KCl concentrations were lowered below 2 M or in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, the emission maximum shifted to a longer wavelength, indicating enhanced exposure of tryptophyl residues to the solvent. The spectral characteristics of the two proteins in guanidine hydrochloride and 0.4 M KCl were identical. However, these denatured states appear to be different than those observed after acid denaturation. Further perturbation of fluorescence was observed due to I-, and application of the Stern-Volmer law showed that the total fluorescence was available to the quenchers only in 0.4 M KCl solutions. The unfolding of proteins in 0.4 M KCl was a gradual process which was accompanied by a time-dependent loss in enzyme activity. The activity loss was complete within 30 min for aldolase whereas in the case of GAPDH nearly 3 h was required for the destruction of activity. For both enzymes, inactivation and protein denaturation were strongly correlated. The data on activity and thermostability measurements of the two enzymes in varying concentrations of KCl and potassium phosphate revealed that though both proteins are halophilic, the forces in the maintenance of their stability could be different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. The sequences of heat shock protein 40 (DnaJ) homologs provide evidence for a close evolutionary relationship between the Deinococcus-thermus group and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bustard, K; Gupta, R S

    1997-08-01

    The genes encoding for heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40 or DnaJ) homologs were cloned and sequenced from the archaebacterium Halobacterium cutirubrum and the eubacterium Deinococcus proteolyticus to add to sequences from the gene banks. These genes were identified downstream of the Hsp70 (or DnaK) genes in genomic fragments spanning this region and, as in other prokaryotic species, Hsp70-Hsp40 genes are likely part of the same operon. The Hsp40 homolog from D. proteolyticus was found to be lacking a central 204 base pair region present in H. cutirubrum that encodes for the four cysteine-rich domains of the repeat consensus sequence CxxCxGxG (where x is any amino acid), present in most Hsp40 homologs. The available sequences from various archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes show that the same deletion is also present in the homologs from Thermus aquaticus and two cyanobacteria, but in no other species tested. This unique deletion and the clustering of homologs from the Deinococcus-Thermus group and cyanobacterial species in the Hsp40 phylogenetic trees suggest a close evolutionary relationship between these groups as was also shown recently for Hsp70 sequences (R.S. Gupta et al., J Bacteriol 179:345-357, 1997). Sequence comparisons indicate that the Hsp40 homologs are not as conserved as the Hsp70 sequences. Phylogenetic analysis provides no reliable information concerning evolutionary relationship between prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their usefulness in this regard is limited. However, in phylogenetic trees based on Hsp40 sequences, the two archaebacterial homologs showed a polyphyletic branching within Gram-positive bacteria, similar to that seen with Hsp70 sequences.

  1. Characterization of the MCM homohexamer from the thermoacidophilic euryarchaeon Picrophilus torridus

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Kasturi; Arora, Jasmine; Saha, Swati

    2015-01-01

    The typical archaeal MCM exhibits helicase activity independently in vitro. This study characterizes MCM from the euryarchaeon Picrophilus torridus. While PtMCM hydrolyzes ATP in DNA-independent manner, it displays very poor ability to unwind DNA independently, and then too only under acidic conditions. The protein exists stably in complex with PtGINS in whole cell lysates, interacting directly with PtGINS under neutral and acidic conditions. GINS strongly activates MCM helicase activity, but only at low pH. In consonance with this, PtGINS activates PtMCM-mediated ATP hydrolysis only at low pH, with the amount of ATP hydrolyzed during the helicase reaction increasing more than fifty-fold in the presence of GINS. While the stimulation of MCM-mediated helicase activity by GINS has been reported in MCMs from P.furiosus, T.kodakarensis, and very recently, T.acidophilum, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an MCM helicase demonstrating DNA unwinding activity only at such acidic pH, across all archaea and eukaryotes. PtGINS may induce/stabilize a conducive conformation of PtMCM under acidic conditions, favouring PtMCM-mediated DNA unwinding coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Our findings underscore the existence of divergent modes of replication regulation among archaea and the importance of investigating replication events in more archaeal organisms. PMID:25762096

  2. Size and Crystallinity in Protein-Templated Inorganic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Craig C.; Uchida, Masaki; Reichhardt, Courtney; Harrington, Richard; Kang, Sebyung; Klem, Michael T.; Parise, John B.; Douglas, Trevor

    2010-12-01

    Protein cages such as ferritins and virus capsids have been used as containers to synthesize a wide variety of protein-templated inorganic nanoparticles. While identification of the inorganic crystal phase has been successful in some cases, very little is known about the detailed nanoscale structure of the inorganic component. We have used pair distribution function analysis of total X-ray scattering to measure the crystalline domain size in nanoparticles of ferrihydrite, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, CoPt, and FePt grown inside 24-meric ferritin cages from H. sapiens and P. furiosus. The material properties of these protein-templated nanoparticles are influenced by processes at a variety of length scales: the chemistry of the material determines the precise arrangement of atoms at very short distances, while the interior volume of the protein cage constrains the maximum nanoparticle size attainable. At intermediate length scales, the size of coherent crystalline domains appears to be constrained by the arrangement of crystal nucleation sites on the interior of the cage. On the basis of these observations, some potential synthetic strategies for the control of crystalline domain size in protein-templated nanoparticles are suggested.

  3. [Experimental estimation of proteome size for cells and human plasma].

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, S N; Zgoda, V G; Maynskova, M A; Ronzhina, N L; Belyakova, N V; Legina, O K; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Huge range of concentrations of different protein and insufficient sensitivity of methods for detection of proteins at a single molecule level does not yet allow obtaining the whole image of human proteome. In our investigations, we tried to evaluate the size of different proteomes (cells and plasma). The approach used is based on detection of protein spots in 2-DE after staining by protein dyes with different sensitivities. The function representing the dependence of the number of protein spots on sensitivity of protein dyes was generated. Next, by extrapolation of this function curve to theoretical point of the maximum sensitivity (detection of a single smallest polypeptide) it was calculated that a single human cell (HepG2) may contain minimum 70,000 proteoforms, and plasma--1.5 mln. Utilization of this approach to other, smaller proteomes showed the competency of this extrapolation. For instance, the size of mycoplas ma (Acholeplasma laidlawii) was estimated in 1100 proteoforms, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)--40,000, E. coli--6200, P. furiosus--3400. In hepatocytes, the amount of proteoforms was the same as in HepG2--70,000. Significance of obtained data is in possibilities to estimating the proteome organization and planning next steps in its study.

  4. GELBANK : A database of annotated two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns of biological systems with completed genomes.

    SciTech Connect

    Babnigg, G.; Giometti, C. S.; Biosciences Division

    2004-01-01

    GELBANK is a publicly available database of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) gel patterns of proteomes from organisms with known genome information (available at and ftp://bioinformatics.anl.gov/gelbank/). Currently it includes 131 completed, mostly microbial proteomes available from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. A web interface allows the upload of 2D gel patterns and their annotation for registered users. The images are organized by species, tissue type, separation method, sample type and staining method. The database can be queried based on protein or 2DE-pattern attributes. A web interface allows registered users to assign molecular weight and pH gradient profiles to their own 2D gel patterns as well as to link protein identifications to a given spot on the pattern. The website presents all of the submitted 2D gel patterns where the end-user can dynamically display the images or parts of images along with molecular weight, pH profile information and linked protein identification. A collection of images can be selected for the creation of animations from which the user can select sub-regions of interest and unlimited 2D gel patterns for visualization. The website currently presents 233 identifications for 81 gel patterns for Homo sapiens, Methanococcus jannaschii, Pyro coccus furiosus, Shewanella oneidensis, Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans.

  5. Purification, characterization, and gene cloning of thermopsin, a thermostable acid protease from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Tang, J

    1990-01-25

    A thermostable, acid proteolytic activity has been found to be associated with the cells and in the culture medium of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, an archaebacterium. This acid protease, which has been named thermopsin, was purified to homogeneity from the culture medium by a five-step procedure including column chromatographies on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, Sephadex G-100, monoQ (fast protein liquid chromatography), and gel filtration (high pressure liquid chromatography). The purified thermopsin produced a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the proteolytic activity was associated with the band. Thermopsin is a single-chain protein as indicated by gel electrophoresis and by a single NH2-terminal sequence. It has maximal proteolytic activity at pH 2 and 90 degrees C. A genomic library of S. acidocaldarius was prepared and screened by an oligonucleotide probe designed from the NH2-terminal sequence of thermopsin. Five positive clones were isolated. From these clones the thermopsin gene was mapped and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence showed that the thermopsin structure is encoded in 1020 bases. In the deduced protein sequence, there are 41 amino acid residues (including the initiation Met) preceding the NH2-terminal position of thermopsin. Most of these residues appear to be characteristic of a leader sequence. However, the presence in this region of a short pro sequence cannot be ruled out. Thermopsin contains a single cysteine at residue 237 that is not essential for activity (Fusek, M., Lin, X.-L., Tang, J. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 1496-1501. Thermopsin has no apparent sequence similarity to aspartic proteases of the pepsin family nor to pepstatin-insensitive acid protease (Maita, T., Nagata, S., Matsuda, G., Murata, S., Oda, K., Murao, S., and Tsura, D. (1984) J. Biochem. 95, 465-475) and thus may represent a new class of acid proteases. Also absent is the characteristic active site aspartyl sequence

  6. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  7. A novel microbial habitat in the mid-ocean ridge subseafloor.

    PubMed

    Summit, M; Baross, J A

    2001-02-27

    The subseafloor at the mid-ocean ridge is predicted to be an excellent microbial habitat, because there is abundant space, fluid flow, and geochemical energy in the porous, hydrothermally influenced oceanic crust. These characteristics also make it a good analog for potential subsurface extraterrestrial habitats. Subseafloor environments created by the mixing of hot hydrothermal fluids and seawater are predicted to be particularly energy-rich, and hyperthermophilic microorganisms that broadly reflect such predictions are ejected from these systems in low-temperature ( approximately 15 degrees C), basalt-hosted diffuse effluents. Seven hyperthermophilic heterotrophs isolated from low-temperature diffuse fluids exiting the basaltic crust in and near two hydrothermal vent fields on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, were compared phylogenetically and physiologically to six similarly enriched hyperthermophiles from samples associated with seafloor metal sulfide structures. The 13 organisms fell into four distinct groups: one group of two organisms corresponding to the genus Pyrococcus and three groups corresponding to the genus Thermococcus. Of these three groups, one was composed solely of sulfide-derived organisms, and the other two related groups were composed of subseafloor organisms. There was no evidence of restricted exchange of organisms between sulfide and subseafloor habitats, and therefore this phylogenetic distinction indicates a selective force operating between the two habitats. Hypotheses regarding the habitat differences were generated through comparison of the physiology of the two groups of hyperthermophiles; some potential differences between these habitats include fluid flow stability, metal ion concentrations, and sources of complex organic matter.

  8. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  9. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  10. Evolution of tRNAPhe:imG2 methyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of wyosine derivatives in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Urbonavičius, Jaunius; Rutkienė, Rasa; Lopato, Anželika; Tauraitė, Daiva; Stankevičiūtė, Jonita; Aučynaitė, Agota; Kaliniene, Laura; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Meškys, Rolandas

    2016-01-01

    Tricyclic wyosine derivatives are found at position 37 of eukaryotic and archaeal tRNAPhe. In Archaea, the intermediate imG-14 is targeted by three different enzymes that catalyze the formation of yW-86, imG, and imG2. We have suggested previously that a peculiar methyltransferase (aTrm5a/Taw22) likely catalyzes two distinct reactions: N1-methylation of guanosine to yield m1G; and C7-methylation of imG-14 to yield imG2. Here we show that the recombinant aTrm5a/Taw22-like enzymes from both Pyrococcus abyssi and Nanoarchaeum equitans indeed possess such dual specificity. We also show that substitutions of individual conservative amino acids of P. abyssi Taw22 (P260N, E173A, and R174A) have a differential effect on the formation of m1G/imG2, while replacement of R134, F165, E213, and P262 with alanine abolishes the formation of both derivatives of G37. We further demonstrate that aTrm5a-type enzyme SSO2439 from Sulfolobus solfataricus, which has no N1-methyltransferase activity, exhibits C7-methyltransferase activity, thereby producing imG2 from imG-14. We thus suggest renaming such aTrm5a methyltransferases as Taw21 to distinguish between monofunctional and bifunctional aTrm5a enzymes. PMID:27852927

  11. Comparative structural biology of eubacterial and archaeal oligosaccharyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Nyirenda, James; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Kohda, Daisuke

    2010-02-12

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid donor to an asparagine residue in nascent polypeptide chains. In the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni, a single-subunit membrane protein, PglB, catalyzes N-glycosylation. We report the 2.8 A resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of PglB and its comparison with the previously determined structure from the archaeon Pyrococcus AglB. The two distantly related oligosaccharyltransferases share unexpected structural similarity beyond that expected from the sequence comparison. The common architecture of the putative catalytic sites revealed a new catalytic motif in PglB. Site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed the contribution of this motif to the catalytic function. Bacterial PglB and archaeal AglB constitute a protein family of the catalytic subunit of OST along with STT3 from eukaryotes. A structure-aided multiple sequence alignment of the STT3/PglB/AglB protein family revealed three types of OST catalytic centers. This novel classification will provide a useful framework for understanding the enzymatic properties of the OST enzymes from Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria.

  12. A New Thermophilic Nitrilase from an Antarctic Hyperthermophilic Microorganism.

    PubMed

    Dennett, Geraldine V; Blamey, Jenny M

    2016-01-01

    Several environmental samples from Antarctica were collected and enriched to search for microorganisms with nitrilase activity. A new thermostable nitrilase from a novel hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus sp. M24D13 was purified and characterized. The activity of this enzyme increased as the temperatures rise from 70 up to 85°C. Its optimal activity occurred at 85°C and pH 7.5. This new enzyme shows a remarkable resistance to thermal inactivation retaining more than 50% of its activity even after 8 h of incubation at 85°C. In addition, this nitrilase is highly versatile demonstrating activity toward different substrates, such as benzonitrile (60 mM, aromatic nitrile) and butyronitrile (60 mM, aliphatic nitrile), with a specific activity of 3286.7 U mg(-1) of protein and 4008.2 U mg(-1) of protein, respectively. Moreover the enzyme NitM24D13 also presents cyanidase activity. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) and V máx of this Nitrilase for benzonitrile were 0.3 mM and 333.3 μM min(-1), respectively, and the specificity constant (k cat/K m) for benzonitrile was 2.05 × 10(5) s(-1) M(-1).

  13. RNase H-dependent PCR (rhPCR): improved specificity and single nucleotide polymorphism detection using blocked cleavable primers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly used to detect the presence of nucleic acid sequences both in research and diagnostic settings. While high specificity is often achieved, biological requirements sometimes necessitate that primers are placed in suboptimal locations which lead to problems with the formation of primer dimers and/or misamplification of homologous sequences. Results Pyrococcus abyssi (P.a.) RNase H2 was used to enable PCR to be performed using blocked primers containing a single ribonucleotide residue which are activated via cleavage by the enzyme (rhPCR). Cleavage occurs 5'-to the RNA base following primer hybridization to the target DNA. The requirement of the primer to first hybridize with the target sequence to gain activity eliminates the formation of primer-dimers and greatly reduces misamplification of closely related sequences. Mismatches near the scissile linkage decrease the efficiency of cleavage by RNase H2, further increasing the specificity of the assay. When applied to the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rhPCR was found to be far more sensitive than standard allele-specific PCR. In general, the best discrimination occurs when the mismatch is placed at the RNA:DNA base pair. Conclusion rhPCR eliminates the formation of primer dimers and markedly improves the specificity of PCR with respect to off-target amplification. These advantages of the assay should find utility in challenging qPCR applications such as genotyping, high level multiplex assays and rare allele detection. PMID:21831278

  14. Tuning the ion selectivity of glutamate transporter–associated uncoupled conductances

    PubMed Central

    Cater, Rosemary J.; Vandenberg, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of glutamate within a glutamatergic synapse is tightly regulated by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). In addition to their primary role in clearing extracellular glutamate, the EAATs also possess a thermodynamically uncoupled Cl− conductance. This conductance is activated by the binding of substrate and Na+, but the direction of Cl− flux is independent of the rate or direction of substrate transport; thus, the two processes are thermodynamically uncoupled. A recent molecular dynamics study of the archaeal EAAT homologue GltPh (an aspartate transporter from Pyrococcus horikoshii) identified an aqueous pore at the interface of the transport and trimerization domains, through which anions could permeate, and it was suggested that an arginine residue at the most restricted part of this pathway might play a role in determining anion selectivity. In this study, we mutate this arginine to a histidine in the human glutamate transporter EAAT1 and investigate the role of the protonation state of this residue on anion selectivity and transporter function. Our results demonstrate that a positive charge at this position is crucial for determining anion versus cation selectivity of the uncoupled conductance of EAAT1. In addition, because the nature of this residue influences the turnover rate of EAAT1, we reveal an intrinsic link between the elevator movement of the transport domain and the Cl− channel. PMID:27296367

  15. Identification and characterization of a novel thermostable gh-57 gene from metagenomic fosmid library of the Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothemal vent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Gong, Yingxue; Xie, Wei; Xiao, Wenjuan; Wang, Junmei; Zheng, Yangyang; Hu, Jia; Liu, Zehuan

    2011-08-01

    A novel glycoside hydrolases family 57 gene (gh-57) was found from a metagenomic fosmid library constructed from a black smoker chimney sample 4143-1 from the Mothra hydrothermal vent at the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sequence and homology analysis using BLAST revealed that it had high similarity to gh-57 family. Conserved domain research revealed that the novel gh-57 contained a Glyco-hydro-57 domain and five conserved regions, including two putative catalytic residues Glu¹⁵⁴ and Asp²⁶³. The three-dimensional features of the protein and its homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 known as α-amylase were generated by homology modeling. The gh-57 gene was cloned, expressed, and purified in Escherichia coli using pQE system. Enzyme activity revealed that the recombinant protein could hydrolyze soluble starch and demonstrated amylase activity. It showed an optimal pH of 7.5, an optimal temperature of 90 °C, and its thermostability at 90 °C could remain over 50% enzyme activity for 4 h. The enzyme activity could be increased by DTT and Mg²⁺ while an inhibitory effect was observed with EDTA, ATP, and Ca²⁺. These results showed that the gh-57 gene was a novel thermostable amylase from oceanic microorganisms.

  16. Insights into Dynamics of Mobile Genetic Elements in Hyperthermophilic Environments from Five New Thermococcus Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles. PMID:23326305

  17. Structure of the dodecamer of the aminopeptidase APDkam598 from the archaeon Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, T. E.; Slutskaya, E. S.; Boyko, K. M.; Sokolova, O. S.; Rakitina, T. V.; Korzhenevskiy, D. A.; Gorbacheva, M. A.; Bezsudnova, E. Y.; Popov, V. O.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the aminopeptidase APDkam589 from the thermophilic crenarchaeon Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis was determined at a resolution of 3.0 Å. In the crystal, the monomer of APDkam589 and its symmetry-related monomers are densely packed to form a 12-subunit complex. Single-particle electron-microscopy analysis confirms that APDkam589 is present as a compact dodecamer in solution. The APDkam589 molecule is built similarly to the molecules of the PhTET peptidases, which have the highest sequence identity to APDkam589 among known structures and were isolated from the more thermostable archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii. A comparison of the interactions of the subunits in APDkam589 with those in PhTET1, PhTET2 and PhTET3 reveals that APDkam589 has a much lower total number of salt bridges, which correlates with the lower thermostability of APDkam589. The monomer of APDkam589 has six Trp residues, five of which are on the external surface of the dodecamer. A superposition of the structure of APDkam589 with those having a high sequence similarity to APDkam589 reveals that, although the positions of Trp45, Trp252 and Trp358 are not conserved in the sequences, the spatial locations of the Trp residues in these models are similar. PMID:25760701

  18. Comparison of Three Ionic Liquid-Tolerant Cellulases by Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Vance; Burney, Patrick; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2015-01-01

    We have employed molecular dynamics to investigate the differences in ionic liquid tolerance among three distinct family 5 cellulases from Trichoderma viride, Thermogata maritima, and Pyrococcus horikoshii. Simulations of the three cellulases were conducted at a range of temperatures in various binary mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate with water. Our analysis demonstrates that the effects of ionic liquids on the enzymes vary in each individual case from local structural disturbances to loss of much of one of the enzyme’s secondary structure. Enzymes with more negatively charged surfaces tend to resist destabilization by ionic liquids. Specific and unique structural changes in the enzymes are induced by the presence of ionic liquids. Disruption of the secondary structure, changes in dynamical motion, and local changes in the binding pocket are observed in less tolerant enzymes. Ionic-liquid-induced denaturation of one of the enzymes is indicated over the 500 ns timescale. In contrast, the most tolerant cellulase behaves similarly in water and in ionic-liquid-containing mixtures. Unlike the heuristic approaches that attempt to predict enzyme stability using macroscopic properties, molecular dynamics allows us to predict specific atomic-level structural and dynamical changes in an enzyme’s behavior induced by ionic liquids and other mixed solvents. Using these insights, we propose specific experimentally testable hypotheses regarding the origin of activity loss for each of the systems investigated in this study. PMID:25692593

  19. Crystal structures of the bifunctional tRNA methyltransferase Trm5a

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caiyan; Jia, Qian; Chen, Ran; Wei, Yuming; Li, Juntao; Ma, Jie; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    tRNA methyltransferase Trm5 catalyses the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to G37 in eukaryotes and archaea. The N1-methylated guanosine is the product of the initial step of the wyosine hypermodification, which is essential for the maintenance of the reading frame during translation. As a unique member of this enzyme family, Trm5a from Pyrococcus abyssi (PaTrm5a) catalyses not only the methylation of N1, but also the further methylation of C7 on 4-demethylwyosine at position 37 to produce isowyosine, but the mechanism for the double methylation is poorly understood. Here we report four crystal structures of PaTrm5a ranging from 1.7- to 2.3-Å, in the apo form or in complex with various SAM analogues. These structures reveal that Asp243 specifically recognises the base moiety of SAM at the active site. Interestingly, the protein in our structures all displays an extended conformation, quite different from the well-folded conformation of Trm5b from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii reported previously, despite their similar overall architectures. To rule out the possibilities of crystallisation artefacts, we conducted the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. The FRET data suggested that PaTrm5a adopts a naturally extended conformation in solution, and therefore the open conformation is a genuine state of PaTrm5a. PMID:27629654

  20. Regulation of riboflavin biosynthesis and transport genes in bacteria by transcriptional and translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Vitreschak, Alexey G.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Mironov, Andrey A.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2002-01-01

    The riboflavin biosynthesis in bacteria was analyzed using comparative analysis of genes, operons and regulatory elements. A model for regulation based on formation of alternative RNA structures involving the RFN elements is suggested. In Gram-positive bacteria including actinomycetes, Thermotoga, Thermus and Deinococcus, the riboflavin metabolism and transport genes are predicted to be regulated by transcriptional attenuation, whereas in most Gram-negative bacteria, the riboflavin biosynthesis genes seem to be regulated on the level of translation initiation. Several new candidate riboflavin transporters were identified (impX in Desulfitobacterium halfniense and Fusobacterium nucleatum; pnuX in several actinomycetes, including some Corynebacterium species and Strepto myces coelicolor; rfnT in Rhizobiaceae). Traces of a number of likely horizontal transfer events were found: the complete riboflavin operon with the upstream regulatory element was transferred to Haemophilus influenzae and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from some Gram-positive bacterium; non-regulated riboflavin operon in Pyrococcus furiousus was likely transferred from Thermotoga; and the RFN element was inserted into the riboflavin operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from some other Pseudomonas species, where it had regulated the ribH2 gene. PMID:12136096

  1. Extending the sub-sea-floor biosphere.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Erwan G; Bonavita, Marie-Anne Cambon; Querellou, Joël; Cragg, Barry A; Webster, Gordon; Prieur, Daniel; Parkes, R John

    2008-05-23

    Sub-sea-floor sediments may contain two-thirds of Earth's total prokaryotic biomass. However, this has its basis in data extrapolation from ~500-meter to 4-kilometer depths, whereas the deepest documented prokaryotes are from only 842 meters. Here, we provide evidence for low concentrations of living prokaryotic cells in the deepest (1626 meters below the sea floor), oldest (111 million years old), and potentially hottest (~100 degrees C) marine sediments investigated. These Newfoundland margin sediments also have DNA sequences related to thermophilic and/or hyperthermophilic Archaea. These form two unique clusters within Pyrococcus and Thermococcus genera, suggesting unknown, uncultured groups are present in deep, hot, marine sediments (~54 degrees to 100 degrees C). Sequences of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea were also present, suggesting a deep biosphere partly supported by methane. These findings demonstrate that the sub-sea-floor biosphere extends to at least 1600 meters below the sea floor and probably deeper, given an upper temperature limit for prokaryotic life of at least 113 degrees C and increasing thermogenic energy supply with depth.

  2. Crystal structures of type III{sub H} NAD-dependent D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase from two thermophiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.M.; Pampa, K.J.; Manjula, M.; Hemantha Kumar, G.; Kunishima, Naoki; Lokanath, N.K.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Determined the crystal structures of PGDH from two thermophiles. • Monomer is composed of nucleotide binding domain and substrate binding domain. • Crystal structures of type III{sub H} PGDH. - Abstract: In the L-Serine biosynthesis, D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH) catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-3-phosphoglycerate to phosphohydroxypyruvate. PGDH belongs to 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases family. We have determined the crystal structures of PGDH from Sulfolobus tokodaii (StPGDH) and Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPGDH) using X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.77 Å and 1.95 Å, respectively. The PGDH protomer from both species exhibits identical structures, consisting of substrate binding domain and nucleotide binding domain. The residues and water molecules interacting with the NAD are identified. The catalytic triad residues Glu-His-Arg are highly conserved. The residues involved in the dimer interface and the structural features responsible for thermostability are evaluated. Overall, structures of PGDHs with two domains and histidine at the active site are categorized as type III{sub H} and such PGDHs structures having this type are reported for the first time.

  3. Transcription factor IID in the Archaea: sequences in the Thermococcus celer genome would encode a product closely related to the TATA-binding protein of eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, T. L.; Reich, C. I.; Whitelock, R. B.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The first step in transcription initiation in eukaryotes is mediated by the TATA-binding protein, a subunit of the transcription factor IID complex. We have cloned and sequenced the gene for a presumptive homolog of this eukaryotic protein from Thermococcus celer, a member of the Archaea (formerly archaebacteria). The protein encoded by the archaeal gene is a tandem repeat of a conserved domain, corresponding to the repeated domain in its eukaryotic counterparts. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the two halves of the repeat are consistent with the duplication occurring before the divergence of the archael and eukaryotic domains. In conjunction with previous observations of similarity in RNA polymerase subunit composition and sequences and the finding of a transcription factor IIB-like sequence in Pyrococcus woesei (a relative of T. celer) it appears that major features of the eukaryotic transcription apparatus were well-established before the origin of eukaryotic cellular organization. The divergence between the two halves of the archael protein is less than that between the halves of the individual eukaryotic sequences, indicating that the average rate of sequence change in the archael protein has been less than in its eukaryotic counterparts. To the extent that this lower rate applies to the genome as a whole, a clearer picture of the early genes (and gene families) that gave rise to present-day genomes is more apt to emerge from the study of sequences from the Archaea than from the corresponding sequences from eukaryotes.

  4. Large scale production of the active human ASCT2 (SLC1A5) transporter in Pichia pastoris--functional and kinetic asymmetry revealed in proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Pingitore, Piero; Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Hedfalk, Kristina; Indiveri, Cesare

    2013-09-01

    The human glutamine/neutral amino acid transporter ASCT2 (hASCT2) was over-expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified by Ni(2+)-chelating and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein was reconstituted in liposomes by detergent removal with a batch-wise procedure. Time dependent [(3)H]glutamine/glutamine antiport was measured in proteoliposomes which was active only in the presence of external Na(+). Internal Na(+) slightly stimulated the antiport. Optimal activity was found at pH7.0. A substantial inhibition of the transport was observed by Cys, Thr, Ser, Ala, Asn and Met (≥70%) and by mercurials and methanethiosulfonates (≥80%). Heterologous antiport of [(3)H]glutamine with other neutral amino acids was also studied. The transporter showed asymmetric specificity for amino acids: Ala, Cys, Val, Met were only inwardly transported, while Gln, Ser, Asn, and Thr were transported bi-directionally. From kinetic analysis of [(3)H]glutamine/glutamine antiport Km values of 0.097 and 1.8mM were measured on the external and internal sides of proteoliposomes, respectively. The Km for Na(+) on the external side was 32mM. The homology structural model of the hASCT2 protein was built using the GltPh of Pyrococcus horikoshii as template. Cys395 was the only Cys residue externally exposed, thus being the potential target of SH reagents inhibition and, hence, potentially involved in the transport mechanism.

  5. Thermodynamic stability and folding of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms.

    PubMed

    Luke, Kathryn A; Higgins, Catherine L; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2007-08-01

    Life grows almost everywhere on earth, including in extreme environments and under harsh conditions. Organisms adapted to high temperatures are called thermophiles (growth temperature 45-75 degrees C) and hyperthermophiles (growth temperature >or= 80 degrees C). Proteins from such organisms usually show extreme thermal stability, despite having folded structures very similar to their mesostable counterparts. Here, we summarize the current data on thermodynamic and kinetic folding/unfolding behaviors of proteins from hyperthermophilic microorganisms. In contrast to thermostable proteins, rather few (i.e. less than 20) hyperthermostable proteins have been thoroughly characterized in terms of their in vitro folding processes and their thermodynamic stability profiles. Examples that will be discussed include co-chaperonin proteins, iron-sulfur-cluster proteins, and DNA-binding proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria (i.e. Aquifex and Theromotoga) and archea (e.g. Pyrococcus, Thermococcus, Methanothermus and Sulfolobus). Despite the small set of studied systems, it is clear that super-slow protein unfolding is a dominant strategy to allow these proteins to function at extreme temperatures.

  6. A New Thermophilic Nitrilase from an Antarctic Hyperthermophilic Microorganism

    PubMed Central

    Dennett, Geraldine V.; Blamey, Jenny M.

    2016-01-01

    Several environmental samples from Antarctica were collected and enriched to search for microorganisms with nitrilase activity. A new thermostable nitrilase from a novel hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus sp. M24D13 was purified and characterized. The activity of this enzyme increased as the temperatures rise from 70 up to 85°C. Its optimal activity occurred at 85°C and pH 7.5. This new enzyme shows a remarkable resistance to thermal inactivation retaining more than 50% of its activity even after 8 h of incubation at 85°C. In addition, this nitrilase is highly versatile demonstrating activity toward different substrates, such as benzonitrile (60 mM, aromatic nitrile) and butyronitrile (60 mM, aliphatic nitrile), with a specific activity of 3286.7 U mg−1 of protein and 4008.2 U mg−1 of protein, respectively. Moreover the enzyme NitM24D13 also presents cyanidase activity. The apparent Michaelis–Menten constant (Km) and Vmáx of this Nitrilase for benzonitrile were 0.3 mM and 333.3 μM min−1, respectively, and the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for benzonitrile was 2.05 × 105 s−1 M−1. PMID:26973832

  7. Structure of the EndoMS-DNA Complex as Mismatch Restriction Endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Setsu; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Kouki; Kouyama, Ken-Ichi; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Archaeal NucS nuclease was thought to degrade the single-stranded region of branched DNA, which contains flapped and splayed DNA. However, recent findings indicated that EndoMS, the orthologous enzyme of NucS, specifically cleaves double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing mismatched bases. In this study, we determined the structure of the EndoMS-DNA complex. The complex structure of the EndoMS dimer with dsDNA unexpectedly revealed that the mismatched bases were flipped out into binding sites, and the overall architecture most resembled that of restriction enzymes. The structure of the apo form was similar to the reported structure of Pyrococcus abyssi NucS, indicating that movement of the C-terminal domain from the resting state was required for activity. In addition, a model of the EndoMS-PCNA-DNA complex was preliminarily verified with electron microscopy. The structures strongly support the idea that EndoMS acts in a mismatch repair pathway.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ST1022, a putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators isolated from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Noboru; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri Matsunaga, Emiko; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-11-01

    A putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, ST1022 from S. tokodaii strain 7, has been purified and crystallized in the absence and presence of the effector l-glutamine. A molecular-replacement solution was found using the FL11 transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus sp. OT3 as a model and structural refinement is under way. The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, also known as feast/famine transcriptional regulators, are widely distributed among bacteria and archaea. This family of proteins are likely to be involved in cellular metabolism, with exogenous amino acids functioning as effectors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ST1022, a member of the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, is reported with and without exogenous glutamine as the effector molecule. The crystals of native ST1022 and of the putative complex belong to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.771, c = 73.297 Å and a = b = 103.846, c = 73.992 Å, respectively. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis and molecular-replacement solution revealed the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit.

  9. Multisite-specific archaeosine tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (ArcTGT) from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a thermo-acidophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Takuya; Hirata, Akira; Ohno, Satoshi; Nomura, Yuichiro; Nagano, Tomoko; Nameki, Nobukazu; Yokogawa, Takashi; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Archaeosine (G+), which is found only at position 15 in many archaeal tRNA, is formed by two steps, the replacement of the guanine base with preQ0 by archaeosine tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (ArcTGT) and the subsequent modification of preQ0 to G+ by archaeosine synthase. However, tRNALeu from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a thermo-acidophilic archaeon, exceptionally has two G+13 and G+15 modifications. In this study, we focused on the biosynthesis mechanism of G+13 and G+15 modifications in this tRNALeu. Purified ArcTGT from Pyrococcus horikoshii, for which the tRNA recognition mechanism and structure were previously characterized, exchanged only the G15 base in a tRNALeu transcript with 14C-guanine. In contrast, T. acidophilum cell extract exchanged both G13 and G15 bases. Because T. acidophilum ArcTGT could not be expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli, we employed an expression system using another thermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus kodakarensis. The arcTGT gene in T. kodakarensis was disrupted, complemented with the T. acidophilum arcTGT gene, and tRNALeu variants were expressed. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified tRNALeu variants revealed the modifications of G+13 and G+15 in the wild-type tRNALeu. Thus, T. acidophilum ArcTGT has a multisite specificity and is responsible for the formation of both G+13 and G+15 modifications. PMID:26721388

  10. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-08-22

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same 'double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs.

  11. Cloning and Characterization of an alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Mark L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular alpha-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  12. Cloning and Characterization of an Alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular a-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  13. Post-translational environmental switch of RadA activity by extein–intein interactions in protein splicing

    PubMed Central

    Topilina, Natalya I.; Novikova, Olga; Stanger, Matthew; Banavali, Nilesh K.; Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational control based on an environmentally sensitive intervening intein sequence is described. Inteins are invasive genetic elements that self-splice at the protein level from the flanking host protein, the exteins. Here we show in Escherichia coli and in vitro that splicing of the RadA intein located in the ATPase domain of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii is strongly regulated by the native exteins, which lock the intein in an inactive state. High temperature or solution conditions can unlock the intein for full activity, as can remote extein point mutations. Notably, this splicing trap occurs through interactions between distant residues in the native exteins and the intein, in three-dimensional space. The exteins might thereby serve as an environmental sensor, releasing the intein for full activity only at optimal growth conditions for the native organism, while sparing ATP consumption under conditions of cold-shock. This partnership between the intein and its exteins, which implies coevolution of the parasitic intein and its host protein may provide a novel means of post-translational control. PMID:26101259

  14. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same ‘double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs. PMID:27548043

  15. The Cm56 tRNA modification in archaea is catalyzed either by a specific 2′-O-methylase, or a C/D sRNP

    PubMed Central

    RENALIER, MARIE-HÉLÈNE; JOSEPH, NICOLE; GASPIN, CHRISTINE; THEBAULT, PATRICIA; MOUGIN, ANNIE

    2005-01-01

    We identified the first archaeal tRNA ribose 2′-O-methylase, aTrm56, belonging to the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) 1303 that contains archaeal genes only. The corresponding protein exhibits a SPOUT S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferase domain found in bacterial and yeast G18 tRNA 2′-O-methylases (SpoU, Trm3). We cloned the Pyrococcus abyssi PAB1040 gene belonging to this COG, expressed and purified the corresponding protein, and showed that in vitro, it specifically catalyzes the AdoMet-dependent 2′-O-ribose methylation of C at position 56 in tRNA transcripts. This tRNA methylation is present only in archaea, and the gene for this enzyme is present in all the archaeal genomes sequenced up to now, except in the crenarchaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum. In this archaea, the C56 2′-O-methylation is provided by a C/D sRNP. Our work is the first demonstration that, within the same kingdom, two different mechanisms are used to modify the same nucleoside in tRNAs. PMID:15987815

  16. Using lanthanoid complexes to phase large macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Talon, Romain; Kahn, Richard; Durá, M Asunción; Maury, Olivier; Vellieux, Frédéric M D; Franzetti, Bruno; Girard, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Lanthanoid ions exhibit extremely large anomalous X-ray scattering at their L(III) absorption edge. They are thus well suited for anomalous diffraction experiments. A novel class of lanthanoid complexes has been developed that combines the physical properties of lanthanoid atoms with functional chemical groups that allow non-covalent binding to proteins. Two structures of large multimeric proteins have already been determined by using such complexes. Here the use of the luminescent europium tris-dipicolinate complex [Eu(DPA)(3)](3-) to solve the low-resolution structure of a 444 kDa homododecameric aminopeptidase, called PhTET1-12s from the archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii, is reported. Surprisingly, considering the low resolution of the data, the experimental electron density map is very well defined. Experimental phases obtained by using the lanthanoid complex lead to maps displaying particular structural features usually observed in higher-resolution maps. Such complexes open a new way for solving the structure of large molecular assemblies, even with low-resolution data.

  17. Bioinformatic and biochemical analysis of a novel maltose-forming α-amylase of the GH57 family in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus sp. CL1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun-Jung; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Jung, Dong-Hyun; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2014-06-10

    Maltose-forming α-amylase is a glycoside hydrolase family 57 (GH57) member that is unique because it displays dual hydrolysis activity toward α-1,4- and α-1,6-glycosidic linkages and only recognizes maltose. This enzyme was previously identified only in Pyrococcus sp. ST04 (PSMA); however, we recently found two homologs subgroups in Thermococcus species. One subgroup (subgroup A) showed relatively high amino acid sequence similarity to PSMA (>71%), while the other subgroup (subgroup B) showed lower homology with PSMA (<59%). To characterize the subgroup B maltose-forming α-amylase from Thermococcus species (TCMA), we cloned the CL1_0868 gene from Thermococcus sp. CL1 and then successfully expressed the gene in Escherichia coli. Although TCMA has a different oligomeric state relative to PSMA, TCMA showed similar substrate specificity. However, TCMA was shown to hydrolyze maltooligosaccharides more easily than PSMA. Also, TCMA displayed different optimum conditions depending on the glycosidic linkage of the substrate. TCMA had the highest activity at 85°C and at pH 5.0 for α-1,4-glycosidic linkage hydrolysis whereas it showed its maximal activity to cleave α-1,6-glycosidic linkages at 98°C and pH 6.0.

  18. Comparison of three ionic liquid-tolerant cellulases by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Vance; Burney, Patrick; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2015-02-17

    We have employed molecular dynamics to investigate the differences in ionic liquid tolerance among three distinct family 5 cellulases from Trichoderma viride, Thermogata maritima, and Pyrococcus horikoshii. Simulations of the three cellulases were conducted at a range of temperatures in various binary mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate with water. Our analysis demonstrates that the effects of ionic liquids on the enzymes vary in each individual case from local structural disturbances to loss of much of one of the enzyme's secondary structure. Enzymes with more negatively charged surfaces tend to resist destabilization by ionic liquids. Specific and unique structural changes in the enzymes are induced by the presence of ionic liquids. Disruption of the secondary structure, changes in dynamical motion, and local changes in the binding pocket are observed in less tolerant enzymes. Ionic-liquid-induced denaturation of one of the enzymes is indicated over the 500 ns timescale. In contrast, the most tolerant cellulase behaves similarly in water and in ionic-liquid-containing mixtures. Unlike the heuristic approaches that attempt to predict enzyme stability using macroscopic properties, molecular dynamics allows us to predict specific atomic-level structural and dynamical changes in an enzyme's behavior induced by ionic liquids and other mixed solvents. Using these insights, we propose specific experimentally testable hypotheses regarding the origin of activity loss for each of the systems investigated in this study.

  19. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Circular Substrates for an Archaeal RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hubert F; Heliou, Alice; Djaout, Kamel; Lestini, Roxane; Regnier, Mireille; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2017-03-09

    It is only recently that the abundant presence of circular RNAs (circRNAs) in all kingdoms of Life, including the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has emerged. This led us to investigate the physiological significance of a previously observed weak intramolecular ligation activity of Pab1020 RNA ligase. Here we demonstrate that this enzyme, despite sharing significant sequence similarity with DNA ligases, is indeed an RNA-specific polynucleotide ligase efficiently acting on physiologically significant substrates. Using a combination of RNA immunoprecipitation assays and RNA-seq, our genome-wide studies revealed 133 individual circRNA loci in P. abyssi. The large majority of these loci interacted with Pab1020 in cells and circularization of selected C/D Box and 5S rRNA transcripts was confirmed biochemically. Altogether these studies revealed that Pab1020 is required for RNA circularization. Our results further suggest the functional speciation of an ancestral NTase domain and/or DNA ligase towards RNA ligase activity and prompt for further characterization of the widespread functions of circular RNAs in prokaryotes. Detailed insight into the cellular substrates of Pab1020 may facilitate the development of new biotechnological applications e.g. in ligation of preadenylated adaptors to RNA molecules.

  20. Habitat suitability of the Carolina madtom, an imperiled, endemic stream fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, S.R.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Aday, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Carolina madtom Noturus furiosus is an imperiled stream ictalurid that is endemic to the Tar and Neuse River basins in North Carolina. The Carolina madtom is listed as a threatened species by the state of North Carolina, and whereas recent distribution surveys have found that the Tar River basin population occupies a range similar to its historical range, the Neuse River basin population has shown recent significant decline. Quantification of habitat requirements and availability is critical for effective management and subsequent survival of the species. We investigated six reaches (three in each basin) to (1) quantify Carolina madtom microhabitat use, availability, and suitability; (2) compare suitable microhabitat availability between the two basins; and (3) examine use of an instream artificial cover unit. Carolina madtoms were located and their habitat was quantified at four of the six survey reaches. They most frequently occupied shallow to moderate depths of swift moving water over a sand substrate and used cobble for cover. Univariate and principal components analyses both showed that Carolina madtom use of instream habitat was selective (i.e., nonrandom). Interbasin comparisons suggested that suitable microhabitats were more prevalent in the impacted Neuse River basin than in the Tar River basin. We suggest that other physical or biotic effects may be responsible for the decline in the Neuse River basin population. We designed instream artificial cover units that were occupied by Carolina madtoms (25% of the time) and occasionally by other organisms. Carolina madtom abundance among all areas treated with the artificial cover unit was statistically higher than that in the control areas, demonstrating use of artificial cover when available. Microhabitat characteristics of occupied artificial cover units closely resembled those of natural instream microhabitat used by Carolina madtoms; these units present an option for conservation and restoration if

  1. Dynamics of RNA modification by a multi-site-specific tRNA methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Hamdane, Djemel; Guelorget, Amandine; Guérineau, Vincent; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    In most organisms, the widely conserved 1-methyl-adenosine58 (m1A58) tRNA modification is catalyzed by an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent, site-specific enzyme TrmI. In archaea, TrmI also methylates the adjacent adenine 57, m1A57 being an obligatory intermediate of 1-methyl-inosine57 formation. To study this multi-site specificity, we used three oligoribonucleotide substrates of Pyrococcus abyssi TrmI (PabTrmI) containing a fluorescent 2-aminopurine (2-AP) at the two target positions and followed the RNA binding kinetics and methylation reactions by stopped-flow and mass spectrometry. PabTrmI did not modify 2-AP but methylated the adjacent target adenine. 2-AP seriously impaired the methylation of A57 but not A58, confirming that PabTrmI methylates efficiently the first adenine of the A57A58A59 sequence. PabTrmI binding provoked a rapid increase of fluorescence, attributed to base unstacking in the environment of 2-AP. Then, a slow decrease was observed only with 2-AP at position 57 and SAM, suggesting that m1A58 formation triggers RNA release. A model of the protein–tRNA complex shows both target adenines in proximity of SAM and emphasizes no major tRNA conformational change except base flipping during the reaction. The solvent accessibility of the SAM pocket is not affected by the tRNA, thereby enabling S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine to be replaced by SAM without prior release of monomethylated tRNA. PMID:25217588

  2. Characterization of the biosynthetic pathway of glucosylglycerate in the archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Empadinhas, Nuno; Gonçalves, Luís; Lamosa, Pedro; Santos, Helena; da Costa, Milton S

    2006-02-01

    The pathway for the synthesis of the organic solute glucosylglycerate (GG) is proposed based on the activities of the recombinant glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS) and glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate phosphatase (GpgP) from Methanococcoides burtonii. A mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate phosphatase gene homologue (mpgP) was found in the genome of M. burtonii (http://www.jgi.doe.gov), but an mpgS gene coding for mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) was absent. The gene upstream of the mpgP homologue encoded a putative glucosyltransferase that was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant product had GpgS activity, catalyzing the synthesis of glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (GPG) from GDP-glucose and d-3-phosphoglycerate, with a high substrate specificity. The recombinant MpgP protein dephosphorylated GPG to GG and was also able to dephosphorylate mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (MPG) but no other substrate tested. Similar flexibilities in substrate specificity were confirmed in vitro for the MpgPs from Thermus thermophilus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, and "Dehalococcoides ethenogenes." GpgS had maximal activity at 50 degrees C. The maximal activity of GpgP was at 50 degrees C with GPG as the substrate and at 60 degrees C with MPG. Despite the similarity of the sugar donors GDP-glucose and GDP-mannose, the enzymes for the synthesis of GPG or MPG share no amino acid sequence identity, save for short motifs. However, the hydrolysis of GPG and MPG is carried out by phosphatases encoded by homologous genes and capable of using both substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the elucidation of a biosynthetic pathway for glucosylglycerate.

  3. Characterization of the Biosynthetic Pathway of Glucosylglycerate in the Archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Joana; Empadinhas, Nuno; Gonçalves, Luís; Lamosa, Pedro; Santos, Helena; da Costa, Milton S.

    2006-01-01

    The pathway for the synthesis of the organic solute glucosylglycerate (GG) is proposed based on the activities of the recombinant glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS) and glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate phosphatase (GpgP) from Methanococcoides burtonii. A mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate phosphatase gene homologue (mpgP) was found in the genome of M. burtonii (http://www.jgi.doe.gov), but an mpgS gene coding for mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) was absent. The gene upstream of the mpgP homologue encoded a putative glucosyltransferase that was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant product had GpgS activity, catalyzing the synthesis of glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (GPG) from GDP-glucose and d-3-phosphoglycerate, with a high substrate specificity. The recombinant MpgP protein dephosphorylated GPG to GG and was also able to dephosphorylate mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (MPG) but no other substrate tested. Similar flexibilities in substrate specificity were confirmed in vitro for the MpgPs from Thermus thermophilus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, and “Dehalococcoides ethenogenes.” GpgS had maximal activity at 50°C. The maximal activity of GpgP was at 50°C with GPG as the substrate and at 60°C with MPG. Despite the similarity of the sugar donors GDP-glucose and GDP-mannose, the enzymes for the synthesis of GPG or MPG share no amino acid sequence identity, save for short motifs. However, the hydrolysis of GPG and MPG is carried out by phosphatases encoded by homologous genes and capable of using both substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the elucidation of a biosynthetic pathway for glucosylglycerate. PMID:16428406

  4. Modeling of tRNA-assisted mechanism of Arg activation based on a structure of Arg-tRNA synthetase, tRNA, and an ATP analog (ANP).

    PubMed

    Konno, Michiko; Sumida, Tomomi; Uchikawa, Emiko; Mori, Yukie; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeuki

    2009-09-01

    The ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction catalyzed by Arg-tRNA, Gln-tRNA and Glu-tRNA synthetases requires the assistance of the cognate tRNA. tRNA also assists Arg-tRNA synthetase in catalyzing the pyrophosphorolysis of synthetic Arg-AMP at low pH. The mechanism by which the 3'-end A76, and in particular its hydroxyl group, of the cognate tRNA is involved with the exchange reaction catalyzed by those enzymes has yet to be established. We determined a crystal structure of a complex of Arg-tRNA synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii, tRNA(Arg)(CCU) and an ATP analog with Rfactor = 0.213 (Rfree = 0.253) at 2.0 A resolution. On the basis of newly obtained structural information about the position of ATP bound on the enzyme, we constructed a structural model for a mechanism in which the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 2'-OH group of A76 of tRNA and the carboxyl group of Arg induces both formation of Arg-AMP (Arg + ATP --> Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate) and pyrophosphorolysis of Arg-AMP (Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate --> Arg + ATP) at low pH. Furthermore, we obtained a structural model of the molecular mechanism for the Arg-tRNA synthetase-catalyzed deacylation of Arg-tRNA (Arg-tRNA + AMP --> Arg-AMP + tRNA at high pH), in which the deacylation of aminoacyl-tRNA bound on Arg-tRNA synthetase and Glu-tRNA synthetase is catalyzed by a quite similar mechanism, whereby the proton-donating group (-NH-C+(NH2)2 or -COOH) of Arg and Glu assists the aminoacyl transfer from the 2'-OH group of tRNA to the phosphate group of AMP at high pH.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of unusually thermostable CutA1 protein from human brain and its protease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Sawano, Masahide; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Takehira, Michiyo; Kunishima, Naoki; Katoh, Etsuko; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-03-01

    Unusually stable proteins are a disadvantage for the metabolic turnover of proteins in cells. The CutA1 proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii and from Oryza sativa (OsCutA1) have unusually high denaturation temperatures (Td) of nearly 150 and 100 °C, respectively, at pH 7.0. It seemed that the CutA1 protein from the human brain (HsCutA1) also has a remarkably high stability. Therefore, the thermodynamic stabilities of HsCutA1 and its protease susceptibility were examined. The Td was remarkably high, being over 95 °C at pH 7.0. The unfolding Gibbs energy (ΔG(0)H2O) was 174 kJ/mol at 37 °C from the denaturant denaturation. The thermodynamic analysis showed that the unfolding enthalpy and entropy values of HsCutA1 were considerably lower than those of OsCutA1 with a similar stability to HsCutA1, which should be related to flexibility of the unstructured properties in both N- and C-terminals of HsCutA1. HsCutA1 was almost completely digested after 1-day incubation at 37 °C by subtilisin, although OsCutA1 was hardly digested at the same conditions. These results indicate that easily available fragmentation of HsCutA1 with remarkably high thermodynamic stability at the body temperature should be important for its protein catabolism in the human cells.

  6. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Zeldes, Benjamin M; Keller, Matthew W; Loder, Andrew J; Straub, Christopher T; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  7. Composition of archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryal RuBisCO genotypes in three Western Pacific arc hydrothermal vent systems.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam Easa; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    We studied the diversity of all forms of the RuBisCO large subunit-encoding gene cbbL in three RuBisCO uncharacterized hydrothermal vent communities. This diversity included the archaeal cbbL and the forms IC and ID, which have not previously been studied in the deep-sea environment, in addition to the forms IA, IB and II. Vent plume sites were Fryer and Pika in the Mariana arc and the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin, Japan. The cbbL forms were PCR amplified from plume bulk microbial DNA and then cloned and sequenced. Archaeal cbbL was detected in the Mariana samples only. Both forms IA and II were amplified from all samples, while the form IC was amplified only from the Pika and Suiyo samples. Only the Suiyo sample showed amplification of the form ID. The form IB was not recorded in any sample. Based on rarefaction analysis, nucleotide diversity and average pairwise difference, the archaeal cbbL was the most diverse form in Mariana samples, while the bacterial form IA was the most diverse form in the Suiyo sample. Also, the Pika sample harbored the highest diversity of cbbL phylogenetic lineages. Based on pairwise reciprocal library comparisons, the Fryer and Pika archaeal cbbL libraries showed the most significant difference, while Pika and Suiyo showed the highest similarity for forms IA and II libraries. This suggested that the Fryer supported the most divergent sequences. All archaeal cbbL sequences formed unique phylogenetic lineages within the branches of anaerobic thermophilic archaea of the genera Pyrococcus, Archaeoglobus, and Methanococcus. The other cbbL forms formed novel phylogenetic clusters distinct from any recorded previously in other deep-sea habitats. This is the first evidence for the diversity of archaeal cbbL in environmental samples.

  8. Crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of oligosaccharyltransferase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.75 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Igura, Mayumi; Nyirenda, James; Matsumoto, Masaki; Yuzawa, Satoru; Noda, Nobuo; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2012-05-22

    Protein N-glycosylation occurs in the three domains of life. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) transfers glycan to asparagine in the N-glycosylation sequon. The catalytic subunit of OST is called STT3 in eukaryotes, AglB in archaea, and PglB in eubacteria. The genome of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, encodes three AglB paralogs. Two of them are the shortest AglBs across all domains of life. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the smallest AglB to identify the minimal structural unit. The Archaeoglobus AglB lacked a β-barrel-like structure, which had been found in other AglB and PglB structures. In agreement, the deletion in a larger Pyrococcus AglB confirmed its dispensability for the activity. By contrast, the Archaeoglobus AglB contains a kinked helix bearing a conserved motif, called DK/MI motif. The lysine and isoleucine residues in the motif participate in the Ser/Thr recognition in the sequon. The Archaeoglobus AglB structure revealed that the kinked helix contained an unexpected insertion. A revised sequence alignment based on this finding identified a variant type of the DK motif with the insertion. A mutagenesis study of the Archaeoglobus AglB confirmed the contribution of this particular type of the DK motif to the activity. When taken together with our previous results, this study defined the classification of OST: one group consisting of eukaryotes and most archaea possesses the DK-type Ser/Thr pocket, and the other group consisting of eubacteria and the remaining archaea possesses the MI-type Ser/Thr pocket. This classification provides a useful framework for OST studies.

  9. Structure–function analysis of Plasmodium RNA triphosphatase and description of a triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme superfamily that includes Cet1-like RNA triphosphatases and CYTH proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chunling; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    RNA triphosphatase catalyzes the first step in mRNA capping. The RNA triphosphatases of fungi and protozoa are structurally and mechanistically unrelated to the analogous mammalian enzyme, a situation that recommends RNA triphosphatase as an anti-infective target. Fungal and protozoan RNA triphosphatases belong to a family of metal-dependent phosphohydrolases exemplified by yeast Cet1. The Cet1 active site is unusually complex and located within a topologically closed hydrophilic β-barrel (the triphosphate tunnel). Here we probe the active site of Plasmodium falciparum RNA triphosphatase by targeted mutagenesis and thereby identify eight residues essential for catalysis. The functional data engender an improved structural alignment in which the Plasmodium counterparts of the Cet1 tunnel strands and active-site functional groups are located with confidence. We gain insight into the evolution of the Cet1-like triphosphatase family by noting that the heretofore unique tertiary structure and active site of Cet1 are recapitulated in recently deposited structures of proteins from Pyrococcus (PBD 1YEM) and Vibrio (PDB 2ACA). The latter proteins exemplify a CYTH domain found in CyaB-like adenylate cyclases and mammalian thiamine triphosphatase. We conclude that the tunnel fold first described for Cet1 is the prototype of a larger enzyme superfamily that includes the CYTH branch. This superfamily, which we name “triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme,” is distributed widely among bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal taxa. It is now clear that Cet1-like RNA triphosphatases did not arise de novo in unicellular eukarya in tandem with the emergence of caps as the defining feature of eukaryotic mRNA. They likely evolved by incremental changes in an ancestral tunnel enzyme that conferred specificity for RNA 5′-end processing. PMID:16809816

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering reveals the assembly mode and oligomeric architecture of TET, a large, dodecameric aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Appolaire, Alexandre; Girard, Eric; Colombo, Matteo; Durá, M. Asunción; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Franzetti, Bruno; Gabel, Frank

    2014-11-01

    The present work illustrates that small-angle neutron scattering, deuteration and contrast variation, combined with in vitro particle reconstruction, constitutes a very efficient approach to determine subunit architectures in large, symmetric protein complexes. In the case of the 468 kDa heterododecameric TET peptidase machine, it was demonstrated that the assembly of the 12 subunits is a highly controlled process and represents a way to optimize the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The specific self-association of proteins into oligomeric complexes is a common phenomenon in biological systems to optimize and regulate their function. However, de novo structure determination of these important complexes is often very challenging for atomic-resolution techniques. Furthermore, in the case of homo-oligomeric complexes, or complexes with very similar building blocks, the respective positions of subunits and their assembly pathways are difficult to determine using many structural biology techniques. Here, an elegant and powerful approach based on small-angle neutron scattering is applied, in combination with deuterium labelling and contrast variation, to elucidate the oligomeric organization of the quaternary structure and the assembly pathways of 468 kDa, hetero-oligomeric and symmetric Pyrococcus horikoshii TET2–TET3 aminopeptidase complexes. The results reveal that the topology of the PhTET2 and PhTET3 dimeric building blocks within the complexes is not casual but rather suggests that their quaternary arrangement optimizes the catalytic efficiency towards peptide substrates. This approach bears important potential for the determination of quaternary structures and assembly pathways of large oligomeric and symmetric complexes in biological systems.

  11. Evidence of Molecular Adaptation to Extreme Environments and Applicability to Space Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipovic, M. D.; Ognjanovic, S.; Ognjanovic, M.

    2008-06-01

    This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile): Escherichia coli (E. coli K12), will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0° C (Metarhizium frigidum (M.~frigidum) and Methanococcoides burtonii (M.~burtonii)) and 110° C (Methanopyrus kandleri (M.~kandleri)). Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used for these studies: Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M.~jannaschii), M.~kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A.~fulgidus) and three species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes where such information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data are needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were analysed for

  12. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  13. Intein-Promoted Cyclization of Aspartic Acid Flanking the Intein Leads to Atypical N-Terminal Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Christopher J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Colelli, Kathryn M; Liu, Xinyue; Linhardt, Robert J; Wang, Chunyu; Gomez, Alvin V; Reitter, Julie N; Mills, Kenneth V

    2017-02-28

    Protein splicing is a post-translational reaction facilitated by an intein, or intervening protein, which involves the removal of the intein and the ligation of the flanking polypeptides, or exteins. A DNA polymerase II intein from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab PolII intein) can promote protein splicing in vitro on incubation at high temperature. Mutation of active site residues Cys1, Gln185, and Cys+1 to Ala results in an inactive intein precursor, which cannot promote the steps of splicing, including cleavage of the peptide bond linking the N-extein and intein (N-terminal cleavage). Surprisingly, coupling the inactivating mutations to a change of the residue at the C-terminus of the N-extein (N-1 residue) from the native Asn to Asp reactivates N-terminal cleavage at pH 5. Similar "aspartic acid effects" have been observed in other proteins and peptides but usually only occur at lower pH values. In this case, however, the unusual N-terminal cleavage is abolished by mutations to catalytic active site residues and unfolding of the intein, indicating that this cleavage effect is mediated by the intein active site and the intein fold. We show via mass spectrometry that the reaction proceeds through cyclization of Asp resulting in anhydride formation coupled to peptide bond cleavage. Our results add to the richness of the understanding of the mechanism of protein splicing and provide insight into the stability of proteins at moderately low pH. The results also explain, and may help practitioners avoid, a side reaction that may complicate intein applications in biotechnology.

  14. Derivative of Extremophilic 50S Ribosomal Protein L35Ae as an Alternative Protein Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lomonosova, Anna V.; Ulitin, Andrei B.; Kazakov, Alexei S.; Mirzabekov, Tajib A.; Permyakov, Eugene A.

    2017-01-01

    Small antibody mimetics, or alternative binding proteins (ABPs), extend and complement antibody functionality with numerous applications in research, diagnostics and therapeutics. Given the superiority of ABPs, the last two decades have witnessed development of dozens of alternative protein scaffolds (APSs) for the design of ABPs. Proteins from extremophiles with their high structural stability are especially favorable for APS design. Here, a 10X mutant of the 50S ribosomal protein L35Ae from hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii has been probed as an APS. A phage display library of L35Ae 10X was generated by randomization of its three CDR-like loop regions (repertoire size of 2×108). Two L35Ae 10X variants specific to a model target, the hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL), were isolated from the resulting library using phage display. The affinity of these variants (L4 and L7) to HEL ranges from 0.10 μM to 1.6 μM, according to surface plasmon resonance data. While L4 has 1–2 orders of magnitude lower affinity to HEL homologue, bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA), L7 is equally specific to HEL and BLA. The reference L35Ae 10X is non-specific to both HEL and BLA. L4 and L7 are more resistant to denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride compared to the reference L35Ae 10X (mid-transition concentration is higher by 0.1–0.5 M). Chemical crosslinking experiments reveal an increased propensity of L4 and L7 to multimerization. Overall, the CDR-like loop regions of L35Ae 10X represent a proper interface for generation of functional ABPs. Hence, L35Ae is shown to extend the growing family of protein scaffolds dedicated to the design of novel binding proteins. PMID:28103321

  15. Extremophilic 50S Ribosomal RNA-Binding Protein L35Ae as a Basis for Engineering of an Alternative Protein Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lomonosova, Anna V.; Ovchinnikova, Elena V.; Kazakov, Alexei S.; Denesyuk, Alexander I.; Sofin, Alexander D.; Mikhailov, Roman V.; Ulitin, Andrei B.; Mirzabekov, Tajib A.; Permyakov, Eugene A.; Permyakov, Sergei E.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their remarkably high structural stability, proteins from extremophiles are particularly useful in numerous biological applications. Their utility as alternative protein scaffolds could be especially valuable in small antibody mimetic engineering. These artificial binding proteins occupy a specific niche between antibodies and low molecular weight substances, paving the way for development of innovative approaches in therapeutics, diagnostics, and reagent use. Here, the 50S ribosomal RNA-binding protein L35Ae from the extremophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii has been probed for its potential to serve as a backbone in alternative scaffold engineering. The recombinant wild type L35Ae has a native-like secondary structure, extreme thermal stability (mid-transition temperature of 90°C) and a moderate resistance to the denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride (half-transition at 2.6 M). Chemical crosslinking and dynamic light scattering data revealed that the wild type L35Ae protein has a propensity for multimerization and aggregation correlating with its non-specific binding to a model cell surface of HEK293 cells, as evidenced by flow cytometry. To suppress these negative features, a 10-amino acid mutant (called L35Ae 10X) was designed, which lacks the interaction with HEK293 cells, is less susceptible to aggregation, and maintains native-like secondary structure and thermal stability. However, L35Ae 10X also shows lowered resistance to guanidine hydrochloride (half-transition at 2.0M) and is more prone to oligomerization. This investigation of an extremophile protein’s scaffolding potential demonstrates that lowered resistance to charged chemical denaturants and increased propensity to multimerization may limit the utility of extremophile proteins as alternative scaffolds. PMID:26247602

  16. Two complementary enzymes for threonylation of tRNA in crenarchaeota: crystal structure of Aeropyrum pernix threonyl-tRNA synthetase lacking a cis-editing domain.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Sato, Yoshiteru; Miyashita, Yu-Ichiro; Hoque, Md Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sagara, Tsubasa; Tsunoda, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Takénaka, Akio

    2009-11-27

    In protein synthesis, threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) must recognize threonine (Thr) from the 20 kinds of amino acids and the cognate tRNA(Thr) from different tRNAs in order to generate Thr-tRNA(Thr). In general, an organism possesses one kind of gene corresponding to ThrRS. However, it has been recently found that some organisms have two different genes for ThrRS in the genome, suggesting that their proteins ThrRS-1 and ThrRS-2 function separately and complement each other in the threonylation of tRNA(Thr), one for catalysis and the other for trans-editing of misacylated Ser-tRNA(Thr). In order to clarify their three-dimensional structures, we performed X-ray analyses of two putatively assigned ThrRSs from Aeropyrum pernix (ApThrRS-1 and ApThrRS-2). These proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure of ApThrRS-1 has been successfully determined at 2.3 A resolution. ApThrRS-1 is a dimeric enzyme composed of two identical subunits, each containing two domains for the catalytic reaction and for anticodon binding. The essential editing domain is completely missing as expected. These structural features reveal that ThrRS-1 catalyzes only the aminoacylation of the cognate tRNA, suggesting the necessity of the second enzyme ThrRS-2 for trans-editing. Since the N-terminal sequence of ApThrRS-2 is similar to the sequence of the editing domain of ThrRS from Pyrococcus abyssi, ApThrRS-2 has been expected to catalyze deaminoacylation of a misacylated serine moiety at the CCA terminus.

  17. Use of a Tn5-based transposon system to create a cost-effective Zymomonas mobilis for ethanol production from lignocelluloses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current methods of ethanol production from lignocelluloses generate a mixture of sugars, primarily glucose and xylose; the fermentation cells are always exposed to stresses like high temperature and low nutritional conditions that affect their growth and productivity. Stress-tolerant strains capable of using both glucose and xylose to produce ethanol with high yield are highly desirable. Results A recombinant Zymomonas mobilis (Z. mobilis) designated as HYMX was constructed by integrating seven genes (Pfu-sHSP, yfdZ, metB, xylA, xylB, tktA and talB) into the genome of Z. mobilis CP4 (CP4) via Tn5 transposon in the present study. The small heat shock protein gene (Pfu-sHSP) from Pyrococcus furious (P. furious) was used to increase the heat-tolerance, the yfdZ and metB genes from E. coli were used to decrease the nutritional requirement. To overcome the bottleneck of CP4 being unable to use pentose, xylose catabolic genes (xylA, xylB, tktA and talB) from E. coli were integrated into CP4 also for construction of the xylose utilizing metabolic pathway. Conclusions The genomic integration confers on Z. mobilis the ability to grow in medium containing xylose as the only carbon source, and to grow in simple chemical defined medium without addition of amino acid. The HYMX demonstrated not only the high tolerance to unfavorable stresses like high temperature and low nutrient, but also the capability of converting both glucose and xylose to ethanol with high yield at high temperature. What’s more, these genetic characteristics were stable up to 100 generations on nonselective medium. Although significant improvements were achieved, yeast extract is needed for ethanol production. PMID:23635356

  18. Transport rates of a glutamate transporter homologue are influenced by the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Benjamin C; Vandenberg, Robert J; Ryan, Renae M

    2015-04-10

    The aspartate transporter from Pyrococcus horikoshii (GltPh) is a model for the structure of the SLC1 family of amino acid transporters. Crystal structures of GltPh provide insight into mechanisms of ion coupling and substrate transport; however, structures have been solved in the absence of a lipid bilayer so they provide limited information regarding interactions that occur between the protein and lipids of the membrane. Here, we investigated the effect of the lipid environment on aspartate transport by reconstituting GltPh into liposomes of defined lipid composition where the primary lipid is phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or its methyl derivatives. We showed that the rate of aspartate transport and the transmembrane orientation of GltPh were influenced by the primary lipid in the liposomes. In PE liposomes, we observed the highest transport rate and showed that 85% of the transporters were orientated right-side out, whereas in trimethyl PE liposomes, 50% of transporters were right-side out, and we observed a 4-fold reduction in transport rate. Differences in orientation can only partially explain the lipid composition effect on transport rate. Crystal structures of GltPh revealed a tyrosine residue (Tyr-33) that we propose interacts with lipid headgroups during the transport cycle. Based on site-directed mutagenesis, we propose that a cation-π interaction between Tyr-33 and the lipid headgroups can influence conformational flexibility of the trimerization domain and thus the rate of transport. These results provide a specific example of how interactions between membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins can influence function and highlight the importance of the role of the membrane in transporter function.

  19. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the GATase subunit and structural basis of the interaction between GATase and ATPPase subunits in a two-subunit-type GMPS from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rustam; Kumar, Sanjeev; Balaram, Hemalatha; Sarma, Siddhartha P

    2013-06-25

    The solution structure of the monomeric glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) subunit of the Methanocaldococcus janaschii (Mj) guanosine monophosphate synthetase (GMPS) has been determined using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Gel filtration chromatography and ¹⁵N backbone relaxation studies have shown that the Mj GATase subunit is present in solution as a 21 kDa (188-residue) monomer. The ensemble of 20 lowest-energy structures showed root-mean-square deviations of 0.35 ± 0.06 Å for backbone atoms and 0.8 ± 0.06 Å for all heavy atoms. Furthermore, 99.4% of the backbone dihedral angles are present in the allowed region of the Ramachandran map, indicating the stereochemical quality of the structure. The core of the tertiary structure of the GATase is composed of a seven-stranded mixed β-sheet that is fenced by five α-helices. The Mj GATase is similar in structure to the Pyrococcus horikoshi (Ph) GATase subunit. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift perturbations and changes in line width were monitored to identify residues on GATase that were responsible for interaction with magnesium and the ATPPase subunit, respectively. These interaction studies showed that a common surface exists for the metal ion binding as well as for the protein-protein interaction. The dissociation constant for the GATase-Mg(2+) interaction has been found to be ∼1 mM, which implies that interaction is very weak and falls in the fast chemical exchange regime. The GATase-ATPPase interaction, on the other hand, falls in the intermediate chemical exchange regime on the NMR time scale. The implication of this interaction in terms of the regulation of the GATase activity of holo GMPS is discussed.

  20. Autonomous Microbial Sampler (AMS), a device for the uncontaminated collection of multiple microbial samples from submarine hydrothermal vents and other aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Craig D.; Doherty, Kenneth W.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.; Morrison, Archie T.; Billings, John D.; Engstrom, Ivory B.; Pfitsch, Don W.; Honjo, Susumu

    2006-05-01

    An Autonomous Microbial Sampler (AMS) is described that will obtain uncontaminated and exogenous DNA-free microbial samples from most marine, freshwater and hydrothermal ecosystems. Sampling with the AMS may be conducted using manned submersibles, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), or when tethered to a hydrowire during hydrocast operations on research vessels. The modular device consists of a titanium nozzle for sampling in potentially hot environments (>350 °C) and fluid-handling components for the collection of six independent filtered or unfiltered samples. An onboard microcomputer permits sampling to be controlled by the investigator, by external devices (e.g., AUV computer), or by internal programming. Temperature, volume pumped and other parameters are recorded during sampling. Complete protection of samples from microbial contamination was observed in tests simulating deployment of the AMS in coastal seawater, where the sampling nozzle was exposed to seawater containing 1×10 6 cells ml -1 of a red pigmented tracer organism, Serratia marinorubra. Field testing of the AMS at a hydrothermal vent field was successfully undertaken in 2000. Results of DNA destruction studies have revealed that exposure of samples of the Eukaryote Euglena and the bacterium S. marinorubra to 0.5 N sulfuric acid at 23 °C for 1 h was sufficient to remove polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifiable DNA. Studies assessing the suitability of hydrogen peroxide as a sterilizing and DNA-destroying agent showed that 20% or 30% hydrogen peroxide sterilized samples of Serratia in 1 h and destroyed the DNA of Serratia in 3 h, but not 1 or 2 h. DNA AWAY™ killed Serratia and destroyed the DNA of both Serratia and the vent microbe (GB-D) of the genus Pyrococcus in 1 h.

  1. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Keller, Matthew W.; Loder, Andrew J.; Straub, Christopher T.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  2. Archaeal ribosomal stalk protein interacts with translation factors in a nucleotide-independent manner via its conserved C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Naoko; Honda, Takayoshi; Baba, Kentaro; Naganuma, Takao; Tanzawa, Takehito; Arisaka, Fumio; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis on the ribosome requires translational GTPase factors to bind to the ribosome in the GTP-bound form, take individual actions that are coupled with GTP hydrolysis, and dissociate, usually in the GDP-bound form. The multiple copies of the flexible ribosomal stalk protein play an important role in these processes. Using biochemical approaches and the stalk protein from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii, we here provide evidence that the conserved C terminus of the stalk protein aP1 binds directly to domain I of the elongation factor aEF-2, irrespective of whether aEF-2 is bound to GTP or GDP. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that four hydrophobic amino acids at the C terminus of aP1, Leu-100, 103, 106, and Phe-107, are crucial for the direct binding. P1 was also found to bind to the initiation factor aIF5B, as well as aEF-1α, but not aIF2γ, via its C terminus. Moreover, analytical ultracentrifugation and gel mobility shift analyses showed that a heptameric complex of aP1 and aP0, aP0(aP1)2(aP1)2(aP1)2, can bind multiple aEF-2 molecules simultaneously, which suggests that individual copies of the stalk protein are accessible to the factor. The functional significance of the C terminus of the stalk protein was also shown using the eukaryotic proteins P1/P2 and P0. It is likely that the conserved C terminus of the stalk proteins of archaea and eukaryotes can bind to translation factors both before and after GTP hydrolysis. This consistent binding ability of the stalk protein may contribute to maintaining high concentrations of translation factors around the ribosome, thus promoting translational efficiency. PMID:22355137

  3. Genome analysis and genome-wide proteomics of Thermococcus gammatolerans, the most radioresistant organism known amongst the Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Armengaud, Jean; Lagorce, Arnaud; Leplat, Christophe; Guérin, Philippe; Dutertre, Murielle; Anthouard, Véronique; Forterre, Patrick; Wincker, Patrick; Confalonieri, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    Background Thermococcus gammatolerans was isolated from samples collected from hydrothermal chimneys. It is one of the most radioresistant organisms known amongst the Archaea. We report the determination and annotation of its complete genome sequence, its comparison with other Thermococcales genomes, and a proteomic analysis. Results T. gammatolerans has a circular chromosome of 2.045 Mbp without any extra-chromosomal elements, coding for 2,157 proteins. A thorough comparative genomics analysis revealed important but unsuspected genome plasticity differences between sequenced Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species that could not be attributed to the presence of specific mobile elements. Two virus-related regions, tgv1 and tgv2, are the only mobile elements identified in this genome. A proteogenome analysis was performed by a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach, allowing the identification of 10,931 unique peptides corresponding to 951 proteins. This information concurrently validates the accuracy of the genome annotation. Semi-quantification of proteins by spectral count was done on exponential- and stationary-phase cells. Insights into general catabolism, hydrogenase complexes, detoxification systems, and the DNA repair toolbox of this archaeon are revealed through this genome and proteome analysis. Conclusions This work is the first archaeal proteome investigation done at the stage of primary genome annotation. This archaeon is shown to use a large variety of metabolic pathways even under a rich medium growth condition. This proteogenomic study also indicates that the high radiotolerance of T. gammatolerans is probably due to proteins that remain to be characterized rather than a larger arsenal of known DNA repair enzymes. PMID:19558674

  4. The CP2 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase is crucial for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhu, Bin; Wang, En-Duo

    2008-12-26

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has an insertion domain, called connective peptide 2 (CP2), either directly preceding or following the editing domain (CP1 domain), depending on the species. The global structures of the CP2 domains from all LeuRSs are similar. Although the CP1 domain has been extensively explored to be responsible for hydrolysis of mischarged tRNALeu, the role of the CP2 domain remains undefined. In the present work, deletion of the CP2 domain of Giardia lamblia LeuRS (GlLeuRS) showed that the CP2 domain is indispensable for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing and that it contributes to LeuRS-tRNALeu binding affinity. In addition, its functions are conserved in both eukaryotic/archaeal and prokaryotic LeuRSs from G. lamblia, Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhLeuRS), and Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS). Alanine scanning and site-directed mutagenesis assays of the CP2 domain identified several residues that are crucial for its various functions. Data from the chimeric mutants, which replaced the CP2 domain of GlLeuRS with either PhLeuRS or EcLeuRS, showed that the CP2 domain of PhLeuRS but not that of EcLeuRS can partially restore amino acid activation and post-transfer editing functions, suggesting that the functions of the CP2 domain are dependent on its location in the primary sequence of LeuRS.

  5. Towards understanding the first genome sequence of a crenarchaeon by genome annotation using clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs)

    PubMed Central

    Natale, Darren A; Shankavaram, Uma T; Galperin, Michael Y; Wolf, Yuri I; Aravind, L; Koonin, Eugene V

    2000-01-01

    Background: Standard archival sequence databases have not been designed as tools for genome annotation and are far from being optimal for this purpose. We used the database of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) to reannotate the genomes of two archaea, Aeropyrum pernix, the first member of the Crenarchaea to be sequenced, and Pyrococcus abyssi. Results: A. pernix and P. abyssi proteins were assigned to COGs using the COGNITOR program; the results were verified on a case-by-case basis and augmented by additional database searches using the PSI-BLAST and TBLASTN programs. Functions were predicted for over 300 proteins from A. pernix, which could not be assigned a function using conventional methods with a conservative sequence similarity threshold, an approximately 50% increase compared to the original annotation. A. pernix shares most of the conserved core of proteins that were previously identified in the Euryarchaeota. Cluster analysis or distance matrix tree construction based on the co-occurrence of genomes in COGs showed that A. pernix forms a distinct group within the archaea, although grouping with the two species of Pyrococci, indicative of similar repertoires of conserved genes, was observed. No indication of a specific relationship between Crenarchaeota and eukaryotes was obtained in these analyses. Several proteins that are conserved in Euryarchaeota and most bacteria are unexpectedly missing in A. pernix, including the entire set of de novo purine biosynthesis enzymes, the GTPase FtsZ (a key component of the bacterial and euryarchaeal cell-division machinery), and the tRNA-specific pseudouridine synthase, previously considered universal. A. pernix is represented in 48 COGs that do not contain any euryarchaeal members. Many of these proteins are TCA cycle and electron transport chain enzymes, reflecting the aerobic lifestyle of A. pernix. Conclusions: Special-purpose databases organized on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and carefully

  6. Microbial Tungsten Extraction From Basalt Under Hydrothermal Conditions (100°C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, C. H.; Zhang, Z.; Brantley, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial leaching of trace metals has been shown to be an important process in many environments. Hydrothermal fluids are, however, often more concentrated in transition metals (e.g., Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn) that are scarce in oxic seawater. It is not presently known whether microbes living in hydrothermal fluids need to leach micronutrients from their basaltic environment. Our study has aimed to test this. Several hyperthermophiles require tungsten (W) for growth including the facultative aerobe Pyrobaculum aerophilum (Afshar et al, 1998) and the strict anaerobe Pyrococcus furiousis (Roy and Adams, 2002). In contrast to Mo, W is present in about an order of magnitude higher concentration in hydrothermal fluids than it is in seawater (Gallant and Von Damm, 2001) making it a useful trace metal for enzymes that traditionally use Mo in their active sites. Basaltic rocks are, however, poor in both Mo and W. Due the scarcity of W in crustal rocks, we have tested whether W-dependent hyperthermophiles leach W from basalt. Our results have indicated that Pyrobaculum aerophilum, when grown under aerobic conditions in the absence of Fe and W and in the presence of basalt powder, enhances the release of W from basalt powder. Concentrations of about 3 ppb were obtained after 15 days, with an abiotic control experiment releasing only 0.1 ppb. The enhanced biological leaching here of W is not observed when growth is in the presence of powdered synthetic basaltic glass enriched in W where abiotic W concentrations where as high as 27 ppb at 15 days. Surprisingly, parallel experiments indicate that Pyrobaculum aerophilum does not leach W under anaerobic conditions, while the strict anaerobe Pyrobaculum islandicum does demonstrate moderate W-leaching with W levels reaching 9 ppb in 15 days, with an abiotic control experiment releasing 3 ppb. During all of these experiments, no significant microbial leaching above background was observed for Fe, Ni, or Cr suggesting a high degree of metal

  7. A Toolkit to Enable Hydrocarbon Conversion in Aqueous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Eva K.; Schipper, Kira; Bongaerts, Nadine; Voges, Mathias J.; Abate, Alessandro; Wahl, S. Aljoscha

    2012-01-01

    This work puts forward a toolkit that enables the conversion of alkanes by Escherichia coli and presents a proof of principle of its applicability. The toolkit consists of multiple standard interchangeable parts (BioBricks)9 addressing the conversion of alkanes, regulation of gene expression and survival in toxic hydrocarbon-rich environments. A three-step pathway for alkane degradation was implemented in E. coli to enable the conversion of medium- and long-chain alkanes to their respective alkanols, alkanals and ultimately alkanoic-acids. The latter were metabolized via the native β-oxidation pathway. To facilitate the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes (C5-C13) and cycloalkanes (C5-C8), four genes (alkB2, rubA3, rubA4and rubB) of the alkane hydroxylase system from Gordonia sp. TF68,21 were transformed into E. coli. For the conversion of long-chain alkanes (C15-C36), theladA gene from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans was implemented. For the required further steps of the degradation process, ADH and ALDH (originating from G. thermodenitrificans) were introduced10,11. The activity was measured by resting cell assays. For each oxidative step, enzyme activity was observed. To optimize the process efficiency, the expression was only induced under low glucose conditions: a substrate-regulated promoter, pCaiF, was used. pCaiF is present in E. coli K12 and regulates the expression of the genes involved in the degradation of non-glucose carbon sources. The last part of the toolkit - targeting survival - was implemented using solvent tolerance genes, PhPFDα and β, both from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3. Organic solvents can induce cell stress and decreased survivability by negatively affecting protein folding. As chaperones, PhPFDα and β improve the protein folding process e.g. under the presence of alkanes. The expression of these genes led to an improved hydrocarbon tolerance shown by an increased growth rate (up to 50%) in the presences of 10% n-hexane in the culture

  8. Expanding tRNA recognition of a tRNA synthetase by a single amino acid change

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liang; Tumbula-Hansen, Debra; Toogood, Helen; Söll, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) occurs in two types: the discriminating enzyme (D-AspRS) forms only Asp-tRNAAsp, whereas the nondiscriminating enzyme (ND-AspRS) also synthesizes Asp-tRNAAsn, which is a required intermediate for protein synthesis in many organisms. We attempted to expand the tRNA recognition of the discriminating Thermococcus kodakaraensis AspRS to that of a ND-AspRS by in vitro mutagenesis. An alignment of 26 archaeal AspRS proteins revealed two positions (26 and 85 in the T. kodakaraensis sequence) whose amino acid identity changes according to the enzymes' tRNA specificity. In their anticodon-binding domain, D-AspRS proteins contain W26 (or Q26) and K85, compared with H26 and P85 in the ND-AspRSs. T. kodakaraensis AspRS gained the ability to form Asp-tRNAAsn in vitro when the W26H or K85P changes were introduced independently or in combination. In the aminoacylation of tRNAAsn or tRNAAsp transcripts, the mutant enzymes displayed at least a 100- to 500-fold change in tRNA specificity, as judged by the ratio of the kcat/Km values of Asp-tRNAAsp vs. Asp-tRNAAsn formation. That T. kodakaraensis mutant AspRSs mischarge tRNAAsn was also manifested in the higher level (1.7%) of aspartylation of unfractionated Pyrococcus tRNA compared with that achieved by the wild-type enzyme (0.9%). Northern blot analysis of the Asp-tRNA separated by acid/urea gel electrophoresis confirmed the in vitro synthesis of Asp-tRNAAsn. A structure-based model points to a direct interaction of K85 in T. kodakaraensis AspRS with the anticodon nucleotide C36 of tRNAAsp. Thus, a switch between D-AspRS and ND-AspRS enzymes could have evolved with only limited amino acid changes. PMID:12730374

  9. Expression Profiles and Physiological Roles of Two Types of Molecular Chaperonins from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Aki, Ryohei; Yoshida, Masaya; Higashibata, Hiroki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fukuda, Wakao

    2008-01-01

    Thermococcus kodakarensis possesses two chaperonins, CpkA and CpkB, and their expression is induced by the downshift and upshift, respectively, of the cell cultivation temperature. The expression levels of the chaperonins were examined by using specific antibodies at various cell growth temperatures in the logarithmic and stationary phases. At 60°C, CpkA was highly expressed in both the logarithmic and stationary phases; however, CpkB was not expressed in either phase. At 85°C, CpkA and CpkB were expressed in both phases; however, the CpkA level was decreased in the stationary phase. At 93°C, CpkA was expressed only in the logarithmic phase and not in the stationary phase. In contrast, CpkB was highly expressed in both phases. The results of reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed the same growth phase- and temperature-dependent profiles as observed in immunoblot analyses, indicating that the expression of cpkA and cpkB is regulated at the mRNA level. The cpkA or cpkB gene disruptant was then constructed, and its growth profile was monitored. The cpkA disruptant showed poor cell growth at 60°C but no significant defects at 85°C and 93°C. On the other hand, cpkB disruption led to growth defects at 93°C but no significant defects at 60°C and 85°C. These data indicate that CpkA and CpkB are necessary for cell growth at lower and higher temperatures, respectively. The logarithmic-phase-dependent expression of CpkA at 93°C suggested that CpkA participates in initial cell growth in addition to lower-temperature adaptation. Promoter mapping and quantitative analyses using the Phr (Pyrococcus heat-shock regulator) gene disruptant revealed that temperature-dependent expression was achieved in a Phr-independent manner. PMID:18835998

  10. Marine Subsurface Microbial Communities Across a Hydrothermal Gradient in Okinawa Trough Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, L. D.; Hser Wah Saw, J.; Ettema, T.; House, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 331 to the Okinawa backarc basin provided an opportunity to study the microbial stratigraphy within the sediments surrounding a hydrothermal vent. The Okinawa backarc basin is a sedimented region of the seafloor located on a continental margin, and also hosts a hydrothermal network within the subsurface. Site C0014 within the Iheya North hydrothermal field is located 450 m east of the active vent and has a surface temperature of 5°C with no evidence of hydrothermal alteration within the top 10 meters below sea floor (mbsf). Temperature increases with depth at an estimated rate of 3°C/m and transitions from non-hydrothermal margin sediments to a hydrothermally altered regime below 10 mbsf. In this study, we utilized deep 16S rRNA sequencing of DNA from IODP Expedition 331 Site C0014 sediment horizons in order to assess diversity throughout the sediment column as well as determine the potential limits of the biosphere. Analysis of the amplicon data shows a shift over 15 mbsf from a heterogeneous community of cosmopolitan marine subsurface taxa toward an archaeal-dominated community in the deepest horizons of the predicted biosphere. Notably, the phylum Chloroflexi represents a substantial taxon through most horizons, where it appears to be replaced below 10 mbsf by punctuations of thermophilic and methanotrophic Archaea and Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group abundances. DNA from the aforementioned transition horizons was further analyzed using metagenomic sequencing. Preliminary taxonomic analysis of the metagenomic data agrees well with amplicon data in capturing the shift in relative abundance of Archaea increasing with depth. Additionally, reverse gyrase, a gene found exclusively in hyperthermophilic microorganisms, was recovered only in the metagenome of the deepest horizon. A BLAST search of this protein sequence against the GenBank non-redudnant protein database produced top hits with reverse gyrase from Thermococcus and Pyrococcus, which are

  11. Microbial Geochemistry in Shallow-Sea Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, J. P.; Pichler, T.

    2006-12-01

    Shallow-sea hydrothermal systems are far more ubiquitous than generally recognized. Approximately 50-60 systems are currently known, occurring world-wide in areas of high heat flow, such as, volcanic island arcs, near-surface mid-ocean ridges, and intraplate oceanic volcanoes. In contrast to deep-sea systems, shallow- sea vent fluids generally include a meteoric component, they experience phase separation near the sediment- water interface, and they discharge into the photic zone (<200 m). They also are characterized by wide ranges in chemical composition, hundreds of redox disequilibria that translate to potential metabolisms, and broad phylogenetic diversity among the thermophilic bacteria and archaea. Perhaps because deep-sea smokers and continental hot springs are visually more stunning, shallow-sea systems are often overlooked study sites. We will discuss their particular features that afford unique opportunities in microbial geochemistry. Two of the better studied examples are at Vulcano Island (Italy) and Ambitle Island (Papua New Guinea). The vents and sediment seeps at Vulcano are the "type locality" for numerous cultured hyperthermophiles, including the bacteria Aquifex and Thermotoga, the crenarchaeon Pyrodictium, and the Euryarchaeota Archaeoglobus and Pyrococcus. Isotope-labeled incubation experiments of heated sediments and an array of culturing studies have shown that simple organic compounds are predominantly fermented or anaerobically respired with sulfate. 16S rRNA gene surveys, together with fluorescent in situ hybridization studies, demonstrated the dominance of key thermophilic bacteria and archaea (e.g., Aquificales, Thermotogales, Thermococcales, Archaeoglobales) in the sediments and the presence of a broad spectrum of mostly uncultured crenarchaeota in several vent waters, sediment samples, and geothermal wells. Thermodynamic modeling quantified potential energy yields from aerobic and anaerobic respiration reactions and fermentation

  12. In silico analysis suggests that PH0702 and PH0208 encode for methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase and ribose-1,5-bisphosphate isomerase, respectively, rather than aIF2Bβ and aIF2Bδ.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Prerana; Srivastava, Ambuj; Jayaprakash, Prajisha; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The overall process of protein biosynthesis across all domains of life is similar; however, detailed insights reveal a range of differences in the proteins involved. For decades, the process of protein translation in archaea has been considered to be closer to eukaryotes than to bacteria. In archaea, however, several homologues of eukaryotic proteins involved in translation initiation have not yet been identified; one of them being the initiation factor eIF2B consisting of five subunits (α, β, γ, δ and ε). Three open reading frames (PH0440, PH0702 and PH0208) in Pyrococcus horikoshii have been proposed to encode for the α-, β- and δ-subunits of aIF2B, respectively. The crystal structure of PH0440 shows similarity toward the α-subunit of eIF2B. However, the capability of PH0702 and PH0208 to function as the β- and δ-subunits of eIF2B, respectively, remains uncertain. In this study, we have taken up the task of annotating PH0702 and PH0208 using bioinformatics methods. The phylogenetic analysis of protein sequences belonging to IF2B-like family along with PH0702 and PH0208 revealed that PH0702 belonged to methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase (MTNA) group of proteins, whereas, PH0208 was found to be clustered in the group of ribose-1,5-bisphosphate isomerase (R15PI) proteins. A careful analysis of protein sequences and structures available for eIF2B, MTNA and R15PI confirms that PH0702 and PH0208 contain residues essential for the enzymatic activity of MTNA and R15PI, respectively. Additionally, the protein PH0208 comprises of the residues required for the dimer formation which is essential for the biological activity of R15PI. This prompted us to examine all eIF2B-like proteins from archaea and to annotate their function. The results reveal that majority of these proteins are homologues of the α-subunit of eIF2B, even though they lack the residues essential for their functional activity. A better understanding of the mechanism of GTP exchange during

  13. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

    PubMed

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Blaud, Magali; Leclerc, Fabrice; Branlant, Christiane; Charpentier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA) is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  14. Identification and characterization of a new gene from Variovorax paradoxus Iso1 encoding N-acyl-D-amino acid amidohydrolase responsible for D-amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Hsun; Su, Shiun-Cheng; Tsai, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Chia-Yin

    2002-10-01

    An N-acyl-d-amino acid amidohydrolase (N-D-AAase) was identified in cell extracts of a strain, Iso1, isolated from an environment containing N-acetyl-d-methionine. The bacterium was classified as Variovorax paradoxus by phylogenetic analysis. The gene was cloned and sequenced. The gene consisted of a 1467-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 488 amino acids. The V. paradoxusN-D-AAase showed significant amino acid similarity to the N-acyl-d-amino acid amidohydrolases of the two eubacteria Alcaligenes xylosoxydans A-6 (44-56% identity), Alcaligenes facelis DA1 (54% identity) and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi (42% identity). After over-expression of the N-D-AAase protein in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was purified by multistep chromatography. The native molecular mass was 52.8 kDa, which agreed with the predicted molecular mass of 52 798 Da and the enzyme appeared to be a monomer protein by gel-filtration chromatography. A homogenous protein with a specific activity of 516 U.mg-1 was finally obtained. After peptide sequencing by LC/MS/MS, the results were in agreement with the deduced amino acid sequence of the N-D-AAase. The pI of the enzyme was 5.12 and it had an optimal pH and temperature of 7.5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. After 30 min heat treatment at 45 degrees C, between pH 6 and pH 8, 80% activity remained. The N-D-AAase had higher hydrolysing activity against N-acetyl-d-amino acid derivates containing d-methionine, d-leucine and d-alanine and against N-chloroacetyl-d-phenylalanine. Importantly, the enzyme does not act on the N-acetyl-l-amino acid derivatives. The enzyme was inhibited by chelating agents and certain metal ions, but was activated by 1 mm of Co2+ and Mg2+. Thus, the N-D-AAase from V. paradoxus can be considered a chiral specific and metal-dependent enzyme.

  15. The phagotrophic origin of eukaryotes and phylogenetic classification of Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2002-03-01

    Eukaryotes and archaebacteria form the clade neomura and are sisters, as shown decisively by genes fragmented only in archaebacteria and by many sequence trees. This sisterhood refutes all theories that eukaryotes originated by merging an archaebacterium and an alpha-proteobacterium, which also fail to account for numerous features shared specifically by eukaryotes and actinobacteria. I revise the phagotrophy theory of eukaryote origins by arguing that the essentially autogenous origins of most eukaryotic cell properties (phagotrophy, endomembrane system including peroxisomes, cytoskeleton, nucleus, mitosis and sex) partially overlapped and were synergistic with the symbiogenetic origin of mitochondria from an alpha-proteobacterium. These radical innovations occurred in a derivative of the neomuran common ancestor, which itself had evolved immediately prior to the divergence of eukaryotes and archaebacteria by drastic alterations to its eubacterial ancestor, an actinobacterial posibacterium able to make sterols, by replacing murein peptidoglycan by N-linked glycoproteins and a multitude of other shared neomuran novelties. The conversion of the rigid neomuran wall into a flexible surface coat and the associated origin of phagotrophy were instrumental in the evolution of the endomembrane system, cytoskeleton, nuclear organization and division and sexual life-cycles. Cilia evolved not by symbiogenesis but by autogenous specialization of the cytoskeleton. I argue that the ancestral eukaryote was uniciliate with a single centriole (unikont) and a simple centrosomal cone of microtubules, as in the aerobic amoebozoan zooflagellate Phalansterium. I infer the root of the eukaryote tree at the divergence between opisthokonts (animals, Choanozoa, fungi) with a single posterior cilium and all other eukaryotes, designated 'anterokonts' because of the ancestral presence of an anterior cilium. Anterokonts comprise the Amoebozoa, which may be ancestrally unikont, and a vast

  16. Community Response to a Heavy Precipitation Event in High Temperature, Chemosynthetic Biofilms and Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Loiacono, S. T.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    Coordinated analysis of the "Bison Pool" (BP) Environmental Genome and a complementary contextual geochemical dataset of ~75 parameters revealed biogeochemical cycling and metabolic and microbial community shifts in a Yellowstone National Park hot spring ecosystem (1). The >22m outflow of BP is a gradient of decreasing temperature, increasing dissolved oxygen, and changing availability of nutrients. Microbial life at BP transitions from a 92°C chemosynthetic community in the BP source pool to a 56°C photosynthetic mat community. Metagenomic data at BP showed the potential for both heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism (rTCA and acetyl-CoA cycles) in the highest temperature, chemosynthetic regions (1). This region of the outflow is dominated by Aquificales and Pyrococcus relatives, with smaller contributions of heterotrophic Bacteria. Following a 2h heavy precipitation event we observed an influx of exogenous organic material into the source pool supplied from the meadow surrounding the BP area. We sampled biomass and fluid at several locations within the outflow immediately following the event, and on several occasions for the next eight days. Elemental analysis and carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses were conducted on biomass and sediment, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon content and δ13C of fluids were analyzed. DNA and RNA were extracted, and following RT-PCR, nitrogen cycle functional gene expression was evaluated. Previous work at BP has shown that chemosynthetic biomass may carry isotopic signatures of fractionation during carbon fixation, via the acetyl-CoA and rTCA cycles (2). However, the addition of exogenous organic carbon during the rain event had an immediate and dramatic effect on the sediments and biofilms in the chemosynthetic zone of the outflow. Dissolved organic carbon was the highest measured in six years. Chemosynthetic biomass responded by incorporating the organic carbon. Carbon isotopic signatures in chemosynthetic

  17. Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-05-26

    Final report on MAGGIE. We set ambitious goals to model the functions of individual organisms and their community from molecular to systems scale. These scientific goals are driving the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyze large amounts of experimental measurements made using high throughput technologies to explain and predict how the environment influences biological function at multiple scales and how the microbial systems in turn modify the environment. By experimentally evaluating predictions made using these models we will test the degree to which our quantitative multiscale understanding wilt help to rationally steer individual microbes and their communities towards specific tasks. Towards this end we have made substantial progress towards understanding evolution of gene families, transcriptional structures, detailed structures of keystone molecular assemblies (proteins and complexes), protein interactions, biological networks, microbial interactions, and community structure. Using comparative analysis we have tracked the evolutionary history of gene functions to understand how novel functions evolve. One level up, we have used proteomics data, high-resolution genome tiling microarrays, and 5' RNA sequencing to revise genome annotations, discover new genes including ncRNAs, and map dynamically changing operon structures of five model organisms: For Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, Pyrococcus furiosis, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Methanococcus maripaludis and Haiobacterium salinarum NROL We have developed machine learning algorithms to accurately identify protein interactions at a near-zero false positive rate from noisy data generated using tagfess complex purification, TAP purification, and analysis of membrane complexes. Combining other genome-scale datasets produced by ENIGMA (in particular, microarray data) and available from literature we have been able to achieve a true positive rate as high as 65% at almost zero false positives when