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Sample records for archeal homolog controls

  1. Archeal lectins: An identification through a genomic search.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Samuel, Ebenezer; Vijayan, M

    2016-01-01

    Forty-six lectin domains which have homologues among well established eukaryotic and bacterial lectins of known three-dimensional structure, have been identified through a search of 165 archeal genomes using a multipronged approach involving domain recognition, sequence search and analysis of binding sites. Twenty-one of them have the 7-bladed β-propeller lectin fold while 16 have the β-trefoil fold and 7 the legume lectin fold. The remainder assumes the C-type lectin, the β-prism I and the tachylectin folds. Acceptable models of almost all of them could be generated using the appropriate lectins of known three-dimensional structure as templates, with binding sites at one or more expected locations. The work represents the first comprehensive bioinformatic study of archeal lectins. The presence of lectins with the same fold in all domains of life indicates their ancient origin well before the divergence of the three branches. Further work is necessary to identify archeal lectins which have no homologues among eukaryotic and bacterial species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nanobody Mediated Crystallization of an Archeal Mechanosensitive Channel

    PubMed Central

    Löw, Christian; Yau, Yin Hoe; Pardon, Els; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Wåhlin, Lisa; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Moberg, Per; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Steyaert, Jan; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels (MS) are integral membrane proteins and allow bacteria to survive sudden changes in external osmolarity due to transient opening of their pores. The efflux of cytoplasmic osmolytes reduces the membrane tension and prevents membrane rupture. Therefore these channels serve as emergency valves when experiencing significant environmental stress. The preparation of high quality crystals of integral membrane proteins is a major bottleneck for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Crystallization chaperones based on various protein scaffolds have emerged as promising tool to increase the crystallization probability of a selected target protein. So far archeal mechanosensitive channels of small conductance have resisted crystallization in our hands. To structurally analyse these channels, we selected nanobodies against an archeal MS channel after immunization of a llama with recombinant expressed, detergent solubilized and purified protein. Here we present the characterization of 23 different binders regarding their interaction with the channel protein using analytical gel filtration, western blotting and surface plasmon resonance. Selected nanobodies bound the target with affinities in the pico- to nanomolar range and some binders had a profound effect on the crystallization of the MS channel. Together with previous data we show that nanobodies are a versatile and valuable tool in structural biology by widening the crystallization space for highly challenging proteins, protein complexes and integral membrane proteins. PMID:24205053

  3. Cell cycle-dependent control of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wei, Chengwen; Li, Jingjing; Xing, Poyuan; Li, Jingyao; Zheng, Sihao; Chen, Xuefeng

    2017-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious type of DNA lesions threatening genome integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are two major pathways to repair DSBs. HR requires a homologous template to direct DNA repair, and is generally recognized as a high-fidelity pathway. In contrast, NHEJ directly seals broken ends, but the repair product is often accompanied by sequence alterations. The choice of repair pathways is strictly controlled by the cell cycle. The occurrence of HR is restricted to late S to G2 phases while NHEJ operates predominantly in G1 phase, although it can act throughout most of the cell cycle. Deregulation of repair pathway choice can result in genotoxic consequences associated with cancers. How the cell cycle regulates the choice of HR and NHEJ has been extensively studied in the past decade. In this review, we will focus on the current progresses on how HR is controlled by the cell cycle in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals. Particular attention will be given to how cyclin-dependent kinases modulate DSB end resection, DNA damage checkpoint signaling, repair and processing of recombination intermediates. In addition, we will discuss recent findings on how HR is repressed in G1 and M phases by the cell cycle. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    PubMed

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  5. Xiro, a Xenopus homolog of the Drosophila Iroquois complex genes, controls development at the neural plate.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Skarmeta, J L; Glavic, A; de la Calle-Mustienes, E; Modolell, J; Mayor, R

    1998-01-01

    The Drosophila homeoproteins Ara and Caup are members of a combination of factors (prepattern) that control the highly localized expression of the proneural genes achaete and scute. We have identified two Xenopus homologs of ara and caup, Xiro1 and Xiro2. Similarly to their Drosophila counterparts, they control the expression of proneural genes and, probably as a consequence, the size of the neural plate. Moreover, Xiro1 and Xiro2 are themselves controlled by noggin and retinoic acid and, similarly to ara and caup, they are overexpressed by expression in Xenopus embryos of the Drosophila cubitus interruptus gene. These and other findings suggest the conservation of at least part of the genetic cascade that regulates proneural genes, and the existence in vertebrates of a prepattern of factors important to control the differentiation of the neural plate. PMID:9427752

  6. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Northall, Sarah J.; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  7. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  8. External and semi-internal controls for PCR amplification of homologous sequences in mixed templates.

    PubMed

    Kalle, Elena; Gulevich, Alexander; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    In a mixed template, the presence of homologous target DNA sequences creates environments that almost inevitably give rise to artifacts and biases during PCR. Heteroduplexes, chimeras, and skewed template-to-product ratios are the exclusive attributes of mixed template PCR and never occur in a single template assay. Yet, multi-template PCR has been used without appropriate attention to quality control and assay validation, in spite of the fact that such practice diminishes the reliability of results. External and internal amplification controls became obligatory elements of good laboratory practice in different PCR assays. We propose the inclusion of an analogous approach as a quality control system for multi-template PCR applications. The amplification controls must take into account the characteristics of multi-template PCR and be able to effectively monitor particular assay performance. This study demonstrated the efficiency of a model mixed template as an adequate external amplification control for a particular PCR application. The conditions of multi-template PCR do not allow implementation of a classic internal control; therefore we developed a convenient semi-internal control as an acceptable alternative. In order to evaluate the effects of inhibitors, a model multi-template mix was amplified in a mixture with DNAse-treated sample. Semi-internal control allowed establishment of intervals for robust PCR performance for different samples, thus enabling correct comparison of the samples. The complexity of the external and semi-internal amplification controls must be comparable with the assumed complexity of the samples. We also emphasize that amplification controls should be applied in multi-template PCR regardless of the post-assay method used to analyze products. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. p21 controls patterning but not homologous recombination in RPE development.

    PubMed

    Bishop, A J R; Kosaras, B; Hollander, M C; Fornace, A; Sidman, R L; Schiestl, R H

    2006-01-05

    p21/WAF1/CIP1/MDA6 is a key cell cycle regulator. Cell cycle regulation is an important part of development, differentiation, DNA repair and apoptosis. Following DNA damage, p53 dependent expression of p21 results in a rapid cell cycle arrest. p21 also appears to be important for the development of melanocytes, promoting their differentiation and melanogenesis. Here, we examine the effect of p21 deficiency on the development of another pigmented tissue, the retinal pigment epithelium. The murine mutation pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) spontaneously reverts to a wild-type allele by homologous recombination. In a retinal pigment epithelium cell this results in pigmentation, which can be observed in the adult eye. The clonal expansion of such cells during development has provided insight into the pattern of retinal pigment epithelium development. In contrast to previous results with Atm, p53 and Gadd45, p(un) reversion events in p21 deficient mice did not show any significant change. These results suggest that p21 does not play any role in maintaining overall genomic stability by regulating homologous recombination frequencies during development. However, the absence of p21 caused a distinct change in the positions of the reversion events within the retinal pigment epithelium. Those events that would normally arrest to produce single cell events continued to proliferate uncovering a cell cycle dysregulation phenotype. It is likely that p21 is involved in controlling the developmental pattern of the retinal pigment. We also found a C57BL/6J specific p21 dependent ocular defect in retinal folding, similar to those reported in the absence of p53.

  10. Disabled homolog 2 controls macrophage phenotypic polarization and adipose tissue inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Samantha E.; Moravec, Radim; Senthivinayagam, Subramanian; Montgomery, Garren; Chen, Wenshu; Han, Jenny; Sharma, Poonam R.; Mullins, Garrett R.; Gorski, Stacey A.; Cooper, Jonathan A.; Kadl, Alexandra; Enfield, Kyle; Braciale, Thomas J.; Harris, Thurl E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tissue injury results in the generation of a myriad of environmental cues that macrophages respond to by changing their phenotype and function. This phenotypic regulation is critical for controlling tissue inflammation and resolution. Here, we have identified the adaptor protein disabled homolog 2 (DAB2) as a regulator of phenotypic switching in macrophages. Dab2 expression was upregulated in M2 macrophages and suppressed in M1 macrophages isolated from both mice and humans, and genetic deletion of Dab2 predisposed macrophages to adopt a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In mice with myeloid cell–specific deletion of Dab2 (Dab2fl/fl Lysm-Cre), treatment with sublethal doses of LPS resulted in increased proinflammatory gene expression and macrophage activation. Moreover, chronic high-fat feeding exacerbated adipose tissue inflammation, M1 polarization of adipose tissue macrophages, and the development of insulin resistance in DAB2-deficient animals compared with controls. Mutational analyses revealed that DAB2 interacts with TNF receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and attenuates IκB kinase β–dependent (IKKβ-dependent) phosphorylation of Ser536 in the transactivation domain of NF-κB p65. Together, these findings reveal that DAB2 is critical for controlling inflammatory signaling during phenotypic polarization of macrophages and suggest that manipulation of DAB2 expression and function may hold therapeutic potential for the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:26927671

  11. PHS1 regulates meiotic recombination and homologous chromosome pairing by controlling the transport of RAD50 to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ronceret, Arnaud; Doutriaux, Marie-Pascale; Golubovskaya, Inna N; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2009-11-24

    Recombination and pairing of homologous chromosomes are critical for bivalent formation in meiotic prophase. In many organisms, including yeast, mammals, and plants, pairing and recombination are intimately interconnected. The POOR HOMOLOGOUS SYNAPSIS1 (PHS1) gene acts in coordination of chromosome pairing and early recombination steps in plants, ensuring pairing fidelity and proper repair of meiotic DNA double-strand-breaks. In phs1 mutants, chromosomes exhibit early recombination defects and frequently associate with non-homologous partners, instead of pairing with their proper homologs. Here, we show that the product of the PHS1 gene is a cytoplasmic protein that functions by controlling transport of RAD50 from cytoplasm to the nucleus. RAD50 is a component of the MRN protein complex that processes meiotic double-strand-breaks to produce single-stranded DNA ends, which act in the homology search and recombination. We demonstrate that PHS1 plays the same role in homologous pairing in both Arabidopsis and maize, whose genomes differ dramatically in size and repetitive element content. This suggests that PHS1 affects pairing of the gene-rich fraction of the genome rather than preventing pairing between repetitive DNA elements. We propose that PHS1 is part of a system that regulates the progression of meiotic prophase by controlling entry of meiotic proteins into the nucleus. We also document that in phs1 mutants in Arabidopsis, centromeres interact before pairing commences along chromosome arms. Centromere coupling was previously observed in yeast and polyploid wheat while our data suggest that it may be a more common feature of meiosis.

  12. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases1–3. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes4–8. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks9. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing10–12, direct evidence that BRCA genes regulate HR at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. We report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex13–16 can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mammalian cells. Tus/Ter-induced HR entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the BRCA1 C-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of BRCA1 encoded by exon 11—two BRCA1 elements implicated in tumor suppression—control Tus/Ter-induced HR. Inactivation of either BRCA1 or BRCA2 increases the absolute frequency of “long-tract” gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks—an outcome not observed in response to a restriction endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double strand break (DSB). Therefore, HR at stalled forks is regulated differently from HR at DSBs arising independently of a fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract HR at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells. PMID:24776801

  13. Testis-specific TAF homologs collaborate to control a tissue-specific transcription program.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Mark; Chen, Xin; Pringle, M Jodeane; Suchorolski, Martin; Sancak, Yasemin; Viswanathan, Sridhar; Bolival, Benjamin; Lin, Ting-Yi; Marino, Susan; Fuller, Margaret T

    2004-11-01

    Alternate forms of the PolII transcription initiation machinery have been proposed to play a role in selective activation of cell-type-specific gene expression programs during cellular differentiation. The cannonball (can) gene of Drosophila encodes a homolog of a TBP-associated factor (dTAF5) protein expressed only in spermatocytes, where it is required for normal transcription of genes required for spermatid differentiation. We show that Drosophila primary spermatocytes also express four additional tissue-specific TAFs: nht (homolog of dTAF4), mia (homolog of dTAF6), sa (homolog of dTAF8) and rye (homolog of dTAF12). Mutations in nht, mia and sa have similar effects in primary spermatocytes on transcription of several target genes involved in spermatid differentiation, and cause the same phenotypes as mutations in can, blocking both meiotic cell cycle progression and spermatid differentiation. The nht, mia, sa and rye proteins contain histone fold domain dimerization motifs. The nht and rye proteins interact structurally when co-expressed in bacteria, similarly to their generally expressed homologs TAF4 and TAF12, which heterodimerize. Strikingly, the structural interaction is tissue specific: nht did not interact with dTAF12 and dTAF4 did not interact with rye in a bacterial co-expression assay. We propose that the products of the five Drosophila genes encoding testis TAF homologs collaborate in an alternative TAF-containing protein complex to regulate a testis-specific gene expression program in primary spermatocytes required for terminal differentiation of male germ cells.

  14. A Novel Function for the NTN Hydrolase Fold Demonstrated by the Structure of an Archeal Inosine Monophosphate Cyclohydrolase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Kang, You-Na; Tran, Anh; White, Robert H.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) cyclohydrolase catalyzes the cyclization of 5-formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (FAICAR) to IMP in the final step of de novo purine biosynthesis. Two major types of this enzyme have been discovered to date: PurH in Bacteria and Eukarya, and PurO in Archaea. The structure of the MTH1020 gene product from Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus was previously solved without functional annotation but shows high amino acid sequence similarity to other PurOs. We determined the crystal structure of the MTH1020 gene product in complex with either IMP or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) at 2.0 Å and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively. Based on the sequence analysis, ligand-bound structures, and biochemical data, MTH1020 is confirmed as an archaeal IMP cyclohydrolase, thus designated as MthPurO. MthPurO has a four-layered αββα core structure, showing an N-terminal nucleophile (NTN) hydrolase fold. The active site is located at the deep pocket between two central β-sheets and contains residues strictly conserved within PurOs. Comparisons of the two types of IMP cyclohydrolase, PurO and PurH, revealed that there are no similarities in sequence, structure, or the active site architecture, suggesting that they are evolutionarily not related to each other. The MjR31K mutant of PurO from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii showed 76% decreased activity and MjE102Q mutation completely abolished enzymatic activity, suggesting that these highly conserved residues play critical roles in catalysis. Interestingly, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which has no structural homology to either PurO or PurH but catalyzes a similar intramolecular cyclohydrolase reaction required for chromophore maturation, utilizes Arg96 and Glu222 in a mechanism analogous to that of PurO. PMID:17407260

  15. Efficient generation of targeted and controlled mutational events in porcine cells using nuclease-directed homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Butler, James R; Santos, Rafael M N; Martens, Gregory R; Ladowski, Joseph M; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Li, Ping; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-05-15

    Nuclease-based genome editing has rapidly sped the creation of new models of human disease. These techniques also hold great promise for the future of clinical xenotransplantation and cell-based therapies for cancer or immunodeficient pathology. However, to fully realize the potential of nuclease editing tools, the efficiency and precision of their application must be optimized. The object of this study was to use nonintegrating selection and nuclease-directed homologous recombination to efficiently control the genetic modification of the porcine genome. Clustered randomly integrating spaced palindromic repeats and associated Cas9 protein (CRISPR/Cas9)-directed mutagenesis with a single-guide RNA target was designed to target the alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase locus (GGTA1) of the porcine genome. A vector expressing a single-guide RNA, Cas9 protein, and green fluorescent protein was used to increase plasmid-delivered mutational efficiency when coupled with fluorescence sorting. Single and double-strand DNA oligonucleotides with a restriction site replacing the start codon were created with variable homology lengths surrounding the mutational event site. Finally, a transgene construct was flanked with 50 base pairs of homology directed immediately 5' to a nuclease cut site. These products were introduced to cells with a constant concentration of CRISPR/cas9 vector. Phenotype-specific mutational efficiency was measured by flow cytometer. Controlled homologous insertion was measured by Sanger sequence, restriction enzyme digest and flow cytometry. Expression of a fluorescence protein on the Cas9 vector functioned as a nonintegrating selection marker. Selection by this marker increased phenotype-silencing mutation rates from 3.5% to 82% (P = 0.0002). Insertion or deletion mutation increased from 11% to 96% (P = 0.0007). Co-transfection with homologous DNA oligonucleotides increased the aggregate phenotype-silencing mutation rates up to 22% and increased biallelic

  16. Control of dendritic field formation in Drosophila: the roles of flamingo and competition between homologous neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, F B; Kohwi, M; Brenman, J E; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    2000-10-01

    Neurons elaborate dendrites with stereotypic branching patterns, thereby defining their receptive fields. These branching patterns may arise from properties intrinsic to the neurons or competition between neighboring neurons. Genetic and laser ablation studies reported here reveal that different multiple dendritic neurons in the same dorsal cluster in the Drosophila embryonic PNS do not compete with one another for dendritic fields. In contrast, when dendrites from homologous neurons in the two hemisegments meet at the dorsal midline in larval stages, they appear to repel each other. The formation of normal dendritic fields and the competition between dendrites of homologous neurons require the proper expression level of Flamingo, a G protein-coupled receptor-like protein, in embryonic neurons. Whereas Flamingo functions downstream of Frizzled in specifying planar polarity, Flamingo-dependent dendritic outgrowth is independent of Frizzled.

  17. DNA end resection controls the balance between homologous and illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ivanković, Siniša; Đermić, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Even a partial loss of function of human RecQ helicase analogs causes adverse effects such as a cancer-prone Werner, Bloom or Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, whereas a complete RecQ deficiency in Escherichia coli is not deleterious for a cell. We show that this puzzling difference is due to different mechanisms of DNA double strand break (DSB) resection in E. coli and humans. Coupled helicase and RecA loading activities of RecBCD enzyme, which is found exclusively in bacteria, are shown to be responsible for channeling recombinogenic 3' ending tails toward productive, homologous and away from nonproductive, aberrant recombination events. On the other hand, in recB1080/recB1067 mutants, lacking RecBCD's RecA loading activity while preserving its helicase activity, DSB resection is mechanistically more alike that in eukaryotes (by its uncoupling from a recombinase polymerization step), and remarkably, the role of RecQ also becomes akin of its eukaryotic counterparts in a way of promoting homologous and suppressing illegitimate recombination. The sickly phenotype of recB1080 recQ mutant was further exacerbated by inactivation of an exonuclease I, which degrades the unwound 3' tail. The respective recB1080 recQ xonA mutant showed poor viability, DNA repair and homologous recombination deficiency, and very increased illegitimate recombination. These findings demonstrate that the metabolism of the 3' ending overhang is a decisive factor in tuning the balance of homologous and illegitimate recombination in E. coli, thus highlighting the importance of regulating DSB resection for preserving genome integrity. recB mutants used in this study, showing pronounced RecQ helicase and exonuclease I dependence, make up a suitable model system for studying mechanisms of DSB resection in bacteria. Also, these mutants might be useful for investigating functions of the conserved RecQ helicase family members, and congruently serve as a simpler, more defined model system for human

  18. Reagent-controlled asymmetric homologation of boronic esters by enantioenriched main-group chiral carbenoids.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Paul R; Marsden, Stephen P; Vater, Huw D

    2006-02-16

    [reaction: see text] Putative enantioenriched carbenoid species, (R)-1-chloro-2-phenylethylmagnesium chloride (9) and (S)-1-chloro-2-phenylethyllithium (26), generated in situ by sulfoxide ligand exchange from (-)-(R(S),R)-1-chloro-2-phenylethyl p-tolyl sulfoxide (8), effected the stereocontrolled homologation of boronic esters. sec-Alcohols derived from the product boronates by oxidation with basic hydrogen peroxide exhibited % ee closely approaching that of sulfoxide 8 in examples employing Li-carbenoid 26.

  19. The Drosophila HEM-2/NAP1 homolog KETTE controls axonal pathfinding and cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Hummel, T; Leifker, K; Klämbt, C

    2000-04-01

    In Drosophila, the correct formation of the segmental commissures depends on neuron-glial interactions at the midline. The VUM midline neurons extend axons along which glial cells migrate in between anterior and posterior commissures. Here, we show that the gene kette is required for the normal projection of the VUM axons and subsequently disrupts glial migration. Axonal projection defects are also found for many other moto- and interneurons. In addition, kette affects the cell morphology of mesodermal and epidermal derivatives, which show an abnormal actin cytoskeleton. The KETTE protein is homologous to the transmembrane protein HEM-2/NAP1 evolutionary conserved from worms to vertebrates. In vitro analysis has shown a specific interaction of the vertebrate HEM-2/NAP1 with the SH2-SH3 adapter protein NCK and the small GTPase RAC1, which both have been implicated in regulating cytoskeleton organization and axonal growth. Hypomorphic kette mutations lead to axonal defects similar to mutations in the Drosophila NCK homolog dreadlocks. Furthermore, we show that kette and dock mutants genetically interact. NCK is thought to interact with the small G proteins RAC1 and CDC42, which play a role in axonal growth. In line with these observations, a kette phenocopy can be obtained following directed expression of mutant DCDC42 or DRAC1 in the CNS midline. In addition, the kette mutant phenotype can be partially rescued by expression of an activated DRAC1 transgene. Our data suggest an important role of the HEM-2 protein in cytoskeletal organization during axonal pathfinding.

  20. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, R.W.; Moloy, K.G.

    1988-02-23

    A process is described for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  1. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, Richard W.; Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    A process for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  2. The Drosophila HEM-2/NAP1 homolog KETTE controls axonal pathfinding and cytoskeletal organization

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Thomas; Leifker, Karin; Klämbt, Christian

    2000-01-01

    In Drosophila, the correct formation of the segmental commissures depends on neuron–glial interactions at the midline. The VUM midline neurons extend axons along which glial cells migrate in between anterior and posterior commissures. Here, we show that the gene kette is required for the normal projection of the VUM axons and subsequently disrupts glial migration. Axonal projection defects are also found for many other moto- and interneurons. In addition, kette affects the cell morphology of mesodermal and epidermal derivatives, which show an abnormal actin cytoskeleton. The KETTE protein is homologous to the transmembrane protein HEM-2/NAP1 evolutionary conserved from worms to vertebrates. In vitro analysis has shown a specific interaction of the vertebrate HEM-2/NAP1 with the SH2–SH3 adapter protein NCK and the small GTPase RAC1, which both have been implicated in regulating cytoskeleton organization and axonal growth. Hypomorphic kette mutations lead to axonal defects similar to mutations in the Drosophila NCK homolog dreadlocks. Furthermore, we show that kette and dock mutants genetically interact. NCK is thought to interact with the small G proteins RAC1 and CDC42, which play a role in axonal growth. In line with these observations, a kette phenocopy can be obtained following directed expression of mutant DCDC42 or DRAC1 in the CNS midline. In addition, the kette mutant phenotype can be partially rescued by expression of an activated DRAC1 transgene. Our data suggest an important role of the HEM-2 protein in cytoskeletal organization during axonal pathfinding. PMID:10766742

  3. A LuxR Homolog Controls Production of Symbiotically Active Extracellular Polysaccharide II by Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Pellock, Brett J.; Teplitski, Max; Boinay, Ryan P.; Bauer, W. Dietz; Walker, Graham C.

    2002-01-01

    Production of complex extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) by the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti is required for efficient invasion of root nodules on the host plant alfalfa. Any one of three S. meliloti polysaccharides, succinoglycan, EPS II, or K antigen, can mediate infection thread initiation and extension (root nodule invasion) on alfalfa. Of these three polysaccharides, the only symbiotically active polysaccharide produced by S. meliloti wild-type strain Rm1021 is succinoglycan. The expR101 mutation is required to turn on production of symbiotically active forms of EPS II in strain Rm1021. In this study, we have determined the nature of the expR101 mutation in S. meliloti. The expR101 mutation, a spontaneous dominant mutation, results from precise, reading frame-restoring excision of an insertion sequence from the coding region of expR, a gene whose predicted protein product is highly homologous to the Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae RhiR protein and a number of other homologs of Vibrio fischeri LuxR that function as receptors for N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in quorum-sensing regulation of gene expression. S. meliloti ExpR activates transcription of genes involved in EPS II production in a density-dependent fashion, and it does so at much lower cell densities than many quorum-sensing systems. High-pressure liquid chromatographic fractionation of S. meliloti culture filtrate extracts revealed at least three peaks with AHL activity, one of which activated ExpR-dependent expression of the expE operon. PMID:12193623

  4. Achaete-Scute Homolog 1 Expression Controls Cellular Differentiation of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kasim, Mumtaz; Heß, Vicky; Scholz, Holger; Persson, Pontus B.; Fähling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the major cause of infant cancer deaths, results from fast proliferation of undifferentiated neuroblasts. Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma includes differentiation with retinoic acid (RA); however, the resistance of many of these tumors to RA-induced differentiation poses a considerable challenge. Human achaete-scute homolog 1 (hASH1) is a proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor essential for neurogenesis and is often upregulated in neuroblastoma. Here, we identified a novel function for hASH1 in regulating the differentiation phenotype of neuroblastoma cells. Global analysis of 986 human neuroblastoma datasets revealed a negative correlation between hASH1 and neuron differentiation that was independent of the N-myc (MYCN) oncogene. Using RA to induce neuron differentiation in two neuroblastoma cell lines displaying high and low levels of hASH1 expression, we confirmed the link between hASH1 expression and the differentiation defective phenotype, which was reversed by silencing hASH1 or by hypoxic preconditioning. We further show that hASH1 suppresses neuronal differentiation by inhibiting transcription at the RA receptor element. Collectively, our data indicate hASH1 to be key for understanding neuroblastoma resistance to differentiation therapy and pave the way for hASH1-targeted therapies for augmenting the response of neuroblastoma to differentiation therapy. PMID:28066180

  5. Homologs of PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH Control Starch Granule Initiation in Arabidopsis Leaves[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    David, Laure C.; Abt, Melanie; Lu, Kuan-Jen

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanism that initiates the synthesis of starch granules is poorly understood. Here, we discovered two plastidial proteins involved in granule initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. Both contain coiled coils and a family-48 carbohydrate binding module (CBM48) and are homologs of the PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST) protein; thus, we named them PTST2 and PTST3. Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells typically contain five to seven granules, but remarkably, most chloroplasts in ptst2 mutants contained zero or one large granule. Chloroplasts in ptst3 had a slight reduction in granule number compared with the wild type, while those of the ptst2 ptst3 double mutant contained even fewer granules than ptst2. The ptst2 granules were larger but similar in morphology to wild-type granules, but those of the double mutant had an aberrant morphology. Immunoprecipitation showed that PTST2 interacts with STARCH SYNTHASE4 (SS4), which influences granule initiation and morphology. Overexpression of PTST2 resulted in chloroplasts containing many small granules, an effect that was dependent on the presence of SS4. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the CBM48 domain of PTST2, which is essential for its function, interacts with long maltooligosaccharides. We propose that PTST2 and PTST3 are critical during granule initiation, as they bind and deliver suitable maltooligosaccharide primers to SS4. PMID:28684429

  6. Homologs of PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH Control Starch Granule Initiation in Arabidopsis Leaves.

    PubMed

    Seung, David; Boudet, Julien; Monroe, Jonathan; Schreier, Tina B; David, Laure C; Abt, Melanie; Lu, Kuan-Jen; Zanella, Martina; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2017-07-01

    The molecular mechanism that initiates the synthesis of starch granules is poorly understood. Here, we discovered two plastidial proteins involved in granule initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. Both contain coiled coils and a family-48 carbohydrate binding module (CBM48) and are homologs of the PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST) protein; thus, we named them PTST2 and PTST3. Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells typically contain five to seven granules, but remarkably, most chloroplasts in ptst2 mutants contained zero or one large granule. Chloroplasts in ptst3 had a slight reduction in granule number compared with the wild type, while those of the ptst2 ptst3 double mutant contained even fewer granules than ptst2 The ptst2 granules were larger but similar in morphology to wild-type granules, but those of the double mutant had an aberrant morphology. Immunoprecipitation showed that PTST2 interacts with STARCH SYNTHASE4 (SS4), which influences granule initiation and morphology. Overexpression of PTST2 resulted in chloroplasts containing many small granules, an effect that was dependent on the presence of SS4. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the CBM48 domain of PTST2, which is essential for its function, interacts with long maltooligosaccharides. We propose that PTST2 and PTST3 are critical during granule initiation, as they bind and deliver suitable maltooligosaccharide primers to SS4. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  7. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog*

    PubMed Central

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C.; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na+ stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na+ binding sites contributes to Na+-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na+, suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na+ responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na+-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na+ and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na+ binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening. PMID:26582198

  8. Enhanced homology-directed human genome engineering by controlled timing of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Steven; Staahl, Brett T; Alla, Ravi K; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a robust genome editing technology that works in human cells, animals and plants based on the RNA-programmed DNA cleaving activity of the Cas9 enzyme. Building on previous work (Jinek et al., 2013), we show here that new genetic information can be introduced site-specifically and with high efficiency by homology-directed repair (HDR) of Cas9-induced site-specific double-strand DNA breaks using timed delivery of Cas9-guide RNA ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Cas9 RNP-mediated HDR in HEK293T, human primary neonatal fibroblast and human embryonic stem cells was increased dramatically relative to experiments in unsynchronized cells, with rates of HDR up to 38% observed in HEK293T cells. Sequencing of on- and potential off-target sites showed that editing occurred with high fidelity, while cell mortality was minimized. This approach provides a simple and highly effective strategy for enhancing site-specific genome engineering in both transformed and primary human cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04766.001 PMID:25497837

  9. Enhanced homology-directed human genome engineering by controlled timing of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Steven; Staahl, Brett T; Alla, Ravi K; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-12-15

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a robust genome editing technology that works in human cells, animals and plants based on the RNA-programmed DNA cleaving activity of the Cas9 enzyme. Building on previous work (Jinek et al., 2013), we show here that new genetic information can be introduced site-specifically and with high efficiency by homology-directed repair (HDR) of Cas9-induced site-specific double-strand DNA breaks using timed delivery of Cas9-guide RNA ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Cas9 RNP-mediated HDR in HEK293T, human primary neonatal fibroblast and human embryonic stem cells was increased dramatically relative to experiments in unsynchronized cells, with rates of HDR up to 38% observed in HEK293T cells. Sequencing of on- and potential off-target sites showed that editing occurred with high fidelity, while cell mortality was minimized. This approach provides a simple and highly effective strategy for enhancing site-specific genome engineering in both transformed and primary human cells.

  10. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog.

    PubMed

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-15

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na(+) stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na(+) binding sites contributes to Na(+)-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na(+), suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na(+) responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na(+)-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na(+) and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na(+) binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening.

  11. Regulation of a LATS-homolog by Ras GTPases is important for the control of cell division

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear Dbf-related/large tumor suppressor (NDR/LATS) kinases have been shown recently to control pathways that regulate mitotic exit, cytokinesis, cell growth, morphological changes and apoptosis. LATS kinases are core components of the Hippo signaling cascade and important tumor suppressors controlling cell proliferation and organ size in flies and mammals, and homologs are also present in yeast and Dictyostelium discoideum. Ras proto-oncogens regulate many biological functions, including differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Dysfunctions of LATS kinases or Ras GTPases have been implicated in the development of a variety of cancers in humans. Results In this study we used the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum to analyze the functions of NdrC, a homolog of the mammalian LATS2 protein, and present a novel regulatory mechanism for this kinase. Deletion of the ndrC gene caused impaired cell division and loss of centrosome integrity. A yeast two-hybrid analysis, using activated Ras proteins as bait, revealed NdrC as an interactor and identified its Ras-binding domain. Further in vitro pull-down assays showed that NdrC binds RasG and RasB, and to a lesser extent RasC and Rap1. In cells lacking NdrC, the levels of activated RasB and RasG are up-regulated, suggesting a functional connection between RasB, RasG, and NdrC. Conclusions Dictyostelium discoideum NdrC is a LATS2-homologous kinase that is important for the regulation of cell division. NdrC contains a Ras-binding domain and interacts preferentially with RasB and RasG. Changed levels of both, RasB or RasG, have been shown previously to interfere with cell division. Since a defect in cell division is exhibited by NdrC-null cells, RasG-null cells, and cells overexpressing activated RasB, we propose a model for the regulation of cytokinesis by NdrC that involves the antagonistic control by RasB and RasG. PMID:24986648

  12. A Norway Spruce FLOWERING LOCUS T Homolog Is Implicated in Control of Growth Rhythm in Conifers1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Clapham, David; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Growth in perennial plants possesses an annual cycle of active growth and dormancy that is controlled by environmental factors, mainly photoperiod and temperature. In conifers and other nonangiosperm species, the molecular mechanisms behind these responses are currently unknown. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) seedlings, growth cessation and bud set are induced by short days and plants from southern latitudes require at least 7 to 10 h of darkness, whereas plants from northern latitudes need only 2 to 3 h of darkness. Bud burst, on the other hand, is almost exclusively controlled by temperature. To test the possible role of Norway spruce FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like genes in growth rhythm, we have studied expression patterns of four Norway spruce FT family genes in two populations with a divergent bud set response under various photoperiodic conditions. Our data show a significant and tight correlation between growth rhythm (both bud set and bud burst), and expression pattern of one of the four Norway spruce phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein gene family members (PaFT4) over a variety of experimental conditions. This study strongly suggests that one Norway spruce homolog to the FT gene, which controls flowering in angiosperms, is also a key integrator of photoperiodic and thermal signals in the control of growth rhythms in gymnosperms. The data also indicate that the divergent adaptive bud set responses of northern and southern Norway spruce populations, both to photoperiod and light quality, are mediated through PaFT4. These results provide a major advance in our understanding of the molecular control of a major adaptive trait in conifers and a tool for further molecular studies of adaptive variation in plants. PMID:17369429

  13. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MRE11 controls extent of resection during homology directed repair by signalling through Exonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Kijas, Amanda W; Lim, Yi Chieh; Bolderson, Emma; Cerosaletti, Karen; Gatei, Magtouf; Jakob, Burkhard; Tobias, Frank; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Gueven, Nuri; Oakley, Greg; Concannon, Patrick; Wolvetang, Ernst; Khanna, Kum Kum; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-09-30

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex plays a central role as a sensor of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and is responsible for the efficient activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Once activated ATM in turn phosphorylates RAD50 and NBS1, important for cell cycle control, DNA repair and cell survival. We report here that MRE11 is also phosphorylated by ATM at S676 and S678 in response to agents that induce DNA DSB, is dependent on the presence of NBS1, and does not affect the association of members of the complex or ATM activation. A phosphosite mutant (MRE11S676AS678A) cell line showed decreased cell survival and increased chromosomal aberrations after radiation exposure indicating a defect in DNA repair. Use of GFP-based DNA repair reporter substrates in MRE11S676AS678A cells revealed a defect in homology directed repair (HDR) but single strand annealing was not affected. More detailed investigation revealed that MRE11S676AS678A cells resected DNA ends to a greater extent at sites undergoing HDR. Furthermore, while ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Kap1 and SMC1 was normal in MRE11S676AS678A cells, there was no phosphorylation of Exonuclease 1 consistent with the defect in HDR. These results describe a novel role for ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MRE11 in limiting the extent of resection mediated through Exonuclease 1.

  14. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gene transcription.

  15. The matricellular protein CCN1 controls retinal angiogenesis by targeting VEGF, Src homology 2 domain phosphatase-1 and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Chintala, Hemabindu; Krupska, Izabela; Yan, Lulu; Lau, Lester; Grant, Maria; Chaqour, Brahim

    2015-07-01

    Physiological angiogenesis depends on the highly coordinated actions of multiple angiogenic regulators. CCN1 is a secreted cysteine-rich and integrin-binding matricellular protein required for proper cardiovascular development. However, our understanding of the cellular origins and activities of this molecule is incomplete. Here, we show that CCN1 is predominantly expressed in angiogenic endothelial cells (ECs) at the leading front of actively growing vessels in the mouse retina. Endothelial deletion of CCN1 in mice using a Cre-Lox system is associated with EC hyperplasia, loss of pericyte coverage and formation of dense retinal vascular networks lacking the normal hierarchical arrangement of arterioles, capillaries and venules. CCN1 is a product of an immediate-early gene that is transcriptionally induced in ECs in response to stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that CCN1 activity is integrated with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) activation and downstream signaling pathways required for tubular network formation. CCN1-integrin binding increased the expression of and association between Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and VEGF-R2, which leads to rapid dephosphorylation of VEGF-R2 tyrosine, thus preventing EC hyperproliferation. Predictably, CCN1 further brings receptors/signaling molecules into proximity that are otherwise spatially separated. Furthermore, CCN1 induces integrin-dependent Notch activation in cultured ECs, and its targeted gene inactivation in vivo alters Notch-dependent vascular specification and remodeling, suggesting that functional levels of Notch signaling requires CCN1 activity. These data highlight novel functions of CCN1 as a naturally optimized molecule, fine-controlling key processes in physiological angiogenesis and safeguarding against aberrant angiogenic responses.

  16. The matricellular protein CCN1 controls retinal angiogenesis by targeting VEGF, Src homology 2 domain phosphatase-1 and Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chintala, Hemabindu; Krupska, Izabela; Yan, Lulu; Lau, Lester; Grant, Maria; Chaqour, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Physiological angiogenesis depends on the highly coordinated actions of multiple angiogenic regulators. CCN1 is a secreted cysteine-rich and integrin-binding matricellular protein required for proper cardiovascular development. However, our understanding of the cellular origins and activities of this molecule is incomplete. Here, we show that CCN1 is predominantly expressed in angiogenic endothelial cells (ECs) at the leading front of actively growing vessels in the mouse retina. Endothelial deletion of CCN1 in mice using a Cre-Lox system is associated with EC hyperplasia, loss of pericyte coverage and formation of dense retinal vascular networks lacking the normal hierarchical arrangement of arterioles, capillaries and venules. CCN1 is a product of an immediate-early gene that is transcriptionally induced in ECs in response to stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that CCN1 activity is integrated with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) activation and downstream signaling pathways required for tubular network formation. CCN1-integrin binding increased the expression of and association between Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and VEGF-R2, which leads to rapid dephosphorylation of VEGF-R2 tyrosine, thus preventing EC hyperproliferation. Predictably, CCN1 further brings receptors/signaling molecules into proximity that are otherwise spatially separated. Furthermore, CCN1 induces integrin-dependent Notch activation in cultured ECs, and its targeted gene inactivation in vivo alters Notch-dependent vascular specification and remodeling, suggesting that functional levels of Notch signaling requires CCN1 activity. These data highlight novel functions of CCN1 as a naturally optimized molecule, fine-controlling key processes in physiological angiogenesis and safeguarding against aberrant angiogenic responses. PMID:26002917

  17. Meiotic Crossover Control by Concerted Action of Rad51-Dmc1 in Homolog Template Bias and Robust Homeostatic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chu-Chun; Grubb, Jennifer; Thacker, Drew; Lee, Chih-Ying; Dresser, Michael E.; Hunter, Neil; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by recombination promotes pairing of homologous chromosomes and their connection by crossovers. Two DNA strand-exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, are required for meiotic recombination in many organisms. Studies in budding yeast imply that Rad51 acts to regulate Dmc1's strand exchange activity, while its own exchange activity is inhibited. However, in a dmc1 mutant, elimination of inhibitory factor, Hed1, activates Rad51's strand exchange activity and results in high levels of recombination without participation of Dmc1. Here we show that Rad51-mediated meiotic recombination is not subject to regulatory processes associated with high-fidelity chromosome segregation. These include homolog bias, a process that directs strand exchange between homologs rather than sister chromatids. Furthermore, activation of Rad51 does not effectively substitute for Dmc1's chromosome pairing activity, nor does it ensure formation of the obligate crossovers required for accurate homolog segregation. We further show that Dmc1's dominance in promoting strand exchange between homologs involves repression of Rad51's strand-exchange activity. This function of Dmc1 is independent of Hed1, but requires the meiotic kinase, Mek1. Hed1 makes a relatively minor contribution to homolog bias, but nonetheless this is important for normal morphogenesis of synaptonemal complexes and efficient crossing-over especially when DSB numbers are decreased. Super-resolution microscopy shows that Dmc1 also acts to organize discrete complexes of a Mek1 partner protein, Red1, into clusters along lateral elements of synaptonemal complexes; this activity may also contribute to homolog bias. Finally, we show that when interhomolog bias is defective, recombination is buffered by two feedback processes, one that increases the fraction of events that yields crossovers, and a second that we propose involves additional DSB formation in response to

  18. Homology and causes.

    PubMed

    Van Valen, L M

    1982-09-01

    Homology is resemblance caused by a continuity of information. In biology it is a unified developmental phenomenon. Homologies among and within individuals intergrade in several ways, so historical homology cannot be separated sharply from repetitive homology. Nevertheless, the consequences of historical and repetitive homologies can be mutually contradictory. A detailed discussion of the rise and fall of the "premolar-analogy" theory of homologies of mammalian molar-tooth cusps exemplifies such a contradiction. All other hypotheses of historical homology which are based on repetitive homology, such as the foliar theory of the flower considered phyletically, are suspect.

  19. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  20. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  1. Analysis of two TFL1 homologs of dogwood species (Cornus L.) indicates functional conservation in control of transition to flowering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Jian; Abuahmad, Ahmad; Franks, Robert G; Xie, De-Yu; Xiang, Qiu-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Two TFL1 -like genes, CorfloTFL1 and CorcanTFL1 cloned from Cornus florida and C. canadensis, function in regulating the transition to reproductive development in Arabidopsis. TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) is known to regulate inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana and to inhibit the transition from a vegetative to reproductive phase within the shoot apical meristem. Despite the importance, TFL1 homologs have been functionally characterized in only a handful eudicots. Here we report the role of TFL1 homologs of Cornus L. in asterid clade of eudicots. Two TFL1-like genes, CorfloTFL1 and CorcanTFL1, were cloned from Cornus florida (a tree) and C. canadensis (a subshrub), respectively. Both are deduced to encode proteins of 175 amino acids. The amino acid sequences of these two Cornus TFL1 homologs share a high similarity to Arabidopsis TFL1 and phylogenetically more close to TFL1 paralogous copy ATC (Arabidopsis thaliana CENTRORADIALIS homologue). Two genes are overexpressed in wild-type and tfl1 mutant plants of A. thaliana. The over-expression of each gene in wild-type Arabidopsis plants results in delaying flowering time, increase of plant height and cauline and rosette leaf numbers, excessive shoot buds, and secondary inflorescence branches. The over-expression of each gene in the tfl1 mutant rescued developmental defects, such as the early determinate inflorescence development, early flowering time, and other vegetative growth defects, to normal phenotypes of wild-type plants. These transgenic phenotypes are inherited in progenies. All data indicate that CorfloTFL1 and CorcanTFL1 have conserved the ancestral function of TFL1 and CEN regulating flowering time and inflorescence determinacy.

  2. Investigation on the application of DNA forensic human identification techniques to detect homologous blood transfusions in doping control.

    PubMed

    Donati, Francesco; Stampella, Alessandra; de la Torre, Xavier; Botrè, Francesco

    2013-06-15

    Homologous blood transfusion is an illicit practice used by athletes to improve the delivery of oxygen to tissues and, as such, it is banned in sports. The current method of detection is based on the flow cytofluorimetric phenotypic identification of red blood cells mismatch of minor blood group antigens between the donor and the recipient. The selectivity of this method to clearly identify transfused samples is related to the number of blood group antigens tested. Despite the fact that several different antigens are investigated, two individuals sharing the expression of the same minor blood group antigens pattern cannot be distinguished. We tested the possibility to use a different approach based on DNA forensic human identification techniques. Analysis of the DNA short tandem repeats (STRs) demonstrated its suitability in detecting mixed whole blood samples simulating homologous blood transfusion in 100% of the samples tested, ensuring the capability of clearly detecting mixed blood cell populations also on samples where the fraction of the minoritary population is as low as 2.5%.

  3. Calcineurin-dependent growth control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking PMC1, a homolog of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, K W; Fink, G R

    1994-02-01

    Ca2+ ATPases deplete the cytosol of Ca2+ ions and are crucial to cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. The PMC1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a vacuole membrane protein that is 40% identical to the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases (PMCAs) of mammalian cells. Mutants lacking PMC1 grow well in standard media, but sequester Ca2+ into the vacuole at 20% of the wild-type levels. pmc1 null mutants fail to grow in media containing high levels of Ca2+, suggesting a role of PMC1 in Ca2+ tolerance. The growth inhibitory effect of added Ca2+ requires activation of calcineurin, a Ca2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase. Mutations in calcineurin A or B subunits or the inhibitory compounds FK506 and cyclosporin A restore growth of pmc1 mutants in high Ca2+ media. Also, growth is restored by recessive mutations that inactivate the high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites in calmodulin. This mutant calmodulin has apparently lost the ability to activate calcineurin in vivo. These results suggest that activation of calcineurin by Ca2+ and calmodulin can negatively affect yeast growth. A second Ca2+ ATPase homolog encoded by the PMR1 gene acts together with PMC1 to prevent lethal activation of calcineurin even in standard (low Ca2+) conditions. We propose that these Ca2+ ATPase homologs are essential in yeast to deplete the cytosol of Ca2+ ions which, at elevated concentrations, inhibits yeast growth through inappropriate activation of calcineurin.

  4. Light-inducible genetic engineering and control of non-homologous end-joining in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms: LML 3.0 and OFN 1.0.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xihua; Zhang, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Wei; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-02-09

    Filamentous fungi play important roles in the production of plant cell-wall degrading enzymes. In recent years, homologous recombinant technologies have contributed significantly to improved enzymes production and system design of genetically manipulated strains. When introducing multiple gene deletions, we need a robust and convenient way to control selectable marker genes, especially when only a limited number of markers are available in filamentous fungi. Integration after transformation is predominantly nonhomologous in most fungi other than yeast. Fungal strains deficient in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway have limitations associated with gene function analyses despite they are excellent recipient strains for gene targets. We describe strategies and methods to address these challenges above and leverage the power of resilient NHEJ deficiency strains. We have established a foolproof light-inducible platform for one-step unmarked genetic modification in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms designated as 'LML 3.0', and an on-off control protocol of NHEJ pathway called 'OFN 1.0', using a synthetic light-switchable transactivation to control Cre recombinase-based excision and inversion. The methods provide a one-step strategy to sequentially modify genes without introducing selectable markers and NHEJ-deficiency. The strategies can be used to manipulate many biological processes in a wide range of eukaryotic cells.

  5. Light-inducible genetic engineering and control of non-homologous end-joining in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms: LML 3.0 and OFN 1.0

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xihua; Zhang, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Wei; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi play important roles in the production of plant cell-wall degrading enzymes. In recent years, homologous recombinant technologies have contributed significantly to improved enzymes production and system design of genetically manipulated strains. When introducing multiple gene deletions, we need a robust and convenient way to control selectable marker genes, especially when only a limited number of markers are available in filamentous fungi. Integration after transformation is predominantly nonhomologous in most fungi other than yeast. Fungal strains deficient in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway have limitations associated with gene function analyses despite they are excellent recipient strains for gene targets. We describe strategies and methods to address these challenges above and leverage the power of resilient NHEJ deficiency strains. We have established a foolproof light-inducible platform for one-step unmarked genetic modification in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms designated as ‘LML 3.0’, and an on-off control protocol of NHEJ pathway called ‘OFN 1.0’, using a synthetic light-switchable transactivation to control Cre recombinase-based excision and inversion. The methods provide a one-step strategy to sequentially modify genes without introducing selectable markers and NHEJ-deficiency. The strategies can be used to manipulate many biological processes in a wide range of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26857594

  6. A Drosophila homolog of cyclase-associated proteins collaborates with the Abl tyrosine kinase to control midline axon pathfinding.

    PubMed

    Wills, Zachary; Emerson, Mark; Rusch, Jannette; Bikoff, Jay; Baum, Buzz; Perrimon, Norbert; Van Vactor, David

    2002-11-14

    We demonstrate that Drosophila capulet (capt), a homolog of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein that binds and regulates actin in yeast, associates with Abl in Drosophila cells, suggesting a functional relationship in vivo. We find a robust and specific genetic interaction between capt and Abl at the midline choice point where the growth cone repellent Slit functions to restrict axon crossing. Genetic interactions between capt and slit support a model where Capt and Abl collaborate as part of the repellent response. Further support for this model is provided by genetic interactions that both capt and Abl display with multiple members of the Roundabout receptor family. These studies identify Capulet as part of an emerging pathway linking guidance signals to regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and suggest that the Abl pathway mediates signals downstream of multiple Roundabout receptors.

  7. A relA/spoT homologous gene from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) controls antibiotic biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Costa, O H; Arias, P; Romero, N M; Parro, V; Mellado, R P; Malpartida, F

    1996-05-03

    A 0.972-kilobase pair DNA fragment from Streptomyces lividans that induces the production of the blue-pigmented antibiotic actinorhodine in S. lividans when cloned on a multicopy plasmid has led to the isolation of a 4-kilobase pair DNA fragment from Streptomyces coelicolor containing homologous sequence. Computer-assisted analysis of the DNA sequence revealed three putative open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3. ORF2 extends beyond the sequenced DNA fragment, and its deduced product shares no similarities with any other known proteins in the data bases. ORF3 is also truncated, and its 41-amino acid C-terminal product is identical to the S. coelicolor adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. The 847-amino acid ORF1 protein, with a predicted molecular mass of 94.2 kDa, strongly resembled the relA and spoT gene products from Escherichia coli and the homologs from Vibrio sp. strain S14, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus equisimilis H46A, and Mycoplasma genitalium. Unlike these proteins, the ORF1 amino acid sequence analysis revealed the presence of a putative ATP/GTP-binding domain. A mutant was generated by deleting most of the ORF1 gene that showed an actinorhodine-nonproducing phenotype, while undecylprodigiosin and the calcium-dependent antibiotic were unaffected. The mutant strain grew at a much lower rate than the wild-type strain, and spore formation was delayed. When the gene was propagated on a low copy number vector, not only was actinorhodine production restored, but actinorhodine and undecylprodigiosin production was enhanced in both the mutant and wild-type and morphological differentiation returned to wild-type characteristics. (p)ppGpp synthetase activity was not detected in purified ribosomes from the ORF1-deleted mutant, while it was restored by complementation of this strain.

  8. Sequencing and structural homology modeling of the ecdysone receptor in two chrysopids used in biological control of pest insects.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Moises João; Christiaens, Olivier; Rougé, Pierre; Grutzmacher, Anderson Dionei; Zimmer, Paulo Dejalma; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-04-01

    In insects, the process of molting and metamorphosis are mainly regulated by a steroidal hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and its analogs (ecdysteroids) that specifically bind to the ecdysone receptor ligand-binding domain (EcR-LBD). Currently, several synthetic non-steroidal ecdysone agonists, including tebufenozide, are commercially available as insecticides. Tebufenozide exerts its activity by binding to the 20E-binding site and thus activating EcR permanently. It appears that subtle differences in the architecture among LBDs may underpin the differential binding affinity of tebufenozide across taxonomic orders. In brief, first we demonstrated the harmlessness of tebufenozide towards Chrysoperla externa (Ce). Then, a molecular analysis of EcR-LBD of two neuropteran insects Chrysoperla carnea and Ce was presented. Finally, we constructed a chrysopid in silico homology model docked ponasterone A (PonA) and tebufenozide into the binding pocket and analyzed the amino acids indentified as critical for binding to PonA and tebufenozide. Due to a restrict extent in the cavity at the bottom of the ecdysone-binding pocket a steric clash occurred upon docking of tebufenozide. The absence of harm biological effect and the docking results suggest that tebufenozide is prevented of any deleterious effects on chrysopids.

  9. Distinct genetic control of homologous recombination repair of Cas9-induced double-strand breaks, nicks and paired nicks

    PubMed Central

    Vriend, Lianne E.M.; Prakash, Rohit; Chen, Chun-Chin; Vanoli, Fabio; Cavallo, Francesca; Zhang, Yu; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be powerful inducers of homologous recombination (HR), but single-strand breaks (nicks) have also been shown to trigger HR. Both DSB- and nick-induced HR (nickHR) are exploited in advanced genome-engineering approaches based on the bacterial RNA-guided nuclease Cas9. However, the mechanisms of nickHR are largely unexplored. Here, we applied Cas9 nickases to study nickHR in mammalian cells. We find that nickHR is unaffected by inhibition of major damage signaling kinases and that it is not suppressed by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) components, arguing that nick processing does not require a DSB intermediate to trigger HR. Relative to a single nick, nicking both strands enhances HR, consistent with a DSB intermediate, even when nicks are induced up to ∼1kb apart. Accordingly, HR and NHEJ compete for repair of these paired nicks, but, surprisingly, only when 5' overhangs or blunt ends can be generated. Our study advances the understanding of molecular mechanisms driving nick and paired-nick repair in mammalian cells and clarify phenomena associated with Cas9-mediated genome editing. PMID:27001513

  10. A chronic high fat diet alters the homologous and heterologous control of appetite regulating peptide receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Wittert, Gary A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Page, Amanda J

    2013-08-01

    Leptin, ghrelin and neuropeptide W (NPW) modulate vagal afferent activity, which may underlie their appetite regulatory actions. High fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity induces changes in the plasma levels of these peptides and alters the expression of receptors on vagal afferents. We investigated homologous and heterologous receptor regulation by leptin, ghrelin and NPW. Mice were fed (12 weeks) a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD. Nodose ganglia were cultured overnight in the presence or absence of each peptide. Leptin (LepR), ghrelin (GHS-R), NPW (GPR7) and cholecystokinin type-1 (CCK1R) receptor mRNA, and the plasma leptin, ghrelin and NPW levels were measured. SLD: leptin reduced LepR, GPR7, increased GHS-R and CCK1R mRNA; ghrelin increased LepR, GPR7, CCK1R, and decreased GHS-R. HFD: leptin decreased GHS-R and GPR7, ghrelin increased GHS-R and GPR7. NPW decreased all receptors except GPR7 which increased with HFD. Plasma leptin was higher and NPW lower in HFD. Thus, HFD-induced obesity disrupts inter-regulation of appetite regulatory receptors in vagal afferents.

  11. Real-time evaluation of a myoelectric control method for high-level upper limb amputees based on homologous leg movements.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Kenneth R; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2016-08-01

    Electromyography-based gesture classification methods for control of advanced upper limb prostheses are limited either to individuals with amputations distal to the elbow or to those willing to undergo targeted muscle reinnervation surgery. Based on the natural similarity between gestures of the lower leg and the arm and on established methods in electromyography-based gesture classification, we propose a noninvasive system with which users control an upper limb prosthesis via homologous movements of the leg and foot. Eight inexperienced able-bodied subjects controlled a simulated robotic arm in a target achievement control (TAC) task with command of up to four degrees of freedom toward targets requiring one motion class. All subjects performed the task with analogous electromyography recording configurations on both the leg and the arm (as a benchmark), achieving slightly better performance with leg control overall. Only a brief demonstration of the arm-leg gesture mapping was necessary for subjects to perform the task, establishing the minimal training time required to begin using the control scheme. Our findings indicate that electromyography-based recognition of leg gestures may be a viable noninvasive prosthesis control option for high-level amputees.

  12. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sha; Yin, Xiaoyan; Spollen, William; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Schoelz, James; Bilyeu, Kristin; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting "hot spots". The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model.

  13. Nitrogenase and Homologs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes biological nitrogen fixation, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. Three homologous nitrogenases have been identified to date, along with several structural and/or functional homologs of this enzyme that are involved in nitrogenase assembly, bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and methanogenic process, respectively. In this article, we provide an overview of the structures and functions of nitrogenase and its homologs, which highlights the similarity and disparity of this uniquely versatile group of enzymes. PMID:25491285

  14. Mediators of homologous DNA pairing.

    PubMed

    Zelensky, Alex; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2014-10-09

    Homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange are at the core of homologous recombination. These reactions are promoted by a DNA-strand-exchange protein assembled into a nucleoprotein filament comprising the DNA-pairing protein, ATP, and single-stranded DNA. The catalytic activity of this molecular machine depends on control of its dynamic instability by accessory factors. Here we discuss proteins known as recombination mediators that facilitate formation and functional activation of the DNA-strand-exchange protein filament. Although the basics of homologous pairing and DNA-strand exchange are highly conserved in evolution, differences in mediator function are required to cope with differences in how single-stranded DNA is packaged by the single-stranded DNA-binding protein in different species, and the biochemical details of how the different DNA-strand-exchange proteins nucleate and extend into a nucleoprotein filament. The set of (potential) mediator proteins has apparently expanded greatly in evolution, raising interesting questions about the need for additional control and coordination of homologous recombination in more complex organisms. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  15. Mediators of Homologous DNA Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Zelensky, Alex; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange are at the core of homologous recombination. These reactions are promoted by a DNA-strand-exchange protein assembled into a nucleoprotein filament comprising the DNA-pairing protein, ATP, and single-stranded DNA. The catalytic activity of this molecular machine depends on control of its dynamic instability by accessory factors. Here we discuss proteins known as recombination mediators that facilitate formation and functional activation of the DNA-strand-exchange protein filament. Although the basics of homologous pairing and DNA-strand exchange are highly conserved in evolution, differences in mediator function are required to cope with differences in how single-stranded DNA is packaged by the single-stranded DNA-binding protein in different species, and the biochemical details of how the different DNA-strand-exchange proteins nucleate and extend into a nucleoprotein filament. The set of (potential) mediator proteins has apparently expanded greatly in evolution, raising interesting questions about the need for additional control and coordination of homologous recombination in more complex organisms. PMID:25301930

  16. NRA-2, a nicalin homolog, regulates neuronal death by controlling surface localization of toxic Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC channels.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Shaunak; Yeola, Shrutika; Zhang, Wenying; Bianchi, Laura; Driscoll, Monica

    2014-04-25

    Hyperactivated DEG/ENaCs induce neuronal death through excessive cation influx and disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC MEC-4 is hyperactivated by the (d) mutation and induces death of touch neurons. The analogous substitution in MEC-10 (MEC-10(d)) co-expressed in the same neurons is only mildly neurotoxic. We exploited the lower toxicity of MEC-10(d) to identify RNAi knockdowns that enhance neuronal death. We report here that knock-out of the C. elegans nicalin homolog NRA-2 enhances MEC-10(d)-induced neuronal death. Cell biological assays in C. elegans neurons show that NRA-2 controls the distribution of MEC-10(d) between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell surface. Electrophysiological experiments in Xenopus oocytes support this notion and suggest that control of channel distribution by NRA-2 is dependent on the subunit composition. We propose that nicalin/NRA-2 functions in a quality control mechanism to retain mutant channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, influencing the extent of neuronal death. Mammalian nicalin may have a similar role in DEG/ENaC biology, therefore influencing pathological conditions like ischemia.

  17. NRA-2, a Nicalin Homolog, Regulates Neuronal Death by Controlling Surface Localization of Toxic Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Shaunak; Yeola, Shrutika; Zhang, Wenying; Bianchi, Laura; Driscoll, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivated DEG/ENaCs induce neuronal death through excessive cation influx and disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC MEC-4 is hyperactivated by the (d) mutation and induces death of touch neurons. The analogous substitution in MEC-10 (MEC-10(d)) co-expressed in the same neurons is only mildly neurotoxic. We exploited the lower toxicity of MEC-10(d) to identify RNAi knockdowns that enhance neuronal death. We report here that knock-out of the C. elegans nicalin homolog NRA-2 enhances MEC-10(d)-induced neuronal death. Cell biological assays in C. elegans neurons show that NRA-2 controls the distribution of MEC-10(d) between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell surface. Electrophysiological experiments in Xenopus oocytes support this notion and suggest that control of channel distribution by NRA-2 is dependent on the subunit composition. We propose that nicalin/NRA-2 functions in a quality control mechanism to retain mutant channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, influencing the extent of neuronal death. Mammalian nicalin may have a similar role in DEG/ENaC biology, therefore influencing pathological conditions like ischemia. PMID:24567339

  18. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  19. Assessment of Human Tribbles Homolog 3 Genetic Variation (rs2295490) Effects on Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Glucose Control and Blood Pressure Lowering Treatment.

    PubMed

    He, Fazhong; Liu, Mouze; Chen, Zhangren; Liu, Guojing; Wang, Zhenmin; Liu, Rong; Luo, Jianquan; Tang, Jie; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Xin; Zhou, Honghao; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Effects of human tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) genetic variation (c.251 A>G, Gln84Arg, rs2295490) on the clinical outcomes of vascular events has not been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes after blood pressure lowering and glucose controlling treatment. We did an analysis of a 2×2 factorial (glucose control axis and blood pressure lowering axis) randomized controlled clinical trial at 61 centers in China, with a follow-up period of 5years. The major vascular endpoints were the composites of death from cardio-cerebral vascular diseases, non-fatal stroke and myocardial infraction, new or worsening renal and diabetic eye disease. A total of 1884 participants were included in our research with a 4.8years median follow-up. For glucose lowering axis, patients with TRIB3 (rs2295490) AA (n=609) genotype exhibited significantly reduced risk of major vascular events compared with AG+GG (n=335) genotype carriers (Hazard ratio 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.94, p=0.016), Paradoxically, the risk of vascular events were significantly increased in patients with AA (n=621) compared to AG+GG (n=319) genotype for intensive glucose control (Hazard ratio 1.46, 95% CI, 1.06-2.17, 35 p=0.018). For blood pressure lowering axis, marginally significant difference was found between TRIB3 variant and coronary events. Our findings suggest that good glucose and blood pressure control exhibited greater benefits on vascular outcomes in patients with TRIB3 (rs2295490) G allele.

  20. Deficiens, a homeotic gene involved in the control of flower morphogenesis in Antirrhinum majus: the protein shows homology to transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, H; Beltrán, J P; Huijser, P; Pape, H; Lönnig, W E; Saedler, H; Schwarz-Sommer, Z

    1990-01-01

    Deficiens (defA+) is a homeotic gene involved in the genetic control of Antirrhinum majus flower development. Mutation of this gene (defA-1) causes homeotic transformation of petals into sepals and of stamina into carpels in flowers displaying the 'globifera' phenotype, as shown by cross sections and scanning electronmicroscopy of developing flowers. A cDNA derived from the wild type defA+ gene has been cloned by differential screening of a subtracted 'flower specific' cDNA library. The identity of this cDNA with the defA+ gene product has been confirmed by utilizing the somatic and germinal instability of defA-1 mutants. According to Northern blot analyses the defA+ gene is expressed in flowers but not in leaves, and its expression is nearly constant during all stages of flower development. The 1.1 kb long mRNA has a 681 bp long open reading frame that can code for a putative protein of 227 amino acids (mol. wt 26.2 kd). At its N-terminus the DEF A protein reveals homology to a conserved domain of the regulatory proteins SRF (activating c-fos) in mammals and GRM/PRTF (regulating mating type) in yeast. We discuss the structure and the possible function of the DEF A protein in the control of floral organogenesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1968830

  1. Computational evaluation of new homologous down regulators of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) targeted for tumor reversion.

    PubMed

    Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Yadav, Mukesh; Wishard, Rohan

    2013-12-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been investigated for tumor reversion and is a target of cancer therapy. Down regulators which suppress the expression of TCTP can trigger the process of tumor reversion leading to the transformation of tumor cells into revertant cells. The present investigation is a novel protein-protein docking approach to target TCTP by a set of proteins similar to the protein: sorting nexin 6 (SNX6) which is an established down regulator of TCTP. The established down regulator along with its set of most similar proteins were modeled using the PYTHON based software - MODELLER v9.9, followed by structure validation using the Procheck Package. Further TCTP was docked with its established and prospective down regulators using the flexible docking protocol suite HADDOCK. The results were evaluated and ranked according to the RMSD values of the complex and the HADDOCK score, which is a weighted sum of van der Waal's energy, electrostatic energy, restraints violation energy and desolvation energy. Results concluded the protein sorting nexin 6 of Mus musculus to be a better down regulator of TCTP, as compared to the suggested down regulator (Homo sapiens snx6).

  2. AtTCTP2, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, enhances in vitro plant regeneration.

    PubMed

    Toscano-Morales, Roberto; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Cabrera-Ponce, José L; Hinojosa-Moya, Jesús; Ruiz-Salas, Jorge L; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V; Guevara-González, Ramón G; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation in animals, and probably also in plants. Arabidopsis harbors two TCTP genes, AtTCTP1 (At3g16640), which is an important mitotic regulator, and AtTCTP2 (At3g05540), which is considered a pseudogene. Nevertheless, we have obtained evidence suggesting that this gene is functional. Indeed, a T-DNA insertion mutant, SALK_045146, displays a lethal phenotype during early rosette stage. Also, both the AtTCTP2 promoter and structural gene are functional, and heterozygous plants show delayed development. AtTCTP1 cannot compensate for the loss of AtTCTP2, since the accumulation levels of the AtTCTP1 transcript are even higher in heterozygous plants than in wild-type plants. Leaf explants transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring AtTCTP2, but not AtTCTP1, led to whole plant regeneration with a high frequency. Insertion of a sequence present in AtTCTP1 but absent in AtTCTP2 demonstrates that it suppresses the capacity for plant regeneration; also, this phenomenon is enhanced by the presence of TCTP (AtTCTP1 or 2) in the nuclei of root cells. This confirms that AtTCTP2 is not a pseudogene and suggests the involvement of certain TCTP isoforms in vegetative reproduction in some plant species.

  3. AtTCTP2, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, enhances in vitro plant regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toscano-Morales, Roberto; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Cabrera-Ponce, José L.; Hinojosa-Moya, Jesús; Ruiz-Salas, Jorge L.; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V.; Guevara-González, Ramón G.; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation in animals, and probably also in plants. Arabidopsis harbors two TCTP genes, AtTCTP1 (At3g16640), which is an important mitotic regulator, and AtTCTP2 (At3g05540), which is considered a pseudogene. Nevertheless, we have obtained evidence suggesting that this gene is functional. Indeed, a T-DNA insertion mutant, SALK_045146, displays a lethal phenotype during early rosette stage. Also, both the AtTCTP2 promoter and structural gene are functional, and heterozygous plants show delayed development. AtTCTP1 cannot compensate for the loss of AtTCTP2, since the accumulation levels of the AtTCTP1 transcript are even higher in heterozygous plants than in wild-type plants. Leaf explants transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring AtTCTP2, but not AtTCTP1, led to whole plant regeneration with a high frequency. Insertion of a sequence present in AtTCTP1 but absent in AtTCTP2 demonstrates that it suppresses the capacity for plant regeneration; also, this phenomenon is enhanced by the presence of TCTP (AtTCTP1 or 2) in the nuclei of root cells. This confirms that AtTCTP2 is not a pseudogene and suggests the involvement of certain TCTP isoforms in vegetative reproduction in some plant species. PMID:26191065

  4. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Control of Entamoeba histolytica adherence involves metallosurface protease 1, an M8 family surface metalloprotease with homology to leishmanolysin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jose E; Sateriale, Adam; Bessoff, Kovi E; Huston, Christopher D

    2012-06-01

    Invasive amebiasis due to Entamoeba histolytica infection is an important cause of morbidity in developing countries. The E. histolytica genome contains two homologues to the metalloprotease leishmanolysin gene, Entamoeba histolytica MSP-1 (EhMSP-1) and EhMSP-2, while the commensal ameba Entamoeba dispar has lost EhMSP-1. In this study, we sought to characterize E. histolytica metallosurface protease 1 (EhMSP-1). Using immunoprecipitation and a model substrate, we found that EhMSP-1 was a functional metalloprotease. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that EhMSP-1 localized to the cell surface and revealed the existence of distinct, nonclonal trophozoite populations with high and low EhMSP-1 surface abundance that became synchronized following serum starvation. Phenotypic assays were performed after silencing EhMSP-1. Adherence of EhMSP-1-deficient trophozoites to tissue culture cell monolayers was more than five times greater than that of control amebas, but surface staining of several antigens, including the galactose adherence lectin, was unchanged. EhMSP-1 silencing similarly increased adherence to both viable and apoptotic Jurkat lymphocytes. Tissue culture cell monolayer destruction was reduced by EhMSP-1 silencing, although it was blocked almost completely by inhibiting cysteine proteases. Consistent with a primary defect in regulation of amebic adherence, EhMSP-1 silencing also resulted in reduced mobility on tissue culture cell monolayers and in increased phagocytosis. In conclusion, EhMSP-1 was shown to be a surface metalloprotease involved in regulation of amebic adherence, with additional effects on cell motility, cell monolayer destruction, and phagocytosis.

  6. A non-cold-inducible cold shock protein homolog mainly contributes to translational control under optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Mega, Ryosuke; Kim, Kwang; Shinkai, Akeo; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Nakagawa, Noriko

    2012-03-01

    Cold shock proteins (Csps) include both cold-induced and non-cold-induced proteins, contrary to their name. Cold-induced Csps are well studied; they function in cold acclimation by controlling transcription and translation. Some Csps have been reported to contribute to other cellular processes. However, the functions of non-cold-induced Csps under optimal growth conditions remain unknown. To elucidate these functions, we used transcriptome and proteome analyses as comprehensive approaches and have compared the outputs of wild-type and non-cold-induced Csp-deletion mutant cells. As a model organism, we selected Thermus thermophilus HB8 because it has only two csp genes (ttcsp1 and ttcsp2); ttCsp1 is the only non-cold-induced Csp. Surprisingly, the amount of transcripts and proteins upon deletion of the ttcsp1 gene was quite different. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the deletion of ttcsp1 did not affect the amount of transcripts, although the ttcsp1 gene was constantly expressed in the wild-type cell. Nonetheless, proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of many proteins were significantly altered when ttcsp1 was deleted. These results suggest that ttCsp1 functions in translation independent of transcription. Furthermore, ttCsp1 is involved in both the stimulation and inhibition of translation of specific proteins. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of ttCsp1 at 1.65 Å. This is the first report to present the structure of a non-cold-inducible cold shock protein. We also report the nucleotide binding affinity of ttCsp1. Finally, we discuss the functions of non-cold-induced Csps and propose how they modulate the levels of specific proteins to suit the prevailing environmental conditions.

  7. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-05

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. Homology, convergence and parallelism

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  9. Development and optimization of a sensitive TaqMan® real-time PCR with synthetic homologous extrinsic control for quantitation of Human cytomegalovirus viral load.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav Nanev; Otaguiri, Katia Kaori; de Figueiredo, Glauciane Garcia; Yamamoto, Aparecida Yulie; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa Marcia; Kashima, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2016-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (Human herpesvirus 5, HCMV) causes frequent asymptomatic infections in the general population. However, in immunosuppressed patients or congenitally infected infants, HCMV is related to high morbidity and mortality. In such cases, a rapid viral detection is crucial for monitoring the clinical outcome and the antiviral treatment. In this study, we optimized a sensitive biplex TaqMan® real-time PCR for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of a partial HCMV UL97 sequence and homologous extrinsic control (HEC) in the same tube. HEC was represented by a plasmid containing a modified HCMV sequence retaining the original primer binding sites, while the probe sequence was substituted by a phylogenetically divergent one (chloroplast CF0 subunit plant gene). It was estimated that the optimal HEC concentration, which did not influence the HCMV amplification is 1,000 copies/reaction. The optimized TaqMan® PCR demonstrated high analytical sensitivity (6.97 copies/reaction, CI = 95%) and specificity (100%). Moreover, the reaction showed adequate precision (repeatability, CV = 0.03; reproducibility, CV = 0.0027) and robustness (no carry-over or cross-contamination). The diagnostic sensitivity (100%) and specificity (97.8%) were adequate for the clinical application of the molecular platform. The optimized TaqMan® real-time PCR is suitable for HCMV detection and quantitation in predisposed patients and monitoring of the applied antiviral therapy. J. Med. Virol. 88:1604-1612, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Ctp1 is a cell-cycle-regulated protein that functions with Mre11 complex to control double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Limbo, Oliver; Chahwan, Charly; Yamada, Yoshiki; de Bruin, Robertus A M; Wittenberg, Curt; Russell, Paul

    2007-10-12

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is a primary sensor of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Upon recruitment to DSBs, it plays a critical role in catalyzing 5' --> 3' single-strand resection that is required for repair by homologous recombination (HR). Unknown mechanisms repress HR in G1 phase of the cell cycle during which nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the favored mode of DSB repair. Here we describe fission yeast Ctp1, so-named because it shares conserved domains with the mammalian tumor suppressor CtIP. Ctp1 is recruited to DSBs where it is essential for repair by HR. Ctp1 is required for efficient formation of RPA-coated single-strand DNA adjacent to DSBs, indicating that it functions with the MRN complex in 5' --> 3' resection. Transcription of ctp1(+) is periodic during the cell cycle, with the onset of its expression coinciding with the start of DNA replication. These data suggest that regulation of Ctp1 underlies cell-cycle control of HR.

  11. Regulated Localization Is Sufficient for Hormonal Control of Regulator of G Protein Signaling Homology Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RH-RhoGEFs)*

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Angela M.; Gutowski, Stephen; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling homology (RH) Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) (p115RhoGEF, leukemia-associated RhoGEF, and PDZ-RhoGEF) contain an RH domain and are specific GEFs for the monomeric GTPase RhoA. The RH domains interact specifically with the α subunits of G12 heterotrimeric GTPases. Activated Gα13 modestly stimulates the exchange activity of both p115RhoGEF and leukemia-associated RhoGEF but not PDZ-RhoGEF. Because all three RH-RhoGEFs can localize to the plasma membrane upon expression of activated Gα13, cellular localization of these RhoGEFs has been proposed as a mechanism for controlling their activity. We use a small molecule-regulated heterodimerization system to rapidly control the localization of RH-RhoGEFs. Acute localization of the proteins to the plasma membrane activates RhoA within minutes and to levels that are comparable with activation of RhoA by hormonal stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors. The catalytic activity of membrane-localized RhoGEFs is not dependent on activated Gα13. We further show that the conserved RH domains can rewire two different RacGEFs to activate Rac1 in response to a traditional activator of RhoA. Thus, RH domains act as independent detectors for activated Gα13 and are sufficient to modulate the activity of RhoGEFs by hormones via mediating their localization to substrate, membrane-associated RhoA. PMID:24855647

  12. Detection of homologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Voss, S C; Thevis, M; Schinkothe, T; Schänzer, W

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve and validate a flow cytometric method for the detection of homologous blood transfusion in doping control analysis. A panel of eight different primary antibodies and two different phycoerythrin-conjugated secondary antibodies was used for the detection of different blood populations. The flow cytometer used in this study was the BD FACSArray instrument. Mixed red blood cell populations were prepared from phenotype known donors. Linearity, specificity, recovery, precision, robustness and interday-precision were tested for every primary antibody used in the presented assay. The technique of signal amplification was utilized for an improved separation of antigens with weak or heterozygous expression to improve the interpretation of histograms. The resulting method allowed to clearly identify mixed red blood cell populations in homologous blood transfusion samples containing 0.3 - 2.0 % of donor blood.

  13. Braid Floer homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. B.; Ghrist, R.; Vandervorst, R. C.; Wójcik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Area-preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-disc can be regarded as time-1 maps of (non-autonomous) Hamiltonian flows on R / Z ×D2. The periodic flow-lines define braid (conjugacy) classes, up to full twists. We examine the dynamics relative to such braid classes and define a new invariant for such classes, the BRAID FLOER HOMOLOGY. This refinement of Floer homology, originally used for the Arnol'd Conjecture, yields a Morse-type forcing theory for periodic points of area-preserving diffeomorphisms of the 2-disc based on braiding. Contributions of this paper include (1) a monotonicity lemma for the behavior of the nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann equations with respect to algebraic lengths of braids; (2) establishment of the topological invariance of the resulting braid Floer homology; (3) a shift theorem describing the effect of twisting braids in terms of shifting the braid Floer homology; (4) computation of examples; and (5) a forcing theorem for the dynamics of Hamiltonian disc maps based on braid Floer homology.

  14. Homology recognition funnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dominic; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2009-10-01

    The recognition of homologous sequences of DNA before strand exchange is considered to be the most puzzling stage of homologous recombination. A mechanism for two homologous dsDNAs to recognize each other from a distance in electrolytic solution without unzipping had been proposed in an earlier paper [A. A. Kornyshev and S. Leikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 366 (2001)]. In that work, the difference in the electrostatic interaction energy between homologous duplexes and between nonhomologous duplexes, termed the recognition energy, has been calculated. That calculation was later extended in a series of papers to account for torsional elasticity of the molecules. A recent paper [A. A. Kornyshev and A. Wynveen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 4683 (2009)] investigated the form of the potential well that homologous DNA molecules may feel when sliding along each other. A simple formula for the shape of the well was obtained. However, this latter study was performed under the approximation that the sliding molecules are torsionally rigid. Following on from this work, in the present article we investigate the effect of torsional flexibility of the molecules on the shape of the well. A variational approach to this problem results in a transcendental equation that is easily solved numerically. Its solutions show that at large interaxial separations the recognition well becomes wider and shallower, whereas at closer distances further unexpected features arise related to an abrupt change in the mean azimuthal alignment of the molecules. The energy surface as a function of interaxial separation and the axial shift defines what we call the recognition funnel. We show that it depends dramatically on the patterns of adsorption of counterions on DNA.

  15. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    PubMed

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  16. Application of DNA-based forensic analysis for the detection of homologous transfusion of whole blood and of red blood cell concentrates in doping control.

    PubMed

    Stampella, Alessandra; Di Marco, Sabrina; Pirri, Daniela; de la Torre, Xavier; Botrè, Francesco; Donati, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In this work we present the application of a method for the identification of homologous blood transfusions using forensic genetic techniques based on DNA typing. Ex vivo mixtures of human blood samples - either whole blood or red blood cell concentrates - simulating homologous blood transfusions at different percentages of the donor were typed for a panel of 16 highly variable DNA short tandem repeats (STR). Tested samples included also mixtures, which gave false-negative results if assayed by the reference flow cytofluorimetric method, which is based on the recognition of target antigens located on the membrane of the red blood cell. The recognition of triplets and quadruplets at various loci gave information of the presence of cells belonging to different individuals, as it is the case for homologous blood transfusions. Specificity and sensitivity of the method were assessed in the validation study. The method proved to be unequivocally specific since it was able to recognize all single profiles of each individual, clearly discriminating them from mixtures. Sensitivity resulted as a consequence of the percentage of the donor aliquot in the total volume of the mixture. Although the source of DNA in a blood sample is represented only by nucleated white blood cells, the same procedure resulted effective also in detecting mixtures of red blood cell concentrates (RBCC) from leukodepletion procedure: DNA of the donor from the residual white blood cells resulted still detectable, even if with an expected loss of sensitivity. The proposed approach may contribute to reduce the risk of false-negative results, which may occur using the reference cytofluorimetric method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Homolog of Blade-On-Petiole 1 and 2 (BOP1/2) Controls Internode Length and Homeotic Changes of the Barley Inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Jost, Matthias; Taketa, Shin; Mascher, Martin; Himmelbach, Axel; Yuo, Takahisa; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Rutten, Twan; Druka, Arnis; Schmutzer, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Beier, Sebastian; Taudien, Stefan; Scholz, Uwe; Morgante, Michele; Waugh, Robbie; Stein, Nils

    2016-06-01

    Inflorescence architecture in small-grain cereals has a direct effect on yield and is an important selection target in breeding for yield improvement. We analyzed the recessive mutation laxatum-a (lax-a) in barley (Hordeum vulgare), which causes pleiotropic changes in spike development, resulting in (1) extended rachis internodes conferring a more relaxed inflorescence, (2) broadened base of the lemma awns, (3) thinner grains that are largely exposed due to reduced marginal growth of the palea and lemma, and (4) and homeotic conversion of lodicules into two stamenoid structures. Map-based cloning enforced by mapping-by-sequencing of the mutant lax-a locus enabled the identification of a homolog of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2 as the causal gene. Interestingly, the recently identified barley uniculme4 gene also is a BOP1/2 homolog and has been shown to regulate tillering and leaf sheath development. While the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BOP1 and BOP2 genes act redundantly, the barley genes contribute independent effects in specifying the developmental growth of vegetative and reproductive organs, respectively. Analysis of natural genetic diversity revealed strikingly different haplotype diversity for the two paralogous barley genes, likely affected by the respective genomic environments, since no indication for an active selection process was detected. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. A Homolog of Blade-On-Petiole 1 and 2 (BOP1/2) Controls Internode Length and Homeotic Changes of the Barley Inflorescence1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Taketa, Shin; Mascher, Martin; Yuo, Takahisa; Beier, Sebastian; Taudien, Stefan; Morgante, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Inflorescence architecture in small-grain cereals has a direct effect on yield and is an important selection target in breeding for yield improvement. We analyzed the recessive mutation laxatum-a (lax-a) in barley (Hordeum vulgare), which causes pleiotropic changes in spike development, resulting in (1) extended rachis internodes conferring a more relaxed inflorescence, (2) broadened base of the lemma awns, (3) thinner grains that are largely exposed due to reduced marginal growth of the palea and lemma, and (4) and homeotic conversion of lodicules into two stamenoid structures. Map-based cloning enforced by mapping-by-sequencing of the mutant lax-a locus enabled the identification of a homolog of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2 as the causal gene. Interestingly, the recently identified barley uniculme4 gene also is a BOP1/2 homolog and has been shown to regulate tillering and leaf sheath development. While the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BOP1 and BOP2 genes act redundantly, the barley genes contribute independent effects in specifying the developmental growth of vegetative and reproductive organs, respectively. Analysis of natural genetic diversity revealed strikingly different haplotype diversity for the two paralogous barley genes, likely affected by the respective genomic environments, since no indication for an active selection process was detected. PMID:27208226

  19. Live imaging of induced and controlled DNA double-strand break formation reveals extremely low repair by homologous recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Shahar, O D; Raghu Ram, E V S; Shimshoni, E; Hareli, S; Meshorer, E; Goldberg, M

    2012-07-26

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the most hazardous DNA lesions, may result in genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer cells. The main DSB repair pathways are non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). In mammalian cells, NHEJ, which can lead to inaccurate repair, predominates. HR repair (HRR) is considered accurate and is restricted to S, G2 and M phases of the cell cycle. Despite its importance, many aspects regarding HRR remain unknown. Here, we developed a novel inducible on/off switch cell system that enables, for the first time, to induce a DSB in a rapid and reversible manner in human cells. By limiting the duration of DSB induction, we found that non-persistent endonuclease-induced DSBs are rarely repaired by HR, whereas persistent DSBs result in the published HRR frequencies (non-significant HR frequency versus frequency of ∼10%, respectively). We demonstrate that these DSBs are repaired by an accurate repair mechanism, which is distinguished from HRR (most likely, error-free NHEJ). Notably, our data reveal that HRR frequencies of endonuclease-induced DSBs in human cells are >10-fold lower than what was previously estimated by prevailing methods, which resulted in recurrent DSB formation. Our findings suggest a role for HRR mainly in repairing challenging DSBs, in contrast to uncomplicated lesions that are frequently repaired by NHEJ. Preventing HR from repairing DSBs in the complex and repetitive human genome probably has an essential role in maintaining genomic stability.

  20. Field homology: a meaningful definition.

    PubMed

    Cookson, K

    2001-02-01

    Field homology refers to populations of cells that derive from evolutionarily conserved regions of embryos but are distributed across sets of adult morphological structures that cannot be placed in one-to-one correspondance. The concept of field homology has proven especially attractive to comparative neurologists because it allows them to deal with the fact that sets of nuclei or nuclear subdivisions often cannot be compared on a one-to-one basis across phyletic groups. However, the concept of field homology has recently come under criticism. It has been argued that field homology is theoretically impossible because it requires sequences of developmental stages to be both evolutionarily conserved and evolutionarily modified. It has also been argued that field homology allows overly vague comparisons of adult morphological structures, fails to account for homologous structures that derive from non-homologous embryonic sources, and establishes overly rigid links between embryonic and adult morphology. All of these criticisms may be adequately addressed by explaining field homology in terms of differentiation. The present paper explains field homology in terms of differentiation using the amniote dorsal thalamus to illustrate major points. It is concluded that field homology is a meaningful concept when defined in terms of differentiation, applied to appropriate cases, and properly limited in its comparisons of adult structures.

  1. Rhythmical bimanual force production: homologous and non-homologous muscles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Deanna M; Boyle, Jason B; Rhee, Joohyun; Shea, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was designed to determine participants' ability to coordinate a bimanual multifrequency pattern of isometric forces using homologous or non-homologous muscles. Lissajous feedback was provided to reduce perceptual and attentional constraints. The primary purpose was to determine whether the activation of homologous and non-homologous muscles resulted in different patterns of distortions in the left limb forces that are related to the forces produced by the right limb. The task was to rhythmically produce a 1:2 pattern of isometric forces by exerting isometric forces on the left side force transducer with the left arm that was coordinated with the pattern of isometric forces produced on the right side force transducer with the right arm. The results indicated that participants were able to 'tune-in' a 1:2 coordination patterns using homologous (triceps muscles of the left and right limbs) and using non-homologous muscles (biceps left limb and triceps right limb) when provided Lissajous feedback. However, distinct but consistent and identifiable distortions in the left limb force traces were observed for both the homologous and non-homologous tasks. For the homologous task, the interference occurred in the left limb when the right limb was initiating and releasing force. For the non-homologous task, the interference in the left limb force occurred only when the right limb was releasing force. In both conditions, the interference appeared to continue from the point of force initiation and/or release to peak force velocity. The overall results are consistent with the notion that neural crosstalk manifests differently during the coordination of the limbs depending upon whether homologous or non-homologous muscles are activated.

  2. Homology, homoplasy, novelty, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Richard Owen coined the modern definition of homology in 1843. Owen's conception of homology was pre-evolutionary, nontransformative (homology maintained basic plans or archetypes), and applied to the fully formed structures of animals. I sketch out the transition to an evolutionary approach to homology in which all classes of similarity are interpreted against the single branching tree of life, and outline the evidence for the application of homology across all levels and features of the biological hierarchy, including behavior. Owen contrasted homology with analogy. While this is not incorrect it is a pre-evolutionary contrast. Lankester [Lankester [1870] Journal of Natural History, 6 (31), 34-43] proposed homoplasy as the class of homology applicable to features formed by independent evolution. Today we identify homology, convergence, parallelism, and novelties as patterns of evolutionary change. A central issue in homology [Owen [1843] Lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology of the invertebrate animals, delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1843. London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans] has been whether homology of features-the "same" portion of the brain in different species, for example-depends upon those features sharing common developmental pathways. Owen did not require this criterion, although he observed that homologues often do share developmental pathways (and we now know, often share gene pathways). A similar situation has been explored in the study of behavior, especially whether behaviors must share a common structural, developmental, neural, or genetic basis to be classified as homologous. However, and importantly, development and genes evolve. As shown with both theory and examples, morphological and behavioral features of the phenotype can be homologized as structural or behavioral homologues, respectively, even when their developmental or genetic bases differ (are not homologous). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Homologous recombination and its regulation

    PubMed Central

    Krejci, Lumir; Altmannova, Veronika; Spirek, Mario; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is critical both for repairing DNA lesions in mitosis and for chromosomal pairing and exchange during meiosis. However, some forms of HR can also lead to undesirable DNA rearrangements. Multiple regulatory mechanisms have evolved to ensure that HR takes place at the right time, place and manner. Several of these impinge on the control of Rad51 nucleofilaments that play a central role in HR. Some factors promote the formation of these structures while others lead to their disassembly or the use of alternative repair pathways. In this article, we review these mechanisms in both mitotic and meiotic environments and in different eukaryotic taxa, with an emphasis on yeast and mammal systems. Since mutations in several proteins that regulate Rad51 nucleofilaments are associated with cancer and cancer-prone syndromes, we discuss how understanding their functions can lead to the development of better tools for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22467216

  4. Homologous artificial insemination and oligospermia.

    PubMed

    Speichinger, J P; Mattox, J H

    1976-02-01

    Of approximately 339 patients evaluated at a private infertility service over a 5-year period, 24 couples underwent homologous artificial insemination (AIH). Nineteen of these were performed to circumvent the problem of oligospermia, and only one pregancy was achieved in this group; conceivably this pregnancy could have occurred by chance. The difficulty in controlling the numerous variables in a clinical fertility study and the limitations of the present methodology are also discussed. It would appear that the use of AIH to circumvent oligospermia has not been successful. However, the present series is rather small. AIH should continue to be offered to couples who have a well-defined indication such as impotence, premature ejaculation, or any anatomical defect which prevents successful intromission. The use of AIH for patients with mild oligospermia but excellent sperm motility probably deserves a limited trial, since it is less expensive and may offer some chance for success.

  5. Round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber is controlled by two interacting quantitative trait loci with one putatively encoding a tomato SUN homolog.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yupeng; Liang, Xinjing; Gao, Meiling; Liu, Hanqiang; Meng, Huanwen; Weng, Yiqun; Cheng, Zhihui

    2017-03-01

    QTL analysis revealed two interacting loci, FS1.2 and FS2.1, underlying round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber; CsSUN , a homolog of tomato fruit shape gene SUN , was a candidate for FS1.2. Fruit size is an important quality and yield trait in cucumber, but its genetic basis remains poorly understood. Here we reported QTL mapping results on fruit size with segregating populations derived from the cross between WI7238 (long fruit) and WI7239 (round fruit) inbred cucumber lines. Phenotypic data of fruit length and diameter were collected at anthesis, immature and mature fruit stages in four environments. Ten major-effect QTL were detected for six traits; synthesis of information from these QTL supported two genes, FS1.2 and FS2.1, underlying fruit size variation in the examined populations. Under the two-gene model, deviation from expected segregation ratio in fruit length and diameter among segregating populations was observed, which could be explained mainly by the interactions between FS1.2 and FS2.1, and segregation distortion in the FS2.1 region. Genome-wide candidate gene search identified CsSUN, a homolog of the tomato fruit shape gene SUN, as the candidate for FS1.2. The round-fruited WI7239 had a 161-bp deletion in the first exon of CsSUN, and its expression in WI7239 was significantly lower than that in WI7238. A marker derived from this deletion was mapped at the peak location of FS1.2 in QTL analysis. Comparative analysis suggested the melon gene CmSUN-14, a homolog of CsSUN as a candidate of the fl2/fd2/fw2 QTL in melon. This study revealed the unique genetic architecture of round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber. It also highlights the power of QTL analysis for traits with a simple genetic basis but their expression is complicated by other factors.

  6. Homological Computation Using Spanning Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Abril, H.; Real, P.

    We introduce here a new mathbb{F}_2 homology computation algorithm based on a generalization of the spanning tree technique on a finite 3-dimensional cell complex K embedded in ℝ3. We demonstrate that the complexity of this algorithm is linear in the number of cells. In fact, this process computes an algebraic map φ over K, called homology gradient vector field (HGVF), from which it is possible to infer in a straightforward manner homological information like Euler characteristic, relative homology groups, representative cycles for homology generators, topological skeletons, Reeb graphs, cohomology algebra, higher (co)homology operations, etc. This process can be generalized to others coefficients, including the integers, and to higher dimension.

  7. A family of cyclin D homologs from plants differentially controlled by growth regulators and containing the conserved retinoblastoma protein interaction motif.

    PubMed Central

    Soni, R; Carmichael, J P; Shah, Z H; Murray, J A

    1995-01-01

    A new family of three related cyclins has been identified in Arabidopsis by complementation of a yeast strain deficient in G1 cyclins. Individual members show tissue-specific expression and are conserved in other plant species. They form a distinctive group of plant cyclins, which we named delta-type cyclins to indicate their similarities with mammalian D-type cyclins. The sequence relationships between delta and D cyclins include the N-terminal sequence LXCXE. This motif was originally identified in certain viral oncoproteins and is strongly implicated in binding to the retinoblastoma protein pRb. By analogy to mammalian cyclin D, these plant homologs may mediate growth and phytohormonal signals into the plant cell cycle. In support of this hypothesis, we show that, on restimulation of suspension-cultured cells, cyclin delta 3 is rapidly induced by the plant growth regulator cytokinin and cyclin delta 2 is induced by carbon source. PMID:7696881

  8. Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) controls surface GluA1 protein in synaptic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Lu, Wen

    2017-09-15

    Src Homology 2 domain-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) functions in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. However, the precise mechanisms by which this multifunctional protein contributes to synaptic function remains largely unknown. Homeostatic plasticity may be viewed as a process of bidirectional synaptic scaling, up or down. Through this process, neuronal circuitry stability is maintained so that changes in synaptic strength may be preserved under changing conditions. A better understanding of these processes is needed. In this regard, we report that phosphorylation of Shp2 at tyrosine 542 and its translocation to the postsynaptic compartment are integral processes in synaptic scaling. Furthermore, we show, using both pharmacological and genetic approaches, that Shp2 phosphatase activity is critical to the regulation of Ser(P)(845) GluA1 and surface expression of this AMPA receptor subunit during synaptic scaling. Thus, Shp2 may contribute meaningfully to synaptic homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. The function of OsbHLH068 is partially redundant with its homolog, AtbHLH112, in the regulation of the salt stress response but has opposite functions to control flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Chi; Hsieh-Feng, Vicki; Liao, Pei-Chun; Cheng, Wan-Hsing; Liu, Li-Yu; Yang, Yun-Wei; Lai, Ming-Hsin; Chang, Men-Chi

    2017-07-01

    The homologous genes OsbHLH068 and AtbHLH112 have partially redundant functions in the regulation of the salt stress response but opposite functions to control flowering in Arabidopsis. The transcription factor (TF) basic/Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) is important for plant growth, development, and stress responses. OsbHLH068, which is a homologous gene of AtbHLH112 that is up-regulated under drought and salt stresses, as indicated by previous microarray data analysis. However, the intrinsic function of OsbHLH068 remains unknown. In the present study, we characterized the function and compared the role of OsbHLH068 with that of its homolog, AtbHLH112. Histochemical GUS staining indicated that OsbHLH068 and AtbHLH112 share a similar expression pattern in transgenic Arabidopsis during the juvenile-to-adult phase transition. Heterologous overexpression of OsbHLH068 in Arabidopsis delays seed germination, decreases salt-induced H2O2 accumulation, and promotes root elongation, whereas AtbHLH112 knock-out mutant displays an opposite phenotype. Both OsbHLH068-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings and the Atbhlh112 mutant display a late-flowering phenotype. Moreover, the expression of OsbHLH068-GFP driven by an AtbHLH112 promoter can compensate for the germination deficiency in the Atbhlh112 mutant, but the delayed-flowering phenotype tends to be more severe. Further analysis by microarray and qPCR indicated that the expression of FT is down-regulated in both OsbHLH068-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants and Atbhlh112 mutant plants, whereas SOC1 but not FT is highly expressed in AtbHLH112-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants. A comparative transcriptomic analysis also showed that several stress-responsive genes, such as AtERF15 and AtPUB23, were affected in both OsbHLH068- and AtbHLH112-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Thus, we propose that OsbHLH068 and AtbHLH112 share partially redundant functions in the regulation of abiotic stress responses but have

  10. Evolving the Concept of Homology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Virginia L.; Miller, Jon S.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding homology is fundamental to learning about evolution. The present study shows an exercise that can be varied in complexity, for which students compile research illustrating the fate of homologous fish skull elements, and assemble a mural to serve as a learning aid. The skull of the most primitive living Actinopterygian (bony fish),…

  11. Colletotrichum orbiculare WHI2, a Yeast Stress-Response Regulator Homolog, Controls the Biotrophic Stage of Hemibiotrophic Infection Through TOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Harata, Ken; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Kubo, Yasuyuki

    2016-06-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum orbiculare first establishes a biotrophic infection stage in cucumber (Cucumber sativus) epidermal cells and subsequently transitions to a necrotrophic stage. Here, we found that C. orbiculare established hemibiotrophic infection via C. orbiculare WHI2, a yeast stress regulator homolog, and TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling. Plant defense responses such as callose deposition, H2O2, and antimicrobial proteins were strongly induced by the C. orbiculare whi2Δ mutant, resulting in defective pathogenesis. Expression analysis of biotrophy-specific genes evaluated by the promoter VENUS fusion gene indicated weaker VENUS signal intensity in the whi2Δ mutant, thereby suggesting that C. orbiculare WHI2 plays a key role in regulating biotrophic infection of C. orbiculare. The involvement of CoWHI2 in biotrophic infection was further explored with a DNA microarray. In the Cowhi2Δ mutant, TOR-dependent ribosomal protein-related genes were strikingly upregulated compared with the wild type. Moreover, callose deposition in the host plant after inoculation with the Cowhi2Δ mutant treated with rapamycin, which inhibits TOR activity, was reduced, and the mutant remained biotrophic in contrast to the untreated mutant. Thus, regulation of TOR by Whi2 is apparently crucial to the biotrophic stage of hemibiotrophic infection in C. orbiculare.

  12. Control of the endonuclease activity of type I restriction-modification systems is required to maintain chromosome integrity following homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Garry W; Murray, Noreen E

    2006-05-01

    A type I restriction-modification enzyme will bind to an unmethylated target sequence in DNA and, while still bound to the target, translocate DNA through the protein complex in both directions. DNA breakage occurs when two translocating complexes collide. However, if type I restriction-modification systems bind to unmodified target sequences within the resident bacterial chromosome, as opposed to incoming 'foreign' DNA, their activity is curtailed; a process known as restriction alleviation (RA). We have identified two genes in Escherichia coli, rnhA and recG, mutations in which lead to the alleviation of restriction. Induction of RA in response to these mutations is consistent with the production of unmodified target sequences following DNA synthesis associated with both homologous recombination and R-loop formation. This implies that a normal function of RA is to protect the bacterial chromosome when recombination generates unmodified products. For EcoKI, our experiments demonstrate the contribution of two pathways that serve to protect unmodified DNA in the bacterial chromosome: the primary pathway in which ClpXP degrades the restriction endonuclease and a mechanism dependent on the lar gene within Rac, a resident, defective prophage of E. coli K-12. Previously, the potential of the second pathway has only been demonstrated when expression of lar has been elevated. Our data identify the effect of lar from the repressed prophage.

  13. A Serratia marcescens PigP Homolog Controls Prodigiosin Biosynthesis, Swarming Motility and Hemolysis and Is Regulated by cAMP-CRP and HexS

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Lahr, Roni M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Arena, Kristin E.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Kwak, Daniel H.; Liu, Xinyu; Kalivoda, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Swarming motility and hemolysis are virulence-associated determinants for a wide array of pathogenic bacteria. The broad host-range opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens produces serratamolide, a small cyclic amino-lipid, that promotes swarming motility and hemolysis. Serratamolide is negatively regulated by the transcription factors HexS and CRP. Positive regulators of serratamolide production are unknown. Similar to serratamolide, the antibiotic pigment, prodigiosin, is regulated by temperature, growth phase, HexS, and CRP. Because of this co-regulation, we tested the hypothesis that a homolog of the PigP transcription factor of the atypical Serratia species ATCC 39006, which positively regulates prodigiosin biosynthesis, is also a positive regulator of serratamolide production in S. marcescens. Mutation of pigP in clinical, environmental, and laboratory strains of S. marcescens conferred pleiotropic phenotypes including the loss of swarming motility, hemolysis, and severely reduced prodigiosin and serratamolide synthesis. Transcriptional analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays place PigP in a regulatory pathway with upstream regulators CRP and HexS. The data from this study identifies a positive regulator of serratamolide production, describes novel roles for the PigP transcription factor, shows for the first time that PigP directly regulates the pigment biosynthetic operon, and identifies upstream regulators of pigP. This study suggests that PigP is important for the ability of S. marcescens to compete in the environment. PMID:23469212

  14. A homolog of male sex-determining factor SRY cooperates with a transposon-derived CENP-B protein to control sex-specific directed recombination

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Emiko; Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Mehta, Sameet; Cui, Bowen; Grewal, Shiv I. S.

    2011-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the expressed mat1 locus with sequences copied from mat2-P or mat3-M silent donor loci. The choice of donor locus is dictated by cell type, such that mat2 is the preferred donor in M cells and mat3 is the preferred donor in P cells. Donor choice involves a recombination-promoting complex (RPC) containing Swi2 and Swi5. In P cells, the RPC localizes to a specific DNA element located adjacent to mat3, but in M cells it spreads across the silent mating-type region, including mat2-P. This differential distribution of the RPC regulates nonrandom choice of donors. However, cell-type–specific differences in RPC localization are not understood. Here we show that the mat1-M–encoded factor Mc, which shares structural and functional similarities with the male sex-determining factor SRY, is highly enriched at the swi2 and swi5 loci and promotes elevated levels of RPC components. Loss of Mc reduces Swi2 and Swi5 to levels comparable to those in P cells and disrupts RPC spreading across the mat2/3 region. Mc also localizes to loci expressed preferentially in M cells and to retrotransposon LTRs. We demonstrate that Mc localization at LTRs and at swi2 requires Abp1, a homolog of transposon-derived CENP-B protein and that loss of Abp1 impairs Swi2 protein expression and the donor choice mechanism. These results suggest that Mc modulates levels of recombination factors, which is important for mating-type donor selection and for the biased gene conversion observed during meiosis, where M cells serve as preferential donors of genetic information. PMID:22042869

  15. A homolog of male sex-determining factor SRY cooperates with a transposon-derived CENP-B protein to control sex-specific directed recombination.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Emiko; Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Mehta, Sameet; Cui, Bowen; Grewal, Shiv I S

    2011-11-15

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the expressed mat1 locus with sequences copied from mat2-P or mat3-M silent donor loci. The choice of donor locus is dictated by cell type, such that mat2 is the preferred donor in M cells and mat3 is the preferred donor in P cells. Donor choice involves a recombination-promoting complex (RPC) containing Swi2 and Swi5. In P cells, the RPC localizes to a specific DNA element located adjacent to mat3, but in M cells it spreads across the silent mating-type region, including mat2-P. This differential distribution of the RPC regulates nonrandom choice of donors. However, cell-type-specific differences in RPC localization are not understood. Here we show that the mat1-M-encoded factor Mc, which shares structural and functional similarities with the male sex-determining factor SRY, is highly enriched at the swi2 and swi5 loci and promotes elevated levels of RPC components. Loss of Mc reduces Swi2 and Swi5 to levels comparable to those in P cells and disrupts RPC spreading across the mat2/3 region. Mc also localizes to loci expressed preferentially in M cells and to retrotransposon LTRs. We demonstrate that Mc localization at LTRs and at swi2 requires Abp1, a homolog of transposon-derived CENP-B protein and that loss of Abp1 impairs Swi2 protein expression and the donor choice mechanism. These results suggest that Mc modulates levels of recombination factors, which is important for mating-type donor selection and for the biased gene conversion observed during meiosis, where M cells serve as preferential donors of genetic information.

  16. The BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) target genes are involved in the oxidative stress response and in control of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Schmidt, Dominic; Manke, Thomas; Piccini, Ilaria; Sultan, Marc; Borodina, Tatiana; Balzereit, Daniela; Wruck, Wasco; Soldatov, Alexey; Vingron, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of gene expression in response to environmental signals and metabolic imbalances is a key step in maintaining cellular homeostasis. BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) is a heme-binding transcription factor repressing the transcription from a subset of MAF recognition elements at low intracellular heme levels. Upon heme binding, BACH1 is released from the MAF recognition elements, resulting in increased expression of antioxidant response genes. To systematically address the gene regulatory networks involving BACH1, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis of BACH1 target genes in HEK 293 cells with knockdown of BACH1 using three independent types of small interfering RNAs followed by transcriptome profiling using microarrays. The 59 BACH1 target genes identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing were found highly enriched in genes showing expression changes after BACH1 knockdown, demonstrating the impact of BACH1 repression on transcription. In addition to known and new BACH1 targets involved in heme degradation (HMOX1, FTL, FTH1, ME1, and SLC48A1) and redox regulation (GCLC, GCLM, and SLC7A11), we also discovered BACH1 target genes affecting cell cycle and apoptosis pathways (ITPR2, CALM1, SQSTM1, TFE3, EWSR1, CDK6, BCL2L11, and MAFG) as well as subcellular transport processes (CLSTN1, PSAP, MAPT, and vault RNA). The newly identified impact of BACH1 on genes involved in neurodegenerative processes and proliferation provides an interesting basis for future dissection of BACH1-mediated gene repression in neurodegeneration and virus-induced cancerogenesis.

  17. Fivebranes and 3-manifold homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Putrov, Pavel; Vafa, Cumrun

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by physical constructions of homological knot invariants, we study their analogs for closed 3-manifolds. We show that fivebrane compactifications provide a universal description of various old and new homological invariants of 3-manifolds. In terms of 3d/3d correspondence, such invariants are given by the Q-cohomology of the Hilbert space of partially topologically twisted 3d N=2 theory T[ M 3] on a Riemann surface with defects. We demonstrate this by concrete and explicit calculations in the case of monopole/Heegaard Floer homology and a 3-manifold analog of Khovanov-Rozansky link homology. The latter gives a categorification of Chern-Simons partition function. Some of the new key elements include the explicit form of the S-transform and a novel connection between categorification and a previously mysterious role of Eichler integrals in Chern-Simons theory.

  18. Abelian link invariants and homology

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnini, Enore; Mancarella, Francesco

    2010-06-15

    We consider the link invariants defined by the quantum Chern-Simons field theory with compact gauge group U(1) in a closed oriented 3-manifold M. The relation of the Abelian link invariants with the homology group of the complement of the links is discussed. We prove that, when M is a homology sphere or when a link--in a generic manifold M--is homologically trivial, the associated observables coincide with the observables of the sphere S{sup 3}. Finally, we show that the U(1) Reshetikhin-Turaev surgery invariant of the manifold M is not a function of the homology group only, nor a function of the homotopy type of M alone.

  19. Fivebranes and 3-manifold homology

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Putrov, Pavel; Vafa, Cumrun

    2017-07-14

    Motivated by physical constructions of homological knot invariants, we study their analogs for closed 3-manifolds. We show that vebrane compacti cations provide a universal description of various old and new homological invariants of 3-manifolds. In terms of 3d/3d correspondence, such invariants are given by the Q-cohomology of the Hilbert space of partially topologically twisted 3d N = 2 theory T[M3] on a Riemann surface with defects. We demonstrate this by concrete and explicit calculations in the case of monopole/Heegaard Floer homology and a 3-manifold analog of Khovanov-Rozansky link homology. The latter gives a categori cation of Chern-Simons partition function. Finally,more » some of the new key elements include the explicit form of the S-transform and a novel connection between categori cation and a previously mysterious role of Eichler integrals in Chern-Simons theory.« less

  20. Regulation of DNA strand exchange in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Holthausen, J Thomas; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2010-12-10

    Homologous recombination, the exchange of DNA strands between homologous DNA molecules, is involved in repair of many structural diverse DNA lesions. This versatility stems from multiple ways in which homologous DNA strands can be rearranged. At the core of homologous recombination are recombinase proteins such as RecA and RAD51 that mediate homology recognition and DNA strand exchange through formation of a dynamic nucleoprotein filament. Four stages in the life cycle of nucleoprotein filaments are filament nucleation, filament growth, homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, and filament dissociation. Progression through this cycle requires a sequence of recombinase-DNA and recombinase protein-protein interactions coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis. The function of recombinases is controlled by accessory proteins that allow coordination of strand exchange with other steps of homologous recombination and that tailor to the needs of specific aberrant DNA structures undergoing recombination. Accessory proteins are also able to reverse filament formation thereby guarding against inappropriate DNA rearrangements. The dynamic instability of the recombinase-DNA interactions allows both positive and negative action of accessory proteins thereby ensuring that genome maintenance by homologous recombination is not only flexible and versatile, but also accurate. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The temporally controlled expression of Drongo, the fruit fly homolog of AGFG1, is achieved in female germline cells via P-bodies and its localization requires functional Rab11.

    PubMed

    Catrina, Irina E; Bayer, Livia V; Yanez, Giussepe; McLaughlin, John M; Malaczek, Kornelia; Bagaeva, Ekaterina; Marras, Salvatore A E; Bratu, Diana P

    2016-11-01

    To achieve proper RNA transport and localization, RNA viruses exploit cellular vesicular trafficking pathways. AGFG1, a host protein essential for HIV-1 and Influenza A replication, has been shown to mediate release of intron-containing viral RNAs from the perinuclear region. It is still unknown what its precise role in this release is, or whether AGFG1 also participates in cytoplasmic transport. We report for the first time the expression patterns during oogenesis for Drongo, the fruit fly homolog of AGFG1. We find that temporally controlled Drongo expression is achieved by translational repression of drongo mRNA within P-bodies. Here we show a first link between the recycling endosome pathway and Drongo, and find that proper Drongo localization at the oocyte's cortex during mid-oogenesis requires functional Rab11.

  2. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  3. Object-oriented Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  4. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  5. The semaphorontic view of homology

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Leandro C.S.; Rieppel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relation of homology is generally characterized as an identity relation, or alternatively as a correspondence relation, both of which are transitive. We use the example of the ontogenetic development and evolutionary origin of the gnathostome jaw to discuss identity and transitivity of the homology relation under the transformationist and emergentist paradigms respectively. Token identity and consequent transitivity of homology relations are shown to be requirements that are too strong to allow the origin of genuine evolutionary novelties. We consequently introduce the concept of compositional identity that is grounded in relations prevailing between parts (organs and organ systems) of a whole (organism). We recognize an ontogenetic identity of parts within a whole throughout the sequence of successive developmental stages of those parts: this is an intra‐organismal character identity maintained throughout developmental trajectory. Correspondingly, we recognize a phylogenetic identity of homologous parts within two or more organisms of different species: this is an inter‐species character identity maintained throughout evolutionary trajectory. These different dimensions of character identity—ontogenetic (through development) and phylogenetic (via shared evolutionary history)—break the transitivity of homology relations. Under the transformationist paradigm, the relation of homology reigns over the entire character (‐state) transformation series, and thus encompasses the plesiomorphic as well as the apomorphic condition of form. In contrast, genuine evolutionary novelties originate not through transformation of ancestral characters (‐states), but instead through deviating developmental trajectories that result in alternate characters. Under the emergentist paradigm, homology is thus synonymous with synapomorphy. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 578–587, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and

  6. The semaphorontic view of homology.

    PubMed

    Havstad, Joyce C; Assis, Leandro C S; Rieppel, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    The relation of homology is generally characterized as an identity relation, or alternatively as a correspondence relation, both of which are transitive. We use the example of the ontogenetic development and evolutionary origin of the gnathostome jaw to discuss identity and transitivity of the homology relation under the transformationist and emergentist paradigms respectively. Token identity and consequent transitivity of homology relations are shown to be requirements that are too strong to allow the origin of genuine evolutionary novelties. We consequently introduce the concept of compositional identity that is grounded in relations prevailing between parts (organs and organ systems) of a whole (organism). We recognize an ontogenetic identity of parts within a whole throughout the sequence of successive developmental stages of those parts: this is an intra-organismal character identity maintained throughout developmental trajectory. Correspondingly, we recognize a phylogenetic identity of homologous parts within two or more organisms of different species: this is an inter-species character identity maintained throughout evolutionary trajectory. These different dimensions of character identity--ontogenetic (through development) and phylogenetic (via shared evolutionary history)--break the transitivity of homology relations. Under the transformationist paradigm, the relation of homology reigns over the entire character (-state) transformation series, and thus encompasses the plesiomorphic as well as the apomorphic condition of form. In contrast, genuine evolutionary novelties originate not through transformation of ancestral characters (-states), but instead through deviating developmental trajectories that result in alternate characters. Under the emergentist paradigm, homology is thus synonymous with synapomorphy. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Leucine-rich Repeat Protein Phosphatase Controls Cell Polarity by Negatively Regulating the Activity of Atypical Protein Kinase C.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaopeng; Li, Xin; Wen, Yang-An; Gao, Tianyan

    2016-11-25

    The proper establishment of epithelial polarity allows cells to sense and respond to signals that arise from the microenvironment in a spatiotemporally controlled manner. Atypical PKCs (aPKCs) are implicated as key regulators of epithelial polarity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the negative regulation of aPKCs remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP), a novel family of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, plays an important role in regulating epithelial polarity by controlling the phosphorylation of both aPKC isoforms. Altered expression of PHLPP1 or PHLPP2 disrupted polarization of Caco2 cells grown in 3D cell cultures as indicated by the formation of aberrant multi-lumen structures. Overexpression of PHLPP resulted in a decrease in aPKC phosphorylation at both the activation loop and the turn motif sites; conversely, knockdown of PHLPP increased aPKC phosphorylation. Moreover, in vitro dephosphorylation experiments revealed that both aPKC isoforms were substrates of PHLPP. Interestingly, knockdown of PKCζ, but not PKCι, led to similar disruption of the polarized lumen structure, suggesting that PKCζ likely controls the polarization process of Caco2 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of PHLPP altered the apical membrane localization of aPKCs and reduced the formation of aPKC-Par3 complex. Taken together, our results identify a novel role of PHLPP in regulating aPKC and cell polarity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. v-Src activates the expression of 92-kDa type IV collagenase gene through the AP-1 site and the GT box homologous to retinoblastoma control elements. A mechanism regulating gene expression independent of that by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kita, M; Seiki, M

    1993-11-05

    The 92-kDa type IV collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase-9; MMP-9) is frequently expressed in cells showing an invasive nature during physiological and pathological processes, and the expression is strictly controlled by a variety of trans-membrane signals. Binding sites for NF-kB, Sp-1, and AP-1 are reportedly required for induction of MMP-9 gene expression by tumor necrosis factor-alpha or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Comparison of the sequence of the newly cloned mouse MMP-9 promoter region with our previous human isolate revealed that, in addition to the above mentioned elements, four units of GGGG(T/A)GGGG sequence (GT box) were conserved between the two species. In this study, we have demonstrated that one of the GT boxes located downstream of the AP-1 site is essential along with the AP-1 site for the activation of the promoter by v-Src but not by tumor necrosis factor-alpha or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Gel mobility-shift assays revealed that binding proteins for retinoblastoma control element, including Sp-1 family protein, can bind specifically to GT boxes. Thus, the v-Src signals to the AP-1 site and to the GT box homologous to retinoblastoma control element acted synergistically in transcriptional activation. These results suggest that certain v-Src-mediated signals are propagated along pathways that are independent of inflammatory cytokines.

  9. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  10. Plasmid pKM101 encodes two nonhomologous antirestriction proteins (ArdA and ArdB) whose expression is controlled by homologous regulatory sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, A A; Delver, E P; Rodzevich, O V

    1993-01-01

    The IncN plasmid pKM101 (a derivative of R46) encodes the antirestriction protein ArdB (alleviation of restriction of DNA) in addition to another antirestriction protein, ArdA, described previously. The relevant gene, ardB, was located in the leading region of pKM101, about 7 kb from oriT. The nucleotide sequence of ardB was determined, and an appropriate polypeptide was identified in maxicells of Escherichia coli. Like ArdA, ArdB efficiently inhibits restriction by members of the three known families of type I systems of E. coli and only slightly affects the type II enzyme, EcoRI. However, in contrast to ArdA, ArdB is ineffective against the modification activity of the type I (EcoK) system. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of ArdA and ArdB revealed only one small region of similarity (nine residues), suggesting that this region may be somehow involved in the interaction with the type I restriction systems. We also found that the expression of both ardA and ardB genes is controlled jointly by two pKM101-encoded proteins, ArdK and ArdR, with molecular weights of about 15,000 and 20,000, respectively. The finding that the sequences immediately upstream of ardA and ardB share about 94% identity over 218 bp suggests that their expression may be controlled by ArdK and ArdR at the transcriptional level. Deletion studies and promoter probe analysis of these sequences revealed the regions responsible for the action of ArdK and ArdR as regulatory proteins. We propose that both types of antirestriction proteins may play a pivotal role in overcoming the host restriction barrier by self-transmissible broad-host-range plasmids. It seems likely that the ardKR-dependent regulatory system serves in this case as a genetic switch that controls the expression of plasmid-encoded antirestriction functions during mating. Images PMID:8393008

  11. Translational control of meiotic cell cycle progression and spermatid differentiation in male germ cells by a novel eIF4G homolog

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Catherine C.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2015-01-01

    Translational control is crucial for proper timing of developmental events that take place in the absence of transcription, as in meiotic activation in oocytes, early embryogenesis in many organisms, and spermatogenesis. Here we show that a novel form of the translation initiation complex component eIF4G in Drosophila, eIF4G2, is required specifically for male germ cells to undergo meiotic division and proper spermatid differentiation. Flies mutant for eIF4G2 are viable and female fertile but male sterile. Spermatocytes form, but the germ cells in mutant males skip the major events of the meiotic divisions and form aberrant spermatids with large nuclei. Consistent with the failure to undergo the meiotic divisions, function of eIF4G2 is required post-transcriptionally for normal accumulation of the core cell cycle regulatory proteins Twine and CycB in mature spermatocytes. Loss of eIF4G2 function also causes widespread defects in spermatid differentiation. Although differentiation markers Dj and Fzo are expressed in late-stage eIF4G2 mutant germ cells, several key steps of spermatid differentiation fail, including formation of a compact mitochondrial derivative and full elongation. Our results suggest that an alternate form of the translation initiation machinery may be required for regulation and execution of key steps in male germ cell differentiation. PMID:17611220

  12. Worst case estimation of homology design by convex analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, N.; Elishakoff, Isaac; Nakagiri, S.

    1998-01-01

    The methodology of homology design is investigated for optimum design of advanced structures. for which the achievement of delicate tasks by the aid of active control system is demanded. The proposed formulation of homology design, based on the finite element sensitivity analysis, necessarily requires the specification of external loadings. The formulation to evaluate the worst case for homology design caused by uncertain fluctuation of loadings is presented by means of the convex model of uncertainty, in which uncertainty variables are assigned to discretized nodal forces and are confined within a conceivable convex hull given as a hyperellipse. The worst case of the distortion from objective homologous deformation is estimated by the Lagrange multiplier method searching the point to maximize the error index on the boundary of the convex hull. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated in a numerical example using the eleven-bar truss structure.

  13. Worst case estimation of homology design by convex analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, N.; Elishakoff, Isaac; Nakagiri, S.

    1998-01-01

    The methodology of homology design is investigated for optimum design of advanced structures. for which the achievement of delicate tasks by the aid of active control system is demanded. The proposed formulation of homology design, based on the finite element sensitivity analysis, necessarily requires the specification of external loadings. The formulation to evaluate the worst case for homology design caused by uncertain fluctuation of loadings is presented by means of the convex model of uncertainty, in which uncertainty variables are assigned to discretized nodal forces and are confined within a conceivable convex hull given as a hyperellipse. The worst case of the distortion from objective homologous deformation is estimated by the Lagrange multiplier method searching the point to maximize the error index on the boundary of the convex hull. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated in a numerical example using the eleven-bar truss structure.

  14. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 74 (ERF74) plays an essential role in controlling a respiratory burst oxidase homolog D (RbohD)-dependent mechanism in response to different stresses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; He, Run Jun; Xie, Qiao Li; Zhao, Xian Hai; Deng, Xiao Mei; He, Jun Bo; Song, Lili; He, Jun; Marchant, Alan; Chen, Xiao-Yang; Wu, Ai-Min

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that the ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR VII (ERF-VII) transcription factor is an important regulator of osmotic and hypoxic stress responses in plants. However, the molecular mechanism of ERF-VII-mediated transcriptional regulation remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of ERF74 (a member of the ERF-VII protein family) by examining the abiotic stress tolerance of an ERF74 overexpression line and a T-DNA insertion mutant using flow cytometry, transactivation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. 35S::ERF74 showed enhanced tolerance to drought, high light, heat and aluminum stresses, whereas the T-DNA insertion mutant erf74 and the erf74;erf75 double mutant displayed higher sensitivity. Using flow cytometry analysis, we found that erf74 and erf74;erf75 lines lack the reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst in the early stages of various stresses, as a result of the lower expression level of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG D (RbohD). Furthermore, ERF74 directly binds to the promoter of RbohD and activates its expression under different abiotic stresses. Moreover, induction of stress marker genes and ROS-scavenging enzyme genes under various stress conditions is dependent on the ERF74-RbohD-ROS signal pathway. We propose a pathway that involves ERF74 acting as an on-off switch controlling an RbohD-dependent mechanism in response to different stresses, subsequently maintaining hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

  15. Homologies in Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, David F.; Cumalat, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The genes of humans and chimpanzees are homologs. These genes are - in large measure - identical. From this detailed observation, we naturally suppose that both species evolved from a common ancestor. In particle physics the ordinary observed particles and their superymmetric partners are thought to be homologs, generated by a common "ancestor” , the Higgs particle. Experiments at CERN currently are testing this comfortable analogy of physics with biology. Neither the Higgs boson nor any supersymmetric particle has yet been found. We speculate that a variety of objects are homologs - evidence of an as yet undeveloped quantum theory of gravity to replace Dark Matter. A purely astronomical homology is the Vc - σ o relation which places nearly spherical elliptical galaxies just above well-formed spirals (SA & SB). Here the asymptotically- flat, circular velocity Vc is observed to be between 1 and 2 times the central bulge velocity dispersion σo over the range 60 km/s< σo <400 km/s (Ferrarese 2002, Fig 3). The Vc - σ o relation is difficult to explain with self-consistent equilibrium galaxy models (Courteau et al 2007). Here we give an explanation based on the Sinusoidal Potential, a non-Newtonian potential in which φ =-GM Cos[ko r]/r and ko=2 π /400 pc. We relate the lower limit of 60 km/s to the thermal velocity of protons at the” Broadhurst/Hirano & Hartnett” lookback redshift Z=105.6. This is the redshift where what was 400 pc then expands to 128 h-1 Mpc today. Further, at this Z the temperature of the universe was close to the Hartree Energy of 2 times 13.6 eV, an energy where protons have an rms speed of about 60 km/s.

  16. Homology-dependent gene silencing and host defense in plants.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Marjori A; Aufsatz, Werner; Kanno, Tatsuo; Mette, M Florian; Matzke, Antonius J M

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of transgene silencing phenomena in plants and other organisms have revealed the existence of epigenetic silencing mechanisms that are based on recognition of nucleic acid sequence homology at either the DNA or RNA level. Common triggers of homology-dependent gene silencing include inverted DNA repeats and double-stranded RNA, a versatile silencing molecule that can induce both degradation of homologous RNA in the cytoplasm and methylation of homologous DNA sequences in the nucleus. Inverted repeats might be frequently associated with silencing because they can potentially interact in cis and in trans to trigger DNA methylation via homologous DNA pairing, or they can be transcribed to produce double-stranded RNA. Homology-dependent gene silencing mechanisms are ideally suited for countering natural parasitic sequences such as transposable elements and viruses, which are usually present in multiple copies and/or produce double-stranded RNA during replication. These silencing mechanisms can thus be regarded as host defense strategies to foreign or invasive nucleic acids. The high content of transposable elements and, in some cases, endogenous viruses in many plant genomes suggests that host defenses do not always prevail over invasive sequences. During evolution, slightly faulty genome defense responses probably allowed transposable elements and viral sequences to accumulate gradually in host chromosomes and to invade host genes. Possible beneficial consequences of this "foreign" DNA buildup include the establishment of genome defense-derived epigenetic control mechanisms for regulating host gene expression and acquired hereditary immunity to some viruses.

  17. Deep homology: a view from systematics.

    PubMed

    Scotland, Robert W

    2010-05-01

    Over the past decade, it has been discovered that disparate aspects of morphology - often of distantly related groups of organisms - are regulated by the same genetic regulatory mechanisms. Those discoveries provide a new perspective on morphological evolutionary change. A conceptual framework for exploring these research findings is termed 'deep homology'. A comparative framework for morphological relations of homology is provided that distinguishes analogy, homoplasy, plesiomorphy and synapomorphy. Four examples - three from plants and one from animals - demonstrate that homologous developmental mechanisms can regulate a range of morphological relations including analogy, homoplasy and examples of uncertain homology. Deep homology is part of a much wider range of phenomena in which biological (genes, regulatory mechanisms, morphological traits) and phylogenetic levels of homology can both be disassociated. Therefore, to understand homology, precise, comparative, independent statements of both biological and phylogenetic levels of homology are necessary.

  18. Fatal attraction: cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine homologs.

    PubMed

    Saederup, N; Mocarski, E S

    2002-01-01

    Members of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) subfamily of betaherpesviruses infecting primates and rodents encode divergent proteins with sequence characteristics and activities of chemokines, a class of small, secreted proteins that control leukocyte migration and trafficking behavior. Human CMV genes UL146 and UL147 encode proteins with sequence characteristics of CXC chemokines, whereas, murine CMV encodes a CC chemokine homolog (MCK-2). Human CMV UL146 encodes a neutrophil-attracting chemokine denoted viral CXC chemokine-1 (vCXCL1) that is as potent as host IL-8 and functions via the CXCR2 receptor, one of two human IL-8 receptors. Murine CMV MCK-2 is composed of a chemokine domain derived from open reading frame (ORF) m131 (and denoted MCK-1) as well as a domain derived from m129 that does not have sequence similarity to any known class of proteins. A synthetic version of murine CMV m131 (MCK-1) protein carries out many of the activities of a positive-acting chemokine, including transient release of intracellular calcium stores and cell adhesion of peritoneal macrophage populations. In the context of the viral genome and infection of the mouse host, the m131-m129 (MCK-2) gene product confers increased inflammation, higher levels of viremia, and higher titers of virus in salivary glands, consistent with a role in promoting dissemination by attracting an important mononuclear leukocyte population. Other characterized primate CMVs, but not other primate betaherpesviruses, encode gene products similar to human UL146 and UL147. Other characterized rodent CMVs encode a gene product similar to the murine CMV chemokine homolog, although not as a spliced gene product. Thus chemokines, like viral proteins that downmodulate MHC class I expression or have sequence homology to host MHC class I proteins, have evolved in primate and rodent CMVs to carry out an analogous set of immunomodulatory functions during infection of the host even though they arise from distinct origins.

  19. Railway vehicle performance optimisation using virtual homologation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, H.; Madeira, J. F. A.; Ambrósio, J.; Pombo, J.

    2016-09-01

    Unlike regular automotive vehicles, which are designed to travel in different types of roads, railway vehicles travel mostly in the same route during their life cycle. To accept the operation of a railway vehicle in a particular network, a homologation process is required according to local standard regulations. In Europe, the standards EN 14363 and UIC 518, which are used for railway vehicle acceptance, require on-track tests and/or numerical simulations. An important advantage of using virtual homologation is the reduction of the high costs associated with on-track tests by studying the railway vehicle performance in different operation conditions. This work proposes a methodology for the improvement of railway vehicle design with the objective of its operation in selected railway tracks by using optimisation. The analyses required for the vehicle improvement are performed under control of the optimisation method global and local optimisation using direct search. To quantify the performance of the vehicle, a new objective function is proposed, which includes: a Dynamic Performance Index, defined as a weighted sum of the indices obtained from the virtual homologation process; the non-compensated acceleration, which is related to the operational velocity; and a penalty associated with cases where the vehicle presents an unacceptable dynamic behaviour according to the standards. Thus, the optimisation process intends not only to improve the quality of the vehicle in terms of running safety and ride quality, but also to increase the vehicle availability via the reduction of the time for a journey while ensuring its operational acceptance under the standards. The design variables include the suspension characteristics and the operational velocity of the vehicle, which are allowed to vary in an acceptable range of variation. The results of the optimisation lead to a global minimum of the objective function in which the suspensions characteristics of the vehicle are

  20. Definition and identification of homology domains.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C B; Goldman, D A

    1988-03-01

    A method is described for identifying and evaluating regions of significant similarity between two sequences. The notion of a 'homology domain' is employed which defines the boundaries of a region of sequence homology containing no insertions or deletions. The relative significance of different potential homology domains is evaluated using a non-linear similarity score related to the probability of finding the observed level of similarity in the region by chance. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by simulating the evolution of homology domains and applying the method to their detection. Several examples of the use of homology domain identification are given.

  1. Establishing homologies in protein sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based statistical techniques used to determine homologies between proteins occurring in different species are reviewed. The technique is based on comparison of two protein sequences, either by relating all segments of a given length in one sequence to all segments of the second or by finding the best alignment of the two sequences. Approaches discussed include selection using printed tabulations, identification of very similar sequences, and computer searches of a database. The use of the SEARCH, RELATE, and ALIGN programs (Dayhoff, 1979) is explained; sample data are presented in graphs, diagrams, and tables and the construction of scoring matrices is considered.

  2. Establishing homologies in protein sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based statistical techniques used to determine homologies between proteins occurring in different species are reviewed. The technique is based on comparison of two protein sequences, either by relating all segments of a given length in one sequence to all segments of the second or by finding the best alignment of the two sequences. Approaches discussed include selection using printed tabulations, identification of very similar sequences, and computer searches of a database. The use of the SEARCH, RELATE, and ALIGN programs (Dayhoff, 1979) is explained; sample data are presented in graphs, diagrams, and tables and the construction of scoring matrices is considered.

  3. Structural homologies among the hemopoietins.

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, J W; Ziltener, H J; Leslie, K B

    1986-01-01

    A group of cytokines characterized by a common set of target cells--namely, the pluripotential hemopoietic stem cells or their cellular derivatives--share similarities in the amino acid sequence at their N terminus or in the putative signal peptide immediately prior to the published N terminus. Murine P-cell-stimulating factor (PSF), murine and human interleukin 2 (IL-2), murine and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), human erythropoietin, and human interleukin 1 beta all share alanine as the N-terminal amino acid and have some similarities in the succeeding three or four amino acids. In the case of murine PSF and GM-CSF, the six N-terminal amino acids are readily cleaved from mature molecules and are lacking from the N-terminal amino acid sequences reported initially. A sixth cytokine, colony-stimulating factor 1, has an alanine followed by a similar pattern of five amino acids at the end of the putative signal peptide. GM-CSF and IL-2 have more extensive homology, about 25% of residues being identical in three regions that comprise about 70% of the molecules. Only minor similarities of uncertain significance were found among the complete amino acid sequences of the other cytokines. Although its evolutionary origin is uncertain, the homology around the N terminus may provide a structural marker for a group of cytokines active on the pluripotential hemopoietic stem cell and its derivatives. PMID:3085095

  4. Orientation Dependence in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K.; Takahashi, N.; Fujitani, Y.; Yoshikura, H.; Kobayashi, I.

    1996-01-01

    Homologous recombination was investigated in Escherichia coli with two plasmids, each carrying the homologous region (two defective neo genes, one with an amino-end deletion and the other with a carboxyl-end deletion) in either direct or inverted orientation. Recombination efficiency was measured in recBC sbcBC and recBC sbcA strains in three ways. First, we measured the frequency of cells carrying neo(+) recombinant plasmids in stationary phase. Recombination between direct repeats was much more frequent than between inverted repeats in the recBC sbcBC strain but was equally frequent in the two substrates in the recBC sbcA strain. Second, the fluctuation test was used to exclude bias by a rate difference between the recombinant and parental plasmids and led to the same conclusion. Third, direct selection for recombinants just after transformation with or without substrate double-strand breaks yielded essentially the same results. Double-strand breaks elevated recombination in both the strains and in both substrates. These results are consistant with our previous findings that the major route of recombination in recBC sbcBC strains generates only one recombinant DNA from two DNAs and in recBC sbcA strains generates two recombinant DNAs from two DNAs. PMID:8722759

  5. A Phenomenological and Dynamic View of Homology: Homologs as Persistently Reproducible Modules.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daichi G; Tanaka, Senji

    2017-01-01

    Homology is a fundamental concept in biology. However, the metaphysical status of homology, especially whether a homolog is a part of an individual or a member of a natural kind, is still a matter of intense debate. The proponents of the individuality view of homology criticize the natural kind view of homology by pointing out that homologs are subject to evolutionary transformation, and natural kinds do not change in the evolutionary process. Conversely, some proponents of the natural kind view of homology argue that a homolog can be construed both as a part of an individual and a member of a natural kind. They adopt the Homeostatic Property Cluster (HPC) theory of natural kinds, and the theory seems to strongly support their construal. Note that this construal implies the acceptance of essentialism. However, looking back on the history of the concept of homology, we should not overlook the fact that the individuality view was proposed to reject the essentialist interpretation of homology. Moreover, the essentialist notions of natural kinds can, in our view, mislead biologists about the phenomena of homology. Consequently, we need a non-essentialist view of homology, which we name the "persistently reproducible module" (PRM) view. This view highlights both the individual-like and kind-like aspects of homologs while stripping down both essentialist and anti-essentialist interpretations of homology. In this article, we articulate the PRM view of homology and explain why it is recommended over the other two views.

  6. Khovanov homology of links and graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, Marko

    2006-05-01

    In this thesis we work with Khovanov homology of links and its generalizations, as well as with the homology of graphs. Khovanov homology of links consists of graded chain complexes which are link invariants, up to chain homotopy, with graded Euler characteristic equal to the Jones polynomial of the link. Hence, it can be regarded as the "categorification" of the Jones polynomial. We prove that the first homology group of positive braid knots is trivial. Futhermore, we prove that non-alternating torus knots are homologically thick. In addition, we show that we can decrease the number of full twists of torus knots without changing low-degree homology and consequently that there exists stable homology for torus knots. We also prove most of the above properties for Khovanov-Rozansky homology. Concerning graph homology, we categorify the dichromatic (and consequently Tutte) polynomial for graphs, by categorifying an infinite set of its one-variable specializations. We categorify explicitly the one-variable specialization that is an analog of the Jones polynomial of an alternating link corresponding to the initial graph. Also, we categorify explicitly the whole two-variable dichromatic polynomial of graphs by using Koszul complexes. textbf{Key-words:} Khovanov homology, Jones polynomial, link, torus knot, graph, dichromatic polynomial

  7. The OGCleaner: filtering false-positive homology clusters.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Detecting homologous sequences in organisms is an essential step in protein structure and function prediction, gene annotation and phylogenetic tree construction. Heuristic methods are often employed for quality control of putative homology clusters. These heuristics, however, usually only apply to pairwise sequence comparison and do not examine clusters as a whole. We present the Orthology Group Cleaner (the OGCleaner), a tool designed for filtering putative orthology groups as homology or non-homology clusters by considering all sequences in a cluster. The OGCleaner relies on high-quality orthologous groups identified in OrthoDB to train machine learning algorithms that are able to distinguish between true-positive and false-positive homology groups. This package aims to improve the quality of phylogenetic tree construction especially in instances of lower-quality transcriptome assemblies. https://github.com/byucsl/ogcleaner CONTACT: sfujimoto@gmail.comSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

  9. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University /Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

  10. Interspecies homology of nitrogenase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruvkun, G B; Ausubel, F M

    1980-01-01

    Cloned nitrogen fixation (nif) genes from Klebsiella pneumoniae hybridize to DNA from 19 out of 19 widely divergent nitrogen-fixing bacterial strains but do not hybridize to DNA from 10 different non-nitrogen-fixing species. K. pneumoniae nif DNA fragments that hybridize to DNA from other species contain part of the three structural genes that code for nitrogenase polypeptides. We have utilized this homology to clone an EcoRI restriction endonuclease fragment from Rhizobium meliloti that hybridizes to the K. pneumoniae nif structural genes. Some of the species whose DNA hybridizes with K. pneumoniae nif DNA have been postulated to have diverged from K. pneumoniae 3 x 10(9) years ago. Nitrogenase genes are the only known example of such highly conserved prokaryotic translated genes. Nitrogenase genes are either extraordinarily conserved in evolution or have been exchanged between different nitrogen-fixing species relatively recently in evolutionary time. Images PMID:6987649

  11. Homology and the hierarchy of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ralf J

    2008-07-01

    Homology is the similarity between organisms due to common ancestry. Introduced by Richard Owen in 1843 in a paper entitled "Lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology of the invertebrate animals", the concept of homology predates Darwin's "Origin of Species" and has been very influential throughout the history of evolutionary biology. Although homology is the central concept of all comparative biology and provides a logical basis for it, the definition of the term and the criteria of its application remain controversial. Here, I will discuss homology in the context of the hierarchy of biological organization. I will provide insights gained from an exemplary case study in evolutionary developmental biology that indicates the uncoupling of homology at different levels of biological organization. I argue that continuity and hierarchy are separate but equally important issues of homology. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Persistent homology analysis of craze formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi; Obayashi, Ippei; Hiraoka, Yasuaki

    2017-01-01

    We apply a persistent homology analysis to investigate the behavior of nanovoids during the crazing process of glassy polymers. We carry out a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of the uniaxial deformation of an amorphous polymer and analyze the results with persistent homology. Persistent homology reveals the void coalescence during craze formation, and the results suggest that the yielding process is regarded as the percolation of nanovoids created by deformation.

  13. Homology-independent metrics for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of "genomic dark matter" with no significant similarity - and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence - from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference.

  14. Involvement of rhp23, a Schizosaccharomyces pombe homolog of the human HHR23A and Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 nucleotide excision repair genes, in cell cycle control and protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Elder, Robert T; Song, Xiang-qian; Chen, Mingzhong; Hopkins, Kevin M; Lieberman, Howard B; Zhao, Yuqi

    2002-01-15

    A functional homolog (rhp23) of human HHR23A and Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 was cloned from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and characterized. Consistent with the role of Rad23 homologs in nucleotide excision repair, rhp23 mutant cells are moderately sensitive to UV light but demonstrate wild-type resistance to gamma-rays and hydroxyurea. Expression of the rhp23, RAD23 or HHR23A cDNA restores UV resistance to the mutant, indicating that rhp23 is a functional homolog of the human and S.cerevisiae genes. The rhp23::ura4 mutation also causes a delay in the G2 phase of the cell cycle which is corrected when rhp23, RAD23 or HHR23A cDNA is expressed. Rhp23 is present throughout the cell but is located predominantly in the nucleus, and the nuclear levels of Rhp23 decrease around the time of S phase in the cell cycle. Rhp23 is ubiquitinated at low levels, but overexpression of the rhp23 cDNA induces a large increase in ubiquitination of other proteins. Consistent with a role in protein ubiquitination, Rhp23 binds ubiquitin, as determined by two-hybrid analysis. Thus, the rhp23 gene plays a role not only in nucleotide excision repair but also in cell cycle regulation and the ubiquitination pathways.

  15. Equivalence of Heegaard Floer homology and embedded contact homology via open book decompositions

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Vincent; Ghiggini, Paolo; Honda, Ko

    2011-01-01

    We sketch the proof of the equivalence between the hat versions of Heegaard Floer homology and embedded contact homology (ECH). The key point is to express these two Floer homology theories in terms of an open book decomposition of the ambient manifold. PMID:21525415

  16. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Hot spot turbulence is a potential contributor to yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, although its origin, if present, remains unclear. In this work, a perturbation analysis is performed of an analytical homologous solution that mimics the hot spot and surrounding cold fuel during the late stages of an ICF implosion. It is shown that the flow is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability, and that during stagnation, short wavelength entropy and vorticity fluctuations amplify by a factor exp (π |N0 | ts) , where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. This amplification factor is exponentially sensitive to mean flow gradients and varies from 103-107 for realistic gradients. Comparisons are made with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and it is found that a numerical resolution of ~ 30 zones per wavelength is required to capture the evolution of vorticity accurately. This translates to an angular resolution of ~(12 / l) ∘ , or ~ 0 .1° to resolve the fastest growing modes (Legendre mode l > 100).

  17. [Symmetries and homologies of Geomerida].

    PubMed

    Zarenkov, N A

    2005-01-01

    The symmetry of Earths life cover (Geomerida) was described generally by L.A. Zenkevich (1948). It coincides with the symmetry of geographic cover. Its symmetry elements are equatorial plane and three meridonal planes corresponded to oceans and continents. The hypsographic curve with point of inflection (symmetry element) on 3 km depth line should be added to these elements. The plankton and benthos communities as well as fauna of taxons are distributed symmetrically according these symmetry elements. Zenkevich model was successfully extrapolated to plankton by K.V. Beklemishev (1967, 1969) and to abyssal benthos by Sokolova M.N. (1986). The plankton communities inhabiting symmetrically located macrocirculations are considered as homologous. The character of circulation determines the trophic structure of plankton and benthos. In the case of high productivity of plankton, benthic grazing animals feed on sedimented particles have bilateral symmetric mouthpart. Otherwise they have to acquire food from water column and use cyclomeric mouthpart. Thus, the symmetry of macrocirculations determines the symmetry distribution of benthic animals with two major symmetries of mouthparts. The peculiarities of organisms' symmetry are discussed in the context of Pierre Curie principle and the ideas of K.V. Beklemishev concerning evolution of morphological axes.

  18. Homology in classical and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C

    1988-11-01

    Hypotheses of homology are the basis of comparative morphology and comparative molecular biology. The kinds of homologous and nonhomologous relations in classical and molecular biology are explored through the three tests that may be applied to a hypothesis of homology: congruence, conjunction, and similarity. The same three tests apply in molecular comparisons and in morphology, and in each field they differentiate eight kinds of relation. These various relations are discussed and compared. The unit or standard of comparison differs in morphology and in molecular biology; in morphology it is the adult or life cycle, but with molecules it is the haploid genome. In morphology the congruence test is decisive in separating homology and nonhomology, whereas with molecular sequence data similarity is the decisive test. Consequences of this difference are that the boundary between homology and nonhomology is not the same in molecular biology as in morphology, that homology and synapomorphy can be equated in morphology but not in all molecular comparisons, and that there is no detected molecular equivalent of convergence. Since molecular homology may reflect either species phylogeny or gene phylogeny, there are more kinds of homologous relation between molecular sequences than in morphology. The terms paraxenology and plerology are proposed for two of these kinds--respectively, the consequence of multiple xenology and of gene conversion.

  19. GENE SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY OF CHEMOKINES ACROSS SPECIES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-react...

  20. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  1. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Random-walk model of homologous recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Youhei; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    1995-12-01

    Interaction between two homologous (i.e., identical or nearly identical) DNA sequences leads to their homologous recombination in the cell. We present the following stochastic model to explain the dependence of the frequency of homologous recombination on the length of the homologous region. The branch point connecting the two DNAs in a reaction intermediate follows the random-walk process along the homology (N base-pairs). If the branch point reaches either of the homology ends, it bounds back to the homologous region at a probability of γ (reflection coefficient) and is destroyed at a probability of 1-γ. When γ is small, the frequency of homologous recombination is found to be proportional to N3 for smaller N and a linear function of N for larger N. The exponent of the nonlinear dependence for smaller N decreases from three as γ increases. When γ=1, only the linear dependence is left. These theoretical results can explain many experimental data in various systems. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  3. Computational methods for remote homolog identification.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiu-Feng; Xu, Dong

    2005-12-01

    As more and more protein sequences are available, homolog identification becomes increasingly important for functional, structural, and evolutional studies of proteins. Many homologous proteins were separated a very long time ago in their evolutionary history and thus their sequences share low sequence identity. These remote homologs have become a research focus in bioinformatics over the past decade, and some significant advances have been achieved. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review on computational techniques used in remote homolog identification based on different methods, including sequence-sequence comparison, and sequence-structure comparison, and structure-structure comparison. Other miscellaneous approaches are also summarized. Pointers to the online resources of these methods and their related databases are provided. Comparisons among different methods in terms of their technical approaches, their strengths, and limitations are followed. Studies on proteins in SARS-CoV are shown as an example for remote homolog identification application.

  4. Homology--history of a concept.

    PubMed

    Panchen, A L

    1999-01-01

    The concept of homology is traceable to Aristotle, but Belon's comparison in 1555 of a human skeleton with that of a bird expressed it overtly. Before the late 18th century, the dominant view of the pattern of organisms was the scala naturae--even Linnaeus with his divergent hierarchical classification did not necessarily see the resulting taxonomic pattern as a natural phenomenon. The divergent hierarchy, rather than the acceptance of phylogeny, was the necessary spur to discussion of homology and the concept of analogy. Lamarck, despite his proposal of evolution, attributed homology to his escalator naturae and analogy to convergent acquired characters. Significantly, it was the concept of serial homology that emerged at the end of the 18th century, although comparison between organisms became popular soon after, and was boosted by the famous Cuvier/Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire debate of the 1830s. The concepts of homology and analogy were well understood by the pre- (or anti-) evolutionary comparative anatomists before the general acceptance of phylogeny, and they were defined by Owen in 1843. The acceptance of evolution led to the idea that homology should be defined by common ancestry, and to the confusion between definition and explanation. The term 'homoplasy', introduced by Lankester in 1870, also arose from a phylogenetic explanation of homology.

  5. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy andmore » vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest-growing modes and that high mode numbers are required to reach this limit (Legendre mode ℓ ≳ 100

  6. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy and vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest

  7. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-08-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of U. maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins.

  8. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Holloman, William K.; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of Ustilago maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins. PMID:18502156

  9. Homology class of a Lagrangian Klein bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovski, Stefan Yu

    2009-08-01

    It is shown that an embedded Lagrangian Klein bottle realises a non-zero mod 2 homology class in a compact symplectic four-manifold (X,\\omega) such that c_1(X,\\omega)\\cdot \\lbrack \\omega \\rbrack > 0.

  10. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ4 lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  11. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  12. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ^{4} lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  13. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage for orbital reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Linberg, J.V.; Anderson, R.L.; Edwards, J.J.; Panje, W.R.; Bardach, J.

    1980-07-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is convenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption.

  14. On the hodological criterion for homology.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as "the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function" and its redefinition after Darwin as "the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry" entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish "sameness."Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  15. On the hodological criterion for homology

    PubMed Central

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as “the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function” and its redefinition after Darwin as “the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry” entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish “sameness.”Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  16. Investigating Homology between Proteins using Energetic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wrabl, James O.; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding) and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved local stability, may

  17. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, James O; Hilser, Vincent J

    2010-03-26

    Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding) and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved local stability, may

  18. Homologs of Breast Cancer Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Oliver; Seeliger, Katharina; Puchta, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of genes involved in hereditary breast cancer in humans, a vast wealth of information has been published. Breast cancer proteins were shown to work as tumor suppressors primarily through their involvement in DNA-damage repair. Surprisingly, homologs of these genes can be found in plant genomes, as well. Here, we want to give an overview of the identification and characterization of the biological roles of these proteins, in plants. In addition to the conservation of their function in DNA repair, new plant-specific characteristics have been revealed. BRCA1 is required for the efficient repair of double strand breaks (DSB) by homologous recombination in somatic cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that, whereas most homologs of key components of the different mammalian BRCA1 complexes are present in plant genomes, homologs of most factors involved in the recruitment of BRCA1 to the DSB cannot be identified. Thus, it is not clear at the moment whether differences exist between plants and animals at this important step. The most conserved region of BRCA1 and BARD1 homologs in plants is a PHD domain which is absent in mammals and which, in AtBARD1, might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of plant development. The presence of a plant-specific domain prompted us to reevaluate the current model for the evolution of BRCA1 homologs and to suggest a new hypothesis, in which we postulate that plant BRCA1 and BARD1 have one common predecessor that gained a PHD domain before duplication. Furthermore, work in Arabidopsis demonstrates that – as in animals – BRCA2 homologs are important for meiotic DNA recombination. Surprisingly, recent research has revealed that AtBRCA2 also has an important role in systemic acquired resistance. In Arabidopsis, BRCA2 is involved in the transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes via its interaction with the strand exchange protein RAD51. PMID

  19. Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks

    PubMed Central

    Petri, G.; Expert, P.; Turkheimer, F.; Carhart-Harris, R.; Nutt, D.; Hellyer, P. J.; Vaccarino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186–198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects—homological cycles—associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle, we apply these tools to compare resting-state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin—the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo. PMID:25401177

  20. Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks.

    PubMed

    Petri, G; Expert, P; Turkheimer, F; Carhart-Harris, R; Nutt, D; Hellyer, P J; Vaccarino, F

    2014-12-06

    Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186-198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects-homological cycles-associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle,we apply these tools to compare resting state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin-the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo.

  1. Hyper(co)homology for exact left covariant functors and a homology theory for topological spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyarenko, E. G.

    1995-06-01

    Contents Introduction §1. Strong cohomology of dual complexes §2. Hyperhomology §3. Examples §4. Typical limit relations for Steenrod-Sitnikov homology §5. The strong homology of topological spaces §6. On the special position held by singular theory Bibliography

  2. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  3. INVHOGEN: a database of homologous invertebrate genes.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Ingo; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2006-01-01

    Classification of proteins into families of homologous sequences constitutes the basis of functional analysis or of evolutionary studies. Here we present INVertebrate HOmologous GENes (INVHOGEN), a database combining the available invertebrate protein genes from UniProt (consisting of Swiss-Prot and TrEMBL) into gene families. For each family INVHOGEN provides a multiple protein alignment, a maximum likelihood based phylogenetic tree and taxonomic information about the sequences. It is possible to download the corresponding GenBank flatfiles, the alignment and the tree in Newick format. Sequences and related information have been structured in an ACNUC database under a client/server architecture. Thus, complex selections can be performed. An external graphical tool (FamFetch) allows access to the data to evaluate homology relationships between genes and distinguish orthologous from paralogous sequences. Thus, INVHOGEN complements the well-known HOVERGEN database. The databank is available at http://www.bi.uni-duesseldorf.de/~invhogen/invhogen.html.

  4. Homologous recombination in plants: an antireview.

    PubMed

    Lieberman-Lazarovich, Michal; Levy, Avraham A

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a central cellular process involved in many aspects of genome maintenance such as DNA repair, replication, telomere maintenance, and meiotic chromosomal segregation. HR is highly conserved among eukaryotes, contributing to genome stability as well as to the generation of genetic diversity. It has been intensively studied, for almost a century, in plants and in other organisms. In this antireview, rather than reviewing existing knowledge, we wish to underline the many open questions in plant HR. We will discuss the following issues: how do we define homology and how the degree of homology affects HR? Are there any plant-specific HR qualities, how extensive is functional conservation and did HR proteins acquire new functions? How efficient is HR in plants and what are the cis and the trans factors that regulate it? Finally, we will give the prospects for enhancing the rates of gene targeting and meiotic HR for plant breeding purposes.

  5. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkovits, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  6. Solar core homology, solar neutrinos and helioseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Bludman, S.A.; Kennedy, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Precise numerical standard solar models (SSMs) now agree with one another and with helioseismological observations in the convective and outer radiative zones. Nevertheless these models obscure how luminosity, neutrino production and g-mode core helioseismology depend on such inputs as opacity and nuclear cross sections. Although the Sun is not homologous, its inner core by itself is chemically evolved and almost homologous, because of its compactness, radiative energy transport, and ppI-dominated luminosity production. We apply luminosity-fixed homology transformations to the core to estimate theoretical uncertainties in the SSM and to obtain a broad class of non-SSMs, parameterized by central temperature and density and purely radiative energy transport in the core. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Homology Modeling of Class A G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of membrane bound signaling proteins that hold great pharmaceutical interest. Since experimentally elucidated structures are available only for a very limited number of receptors, homology modeling has become a widespread technique for the construction of GPCR models intended to study the structure-function relationships of the receptors and aid the discovery and development of ligands capable of modulating their activity. Through this chapter, various aspects involved in the constructions of homology models of the serpentine domain of the largest class of GPCRs, known as class A or rhodopsin family, are illustrated. In particular, the chapter provides suggestions, guidelines and critical thoughts on some of the most crucial aspect of GPCR modeling, including: collection of candidate templates and a structure-based alignment of their sequences; identification and alignment of the transmembrane helices of the query receptor to the corresponding domains of the candidate templates; selection of one or more templates receptor; election of homology or de novo modeling for the construction of specific extracellular and intracellular domains; construction of the three-dimensional models, with special consideration to extracellular regions, disulfide bridges, and interhelical cavity; validation of the models through controlled virtual screening experiments. PMID:22323225

  8. New insights into the mechanism of homologous recombination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Aylon, Yael; Kupiec, Martin

    2004-05-01

    Genome stability is of primary importance for the survival and proper functioning of all organisms. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise spontaneously during growth, or can be created by external insults. Repair of DSBs by homologous recombination provides an efficient and fruitful pathway to restore chromosomal integrity. Exciting new work in yeast has lately provided insights into this complex process. Many of the proteins involved in recombination have been isolated and the details of the repair mechanism are now being unraveled at the molecular level. In this review, we focus on recent studies which dissect the recombinational repair of a single broken chromosome. After DSB formation, a decision is made regarding the mechanism of repair (recombination or non-homologous end-joining). This decision is under genetic control. Once committed to the recombination pathway, the broken chromosomal ends are resected by a still unclear mechanism in which the DNA damage checkpoint protein Rad24 participates. At this stage several proteins are recruited to the broken ends, including Rad51p, Rad52p, Rad55p, Rad57p, and possibly Rad54p. A genomic search for homology ensues, followed by strand invasion, promoted by the Rad51 filament with the participation of Rad55p, Rad57p and Rad54p. DNA synthesis then takes place, restoring the resected ends. Crossing-over formation depends on the length of the homologous recombining sequences, and is usually counteracted by the activity of the mismatch repair system. Given the conservation of the repair mechanisms and genes throughout evolution, these studies have profound implications for other eukaryotic organisms.

  9. Single copy DNA homology in sea stars.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J; Nicholson, R; Stuerzl, M; Lui, A

    1982-01-01

    The sequence homology in the single copy DNA of sea stars has been measured. Labeled single copy DNA from Pisaster ochraceus was reannealed with excess genomic DNA from P. brevispinus, Evasterias troschelii, Pycnopodia helianthoides, Solaster stimpsoni, and Dermasterias imbricata. Reassociation reactions were performed under two criteria of salt and temperature. The extent of reassociation and thermal denaturation characteristics of hybrid single copy DNA molecules follow classical taxonomic lines. P. brevispinus DNA contains essentially all of the sequences present in P. ochraceus single copy tracer while Evasterias and Pycnopodia DNAs contain 52% and 46% of such sequences respectively. Reciprocal reassociation reactions with labeled Evasterias single copy DNA confirm the amount and fidelity of the sequence homology. There is a small definite reaction of uncertain homology between P. ochraceus single copy DNA and Solaster or Dermasterias DNA. Similarly Solaster DNA contains sequences homologous to approximately 18% of Dermasterias unique DNA. The thermal denaturation temperatures of heteroduplexes indicate that the genera Pisaster and Evasterias diverged shortly after the divergence of the subfamilies Pycnopodiinae and Asteriinae. The two Pisaster species diverged more recently, probably in the most recent quarter of the interval since the separation of the genera Pisaster and Evasterias.

  10. Cyclic homology for Hom-associative algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Mohammad; Shapiro, Ilya; Sütlü, Serkan

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper we investigate the noncommutative geometry of a class of algebras, called the Hom-associative algebras, whose associativity is twisted by a homomorphism. We define the Hochschild, cyclic, and periodic cyclic homology and cohomology for this class of algebras generalizing these theories from the associative to the Hom-associative setting.

  11. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  12. Persistent homology in graph power filtrations

    PubMed Central

    Marchette, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of homological features in simplicial complex representations of big datasets in Rn resulting from Vietoris–Rips or Čech filtrations is commonly used to probe the topological structure of such datasets. In this paper, the notion of homological persistence in simplicial complexes obtained from power filtrations of graphs is introduced. Specifically, the rth complex, r ≥ 1, in such a power filtration is the clique complex of the rth power Gr of a simple graph G. Because the graph distance in G is the relevant proximity parameter, unlike a Euclidean filtration of a dataset where regional scale differences can be an issue, persistence in power filtrations provides a scale-free insight into the topology of G. It is shown that for a power filtration of G, the girth of G defines an r range over which the homology of the complexes in the filtration are guaranteed to persist in all dimensions. The role of chordal graphs as trivial homology delimiters in power filtrations is also discussed and the related notions of ‘persistent triviality’, ‘transient noise’ and ‘persistent periodicity’ in power filtrations are introduced. PMID:27853540

  13. Rad54, the Motor of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Mazin, Alexander V.; Mazina, Olga M.; Bugreev, Dmitry V.; Rossi, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) performs crucial functions including DNA repair, segregation of homologous chromosomes, propagation of genetic diversity, and maintenance of telomeres. HR is responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA interstrand cross-links. The process of HR is initiated at the site of DNA breaks and gaps and involves a search for homologous sequences promoted by Rad51 and auxiliary proteins followed by the subsequent invasion of broken DNA ends into the homologous duplex DNA that then serves as a template for repair. The invasion produces a cross-stranded structure, known as the Holliday junction. Here, we describe the properties of Rad54, an important and versatile HR protein that is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes. Rad54 is a motor protein that translocates along dsDNA and performs several important functions in HR. The current review focuses on the recently identified Rad54 activities which contribute to the late phase of HR, especially the branch migration of Holliday junctions. PMID:20089461

  14. Homology modeling of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Trayder; McLean, Kimberley C; McRobb, Fiona M; Manallack, David T; Chalmers, David K; Yuriev, Elizabeth

    2014-01-27

    We have developed homology models of the acetylcholine muscarinic receptors M₁R-M₅R, based on the β₂-adrenergic receptor crystal as the template. This is the first report of homology modeling of all five subtypes of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors with binding sites optimized for ligand binding. The models were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between muscarinic antagonists and decoy compounds using virtual screening using enrichment factors, area under the ROC curve (AUC), and an early enrichment measure, LogAUC. The models produce rational binding modes of docked ligands as well as good enrichment capacity when tested against property-matched decoy libraries, which demonstrates their unbiased predictive ability. To test the relative effects of homology model template selection and the binding site optimization procedure, we generated and evaluated a naïve M₂R model, using the M₃R crystal structure as a template. Our results confirm previous findings that binding site optimization using ligand(s) active at a particular receptor, i.e. including functional knowledge into the model building process, has a more pronounced effect on model quality than target-template sequence similarity. The optimized M₁R-M₅R homology models are made available as part of the Supporting Information to allow researchers to use these structures, compare them to their own results, and thus advance the development of better modeling approaches.

  15. Increased chromosome mobility facilitates homology search during recombination.

    PubMed

    Miné-Hattab, Judith; Rothstein, Rodney

    2012-04-08

    Homologous recombination, an essential process for preserving genomic integrity, uses intact homologous sequences to repair broken chromosomes. To explore the mechanism of homologous pairing in vivo, we tagged two homologous loci in diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and investigated their dynamic organization in the absence and presence of DNA damage. When neither locus is damaged, homologous loci occupy largely separate regions, exploring only 2.7% of the nuclear volume. Following the induction of a double-strand break, homologous loci co-localize ten times more often. The mobility of the cut chromosome markedly increases, allowing it to explore a nuclear volume that is more than ten times larger. Interestingly, the mobility of uncut chromosomes also increases, allowing them to explore a four times larger volume. We propose a model for homology search in which increased chromosome mobility facilitates homologous pairing. Finally, we find that the increase in DNA dynamics is dependent on early steps of homologous recombination.

  16. Game-theoretic homological sensor resource management for SSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Sang Peter

    2009-05-01

    We present a game-theoretic approach to Level 2/3/4 fusion for the purpose of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) along with prototypical SW implementation of this approach to demonstrate its effectiveness for possible future space operations. Our approach is based upon innovative techniques that we are developing to solve dynamic games and Nperson cooperative/non-cooperative games, as well as a new emerging homological sensing algorithms which we apply to control disparate network of space sensors in order to gain better SSA.

  17. Text mining of DNA sequence homology searches.

    PubMed

    McCallum, John; Ganesh, Siva

    2003-01-01

    Primary tasks in analysis and annotation of expressed sequence tag (EST) datasets are to identify similarity among sequences by unsupervised clustering and assign putative function based on BLAST homology searches. We investigated the usefulness of text mining as a simple approach for further higher-level clustering of EST datasets using IBM Intelligent Miner for Text v2.3 tools. Agglomerative and k-means clustering tools were used to cluster BLASTx homology search documents from two onion EST datasets and optimised by pre-processing and pruning. Subjective evaluation confirmed that these tools provided biologically useful and complementary views of the two libraries, provided new insights into their composition and revealed clusters previously identified by human experts. We compared BLASTx textual clusters for two gene families with their DNA sequence-based clusters and confirmed that these shared similar morphology.

  18. Redesigning Aldolase Stereoselectivity by Homologous Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Henßen, Birgit; Metz, Alexander; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-d-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) offers access to highly desirable building blocks for organic synthesis by catalyzing a stereoselective C-C bond formation between acetaldehyde and certain electrophilic aldehydes. DERA´s potential is particularly highlighted by the ability to catalyze sequential, highly enantioselective aldol reactions. However, its synthetic use is limited by the absence of an enantiocomplementary enzyme. Here, we introduce the concept of homologous grafting to identify stereoselectivity-determining amino acid positions in DERA. We identified such positions by structural analysis of the homologous aldolases 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase (KDPG) and the enantiocomplementary enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate aldolase (KDPGal). Mutation of these positions led to a slightly inversed enantiopreference of both aldolases to the same extent. By transferring these sequence motifs onto DERA we achieved the intended change in enantioselectivity. PMID:27327271

  19. Homologation Reaction of Ketones with Diazo Compounds.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Nuno R; Paterna, Roberta; Gois, Pedro M P

    2016-03-09

    This review covers the addition of diazo compounds to ketones to afford homologated ketones, either in the presence or in the absence of promoters or catalysts. Reactions with diazoalkanes, aryldiazomethanes, trimethylsilyldiazomethane, α-diazo esters, and disubstituted diazo compounds are covered, commenting on the complex regiochemistry of the reaction and the nature of the catalysts and promoters. The recent reports on the enantioselective version of ketone homologation reactions are gathered in one section, followed by reports on the use of cyclic ketones ring expansion in total synthesis. Although the first reports of this reaction appeared in the literature almost one century ago, the recent achievements, in particular, for the asymmetric version, forecast the development of new breakthroughs in the synthetically valuable field of diazo chemistry.

  20. Homologous Pairing between Long DNA Double Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition between two double stranded (ds) DNA with homologous sequences may not seem compatible with the B-DNA structure because the sequence information is hidden when it is used for joining the two strands. Nevertheless, it has to be invoked to account for various biological data. Using quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and hints from recent genetics experiments, I show here that direct recognition between homologous dsDNA is possible through the formation of short quadruplexes due to direct complementary hydrogen bonding of major-groove surfaces in parallel alignment. The constraints imposed by the predicted structures of the recognition units determine the mechanism of complexation between long dsDNA. This mechanism and concomitant predictions agree with the available experimental data and shed light upon the sequence effects and the possible involvement of topoisomerase II in the recognition.

  1. Homologous pairing in stretched supercoiled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Strick, T. R.; Croquette, V.; Bensimon, D.

    1998-01-01

    By using elastic measurements on single DNA molecules, we show that stretching a negatively supercoiled DNA activates homologous pairing in physiological conditions. These experiments indicate that a stretched unwound DNA locally denatures to alleviate the force-driven increase in torsional stress. This is detected by hybridization with 1 kb of homologous single-stranded DNA probes. The stretching force involved (≈2 pN) is small compared with those typically developed by molecular motors, suggesting that this process may be relevant to DNA processing in vivo. We used this technique to monitor the progressive denaturation of DNA as it is unwound and found that distinct, stable denaturation bubbles formed, beginning in A+T-rich regions. PMID:9724746

  2. Homology and phylogeny and their automated inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuellen, Georg

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of the ever-increasing amount of biological and biomedical data can be pushed forward by comparing the data within and among species. For example, an integrative analysis of data from the genome sequencing projects for various species traces the evolution of the genomes and identifies conserved and innovative parts. Here, I review the foundations and advantages of this “historical” approach and evaluate recent attempts at automating such analyses. Biological data is comparable if a common origin exists (homology), as is the case for members of a gene family originating via duplication of an ancestral gene. If the family has relatives in other species, we can assume that the ancestral gene was present in the ancestral species from which all the other species evolved. In particular, describing the relationships among the duplicated biological sequences found in the various species is often possible by a phylogeny, which is more informative than homology statements. Detecting and elaborating on common origins may answer how certain biological sequences developed, and predict what sequences are in a particular species and what their function is. Such knowledge transfer from sequences in one species to the homologous sequences of the other is based on the principle of ‘my closest relative looks and behaves like I do’, often referred to as ‘guilt by association’. To enable knowledge transfer on a large scale, several automated ‘phylogenomics pipelines’ have been developed in recent years, and seven of these will be described and compared. Overall, the examples in this review demonstrate that homology and phylogeny analyses, done on a large (and automated) scale, can give insights into function in biology and biomedicine.

  3. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Igor M

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  4. Dual submanifolds in rational homology spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, FuQuan

    2017-09-01

    Let $\\Sigma$ be a simply connected rational homology sphere. A pair of disjoint closed submanifolds $M_+, M_-$ in $\\Sigma$ are called dual to each other if the complement $\\Sigma - M_+$ strongly homotopy retracts onto $M_-$ or vice-versa. In this paper we will give a complete answer of which integral triples $(n; m_+, m_-)$ can appear, where $n=dim \\Sigma -1$, $m_+={codim}M_+ -1$ and $m_-={codim}M_- -1$.

  5. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force-extension experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Kornyshev, A. A.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data.

  6. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force–extension experiments

    PubMed Central

    (O’) Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data. PMID:27493568

  7. Homology among divergent Paleozoic tetrapod clades.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R L

    1999-01-01

    A stringent definition of homology is necessary to establish phylogenetic relationships among Paleozoic amphibians. Many derived characters exhibited by divergent clades of Carboniferous lepospondyls resemble those achieved convergently among Cenozoic squamates that have elongate bodies and reduced limbs, and by lineages of modern amphibians that have undergone miniaturization. Incongruent character distribution, poorly resolved cladograms and functionally improbable character transformations determined by phylogenetic analysis suggest that convergence was also common among Paleozoic amphibians with a skull length under 3 cm, including lepospondyls, early amniotes and the putative ancestors of modern amphibians. For this reason, it is injudicious to equate apparent synapomorphy (perceived common presence of a particular derived character in two putative sister-taxa) with strict homology of phylogenetic origin. Identification of homology by the similarity of structure, anatomical position and pattern of development is insufficient to establish the synapomorphy of bone and limb loss or precocial ossification of vertebral centra, which are common among small Paleozoic amphibians. The only way in which synapomorphies can be established definitively is through the discovery and recognition of the trait in question in basal members of each of the clades under study, and in their immediate common ancestors.

  8. Faster sequence homology searches by clustering subsequences

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shuji; Kakuta, Masanori; Ishida, Takashi; Akiyama, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Sequence homology searches are used in various fields. New sequencing technologies produce huge amounts of sequence data, which continuously increase the size of sequence databases. As a result, homology searches require large amounts of computational time, especially for metagenomic analysis. Results: We developed a fast homology search method based on database subsequence clustering, and implemented it as GHOSTZ. This method clusters similar subsequences from a database to perform an efficient seed search and ungapped extension by reducing alignment candidates based on triangle inequality. The database subsequence clustering technique achieved an ∼2-fold increase in speed without a large decrease in search sensitivity. When we measured with metagenomic data, GHOSTZ is ∼2.2–2.8 times faster than RAPSearch and is ∼185–261 times faster than BLASTX. Availability and implementation: The source code is freely available for download at http://www.bi.cs.titech.ac.jp/ghostz/ Contact: akiyama@cs.titech.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25432166

  9. Weak homological dimensions and biflat Koethe algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Pirkovskii, A Yu

    2008-06-30

    The homological properties of metrizable Koethe algebras {lambda}(P) are studied. A criterion for an algebra A={lambda}(P) to be biflat in terms of the Koethe set P is obtained, which implies, in particular, that for such algebras the properties of being biprojective, biflat, and flat on the left are equivalent to the surjectivity of the multiplication operator A otimes-hat A{yields}A. The weak homological dimensions (the weak global dimension w.dg and the weak bidimension w.db) of biflat Koethe algebras are calculated. Namely, it is shown that the conditions w.db {lambda}(P)<=1 and w.dg {lambda}(P)<=1 are equivalent to the nuclearity of {lambda}(P); and if {lambda}(P) is non-nuclear, then w.dg {lambda}(P)=w.db {lambda}(P)=2. It is established that the nuclearity of a biflat Koethe algebra {lambda}(P), under certain additional conditions on the Koethe set P, implies the stronger estimate db {lambda}(P), where db is the (projective) bidimension. On the other hand, an example is constructed of a nuclear biflat Koethe algebra {lambda}(P) such that db {lambda}(P)=2 (while w.db {lambda}(P)=1). Finally, it is shown that many biflat Koethe algebras, while not being amenable, have trivial Hochschild homology groups in positive degrees (with arbitrary coefficients). Bibliography: 37 titles.

  10. PubServer: literature searches by homology

    PubMed Central

    Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Koska, Laszlo; Sedova, Mayya; Godzik, Adam

    2014-01-01

    PubServer, available at http://pubserver.burnham.org/, is a tool to automatically collect, filter and analyze publications associated with groups of homologous proteins. Protein entries in databases such as Entrez Protein database at NCBI contain information about publications associated with a given protein. The scope of these publications varies a lot: they include studies focused on biochemical functions of individual proteins, but also reports from genome sequencing projects that introduce tens of thousands of proteins. Collecting and analyzing publications related to sets of homologous proteins help in functional annotation of novel protein families and in improving annotations of well-studied protein families or individual genes. However, performing such collection and analysis manually is a tedious and time-consuming process. PubServer automatically collects identifiers of homologous proteins using PSI-Blast, retrieves literature references from corresponding database entries and filters out publications unlikely to contain useful information about individual proteins. It also prepares simple vocabulary statistics from titles, abstracts and MeSH terms to identify the most frequently occurring keywords, which may help to quickly identify common themes in these publications. The filtering criteria applied to collected publications are user-adjustable. The results of the server are presented as an interactive page that allows re-filtering and different presentations of the output. PMID:24957597

  11. Dental homologies in lamniform sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii).

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenshu

    2002-01-01

    The dentitions of lamniform sharks are said to exhibit a unique heterodonty called the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The presence of an inflated hollow "dental bulla" on each jaw cartilage allows the recognition of homologous teeth across most modern macrophagous lamniforms based on topographic correspondence through the "similarity test." In most macrophagous lamniforms, three tooth rows are supported by the upper dental bulla: two rows of large anterior teeth followed by a row of small intermediate teeth. The lower tooth row occluding between the two rows of upper anterior teeth is the first lower anterior tooth row. Like the first and second lower anterior tooth rows, the third lower tooth row is supported by the dental bulla and may be called the first lower intermediate tooth row. The lower intermediate tooth row occludes between the first and second upper lateral tooth rows situated distal to the upper dental bulla, and the rest of the upper and lower tooth rows, all called lateral tooth rows, occlude alternately. Tooth symmetry cannot be used to identify their dental homology. The presence of dental bullae can be regarded as a synapomorphy of Lamniformes and this character is more definable than the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The formation of the tooth pattern appears to be related to the evolution of dental bullae. This study constitutes the first demonstration of supraspecific tooth-to-tooth dental homologies in nonmammalian vertebrates. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. PubServer: literature searches by homology.

    PubMed

    Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Koska, Laszlo; Sedova, Mayya; Godzik, Adam

    2014-07-01

    PubServer, available at http://pubserver.burnham.org/, is a tool to automatically collect, filter and analyze publications associated with groups of homologous proteins. Protein entries in databases such as Entrez Protein database at NCBI contain information about publications associated with a given protein. The scope of these publications varies a lot: they include studies focused on biochemical functions of individual proteins, but also reports from genome sequencing projects that introduce tens of thousands of proteins. Collecting and analyzing publications related to sets of homologous proteins help in functional annotation of novel protein families and in improving annotations of well-studied protein families or individual genes. However, performing such collection and analysis manually is a tedious and time-consuming process. PubServer automatically collects identifiers of homologous proteins using PSI-Blast, retrieves literature references from corresponding database entries and filters out publications unlikely to contain useful information about individual proteins. It also prepares simple vocabulary statistics from titles, abstracts and MeSH terms to identify the most frequently occurring keywords, which may help to quickly identify common themes in these publications. The filtering criteria applied to collected publications are user-adjustable. The results of the server are presented as an interactive page that allows re-filtering and different presentations of the output.

  13. Advances in Homology Protein Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhexin

    2007-01-01

    Homology modeling plays a central role in determining protein structure in the structural genomics project. The importance of homology modeling has been steadily increasing because of the large gap that exists between the overwhelming number of available protein sequences and experimentally solved protein structures, and also, more importantly, because of the increasing reliability and accuracy of the method. In fact, a protein sequence with over 30% identity to a known structure can often be predicted with an accuracy equivalent to a low-resolution X-ray structure. The recent advances in homology modeling, especially in detecting distant homologues, aligning sequences with template structures, modeling of loops and side chains, as well as detecting errors in a model, have contributed to reliable prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. The ongoing efforts in solving protein structures, which can be time-consuming and often difficult, will continue to spur the development of a host of new computational methods that can fill in the gap and further contribute to understanding the relationship between protein structure and function. PMID:16787261

  14. Mismatch repair during homologous and homeologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans.

  15. Homologous recombination using bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cary; Fischer, Tobias; Munroe, Elizabeth

    2015-02-02

    This protocol introduces the technique of homologous recombination in bacteria to insert a linear DNA fragment into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Homologous recombination allows the modification of large DNA molecules, in contrast with conventional restriction endonuclease-based strategies, which cleave large DNAs into numerous fragments and are unlikely to permit the precise targeting afforded by recombination-based approaches. The method uses a phage lambda-derived recombination system (using exo, beta, and gam) as well as other enzymatic activities provided by the host (Escherichia coli). In the method described here, a DNA fragment encoding enhanced cyan fluorescent protein is inserted immediately after the start codon of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase ("ChAT"), the final enzyme in acetylcholine biosynthesis, using homologous recombination between sequences that are present both on the introduced DNA fragment and in the target BAC. The desired recombination products are identified via positive selection for resistance to kanamycin. In principle, the resulting modified BAC could be used to produce transgenic mice that express this fluorescent protein in cholinergic neurons. The approach described here could be used to insert any DNA fragment.

  16. Mismatch Repair during Homologous and Homeologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans. PMID:25731766

  17. Methotrexate-mediated inhibition of RAD51 expression and homologous recombination in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Qing; Du, Xiao-Qing; Bai, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Yan; Yang, Qing-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Hong; Liu, Qiang; Fan, Fei-Yue

    2012-05-01

    Methotrexate is an inhibitor of folic acid metabolism. Homologous recombination is one of the most important ways to repair double-stranded breaks in DNA and influence the radio- and chemosensitivity of tumor cells. But the relationship between methotrexate and homologous recombination repair has not been elucidated. Induction of double-strand breaks by methotrexate in HOS cells is assessed by the neutral comet assay. Inhibition of subnuclear repair foci by methotrexate is measured by immunofluorescence. Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR are conducted to detect whether methotrexate affects the expression level of genes involved in homologous recombination. In addition, we used a pCMV3xnls-I-SceI construct to determine whether methotrexate directly inhibits the process of homologous recombinational repair in cells, and the sensitivity to methotrexate in the Ku80-deficient cells is detected using clonogenic survival assays. The result showed that methotrexate can regulate the repair of DNA double-strand breaks after radiation exposure, and methotrexate inhibition caused the complete inhibition of subnuclear repair foci in response to ionizing radiation. Mechanistic investigation revealed that methotrexate led to a significant reduction in the transcription of RAD51 genes. Treatment with methotrexate resulted in a decreased ability to perform homology-directed repair of I-SceI-induced chromosome breaks. In addition, enhancement of cell death was observed in Ku mutant cells compared to wild-type cells. These results demonstrate that methotrexate can affect homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks by controlling the expression of homologous recombination-related genes and suppressing the proper assembly of homologous recombination-directed subnuclear foci.

  18. Ipsilateral corticomotor responses are confined to the homologous muscle following cross-education of muscular strength.

    PubMed

    Mason, Joel; Frazer, Ashlyn K; Horvath, Deanna M; Pearce, Alan J; Avela, Janne; Howatson, Glyn; Kidgell, Dawson J

    2017-08-22

    Cross-education of strength occurs when strength-training one limb increases the strength of the untrained limb and is restricted to the untrained homologous muscle. Cortical circuits located ipsilateral to the trained limb might be involved. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to determine the corticomotor responses from the untrained homologous (biceps brachii) and non-homologous (flexor carpi radialis) muscle following strength-training of the right elbow flexors. Motor evoked potentials were recorded from the untrained left biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis during a submaximal contraction from 20 individuals (10 women, 10 men, aged 18-35 years; training group; n = 10 and control group; n = 10) before and after 3-weeks of strength-training the right biceps brachii at 80% of 1-repetition maximum (1-RM). Recruitment-curves for corticomotor excitability and inhibition of the untrained homologous and non-homologous muscle were constructed and assessed by examining the area under the recruitment curve (AURC). Strength-training increased strength of the trained elbow flexors (29%), resulting in a 18% increase in contralateral strength of the untrained elbow flexors (P <0.0001). The trained wrist flexors increased by 19%, resulting in a 12% increase in strength of the untrained wrist flexors (P = 0.005). TMS showed increased corticomotor excitability and decreased corticomotor inhibition for the untrained homologous muscle (P < 0.05); however, there were no changes in the untrained non-homologous muscle (P > 0.05). These findings show that the cross-education of muscular strength is spatially distributed; however, the neural adaptations are confined to the motor pathway ipsilateral to the untrained homologous agonist.

  19. Homology and ontogeny: pattern and process in comparative developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Scholtz, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    In this article the interface between development and homology is discussed. Development is here interpreted as a sequence of evolutionarily independent stages. Any approach stressing the importance of specific developmental stages is rejected. A homology definition is favoured which includes similarity, and complexity serves as a test for homology. Complexity is seen as the possibility of subdividing a character into evolutionarily independent corresponding substructures. Topology as a test for homology is critically discussed because corresponding positions are not necessarily indicative of homology. Complexity can be used twofold for homology assessments of development: either stages or processes of development are homologized. These two approaches must not be con-flated. This distinction leads to the conclusion that there is no ontogenetic homology "criterion".

  20. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    SciTech Connect

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogerio; Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  1. HomologMiner: looking for homologous genomic groups in whole genomes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Minmei; Berman, Piotr; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Harris, Robert S

    2007-04-15

    Complex genomes contain numerous repeated sequences, and genomic duplication is believed to be a main evolutionary mechanism to obtain new functions. Several tools are available for de novo repeat sequence identification, and many approaches exist for clustering homologous protein sequences. We present an efficient new approach to identify and cluster homologous DNA sequences with high accuracy at the level of whole genomes, excluding low-complexity repeats, tandem repeats and annotated interspersed repeats. We also determine the boundaries of each group member so that it closely represents a biological unit, e.g. a complete gene, or a partial gene coding a protein domain. We developed a program called HomologMiner to identify homologous groups applicable to genome sequences that have been properly marked for low-complexity repeats and annotated interspersed repeats. We applied it to the whole genomes of human (hg17), macaque (rheMac2) and mouse (mm8). Groups obtained include gene families (e.g. olfactory receptor gene family, zinc finger families), unannotated interspersed repeats and additional homologous groups that resulted from recent segmental duplications. Our program incorporates several new methods: a new abstract definition of consistent duplicate units, a new criterion to remove moderately frequent tandem repeats, and new algorithmic techniques. We also provide preliminary analysis of the output on the three genomes mentioned above, and show several applications including identifying boundaries of tandem gene clusters and novel interspersed repeat families. All programs and datasets are downloadable from www.bx.psu.edu/miller_lab.

  2. A defect in homologous recombination leads to increased translesion synthesis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Karel; Pagès, Vincent; Fuchs, Robert P

    2016-09-19

    DNA damage tolerance pathways allow cells to duplicate their genomes despite the presence of replication blocking lesions. Cells possess two major tolerance strategies, namely translesion synthesis (TLS) and homology directed gap repair (HDGR). TLS pathways involve specialized DNA polymerases that are able to synthesize past DNA lesions with an intrinsic risk of causing point mutations. In contrast, HDGR pathways are essentially error-free as they rely on the recovery of missing information from the sister chromatid by RecA-mediated homologous recombination. We have investigated the genetic control of pathway choice between TLS and HDGR in vivo in Escherichia coli In a strain with wild type RecA activity, the extent of TLS across replication blocking lesions is generally low while HDGR is used extensively. Interestingly, recA alleles that are partially impaired in D-loop formation confer a decrease in HDGR and a concomitant increase in TLS. Thus, partial defect of RecA's capacity to invade the homologous sister chromatid increases the lifetime of the ssDNA.RecA filament, i.e. the 'SOS signal'. This increase favors TLS by increasing both the TLS polymerase concentration and the lifetime of the TLS substrate, before it becomes sequestered by homologous recombination. In conclusion, the pathway choice between error-prone TLS and error-free HDGR is controlled by the efficiency of homologous recombination. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. PRIMO: An Interactive Homology Modeling Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Hatherley, Rowan; Brown, David K; Glenister, Michael; Tastan Bishop, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    The development of automated servers to predict the three-dimensional structure of proteins has seen much progress over the years. These servers make calculations simpler, but largely exclude users from the process. In this study, we present the PRotein Interactive MOdeling (PRIMO) pipeline for homology modeling of protein monomers. The pipeline eases the multi-step modeling process, and reduces the workload required by the user, while still allowing engagement from the user during every step. Default parameters are given for each step, which can either be modified or supplemented with additional external input. PRIMO has been designed for users of varying levels of experience with homology modeling. The pipeline incorporates a user-friendly interface that makes it easy to alter parameters used during modeling. During each stage of the modeling process, the site provides suggestions for novice users to improve the quality of their models. PRIMO provides functionality that allows users to also model ligands and ions in complex with their protein targets. Herein, we assess the accuracy of the fully automated capabilities of the server, including a comparative analysis of the available alignment programs, as well as of the refinement levels used during modeling. The tests presented here demonstrate the reliability of the PRIMO server when producing a large number of protein models. While PRIMO does focus on user involvement in the homology modeling process, the results indicate that in the presence of suitable templates, good quality models can be produced even without user intervention. This gives an idea of the base level accuracy of PRIMO, which users can improve upon by adjusting parameters in their modeling runs. The accuracy of PRIMO's automated scripts is being continuously evaluated by the CAMEO (Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn) project. The PRIMO site is free for non-commercial use and can be accessed at https://primo.rubi.ru.ac.za/.

  4. PRIMO: An Interactive Homology Modeling Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Glenister, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The development of automated servers to predict the three-dimensional structure of proteins has seen much progress over the years. These servers make calculations simpler, but largely exclude users from the process. In this study, we present the PRotein Interactive MOdeling (PRIMO) pipeline for homology modeling of protein monomers. The pipeline eases the multi-step modeling process, and reduces the workload required by the user, while still allowing engagement from the user during every step. Default parameters are given for each step, which can either be modified or supplemented with additional external input. PRIMO has been designed for users of varying levels of experience with homology modeling. The pipeline incorporates a user-friendly interface that makes it easy to alter parameters used during modeling. During each stage of the modeling process, the site provides suggestions for novice users to improve the quality of their models. PRIMO provides functionality that allows users to also model ligands and ions in complex with their protein targets. Herein, we assess the accuracy of the fully automated capabilities of the server, including a comparative analysis of the available alignment programs, as well as of the refinement levels used during modeling. The tests presented here demonstrate the reliability of the PRIMO server when producing a large number of protein models. While PRIMO does focus on user involvement in the homology modeling process, the results indicate that in the presence of suitable templates, good quality models can be produced even without user intervention. This gives an idea of the base level accuracy of PRIMO, which users can improve upon by adjusting parameters in their modeling runs. The accuracy of PRIMO’s automated scripts is being continuously evaluated by the CAMEO (Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn) project. The PRIMO site is free for non-commercial use and can be accessed at https://primo.rubi.ru.ac.za/. PMID:27855192

  5. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Didelot, Xavier; Méric, Guillaume; Falush, Daniel; Darling, Aaron E

    2012-06-19

    Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E). From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E), which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and therefore provide additional evidence to explain the

  6. Identification of plant microRNA homologs.

    PubMed

    Dezulian, Tobias; Remmert, Michael; Palatnik, Javier F; Weigel, Detlef; Huson, Daniel H

    2006-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene and protein expression in plants and animals. MiRNAs have so far been identified mostly by specific cloning of small RNA molecules, complemented by computational methods. We present a computational identification approach that is able to identify candidate miRNA homologs in any set of sequences, given a query miRNA. The approach is based on a sequence similarity search step followed by a set of structural filters.

  7. Genetic Homologies Among Streptomyces violaceoruber Strains

    PubMed Central

    Monson, A. M.; Bradley, S. G.; Enquist, L. W.; Cruces, Griselda

    1969-01-01

    Most of the genetic studies on streptomycetes have been done with cultures erroneously designated as Streptomyces coelicolor. To determine whether these cultures are genetically homologous with the S. violaceoruber nominifer, their deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) were analyzed, and selected pairs of mutants were crossed. The four cultures used in genetic studies, and called S. coelicolor in the literature, were found to constitute a genospecies, based upon DNA hybridization and recombination tests. In addition, DNA from Actinopycnidium caeruleum formed extensive duplexes with S. violaceoruber DNA. S. violaceoruber cultures and A. caeruleum were distinctly different from the S. coelicolor nominifer. PMID:5370275

  8. Imatinib radiosensitises bladder cancer by targeting homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Boling; Kerr, Martin; Groselj, Blaz; Teo, Mark TW; Knowles, Margaret A; Bristow, Robert G; Phillips, Roger M; Kiltie, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality used to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer, with patient outcomes similar to surgery. However, radioresistance is a significant factor in treatment failure. Cell-free extracts of muscle-invasive bladder tumours are defective in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), and this phenotype might be exploited clinically by combining radiotherapy with a radiosensitising drug that targets homologous recombination (HR), thereby sparing normal tissues with intact NHEJ. The response of the HR protein RAD51 to radiation is inhibited by the small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. Stable RT112 bladder cancer Ku knockdown (Ku80KD) cells were generated using shRNA technology to mimic the invasive tumour phenotype, and also RAD51 knockdown (RAD51KD) cells to demonstrate imatinib’s pathway selectivity. Ku80KD, RAD51KD, non-silencing vector control and parental RT112 cells were treated with radiation in combination with either imatinib or lapatinib, which inhibits NHEJ, and cell survival assessed by clonogenic assay. Drug doses were chosen at approximately IC40 and IC10 (non-toxic) levels. Imatinib radiosensitised Ku80KD cells to a greater extent than RAD51KD or RT112 cells. In contrast, lapatinib radiosensitised RAD51KD and RT112 cells, but not Ku80KD cells. Taken together, our findings suggest a new application for imatinib in concurrent use with radiotherapy to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:23302228

  9. Presynaptic Filament Dynamics in Homologous Recombination and DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ehmsen, Kirk T.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Morrical, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) is an essential genome stability mechanism used for high-fidelity repair of DNA double-strand breaks and for the recovery of stalled or collapsed DNA replication forks. The crucial homology search and DNA strand exchange steps of HR are catalyzed by presynaptic filaments—helical filaments of a recombinase enzyme bound to single-stranded DNA. Presynaptic filaments are fundamentally dynamic structures, the assembly, catalytic turnover, and disassembly of which must be closely coordinated with other elements of the DNA recombination, repair, and replication machinery in order for genome maintenance functions to be effective. Here, we review the major dynamic elements controlling the assembly, activity, and disassembly of presynaptic filaments: some intrinsic such as recombinase ATP binding and hydrolytic activities, others extrinsic such as ssDNA-binding proteins, mediator proteins, and DNA motor proteins. We examine dynamic behavior on multiple levels, including atomic- and filament-level structural changes associated with ATP binding and hydrolysis as evidenced in crystal structures, as well as subunit binding and dissociation events driven by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We examine the biochemical properties of recombination proteins from four model systems (T4 phage, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, and H. sapiens), demonstrating how their properties are tailored for the context-specific requirements in these diverse species. We propose that the presynaptic filament has evolved to rely on multiple external factors for increased multi-level regulation of HR processes in genomes with greater structural and sequence complexity. PMID:21599536

  10. Histone deacetylases 9 and 10 are required for homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kotian, Shweta; Liyanarachchi, Sandhya; Zelent, Arthur; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2011-03-11

    We tested the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the homologous recombination process. A tissue-culture based homology-directed repair assay was used in which repair of a double-stranded break by homologous recombination results in gene conversion of an inactive GFP allele to an active GFP gene. Our rationale was that hyperacetylation caused by HDAC inhibitor treatment would increase chromatin accessibility to repair factors, thereby increasing homologous recombination. Contrary to expectation, treatment of cells with the inhibitors significantly reduced homologous recombination activity. Using RNA interference to deplete each HDAC, we found that depletion of either HDAC9 or HDAC10 specifically inhibited homologous recombination. By assaying for sensitivity of cells to the interstrand cross-linker mitomycin C, we found that treatment of cells with HDAC inhibitors or depletion of HDAC9 or HDAC10 resulted in increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Our data reveal an unanticipated function of HDAC9 and HDAC10 in the homologous recombination process.

  11. Archaeal and eukaryotic homologs of Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Cameron; Randolph, Peter S.; Patterson, Jennifer; Cozen, Aaron E.

    2013-01-01

    Hfq and other Sm proteins are central in RNA metabolism, forming an evolutionarily conserved family that plays key roles in RNA processing in organisms ranging from archaea to bacteria to human. Sm-based cellular pathways vary in scope from eukaryotic mRNA splicing to bacterial quorum sensing, with at least one step in each of these pathways being mediated by an RNA-associated molecular assembly built upon Sm proteins. Though the first structures of Sm assemblies were from archaeal systems, the functions of Sm-like archaeal proteins (SmAPs) remain murky. Our ignorance about SmAP biology, particularly vis-à-vis the eukaryotic and bacterial Sm homologs, can be partly reduced by leveraging the homology between these lineages to make phylogenetic inferences about Sm functions in archaea. Nevertheless, whether SmAPs are more eukaryotic (RNP scaffold) or bacterial (RNA chaperone) in character remains unclear. Thus, the archaeal domain of life is a missing link, and an opportunity, in Sm-based RNA biology. PMID:23579284

  12. SANSparallel: interactive homology search against Uniprot.

    PubMed

    Somervuo, Panu; Holm, Liisa

    2015-07-01

    Proteins evolve by mutations and natural selection. The network of sequence similarities is a rich source for mining homologous relationships that inform on protein structure and function. There are many servers available to browse the network of homology relationships but one has to wait up to a minute for results. The SANSparallel webserver provides protein sequence database searches with immediate response and professional alignment visualization by third-party software. The output is a list, pairwise alignment or stacked alignment of sequence-similar proteins from Uniprot, UniRef90/50, Swissprot or Protein Data Bank. The stacked alignments are viewed in Jalview or as sequence logos. The database search uses the suffix array neighborhood search (SANS) method, which has been re-implemented as a client-server, improved and parallelized. The method is extremely fast and as sensitive as BLAST above 50% sequence identity. Benchmarks show that the method is highly competitive compared to previously published fast database search programs: UBLAST, DIAMOND, LAST, LAMBDA, RAPSEARCH2 and BLAT. The web server can be accessed interactively or programmatically at http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/cgi-bin/sans/sans.cgi. It can be used to make protein functional annotation pipelines more efficient, and it is useful in interactive exploration of the detailed evidence supporting the annotation of particular proteins of interest.

  13. Towards Scalable Optimal Sequence Homology Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Jeffrey A.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman

    2012-12-26

    Abstract—The field of bioinformatics and computational biol- ogy is experiencing a data revolution — experimental techniques to procure data have increased in throughput, improved in accuracy and reduced in costs. This has spurred an array of high profile sequencing and data generation projects. While the data repositories represent untapped reservoirs of rich information critical for scientific breakthroughs, the analytical software tools that are needed to analyze large volumes of such sequence data have significantly lagged behind in their capacity to scale. In this paper, we address homology detection, which is a funda- mental problem in large-scale sequence analysis with numerous applications. We present a scalable framework to conduct large- scale optimal homology detection on massively parallel super- computing platforms. Our approach employs distributed memory work stealing to effectively parallelize optimal pairwise alignment computation tasks. Results on 120,000 cores of the Hopper Cray XE6 supercomputer demonstrate strong scaling and up to 2.42 × 107 optimal pairwise sequence alignments computed per second (PSAPS), the highest reported in the literature.

  14. Mammalian masticatory muscles: homology, nomenclature, and diversification.

    PubMed

    Druzinsky, Robert E; Doherty, Alison H; De Vree, Frits L

    2011-08-01

    There is a deep and rich literature of comparative studies of jaw muscles in mammals but no recent analyses employ modern phylogenetic techniques to better understand evolutionary changes that have occurred in these muscles. In order to fully develop and utilize the Feeding Experiments End-user Database (FEED), we are constructing a comprehensive ontology of mammalian jaw muscles. This process has led to a careful consideration of nomenclature and homologies of the muscles and their constituent parts. Precise determinations of muscle attachments have shown that muscles with similar names are not necessarily homologous. Using new anatomical descriptions derived from the literature, we defined character states for the jaw muscles in diverse mammalian species. We then mapped those characters onto a recent phylogeny of mammals with the aid of the Mesquite software package. Our data further elucidate how muscle groups associated with the feeding apparatus differ and have become highly specialized in certain mammalian orders, such as Rodentia, while remaining conserved in other orders. We believe that careful naming of muscles and statistical analyses of their distributions among mammals, in association with the FEED database, will lead to new, significant insights into the functional, structural, and evolutionary morphology of the jaw muscles.

  15. Homologous microwave flare on May 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Urpo, S.

    1982-01-01

    Observations are presented of two homologous solar bursts recorded on May 29, 1980 at 1028 UT and at 1147 UT from the Hale region 16864. The measurements were obtained at 8 mm wavelength (frequency 37 GHz) at the Metsahovi Radio Research Station, Finland, using a 14 meter radio telescope. Results show that the time series of the bursts were similar even in the small details, in which the rise time of both bursts was about 10 seconds and the peak flux density was 3.3 sfu at 1028 UT and 1.2 sfu at 1147 UT. It was found that both bursts were composed of several elementary spikes which were typically 3 seconds apart from each other. Both bursts were composed of several elementary spikes which were typically 3 seconds apart from each other, and the maximum of the gyro-synchrotron type spectrum was determined to be close to 15 GHz. The time profile of the burst, the elementary spikes, and the frequency spectrum shows that the origin of these homologous microwave bursts was in a magnetic structure with several loops and that the same complex loop structure was producing energy during both bursts.

  16. Distribution and Characterization of AKT Homologs in the Tangerine Pathotype of Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Masunaka, A; Tanaka, A; Tsuge, T; Peever, T L; Timmer, L W; Yamamoto, M; Yamamoto, H; Akimitsu, K

    2000-07-01

    ABSTRACT The tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata produces a host-selective toxin (HST), known as ACT-toxin, and causes Alternaria brown spot disease of citrus. The structure of ACT-toxin is closely related to AK- and AF-toxins, which are HSTs produced by the Japanese pear and strawberry pathotypes of A. alternata, respectively. AC-, AK-, and AF-toxins are chemically similar and share a 9,10-epoxy-8-hydroxy-9-methyl-decatrienoic acid moiety. Two genes controlling AK-toxin biosynthesis (AKT1 and AKT2) were recently cloned from the Japanese pear pathotype of A. alternata. Portions of these genes were used as heterologous probes in Southern blots, that detected homologs in 13 isolates of A. alternata tangerine pathotype from Minneola tangelo in Florida. Partial sequencing of the homologs in one of these isolates demonstrated high sequence similarity to AKT1 (89.8%) and to AKT2 (90.7%). AKT homologs were not detected in nine isolates of A. alternata from rough lemon, six isolates of nonpathogenic A. alternata, and one isolate of A. citri that causes citrus black rot. The presence of homologs in the Minneola isolates and not in the rough lemon isolates, nonpathogens or black rot isolates, correlates perfectly to pathogenicity on Iyo tangerine and ACT-toxin production. Functionality of the homologs was demonstrated by detection of transcripts using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in total RNA of the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata. The high sequence similarity of AKT and AKT homologs in the tangerine patho-type, combined with the structural similarity of AK-toxin and ACT-toxin, may indicate that these homologs are involved in the biosynthesis of the decatrienoic acid moiety of ACT-toxin.

  17. Hotspots of homologous recombination in the human genome: not all homologous sequences are equal.

    PubMed

    Lupski, James R

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination between alleles or non-allelic paralogous sequences does not occur uniformly but is concentrated in 'hotspots' with high recombination rates. Recent studies of these hotspots show that they do not share common sequence motifs, but they do have other features in common.

  18. Should nucleotide sequence analyzing computer algorithms always extend homologies by extending homologies?

    PubMed

    Burnett, L; Basten, A; Hensley, W J

    1986-01-10

    Most computer algorithms used for comparing or aligning nucleotide sequences rely on the premise that the best way to extend a homology between the two sequences is to select a match rather than a mismatch. We have tested this assumption and found that it is not always valid.

  19. Homologous Recombination—Experimental Systems, Analysis and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is the most complex of all recombination events that shape genomes and produce material for evolution. Homologous recombination events are exchanges between DNA molecules in the lengthy regions of shared identity, catalyzed by a group of dedicated enzymes. There is a variety of experimental systems in E. coli and Salmonella to detect homologous recombination events of several different kinds. Genetic analysis of homologous recombination reveals three separate phases of this process: pre-synapsis (the early phase), synapsis (homologous strand exchange) and post-synapsis (the late phase). In E. coli, there are at least two independent pathway of the early phase and at least two independent pathways of the late phase. All this complexity is incongruent with the originally ascribed role of homologous recombination as accelerator of genome evolution: there is simply not enough duplication and repetition in enterobacterial genomes for homologous recombination to have a detectable evolutionary role, and therefore not enough selection to maintain such a complexity. At the same time, the mechanisms of homologous recombination are uniquely suited for repair of complex DNA lesions called chromosomal lesions. In fact, the two major classes of chromosomal lesions are recognized and processed by the two individual pathways at the early phase of homologous recombination. It follows, therefore, that homologous recombination events are occasional reflections of the continual recombinational repair, made possible in cases of natural or artificial genome redundancy. PMID:26442506

  20. Increased homologous integration frequency in Yarrowia lipolytica strains defective in non-homologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Anne; Otto, Christina; Holz, Martina; Werner, Severine; Hübner, Linda; Barth, Gerold

    2013-05-01

    The ascomycetous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has been established as model system for studies of several research topics as well as for biotechnological processes in the last two decades. However, frequency of heterologous recombination is high in this yeast species, and so knockouts of genes are laborious to achieve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to check whether a reduction of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of double strand breaks (DSB) results in a strong increase of proportion of homologous recombinants. The Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer is known as an essential protein complex of the NHEJ. We show that deletion of YlKU70 and/or YlKU80 results in an increase of the rate of transformants with homologous recombination (HR) up to 85 % in each case. However, it never reaches near 100 % of HR in any case as described for some other yeast. Furthermore, we demonstrated that growth of Δylku strains was similar to that of the wild-type strain. In addition, no differences were detected between the Δylku strains and the parent strain in respect to sensitivity to the mutagenic agent EMS as well as to the antibiotics hygromycin, bleomycin and nourseothricin. However, Δylku70 and Δylku80 strain showed a slightly higher sensitivity against UV rays. Thus, the new constructed Δylku strains are attractive recipient strains for homologous integration of DNA fragments and a valuable tool for directed knockouts of genes. Nevertheless, our data suggest the existence of another system of non-homologous recombination what may be subject of further investigation.

  1. ACTION ON FIBROBLASTS OF EXTRACTS OF HOMOLOGOUS AND HETEROLOGOUS TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis; Ebeling, Albert H.

    1923-01-01

    Extracts of homologous adult tissues detemine an increase in the mass of pure cultures of chicken fibroblasts nourished thereon comparable to that resulting from embryonic tissue juice. But the effect of these extracts differs markedly from that of the latter, since cell multiplication does not continue indefinitely. After a few passages, the fibroblasts cultivated in adult tissue extracts grew more slowly than in Tyrode solution. The cytoplasm became dark and filled with fat granules, and death followed. It is possible that the tissues of adult animals contain, as does the serum, substances which are toxic for the homologous cells, and which progressively overcome the effect of the growth-activating substances. The effect of heterologous adult tissue extracts did not differ markedly from that of homologous tissues. The chicken connective tissue increased slightly in mass, but died sooner than the controls in Tyrode solution. By contrast, tissue juices derived from the embryos of mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits acted on chicken fibroblasts in the same manner as chick embryo juices. The increase in mass of the cultures was regular and rapid. They doubled in size every 48 or 72 hours, and the rate of growth did not decrease after 30 days. It appears that embryonic tissue juices are not necessarily toxic for heterologous fibroblasts, and that they can be used in the building up of protoplasm in the tissues of a different species. In experiments made long ago, the action of tissue juice was described as being specific. The premature death of the fibroblasts cultivated in heterologous juices at that time would now appear to have been due to spontaneous changes in the pH and the deterioration that even normal chick embryo juice at a pH of 7.8 undergoes spontaneously. In the recent experiments, when freshly prepared homologous and heterologous juices were used, their action on chicken fibroblasts in pure culture was identical. However, the fibroblasts produced in cultures

  2. [Contemporary concepts of homology in biology (a theoretical review)].

    PubMed

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of the contemporary theoretical concepts of homology being developed basically in systematics and phylogenetics as well as in developmental biology is presented. Ontologically, both homology and analogy represent a kind of correspondence considered from the standpoint of nominalism, realism, and conceptualism. According to their nominalistic treatment, both are described by a set-theory approximation which makes them classes (in the logical sense). The realistic treatment provides their holistic view according to which a homologue is an anatomical or evolutionary singular while analogue remains a class. The conceptualistic treatment means that there are real (objective) correspondences existing among real (objective) entities while fixation of any of them is based on certain theoretical presumptions adopted by a researcher; homology as a natural kind (including homeostatic property cluster) seems to be most consistent with such a treatment. Realistic view of homology makes it "absolute", while two others make discrimination of homology and analogy strictly relative. Two basic general homology concepts have been developed in recent literature--taxic and transformational ones; the first considers respective correspondences as structure relations, the second as process relations. The taxic homology is nearly the same as classical typological one (Owen), while transformational homology unites all its phylogenetic, ontogenetic (developmental) and transformation-typological definitions. Process-structuralistic approach seems to unite both taxic and transformational ones. The latter makes it possible to apply general homology concept not only to structures but to processes as well. It is stressed that homology is not identical to the similarity, the latter being just the means for revealing the former. Some closer consideration is given to phylogenetic, ontogenetic and genetic treatments of homology; significant uncertainty is shown to exist between them

  3. A mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1)/V-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1)/cathepsin H axis controls filaggrin expression and processing in skin, a novel mechanism for skin barrier disruption in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aishath S; Tommasi, Cristina; Cole, Christian; Brown, Stuart J; Zhu, Yanan; Way, Benjamin; Willis Owen, Saffron A G; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William O; Harper, John I; Di, Wei-Li; Brown, Sara J; Reinheckel, Thomas; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L

    2017-04-01

    Filaggrin, which is encoded by the filaggrin gene (FLG), is an important component of the skin's barrier to the external environment, and genetic defects in FLG strongly associate with atopic dermatitis (AD). However, not all patients with AD have FLG mutations. We hypothesized that these patients might possess other defects in filaggrin expression and processing contributing to barrier disruption and AD, and therefore we present novel therapeutic targets for this disease. We describe the relationship between the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1/2 protein subunit regulatory associated protein of the MTOR complex 1 (RAPTOR), the serine/threonine kinase V-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1), and the protease cathepsin H (CTSH), for which we establish a role in filaggrin expression and processing. Increased RAPTOR levels correlated with decreased filaggrin expression in patients with AD. In keratinocyte cell cultures RAPTOR upregulation or AKT1 short hairpin RNA knockdown reduced expression of the protease CTSH. Skin of CTSH-deficient mice and CTSH short hairpin RNA knockdown keratinocytes showed reduced filaggrin processing, and the mouse had both impaired skin barrier function and a mild proinflammatory phenotype. Our findings highlight a novel and potentially treatable signaling axis controlling filaggrin expression and processing that is defective in patients with AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Homologies among Coniferophyte cones: further observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauvogel-Stamm, Léa; Galtier, Jean

    1998-04-01

    A reinvestigation of the Triassic conifer pollen cone of Darneya shows evidence that clusters of pollen sacs are attached (adnate), at regular intervals, to the upper side of the stalk and that the distribution of stomata is restricted to the apical part of the abaxial side of the peltate scale. These features and others, such as the commissure visible on the stalk and the scale, suggest a dual nature of the male scale complex of Darneya which therefore is interpreted as an abaxial bract fused with an adaxial fertile shoot bearing several clusters of pollen sacs. This conifer pollen cone is thus considered as a compound strobilus (inflorescence) homologous with the female cone of the conifers and therefore with the cones, both male and female, of the cordaites.

  5. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  6. HOMOLOGOUS CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xinting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Through observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we tracked one rotating network magnetic field (RNF) near the solar equator. It lasted for more than 100 hr, from 2013 February 23 to 28. During its evolution, three cyclones were found to be rooted in this structure. Each cyclone event lasted for about 8 to 10 hr. While near the polar region, another RNF was investigated. It lasted for a shorter time (∼70 hr), from 2013 July 7 to 9. There were two cyclones rooted in the RNF and each lasted for 8 and 11 hr, respectively. For the two given examples, the cyclones have a similar dynamic evolution, and thus we put forward a new term: homologous cyclones. The detected brightening in AIA 171 Å maps indicates the release of energy, which is potentially available to heat the corona.

  7. How homologous recombination maintains telomere integrity.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, Eliana M C; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2015-06-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes against loss of genetic information and inappropriate processing as damaged DNA and are therefore crucial to the maintenance of chromosome integrity. In addition to providing a pathway for genome-wide DNA repair, homologous recombination (HR) plays a key role in telomere replication and capping. Consistent with this, the genomic instability characteristic of HR-deficient cells and tumours is driven in part by telomere dysfunction. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which HR modulates the response to intrinsic cellular challenges that arise during telomere replication, as well as its impact on the assembly of telomere protective structures. How normal and tumour cells differ in their ability to maintain telomeres is deeply relevant to the search for treatments that would selectively eliminate cells whose capacity for HR-mediated repair has been compromised.

  8. Identifying potential PARIS homologs in D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Merzetti, E M; Staveley, B E

    2016-11-03

    Mitochondrial destruction leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species, increases cellular stress, causes apoptotic cell death, and involves a cascade of proteins including PARKIN, PINK1, and Mitofusin2. Mitochondrial biogenesis pathways depend upon the activity of the protein PGC-1α. These two processes are coordinated by the activity of a transcriptional repressor, Parkin interacting substrate (PARIS). The PARIS protein is degraded through the activity of the PARKIN protein, which in turn eliminates the transcriptional repression that PARIS imposes upon a downstream target, PGC-1α. Genes in this pathway have been implicated in Parkinson's disease, and there is a strong relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and pre-mature neuron death. The identification of a PARIS homolog in Drosophila melanogaster would increase our understanding of the roles that PARIS and interacting genes play in higher organisms. We identified three potential PARIS homologs in D. melanogaster, one of which encodes a protein with similar domains to the Homo sapiens PARIS protein, CG15436. The Drosophila eye is formed from neuronal precursors, making it an ideal system to assay the effects of altered gene expression on neuronal tissue formation. The eye-specific expression of RNAi constructs for these genes revealed that both CG15269 and Crol caused neurodegenerative phenotypes, whereas CG15436 produced a phenotype similar to srl-EY. Crol-RNAi expression reduced mean lifespan when expressed in dopaminergic neurons, whereas CG15436-RNAi significantly increased lifespan. CG15436 was PARIS-like in both structure and function, and we characterized the effects of decreased gene expression in both the neuron-rich D. melanogaster eye and in dopaminergic neurons.

  9. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  10. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  11. The Chromosomal Courtship Dance-homolog pairing in early meiosis.

    PubMed

    Klutstein, Michael; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2014-02-01

    The intermingling of genomes that characterizes sexual reproduction requires haploid gametes in which parental homologs have recombined. For this, homologs must pair during meiosis. In a crowded nucleus where sequence homology is obscured by the enormous scale and packaging of the genome, partner alignment is no small task. Here we review the early stages of this process. Chromosomes first establish an initial docking site, usually at telomeres or centromeres. The acquisition of chromosome-specific patterns of binding factors facilitates homolog recognition. Chromosomes are then tethered to the nuclear envelope (NE) and subjected to nuclear movements that 'shake off' inappropriate contacts while consolidating homolog associations. Thereafter, homolog connections are stabilized by building the synaptonemal complex or its equivalent and creating genetic crossovers. Recent perspectives on the roles of these stages will be discussed.

  12. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. Results We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E). From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E), which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Conclusions Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and therefore provide additional

  13. The cytogenetics of homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis in plants.

    PubMed

    Bozza, C G; Pawlowski, W P

    2008-01-01

    Three activities hallmark meiotic cell division: homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and recombination. Recombination and synapsis are well-studied but homologous pairing still holds many black boxes. In the past several years, many studies in plants have yielded insights into the mechanisms of chromosome pairing interactions. Research in several plant species showed the importance of telomere clustering on the nuclear envelope (telomere bouquet formation) in facilitating alignment of homologous chromosomes. Homologous pairing was also shown to be tied to the early stages of recombination by mutant analyses in Arabidopsis and maize. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms that guide homolog interaction after their rough alignment by the bouquet and before the close-range recombination-dependent homology search. The relatively large and complex genomes of plants may require additional mechanisms, not needed in small genome eukaryotes, to distinguish between local homology of duplicated genes or transposable elements and global chromosomal homology. Plants provide an excellent large genome model for the study of homologous pairing and dissection of this process. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Gene prediction by pattern recognition and homology search

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for combining pattern recognition-based exon prediction and database homology search in gene model construction. The goal is to use homologous genes or partial genes existing in the database as reference models while constructing (multiple) gene models from exon candidates predicted by pattern recognition methods. A unified framework for gene modeling is used for genes ranging from situations with strong homology to no homology in the database. To maximally use the homology information available, the algorithm applies homology on three levels: (1) exon candidate evaluation, (2) gene-segment construction with a reference model, and (3) (complete) gene modeling. Preliminary testing has been done on the algorithm. Test results show that (a) perfect gene modeling can be expected when the initial exon predictions are reasonably good and a strong homology exists in the database; (b) homology (not necessarily strong) in general helps improve the accuracy of gene modeling; (c) multiple gene modeling becomes feasible when homology exists in the database for the involved genes.

  15. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  16. DNA-Pairing and Annealing Processes in Homologous Recombination and Homology-Directed Repair

    PubMed Central

    Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of heteroduplex DNA is a central step in the exchange of DNA sequences via homologous recombination, and in the accurate repair of broken chromosomes via homology-directed repair pathways. In cells, heteroduplex DNA largely arises through the activities of recombination proteins that promote DNA-pairing and annealing reactions. Classes of proteins involved in pairing and annealing include RecA-family DNA-pairing proteins, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins, recombination mediator proteins, annealing proteins, and nucleases. This review explores the properties of these pairing and annealing proteins, and highlights their roles in complex recombination processes including the double Holliday junction (DhJ) formation, synthesis-dependent strand annealing, and single-strand annealing pathways—DNA transactions that are critical both for genome stability in individual organisms and for the evolution of species. PMID:25646379

  17. Homology-aware Phylogenomics at Gigabase Scales.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, M J; Nicolae, Marius; McMahon, M M

    2017-01-25

    Obstacles to inferring species trees from whole genome data sets range from algorithmic and data management challenges to the wholesale discordance in evolutionary history found in different parts of a genome. Recent work that builds trees directly from genomes by parsing them into sets of small k-mer strings holds promise to streamline and simplify these efforts, but existing approaches do not account well for gene tree discordance. We describe a "seed and extend" protocol that finds nearly exact matching sets of orthologous k-mers and extends them to construct data sets that can properly account for genomic heterogeneity. Exploiting an efficient suffix array data structure, sets of whole genomes can be parsed and converted into phylogenetic data matrices rapidly, with contiguous blocks of k-mers from the same chromosome, gene, or scaffold concatenated as needed. Phylogenetic trees constructed from highly curated rice genome data and a diverse set of six other eukaryotic whole genome, transcriptome and organellar genome data sets recovered trees nearly identical to published phylogenomic analyses, in a small fraction of the time, and requiring many fewer parameter choices. Our method's ability to retain local homology information was demonstrated by using it to characterize gene tree discordance across the rice genome, and by its robustness to the high rate of inter-chromosomal gene transfer found in several rice species.

  18. Surprises from an unusual CLC homolog.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Sabrina; Brammer, Ashley E; Rodriguez, Luis; Lim, Hyun-Ho; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Matulef, Kimberly

    2012-11-07

    The chloride channel (CLC) family is distinctive in that some members are Cl(-) ion channels and others are Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters. The molecular mechanism that couples H(+) and Cl(-) transport in the antiporters remains unknown. Our characterization of a novel bacterial homolog from Citrobacter koseri, CLC-ck2, has yielded surprising discoveries about the requirements for both Cl(-) and H(+) transport in CLC proteins. First, even though CLC-ck2 lacks conserved amino acids near the Cl(-)-binding sites that are part of the CLC selectivity signature sequence, this protein catalyzes Cl(-) transport, albeit slowly. Ion selectivity in CLC-ck2 is similar to that in CLC-ec1, except that SO(4)(2-) strongly competes with Cl(-) uptake through CLC-ck2 but has no effect on CLC-ec1. Second, and even more surprisingly, CLC-ck2 is a Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter, even though it contains an isoleucine at the Glu(in) position that was previously thought to be a critical part of the H(+) pathway. CLC-ck2 is the first known antiporter that contains a nonpolar residue at this position. Introduction of a glutamate at the Glu(in) site in CLC-ck2 does not increase H(+) flux. Like other CLC antiporters, mutation of the external glutamate gate (Glu(ex)) in CLC-ck2 prevents H(+) flux. Hence, Glu(ex), but not Glu(in), is critical for H(+) permeation in CLC proteins.

  19. Homologous recombination in plants is organ specific.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alexander; Filkowski, Jody; Hudson, Darryl; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2006-03-20

    In this paper we analysed the genome stability of various Arabidopsis thaliana plant organs using a transgenic recombination system. The system was based on two copies of non-functional GUS (lines #651 and #11) or LUC (line #15D8) reporter genes serving as a recombination substrate. Both reporter assays showed that recombination in flowers or stems were rare events. Most of the recombination sectors were found in leaves and roots, with leaves having over 2-fold greater number of the recombination events per single cell genome as compared to roots. The recombination events per single genome were 9.7-fold more frequent on the lateral half of the leaves than on the medial halves. This correlated with a 2.5-fold higher metabolic activity in the energy source (lateral) versus energy sink (medial) of leaves. Higher metabolic activity was paralleled by a higher anthocyanin production in lateral halves. The level of double strand break (DSB) occurrence was also different among plant organs; the highest level was observed in roots and the lowest in leaves. High level of DSBs strongly positively correlated with the activity of the key repair enzymes, AtKU70 and AtRAD51. The ratio of AtRAD51 to AtKU70 expression was the highest in leaves, supporting the more active involvement of homologous recombination pathway in the repair of DSBs in this organ. Western blot analysis confirmed the real time PCR expression data for AtKU70 gene.

  20. The Causes of Quasi-homologous CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Zhenjun; Temmer, M.; Thalmann, J. K.; Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Zhang, Quanhao; Veronig, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we identified the magnetic source locations of 142 quasi-homologous (QH) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), of which 121 are from solar cycle (SC) 23 and 21 from SC 24. Among those CMEs, 63% originated from the same source location as their predecessor (defined as S-type), while 37% originated from a different location within the same active region as their predecessor (defined as D-type). Their distinctly different waiting time distributions, peaking around 7.5 and 1.5 hr for S- and D-type CMEs, suggest that they might involve different physical mechanisms with different characteristic timescales. Through detailed analysis based on nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field modeling of two exemplary cases, we propose that the S-type QH CMES might involve a recurring energy release process from the same source location (by magnetic free energy replenishment), whereas the D-type QH CMEs can happen when a flux tube system is disturbed by a nearby CME.

  1. Precise genome editing by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hoshijima, K.; Jurynec, M.J.; Grunwald, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods are presented for creating precise modifications of the zebrafish genome. Edited alleles are generated by homologous recombination between the host genome and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) donor molecules, stimulated by the induction of double-strand breaks at targeted loci in the host genome. Because several kilobase-long tracts of sequence can be exchanged, multiple genome modifications can be generated simultaneously at a single locus. Methods are described for creating: (1) alleles with simple sequence changes or in-frame additions, (2) knockin/knockout alleles that express a reporter protein from an endogenous locus, and (3) conditional alleles in which exons are flanked by recombinogenic loxP sites. Significantly, our approach to genome editing allows the incorporation of a linked reporter gene into the donor sequences so that successfully edited alleles can be identified by virtue of expression of the reporter. Factors affecting the efficiency of genome editing are discussed, including the finding that dsDNA products of I-SceI meganuclease enzyme digestion are particularly effective as donor molecules for gene-editing events. Reagents and procedures are described for accomplishing efficient genome editing in the zebrafish. PMID:27443923

  2. A Cytohesin Homolog in Dictyostelium Amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Shina, Maria Christina; Müller, Rolf; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Glöckner, Gernot; Schleicher, Michael; Eichinger, Ludwig; Noegel, Angelika A.; Kolanus, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    Background Dictyostelium, an amoeboid motile cell, harbors several paralogous Sec7 genes that encode members of three distinct subfamilies of the Sec7 superfamily of Guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Among them are proteins of the GBF/BIG family present in all eukaryotes. The third subfamily represented with three members in D. discoideum is the cytohesin family that has been thought to be metazoan specific. Cytohesins are characterized by a Sec7 PH tandem domain and have roles in cell adhesion and migration. Principal Findings Dictyostelium SecG exhibits highest homologies to the cytohesins. It harbors at its amino terminus several ankyrin repeats that are followed by the Sec7 PH tandem domain. Mutants lacking SecG show reduced cell-substratum adhesion whereas cell-cell adhesion that is important for development is not affected. Accordingly, multicellular development proceeds normally in the mutant. During chemotaxis secG− cells elongate and migrate in a directed fashion towards cAMP, however speed is moderately reduced. Significance The data indicate that SecG is a relevant factor for cell-substrate adhesion and reveal the basic function of a cytohesin in a lower eukaryote. PMID:20186335

  3. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits [Rozenlaan, NL; Gualfetti, Peter [San Francisco, CA; Mitchinson, Colin [Half Moon Bay, CA; Neefe, Paulien [Zoetermeer, NL

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  4. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  5. Molecular Phylogenetics and the Perennial Problem of Homology.

    PubMed

    Inkpen, S Andrew; Doolittle, W Ford

    2016-12-01

    The concept of homology has a long history, during much of which the issue has been how to reconcile similarity and common descent when these are not coextensive. Although thinking molecular phylogeneticists have learned not to say "percent homology," the problems are deeper than that and unresolved.

  6. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2008-11-18

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  7. Assessing model accuracy using the homology modeling automatically software.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Aneerban; Wunderlich, Zeba; Monleon, Daniel; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2008-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful technique that greatly increases the value of experimental structure determination by using the structural information of one protein to predict the structures of homologous proteins. We have previously described a method of homology modeling by satisfaction of spatial restraints (Li et al., Protein Sci 1997;6:956-970). The Homology Modeling Automatically (HOMA) web site, , is a new tool, using this method to predict 3D structure of a target protein based on the sequence alignment of the target protein to a template protein and the structure coordinates of the template. The user is presented with the resulting models, together with an extensive structure validation report providing critical assessments of the quality of the resulting homology models. The homology modeling method employed by HOMA was assessed and validated using twenty-four groups of homologous proteins. Using HOMA, homology models were generated for 510 proteins, including 264 proteins modeled with correct folds and 246 modeled with incorrect folds. Accuracies of these models were assessed by superimposition on the corresponding experimentally determined structures. A subset of these results was compared with parallel studies of modeling accuracy using several other automated homology modeling approaches. Overall, HOMA provides prediction accuracies similar to other state-of-the-art homology modeling methods. We also provide an evaluation of several structure quality validation tools in assessing the accuracy of homology models generated with HOMA. This study demonstrates that Verify3D (Luthy et al., Nature 1992;356:83-85) and ProsaII (Sippl, Proteins 1993;17:355-362) are most sensitive in distinguishing between homology models with correct or incorrect folds. For homology models that have the correct fold, the steric conformational energy (including primarily the Van der Waals energy), MolProbity clashscore (Word et al., Protein

  8. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  9. DNA Strand Exchange and RecA Homologs in Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. Scott; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    Homology search and DNA strand–exchange reactions are central to homologous recombination in meiosis. During meiosis, these processes are regulated such that the probability of choosing a homolog chromatid as recombination partner is enhanced relative to that of choosing a sister chromatid. This regulatory process occurs as homologous chromosomes pair in preparation for assembly of the synaptonemal complex. Two strand–exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, cooperate in regulated homology search and strand exchange in most organisms. Here, we summarize studies on the properties of these two proteins and their accessory factors. In addition, we review current models for the assembly of meiotic strand–exchange complexes and the possible mechanisms through which the interhomolog bias of recombination partner choice is achieved. PMID:25475089

  10. DNA strand exchange and RecA homologs in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Scott; Bishop, Douglas K

    2014-12-04

    Homology search and DNA strand-exchange reactions are central to homologous recombination in meiosis. During meiosis, these processes are regulated such that the probability of choosing a homolog chromatid as recombination partner is enhanced relative to that of choosing a sister chromatid. This regulatory process occurs as homologous chromosomes pair in preparation for assembly of the synaptonemal complex. Two strand-exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, cooperate in regulated homology search and strand exchange in most organisms. Here, we summarize studies on the properties of these two proteins and their accessory factors. In addition, we review current models for the assembly of meiotic strand-exchange complexes and the possible mechanisms through which the interhomolog bias of recombination partner choice is achieved.

  11. Eukaryotic GPN-loop GTPases paralogs use a dimeric assembly reminiscent of archeal GPN.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Béatrice; Beraud, Carole; Meguellati, Sarra; Chen, Shu W; Pellequer, Jean Luc; Armengaud, Jean; Godon, Christian

    2013-02-01

    GTPases are molecular switches that regulate a wide-range of cellular processes. The GPN-loop GTPase (GPN) is a sub-family of P-loop NTPase that evolved from a single gene copy in archaea to triplicate paralog genes in eukaryotes, each having a non-redundant essential function in cell. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yGPN1 and yGPN2 are involved in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism, whereas nothing is known regarding yGPN3 function. Previous high-throughput experiments suggested that GPN paralogs interaction may occur. In this work, GPN|GPN contact was analyzed in details using TAP-Tag approach, yeast two-hybrid assay, in silico energy computation and site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved Glu residue located at the center of the interaction interface. It is demonstrated that this residue is essential for cell viability. A chromatid cohesion assay revealed that, like yGPN1 and yGPN2, yGPN3 also plays a role in sister chromatid cohesion. These results suggest that all three GPN proteins act at the molecular level in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism as a GPN|GPN complex reminiscent of the homodimeric structure of PAB0955, an archaeal member of GPN-loop GTPase.

  12. Enhancing recombinant protein solubility with ubiquitin-like small archeal modifying protein fusion partners.

    PubMed

    Varga, Sándor; Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Baka, Erzsébet; Boicu, Marius; Kriszt, Balázs; Székács, András; Zinzula, Luca; Kukolya, József; Nagy, István

    2015-11-01

    A variety of protein expression tags with different biochemical properties has been used to enhance the yield and solubility of recombinant proteins. Ubiquitin, SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) and prokaryotic ubiquitin like MoaD (molybdopterin synthase, small subunit) fusion tags are getting more popular because of their small size. In this paper we report on the use of ubiquitin-like small archaeal modifier proteins (SAMPs) as fusion tags since they proved to increase expression yield, stability and solubility in our experiments. Equally important, they did not co-purify with proteins of the expression host and there was information that their specific JAB1/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme (JAMM) protease can recognize the C-terminal VSGG sequence when SAMPs fused, either branched or linearly to target proteins, and cleave it specifically. SAMPs and JAMM proteases from Haloferax volcanii, Thermoplasma acidophilum, Methanococcoides burtonii and Nitrosopumilus maritimus were selected, cloned, expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and tested as fusion tags and cleaving proteases, respectively. Investigated SAMPs enhanced protein expression and solubility on a wide scale. T. acidophilum SAMPs Ta0895 and Ta01019 were the best performing tags and their effect was comparable to the widely used maltose binding protein (MBP) and N utilization substance protein A (NusA) tags. Moreover, H. volcanii SAMP Hvo_2619 contribution was mediocre, whereas M. burtonii Mbur_1415 could not be expressed. Out of four investigated JAMM proteases, only Hvo_2505 could cleave fusion tags. Interestingly, it was found active not only on its own partner substrate Hvo_2619, but it also cleaved off Ta0895. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Troels K H; Galli, Andrea; Li, Yi-Ping; Mikkelsen, Lotte S; Gottwein, Judith M; Bukh, Jens

    2013-03-01

    Genetic recombination is an important mechanism for increasing diversity of RNA viruses, and constitutes a viral escape mechanism to host immune responses and to treatment with antiviral compounds. Although rare, epidemiologically important hepatitis C virus (HCV) recombinants have been reported. In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13-36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6 sequence from the 5' end to the NS2-NS3 region followed by JFH1 sequence from Core to the 3' end. These recombinants carried duplicated sequence of up to 2400 nucleotides. HCV replication was not required for recombination, as recombinants were observed in most experiments even when two replication incompetent genomes were co-transfected. Reverse genetic studies verified the viability of representative recombinants. After serial passage, subsequent recombination events reducing or eliminating the duplicated region were observed for some but not all recombinants. Furthermore, we found that inter-genotypic recombination could occur, but at a lower frequency than intra-genotypic recombination. Productive recombination of attenuated HCV genomes depended on expression of all HCV proteins and tolerated duplicated sequence. In general, no strong site specificity was observed. Non-homologous recombination was observed in most cases, while few homologous events were identified. A better understanding of HCV recombination could help identification of natural recombinants and

  14. Productive Homologous and Non-homologous Recombination of Hepatitis C Virus in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Ping; Mikkelsen, Lotte S.; Gottwein, Judith M.; Bukh, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Genetic recombination is an important mechanism for increasing diversity of RNA viruses, and constitutes a viral escape mechanism to host immune responses and to treatment with antiviral compounds. Although rare, epidemiologically important hepatitis C virus (HCV) recombinants have been reported. In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13–36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6 sequence from the 5′ end to the NS2–NS3 region followed by JFH1 sequence from Core to the 3′ end. These recombinants carried duplicated sequence of up to 2400 nucleotides. HCV replication was not required for recombination, as recombinants were observed in most experiments even when two replication incompetent genomes were co-transfected. Reverse genetic studies verified the viability of representative recombinants. After serial passage, subsequent recombination events reducing or eliminating the duplicated region were observed for some but not all recombinants. Furthermore, we found that inter-genotypic recombination could occur, but at a lower frequency than intra-genotypic recombination. Productive recombination of attenuated HCV genomes depended on expression of all HCV proteins and tolerated duplicated sequence. In general, no strong site specificity was observed. Non-homologous recombination was observed in most cases, while few homologous events were identified. A better understanding of HCV recombination could help identification of natural recombinants

  15. Peridinialean dinoflagellate plate patterns, labels and homologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tabulation patterns for peridinialean dinoflagellate thecae and cysts have been traditionally expressed using a plate labelling system described by C.A. Kofoid in the early 1900's. This system can obscure dinoflagellate plate homologies and has not always been strictly applied. The plate-labelling system presented here introduces new series labels but incorporates key features and ideas from the more recently proposed systems of G.L. Eaton and F.J.R. Taylor, as modified by W.R. Evitt. Plate-series recognition begins with the cingulum (C-series) and proceeds from the cingulum toward the apex for the three series of the epitheca/epicyst and proceeds from the cingulum toward the antapex for the two series of the hypotheca/hypocyst. The epithecal/epicystal model consists of eight plates that touch the anterior margin of the cingulum (E-series: plates E1-E7, ES), seven plates toward the apex that touch the E-series plates (M-series: R, M1-M6), and up to seven plates near the apex that do not touch E-series plates (D-series: Dp-Dv). The hypothecal/hypocystal model consists of eight plates that touch the posterior margin of the cingulum (H-series: H1-H6,HR,HS) and three plates toward the antapex (T1-T3). Epithecal/epicystal tabulation patterns come in both 8- and 7- models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the E-series. Hypothecal/hypocystal tabulation patterns also come in both 8- and 7-models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the H-series. By convention, the 7-model epitheca/epicyst has no plates E1 and M1; the 7-model hypotheca/hypocyst has no plate H6. Within an 8-model or 7-model, the system emphasizes plates that are presumed to be homologous by giving them identical labels. I introduce the adjectives "monothigmate", "dithigmate," and "trithigmate" to designate plates touching one, two, and three plates, respectively, of the adjacent series. The term "thigmation" applies to the analysis of plate contacts between

  16. Olfactory Psychometric Functions for Homologous 2-Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Cometto-Muñiz, J. Enrique; Abraham, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    We measured concentration-detection (i.e., psychometric) odor functions for the homologous ketones propanone (acetone), 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-nonanone. Under a forced-choice procedure, stimuli were presented via an 8-channel air-dilution olfactometer that allowed natural sampling of the odorant and whose output was quantified by gas chromatography. Subjects (17 to 22 per compound) comprised young adults from both genders, all normosmics and nonsmokers. A sigmoid (logistic) equation tightly fitted group and individual functions. The odor detection threshold (ODT) was the concentration detectable at halfway (P=0.5) between chance (P=0.0) and perfect (P=1.0) detection. Odor sensitivity increased (i.e., thresholds decreased) from acetone to heptanone, remaining constant for nonanone. This relative trend was also observed in previous work and in odor thresholds compilations, but the absolute ODTs obtained here were consistently at the lower end of those reported before. Interindividual variability of ODTs was about one order of magnitude. These odor functions measured behaviorally in humans were obtained at vapor concentrations 1,000 times lower than functions measured via activation, with similar 2-ketones, of receptor neurons converging into individual olfactory glomeruli of mice, visualized with calcium sensitive dyes. Odorant concentrations presented as vapors (as in behavioral studies) and those presented as liquids (as in cellular/tissue studies) can be rendered equivalent via liquid-vapor partition coefficients and, then, compared in relative olfactory potency. These comparisons can reveal how sensitivity is progressively shaped across levels of the neural pathway. PMID:19428635

  17. Olfactory psychometric functions for homologous 2-ketones.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique; Abraham, Michael H

    2009-07-19

    We measured concentration-detection (i.e., psychometric) odor functions for the homologous ketones propanone (acetone), 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-nonanone. Under a forced-choice procedure, stimuli were presented via an 8-channel air-dilution olfactometer that allowed natural sampling of the odorant and whose output was quantified by gas chromatography. Subjects (17-22 per compound) comprised young adults from both genders, all normosmics and nonsmokers. A sigmoid (logistic) equation tightly fitted group and individual functions. The odor detection threshold (ODT) was the concentration detectable at halfway (P=0.5) between chance (P=0.0) and perfect (P=1.0) detection. Odor sensitivity increased (i.e., thresholds decreased) from acetone to heptanone, remaining constant for nonanone. This relative trend was also observed in previous work and in odor thresholds compilations, but the absolute ODTs obtained here were consistently at the lower end of those reported before. Interindividual variability of ODTs was about 1 order of magnitude. These odor functions measured behaviorally in humans were obtained at vapor concentrations 1000 times lower than functions measured via activation, with similar 2-ketones, of receptor neurons converging into individual olfactory glomeruli of mice, visualized with calcium sensitive dyes. Odorant concentrations presented as vapors (as in behavioral studies) and those presented as liquids (as in cellular/tissue studies) can be rendered equivalent via liquid-vapor partition coefficients and, then, compared in relative olfactory potency. These comparisons can reveal how sensitivity is progressively shaped across levels of the neural pathway.

  18. Vertebrate head development: segmentation, novelties, and homology.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Lennart; Ericsson, Rolf; Cerny, Robert

    2005-11-01

    Vertebrate head development is a classical topic lately invigorated by methodological as well as conceptual advances. In contrast to the classical segmentalist views going back to idealistic morphology, the head is now seen not as simply an extension of the trunk, but as a structure patterned by different mechanisms and tissues. Whereas the trunk paraxial mesoderm imposes its segmental pattern on adjacent tissues such as the neural crest derivatives, in the head the neural crest cells carry pattern information needed for proper morphogenesis of mesodermal derivatives, such as the cranial muscles. Neural crest cells make connective tissue components which attach the muscle fiber to the skeletal elements. These crest cells take their origin from the same visceral arch as the muscle cells, even when the skeletal elements to which the muscle attaches are from another arch. The neural crest itself receives important patterning influences from the pharyngeal endoderm. The origin of jaws can be seen as an exaptation in which a heterotopic shift of the expression domains of regulatory genes was a necessary step that enabled this key innovation. The jaws are patterned by Dlx genes expressed in a nested pattern along the proximo-distal axis, analogous to the anterior-posterior specification governed by Hox genes. Knocking out Dlx 5 and 6 transforms the lower jaw homeotically into an upper jaw. New data indicate that both upper and lower jaw cartilages are derived from one, common anlage traditionally labelled the "mandibular" condensation, and that the "maxillary" condensation gives rise to other structures such as the trabecula. We propose that the main contribution from evolutionary developmental biology to solving homology questions lies in deepening our biological understanding of characters and character states.

  19. A mechanism for the suppression of homologous recombination in G1 cells.

    PubMed

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Noordermeer, Sylvie M; Wilson, Marcus D; Landry, Sébastien; Enchev, Radoslav I; Sherker, Alana; Munro, Meagan; Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham; Xia, Bing; Peter, Matthias; Durocher, Daniel

    2015-12-17

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is highly suppressed in G1 cells to ensure that mitotic recombination occurs solely between sister chromatids. Although many homologous recombination factors are cell-cycle regulated, the identity of the events that are both necessary and sufficient to suppress recombination in G1 cells is unknown. Here we report that the cell cycle controls the interaction of BRCA1 with PALB2-BRCA2 to constrain BRCA2 function to the S/G2 phases in human cells. We found that the BRCA1-interaction site on PALB2 is targeted by an E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of KEAP1, a PALB2-interacting protein, in complex with cullin-3 (CUL3)-RBX1 (ref. 6). PALB2 ubiquitylation suppresses its interaction with BRCA1 and is counteracted by the deubiquitylase USP11, which is itself under cell cycle control. Restoration of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction combined with the activation of DNA-end resection is sufficient to induce homologous recombination in G1, as measured by RAD51 recruitment, unscheduled DNA synthesis and a CRISPR-Cas9-based gene-targeting assay. We conclude that the mechanism prohibiting homologous recombination in G1 minimally consists of the suppression of DNA-end resection coupled with a multi-step block of the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA damage sites that involves the inhibition of BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex assembly. We speculate that the ability to induce homologous recombination in G1 cells with defined factors could spur the development of gene-targeting applications in non-dividing cells.

  20. Possible cause of lack of positive samples on homologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Krotov, Grigory; Nikitina, Maria; Rodchenkov, Grigory

    2014-01-01

    Homologous blood transfusion is a prohibited method of blood manipulation that can be used to increase the number of erythrocytes circulating in the blood stream resulting in an increased oxygen transport capacity. In doping controls, homologous blood transfusions are determined by means of a procedure based on the detection of red blood cell phenotypes by flow cytometry. In the past six years, no adverse analytical findings concerning homologous blood transfusions were reported. One explanation for that phenomenon, assuming that athletes have not completely given up this kind of manipulation, would be a more careful selection of potential donors. If such a donor has the same set of minor erythrocyte antigens as the recipient, the established methodology to detect homologous transfusion would fail. We have hypothesized that any athlete can be a potential donor for teammates with the same RhD factor and AB0 blood group. Having analyzed the phenotype of erythrocytes of 535 Russian athletes in various endurance sports, several pairs of athletes with the same phenotype were observed. Based on the frequency of occurrence of red blood cell antigens, the theoretical probability of finding a donor within a team with exactly the same phenotype was calculated, and the existing number of occurrences where two individuals share the same phenotype in the same sport was in fact five times higher than the theoretical probability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status

    SciTech Connect

    Sprong, Debbie; Janssen, Hilde L.; Vens, Conchita; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. Methods and Materials: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (<0.1% oxygen) conditions, and the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculated. In addition, Fanconi anemia fibroblasts (complementation groups C and G) were compared with fibroblasts from nonsyndrome patients. RAD51 foci were studied using immunofluorescence. Results: All hamster cell lines deficient in homologous recombination showed a decrease in OER (1.5-2.0 vs. 2.6-3.0 for wild-types). In contrast, the OER for the DNA-PKcs-deficient line was comparable to wild-type controls. The two Fanconi anemia cell strains also showed a significant reduction in OER. The OER for RAD51 foci formation at late times after irradiation was considerably lower than that for survival in wild-type cells. Conclusion: Homologous recombination plays an important role in determining hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. Lower OERs have also been reported in cells deficient in XPF and ERCC1, which, similar to homologous recombination genes, are known to play a role in cross-link repair. Because Fanconi anemia cells are also sensitive to cross-linking agents, this strengthens the notion that the capacity to repair cross-links determines hypoxic radiosensitivity.

  2. Deep homology in the age of next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tschopp, Patrick; Tabin, Clifford J

    2017-02-05

    The principle of homology is central to conceptualizing the comparative aspects of morphological evolution. The distinctions between homologous or non-homologous structures have become blurred, however, as modern evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) has shown that novel features often result from modification of pre-existing developmental modules, rather than arising completely de novo. With this realization in mind, the term 'deep homology' was coined, in recognition of the remarkably conserved gene expression during the development of certain animal structures that would not be considered homologous by previous strict definitions. At its core, it can help to formulate an understanding of deeper layers of ontogenetic conservation for anatomical features that lack any clear phylogenetic continuity. Here, we review deep homology and related concepts in the context of a gene expression-based homology discussion. We then focus on how these conceptual frameworks have profited from the recent rise of high-throughput next-generation sequencing. These techniques have greatly expanded the range of organisms amenable to such studies. Moreover, they helped to elevate the traditional gene-by-gene comparison to a transcriptome-wide level. We will end with an outlook on the next challenges in the field and how technological advances might provide exciting new strategies to tackle these questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Homologous recombination in bovine pestiviruses. Phylogenetic and statistic evidence.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leandro Roberto; Weber, E Laura

    2004-12-01

    Bovine pestiviruses (Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1 (BVDV 1) and Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 2 (BVDV 2)) belong to the genus Pestivirus (Flaviviridae), which is composed of positive stranded RNA viruses causing significant economic losses world-wide. We used phylogenetic and bootstrap analyses to systematically scan alignments of previously sequenced genomes in order to explore further the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for variation in the virus. Previously published data suggested that homologous crossover might be one of the mechanisms responsible for the genomic rearrangements observed in cytopathic (cp) strains of bovine pestiviruses. Nevertheless, homologous recombination involves not just homologous crossovers, but also replacement of a homologous region of the acceptor RNA. Furthermore, cytopathic strains represent dead paths in evolution, since they are isolated exclusively from the fatal cases of mucosal disease. Herein, we report evidence of homologous inter-genotype recombination in the genome of a non-cytopathic (ncp) strain of Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1, the type species of the genus Pestivirus. We also show that intra-genotype homologous recombination might be a common phenomenon in both species of Pestivirus. This evidence demonstrates that homologous recombination contribute to the diversification of bovine pestiviruses in nature. Implications for virus evolution, taxonomy and phylogenetics are discussed.

  4. Benchmarking the next generation of homology inference tools

    PubMed Central

    Saripella, Ganapathi Varma; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Forslund, Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Over the last decades, vast numbers of sequences were deposited in public databases. Bioinformatics tools allow homology and consequently functional inference for these sequences. New profile-based homology search tools have been introduced, allowing reliable detection of remote homologs, but have not been systematically benchmarked. To provide such a comparison, which can guide bioinformatics workflows, we extend and apply our previously developed benchmark approach to evaluate the ‘next generation’ of profile-based approaches, including CS-BLAST, HHSEARCH and PHMMER, in comparison with the non-profile based search tools NCBI-BLAST, USEARCH, UBLAST and FASTA. Method: We generated challenging benchmark datasets based on protein domain architectures within either the PFAM + Clan, SCOP/Superfamily or CATH/Gene3D domain definition schemes. From each dataset, homologous and non-homologous protein pairs were aligned using each tool, and standard performance metrics calculated. We further measured congruence of domain architecture assignments in the three domain databases. Results: CSBLAST and PHMMER had overall highest accuracy. FASTA, UBLAST and USEARCH showed large trade-offs of accuracy for speed optimization. Conclusion: Profile methods are superior at inferring remote homologs but the difference in accuracy between methods is relatively small. PHMMER and CSBLAST stand out with the highest accuracy, yet still at a reasonable computational cost. Additionally, we show that less than 0.1% of Swiss-Prot protein pairs considered homologous by one database are considered non-homologous by another, implying that these classifications represent equivalent underlying biological phenomena, differing mostly in coverage and granularity. Availability and Implementation: Benchmark datasets and all scripts are placed at (http://sonnhammer.org/download/Homology_benchmark). Contact: forslund@embl.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  5. Benchmarking the next generation of homology inference tools.

    PubMed

    Saripella, Ganapathi Varma; Sonnhammer, Erik L L; Forslund, Kristoffer

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decades, vast numbers of sequences were deposited in public databases. Bioinformatics tools allow homology and consequently functional inference for these sequences. New profile-based homology search tools have been introduced, allowing reliable detection of remote homologs, but have not been systematically benchmarked. To provide such a comparison, which can guide bioinformatics workflows, we extend and apply our previously developed benchmark approach to evaluate the 'next generation' of profile-based approaches, including CS-BLAST, HHSEARCH and PHMMER, in comparison with the non-profile based search tools NCBI-BLAST, USEARCH, UBLAST and FASTA. We generated challenging benchmark datasets based on protein domain architectures within either the PFAM + Clan, SCOP/Superfamily or CATH/Gene3D domain definition schemes. From each dataset, homologous and non-homologous protein pairs were aligned using each tool, and standard performance metrics calculated. We further measured congruence of domain architecture assignments in the three domain databases. CSBLAST and PHMMER had overall highest accuracy. FASTA, UBLAST and USEARCH showed large trade-offs of accuracy for speed optimization. Profile methods are superior at inferring remote homologs but the difference in accuracy between methods is relatively small. PHMMER and CSBLAST stand out with the highest accuracy, yet still at a reasonable computational cost. Additionally, we show that less than 0.1% of Swiss-Prot protein pairs considered homologous by one database are considered non-homologous by another, implying that these classifications represent equivalent underlying biological phenomena, differing mostly in coverage and granularity. Benchmark datasets and all scripts are placed at (http://sonnhammer.org/download/Homology_benchmark). forslund@embl.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. The history of the homology concept and the "Phylogenetisches Symposium".

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Olsson, Lennart

    2005-11-01

    The homology concept has had a long and varied history, starting out as a geometrical term in ancient Greece. Here we describe briefly how a typological use of homology to designate organs and body parts in the same position anatomically in different organisms was changed by Darwin's theory of evolution into a phylogenetic concept. We try to indicate the diversity of opinions on how to define and test for homology that has prevailed historically, before the important books by Hennig (1950. Grundzüge einer Theorie der Phylogenetischen Systematik. Deutscher Zentralverlag, Berlin) and Remane (1952. Die Grundlagen des Natürlichen Systems, der Vergleichenden Anatomie und der Phylogenetik. Geest & Portig, Leipzig) brought more rigor into both the debate on homology and into the usage of the term homology among systematists. Homology as a theme has recurred repeatedly throughout the history of the "Phylogenetisches Symposium" and we give a very brief overview of the different aspects of homology that have been discussed at specific symposia over the last 48 years. We also honour the fact that the 2004 symposium was held in Jena by pointing to the roles played by biologists active in Jena, such as Ernst Haeckel and Carl Gegenbaur, in starting the development towards a homology concept concordant with an evolutionary world view. As historians of biology, we emphasize the importance of major treatises on homology and its history that may be little read by systematists active today, and have sometimes also received less attention by historians of biology than they deserve. Prominent among these are the works of Dietrich Starck, who also happened to be both a student, and later a benefactor, of systematics at Jena University.

  7. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez Aguilar, R.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City, IA (IIHR, U of Iowa), we perform an analysis of the homology groups generated by data connectivity in state space, and attempt a qualitative interpretation of the first and second homology groups. Let us note that homology groups are generated, in the context of topological data analysis (TDA), by representing the data in n-dimensional state space and building a connectivity diagram according to the respective distances between the data points. Subsequently, the topological invariants of the resulting connected structures are being analyzed.

  8. Geometric K-Homology of Flat D-Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Rui M. G.; Szabo, Richard J.

    2006-08-01

    We use the Baum-Douglas construction of K-homology to explicitly describe various aspects of D-branes in Type II superstring theory in the absence of background supergravity form fields. We rigorously derive various stability criteria for states of D-branes and show how standard bound state constructions are naturally realized directly in terms of topological K-cycles. We formulate the mechanism of flux stabilization in terms of the K-homology of non-trivial fibre bundles. Along the way we derive a number of new mathematical results in topological K-homology of independent interest.

  9. Importing the homology concept from biology into developmental psychology.

    PubMed

    Moore, David S

    2013-01-01

    To help introduce the idea of homology into developmental psychology, this article presents some of the concepts, distinctions, and guidelines biologists and philosophers of biology have devised to study homology. Some unresolved issues related to this idea are considered as well. Because homology reflects continuity across time, developmental scientists should find this concept to be useful in the study of psychological/behavioral development, just as biologists have found it essential in the study of the evolution and development of morphological and other characteristics.

  10. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog- dependent

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R.; Glaholt, Stephen P.; Colbourne, John K.; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC.

    2013-01-01

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1–mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. PMID:24113165

  11. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog-dependent.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R; Glaholt, Stephen P; Colbourne, John K; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2013-10-15

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1-mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Homology-Dependent Silencing by an Exogenous Sequence in the Drosophila Germline

    PubMed Central

    Pöyhönen, Maria; de Vanssay, Augustin; Delmarre, Valérie; Hermant, Catherine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Teysset, Laure; Ronsseray, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The study of P transposable element repression in Drosophila melanogaster led to the discovery of the trans-silencing effect (TSE), a homology-dependent repression mechanism by which a P-transgene inserted in subtelomeric heterochromatin (Telomeric Associated Sequences) represses in trans, in the female germline, a homologous P-lacZ transgene inserted in euchromatin. TSE shows variegation in ovaries and displays a maternal effect as well as epigenetic transmission through meiosis. In addition, TSE is highly sensitive to mutations affecting heterochromatin components (including HP1) and the Piwi-interacting RNA silencing pathway (piRNA), a homology-dependent silencing mechanism that functions in the germline. TSE appears thus to involve the piRNA-based silencing proposed to play a major role in P repression. Under this hypothesis, TSE may also be established when homology between the telomeric and target loci involves sequences other than P elements, including sequences exogenous to the D. melanogaster genome. We have tested whether TSE can be induced via lacZ sequence homology. We generated a piggyBac-otu-lacZ transgene in which lacZ is under the control of the germline ovarian tumor promoter, resulting in strong expression in nurse cells and the oocyte. We show that all piggyBac-otu-lacZ transgene insertions are strongly repressed by maternally inherited telomeric P-lacZ transgenes. This repression shows variegation between egg chambers when it is incomplete and presents a maternal effect, two of the signatures of TSE. Finally, this repression is sensitive to mutations affecting aubergine, a key player of the piRNA pathway. These data show that TSE can occur when silencer and target loci share solely a sequence exogenous to the D. melanogaster genome. This functionally supports the hypothesis that TSE represents a general repression mechanism which can be co-opted by new transposable elements to regulate their activity after a transfer to the D. melanogaster

  13. Recombination, Pairing, and Synapsis of Homologs during Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Recombination is a prominent feature of meiosis in which it plays an important role in increasing genetic diversity during inheritance. Additionally, in most organisms, recombination also plays mechanical roles in chromosomal processes, most notably to mediate pairing of homologous chromosomes during prophase and, ultimately, to ensure regular segregation of homologous chromosomes when they separate at the first meiotic division. Recombinational interactions are also subject to important spatial patterning at both early and late stages. Recombination-mediated processes occur in physical and functional linkage with meiotic axial chromosome structure, with interplay in both directions, before, during, and after formation and dissolution of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a highly conserved meiosis-specific structure that links homolog axes along their lengths. These diverse processes also are integrated with recombination-independent interactions between homologous chromosomes, nonhomology-based chromosome couplings/clusterings, and diverse types of chromosome movement. This review provides an overview of these diverse processes and their interrelationships. PMID:25986558

  14. Recombination, Pairing, and Synapsis of Homologs during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy

    2015-05-18

    Recombination is a prominent feature of meiosis in which it plays an important role in increasing genetic diversity during inheritance. Additionally, in most organisms, recombination also plays mechanical roles in chromosomal processes, most notably to mediate pairing of homologous chromosomes during prophase and, ultimately, to ensure regular segregation of homologous chromosomes when they separate at the first meiotic division. Recombinational interactions are also subject to important spatial patterning at both early and late stages. Recombination-mediated processes occur in physical and functional linkage with meiotic axial chromosome structure, with interplay in both directions, before, during, and after formation and dissolution of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a highly conserved meiosis-specific structure that links homolog axes along their lengths. These diverse processes also are integrated with recombination-independent interactions between homologous chromosomes, nonhomology-based chromosome couplings/clusterings, and diverse types of chromosome movement. This review provides an overview of these diverse processes and their interrelationships.

  15. Structural homologies among type I restriction-modification systems.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, N E; Gough, J A; Suri, B; Bickle, T A

    1982-01-01

    Structural homologies among different restriction systems of Escherichia coli and several Salmonella species have been investigated by immunological methods using antibodies prepared against two subunits of the E. coli K12 restriction enzyme, and by DNA hybridization experiments using different fragments of the E. coli K12 hsd genes as probes. The results with both techniques show a strong homology between the E. coli K12 and B restriction-modification systems, weaker but nevertheless marked homology between E. coli K12 and the Salmonella systems SB, SP, and SQ and, surprisingly, no homology between the E. coli K12 and A systems. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6329689

  16. [Evaluation of an homologous bacterin against bovine leptospirosis].

    PubMed

    Vega, Laura Elena Orozco; Flores, Rafael López; Moles y Cervantes, Luis Pedro; Valiente, Jorge Quiroz

    2005-01-01

    48 adult bovine females dividided into 6 groups were used aimed at characterizing the immune response induced in breastfeeeding cows by an homologous bacterin formulated with different adjuvants. They were intramuscularly administered 2 milliliters of a bacterin formulated with Leptospira interrogans serovars uam, wolffi, hardjo, bratislava, grippotyphosa and panama added with different adjuvants, such as aluminum hydroxide, Freud's complete adjuvant, Freud's incomplete adjuvant, liposoluble vitamins, bacterin plus disparasitization with levamisol. The control group was administred only with bacterin. Immunization took place in 2 occasions at a time interval of 28 days. Blood samples were taken every 7 days during the first month after vaccination, and every 28 days for the next 8 months. All the sera were analyzed by the microscopic agglutination test. The results were transformed into Log10 and they were analyzed by NLIN and GLM of SAS. The period of greater response was estimated by the prediction model (Wood). The bacterin did not produce alteration either in the physiological constants, or in milk production. The serovars of Leptospira interrogans that induced higher titers were uam, hardjo and wolffi. The statistical difference between treatments and between serovars was determined.

  17. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  18. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-05

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  19. Efficient Assembly of DNA Using Yeast Homologous Recombination (YHR).

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sunil; Shapland, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of multiple DNA parts into a larger DNA construct is a requirement in most synthetic biology laboratories. Here we describe a method for the efficient, high-throughput, assembly of DNA utilizing the yeast homologous recombination (YHR). The YHR method utilizes overlapping DNA parts that are assembled together by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via homologous recombination between designed overlapping regions. Using this method, we have successfully assembled up to 12 DNA parts in a single reaction.

  20. Homological properties of rings of functional-analytic type.

    PubMed Central

    Wodzicki, M

    1990-01-01

    Strong flatness properties are established for a large class of functional-analytic rings including all C*-algebras. This is later used to prove that all those rings satisfy excision in Hochschild and in cyclic homology over almost arbitrary rings of coefficients and that, for stable C*-algebras, the Hochschild and cyclic homology groups defined over an arbitrary coefficient ring k subset C of complex numbers (e.g., k = Z or Q) vanish in all dimensions. PMID:11607088

  1. MRFalign: protein homology detection through alignment of Markov random fields.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Jinbo

    2014-03-01

    Sequence-based protein homology detection has been extensively studied and so far the most sensitive method is based upon comparison of protein sequence profiles, which are derived from multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of sequence homologs in a protein family. A sequence profile is usually represented as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) or an HMM (Hidden Markov Model) and accordingly PSSM-PSSM or HMM-HMM comparison is used for homolog detection. This paper presents a new homology detection method MRFalign, consisting of three key components: 1) a Markov Random Fields (MRF) representation of a protein family; 2) a scoring function measuring similarity of two MRFs; and 3) an efficient ADMM (Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers) algorithm aligning two MRFs. Compared to HMM that can only model very short-range residue correlation, MRFs can model long-range residue interaction pattern and thus, encode information for the global 3D structure of a protein family. Consequently, MRF-MRF comparison for remote homology detection shall be much more sensitive than HMM-HMM or PSSM-PSSM comparison. Experiments confirm that MRFalign outperforms several popular HMM or PSSM-based methods in terms of both alignment accuracy and remote homology detection and that MRFalign works particularly well for mainly beta proteins. For example, tested on the benchmark SCOP40 (8353 proteins) for homology detection, PSSM-PSSM and HMM-HMM succeed on 48% and 52% of proteins, respectively, at superfamily level, and on 15% and 27% of proteins, respectively, at fold level. In contrast, MRFalign succeeds on 57.3% and 42.5% of proteins at superfamily and fold level, respectively. This study implies that long-range residue interaction patterns are very helpful for sequence-based homology detection. The software is available for download at http://raptorx.uchicago.edu/download/. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5.

  2. MRFalign: Protein Homology Detection through Alignment of Markov Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-based protein homology detection has been extensively studied and so far the most sensitive method is based upon comparison of protein sequence profiles, which are derived from multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of sequence homologs in a protein family. A sequence profile is usually represented as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) or an HMM (Hidden Markov Model) and accordingly PSSM-PSSM or HMM-HMM comparison is used for homolog detection. This paper presents a new homology detection method MRFalign, consisting of three key components: 1) a Markov Random Fields (MRF) representation of a protein family; 2) a scoring function measuring similarity of two MRFs; and 3) an efficient ADMM (Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers) algorithm aligning two MRFs. Compared to HMM that can only model very short-range residue correlation, MRFs can model long-range residue interaction pattern and thus, encode information for the global 3D structure of a protein family. Consequently, MRF-MRF comparison for remote homology detection shall be much more sensitive than HMM-HMM or PSSM-PSSM comparison. Experiments confirm that MRFalign outperforms several popular HMM or PSSM-based methods in terms of both alignment accuracy and remote homology detection and that MRFalign works particularly well for mainly beta proteins. For example, tested on the benchmark SCOP40 (8353 proteins) for homology detection, PSSM-PSSM and HMM-HMM succeed on 48% and 52% of proteins, respectively, at superfamily level, and on 15% and 27% of proteins, respectively, at fold level. In contrast, MRFalign succeeds on 57.3% and 42.5% of proteins at superfamily and fold level, respectively. This study implies that long-range residue interaction patterns are very helpful for sequence-based homology detection. The software is available for download at http://raptorx.uchicago.edu/download/. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2–5. PMID:24675572

  3. Homoplasy, homology and the problem of 'sameness' in biology.

    PubMed

    Wake, D B

    1999-01-01

    The reality of evolution requires some concept of 'sameness'. That which evolves changes its state to some degree, however minute or grand, although parts remain 'the same'. Yet homology, our word for sameness, while universal in the sense of being necessarily true, can only ever be partial with respect to features that change. Determining what is equivalent to what among taxa, and from what something has evolved, remain real problems, but the word homology is not helpful in these problematic contexts. Henning saw this clearly when he coined new terms with technical meanings for phylogenetic studies. Analysis in phylogenetic systematics remains contentious and relatively subjective, especially as new information accumulates or as one changes one's mind about characters. This pragmatic decision making should not be called homology assessment. Homology as a concept anticipated evolution. Homology dates to pre-evolutionary times and represents late 18th and early 19th century idealism. Our attempts to recycle words in science leads to difficulty, and we should eschew giving precise modern definitions to terms that originally arose in entirely different contexts. Rather than continue to refine our homology concept we should focus on issues that have high relevance to modern evolutionary biology, in particular homoplasy--derived similarity--whose biological bases require elucidation.

  4. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  5. Homologous pairing and the role of pairing centers in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-He; McKee, Bruce D

    2011-06-15

    Homologous pairing establishes the foundation for accurate reductional segregation during meiosis I in sexual organisms. This Commentary summarizes recent progress in our understanding of homologous pairing in meiosis, and will focus on the characteristics and mechanisms of specialized chromosome sites, called pairing centers (PCs), in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. In C. elegans, each chromosome contains a single PC that stabilizes chromosome pairing and initiates synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Specific zinc-finger proteins recruited to PCs link chromosomes to nuclear envelope proteins--and through them to the microtubule cytoskeleton--thereby stimulating chromosome movements in early prophase, which are thought to be important for homolog sorting. This mechanism appears to be a variant of the 'telomere bouquet' process, in which telomeres cluster on the nuclear envelope, connect chromosomes through nuclear envelope proteins to the cytoskeleton and lead chromosome movements that promote homologous synapsis. In Drosophila males, which undergo meiosis without recombination, pairing of the largely non-homologous X and Y chromosomes occurs at specific repetitive sequences in the ribosomal DNA. Although no other clear examples of PC-based pairing mechanisms have been described, there is evidence for special roles of telomeres and centromeres in aspects of chromosome pairing, synapsis and segregation; these roles are in some cases similar to those of PCs.

  6. Loss of Homologous Recombination or Non-homologous End-joining Leads to Radial Formation Following DNA Interstrand Crosslink Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon Newell, Amy E.; Hemphill, Aaron; Akkari, Yassmine M.N.; Hejna, James; Moses, Robb E.; Olson, Susan B.

    2008-01-01

    High levels of interstrand cross-link damage in mammalian cells cause chromatid breaks and radial formations recognizable by cytogenetic examination. The mechanism of radial formation observed following DNA damage has yet to be determined. Due to recent findings linking homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining to the action of the Fanconi anemia pathway, we speculated that radials might be the result of defects in either of the pathways of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the role of homologous recombination proteins RAD51 and RAD52, non-homologous end-joining proteins Ku70 and LIG4, and protein MRE11 in radial formation and cell survival following interstrand crosslink damage with mitomycin C. For the studies we used small inhibitory RNA to deplete the proteins from cells, allowing for evaluation of radial formation and cell survival. In transformed normal human fibroblasts, depletion of these proteins increased interstrand crosslink sensitivity as manifest by decreased cell survival and increased radial formation. These results demonstrate that inactivation of proteins from either of the two separate DNA repair pathways increases cellular sensitivity to interstrand crosslinks, indicating each pathway plays a role in the normal response to interstrand crosslink damage. We can also conclude that homologous recombination or non-homologous end-joining are not required for radial formation, since radials occur with depletion of these pathways. PMID:18758156

  7. Homologous prominence non-radial eruptions: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchlev, P.; Koleva, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Dechev, M.

    2016-10-01

    The present study provides important details on homologous eruptions of a solar prominence that occurred in active region NOAA 10904 on 2006 August 22. We report on the pre-eruptive phase of the homologous feature as well as the kinematics and the morphology of a forth from a series of prominence eruptions that is critical in defining the nature of the previous consecutive eruptions. The evolution of the overlying coronal field during homologous eruptions is discussed and a new observational criterion for homologous eruptions is provided. We find a distinctive sequence of three activation periods each of them containing pre-eruptive precursors such as a brightening and enlarging of the prominence body followed by small surge-like ejections from its southern end observed in the radio 17 GHz. We analyse a fourth eruption that clearly indicates a full reformation of the prominence after the third eruption. The fourth eruption although occurring 11 h later has an identical morphology, the same angle of propagation with respect to the radial direction, as well as similar kinematic evolution as the previous three eruptions. We find an important feature of the homologous eruptive prominence sequence that is the maximum height increase of each consecutive eruption. The present analysis establishes that all four eruptions observed in Hα are of confined type with the third eruption undergoing a thermal disappearance during its eruptive phase. We suggest that the observation of the same direction of the magnetic flux rope (MFR) ejections can be consider as an additional observational criterion for MFR homology. This observational indication for homologous eruptions is important, especially in the case of events of typical or poorly distinguishable morphology of eruptive solar phenomena.

  8. Ionizing radiation-induced instant pairing of heterochromatin of homologous chromosomes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, H I; Imam, S A; Badr, F M; Natarajan, A T; Mullenders, L H F; Boei, J J W A

    2004-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with human band-specific DNA probes we examined the effect of ionizing radiation on the intra-nuclear localization of the heterochromatic region 9q12-->q13 and the euchromatic region 8p11.2 of similar sized chromosomes 9 and 8 respectively in confluent (G1) primary human fibroblasts. Microscopic analysis of the interphase nuclei revealed colocalization of the homologous heterochromatic regions from chromosome 9 in a proportion of cells directly after exposure to 4 Gy X-rays. The percentage of cells with paired chromosomes 9 gradually decreased to control levels during a period of one hour. No significant changes in localization were observed for chromosome 8. Using 2-D image analysis, radial and inter-homologue distances were measured for both chromosome bands. In unexposed cells, a random distribution of the chromosomes over the interphase nucleus was found. Directly after irradiation, the average inter-homologue distance decreased for chromosome 9 without alterations in radial distribution. The percentage of cells with inter-homologue distance <3 micro m increased from 11% in control cells to 25% in irradiated cells. In contrast, irradiation did not result in significant changes in the inter-homologue distance for chromosome 8. Colocalization of the heterochromatic regions of homologous chromosomes 9 was not observed in cells irradiated on ice. This observation, together with the time dependency of the colocalization, suggests an underlying active cellular process. The biological relevance of the observed homologous pairing remains unclear. It might be related to a homology dependent repair process of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage that is specific for heterochromatin. However, also other more general cellular responses to radiation-induced stress or change in chromatin organization might be responsible for the observed pairing of heterochromatic regions.

  9. Mammalian Homologs of Yeast Checkpoint Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    this interaction fo DNA damage-dependent regulation of Chk2 is discussed. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Breast Cancer , Checkpoint control...and how it regulates targets. This work is directly relevant to breast cancer , since it is now clear that Chk2 is an intermediary linking DNA...Li- Fraumeni syndrome, which predisposes to breast cancer and other cancers [6]. Connection with Approved Technical Objectives. Technical Objective 1

  10. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silica normal phase column and an isocratic, n-hexane:1,4 dioxane (98:2) mobile phase. An optimized protocol was used to report vitamin E homolog concentrations in soybean oil-based (Intralipid®, Ivelip®, Lipofundin® N, Liposyn® III, and Liposyn® II), medium- and long-chain fatty acid-based (Lipofundin®, MCT and Structolipid®), olive oil-based (ClinOleic®), and fish oil-based (Omegaven®) and mixture of these oils-based (SMOFlipid®, Lipidem®) commercial parenteral lipid emulsions. Total content of all vitamin E homologs varied greatly between different emulsions, ranging from 57.9 to 383.9 µg/mL. Tocopherols (α, β, γ, δ) were the predominant vitamin E homologs for all emulsions, with tocotrienol content < 0.3%. In all of the soybean emulsions, except for Lipofundin® N, the predominant vitamin E homolog was γ-tocopherol, which ranged from 57–156 µg/mL. ClinOleic® predominantly contained α-tocopherol (32 µg/mL), whereas α-tocopherol content in Omegaven® was higher than most of the other lipid emulsions (230 µg/mL). Practical applications The information on the types and quantity of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions will be extremely useful to physicians and healthcare personnel in selecting appropriate lipid emulsions that are exclusively used in patients with inadequate gastrointestinal function, including hospitalized and critically ill patients. Some emulsions may require vitamin E supplementation in order to meet minimal human requirements

  11. PDBalert: automatic, recurrent remote homology tracking and protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vatsal; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Söding, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Background During the last years, methods for remote homology detection have grown more and more sensitive and reliable. Automatic structure prediction servers relying on these methods can generate useful 3D models even below 20% sequence identity between the protein of interest and the known structure (template). When no homologs can be found in the protein structure database (PDB), the user would need to rerun the same search at regular intervals in order to make timely use of a template once it becomes available. Results PDBalert is a web-based automatic system that sends an email alert as soon as a structure with homology to a protein in the user's watch list is released to the PDB database or appears among the sequences on hold. The mail contains links to the search results and to an automatically generated 3D homology model. The sequence search is performed with the same software as used by the very sensitive and reliable remote homology detection server HHpred, which is based on pairwise comparison of Hidden Markov models. Conclusion PDBalert will accelerate the information flow from the PDB database to all those who can profit from the newly released protein structures for predicting the 3D structure or function of their proteins of interest. PMID:19025670

  12. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2015-02-26

    Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair single-strand DNA (ssDNA) with a homologous double-strand DNA (dsDNA) template. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a ninth nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy, and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  14. Double-stranded DNA homology produces a physical signature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Xiaoping; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is found in the cell largely as a negatively supercoiled molecule. This high-energy form of the genetic material can engender sequence-dependent structures, such as cruciforms, Z-DNA, or H-DNA, even though they are not favored by conventional conditions in relaxed DNA. A key feature of DNA in living systems is the presence of homology. We have sought homology-dependent structural phenomena based on topological relaxation. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we demonstrate a structural transition in supercoiled plasmid molecules containing homologous segments. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals a dumbbell structure in molecules whose linking difference is beyond the transition point. The position of the dumbbell shaft is a function of the site of homology, and its extent is proportional to the linking difference. Second-site-reversion electrophoresis data support the notion that the shaft contains PX-DNA. Predicted cross-linking patterns generated in vivo suggest that homology-dependent structures can occur within the cell. PMID:20616051

  15. RecA filament sliding on DNA facilitates homology search

    PubMed Central

    Ragunathan, Kaushik; Liu, Cheng; Ha, Taekjip

    2012-01-01

    During homologous recombination, RecA forms a helical filament on a single stranded (ss) DNA that searches for a homologous double stranded (ds) DNA and catalyzes the exchange of complementary base pairs to form a new heteroduplex. Using single molecule fluorescence imaging tools with high spatiotemporal resolution we characterized the encounter complex between the RecA filament and dsDNA. We present evidence in support of the ‘sliding model’ wherein a RecA filament diffuses along a dsDNA track. We further show that homology can be detected during sliding. Sliding occurs with a diffusion coefficient of approximately 8000 bp2/s allowing the filament to sample several hundred base pairs before dissociation. Modeling suggests that sliding can accelerate homology search by as much as 200 fold. Homology recognition can occur for as few as 6 nt of complementary basepairs with the recognition efficiency increasing for higher complementarity. Our data represents the first example of a DNA bound multi-protein complex which can slide along another DNA to facilitate target search. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00067.001 PMID:23240082

  16. Fold homology detection using sequence fragment composition profiles of proteins.

    PubMed

    Solis, Armando D; Rackovsky, Shalom R

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called "twilight zone" problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (approximately 15-30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver-operating characteristic measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the "twilight zone". 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Fold Homology Detection Using Sequence Fragment Composition Profiles of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Armando D.; Rackovsky, Shalom R.

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called “twilight zone” problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (around 15 to 30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database, that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the “twilight zone”. PMID:20635424

  18. Single-Stranded DNA Curtains for Studying Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Ma, C J; Steinfeld, J B; Greene, E C

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Genetic studies form the foundation of our knowledge on homologous recombination. Significant progress has also been made toward understanding the biochemical and biophysical properties of the proteins, complexes, and reaction intermediates involved in this essential DNA repair pathway. However, heterogeneous or transient recombination intermediates remain extremely difficult to assess through traditional ensemble methods, leaving an incomplete mechanistic picture of many steps that take place during homologous recombination. To help overcome some of these limitations, we have established DNA curtain methodologies as an experimental platform for studying homologous DNA recombination in real-time at the single-molecule level. Here, we present a detailed overview describing the preparation and use of single-stranded DNA curtains in applications related to the study of homologous DNA recombination with emphasis on recent work related to the study of the eukaryotic recombinase Rad51. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Homologous recombination is required for recovery from oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Michio; Umezu, Keiko

    2017-04-03

    We have been studying the genetic events, including chromosome loss, chromosome rearrangements and intragenic point mutations, that are responsible for the deletion of a URA3 marker in a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay in the yeast Saccharomycess cerevisiae. With this assay, we previously showed that homologous recombination plays an important role in genome maintenance in response to DNA lesions that occur spontaneously in normally growing cells. Here, to investigate DNA lesions capable of triggering homologous recombination, we examined the effects of oxidative stress, a prominent cause of endogenous DNA damage, on LOH events. Treatment of log-phase cells with H2O2 first caused growth arrest and then, during the subsequent recovery, chromosome loss and various chromosome rearrangements were induced more than 10-fold. Further analysis of the rearrangements showed that gene conversion was strongly induced, approximately 100 times more frequently than in untreated cells. Consistent with these results, two diploid strains deficient for homologous recombination, rad52Δ/rad52Δ and rad51Δ/rad51Δ, were sensitive to H2O2 treatment. In addition, chromosome DNA breaks were detected in H2O2-treated cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Altogether, these results suggest that oxidative stress induced recombinogenic lesions on chromosomes, which then triggered homologous recombination leading to chromosome rearrangements, and that this response contributed to the survival of cells afflicted by oxidative DNA damage. We therefore conclude that homologous recombination is required for the recovery of cells from oxidative stress.

  20. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  1. Primary homologies of the circumorbital bones of snakes.

    PubMed

    Palci, Alessandro; Caldwell, Michael W

    2013-09-01

    Some snakes have two circumorbital ossifications that in the current literature are usually referred to as the postorbital and supraorbital. We review the arguments that have been proposed to justify this interpretation and provide counter-arguments that reject those conjectures of primary homology based on the observation of 32 species of lizards and 81 species of snakes (both extant and fossil). We present similarity arguments, both topological and structural, for reinterpretation of the primary homologies of the dorsal and posterior orbital ossifications of snakes. Applying the test of similarity, we conclude that the posterior orbital ossification of snakes is topologically consistent as the homolog of the lacertilian jugal, and that the dorsal orbital ossification present in some snakes (e.g., pythons, Loxocemus, and Calabaria) is the homolog of the lacertilian postfrontal. We therefore propose that the terms postorbital and supraorbital should be abandoned as reference language for the circumorbital bones of snakes, and be replaced with the terms jugal and postfrontal, respectively. The primary homology claim for the snake "postorbital" fails the test of similarity, while the term "supraorbital" is an unnecessary and inaccurate application of the concept of a neomorphic ossification, for an element that passes the test of similarity as a postfrontal. This reinterpretation of the circumorbital bones of snakes is bound to have important repercussions for future phylogenetic analyses and consequently for our understanding of the origin and evolution of snakes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Homology modeling a fast tool for drug discovery: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vyas, V K; Ukawala, R D; Ghate, M; Chintha, C

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery.

  3. Nascent DNA synthesis during homologous recombination is synergistically promoted by the rad51 recombinase and DNA homology.

    PubMed

    Mundia, Maureen M; Desai, Vatsal; Magwood, Alissa C; Baker, Mark D

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we exploited a plasmid-based assay that detects the new DNA synthesis (3' extension) that accompanies Rad51-mediated homology searching and strand invasion steps of homologous recombination to investigate the interplay between Rad51 concentration and homology length. Mouse hybridoma cells that express endogenous levels of Rad51 display an approximate linear increase in the frequency of 3' extension for homology lengths of 500 bp to 2 kb. At values below ∼500 bp, the frequency of 3' extension declines markedly, suggesting that this might represent the minimal efficient processing segment for 3' extension. Overexpression of wild-type Rad51 stimulated the frequency of 3' extension by ∼3-fold for homology lengths <900 bp, but when homology was >2 kb, 3' extension frequency increased by as much as 10-fold. Excess wild-type Rad51 did not increase the average 3' extension tract length. Analysis of cell lines expressing N-terminally FLAG-tagged Rad51 polymerization mutants F86E, A89E, or F86E/A89E established that the 3' extension process requires Rad51 polymerization activity. Mouse hybridoma cells that have reduced Brca2 (Breast cancer susceptibility 2) due to stable expression of small interfering RNA show a significant reduction in 3' extension efficiency; expression of wild-type human BRCA2, but not a BRCA2 variant devoid of BRC repeats 1-8, rescues the 3' extension defect in these cells. Our results suggest that increased Rad51 concentration and homology length interact synergistically to promote 3' extension, presumably as a result of enhanced Brca2-mediated Rad51 polymerization.

  4. Nascent DNA Synthesis During Homologous Recombination Is Synergistically Promoted by the Rad51 Recombinase and DNA Homology

    PubMed Central

    Mundia, Maureen M.; Desai, Vatsal; Magwood, Alissa C.; Baker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we exploited a plasmid-based assay that detects the new DNA synthesis (3′ extension) that accompanies Rad51-mediated homology searching and strand invasion steps of homologous recombination to investigate the interplay between Rad51 concentration and homology length. Mouse hybridoma cells that express endogenous levels of Rad51 display an approximate linear increase in the frequency of 3′ extension for homology lengths of 500 bp to 2 kb. At values below ∼500 bp, the frequency of 3′ extension declines markedly, suggesting that this might represent the minimal efficient processing segment for 3′ extension. Overexpression of wild-type Rad51 stimulated the frequency of 3′ extension by ∼3-fold for homology lengths <900 bp, but when homology was >2 kb, 3′ extension frequency increased by as much as 10-fold. Excess wild-type Rad51 did not increase the average 3′ extension tract length. Analysis of cell lines expressing N-terminally FLAG-tagged Rad51 polymerization mutants F86E, A89E, or F86E/A89E established that the 3′ extension process requires Rad51 polymerization activity. Mouse hybridoma cells that have reduced Brca2 (Breast cancer susceptibility 2) due to stable expression of small interfering RNA show a significant reduction in 3′ extension efficiency; expression of wild-type human BRCA2, but not a BRCA2 variant devoid of BRC repeats 1–8, rescues the 3′ extension defect in these cells. Our results suggest that increased Rad51 concentration and homology length interact synergistically to promote 3′ extension, presumably as a result of enhanced Brca2-mediated Rad51 polymerization. PMID:24583581

  5. Mesodermal expression of the C. elegans HMX homolog mls-2 requires the PBC homolog CEH-20.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Amin, Nirav M; Sultan, Ibrahim; Liu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan development proceeds primarily through the regulated expression of genes encoding transcription factors and components of cell signaling pathways. One way to decipher the complex developmental programs is to assemble the underlying gene regulatory networks by dissecting the cis-regulatory modules that direct temporal-spatial expression of developmental genes and identify corresponding trans-regulatory factors. Here, we focus on the regulation of a HMX homoebox gene called mls-2, which functions at the intersection of a network that regulates cleavage orientation, cell proliferation and fate specification in the Caenorhabditis elegans postembryonic mesoderm. In addition to its transient expression in the postembryonic mesodermal lineage, the M lineage, mls-2 expression is detected in a subset of embryonic cells, in three pairs of head neurons and transiently in the somatic gonad. Through mutational analysis of the mls-2 promoter, we identified two elements (E1 and E2) involved in regulating the temporal-spatial expression of mls-2. In particular, we showed that one of the elements (E1) required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage contains two critical putative PBC-Hox binding sites that are evolutionarily conserved in C. briggsae and C. remanei. Furthermore, the C. elegans PBC homolog CEH-20 is required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage. Our data suggest that mls-2 might be a direct target of CEH-20 in the M lineage and that the regulation of CEH-20 on mls-2 is likely Hox-independent.

  6. Mesodermal expression of the C. elegans HMX homolog mls-2 requires the PBC homolog CEH-20

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Amin, Nirav M.; Sultan, Ibrahim; Liu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan development proceeds primarily through the regulated expression of genes encoding transcription factors and components of cell signaling pathways. One way to decipher the complex developmental programs is to assemble the underlying gene regulatory networks by dissecting the cis-regulatory modules that direct temporal-spatial expression of developmental genes and identify corresponding trans-regulatory factors. Here, we focus on the regulation of a HMX homoebox gene called mls-2, which functions at the intersection of a network that regulates cleavage orientation, cell proliferation and fate specification in the C. elegans postembryonic mesoderm. In addition to its transient expression in the postembryonic mesodermal lineage, the M lineage, mls-2 expression is detected in a subset of embryonic cells, in three pairs of head neurons and transiently in the somatic gonad. Through mutational analysis of the mls-2 promoter, we identified two elements (E1 and E2) involved in regulating the temporal-spatial expression of mls-2. In particular, we showed that one of the elements (E1) required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage contains two critical putative PBC-Hox binding sites that are evolutionarily conserved in C. briggsae and C. remanei. Furthermore, the C. elegans PBC homolog CEH-20 is required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage. Our data suggests that mls-2 might be a direct target of CEH-20 in the M lineage and that the regulation of CEH-20 on mls-2 is likely Hox-independent. PMID:18316179

  7. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling.

  8. Data bank homology search algorithm with linear computation complexity.

    PubMed

    Strelets, V B; Ptitsyn, A A; Milanesi, L; Lim, H A

    1994-06-01

    A new algorithm for data bank homology search is proposed. The principal advantages of the new algorithm are: (i) linear computation complexity; (ii) low memory requirements; and (iii) high sensitivity to the presence of local region homology. The algorithm first calculates indicative matrices of k-tuple 'realization' in the query sequence and then searches for an appropriate number of matching k-tuples within a narrow range in database sequences. It does not require k-tuple coordinates tabulation and in-memory placement for database sequences. The algorithm is implemented in a program for execution on PC-compatible computers and tested on PIR and GenBank databases with good results. A few modifications designed to improve the selectivity are also discussed. As an application example, the search for homology of the mouse homeotic protein HOX 3.1 is given.

  9. Homologous flares and the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, K. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Mccabe, M. K.; Machado, M. E.; Saba, J. L. R.; Simnett, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed record of the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372 has been compiled by the FBS Homology Study Group. It was one of the most prolific flare-producing regions observed by SMM. The flares occurred in distinct stages which corresponded to particular evolutionary phases in the development of the active region magnetic field. By comparison with a similar but less productive active region, it is found that the activity seems to be related to the magnetic complexity of the region and the amount of shear in the field. Further, the soft X-ray emission in the quiescent active region is related to its flare rate. Within the broader definition of homology adopted, there was a degree of homology between the events within each stage of evolution of AR2372.

  10. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  11. Homology groups for particles on one-connected graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MaciÄ Żek, Tomasz; Sawicki, Adam

    2017-06-01

    We present a mathematical framework for describing the topology of configuration spaces for particles on one-connected graphs. In particular, we compute the homology groups over integers for different classes of one-connected graphs. Our approach is based on some fundamental combinatorial properties of the configuration spaces, Mayer-Vietoris sequences for different parts of configuration spaces, and some limited use of discrete Morse theory. As one of the results, we derive the closed-form formulae for ranks of the homology groups for indistinguishable particles on tree graphs. We also give a detailed discussion of the second homology group of the configuration space of both distinguishable and indistinguishable particles. Our motivation is the search for new kinds of quantum statistics.

  12. Protein Remote Homology Detection Based on an Ensemble Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Bingquan; Huang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein remote homology detection is one of the central problems in bioinformatics. Although some computational methods have been proposed, the problem is still far from being solved. In this paper, an ensemble classifier for protein remote homology detection, called SVM-Ensemble, was proposed with a weighted voting strategy. SVM-Ensemble combined three basic classifiers based on different feature spaces, including Kmer, ACC, and SC-PseAAC. These features consider the characteristics of proteins from various perspectives, incorporating both the sequence composition and the sequence-order information along the protein sequences. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset showed that the proposed SVM-Ensemble can obviously improve the predictive performance for the protein remote homology detection. Moreover, it achieved the best performance and outperformed other state-of-the-art methods.

  13. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review.

  14. Nasal pungency, odor, and eye irritation thresholds for homologous acetates.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J E; Cain, W S

    1991-08-01

    We measured detection thresholds for nasal pungency (in anosmics), odor (in normosmics) and eye irritation employing a homologous series of acetates: methyl through octyl acetate, decyl and dodecyl acetate. All anosmics reliably detected the series up to heptyl acetate. Only the anosmics without smell since birth (congenital) reliably detected octyl acetate, and only one congenital anosmic detected decyl and dodecyl acetate. Anosmics who lost smell from head trauma proved to be selectively less sensitive. As expected, odor thresholds lay well below pungency thresholds. Eye irritation thresholds for selected acetates came close to nasal pungency thresholds. All three types of thresholds decreased logarithmically with carbon chain length, as previously seen with homologous alcohols and as seen in narcotic and toxic phenomena. Results imply that nasal pungency for these stimuli rests upon a physical, rather than chemical, interaction with susceptible mucosal structures. When expressed as thermodynamic activity, nasal pungency thresholds remain remarkably constant within and across the homologous series of acetates and alcohols.

  15. Remote homology and the functions of metagenomic dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, Briallen; Kurtz, Daniel A.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Doxey, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Predicted open reading frames (ORFs) that lack detectable homology to known proteins are termed ORFans. Despite their prevalence in metagenomes, the extent to which ORFans encode real proteins, the degree to which they can be annotated, and their functional contributions, remain unclear. To gain insights into these questions, we applied sensitive remote-homology detection methods to functionally analyze ORFans from soil, marine, and human gut metagenome collections. ORFans were identified, clustered into sequence families, and annotated through profile-profile comparison to proteins of known structure. We found that a considerable number of metagenomic ORFans (73,896 of 484,121, 15.3%) exhibit significant remote homology to structurally characterized proteins, providing a means for ORFan functional profiling. The extent of detected remote homology far exceeds that obtained for artificial protein families (1.4%). As expected for real genes, the predicted functions of ORFans are significantly similar to the functions of their gene neighbors (p < 0.001). Compared to the functional profiles predicted through standard homology searches, ORFans show biologically intriguing differences. Many ORFan-enriched functions are virus-related and tend to reflect biological processes associated with extreme sequence diversity. Each environment also possesses a large number of unique ORFan families and functions, including some known to play important community roles such as gut microbial polysaccharide digestion. Lastly, ORFans are a valuable resource for finding novel enzymes of interest, as we demonstrate through the identification of hundreds of novel ORFan metalloproteases that all possess a signature catalytic motif despite a general lack of similarity to known proteins. Our ORFan functional predictions are a valuable resource for discovering novel protein families and exploring the boundaries of protein sequence space. All remote homology predictions are available at http

  16. Remote homology and the functions of metagenomic dark matter.

    PubMed

    Lobb, Briallen; Kurtz, Daniel A; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Predicted open reading frames (ORFs) that lack detectable homology to known proteins are termed ORFans. Despite their prevalence in metagenomes, the extent to which ORFans encode real proteins, the degree to which they can be annotated, and their functional contributions, remain unclear. To gain insights into these questions, we applied sensitive remote-homology detection methods to functionally analyze ORFans from soil, marine, and human gut metagenome collections. ORFans were identified, clustered into sequence families, and annotated through profile-profile comparison to proteins of known structure. We found that a considerable number of metagenomic ORFans (73,896 of 484,121, 15.3%) exhibit significant remote homology to structurally characterized proteins, providing a means for ORFan functional profiling. The extent of detected remote homology far exceeds that obtained for artificial protein families (1.4%). As expected for real genes, the predicted functions of ORFans are significantly similar to the functions of their gene neighbors (p < 0.001). Compared to the functional profiles predicted through standard homology searches, ORFans show biologically intriguing differences. Many ORFan-enriched functions are virus-related and tend to reflect biological processes associated with extreme sequence diversity. Each environment also possesses a large number of unique ORFan families and functions, including some known to play important community roles such as gut microbial polysaccharide digestion. Lastly, ORFans are a valuable resource for finding novel enzymes of interest, as we demonstrate through the identification of hundreds of novel ORFan metalloproteases that all possess a signature catalytic motif despite a general lack of similarity to known proteins. Our ORFan functional predictions are a valuable resource for discovering novel protein families and exploring the boundaries of protein sequence space. All remote homology predictions are available at http://doxey.uwaterloo.ca/ORFans.

  17. From meiosis to postmeiotic events: alignment and recognition of homologous chromosomes in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2010-02-01

    Recombination of homologous chromosomes is essential for correct reductional segregation of homologous chromosomes, which characterizes meiosis. To accomplish homologous recombination, chromosomes must find their homologous partners and pair with them within the spatial constraints of the nucleus. Although various mechanisms have developed in different organisms, two major steps are involved in the process of pairing: first, alignment of homologous chromosomes to bring them close to each other for recognition; and second, recognition of the homologous partner of each chromosome so that they can form an intimate pair. Here, we discuss the various mechanisms used for alignment and recognition of homologous chromosomes in meiosis.

  18. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  19. Immunization of rodents against Hymenolepis infections using non-viable homologous oncospheres.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ping-Chin; Chung, Wen-Cheng; Ito, Akira

    2004-12-01

    Immunity to Taiwan Taenia infection in pigs can be stimulated using homologous or heterologous non-viable Taenia oncospheres. This study was designed to determine whether homologous non-viable oncospheres could stimulate immunity to Hymenolepis infection in rodents. Hatched oncospheres were prepared from eggs of Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana, and Hymenolepis microstoma and kept at -70 degrees C for more than 1 month. A mixture of 500 non-viable oncospheres of each tapeworm and complete Freund's adjuvant was injected subcutaneously in four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats or ICR mice one to four times at an interval of 1 week; controls were not immunized. After immunization, each rodent was orally inoculated with three fresh active cysticercoids of H. diminuta or H. microstoma or 500 fresh eggs of H. nana. The animals were then necropsied for adult tapeworms. No rats or mice immunized with non-viable oncospheres of H. diminuta or H. nana were infected by the challenge inoculation. However, 28 of 34 mice immunized with non-viable H. microstoma oncospheres were infected after inoculation with cysticercoids. This study demonstrated complete protection against infection by homologous parasites in rats or mice immunized with non-viable oncospheres of H. diminuta and H. nana, respectively. Repeated immunization may not be required if resistance is stimulated in rodent hosts.

  20. Planarian PTEN homologs regulate stem cells and regeneration through TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Néstor J; Pearson, Bret J; Levin, Michael; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    We have identified two genes, Smed-PTEN-1 and Smed-PTEN-2, capable of regulating stem cell function in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Both genes encode proteins homologous to the mammalian tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). Inactivation of Smed-PTEN-1 and -2 by RNA interference (RNAi) in planarians disrupts regeneration, and leads to abnormal outgrowths in both cut and uncut animals followed soon after by death (lysis). The resulting phenotype is characterized by hyperproliferation of neoblasts (planarian stem cells), tissue disorganization and a significant accumulation of postmitotic cells with impaired differentiation capacity. Further analyses revealed that rapamycin selectively prevented such accumulation without affecting the normal neoblast proliferation associated with physiological turnover and regeneration. In animals in which PTEN function is abrogated, we also detected a significant increase in the number of cells expressing the planarian Akt gene homolog (Smed-Akt). However, functional abrogation of Smed-Akt in Smed-PTEN RNAi-treated animals does not prevent cell overproliferation and lethality, indicating that functional abrogation of Smed-PTEN is sufficient to induce abnormal outgrowths. Altogether, our data reveal roles for PTEN in the regulation of planarian stem cells that are strikingly conserved to mammalian models. In addition, our results implicate this protein in the control of stem cell maintenance during the regeneration of complex structures in planarians.

  1. The vector homology problem in diagnostic nucleic acid hybridization of clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ambinder, R F; Charache, P; Staal, S; Wright, P; Forman, M; Hayward, S D; Hayward, G S

    1986-01-01

    Nucleic acid hybridization techniques using cloned probes are finding application in assays of clinical specimens in research and diagnostic laboratories. The probes that we and others have used are recombinant plasmids composed of viral inserts and bacterial plasmid vectors such as pBR322. We suspected that there was material homologous to pBR322 present in many clinical samples. because hybridization occurred in samples which lacked evidence of virus by other techniques. If the presence of this vector-homologous material was unrecognized, hybridization in the test sample might erroneously be interpreted as indicating the presence of viral sequences. In this paper we demonstrate specific hybridization of labeled pBR322 DNA with DNA from various clinical samples. Evidence is presented that nonspecific probe trapping could not account for this phenomenon. In mixing experiments, it is shown that contamination of clinical samples with bacteria would explain such a result. Approaches tested to circumvent this problem included the use of isolated insert probes, alternate cloning vectors, and cold competitor pBR322 DNA in prehybridization and hybridization mixes. None proved entirely satisfactory. We therefore emphasize that it is essential that all hybridization detection systems use a control probe of the vector alone in order to demonstrate the absence of material with vector homology in the specimen tested. Images PMID:3013928

  2. Tumor malignancy is engaged to prokaryotic homolog toolbox.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Janaina; Guedes, Patrícia G; Lage, Celso Luiz S; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola F; Lage, Claudia de Alencar S

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells display high proliferation rates and survival provided by high glycolysis, chemoresistance and radioresistance, metabolic features that appear to be activated with malignancy, and seemed to have arisen as early in evolution as in unicellular/prokaryotic organisms. Based on these assumptions, we hypothesize that aggressive phenotypes found in malignant cells may be related to acquired unicellular behavior, launched within a tumor when viral and prokaryotic homologs are overexpressed performing likely robust functions. The ensemble of these expressed viral and prokaryotic close homologs in the proteome of a tumor tissue gives them advantage over normal cells. To assess the hypothesis validity, sequences of human proteins involved in apoptosis, energetic metabolism, cell mobility and adhesion, chemo- and radio-resistance were aligned to homologs present in other life forms, excluding all eukaryotes, using PSI-BLAST, with further corroboration from data available in the literature. The analysis revealed that selected sequences of proteins involved in apoptosis and tumor suppression (as p53 and pRB) scored non-significant (E-value>0.001) with prokaryotic homologs; on the other hand, human proteins involved in cellular chemo- and radio-resistance scored highly significant with prokaryotic and viral homologs (as catalase, E-value=zero). We inferred that such upregulated and/or functionally activated proteins in aggressive malignant cells represent a toolbox of modern human homologs evolved from a similar key set that have granted survival of ancient prokaryotes against extremely harsh environments. According to what has been discussed along this analysis, high mutation rates usually hit hotspots in important conserved protein domains, allowing uncontrolled expansion of more resistant, death-evading malignant clones. That is the case of point mutations in key viral proteins affording viruses escape to chemotherapy, and human homologs of such retroviral

  3. Genome destabilization by homologous recombination in the germline

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Mariko; Lange, Julian; Keeney, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Meiotic recombination, which promotes proper homologous chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division, normally occurs between allelic sequences on homologues. However, recombination can also take place between non-allelic DNA segments that share high sequence identity. Such non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) can markedly alter genome architecture during gametogenesis by generating chromosomal rearrangements. Indeed, NAHR-mediated deletions, duplications, inversions and other alterations have been implicated in numerous human genetic disorders. Studies in yeast have revealed insights into the molecular mechanisms of meiotic NAHR as well as the cellular strategies that limit NAHR. PMID:20164840

  4. Homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Michel, B

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats have a marked beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Preincubation of these hepatocytes with isoprenaline induced a time-dependent and concentration-dependent desensitization of the beta-adrenergic responsiveness without altering that to glucagon (homologous desensitization). The desensitization was evidenced both in the cyclic AMP accumulation and in the stimulation of ureagenesis induced by the beta-adrenergic agonists. Under the same conditions, preincubation with glucagon induced no desensitization. Propranolol was also unable to induce desensitization, but blocked that induced by isoprenaline. Pertussis-toxin treatment did not alter the homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization induced by isoprenaline. PMID:2825633

  5. Homological unimodularity and Calabi-Yau condition for Poisson algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jiafeng; Wang, Xingting; Zhuang, Guangbin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we show that the twisted Poincaré duality between Poisson homology and cohomology can be derived from the Serre invertible bimodule. This gives another definition of a unimodular Poisson algebra in terms of its Poisson Picard group. We also achieve twisted Poincaré duality for Hochschild (co)homology of Poisson bimodules using rigid dualizing complex. For a smooth Poisson affine variety with the trivial canonical bundle, we prove that its enveloping algebra is a Calabi-Yau algebra if the Poisson structure is unimodular.

  6. Noncanonical views of homology-directed DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Priyanka; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair is essential to maintain genomic integrity and initiate genetic diversity. While gene conversion and classical nonhomologous end-joining are the most physiologically predominant forms of DNA repair mechanisms, emerging lines of evidence suggest the usage of several noncanonical homology-directed repair (HDR) pathways in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes in different contexts. Here we review how these alternative HDR pathways are executed, specifically focusing on the determinants that dictate competition between them and their relevance to cancers that display complex genomic rearrangements or maintain their telomeres by homology-directed DNA synthesis. PMID:27222516

  7. Using genetic networks and homology to understand the evolution of phenotypic traits.

    PubMed

    McCune, Amy R; Schimenti, John C

    2012-03-01

    Homology can have different meanings for different kinds of biologists. A phylogenetic view holds that homology, defined by common ancestry, is rigorously identified through phylogenetic analysis. Such homologies are taxic homologies (=synapomorphies). A second interpretation, "biological homology" emphasizes common ancestry through the continuity of genetic information underlying phenotypic traits, and is favored by some developmental geneticists. A third kind of homology, deep homology, was recently defined as "the sharing of the genetic regulatory apparatus used to build morphologically and phylogenetically disparate features." Here we explain the commonality among these three versions of homology. We argue that biological homology, as evidenced by a conserved gene regulatory network giving a trait its "essential identity" (a Character Identity Network or "ChIN") must also be a taxic homology. In cases where a phenotypic trait has been modified over the course of evolution such that homology (taxic) is obscured (e.g. jaws are modified gill arches), a shared underlying ChIN provides evidence of this transformation. Deep homologies, where molecular and cellular components of a phenotypic trait precede the trait itself (are phylogenetically deep relative to the trait), are also taxic homologies, undisguised. Deep homologies inspire particular interest for understanding the evolutionary assembly of phenotypic traits. Mapping these deeply homologous building blocks on a phylogeny reveals the sequential steps leading to the origin of phenotypic novelties. Finally, we discuss how new genomic technologies will revolutionize the comparative genomic study of non-model organisms in a phylogenetic context, necessary to understand the evolution of phenotypic traits.

  8. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  9. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs. PMID:26450288

  10. Investigations of homologous recombination pathways and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Daley, James M; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick

    2013-12-13

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB), arising from exposure to ionizing radiation or various chemotherapeutic agents or from replication fork collapse, is among the most dangerous of chromosomal lesions. DSBs are highly cytotoxic and can lead to translocations, deletions, duplications, or mutations if mishandled. DSBs are eliminated by either homologous recombination (HR), which uses a homologous template to guide accurate repair, or by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which simply rejoins the two broken ends after damaged nucleotides have been removed. HR generates error-free repair products and is also required for generating chromosome arm crossovers between homologous chromosomes in meiotic cells. The HR reaction includes several distinct steps: resection of DNA ends, homologous DNA pairing, DNA synthesis, and processing of HR intermediates. Each occurs in a highly regulated fashion utilizing multiple protein factors. These steps are being elucidated using a combination of genetic tools, cell-based assays, and in vitro reconstitution with highly purified HR proteins. In this review, we summarize contributions from our laboratory at Yale University in understanding HR mechanisms in eukaryotic cells.

  11. What is "homology thinking" and what is it for?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Günter P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I examine the thesis by Marc Ereshefsky that, in evolutionary biology, there is a third style of thinking, besides the well-known "population thinking" and "tree thinking." Ereshefsky proposes "homology thinking" as a third approach, focused on the transformation of organismal phenotypes. In this short commentary, I aim at identifying the underlying biological assumptions for homology thinking and how they can be put to work in a research program within evolutionary biology. I propose that homology thinking is based on three insights: 1) multicellular organisms consist of developmentally individualized parts (sub-systems); 2) that developmental individuation entails evolutionary individuation, that is, variational quasi-independence; and 3) these individuated body parts are inherited, though indirectly, and form lineages that are recognized as homologies. These facts support a research program focused on the modification and origination of individuated body parts that supplements and puts into perspective the population genetic and phylogenetic approaches to the study of evolution. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Using intron position conservation for homology-based gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Keilwagen, Jens; Wenk, Michael; Erickson, Jessica L.; Schattat, Martin H.; Grau, Jan; Hartung, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is very important in bioinformatics and biology and has a decisive influence on many downstream analyses. Homology-based gene prediction programs allow for transferring knowledge about protein-coding genes from an annotated organism to an organism of interest. Here, we present a homology-based gene prediction program called GeMoMa. GeMoMa utilizes the conservation of intron positions within genes to predict related genes in other organisms. We assess the performance of GeMoMa and compare it with state-of-the-art competitors on plant and animal genomes using an extended best reciprocal hit approach. We find that GeMoMa often makes more precise predictions than its competitors yielding a substantially increased number of correct transcripts. Subsequently, we exemplarily validate GeMoMa predictions using Sanger sequencing. Finally, we use RNA-seq data to compare the predictions of homology-based gene prediction programs, and find again that GeMoMa performs well. Hence, we conclude that exploiting intron position conservation improves homology-based gene prediction, and we make GeMoMa freely available as command-line tool and Galaxy integration. PMID:26893356

  13. Pilot study of homologous platelet gel in venous ulcers*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Mariele Gobo; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes; Miot, Hélio Amante; Ferreira, Rosana Rossi; Deffune, Elenice

    2017-01-01

    Background Venous ulcers represent 70% of the lower limb ulcers. They are difficult to heal, requiring a correct diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Many products have been developed to healing, such as homologous platelet gel obtained from the platelet concentrate exceeding from blood transfusion. Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of homologous platelet gel in venous ulcers compared with hydrocolloid dressing. Method A pilot randomized clinical trial in patients with venous ulcers. Randomized groups (homologous platelet gel and hydrocolloid groups) were followed for 90 days and were assessed through the evolution of ulcerated area, qualitative analysis of vascularization and adverse events. Both groups used elastic compression. Results We included 16 participants, with a total of 21 venous ulcers. Both treatments promoted a reduction of the areas of the ulcers in 90 days (mean 69%), there was significant difference between the groups concerning the gradual reduction of the ulcers areas, favorably to the hydrocolloid (70% vs 64%; p <0.01). There were some mild adverse events in both groups. Study limitations Single-center study with a small number of patients, preventing more accurate assessment of the effects of platelet gel. Conclusion The homologous platelet gel associated with the elastic compression can be an alternative to the venous ulcer treatment and is safe due to the occurrence of a few mild local adverse events and no serious adverse events. Clinical trials with larger numbers of patients must be performed to maintain the indication of this treatment for venous ulcer. PMID:28954098

  14. A Prominence/filament eruption triggered by eight homologous flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse; Innes, Davina; Moore, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    Eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 16 - 17 June 2011. A prominence system with a surrounding coronal cavity was adjacent to, but still magnetically connected to the active region. The eight eruptions expelled hot material from the active region into the prominence/filament cavity system (PFCS) where the ejecta became confined. We mainly aim to diagnose the 3D dynamics of the PFCS during the series of eight homologous eruptions by using data from two instruments: SDO/AIA and STEREO/EUVI-B, covering the Sun from two directions. The field containing the ejected hot material interacts with the PFCS and causes it to inflate, resulting in a discontinuous rise of the prominence/filament approximately in steps with the homologous eruptions. The eighth eruption triggers the PFCS to move outward slowly, accompanied by a weak coronal dimming. Subsequently the prominence/filament material drains to the solar surface. This PFCS eruption evidently slowly opens field overlying the active region, which results in a final ‘ejective’ eruption from the core of the active region. A strong dimming appears adjacent to the final eruption’s flare loops in the EUVI-B images, followed by a CME. We propose that the eight homologous flares gradually disrupted the PFCS and removed the overlying field above the active region, leading to the CME via the ‘lid removal’ mechanism.

  15. Homology modeling: an important tool for the drug discovery.

    PubMed

    França, Tanos Celmar Costa

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, homology modeling has become a popular tool to access theoretical three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecular targets. So far several 3D models of proteins have been built by this technique and used in a great diversity of structural biology studies. But are those models consistent enough with experimental structures to make this technique an effective and reliable tool for drug discovery? Here we present, briefly, the fundamentals and current state-of-the-art of the homology modeling techniques used to build 3D structures of molecular targets, which experimental structures are not available in databases, and list some of the more important works, using this technique, available in literature today. In many cases those studies have afforded successful models for the drug design of more selective agonists/antagonists to the molecular targets in focus and guided promising experimental works, proving that, when the appropriate templates are available, useful models can be built using some of the several software available today for this purpose. Limitations of the experimental techniques used to solve 3D structures allied to constant improvements in the homology modeling software will maintain the need for theoretical models, establishing the homology modeling as a fundamental tool for the drug discovery.

  16. Using intron position conservation for homology-based gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Keilwagen, Jens; Wenk, Michael; Erickson, Jessica L; Schattat, Martin H; Grau, Jan; Hartung, Frank

    2016-05-19

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is very important in bioinformatics and biology and has a decisive influence on many downstream analyses. Homology-based gene prediction programs allow for transferring knowledge about protein-coding genes from an annotated organism to an organism of interest.Here, we present a homology-based gene prediction program called GeMoMa. GeMoMa utilizes the conservation of intron positions within genes to predict related genes in other organisms. We assess the performance of GeMoMa and compare it with state-of-the-art competitors on plant and animal genomes using an extended best reciprocal hit approach. We find that GeMoMa often makes more precise predictions than its competitors yielding a substantially increased number of correct transcripts. Subsequently, we exemplarily validate GeMoMa predictions using Sanger sequencing. Finally, we use RNA-seq data to compare the predictions of homology-based gene prediction programs, and find again that GeMoMa performs well.Hence, we conclude that exploiting intron position conservation improves homology-based gene prediction, and we make GeMoMa freely available as command-line tool and Galaxy integration. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Homology and the optimization of DNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W.

    2001-01-01

    Three methods of nucleotide character analysis are discussed. Their implications for molecular sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis are compared. The criterion of inter-data set congruence, both character based and topological, are applied to two data sets to elucidate and potentially discriminate among these parsimony-based ideas. c2001 The Willi Hennig Society.

  18. Protein homology reveals new targets for bioactive small molecules.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, David; Zoete, Vincent

    2015-08-15

    The functional impact of small molecules is increasingly being assessed in different eukaryotic species through large-scale phenotypic screening initiatives. Identifying the targets of these molecules is crucial to mechanistically understand their function and uncover new therapeutically relevant modes of action. However, despite extensive work carried out in model organisms and human, it is still unclear to what extent one can use information obtained in one species to make predictions in other species. Here, for the first time, we explore and validate at a large scale the use of protein homology relationships to predict the targets of small molecules across different species. Our results show that exploiting target homology can significantly improve the predictions, especially for molecules experimentally tested in other species. Interestingly, when considering separately orthology and paralogy relationships, we observe that mapping small molecule interactions among orthologs improves prediction accuracy, while including paralogs does not improve and even sometimes worsens the prediction accuracy. Overall, our results provide a novel approach to integrate chemical screening results across multiple species and highlight the promises and remaining challenges of using protein homology for small molecule target identification. Homology-based predictions can be tested on our website http://www.swisstargetprediction.ch. david.gfeller@unil.ch or vincent.zoete@isb-sib.ch. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Reducing dimensionality in remote homology detection using predicted contact maps.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Oscar; Tischer, Irene

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a new method for remote protein homology detection is presented. Most discriminative methods concatenate the values extracted from physicochemical properties to build a model that separates homolog and non-homolog examples. Each discriminative method uses a specific strategy to represent the information extracted from the protein sequence and a different number of indices. After the vector representation is achieved, support vector machines (SVM) are usually used. Most classification techniques are not suitable in remote homology detection because they do not address high dimensional datasets. In this paper, we propose a method that reduces the high dimensionality of the vector representation using models that are defined at the 3D level. Next, the models are mapped from the protein primary sequence. The new method, called remote-C3D, is presented and tested on the SCOP 1.53 and SCOP 1.55 datasets. The remote-C3D method achieves a higher accuracy than the composition-based methods and a comparable performance with profile-based methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Discovery of eight novel divergent homologs expressed in cattle placenta.

    PubMed

    Larson, Joshua H; Kumar, Charu G; Everts, Robin E; Green, Cheryl A; Everts-van der Wind, Annelie; Band, Mark R; Lewin, Harris A

    2006-05-16

    Ten divergent homologs were identified using a subtractive bioinformatic analysis of 12,614 cattle placenta expressed sequence tags followed by comparative, evolutionary, and gene expression studies. Among the 10 divergent homologs, 8 have not been identified previously. These were named as follows: cattle cerebrum and skeletal muscle-specific transcript 1 (CSSMST1), cattle intestine-specific transcript 1 (CIST1), hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 amino-terminal domain-containing protein (HAVCRNDP), prolactin-related proteins 8, 9, and 11 (PRP8, PRP9, and PRP11, respectively) and secreted and transmembrane protein 1A and 1B (SECTM1A and SECTM1B, respectively). In addition, two previously known divergent genes were identified, trophoblast Kunitz domain protein 1 (TKDP1) and a new splice variant of TKDP4. Nucleotide substitution analysis provided evidence for positive selection in members of the PRP gene family, SECTM1A and SECTM1B. Gene expression profiles, motif predictions, and annotations of homologous sequences indicate immunological and reproductive functions of the divergent homologs. The genes identified in this study are thus of evolutionary and physiological importance and may have a role in placental adaptations.

  1. Homology and the optimization of DNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W.

    2001-01-01

    Three methods of nucleotide character analysis are discussed. Their implications for molecular sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis are compared. The criterion of inter-data set congruence, both character based and topological, are applied to two data sets to elucidate and potentially discriminate among these parsimony-based ideas. c2001 The Willi Hennig Society.

  2. Disruption of an ADE6 Homolog of Ustilago maydis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ustilago maydis secretes iron-binding compounds during times of iron depletion. A putative homolog of the Sacharromyces cereviseae ADE6 and Escherichia coli purL genes was identified near a multigenic complex, which contains two genes sid1 and sid2 involved in a siderophore biosynthetic pathway. The...

  3. Characterization and expression pattern of the novel MIA homolog TANGO.

    PubMed

    Bosserhoff, A K; Moser, M; Buettner, R

    2004-07-01

    A novel human gene, TANGO, encoding a MIA ('melanoma inhibitory activity') homologous protein was identified by a gene bank search. TANGO, together with the homologous genes MIA, OTOR (FPD, MIAL) and MIA2 define a novel gene family sharing important structural features, significant homology at both the nucleotide and protein level, and similar genomic organization. The four members share 34-45% amino acid identity and 47-59% cDNA sequence identity. TANGO encodes a mature protein of 103 amino acids in addition to a hydrophobic secretory signal sequence. Sequence homology confirms the highly conserved SH3 structure present also in MIA, OTOR and MIA2. Thus, it appears that there are a number of extracellular proteins with SH3-fold like structures. Interestingly, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR and Northern Blots revealed very broad TANGO expression patterns in contrast to the highly restricted expression patterns previously determined for the other members of the MIA gene family. The only cells lacking TANGO expression are cells belonging to the hematopoetic system. High levels of TANGO expression were observed both during embryogenesis and in adult tissues.

  4. Homolog-specific PCR primer design for profiling splice variants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Gyan Prakash; Hanumappa, Mamatha; Kushwaha, Garima; Nguyen, Henry T; Xu, Dong

    2011-05-01

    To study functional diversity of proteins encoded from a single gene, it is important to distinguish the expression levels among the alternatively spliced variants. A variant-specific primer pair is required to amplify each alternatively spliced variant individually. For this purpose, we developed a new feature, homolog-specific primer design (HSPD), in our high-throughput primer and probe design software tool, PRIMEGENS-v2. The algorithm uses a de novo approach to design primers without any prior information of splice variants or close homologs for an input query sequence. It not only designs primer pairs but also finds potential isoforms and homologs of the input sequence. Efficiency of this algorithm was tested for several gene families in soybean. A total of 187 primer pairs were tested under five different abiotic stress conditions with three replications at three time points. Results indicate a high success rate of primer design. Some primer pairs designed were able to amplify all splice variants of a gene. Furthermore, by utilizing combinations within the same multiplex pool, we were able to uniquely amplify a specific variant or duplicate gene. Our method can also be used to design PCR primers to specifically amplify homologs in the same gene family. PRIMEGENS-v2 is available at: http://primegens.org.

  5. Isolation and characterization of an AGAMOUS homolog from Fraxinus pennsylvanica

    Treesearch

    Ningxia Du; Paula M. Pijut

    2010-01-01

    An AGAMOUS homolog (FpAG) was isolated from green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method. Southern blot analysis indicated that FpAG was present as a single-copy sequence in the genome of green ash. RNA accumulated in the reproductive tissues (female...

  6. Molecular cloning of plant transcripts encoding protein kinase homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, M A; Yamamoto, R T; Hanks, S K; Lamb, C J

    1989-01-01

    Oligonucleotides, corresponding to conserved regions of animal protein-serine/threonine kinases, were used to isolate cDNAs encoding plant homologs in the dicot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and the monocot rice (Oryzae sativa L.). The C-terminal regions of the deduced polypeptides encoded by the bean (PVPK-1) and rice (G11A) cDNAs, prepared from mRNAs of suspension cultures and leaves, respectively, contain features characteristic of the catalytic domains of eukaryotic protein-serine/threonine kinases, indicating that these cDNAs encode plant protein kinases. The putative catalytic domains are most closely related to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases and the protein kinase C family, suggesting the plant homologs may likewise transduce extracellular signals. However, outside these domains, PVPK-1 and G11A exhibit no homology either to each other or to regulatory domains of other protein kinases, indicating the plant homologs are modulated by other signals. PVPK-1 corresponds to a 2.4-kb transcript in suspension cultured bean cells. Southern blots of genomic DNA indicate that PVPK-1 and G11A correspond to single copy genes that form part of a family of related plant sequences. Images PMID:2541432

  7. Functional Redundancy of Septin Homologs in Dendritic Branching

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Charlotte; Steinmann, Mayra; Zapiorkowska, Natalia A.; Ewers, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Septins are cytoskeletal GTPases present in nonpolar heteromeric complexes that assemble in a palindromic fashion from two to eight subunits. Mammalian septins function in several fundamental cellular processes at the membrane-cytoskeleton interface including dendritic branching in neurons. Sequence homology divides the 13 mammalian septin genes into four homology groups. Experimental findings suggest that septin function is redundant among septins from one homology group. This is best understood for the isoforms of the SEPT2 group, which form a homodimer at the center of septin complexes. In vitro, all SEPT2-group septins form recombinant hexameric complexes with two copies of SEPT6 and SEPT7. However, it remains unclear to what extent homologs septins can substitute for each other in specific cellular processes. Here, we use the experimental paradigm of dendritic branching in hippocampal rat neurons to ask, to what extent septins of the SEPT2-group are functionally redundant. Dendritic branching is significantly reduced when SEPT5 is downregulated. In neurons expressing SEPT5-shRNA, simultaneously expressed SEPT2-GFP, and SEPT4-GFP colocalize with SEPT7 at dendritic spine necks and rescue dendritic branching. In contrast, SEPT1-GFP is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm in SEPT5 downregulated neurons and cannot rescue dendritic branching. Our findings provide a basis for the study of septin-specific functions in cells. PMID:28265560

  8. Nematode sbRNAs: homologs of vertebrate Y RNAs.

    PubMed

    Boria, Ilenia; Gruber, Andreas R; Tanzer, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H; Lorenz, Ronny; Mueller, Michael M; Hofacker, Ivo L; Stadler, Peter F

    2010-04-01

    Stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) are a group of small, functionally yet uncharacterized noncoding RNAs first described in C. elegans, with a few homologous sequences postulated in C. briggsae. In this study, we report on a comprehensive survey of this ncRNA family in the phylum Nematoda. Employing homology search strategies based on both sequence and secondary structure models and a computational promoter screen we identified a total of 240 new sbRNA homologs. For the majority of these loci we identified both promoter regions and transcription termination signals characteristic for pol-III transcripts. Sequence and structure comparison with known RNA families revealed that sbRNAs are homologs of vertebrate Y RNAs. Most of the sbRNAs show the characteristic Ro protein binding motif, and contain a region highly similar to a functionally required motif for DNA replication previously thought to be unique to vertebrate Y RNAs. The single Y RNA that was previously described in C. elegans, however, does not show this motif, and in general bears the hallmarks of a highly derived family member.

  9. Non-homologous end joining: emerging themes and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-05-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells. Here, we discuss current insights into the mechanism of NHEJ and the interplay between NHEJ and other pathways for repair of IR-induced DNA damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Homology and the optimization of DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, W

    2001-03-01

    Three methods of nucleotide character analysis are discussed. Their implications for molecular sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis are compared. The criterion of inter-data set congruence, both character based and topological, are applied to two data sets to elucidate and potentially discriminate among these parsimony-based ideas.

  11. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-07

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  12. Neural coupling between homologous muscles during bimanual tasks: effects of visual and somatosensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoi B; Lee, Sang Wook; Harris-Love, Michelle L; Lum, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    While the effects of sensory feedback on bimanual tasks have been studied extensively at two ends of the motor control hierarchy, the cortical and behavioral levels, much less is known about how it affects the intermediate levels, including neural control of homologous muscle groups. We investigated the effects of somatosensory input on the neural coupling between homologous arm muscles during bimanual tasks. Twelve subjects performed symmetric elbow flexion/extension tasks under different types of sensory feedback. The first two types involve visual feedback, with one imposing stricter force symmetry than the other. The third incorporated somatosensory feedback via a balancing apparatus that forced the two limbs to produce equal force levels. Although the force error did not differ between feedback conditions, the somatosensory feedback significantly increased temporal coupling of bilateral force production, indicated by a high correlation between left/right force profiles (P < 0.001). More importantly, intermuscular coherence between biceps brachii muscles was significantly higher with somatosensory feedback than others (P = 0.001). Coherence values also significantly differed between tasks (flexion/extension). Notably, whereas feedback type mainly modulated coherence in the α- and γ-bands, task type only affected β-band coherence. Similar feedback effects were observed for triceps brachii muscles, but there was also a strong phase effect on the coherence values (P < 0.001) that could have diluted feedback effects. These results suggest that somatosensory feedback can significantly increase neural coupling between homologous muscles. Additionally, the between-task difference in β-band coherence may reflect different neural control strategies for the elbow flexor and extensor muscles.

  13. Cloning and antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a human homolog of cdc2 required in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Lapidot-Lifson, Y; Patinkin, D; Prody, C A; Ehrlich, G; Seidman, S; Ben-Aziz, R; Benseler, F; Eckstein, F; Zakut, H; Soreq, H

    1992-01-15

    Mechanisms triggering the commitment of pluripotent bone marrow stem cells to differentiated lineages such as mononuclear macrophages or multinucleated megakaryocytes are still unknown, although several lines of evidence suggested correlation between cholinergic signaling and hematopoietic differentiation. We now present cloning of a cDNA coding for CHED (cholinesterase-related cell division controller), a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell division cycle 2 (cdc2)-like kinases, universal controllers of the mitotic cell cycle. Library screening, RNA blot hybridization, and direct PCR amplification of cDNA reverse-transcribed from cellular mRNA revealed that CHED mRNA is expressed in multiple tissues, including bone marrow. The CHED protein includes the consensus ATP binding and phosphorylation domains characteristic of kinases, displays 34-42% identically aligned amino acid residues with other cdc2-related kinases, and is considerably longer at its amino and carboxyl termini. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide designed to interrupt CHED's expression (AS-CHED) significantly reduced the ratio between CHED mRNA and actin mRNA within 1 hr of its addition to cultures, a reduction that persisted for 4 days. AS-CHED treatment selectively inhibited megakaryocyte development in murine bone marrow cultures but did not prevent other hematopoietic pathways, as evidenced by increasing numbers of mononuclear cells. An oligodeoxynucleotide blocking production of the acetylcholine-hydrolyzing enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, displayed a similar inhibition of megakaryocytopoiesis. In contrast, an oligodeoxynucleotide blocking production of the human 2Hs cdc2 homolog interfered with production of the human 2Hs cdc2 homolog interfered with cellular proliferation without altering the cell-type composition of these cultures. Therefore, these findings strengthen the link between cholinergic signaling and cell division control in hematopoiesis and implicate both CHED and

  14. Cloning and antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a human homolog of cdc2 required in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot-Lifson, Y; Patinkin, D; Prody, C A; Ehrlich, G; Seidman, S; Ben-Aziz, R; Benseler, F; Eckstein, F; Zakut, H; Soreq, H

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms triggering the commitment of pluripotent bone marrow stem cells to differentiated lineages such as mononuclear macrophages or multinucleated megakaryocytes are still unknown, although several lines of evidence suggested correlation between cholinergic signaling and hematopoietic differentiation. We now present cloning of a cDNA coding for CHED (cholinesterase-related cell division controller), a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell division cycle 2 (cdc2)-like kinases, universal controllers of the mitotic cell cycle. Library screening, RNA blot hybridization, and direct PCR amplification of cDNA reverse-transcribed from cellular mRNA revealed that CHED mRNA is expressed in multiple tissues, including bone marrow. The CHED protein includes the consensus ATP binding and phosphorylation domains characteristic of kinases, displays 34-42% identically aligned amino acid residues with other cdc2-related kinases, and is considerably longer at its amino and carboxyl termini. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide designed to interrupt CHED's expression (AS-CHED) significantly reduced the ratio between CHED mRNA and actin mRNA within 1 hr of its addition to cultures, a reduction that persisted for 4 days. AS-CHED treatment selectively inhibited megakaryocyte development in murine bone marrow cultures but did not prevent other hematopoietic pathways, as evidenced by increasing numbers of mononuclear cells. An oligodeoxynucleotide blocking production of the acetylcholine-hydrolyzing enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, displayed a similar inhibition of megakaryocytopoiesis. In contrast, an oligodeoxynucleotide blocking production of the human 2Hs cdc2 homolog interfered with production of the human 2Hs cdc2 homolog interfered with cellular proliferation without altering the cell-type composition of these cultures. Therefore, these findings strengthen the link between cholinergic signaling and cell division control in hematopoiesis and implicate both CHED and

  15. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J; Lewis, Warren G; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  16. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J.; Lewis, Warren G.; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening. PMID:27746901

  17. Mutation of the BRCA1 SQ-cluster results in aberrant mitosis, reduced homologous recombination, and a compensatory increase in non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Beckta, Jason M; Dever, Seth M; Gnawali, Nisha; Khalil, Ashraf; Sule, Amrita; Golding, Sarah E; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Xu, Bo; Povirk, Lawrence F; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2015-09-29

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene are catalysts for breast and ovarian cancers. Most mutations are associated with the BRCA1 N- and C-terminal domains linked to DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. However, little is known about the role of the intervening serine-glutamine (SQ) - cluster in the DNA damage response beyond its importance in regulating cell cycle checkpoints. We show that serine-to-alanine alterations at critical residues within the SQ-cluster known to be phosphorylated by ATM and ATR result in reduced homologous recombination repair (HRR) and aberrant mitosis. While a S1387A BRCA1 mutant - previously shown to abrogate S-phase arrest in response to radiation - resulted in only a modest decrease in HRR, S1387A together with an additional alteration, S1423A (BRCA12P), reduced HRR to vector control levels and similar to a quadruple mutant also including S1457A and S1524A (BRCA14P). These effects appeared to be independent of PALB2. Furthermore, we found that BRCA14P promoted a prolonged and struggling HRR late in the cell cycle and shifted DSB repair from HRR to non-homologous end joining which, in the face of irreparable chromosomal damage, resulted in mitotic catastrophe. Altogether, SQ-cluster phosphorylation is critical for allowing adequate time for completing normal HRR prior to mitosis and preventing cells from entering G1 prematurely resulting in gross chromosomal aberrations.

  18. Mutation of the BRCA1 SQ-cluster results in aberrant mitosis, reduced homologous recombination, and a compensatory increase in non-homologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Gnawali, Nisha; Khalil, Ashraf; Sule, Amrita; Golding, Sarah E.; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Xu, Bo; Povirk, Lawrence F.; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene are catalysts for breast and ovarian cancers. Most mutations are associated with the BRCA1 N- and C-terminal domains linked to DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. However, little is known about the role of the intervening serine-glutamine (SQ) - cluster in the DNA damage response beyond its importance in regulating cell cycle checkpoints. We show that serine-to-alanine alterations at critical residues within the SQ-cluster known to be phosphorylated by ATM and ATR result in reduced homologous recombination repair (HRR) and aberrant mitosis. While a S1387A BRCA1 mutant - previously shown to abrogate S-phase arrest in response to radiation - resulted in only a modest decrease in HRR, S1387A together with an additional alteration, S1423A (BRCA12P), reduced HRR to vector control levels and similar to a quadruple mutant also including S1457A and S1524A (BRCA14P). These effects appeared to be independent of PALB2. Furthermore, we found that BRCA14P promoted a prolonged and struggling HRR late in the cell cycle and shifted DSB repair from HRR to non-homologous end joining which, in the face of irreparable chromosomal damage, resulted in mitotic catastrophe. Altogether, SQ-cluster phosphorylation is critical for allowing adequate time for completing normal HRR prior to mitosis and preventing cells from entering G1 prematurely resulting in gross chromosomal aberrations. PMID:26320175

  19. Monitoring homology search during DNA double-strand break repair in vivo.

    PubMed

    Renkawitz, Jörg; Lademann, Claudio A; Kalocsay, Marian; Jentsch, Stefan

    2013-04-25

    Homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genetic exchange and accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is pivotal for genome integrity. HR uses homologous sequences for repair, but how homology search, the exploration of the genome for homologous DNA sequences, is conducted in the nucleus remains poorly understood. Here, we use time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitations of repair proteins to monitor homology search in vivo. We found that homology search proceeds by a probing mechanism, which commences around the break and samples preferentially on the broken chromosome. However, elements thought to instruct chromosome loops mediate homology search shortcuts, and centromeres, which cluster within the nucleus, may facilitate homology search on other chromosomes. Our study thus reveals crucial parameters for homology search in vivo and emphasizes the importance of linear distance, chromosome architecture, and proximity for recombination efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Studies of DNA End Detection and Resection in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Christian Bernd; Seifert, Florian Ulrich; Linke-Winnebeck, Christian; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by two major pathways, homologous recombination or nonhomologous end joining. The commitment to one or the other pathway proceeds via different steps of resection of the DNA ends, which is controlled and executed by a set of DNA double-strand break sensors, endo- and exonucleases, helicases, and DNA damage response factors. The molecular choreography of the underlying protein machinery is beginning to emerge. In this review, we discuss the early steps of genetic recombination and double-strand break sensing with an emphasis on structural and molecular studies. PMID:25081516

  1. Retinoblastoma family proteins: New players in DNA repair by non-homologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Paul H; Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2016-03-01

    Loss of retinoblastoma protein (RB1) function is a major driver in cancer development. We have recently reported that, in addition to its well-documented functions in cell cycle and fate control, RB1 and its paralogs have a novel role in regulating DNA repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here we summarize our findings and present mechanistic hypotheses on how RB1 may support the DNA repair process and the therapeutic implications for patients who harbor RB1-negative cancers.

  2. Chimeric mitochondrial minichromosomes of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus: evidence for homologous and non-homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Shao, Renfu; Barker, Stephen C

    2011-02-15

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, consists of 18 minichromosomes. Each minichromosome is 3 to 4 kb long and has 1 to 3 genes. There is unequivocal evidence for recombination between different mt minichromosomes in P. humanus. It is not known, however, how these minichromosomes recombine. Here, we report the discovery of eight chimeric mt minichromosomes in P. humanus. We classify these chimeric mt minichromosomes into two groups: Group I and Group II. Group I chimeric minichromosomes contain parts of two different protein-coding genes that are from different minichromosomes. The two parts of protein-coding genes in each Group I chimeric minichromosome are joined at a microhomologous nucleotide sequence; microhomologous nucleotide sequences are hallmarks of non-homologous recombination. Group II chimeric minichromosomes contain all of the genes and the non-coding regions of two different minichromosomes. The conserved sequence blocks in the non-coding regions of Group II chimeric minichromosomes resemble the "recombination repeats" in the non-coding regions of the mt genomes of higher plants. These repeats are essential to homologous recombination in higher plants. Our analyses of the nucleotide sequences of chimeric mt minichromosomes indicate both homologous and non-homologous recombination between minichromosomes in the mitochondria of the human body louse. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated multimodal network approach to PET and MRI based on multidimensional persistent homology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyekyoung; Kang, Hyejin; Chung, Moo K; Lim, Seonhee; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-03-01

    Finding underlying relationships among multiple imaging modalities in a coherent fashion is one of the challenging problems in multimodal analysis. In this study, we propose a novel approach based on multidimensional persistence. In the extension of the previous threshold-free method of persistent homology, we visualize and discriminate the topological change of integrated brain networks by varying not only threshold but also mixing ratio between two different imaging modalities. The multidimensional persistence is implemented by a new bimodal integration method called 1D projection. When the mixing ratio is predefined, it constructs an integrated edge weight matrix by projecting two different connectivity information onto the one dimensional shared space. We applied the proposed methods to PET and MRI data from 23 attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children, 21 autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and 10 pediatric control subjects. From the results, we found that the brain networks of ASD, ADHD children and controls differ, with ASD and ADHD showing asymmetrical changes of connected structures between metabolic and morphological connectivities. The difference of connected structure between ASD and the controls was mainly observed in the metabolic connectivity. However, ADHD showed the maximum difference when two connectivity information were integrated with the ratio 0.6. These results provide a multidimensional homological understanding of disease-related PET and MRI networks that disclose the network association with ASD and ADHD. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1387-1402, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prognostic Value of Discs Large Homolog 7 Transcript Levels in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Christian R.; Kosari, Farhad; Munz, Jan-Marie; Schreiber, Claire A.; Knutson, Gaylord J.; Ida, Cristiane M.; El Khattouti, Abdelouahid; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Cheville, John C.; Vasmatzis, George; Vuk-Pavlović, Stanimir

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia has been associated with malignant progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Hence, we studied expression of hypoxia–regulated genes in 100 prostate cancer (CaP) bulk tissues and 71 adjacent benign tissues. We found 24 transcripts significantly overexpressed (p≤0.02). Importantly, higher transcript levels of disc large (drosophila) homolog-associated protein 5 (DLGAP5)/discs large homolog 7 (DLG7)/hepatoma up-regulated protein (HURP), hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (HMMR) and cyclin B1 (CCNB1) were associated with higher Gleason score and more advanced systemic progression. Since the products of HMMR and CCNB1 have been identified recently as molecular markers of CaP progression, we postulated that DLG7 has prognostic value too. To test this hypothesis, we measured transcript levels for DLG7 in a 150-pair case-control cohort. The cases (progression to systemic disease within six years of surgery) and controls (no progression within eight years) were matched for clinical and pathologic prognostic variables, including grade, stage, and preoperative serum levels of PSA. The overall prognostic ability of DLG7, as tested in receiver operating characteristic analysis was of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.8). Overall, our data indicate that expression of DLG7, a hypoxia-controlled gene, holds prognostic potential in high-risk CaP; this also demonstrates that variation of oxygen tension may constitute a tool for identification of novel biomarkers for CaP. PMID:24349376

  5. Analysis of benzalkonium chloride and its homologs: HPLC versus HPCE.

    PubMed

    Prince, S J; McLaury, H J; Allen, L V; McLaury, P

    1999-05-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is a mixture of alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride homologs with n-C,2H25, n-C,4H29, and n-C16H33 comprising a major portion of the alkyl groups present. An analytical method for BAK must differentiate and quantitate the homologs in the BAK mixture. Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separates compounds based on their affinity for a nonpolar column, which is a direct correlation to the compounds' polarity. High performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE), however, separates compounds in an electric field according to their charge and size. The BAK homologs are suitable for separation by either of these methods because their polarity and sizes differ significantly. The HPLC method employed a mobile phase of 60% acetonitrile and 40% 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer pH 5 pumped at 1.0 ml min(-1), a 4.6 x 250 mm cyano column with 5 microm packing, and UV detection at 254 nm. The HPCE method utilized a run buffer of 30% acetonitrile and 70% 0.05 M sodium phosphate pH 3.06, a 50 microm x 20 cm open silica capillary, 7.5 kV electric field and UV detection at 214 nm. Both HPLC and HPCE demonstrated good linearity in the range of 0.025 to 0.8 mg ml(-1) with r2 values of approximately 0.99. The HPLC method produced good separation of the homolog peaks with a total analysis time of 25 min. HPCE run time was less than 5 min and demonstrated good separation of the three homologs. The HPLC method, however, was superior to HPCE in the areas of sensitivity and precision. The HPLC has been extensively used in the routine quantitation and qualitation of benzalkonium chloride concentrations in various products; however, long analysis times make this method inefficient. The HPCE method produced comparable results to the HPLC method but with much shorter analysis times. An HPCE analysis method, as presented here, may prove to be a much more useful and efficient method for the analysis of benzalkonium chloride and its homologs.

  6. Guidelines for identifying homologous recombination events in influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Boni, Maciej F; de Jong, Menno D; van Doorn, H Rogier; Holmes, Edward C

    2010-05-03

    The rapid evolution of influenza viruses occurs both clonally and non-clonally through a variety of genetic mechanisms and selection pressures. The non-clonal evolution of influenza viruses comprises relatively frequent reassortment among gene segments and a more rarely reported process of non-homologous RNA recombination. Homologous RNA recombination within segments has been proposed as a third such mechanism, but to date the evidence for the existence of this process among influenza viruses has been both weak and controversial. As homologous recombination has not yet been demonstrated in the laboratory, supporting evidence, if it exists, may come primarily from patterns of phylogenetic incongruence observed in gene sequence data. Here, we review the necessary criteria related to laboratory procedures and sample handling, bioinformatic analysis, and the known ecology and evolution of influenza viruses that need to be met in order to confirm that a homologous recombination event occurred in the history of a set of sequences. To determine if these criteria have an effect on recombination analysis, we gathered 8307 publicly available full-length sequences of influenza A segments and divided them into those that were sequenced via the National Institutes of Health Influenza Genome Sequencing Project (IGSP) and those that were not. As sample handling and sequencing are executed to a very high standard in the IGSP, these sequences should be less likely to be exposed to contamination by other samples or by laboratory strains, and thus should not exhibit laboratory-generated signals of homologous recombination. Our analysis shows that the IGSP data set contains only two phylogenetically-supported single recombinant sequences and no recombinant clades. In marked contrast, the non-IGSP data show a very large amount of potential recombination. We conclude that the presence of false positive signals in the non-IGSP data is more likely than false negatives in the IGSP data

  7. Scientific and forensic standards for homologous blood transfusion anti-doping analyses.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Sylvain; Robinson, Neil; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2008-07-18

    Since the introduction in 2001 of a urine-based detection method for recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO), transfusion-doping practices have regained interest. To address this problem, an efficient antidoping test designed to obtain direct proof of allogeneic blood transfusion was developed and validated. This test, based on flow cytometry analysis of red blood cell (RBCs) phenotypes, was used to determine the absence or the presence of numerous RBCs populations in a blood sample. A such, it may constitute a direct proof of an abnormal blood population resulting from homologous transfusion. Single-blind and single-site studies were carried out to validate this method as a forensic quality standard analysis and to allow objective interpretation of real cases. The analysis of 140 blood samples containing different percentages (0-5%) of a minor RBCs population were carried on by four independent analysts. Robustness, sensitivity, specificity, precision and stability were assessed. ISO-accredited controls samples were used to demonstrate that the method was robust, stable and precise. No false positive results were observed, resulting in a 100% specificity of the method. Most samples containing a 1.5% minor RBCs population were unambiguously detected, yielding a 78.1% sensitivity. These samples mimicked blood collected from an athlete 3 months after a homologous blood transfusion event where 10% of the total RBCs present in the recipient originated in the donor. The observed false negative results could be explained by differences in antigen expression between the donor and the recipient. False negatives were more numerous with smaller minor RBCs populations. The method described here fulfils the ISO-17025 accreditation and validation requirements. The controls and the methodology are solid enough to determine with certainty whether a sample contains one or more RBCs populations. This variable is currently the best indicator for homologous blood transfusion doping.

  8. LuxR homolog-independent gene regulation by acyl-homoserine lactones in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chugani, Sudha; Greenberg, Everett Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum control of gene expression involves three LuxR-type signal receptors LasR, RhlR, and QscR that respond to the LasI- and RhlI-generated acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signals 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL. We found that a LasR-RhlR-QscR triple mutant responds to acyl-HSLs by regulating at least 37 genes. LuxR homolog-independent activation of the representative genes antA and catB also occurs in the wild type. Expression of antA was influenced the most by C10-HSL and to a lesser extent by other acyl-HSLs, including the P. aeruginosa 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL signals. The ant and cat operons encode enzymes for the degradation of anthranilate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Our results indicate that LuxR homolog-independent acyl-HSL control of the ant and cat operons occurs via regulation of antR, which codes for the transcriptional activator of the ant operon. Although P. aeruginosa has multiple pathways for anthranilate synthesis, one pathway—the kynurenine pathway for tryptophan degradation—is required for acyl-HSL activation of the ant operon. The kynurenine pathway is also the critical source of anthranilate for energy metabolism via the antABC gene products, as well as the source of anthranilate for synthesis of the P. aeruginosa quinolone signal. Our discovery of LuxR homolog-independent responses to acyl-HSLs provides insight into acyl-HSL signaling. PMID:20498077

  9. A computational approach to discovering the functions of bacterial phytochromes by analysis of homolog distributions.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, Tilman

    2006-03-16

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors, discovered in plants, that control a wide variety of developmental processes. They have also been found in bacteria and fungi, but for many species their biological role remains obscure. This work concentrates on the phytochrome system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a non-photosynthetic soil bacterium with two phytochromes. To identify proteins that might share common functions with phytochromes, a co-distribution analysis was performed on the basis of protein sequences from 138 bacteria. A database of protein sequences from 138 bacteria was generated. Each sequence was BLASTed against the entire database. The homolog distribution of each query protein was then compared with the homolog distribution of every other protein (target protein) of the same species, and the target proteins were sorted according to their probability of co-distribution under random conditions. As query proteins, phytochromes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Deinococcus radiodurans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 were chosen along with several phytochrome-related proteins from A. tumefaciens. The Synechocystis photosynthesis protein D1 was selected as a control. In the D1 analyses, the ratio between photosynthesis-related proteins and those not related to photosynthesis among the top 150 in the co-distribution tables was > 3:1, showing that the method is appropriate for finding partner proteins with common functions. The co-distribution of phytochromes with other histidine kinases was remarkably high, although most co-distributed histidine kinases were not direct BLAST homologs of the query protein. This finding implies that phytochromes and other histidine kinases share common functions as parts of signalling networks. All phytochromes tested, with one exception, also revealed a remarkably high co-distribution with glutamate synthase and methionine synthase. This result implies a general role of bacterial phytochromes in ammonium

  10. Vitelline membrane outer layer 1 homolog interacts with lysozyme C and promotes the stabilization of tear film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Chen, Ziyan; Yang, Qian; Jiang, Yibo; Lin, Liping; Liu, Xialin; Wu, Kaili

    2014-09-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the possible interactions between vitelline membrane outer layer 1 homolog (VMO1) and other tear proteins and to determine the function of VMO1 in tear fluid. Interactions between recombinant human VMO1 and several abundant tear proteins were determined by dot blot, His pull-down, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot assays, as well as by computer-assisted prediction and modeling of molecular interactions. Kirby-Bauer antibiotic testing was performed to determine whether VMO1 possesses antimicrobial activity. Tear samples were collected from dry eye patients and from healthy controls. The role of VMO1 in maintaining the stability of tear film was investigated by measurement of contact angles on Teflon, tear break-up time (TBUT) and the time-dependent reduction in tear film integrity in mice. Vitelline membrane outer layer 1 homolog showed an interaction with lysozyme C (LYSC) in the dot-blot, His pull-down, and immunoprecipitation assays. Vitelline membrane outer layer 1 homolog revealed no zones of growth inhibition of standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Tears presented smaller contact angles on Teflon surfaces after the addition of VMO1 (P<0.05). Vitelline membrane outer layer 1 homolog-treated mice showed longer TBUTs (P<0.05). Tear films from VMO1-treated mice maintained their integrity for longer periods of time than tear films from the control group, and this effect was dose-dependent. Vitelline membrane outer layer 1 homolog interacts with LYSC and has positive effects on the stabilization of tear film. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  11. Rankprop: a web server for protein remote homology detection

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Iain; Weston, Jason; Leslie, Christina; Noble, William Stafford

    2009-01-01

    Summary: We present a large-scale implementation of the Rankprop protein homology ranking algorithm in the form of an openly accessible web server. We use the NRDB40 PSI-BLAST all-versus-all protein similarity network of 1.1 million proteins to construct the graph for the Rankprop algorithm, whereas previously, results were only reported for a database of 108 000 proteins. We also describe two algorithmic improvements to the original algorithm, including propagation from multiple homologs of the query and better normalization of ranking scores, that lead to higher accuracy and to scores with a probabilistic interpretation. Availability: The Rankprop web server and source code are available at http://rankprop.gs.washington.edu Contact: iain@nec-labs.com; noble@gs.washington.edu PMID:18990723

  12. Molecular evolution of a Drosophila homolog of human BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sarah M; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2009-11-01

    The human cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, functions in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination, and it appears to function via interaction of a repetitive region ("BRC repeats") with RAD-51. A putatively simpler homolog, dmbrca2, was identified in Drosophila melanogaster recently and also affects mitotic and meiotic double-strand break repair. In this study, we examined patterns of repeat variation both within Drosophila pseudoobscura and among available Drosophila genome sequences. We identified extensive variation within and among closely related Drosophila species in BRC repeat number, to the extent that variation within this genus recapitulates the extent of variation found across the entire animal kingdom. We describe patterns of evolution across species by documenting recent repeat expansions (sometimes in tandem arrays) and homogenizations within available genome sequences. Overall, we have documented patterns and modes of evolution in a new model system of a gene which is important to human health.

  13. Electrostatic Braiding and Homologous Pairing of DNA Double Helices

    PubMed Central

    Cortini, Ruggero; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Homologous pairing and braiding (supercoiling) have crucial effects on genome organization, maintenance, and evolution. Generally, the pairing and braiding processes are discussed in different contexts, independently of each other. However, analysis of electrostatic interactions between DNA double helices suggests that in some situations these processes may be related. Here we present a theory of DNA braiding that accounts for the elastic energy of DNA double helices as well as for the chiral nature of the discrete helical patterns of DNA charges. This theory shows that DNA braiding may be affected, stabilized, or even driven by chiral electrostatic interactions. For example, electrostatically driven braiding may explain the surprising recent observation of stable pairing of homologous double-stranded DNA in solutions containing only monovalent salt. Electrostatic stabilization of left-handed braids may stand behind the chiral selectivity of type II topoisomerases and positive plasmid supercoiling in hyperthermophilic bacteria and archea. PMID:21843478

  14. Homology, similarity, and identity in peptide epitope immunodefinition.

    PubMed

    Kanduc, Darja

    2012-08-01

    The tendency to use the terms homology, similarity, and identity interchangeably persists in comparative biology. When translated to immunology, overlapping the concepts of homology, similarity, and identity complicates the exact definition of the self-nonself dichotomy and, in particular, affects immunopeptidomics, an emerging field aimed at cataloging and distinguishing immunoreactive peptide epitopes from silent nonreactive amino acid sequences. The definition of similar/dissimilar peptides in immunology is discussed with special attention to the analysis of immunological (dis)similarity between two or more protein sequences that equates to measuring sequence similarity with the use of a proper measurement unit such as a length determinant. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Levels of homology and the problem of neocortex.

    PubMed

    Dugas-Ford, Jennifer; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-07-08

    The neocortex is found only in mammals, and the fossil record is silent on how this soft tissue evolved. Understanding neocortex evolution thus devolves to a search for candidate homologous neocortex traits in the extant nonmammalian amniotes. The difficulty is that homology is based on similarity, and the six-layered neocortex structure could hardly be more dissimilar in appearance from the nuclear organization that is so conspicuous in the dorsal telencephalon of birds and other reptiles. Recent molecular data have, however, provided new support for one prominent hypothesis, based on neuronal circuits, that proposes the principal neocortical input and output cell types are a conserved feature of amniote dorsal telencephalon. Many puzzles remain, the greatest being understanding the selective pressures and molecular mechanisms that underlie such tremendous morphological variation in telencephalon structure.

  16. Emerging flux as a driver for homologous flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranns, N. D. R.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Culhane, J. L.

    2000-08-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of 2 M-class solar flares observed by SoHO and Yohkoh, which appear to be homologous. By examination of the flare loop morphology and footpoints we propose a schematic reconnection scenario of a two loop interaction in a quadrupolar magnetic configuration, for both flares (Machado ?; Mandrini ?). After the first flare, the combination of chance emergence of new flux at an opportune location and a subsequent flare, of the type described by Heyvaerts et al. (?), form a new quadrupolar configuration in which the second flare occurred. Therefore though the two M-class flares are homologous by definition, they appear to conform to a scenario in which the preflare conditions are reformed after the first flare by emerging flux, rather than models which involve the continual shearing of a single magnetic structure.

  17. Computational identification of functional RNA homologs in metagenomic data

    PubMed Central

    Nawrocki, Eric P.; Eddy, Sean R.

    2013-01-01

    A key step toward understanding a metagenomics data set is the identification of functional sequence elements within it, such as protein coding genes and structural RNAs. Relative to protein coding genes, structural RNAs are more difficult to identify because of their reduced alphabet size, lack of open reading frames, and short length. Infernal is a software package that implements “covariance models” (CMs) for RNA homology search, which harness both sequence and structural conservation when searching for RNA homologs. Thanks to the added statistical signal inherent in the secondary structure conservation of many RNA families, Infernal is more powerful than sequence-only based methods such as BLAST and profile HMMs. Together with the Rfam database of CMs, Infernal is a useful tool for identifying RNAs in metagenomics data sets. PMID:23722291

  18. Homology and isomorphism: Bourdieu in conversation with New Institutionalism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingyao

    2016-06-01

    Bourdieusian Field Theory (BFT) provided decisive inspiration for the early conceptual formulation of New Institutionalism (NI). This paper attempts to reinvigorate the stalled intellectual dialogue between NI and BFT by comparing NI's concept of isomorphism with BFT's notion of homology. I argue that Bourdieu's understanding of domination-oriented social action, transposable habitus, and a non-linear causality, embodied in his neglected concept of homology, provides an alternative theorization of field-level convergence to New Institutionalism's central idea of institutional isomorphism. To showcase how BFT can be useful for organizational research, I postulate a habitus-informed and field-conditioned theory of transference to enrich NI's spin-off thesis of 'diffusion'. I propose that while NI can benefit from BFT's potential of bringing social structure back into organizational research, BFT can enrich its social analysis by borrowing from NI's elaboration of the symbolic system of organizations. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  19. Community-local homology of force chains in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Chad; Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen; Bassett, Danielle

    2015-03-01

    The development of robust quantitative measurements of the structure of force chains in granular materials remains an open problem. Recent work of Bassett, et. al. applies community detection algorithms to extract subnetworks of strongly interacting particles, and then computes geometric measures of these networks to characterize local branching. Separately, Kramar, et. al. apply persistent homology to extract robust global signatures of chains in terms of their Betti numbers. Here, we investigate a hybrid of these two approaches, computing low-dimensional persistent homology of the clique complexes of communities in force-chain graphs. Such invariants measure the tendency of core chain sections to branch while remaining insensitive to the presence of tightly-packed collections of particles, thus making them natural candidates for both local and global stability analysis.

  20. Optimization criteria and biological process enrichment in homologous multiprotein modules

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Luqman; Karp, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Biological process enrichment is a widely used metric for evaluating the quality of multiprotein modules. In this study, we examine possible optimization criteria for detecting homologous multiprotein modules and quantify their effects on biological process enrichment. We find that modularity, linear density, and module size are the most important criteria considered, complementary to each other, and that graph theoretical attributes account for 36% of the variance in biological process enrichment. Variations in protein interaction similarity within module pairs have only minor effects on biological process enrichment. As random modules increase in size, both biological process enrichment and modularity tend to improve, although modularity does not show this upward trend in modules with size at most 50 proteins. To adjust for these trends, we recommend a size correction based on random sampling of modules when using biological process enrichment or other attributes to evaluate module boundaries. Characteristics of homologous multiprotein modules optimized for each of the optimization criteria are examined. PMID:23757502

  1. Guidelines for Homology Modeling of Dopamine, Norepinephrine, and Serotonin Transporters.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-11-16

    The human dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters (hDAT, hNET, and hSERT) are carriers of neurotransmitters and targets for many drugs. Pioneering works in the past three years to elucidate experimental models of the Drosophila dDAT and human hSERT structures will rapidly impact the field of neuroscience. Here, we evaluated automated homology-based human models of these transporters, employing systematic physics-based, knowledge-based, and empirical-based check. Modeling guidelines were conveyed with attention to the central binding site (S1), secondary binding site (S2), and the extracellular loops EL2 and EL4. Application of new experimental models (dDAT and hSERT) will improve the accuracy of homology models, previously utilizing prokaryotic leucine transporter (LeuT) structure, and provide better predictions of ligand interactions, which is required for understanding of cellular mechanisms and for development of novel therapeutics.

  2. Homology Parameters for Large Axisymmetric Shaped Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, You; Duan, Baoyan; Wang, Congsi; Wang, Wei; Feng, Shufei; Xiang, Binbin

    2017-05-01

    We extend the concept of best-fitting paraboloids for large single and dual reflectors with conic-section surfaces to best-fit shaped surface for large dual reflectors shaped for uniform amplitude distribution. The point focus of the paraboloidal main reflector is replaced by focal lines for the main reflector and the primary subreflector focus, whereas the secondary subreflector point focus at the feed is kept. The reflector surfaces are shaped, and all rays from the main-reflector aperture to the feed meet an equal-path-length condition. This condition may be represented by a set of "homology parameters" determined by a least-squares method. Finally, we calculate the homology parameters and the root mean square of surface errors for an 8-m dual-reflector system including gravity effects for the antenna pointed toward zenith and the horizon.

  3. Homology modeling of transporter proteins (carriers and ion channels).

    PubMed

    Ravna, Aina Westrheim; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2012-01-01

    Transporter proteins are divided into channels and carriers and constitute families of membrane proteins of physiological and pharmacological importance. These proteins are targeted by several currently prescribed drugs, and they have a large potential as targets for new drug development. Ion channels and carriers are difficult to express and purify in amounts for X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, and few carrier and ion channel structures are deposited in the PDB database. The scarcity of atomic resolution 3D structures of carriers and channels is a problem for understanding their molecular mechanisms of action and for designing new compounds with therapeutic potentials. The homology modeling approach is a valuable approach for obtaining structural information about carriers and ion channels when no crystal structure of the protein of interest is available. In this chapter, computational approaches for constructing homology models of carriers and transporters are reviewed.

  4. On the homology of lattice vibrations of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, V.; Satishkumar, M.

    1980-02-01

    Investigations of the dependence of lattice vibrations of alkali metals on their interatomic distance, r reveal that they satisfy an empirical relation, Mv 2 r α=δ(q), a constant which depends on α, with q=2·48 ± 0·19 at all wave vectors and hence are homologous. It is shown that the observed crossover of [ζ00] branches of lithium is not an anomalous property, but only manifests itself in alkali metals with smaller interatomic distance due to small variations of α. The role played by interatomic distance which is closely related to that of the electron gas constant C' in producing a crossover and a possible reason for the observed homology are discussed.

  5. Modulation of meiotic homologous recombination by DNA helicases.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    DNA helicases are ATP-driven motor proteins which translocate along DNA capable of dismantling DNA-DNA interactions and/or removing proteins bound to DNA. These biochemical capabilities make DNA helicases main regulators of crucial DNA metabolic processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. This budding topic will focus on reviewing the function of DNA helicases important for homologous recombination during meiosis, and discuss recent advances in how these modulators of meiotic recombination are themselves regulated. The emphasis is placed on work in the two model yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has vastly expanded our understanding of meiotic homologous recombination, a process whose correct execution is instrumental for healthy gamete formation, and thus functioning sexual reproduction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  7. Insect morphological diversification through the modification of wing serial homologs.

    PubMed

    Ohde, Takahiro; Yaginuma, Toshinobu; Niimi, Teruyuki

    2013-04-26

    Fossil insects living some 300 million years ago show winglike pads on all thoracic and abdominal segments, which suggests their serial homology. It remains unclear whether winglike structures in nonwinged segments have been lost or modified through evolution. Here, we identified a ventral lateral part of the body wall on the first thoracic segment, the hypomeron, and pupal dorsolateral denticular outgrowths as wing serial homologs in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor. Both domains transform into winglike structures under Hox RNA interference conditions. Gene expression and functional analyses revealed central roles for the key wing selector genes, vestigial and scalloped, in the hypomeron and the denticular outgrowth formation. We propose that modification, rather than loss, of dorsal appendages has provided an additional diversifying mechanism of insect body plan.

  8. The Divergent Roles of STAYGREEN (SGR) Homologs in Chlorophyll Degradation.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Park, So-Yon; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-05-01

    Degradation of chlorophyll (Chl) by Chl catabolic enzymes (CCEs) causes the loss of green color that typically occurs during senescence of leaves. In addition to CCEs, staygreen1 (SGR1) functions as a key regulator of Chl degradation. Although sgr1 mutants in many plant species exhibit a stay-green phenotype, the biochemical function of the SGR1 protein remains elusive. Many recent studies have examined the physiological and molecular roles of SGR1 and its homologs (SGR2 and SGR-LIKE) in Chl metabolism, finding that these proteins have different roles in different species. In this review, we summarize the recent studies on SGR and discuss the most likely functions of SGR homologs.

  9. The endless tale of non-homologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in cells by ionizing radiation and reactive oxygen species. In addition, they are commonly generated during V(D)J recombination, an essential aspect of the developing immune system. Failure to effectively repair these DSBs can result in chromosome breakage, cell death, onset of cancer, and defects in the immune system of higher vertebrates. Fortunately, all mammalian cells possess two enzymatic pathways that mediate the repair of DSBs: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The NHEJ process utilizes enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA molecule, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and finally repair the DNA break. In this review, all the known enzymes that play a role in the NHEJ process are discussed and a working model for the co-operation of these enzymes during DSB repair is presented.

  10. Botulinum neurotoxin homologs in non-Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Michael J; Adams, Jeremy B; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-30

    Clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are the deadliest toxins known and the causative agents of botulism and tetanus. Despite their structural and functional complexity, no CNT homologs are currently known outside Clostridium. Here, we report the first homologs of Clostridium CNTs within the genome of the rice fermentation organism Weissella oryzae SG25. One gene in W. oryzae S25 encodes a protein with a four-domain architecture and HExxH protease motif common to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). An adjacent gene with partial similarity to CNTs is also present, and both genes seem to have been laterally transferred into the W. oryzae genome from an unknown source. Identification of mobile, CNT-related genes outside of Clostridium has implications for our understanding of the evolution of this important toxin family. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiple templates-based homology modeling enhances structure quality of AT1 receptor: validation by molecular dynamics and antagonist docking.

    PubMed

    Sokkar, Pandian; Mohandass, Shylajanaciyar; Ramachandran, Murugesan

    2011-07-01

    We present a comparative account on 3D-structures of human type-1 receptor (AT1) for angiotensin II (AngII), modeled using three different methodologies. AngII activates a wide spectrum of signaling responses via the AT1 receptor that mediates physiological control of blood pressure and diverse pathological actions in cardiovascular, renal, and other cell types. Availability of 3D-model of AT1 receptor would significantly enhance the development of new drugs for cardiovascular diseases. However, templates of AT1 receptor with low sequence similarity increase the complexity in straightforward homology modeling, and hence there is a need to evaluate different modeling methodologies in order to use the models for sensitive applications such as rational drug design. Three models were generated for AT1 receptor by, (1) homology modeling with bovine rhodopsin as template, (2) homology modeling with multiple templates and (3) threading using I-TASSER web server. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation (15 ns) of models in explicit membrane-water system, Ramachandran plot analysis and molecular docking with antagonists led to the conclusion that multiple template-based homology modeling outweighs other methodologies for AT1 modeling.

  12. The pam1 gene is required for meiotic bouquet formation and efficient homologous synapsis in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Inna N; Harper, Lisa C; Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Schichnes, Denise; Cande, W Zacheus

    2002-12-01

    The clustering of telomeres on the nuclear envelope (NE) during meiotic prophase to form the bouquet arrangement of chromosomes may facilitate homologous chromosome synapsis. The pam1 (plural abnormalities of meiosis 1) gene is the first maize gene that appears to be required for telomere clustering, and homologous synapsis is impaired in pam1. Telomere clustering on the NE is arrested or delayed at an intermediate stage in pam1. Telomeres associate with the NE during the leptotene-zygotene transition but cluster slowly if at all as meiosis proceeds. Intermediate stages in telomere clustering including miniclusters are observed in pam1 but not in wild-type meiocytes. The tight bouquet normally seen at zygotene is a rare event. In contrast, the polarization of centromeres vs. telomeres in the nucleus at the leptotene-zygotene transition is the same in mutant and wild-type cells. Defects in homologous chromosome synapsis include incomplete synapsis, nonhomologous synapsis, and unresolved interlocks. However, the number of RAD51 foci on chromosomes in pam1 is similar to that of wild type. We suggest that the defects in homologous synapsis and the retardation of prophase I arise from the irregularity of telomere clustering and propose that pam1 is involved in the control of bouquet formation and downstream meiotic prophase I events.

  13. The Fanconi anemia ortholog FANCM ensures ordered homologous recombination in both somatic and meiotic cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Alexander; Higgins, James D; Seeliger, Katharina; Reha, Sarah J; Dangel, Natalie J; Bauknecht, Markus; Schröpfer, Susan; Franklin, F Christopher H; Puchta, Holger

    2012-04-01

    The human hereditary disease Fanconi anemia leads to severe symptoms, including developmental defects and breakdown of the hematopoietic system. It is caused by single mutations in the FANC genes, one of which encodes the DNA translocase FANCM (for Fanconi anemia complementation group M), which is required for the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links to ensure replication progression. We identified a homolog of FANCM in Arabidopsis thaliana that is not directly involved in the repair of DNA lesions but suppresses spontaneous somatic homologous recombination via a RecQ helicase (At-RECQ4A)-independent pathway. In addition, it is required for double-strand break-induced homologous recombination. The fertility of At-fancm mutant plants is compromised. Evidence suggests that during meiosis At-FANCM acts as antirecombinase to suppress ectopic recombination-dependent chromosome interactions, but this activity is antagonized by the ZMM pathway to enable the formation of interference-sensitive crossovers and chromosome synapsis. Surprisingly, mutation of At-FANCM overcomes the sterility phenotype of an At-MutS homolog4 mutant by apparently rescuing a proportion of crossover-designated recombination intermediates via a route that is likely At-MMS and UV sensitive81 dependent. However, this is insufficient to ensure the formation of an obligate crossover. Thus, At-FANCM is not only a safeguard for genome stability in somatic cells but is an important factor in the control of meiotic crossover formation.

  14. Homologous recombination is a primary pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks generated during DNA rereplication.

    PubMed

    Truong, Lan N; Li, Yongjiang; Sun, Emily; Ang, Katrina; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-10-17

    Re-initiation of DNA replication at origins within a given cell cycle would result in DNA rereplication, which can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. DNA rereplication can be induced by loss of licensing control at cellular replication origins, or by viral protein-driven multiple rounds of replication initiation at viral origins. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated during rereplication, but the mechanisms of how these DSBs are repaired to maintain genome stability and cell viability are poorly understood in mammalian cells. We generated novel EGFP-based DSB repair substrates, which specifically monitor the repair of rereplication-associated DSBs. We demonstrated that homologous recombination (HR) is an important mechanism to repair rereplication-associated DSBs, and sister chromatids are used as templates for such HR-mediated DSB repair. Micro-homology-mediated non-homologous end joining (MMEJ) can also be used but to a lesser extent compared to HR, whereas Ku-dependent classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) has a minimal role to repair rereplication-associated DSBs. In addition, loss of HR activity leads to severe cell death when rereplication is induced. Therefore, our studies identify HR, the most conservative repair pathway, as the primary mechanism to repair DSBs upon rereplication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The pam1 gene is required for meiotic bouquet formation and efficient homologous synapsis in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed Central

    Golubovskaya, Inna N; Harper, Lisa C; Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Schichnes, Denise; Cande, W Zacheus

    2002-01-01

    The clustering of telomeres on the nuclear envelope (NE) during meiotic prophase to form the bouquet arrangement of chromosomes may facilitate homologous chromosome synapsis. The pam1 (plural abnormalities of meiosis 1) gene is the first maize gene that appears to be required for telomere clustering, and homologous synapsis is impaired in pam1. Telomere clustering on the NE is arrested or delayed at an intermediate stage in pam1. Telomeres associate with the NE during the leptotene-zygotene transition but cluster slowly if at all as meiosis proceeds. Intermediate stages in telomere clustering including miniclusters are observed in pam1 but not in wild-type meiocytes. The tight bouquet normally seen at zygotene is a rare event. In contrast, the polarization of centromeres vs. telomeres in the nucleus at the leptotene-zygotene transition is the same in mutant and wild-type cells. Defects in homologous chromosome synapsis include incomplete synapsis, nonhomologous synapsis, and unresolved interlocks. However, the number of RAD51 foci on chromosomes in pam1 is similar to that of wild type. We suggest that the defects in homologous synapsis and the retardation of prophase I arise from the irregularity of telomere clustering and propose that pam1 is involved in the control of bouquet formation and downstream meiotic prophase I events. PMID:12524364

  16. [An homologous recombination strategy to directly clone mammalian telemeres

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We have pursued three goals over the past year. The first involved determining whether the HARY vector could be used for homologous integration in the human genome. The second was to ascertain whether inserted sequences could be amplified in preference to the endogenous DHFR genes. The third was to determine if the HARY insertion could provide an anchor point for long range restriction mapping. The progress in each goal is described.

  17. A novel homologous model for noninvasive monitoring of endometriosis progression.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Hortensia; Buigues, Anna; Martínez, Jessica; Simón, Carlos; Pellicer, Antonio; Gómez, Raúl

    2017-02-01

    To date, several groups have generated homologous models of endometriosis through the implantation of endometrial tissue fluorescently labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP) or tissue from luciferase-expressing transgenic mice into recipient animals, enabling noninvasive monitoring of lesion signal. These models present an advantage over endpoint models, but some limitations persist; use of transgenic mice is laborious and expensive, and GFP presents poor tissue penetration due to the relatively short emission wavelength. For this reason, a homologous mouse model of endometriosis that allows in vivo monitoring of generated lesions over time and mimics human lesions in recipient mice would be most desirable. In this regard, using C57BL/6 and B6N-Tyrc-Brd/BrdCrCrl mice, we optimized a decidualization protocol to obtain large volumes of decidual endometrium and mimic human lesions. Subsequently, to obtain a more robust and reliable noninvasive monitoring of lesions, we used the fluorescent reporter mCherry, which presents deeper tissue penetration and higher photostability, showing that endometrial tissue was properly labeled with 1 × 108 PFU/mL mCherry adenoviral vectors. mCherry-labeled endometriotic tissue was implanted in recipient mice, generating lesions that displayed characteristics typical of human endometriotic lesions, such as epithelial cells forming glands, local inflammation, collagen deposits, and new vessel formation. In vivo monitoring demonstrated that subcutaneous implantation on ventral abdomen of recipient mice provided the most intense and reliable signal for noninvasive lesion monitoring over a period of at least 20 days. This homologous model improves upon previously reported models of endometriosis and provides opportunities to study mechanism underlying endometriotic lesion growth and progression. We created a cost-effective but accurate homologous mouse model of endometriosis that allows the study of growth and progression of

  18. Oscillator strength trends in group IVb homologous ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Shock tube data are used to examine the systematic f value behavior in prominent visible transition arrays (ns-np, np-(n+l)s, np-nd) for the homologous emitter sequence Si 11, Ge 11, Sn 11, and Pb 11. Regularities found for these data are compared with trends in lighter elements. Agreements and s disparities with theoretical and experimental oscillator strengths from the literature are noted.

  19. Homology of lungs and gas bladders: insights from arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Longo, Sarah; Riccio, Mark; McCune, Amy R

    2013-06-01

    Gas bladders of ray-finned fishes serve a variety of vital functions and are thus an important novelty of most living vertebrates. The gas bladder has long been regarded as an evolutionary modification of lungs. Critical evidence for this hypothesized homology is whether pulmonary arteries supply the gas bladder as well as the lungs. Pulmonary arteries, paired branches of the fourth efferent branchial arteries, deliver blood to the lungs in osteichthyans with functional lungs (lungfishes, tetrapods, and the ray-finned polypterid fishes). The fact that pulmonary arteries also supply the respiratory gas bladder of Amia calva (bowfin) has been used to support the homology of lungs and gas bladders, collectively termed air-filled organs (AO). However, the homology of pulmonary arteries in bowfin and lunged osteichthyans has been uncertain, given the apparent lack of pulmonary arteries in critical taxa. To re-evaluate the homology of pulmonary arteries in bowfin and lunged osteichthyans, we studied, using micro-CT technology, the arterial vasculature of Protopterus, Polypterus, Acipenser, Polyodon, Amia, and Lepisosteus, and analyzed these data using a phylogenetic approach. Our data reveal that Acipenser and Polyodon have paired posterior branches of the fourth efferent branchial arteries, which are thus similar in origin to pulmonary arteries. We hypothesize that these arteries are vestigial pulmonary arteries that have been coopted for new functions due to the dorsal shift of the AO and/or the loss of respiration in these taxa. Ancestral state reconstructions support pulmonary arteries as a synapomorphy of the Osteichthyes, provide the first concrete evidence for the retention of pulmonary arteries in Amia, and support thehomology of lungs and gas bladders due to a shared vascular supply. Finally, we use ancestral state reconstructions to show that arterial AO supplies from the celiacomesenteric artery or dorsal aorta appear to be convergent between teleosts and

  20. The evolution of function within the Nudix homology clan

    PubMed Central

    Srouji, John R.; Xu, Anting; Park, Annsea; Kirsch, Jack F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Nudix homology clan encompasses over 80,000 protein domains from all three domains of life, defined by homology to each other. Proteins with a domain from this clan fall into four general functional classes: pyrophosphohydrolases, isopentenyl diphosphate isomerases (IDIs), adenine/guanine mismatch‐specific adenine glycosylases (A/G‐specific adenine glycosylases), and nonenzymatic activities such as protein/protein interaction and transcriptional regulation. The largest group, pyrophosphohydrolases, encompasses more than 100 distinct hydrolase specificities. To understand the evolution of this vast number of activities, we assembled and analyzed experimental and structural data for 205 Nudix proteins collected from the literature. We corrected erroneous functions or provided more appropriate descriptions for 53 annotations described in the Gene Ontology Annotation database in this family, and propose 275 new experimentally‐based annotations. We manually constructed a structure‐guided sequence alignment of 78 Nudix proteins. Using the structural alignment as a seed, we then made an alignment of 347 “select” Nudix homology domains, curated from structurally determined, functionally characterized, or phylogenetically important Nudix domains. Based on our review of Nudix pyrophosphohydrolase structures and specificities, we further analyzed a loop region downstream of the Nudix hydrolase motif previously shown to contact the substrate molecule and possess known functional motifs. This loop region provides a potential structural basis for the functional radiation and evolution of substrate specificity within the hydrolase family. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of the 347 select protein domains and of the complete Nudix homology clan revealed general monophyly with regard to function and a few instances of probable homoplasy. Proteins 2017; 85:775–811. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27936487

  1. Prediction of common folding structures of homologous RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Han, K; Kim, H J

    1993-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm and a computer program for simultaneously folding homologous RNA sequences. Given an alignment of M homologous sequences of length N, the program performs phylogenetic comparative analysis and predicts a common secondary structure conserved in the sequences. When the structure is not uniquely determined, it infers multiple structures which appear most plausible. This method is superior to energy minimization methods in the sense that it is not sensitive to point mutation of a sequence. It is also superior to usual phylogenetic comparative methods in that it does not require manual scrutiny for covariation or secondary structures. The most plausible 1-5 structures are produced in O(MN2 + N3) time and O(N2) space, which are the same requirements as those of widely used dynamic programs based on energy minimization for folding a single sequence. This is the first algorithm probably practical both in terms of time and space for finding secondary structures of homologous RNA sequences. The algorithm has been implemented in C on a Sun SparcStation, and has been verified by testing on tRNAs, 5S rRNAs, 16S rRNAs, TAR RNAs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and RRE RNAs of HIV-1. We have also applied the program to cis-acting packaging sequences of HIV-1, for which no generally accepted structures yet exist, and propose potentially stable structures. Simulation of the program with random sequences with the same base composition and the same degree of similarity as the above sequences shows that structures common to homologous sequences are very unlikely to occur by chance in random sequences. PMID:7681944

  2. A strand invasion 3' polymerization intermediate of mammalian homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Si, Weiduo; Mundia, Maureen M; Magwood, Alissa C; Mark, Adam L; McCulloch, Richard D; Baker, Mark D

    2010-06-01

    Initial events in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination in vivo involve homology searching, 3' strand invasion, and new DNA synthesis. While studies in yeast have contributed much to our knowledge of these processes, in comparison, little is known of the early events in the integrated mammalian system. In this study, a sensitive PCR procedure was developed to detect the new DNA synthesis that accompanies mammalian homologous recombination. The test system exploits a well-characterized gene targeting assay in which the transfected vector bears a gap in the region of homology to the single-copy chromosomal immunoglobulin mu heavy chain gene in mouse hybridoma cells. New DNA synthesis primed by invading 3' vector ends copies chromosomal mu-gene template sequences excluded by the vector-borne double-stranded gap. Following electroporation, specific 3' extension products from each vector end are detected with rapid kinetics: they appear after 0.5 hr, peak at 3-6 hr, and then decline, likely as a result of the combined effects of susceptibility to degradation and cell division. New DNA synthesis from each vector 3' end extends at least approximately 1000 nucleotides into the gapped region, but the efficiency declines markedly within the first approximately 200 nucleotides. Over this short distance, an average frequency of 3' extension for the two invading vector ends is approximately 0.007 events/vector backbone. DNA sequencing reveals precise copying of the cognate chromosomal mu-gene template. In unsynchronized cells, 3' extension is sensitive to aphidicolin supporting involvement of a replicative polymerase. Analysis suggests that the vast majority of 3' extensions reside on linear plasmid molecules.

  3. The evolution of function within the Nudix homology clan.

    PubMed

    Srouji, John R; Xu, Anting; Park, Annsea; Kirsch, Jack F; Brenner, Steven E

    2017-05-01

    The Nudix homology clan encompasses over 80,000 protein domains from all three domains of life, defined by homology to each other. Proteins with a domain from this clan fall into four general functional classes: pyrophosphohydrolases, isopentenyl diphosphate isomerases (IDIs), adenine/guanine mismatch-specific adenine glycosylases (A/G-specific adenine glycosylases), and nonenzymatic activities such as protein/protein interaction and transcriptional regulation. The largest group, pyrophosphohydrolases, encompasses more than 100 distinct hydrolase specificities. To understand the evolution of this vast number of activities, we assembled and analyzed experimental and structural data for 205 Nudix proteins collected from the literature. We corrected erroneous functions or provided more appropriate descriptions for 53 annotations described in the Gene Ontology Annotation database in this family, and propose 275 new experimentally-based annotations. We manually constructed a structure-guided sequence alignment of 78 Nudix proteins. Using the structural alignment as a seed, we then made an alignment of 347 "select" Nudix homology domains, curated from structurally determined, functionally characterized, or phylogenetically important Nudix domains. Based on our review of Nudix pyrophosphohydrolase structures and specificities, we further analyzed a loop region downstream of the Nudix hydrolase motif previously shown to contact the substrate molecule and possess known functional motifs. This loop region provides a potential structural basis for the functional radiation and evolution of substrate specificity within the hydrolase family. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of the 347 select protein domains and of the complete Nudix homology clan revealed general monophyly with regard to function and a few instances of probable homoplasy. Proteins 2017; 85:775-811. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Widespread homologous recombination within and between Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Doroghazi, James R; Buckley, Daniel H

    2010-09-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is widespread in the microbial world, but its impact on the origin and persistence of microbial species remains poorly defined. HGT can result in either acquisition of new genetic material or homologous replacement of existing genes. The evolutionary significance of homologous recombination in a population can be quantified by examining the relative rates at which polymorphisms are introduced from recombination (rho) and mutation (theta(w)). We used multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) to quantify both intraspecies and interspecies homologous recombination among streptomycetes, multicellular Gram-positive bacteria ubiquitous in soil, which are an important source of antibiotics and bioactive compounds. Intraspecies recombination was examined using strains of Streptomyces flavogriseus isolated from soils at five locations spanning 1000 km. The strains had >99.8% nucleotide identity across the loci examined. We found remarkable levels of gene exchange within S. flavogriseus (rho/theta(w)=27.9), and found that the population was in linkage equilibrium (standardized index of association=0.0018), providing evidence for a freely recombining sexual population structure. We also examined interspecies homologous recombination among different Streptomyces species in an MLSA data set and found that 40% of the species had housekeeping genes acquired through HGT. The recombination rate between these named species (rho/theta(w)=0.21) exceeds that observed within many species of bacteria. Despite widespread gene exchange in the genus, the intraspecies recombination rate exceeded the interspecies rate by two orders of magnitude suggesting that patterns of gene exchange and recombination may shape the evolution of streptomycetes.

  5. Prefiltering Model for Homology Detection Algorithms on GPU

    PubMed Central

    Retamosa, Germán; de Pedro, Luis; González, Ivan; Tamames, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Homology detection has evolved over the time from heavy algorithms based on dynamic programming approaches to lightweight alternatives based on different heuristic models. However, the main problem with these algorithms is that they use complex statistical models, which makes it difficult to achieve a relevant speedup and find exact matches with the original results. Thus, their acceleration is essential. The aim of this article was to prefilter a sequence database. To make this work, we have implemented a groundbreaking heuristic model based on NVIDIA’s graphics processing units (GPUs) and multicore processors. Depending on the sensitivity settings, this makes it possible to quickly reduce the sequence database by factors between 50% and 95%, while rejecting no significant sequences. Furthermore, this prefiltering application can be used together with multiple homology detection algorithms as a part of a next-generation sequencing system. Extensive performance and accuracy tests have been carried out in the Spanish National Centre for Biotechnology (NCB). The results show that GPU hardware can accelerate the execution times of former homology detection applications, such as National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Basic Local Alignment Search Tool for Proteins (BLASTP), up to a factor of 4. KEY POINTS:Owing to the increasing size of the current sequence datasets, filtering approach and high-performance computing (HPC) techniques are the best solution to process all these information in acceptable processing times.Graphics processing unit cards and their corresponding programming models are good options to carry out these processing methods.Combination of filtration models with HPC techniques is able to offer new levels of performance and accuracy in homology detection algorithms such as National Centre for Biotechnology Information Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. PMID:28008220

  6. The Functions of BRCA2 in Homologous Recombinational Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    February 2004. 2. A manuscript related to this project entitled "Human Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3 , impairs recombination and radiosensitizes...Cell Biol 15: 1968-1973 15. Brenneman MA et al. (2000) XRCC3 is required for efficient repair of chromosome breaks by homologous recombination. Mutat...JBiol Chem 278: 2469-2478 APPENDICES 1. Lio, Y-C, Schild, D, Brenneman, MA, Redpath, JL, and Chen, DJ (2004) Human RadS1C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3

  7. A cut-off in ocular chemesthesis from vapors of homologous alkylbenzenes and 2-ketones as revealed by concentration-detection functions

    SciTech Connect

    Cometto-Muniz, J. Enrique Abraham, Michael H.

    2008-08-01

    Studies of homologous series of environmental vapors have shown that their chemesthetic (i.e., sensory irritation) potency increases with carbon chain length (that is, their detection thresholds decrease) until they reach a homolog that fails to be detected, even at vapor saturation. All ensuing homologs cannot be detected either. In this investigation, we measured concentration-detection (i.e., psychometric) functions for ocular chemesthesis from homologous alkylbenzenes (pentyl, hexyl, and heptyl benzene) and 2-ketones (undecanone, dodecanone, and tridecanone). Using a three-alternative forced-choice procedure against air blanks, we tested a total of 18 to 24 subjects, about half of them females, average age 31 years, ranging from 18 to 56 years. Stimuli were generated and presented by a computer-controlled, vapor delivery device whose output was quantified by gas chromatography. Exposure time was 6 s and delivery flow 2.5 L/min. Within the context of present and previous findings, the outcome indicated that the functions for heptylbenzene and 2-tridecanone reached a plateau where further increases in concentration did not enhance detection. We conclude that: a) a cut-off point in ocular chemesthetic detection is reached along homologous alkylbenzenes and 2-ketones at the level of heptylbenzene and 2-tridecanone, respectively, and b) the observed effect rests on the homologs exceeding a critical molecular size (or dimension) rather than on them failing to achieve a high enough vapor concentration.

  8. A new human p34 protein kinase, CDK2, identified by complementation of a cdc28 mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a homolog of Xenopus Eg1.

    PubMed

    Elledge, S J; Spottswood, M R

    1991-09-01

    The onset of S-phase and M-phase in both Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the function of the cdc2/CDC28 gene product, p34, a serine-threonine protein kinase. A human homolog, p34cdc2, was identified by functional complementation of the S.pombe cdc2 mutation (Lee and Nurse, 1987). Using a human cDNA expression library to search for suppressors of cdc28 mutations in S. cerevisiae, we have identified a second functional p34 homolog, CDK2 cell division kinase). This gene is expressed as a 2.1 kb transcript encoding a polypeptide of 298 amino acids. This protein retains nearly all of the amino acids highly conserved among previously identified p34 homologs from other species, but is considerably divergent from all previous p34cdc2 homologs, approximately 65% identity. This gene encodes the human homolog of the Xenopus Eg1 gene, sharing 89% amino acid identity, and defines a second sub-family of CDC2 homologs. A second chromosomal mutation which arose spontaneously was required to allow complementation of the cdc28-4 mutation by CDK2. This mutation blocked the ability of this strain to mate. These results suggest that the machinery controlling the human cell cycle is more complex than that for fission and budding yeast.

  9. Hop2 and Sae3 Are Required for Dmc1-Mediated Double-Strand Break Repair via Homolog Bias during Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hong-Rae; Kong, Yoon-Ju; Hong, Soo-Gil; Kim, Keun Pil

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, exchange of DNA segments occurs between paired homologous chromosomes in order to produce recombinant chromosomes, helping to increase genetic diversity within a species. This genetic exchange process is tightly controlled by the eukaryotic RecA homologs Rad51 and Dmc1, which are involved in strand exchange of meiotic recombination, with Rad51 participating specifically in mitotic recombination. Meiotic recombination requires an interaction between homologous chromosomes to repair programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). In this study, we investigated the budding yeast meiosis-specific proteins Hop2 and Sae3, which function in the Dmc1-dependent pathway. This pathway mediates the homology searching and strand invasion processes. Mek1 kinase participates in switching meiotic recombination from sister bias to homolog bias after DSB formation. In the absence of Hop2 and Sae3, DSBs were produced normally, but showed defects in the DSB-to-single-end invasion transition mediated by Dmc1 and auxiliary factors, and mutant strains failed to complete proper chromosome segregation. However, in the absence of Mek1 kinase activity, Rad51-dependent recombination progressed via sister bias in the hop2Δ or sae3Δ mutants, even in the presence of Dmc1. Thus, Hop2 and Sae3 actively modulate Dmc1-dependent recombination, effectively progressing homolog bias, a process requiring Mek1 kinase activation. PMID:27329041

  10. Ocular toxicity of benzalkonium chloride homologs compared with their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Okahara, Akihiko; Tanioka, Hidetoshi; Takada, Koichi; Kawazu, Kouichi

    2013-12-01

    This study was performed to assess the in vivo ocular toxicity of benzalkonium chloride (BAK) homologs compared with commercially available BAK (BAK mixture) and to assess the ocular toxicity of BAK homolog after repeated ocular application. Rabbit eyes were examined by ophthalmology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after 10 applications of BAK homologs with C12 (C12-BAK) and C14 (C14-BAK) alkyl chain lengths and a BAK mixture at concentrations of 0.001% (w/v), 0.003% (w/v), 0.005% (w/v), 0.01% (w/v) and 0.03% (w/v). The ocular toxicity of C12-BAK to rabbit eyes was examined by ophthalmology and histopathology after repeated ocular application for 39 weeks. In addition, the antimicrobial activities of C12-BAK and C14-BAK against A. niger, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were assessed. Ocular toxicity of C12-BAK was less than those of the BAK mixture and C14-BAK. No ocular toxicity was noted after ocular application of 0.01% C12-BAK to rabbits for 39 weeks. C12-BAK showed antimicrobial activities at a concentration of 0.003%. These results suggest that the use of C12-BAK to replace BAK mixture as a preservative in ophthalmic solutions should be considered in order to reduce the incidence of the corneal epithelial cell injury induced clinically by BAK.

  11. Ocular Toxicity of Benzalkonium Chloride Homologs Compared with Their Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Okahara, Akihiko; Tanioka, Hidetoshi; Takada, Koichi; Kawazu, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the in vivo ocular toxicity of benzalkonium chloride (BAK) homologs compared with commercially available BAK (BAK mixture) and to assess the ocular toxicity of BAK homolog after repeated ocular application. Rabbit eyes were examined by ophthalmology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after 10 applications of BAK homologs with C12 (C12-BAK) and C14 (C14-BAK) alkyl chain lengths and a BAK mixture at concentrations of 0.001% (w/v), 0.003% (w/v), 0.005% (w/v), 0.01% (w/v) and 0.03% (w/v). The ocular toxicity of C12-BAK to rabbit eyes was examined by ophthalmology and histopathology after repeated ocular application for 39 weeks. In addition, the antimicrobial activities of C12-BAK and C14-BAK against A. niger, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were assessed. Ocular toxicity of C12-BAK was less than those of the BAK mixture and C14-BAK. No ocular toxicity was noted after ocular application of 0.01% C12-BAK to rabbits for 39 weeks. C12-BAK showed antimicrobial activities at a concentration of 0.003%. These results suggest that the use of C12-BAK to replace BAK mixture as a preservative in ophthalmic solutions should be considered in order to reduce the incidence of the corneal epithelial cell injury induced clinically by BAK. PMID:24526806

  12. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Andrew A; Waldvogel, Sarah M; Luthman, Adam J; Sehorn, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity.

  13. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Andrew A.; Waldvogel, Sarah M.; Luthman, Adam J.; Sehorn, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity. PMID:28936205

  14. A DNA-based method for detecting homologous blood doping.

    PubMed

    Manokhina, Irina; Rupert, James L

    2013-12-01

    Homologous (or allogeneic) blood doping, in which blood is transferred from a donor into a recipient athlete, is the easiest, cheapest, and fastest way to increase red cell mass (hematocrit) and therefore the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Although thought to have been rendered obsolete as a doping strategy by the increased use of rhEPO to increased hematocrits, there is evidence that athletes are still using this potentially dangerous method to improve endurance performance. Current testing for homologous blood doping is based on identification of mixed populations of red blood cells by flow cytometry. This paper proposes that homologous blood doping could also be tested for by high-resolution qPCR-based genotyping and demonstrates that assays could be developed that would detect second populations of cells even if the "donor" blood was depleted of 99% of the DNA-containing leukocytes. Issues of test specificity and sensitivity are discussed as well as some of the ethical considerations that would have to be addressed if athletes' genotypes were to be used by the anti-doping authorities to prevent, or detect, the use of prohibited ergogenic practices.

  15. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting by ‘ends-out’ homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR. PMID:24154526

  16. Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes: Navigating Meiosis without a Homologous Partner

    PubMed Central

    Checchi, Paula M.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on homology between the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Yet by definition, sex chromosomes of the heterogametic sex lack a homologous partner. Recent studies in a number of systems have shed light on the unique meiotic behavior of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and highlight both the commonalities and differences in divergent species. During meiotic prophase, the homology-dependent processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination have been modified in many different ways to ensure segregation of heteromorphic sex chromosomes at the first meiotic division. Additionally, an almost universal feature of heteromorphic sex chromosomes during meiosis is transcriptional silencing, or meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, an essential process proposed to prevent expression of genes deleterious to meiosis in the heterogametic sex as well as to shield unpaired sex chromosomes from recognition by meiotic checkpoints. Comparative analyses of the meiotic behavior of sex chromosomes in nematodes, mammals, and birds reveal important conserved features as well as provide insight into sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22113949

  17. Heteromorphic sex chromosomes: navigating meiosis without a homologous partner.

    PubMed

    Checchi, Paula M; Engebrecht, Joanne

    2011-09-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on homology between the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Yet by definition, sex chromosomes of the heterogametic sex lack a homologous partner. Recent studies in a number of systems have shed light on the unique meiotic behavior of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and highlight both the commonalities and differences in divergent species. During meiotic prophase, the homology-dependent processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination have been modified in many different ways to ensure segregation of heteromorphic sex chromosomes at the first meiotic division. Additionally, an almost universal feature of heteromorphic sex chromosomes during meiosis is transcriptional silencing, or meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, an essential process proposed to prevent expression of genes deleterious to meiosis in the heterogametic sex as well as to shield unpaired sex chromosomes from recognition by meiotic checkpoints. Comparative analyses of the meiotic behavior of sex chromosomes in nematodes, mammals, and birds reveal important conserved features as well as provide insight into sex chromosome evolution. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  19. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Quasi-Homologous Solar Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (31)) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet, and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  20. GCView: the genomic context viewer for protein homology searches

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Iwan; Linke, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Genomic neighborhood can provide important insights into evolution and function of a protein or gene. When looking at operons, changes in operon structure and composition can only be revealed by looking at the operon as a whole. To facilitate the analysis of the genomic context of a query in multiple organisms we have developed Genomic Context Viewer (GCView). GCView accepts results from one or multiple protein homology searches such as BLASTp as input. For each hit, the neighboring protein-coding genes are extracted, the regions of homology are labeled for each input and the results are presented as a clear, interactive graphical output. It is also possible to add more searches to iteratively refine the output. GCView groups outputs by the hits for different proteins. This allows for easy comparison of different operon compositions and structures. The tool is embedded in the framework of the Bioinformatics Toolkit of the Max-Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (MPI Toolkit). Job results from the homology search tools inside the MPI Toolkit can be forwarded to GCView and results can be subsequently analyzed by sequence analysis tools. Results are stored online, allowing for later reinspection. GCView is freely available at http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/gcview. PMID:21609955

  1. Homologous recombination catalyzed by a nuclear extract from Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, C W; Carroll, D

    1991-01-01

    Xenopus laevis oocytes efficiently recombine linear DNA injected into their nuclei (germinal vesicles). This process requires homologous sequences at or near the molecular ends. Here we report that a cell-free extract made from germinal vesicles is capable of accomplishing the complete recombination reaction in vitro. Like the in vivo process, the extract converts the overlapping ends of linear substrate molecules into covalently closed products. Establishment of this cell-free system has allowed examination of the cofactors required for recombination. The first step involves a 5'----3' exonuclease activity that requires a divalent cation but not NTPs. Completion of recombination requires a hydrolyzable NTP; maximal product formation occurs in the presence of millimolar levels of ATP or dATP. At submillimolar levels of all four dNTPs, homologous recombination is inefficient, and a side reaction produces end-joined products. This cell-free system should facilitate a step-by-step understanding of an homologous recombination pathway that operates not only in Xenopus laevis oocytes but also in cells from a wide variety of organisms. Images PMID:1961753

  2. Homologous recombination prevents methylation-induced toxicity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Smith, Stephen A; Engelward, Bevin P; Marinus, M G

    2006-01-01

    Methylating agents such as N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) produce a wide variety of N- and O-methylated bases in DNA, some of which can block replication fork progression. Homologous recombination is a mechanism by which chromosome replication can proceed despite the presence of lesions. The two major recombination pathways, RecBCD and RecFOR, which repair double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-strand gaps respectively, are needed to protect against toxicity with the RecBCD system being more important. We find that recombination-deficient cell lines, such as recBCD recF, and ruvC recG, are as sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of MMS and MNNG as the most base excision repair (BER)-deficient (alkA tag) isogenic mutant strain. Recombination and BER-deficient double mutants (alkA tag recBCD) were more sensitive to MNNG and MMS than the single mutants suggesting that homologous recombination and BER play essential independent roles. Cells deleted for the polA (DNA polymerase I) or priA (primosome) genes are as sensitive to MMS and MNNG as alkA tag bacteria. Our results suggest that the mechanism of cytotoxicity by alkylating agents includes the necessity for homologous recombination to repair DSBs and single-strand gaps produced by DNA replication at blocking lesions or single-strand nicks resulting from AP-endonuclease action.

  3. Persistent Homology for The Quantitative Prediction of Fullerene Stability

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2014-01-01

    Persistent homology is a relatively new tool often used for qualitative analysis of intrinsic topological features in images and data originated from scientific and engineering applications. In this paper, we report novel quantitative predictions of the energy and stability of fullerene molecules, the very first attempt in employing persistent homology in this context. The ground-state structures of a series of small fullerene molecules are first investigated with the standard Vietoris-Rips complex. We decipher all the barcodes, including both short-lived local bars and long-lived global bars arising from topological invariants, and associate them with fullerene structural details. By using accumulated bar lengths, we build quantitative models to correlate local and global Betti-2 bars respectively with the heat of formation and total curvature energies of fullerenes. It is found that the heat of formation energy is related to the local hexagonal cavities of small fullerenes, while the total curvature energies of fullerene isomers are associated with their sphericities, which are measured by the lengths of their long-lived Betti-2 bars. Excellent correlation coefficients (> 0.94) between persistent homology predictions and those of quantum or curvature analysis have been observed. A correlation matrix based filtration is introduced to further verify our findings. PMID:25523342

  4. Remote homology detection incorporating the context of physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Oscar; Tischer, Irene

    2014-02-01

    A new method for remote protein homology detection, called support vector machine incorporating the context of physicochemical properties (SVM-CP), is presented. Recent discriminative methods are based on concatenating information extracted from each protein by considering several physicochemical properties. We show that there are physicochemical properties that reflect the functional or structural characteristics of each specific protein family, but there are also some physicochemical properties that affect the accuracy of the classification techniques. The research highlights the importance of the selection of physicochemical properties in remote homology detection. Most of the methods slide a window over every protein sequence to extract physicochemical information. This extraction is usually performed by giving the same importance to every value in the window, i.e., averaging the physicochemical values in the observation window. SVM-CP takes into account that every residue in a sliding window has a different weight, which reflects the importance or contribution to the representative value of the window. The SVM-CP method reaches a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) score of 0.93462, which is the highest value for a remote homology detection method based on the sequence composition information. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Homology modeling and molecular docking for the science curriculum.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Owen M; Cornia, Nic; Sambasivarao, S V; Remm, Andrew; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia Thom; Maupin, C Mark; Andersen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    DockoMatic 2.0 is a powerful open source software program (downloadable from sourceforge.net) that allows users to utilize a readily accessible computational tool to explore biomolecules and their interactions. This manuscript describes a practical tutorial for use in the undergraduate curriculum that introduces students to macromolecular structure creation, ligand binding calculations, and visualization of docking results. A student procedure is provided that illustrates the use of DockoMatic to create a homology model for the amino propeptide region (223 amino acids with two disulfide bonds) of collagen α1 (XI), followed by molecular docking of the commercial drug Arixtra(®) to the homology model of α1 (XI), and finally, analysis of the results of the docking experiment. The activities and Supporting Information described are intended to educate students in the use of computational tools to create and investigate homology models for other systems of interest and to train students to perform and analyze molecular docking studies. The tutorial also serves as a foundation for investigators seeking to explore the viability of using computational biochemistry to study their receptor-ligand binding motifs. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 42(2):179-182, 2014. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Assessment of sequence homology and cross-reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Aalberse, Rob C. . E-mail: r.aalberse@sanquin.nl

    2005-09-01

    Three aspects of allergenicity assessment and are discussed: IgE immunogenicity, IgE cross-reactivity and T cell cross-reactivity, all with emphasis on in-silico predictability: from amino acid sequence via 3D structure to allergenicity.(1)IgE immunogenicity depends to an overwhelming degree on factors other than the protein itself: the context and history of the protein by the time it reaches the immune system. Without specification of these two factors very few foreign proteins can be claimed to be absolutely non-allergenic. Any antigen may be allergenic, particularly if it avoids activation of TH2-suppressive mechanisms (CD8 cells, TH1 cells, other regulatory T cells and regulatory cytokines). (2)IgE cross-reactivity can be much more reliably assessed by a combination of in-silico homology searches and in vitro IgE antibody assays. The in-silico homology search is unlikely to miss potential cross-reactivity with sequenced allergens. So far, no biologically relevant cross-reactivity at the antibody level has been demonstrated between proteins without easily-demonstrable homology. (3)T cell cross-reactivity is much more difficult to predict compared to B cell cross-reactivity, and its effects are more diverse. Yet, pre-existing cross-reactive T cell activity is likely to influence the outcome not only of the immune response, but also of the effector phase of the allergic reaction.

  7. Prefiltering Model for Homology Detection Algorithms on GPU.

    PubMed

    Retamosa, Germán; de Pedro, Luis; González, Ivan; Tamames, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Homology detection has evolved over the time from heavy algorithms based on dynamic programming approaches to lightweight alternatives based on different heuristic models. However, the main problem with these algorithms is that they use complex statistical models, which makes it difficult to achieve a relevant speedup and find exact matches with the original results. Thus, their acceleration is essential. The aim of this article was to prefilter a sequence database. To make this work, we have implemented a groundbreaking heuristic model based on NVIDIA's graphics processing units (GPUs) and multicore processors. Depending on the sensitivity settings, this makes it possible to quickly reduce the sequence database by factors between 50% and 95%, while rejecting no significant sequences. Furthermore, this prefiltering application can be used together with multiple homology detection algorithms as a part of a next-generation sequencing system. Extensive performance and accuracy tests have been carried out in the Spanish National Centre for Biotechnology (NCB). The results show that GPU hardware can accelerate the execution times of former homology detection applications, such as National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Basic Local Alignment Search Tool for Proteins (BLASTP), up to a factor of 4.

  8. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-01

    Gene targeting by 'ends-out' homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR.

  9. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Gitte S; Germann, Susanne M; Westergaard, Tine; Lisby, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is blocked by sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, PBA suppresses CPT- and MMS-induced genetic recombination as well as DNA double-strand break repair during mating-type interconversion. Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability. In contrast, the suppression of MMS-induced recombination by PBA is accompanied by a dramatic loss in cell viability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PBA inhibits DNA damage-induced homologous recombination likely by mediating changes in chromatin acetylation. Moreover, the combination of PBA with genotoxic agents can lead to different cell fates depending on the type of DNA damage inflicted. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Persistent homology for the quantitative prediction of fullerene stability.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2015-03-05

    Persistent homology is a relatively new tool often used for qualitative analysis of intrinsic topological features in images and data originated from scientific and engineering applications. In this article, we report novel quantitative predictions of the energy and stability of fullerene molecules, the very first attempt in using persistent homology in this context. The ground-state structures of a series of small fullerene molecules are first investigated with the standard Vietoris-Rips complex. We decipher all the barcodes, including both short-lived local bars and long-lived global bars arising from topological invariants, and associate them with fullerene structural details. Using accumulated bar lengths, we build quantitative models to correlate local and global Betti-2 bars, respectively with the heat of formation and total curvature energies of fullerenes. It is found that the heat of formation energy is related to the local hexagonal cavities of small fullerenes, while the total curvature energies of fullerene isomers are associated with their sphericities, which are measured by the lengths of their long-lived Betti-2 bars. Excellent correlation coefficients (>0.94) between persistent homology predictions and those of quantum or curvature analysis have been observed. A correlation matrix based filtration is introduced to further verify our findings. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Quantifying homologous replacement of loci between haloarchaeal species.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Gogarten, J Peter; Papke, R Thane

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies of the haloarchaeal genus Haloferax have demonstrated their ability to frequently exchange DNA between species, whereas rates of homologous recombination estimated from natural populations in the genus Halorubrum are high enough to maintain random association of alleles between five loci. To quantify the effects of gene transfer and recombination of commonly held (relaxed core) genes during the evolution of the class Halobacteria (haloarchaea), we reconstructed the history of 21 genomes representing all major groups. Using a novel algorithm and a concatenated ribosomal protein phylogeny as a reference, we created a directed horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) network of contemporary and ancestral genomes. Gene order analysis revealed that 90% of testable HGTs were by direct homologous replacement, rather than nonhomologous integration followed by a loss. Network analysis revealed an inverse log-linear relationship between HGT frequency and ribosomal protein evolutionary distance that is maintained across the deepest divergences in Halobacteria. We use this mathematical relationship to estimate the total transfers and amino acid substitutions delivered by HGTs in each genome, providing a measure of chimerism. For the relaxed core genes of each genome, we conservatively estimate that 11-20% of their evolution occurred in other haloarchaea. Our findings are unexpected, because the transfer and homologous recombination of relaxed core genes between members of the class Halobacteria disrupts the coevolution of genes; however, the generation of new combinations of divergent but functionally related genes may lead to adaptive phenotypes not available through cumulative mutations and recombination within a single population.

  12. Quantifying Homologous Replacement of Loci between Haloarchaeal Species

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies of the haloarchaeal genus Haloferax have demonstrated their ability to frequently exchange DNA between species, whereas rates of homologous recombination estimated from natural populations in the genus Halorubrum are high enough to maintain random association of alleles between five loci. To quantify the effects of gene transfer and recombination of commonly held (relaxed core) genes during the evolution of the class Halobacteria (haloarchaea), we reconstructed the history of 21 genomes representing all major groups. Using a novel algorithm and a concatenated ribosomal protein phylogeny as a reference, we created a directed horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) network of contemporary and ancestral genomes. Gene order analysis revealed that 90% of testable HGTs were by direct homologous replacement, rather than nonhomologous integration followed by a loss. Network analysis revealed an inverse log-linear relationship between HGT frequency and ribosomal protein evolutionary distance that is maintained across the deepest divergences in Halobacteria. We use this mathematical relationship to estimate the total transfers and amino acid substitutions delivered by HGTs in each genome, providing a measure of chimerism. For the relaxed core genes of each genome, we conservatively estimate that 11–20% of their evolution occurred in other haloarchaea. Our findings are unexpected, because the transfer and homologous recombination of relaxed core genes between members of the class Halobacteria disrupts the coevolution of genes; however, the generation of new combinations of divergent but functionally related genes may lead to adaptive phenotypes not available through cumulative mutations and recombination within a single population. PMID:23160063

  13. Biomineral homologies, organismobiosis, and the problem of biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkin, Nikolai P.

    2000-12-01

    Comparative analysis of bio-organisms and mineral individuals provides a bulk of evidence for biomineral homologies at the morphological, functional, ontogenetic, phylogenetic, and paragenetic levels and mineral predetermination of many features and functions traditionally viewed as purely biological. Highly-structured solid hydrocarbons (bitumens) and highly carbonaceous substances provide best homologies with simplest biological organisms. The physico-chemical conditions of ordered hydrocarbon condensation are similar to the theoretical origin-of-life conditions. It has been shown that protein amino acids are produced during crystallization and thermal ordering of hydrocarbons as well as by means of radioactive synthesis, which suggests mineral-based genesis of primitive biofunctioning structures and hydrocarbon mineral individuals with structures and functions of proto-organisms. These experimental data underlie our concept of hydrocarbon crystallization of life and mineral organismo-biosis. Biomineral homologies and the associated convergence of properties of bio-organisms and hydrocarbon minerals constitute the greatest obstacle hindering identification of biomorphous problematica, because, on the one hand, their biochemical components are easily destroyed under conditions of even low-grade metamorphism and, on the other hand, almost all compounds referred to as biological ones are synthesizable in the abiogenic way under natural conditions. So one should look for biomarkers relying on their structural and morphological features rather than biochemical ones, because the major elements of the bio-organisms's form and structure can be inherited by the fossilized product.

  14. Modular arrangement of proteins as inferred from analysis of homology.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnhammer, E. L.; Kahn, D.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of many proteins consists of a combination of discrete modules that have been shuffled during evolution. Such modules can frequently be recognized from the analysis of homology. Here we present a systematic analysis of the modular organization of all sequenced proteins. To achieve this we have developed an automatic method to identify protein domains from sequence comparisons. Homologous domains can then be clustered into consistent families. The method was applied to all 21,098 nonfragment protein sequences in SWISS-PROT 21.0, which was automatically reorganized into a comprehensive protein domain database, ProDom. We have constructed multiple sequence alignments for each domain family in ProDom, from which consensus sequences were generated. These nonreduntant domain consensuses are useful for fast homology searches. Domain organization in ProDom is exemplified for proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PEP:PTS) and for bacterial 2-component regulators. We provide 2 examples of previously unrecognized domain arrangements discovered with the help of ProDom. PMID:8019419

  15. Irradiated homologous cartilage grafts. Long-term results

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, D.B.; Maves, M.D.; Schuller, D.E.; Bardach, J.

    1988-03-01

    The use of irradiated homologous cartilage for the restoration of facial contour defects remains a controversial issue in reconstructive surgery. Both favorable and unfavorable reports can be found in the literature. Some basic research concerning the rate and mechanism of resorption has been completed but has failed to resolve the issue of the usefulness of this material in day-to-day practice. One frequently cited reference concerning the use of irradiated homologous cartilage in reconstructive surgery was coauthored by two of the present investigators ten years ago. In an effort to place this study in a long-term perspective, we examined 42 of the original 107 patients who formed the initial population base. Sixty-two of the original 145 irradiated homologous cartilage grafts have been followed up for an average of nine years, with an average resorption rate of approximately 75%. Eighteen of 24 grafts followed up from 11 to 16 years completely resorbed. In spite of complete graft resorption, some patients have maintained satisfactory facial contour with fibrous tissue replacement of the cartilage.

  16. MEDELLER: homology-based coordinate generation for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Sebastian; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M

    2010-11-15

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are important drug targets but knowledge of their exact structure is limited to relatively few examples. Existing homology-based structure prediction methods are designed for globular, water-soluble proteins. However, we are now beginning to have enough MP structures to justify the development of a homology-based approach specifically for them. We present a MP-specific homology-based coordinate generation method, MEDELLER, which is optimized to build highly reliable core models. The method outperforms the popular structure prediction programme Modeller on MPs. The comparison of the two methods was performed on 616 target-template pairs of MPs, which were classified into four test sets by their sequence identity. Across all targets, MEDELLER gave an average backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 2.62 Å versus 3.16 Å for Modeller. On our 'easy' test set, MEDELLER achieves an average accuracy of 0.93 Å backbone RMSD versus 1.56 Å for Modeller. http://medeller.info; Implemented in Python, Bash and Perl CGI for use on Linux systems; Supplementary data are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/proteins/resources.

  17. Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking for the Science Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Owen M.; Comia, Nic; Sambasivarao, S.V.; Remm, Andrew; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia Thom; Maupin, C. Mark; Andersen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    DockoMatic 2.0 is a powerful open source software program (downloadable from sourceforge.net) that simplifies the exploration of computational biochemistry. This manuscript describes a practical tutorial for use in the undergraduate curriculum that introduces students to macromolecular structure creation, ligand binding calculations, and visualization of docking results. A student procedure is provided that illustrates use of DockoMatic to create a homology model for the amino propeptide region (223 amino acids with two disulfide bonds) of collagen α1 (XI), followed by molecular docking of the commercial drug Arixtra® to the homology model of the amino propeptide domain of collagen α1 (XI), and finally, analysis of the results of the docking experiment. The activities and supplemental materials described are intended to educate students in the use of computational tools to create and investigate homology models for other systems of interest and to train students to be proficient with molecular docking and analyzing results. The tutorial also serves as a foundation for investigators seeking to explore the viability of using computational biochemistry to study their receptor-ligand binding motifs. PMID:24376157

  18. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  19. Identification of viruses and viroids by next-generation sequencing and homology-dependent and homology-independent algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfa; Ding, Shou-Wei; Zhang, Yongjiang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    A fast, accurate, and full indexing of viruses and viroids in a sample for the inspection and quarantine services and disease management is desirable but was unrealistic until recently. This article reviews the rapid and exciting recent progress in the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for the identification of viruses and viroids in plants. A total of four viroids/viroid-like RNAs and 49 new plant RNA and DNA viruses from 18 known or unassigned virus families have been identified from plants since 2009. A comparison of enrichment strategies reveals that full indexing of RNA and DNA viruses as well as viroids in a plant sample at single-nucleotide resolution is made possible by one NGS run of total small RNAs, followed by data mining with homology-dependent and homology-independent computational algorithms. Major challenges in the application of NGS technologies to pathogen discovery are discussed.

  20. Initiation of DNA double strand break repair: signaling and single-stranded resection dictate the choice between homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and alternative end-joining.

    PubMed

    Grabarz, Anastazja; Barascu, Aurélia; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Lopez, Bernard S

    2012-01-01

    A DNA double strand break (DSB) is a highly toxic lesion, which can generate genetic instability and profound genome rearrangements. However, DSBs are required to generate diversity during physiological processes such as meiosis or the establishment of the immune repertoire. Thus, the precise regulation of a complex network of processes is necessary for the maintenance of genomic stability, allowing genetic diversity but protecting against genetic instability and its consequences on oncogenesis. Two main strategies are employed for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). HR is initiated by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) resection and requires sequence homology with an intact partner, while NHEJ requires neither resection at initiation nor a homologous partner. Thus, resection is an pivotal step at DSB repair initiation, driving the choice of the DSB repair pathway employed. However, an alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway, which is highly mutagenic, has recently been described; A-EJ is initiated by ssDNA resection but does not require a homologous partner. The choice of the appropriate DSB repair system, for instance according the cell cycle stage, is essential for genome stability maintenance. In this context, controlling the initial events of DSB repair is thus an essential step that may be irreversible, and the wrong decision should lead to dramatic consequences. Here, we first present the main DSB repair mechanisms and then discuss the importance of the choice of the appropriate DSB repair pathway according to the cell cycle phase. In a third section, we present the early steps of DSB repair i.e., DSB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and the regulation of ssDNA resection. In the last part, we discuss the competition between the different DSB repair mechanisms. Finally, we conclude with the importance of the fine tuning of this network for genome stability maintenance and for tumor protection in fine.

  1. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Wolfgang; Messing, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to diploidization

  2. The homology of odontodes in gnathostomes: insights from Dlx gene expression in the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Debiais-Thibaud, Mélanie; Oulion, Silvan; Bourrat, Franck; Laurenti, Patrick; Casane, Didier; Borday-Birraux, Véronique

    2011-10-18

    Teeth and tooth-like structures, together named odontodes, are repeated organs thought to share a common evolutionary origin. These structures can be found in gnathostomes at different locations along the body: oral teeth in the jaws, teeth and denticles in the oral-pharyngeal cavity, and dermal denticles on elasmobranch skin. We, and other colleagues, had previously shown that teeth in any location were serially homologous because: i) pharyngeal and oral teeth develop through a common developmental module; and ii) the expression patterns of the Dlx genes during odontogenesis were highly divergent between species but almost identical between oral and pharyngeal dentitions within the same species. Here we examine Dlx gene expression in oral teeth and dermal denticles in order to test the hypothesis of serial homology between these odontodes. We present a detailed comparison of the first developing teeth and dermal denticles (caudal primary scales) of the dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) and show that both odontodes develop through identical stages that correspond to the common stages of oral and pharyngeal odontogenesis. We identified six Dlx paralogs in the dogfish and found that three showed strong transcription in teeth and dermal denticles (Dlx3, Dlx4 and Dlx5) whereas a weak expression was detected for Dlx1 in dermal denticles and teeth, and for Dlx2 in dermal denticles. Very few differences in Dlx expression patterns could be detected between tooth and dermal denticle development, except for the absence of Dlx2 expression in teeth. Taken together, our histological and expression data strongly suggest that teeth and dermal denticles develop from the same developmental module and under the control of the same set of Dlx genes. Teeth and dermal denticles should therefore be considered as serial homologs developing through the initiation of a common gene regulatory network (GRN) at several body locations. This mechanism of heterotopy supports the 'inside and out

  3. Cohesin Is limiting for the suppression of DNA damage-induced recombination between homologous chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Covo, Shay; Westmoreland, James W; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) repair through homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that is generally error-free. The risk to genome stability posed by nonallelic recombination or loss-of-heterozygosity could be reduced by confining HR to sister chromatids, thereby preventing recombination between homologous chromosomes. Here we show that the sister chromatid cohesion complex (cohesin) is a limiting factor in the control of DSB repair and genome stability and that it suppresses DNA damage-induced interactions between homologues. We developed a gene dosage system in tetraploid yeast to address limitations on various essential components in DSB repair and HR. Unlike RAD50 and RAD51, which play a direct role in HR, a 4-fold reduction in the number of essential MCD1 sister chromatid cohesion subunit genes affected survival of gamma-irradiated G(2)/M cells. The decreased survival reflected a reduction in DSB repair. Importantly, HR between homologous chromosomes was strongly increased by ionizing radiation in G(2)/M cells with a single copy of MCD1 or SMC3 even at radiation doses where survival was high and DSB repair was efficient. The increased recombination also extended to nonlethal doses of UV, which did not induce DSBs. The DNA damage-induced recombinants in G(2)/M cells included crossovers. Thus, the cohesin complex has a dual role in protecting chromosome integrity: it promotes DSB repair and recombination between sister chromatids, and it suppresses damage-induced recombination between homologues. The effects of limited amounts of Mcd1and Smc3 indicate that small changes in cohesin levels may increase the risk of genome instability, which may lead to genetic diseases and cancer.

  4. Structural homologies between phenformin, lipitor and gleevec aim the same metabolic oncotarget in leukemia and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Somlyai, Gábor; Collins, T Que; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Hitendra, Patel; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Boros, László G

    2017-07-25

    Phenformin's recently demonstrated efficacy in melanoma and Gleevec's demonstrated anti-proliferative action in chronic myeloid leukemia may lie within these drugs' significant pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and structural homologies, which are reviewed herein. Gleevec's success in turning a fatal leukemia into a manageable chronic disease has been trumpeted in medical, economic, political and social circles because it is considered the first successful targeted therapy. Investments have been immense in omics analyses and while in some cases they greatly helped the management of patients, in others targeted therapies failed to achieve clinically stable recurrence-free disease course or to substantially extend survival. Nevertheless protein kinase controlling approaches have persisted despite early warnings that the targeted genomics narrative is overblown. Experimental and clinical observations with Phenformin suggest an alternative explanation for Gleevec's mode of action. Using 13C-guided precise flux measurements, a comparative multiple cell line study demonstrated the drug's downstream impact on submolecular fatty acid processing metabolic events that occurred independent of Gleevec's molecular target. Clinical observations that hyperlipidemia and diabetes are both reversed in mice and in patients taking Gleevec support the drugs' primary metabolic targets by biguanides and statins. This is evident by structural data demonstrating that Gleevec shows pyridine- and phenyl-guanidine homology with Phenformin and identical phenylcarbamoyl structural and ligand binding homology with Lipitor. The misunderstood mechanism of action of Gleevec is emblematic of the pervasive flawed reasoning that genomic analysis will lead to targeted, personalized diagnosis and therapy. The alternative perspective for Gleevec's mode of action may turn oncotargets towards metabolic channel reaction architectures in leukemia and melanoma, as well as in other cancers.

  5. Structural homologies between phenformin, lipitor and gleevec aim the same metabolic oncotarget in leukemia and melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Somlyai, Gábor; Collins, T. Que; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Hitendra, Patel; D'Agostino, Dominic P.; Boros, László G.

    2017-01-01

    Phenformin's recently demonstrated efficacy in melanoma and Gleevec's demonstrated anti-proliferative action in chronic myeloid leukemia may lie within these drugs' significant pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and structural homologies, which are reviewed herein. Gleevec's success in turning a fatal leukemia into a manageable chronic disease has been trumpeted in medical, economic, political and social circles because it is considered the first successful targeted therapy. Investments have been immense in omics analyses and while in some cases they greatly helped the management of patients, in others targeted therapies failed to achieve clinically stable recurrence-free disease course or to substantially extend survival. Nevertheless protein kinase controlling approaches have persisted despite early warnings that the targeted genomics narrative is overblown. Experimental and clinical observations with Phenformin suggest an alternative explanation for Gleevec's mode of action. Using 13C-guided precise flux measurements, a comparative multiple cell line study demonstrated the drug's downstream impact on submolecular fatty acid processing metabolic events that occurred independent of Gleevec's molecular target. Clinical observations that hyperlipidemia and diabetes are both reversed in mice and in patients taking Gleevec support the drugs' primary metabolic targets by biguanides and statins. This is evident by structural data demonstrating that Gleevec shows pyridine- and phenyl-guanidine homology with Phenformin and identical phenylcarbamoyl structural and ligand binding homology with Lipitor. The misunderstood mechanism of action of Gleevec is emblematic of the pervasive flawed reasoning that genomic analysis will lead to targeted, personalized diagnosis and therapy. The alternative perspective for Gleevec's mode of action may turn oncotargets towards metabolic channel reaction architectures in leukemia and melanoma, as well as in other cancers. PMID:28418852

  6. The homology of odontodes in gnathostomes: insights from Dlx gene expression in the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teeth and tooth-like structures, together named odontodes, are repeated organs thought to share a common evolutionary origin. These structures can be found in gnathostomes at different locations along the body: oral teeth in the jaws, teeth and denticles in the oral-pharyngeal cavity, and dermal denticles on elasmobranch skin. We, and other colleagues, had previously shown that teeth in any location were serially homologous because: i) pharyngeal and oral teeth develop through a common developmental module; and ii) the expression patterns of the Dlx genes during odontogenesis were highly divergent between species but almost identical between oral and pharyngeal dentitions within the same species. Here we examine Dlx gene expression in oral teeth and dermal denticles in order to test the hypothesis of serial homology between these odontodes. Results We present a detailed comparison of the first developing teeth and dermal denticles (caudal primary scales) of the dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) and show that both odontodes develop through identical stages that correspond to the common stages of oral and pharyngeal odontogenesis. We identified six Dlx paralogs in the dogfish and found that three showed strong transcription in teeth and dermal denticles (Dlx3, Dlx4 and Dlx5) whereas a weak expression was detected for Dlx1 in dermal denticles and teeth, and for Dlx2 in dermal denticles. Very few differences in Dlx expression patterns could be detected between tooth and dermal denticle development, except for the absence of Dlx2 expression in teeth. Conclusions Taken together, our histological and expression data strongly suggest that teeth and dermal denticles develop from the same developmental module and under the control of the same set of Dlx genes. Teeth and dermal denticles should therefore be considered as serial homologs developing through the initiation of a common gene regulatory network (GRN) at several body locations. This mechanism of heterotopy

  7. Identification of SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Src homology domain 2 (SH2) domain-containing inositol 5’-phosphatases (SHIP) proteins have diverse roles in signal transduction. SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs were identified in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, based on sequence homology to murine and human SHIP sequences. Full-length cDNAs for ...

  8. Separase Is Required for Homolog and Sister Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of Sister Centromeres.

    PubMed

    Blattner, Ariane C; Chaurasia, Soumya; McKee, Bruce D; Lehner, Christian F

    2016-04-01

    Spatially controlled release of sister chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of sister centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain sister centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of sister centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in sister centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that sister centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase.

  9. Separase Is Required for Homolog and Sister Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of Sister Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Ariane C.; McKee, Bruce D.; Lehner, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially controlled release of sister chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of sister centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain sister centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of sister centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in sister centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that sister centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase. PMID:27120695

  10. Identification of the homolog of cell-counting factor in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Okuwa, Takako; Katayama, Takahiro; Takano, Akinori; Yasukawa, Hiroo

    2002-10-01

    Genes for the cell-counting factors in Dictyostelium discoideum, countin and countin2, are considered to control the size of the multicellular structure of this organism. A novel gene, countin3, that is homologous to countin and countin2 genes (49 and 39% identity in amino acid sequence, respectively) was identified in the D. discoideum genome. The expression of countin3 was observed in the vegetatively growing cells, decreased in the aggregating stage, increased in the mid-developmental stage and decreased again in subsequent stages. This expression pattern is different from that of countin and countin2. The distinct expression kinetics of three genes suggests that they would have unique roles in size control of D. discoideum.

  11. MutS2 Promotes Homologous Recombination in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Burby, Peter E; Simmons, Lyle A

    2017-01-15

    Bacterial MutS proteins are subdivided into two families, MutS1 and MutS2. MutS1 family members recognize DNA replication errors during their participation in the well-characterized mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In contrast to the well-described function of MutS1, the function of MutS2 in bacteria has remained less clear. In Helicobacter pylori and Thermus thermophilus, MutS2 has been shown to suppress homologous recombination. The role of MutS2 is unknown in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis In this work, we investigated the contribution of MutS2 to maintaining genome integrity in B. subtilis We found that deletion of mutS2 renders B. subtilis sensitive to the natural antibiotic mitomycin C (MMC), which requires homologous recombination for repair. We demonstrate that the C-terminal small MutS-related (Smr) domain is necessary but not sufficient for tolerance to MMC. Further, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to test if the inducible prophage PBSX was the underlying cause of the observed MMC sensitivity. Genetic analysis revealed that MMC sensitivity was dependent on recombination and not on nucleotide excision repair or a symptom of prophage PBSX replication and cell lysis. We found that deletion of mutS2 resulted in decreased transformation efficiency using both plasmid and chromosomal DNA. Further, deletion of mutS2 in a strain lacking the Holliday junction endonuclease gene recU resulted in increased MMC sensitivity and decreased transformation efficiency, suggesting that MutS2 could function redundantly with RecU. Together, our results support a model where B. subtilis MutS2 helps to promote homologous recombination, demonstrating a new function for bacterial MutS2.

  12. Homologies between proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi and thyroid autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Vaccaro, Mario; Santarpia, Libero; Trimarchi, Francesco

    2004-11-01

    Subclinical exposure to microbic antigens that share amino acid sequence homology with self antigens might trigger autoimmune diseases in genetically predisposed individuals via molecular mimicry. Genetic predisposition to Graves' disease (GD) or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is conferred by HLA loci DR3 or DR5, respectively. Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) outer proteins (YOPs) are candidate triggers based on the high prevalence of serum antibodies (Ab) against YOPs in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) and reactivity of these Ab with hTSH-R, suggesting homology between YOPs and hTSH-R. We have reported previously that the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) could be another trigger. We have explored further the homology of hTSH-R with YE and Bb. Using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), we found four matches with YE and five matches with Bb . Residues 22-272, 186-330, 319-363 and 684-749 of hTSH-R matched YopM, Ysp, exopolygalacturonase and SpyA of YE (identity 23-31%, similarity 40-48%). Residues 112-205, 127-150, 141-260, 299-383 and 620-697 of hTSH-R matched outer surface protein A, flagellar motor rotation protein A, two hypothetical proteins (BBG02 and BBJ08) and DNA recombinase/ATP dependent helicase of Borrelia (identity 27-50%, similarity 40-75%). Interestingly, the above hTSH-R regions coincide with (or include) known human T-cell epitopes: aa 52-71, 140-176, 240-270, 340-380 and 441-661. Our data strengthen the hypothesis of Bb and YE as environmental triggers of AITD in genetically predisposed persons through molecular mimicry mechanisms.

  13. An expert system for processing sequence homology data

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnhammer, E.L.L.; Durbin, R.

    1994-12-31

    When confronted with the task of finding homology to large numbers of sequences, database searching tools such as Blast and Fasta generate prohibitively large amounts of information. An automatic way of making most of the decisions a trained sequence analyst would make was developed by means of a rule-based expert system combined with an algorithm to avoid non-informative biased residue composition matches. The results found relevant by the system are presented in a very concise and clear way, so that the homology can be assessed with minimum effort. The expert system, HSPcrunch, was implemented to process the output of the programs in the BLAST suite. HSPcrunch embodies rules on detecting distant similarities when pairs of weak matches are consistent with a larger gaped alignment, i.e. when Blast has broken a longer gaped alignment up into smaller ungaped ones. This way, more distant similarities can be detected with no or little side-effects of more spurious matches. The rules for how small the gaps must be to be considered significant have been derived empirically. Currently a set of rules are used that operate on two different scoring levels, one for very weak matches that have very small gaps and one for medium weak matches that have slightly larger gaps. This set of rules proved to be robust for most cases and gives high fidelity separation between real homologies and spurious matches, One of the most important rules for reducing the amount of output is to limit the number of overlapping matches to the same region of the query sequence. This way, a region with many high-scoring matches will not dominate the output and hide weaker but relevant matches to other regions. This is particularly valuable for multi-domain queries.

  14. A procedure for identifying homologous alternative splicing events

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, David; Hospital, Adam; Orozco, Modesto; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Background The study of the functional role of alternative splice isoforms of a gene is a very active area of research in biology. The difficulty of the experimental approach (in particular, in its high-throughput version) leaves ample room for the development of bioinformatics tools that can provide a useful first picture of the problem. Among the possible approaches, one of the simplest is to follow classical protein function annotation protocols and annotate target alternative splice events with the information available from conserved events in other species. However, the application of this protocol requires a procedure capable of recognising such events. Here we present a simple but accurate method developed for this purpose. Results We have developed a method for identifying homologous, or equivalent, alternative splicing events, based on the combined use of neural networks and sequence searches. The procedure comprises four steps: (i) BLAST search for homologues of the two isoforms defining the target alternative splicing event; (ii) construction of all possible candidate events; (iii) scoring of the latter with a series of neural networks; and (iv) filtering of the results. When tested in a set of 473 manually annotated pairs of homologous events, our method showed a good performance, with an accuracy of 0.99, a precision of 0.98 and a sensitivity of 0.93. When no candidates were available, the specificity of our method varied between 0.81 and 0.91. Conclusion The method described in this article allows the identification of homologous alternative splicing events, with a good success rate, indicating that such method could be used for the development of functional annotation of alternative splice isoforms. PMID:17640387

  15. The PIKE homolog Centaurin gamma regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gündner, Anna Lisa; Hahn, Ines; Sendscheid, Oliver; Aberle, Hermann; Hoch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) proteins encoded by the PIKE/CENTG1 gene are members of the gamma subgroup of the Centaurin superfamily of small GTPases. They are characterized by their chimeric protein domain architecture consisting of a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, a GTPase-activating (GAP) domain, Ankyrin repeats as well as an intrinsic GTPase domain. In mammals, three PIKE isoforms with variations in protein structure and subcellular localization are encoded by the PIKE locus. PIKE inactivation in mice results in a broad range of defects, including neuronal cell death during brain development and misregulation of mammary gland development. PIKE -/- mutant mice are smaller, contain less white adipose tissue, and show insulin resistance due to misregulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin receptor/Akt signaling. here, we have studied the role of PIKE proteins in metabolic regulation in the fly. We show that the Drosophila PIKE homolog, ceng1A, encodes functional GTPases whose internal GAP domains catalyze their GTPase activity. To elucidate the biological function of ceng1A in flies, we introduced a deletion in the ceng1A gene by homologous recombination that removes all predicted functional PIKE domains. We found that homozygous ceng1A mutant animals survive to adulthood. In contrast to PIKE -/- mouse mutants, genetic ablation of Drosophila ceng1A does not result in growth defects or weight reduction. Although metabolic pathways such as insulin signaling, sensitivity towards starvation and mobilization of lipids under high fed conditions are not perturbed in ceng1A mutants, homozygous ceng1A mutants show a prolonged development in second instar larval stage, leading to a late onset of pupariation. In line with these results we found that expression of ecdysone inducible genes is reduced in ceng1A mutants. Together, we propose a novel role for Drosophila Ceng1A in regulating ecdysone signaling-dependent second to third instar

  16. Homologous recombination deficiency: Exploiting the fundamental vulnerability of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) exhibit defective DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) due to genetic and epigenetic alterations of HR pathway genes. Defective HR is an important therapeutic target in EOC as exemplified by the efficacy of platinum analogues in this disease, as well as the advent of poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors which exhibit synthetic lethality when applied to HR deficient cells. Here, we describe the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of HR deficient EOCs, discuss current and emerging approaches for targeting these tumors, and present challenges associated with these approaches focusing on development and overcoming resistance. PMID:26463832

  17. Homologous versus heterologous gene expression in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C Y; Oppermann, H; Hitzeman, R A

    1984-01-01

    DNA sequences normally flanking the highly expressed yeast 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene have been placed adjacent to heterologous mammalian genes on high copy number plasmid vectors and used for expression experiments in yeast. For many genes thus far expressed with this system, expression has been 15-50 times lower than the expression of the natural homologous PGK gene on the same plasmid. We have extensively investigated this dramatic difference and have found that in most cases it is directly proportional to the steady-state levels of mRNAs. We demonstrate this phenomenon and suggest possible causes for this effect on mRNA levels. Images PMID:6096814

  18. Addressing inaccuracies in BLOSUM computation improves homology search performance.

    PubMed

    Hess, Martin; Keul, Frank; Goesele, Michael; Hamacher, Kay

    2016-04-27

    BLOSUM matrices belong to the most commonly used substitution matrix series for protein homology search and sequence alignments since their publication in 1992. In 2008, Styczynski et al. discovered miscalculations in the clustering step of the matrix computation. Still, the RBLOSUM64 matrix based on the corrected BLOSUM code was reported to perform worse at a statistically significant level than the BLOSUM62. Here, we present a further correction of the (R)BLOSUM code and provide a thorough performance analysis of BLOSUM-, RBLOSUM- and the newly derived CorBLOSUM-type matrices. Thereby, we assess homology search performance of these matrix-types derived from three different BLOCKS databases on all versions of the ASTRAL20, ASTRAL40 and ASTRAL70 subsets resulting in 51 different benchmarks in total. Our analysis is focused on two of the most popular BLOSUM matrices - BLOSUM50 and BLOSUM62. Our study shows that fixing small errors in the BLOSUM code results in substantially different substitution matrices with a beneficial influence on homology search performance when compared to the original matrices. The CorBLOSUM matrices introduced here performed at least as good as their BLOSUM counterparts in ∼75 % of all test cases. On up-to-date ASTRAL databases BLOSUM matrices were even outperformed by CorBLOSUM matrices in more than 86 % of the times. In contrast to the study by Styczynski et al., the tested RBLOSUM matrices also outperformed the corresponding BLOSUM matrices in most of the cases. Comparing the CorBLOSUM with the RBLOSUM matrices revealed no general performance advantages for either on older ASTRAL releases. On up-to-date ASTRAL databases however CorBLOSUM matrices performed better than their RBLOSUM counterparts in ∼74 % of the test cases. Our results imply that CorBLOSUM type matrices outperform the BLOSUM matrices on a statistically significant level in most of the cases, especially on up-to-date databases such as ASTRAL ≥2.01. Additionally, Cor

  19. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  20. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations Applied to Protein Homology Models.

    PubMed

    Cappel, Daniel; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James; Sherman, Woody

    2016-12-27

    A significant challenge and potential high-value application of computer-aided drug design is the accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Free energy perturbation (FEP) using molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is among the most suitable approaches to achieve accurate binding free energy predictions, due to the rigorous statistical framework of the methodology, correct representation of the energetics, and thorough treatment of the important degrees of freedom in the system (including explicit waters). Recent advances in sampling methods and force fields coupled with vast increases in computational resources have made FEP a viable technology to drive hit-to-lead and lead optimization, allowing for more efficient cycles of medicinal chemistry and the possibility to explore much larger chemical spaces. However, previous FEP applications have focused on systems with high-resolution crystal structures of the target as starting points-something that is not always available in drug discovery projects. As such, the ability to apply FEP on homology models would greatly expand the domain of applicability of FEP in drug discovery. In this work we apply a particular implementation of FEP, called FEP+, on congeneric ligand series binding to four diverse targets: a kinase (Tyk2), an epigenetic bromodomain (BRD4), a transmembrane GPCR (A2A), and a protein-protein interaction interface (BCL-2 family protein MCL-1). We apply FEP+ using both crystal structures and homology models as starting points and find that the performance using homology models is generally on a par with the results when using crystal structures. The robustness of the calculations to structural variations in the input models can likely be attributed to the conformational sampling in the molecular dynamics simulations, which allows the modeled receptor to adapt to the "real" conformation for each ligand in the series. This work exemplifies the advantages of using all-atom simulation methods with

  1. Parallel Computation of Persistent Homology using the Blowup Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Ryan; Morozov, Dmitriy

    2015-04-27

    We describe a parallel algorithm that computes persistent homology, an algebraic descriptor of a filtered topological space. Our algorithm is distinguished by operating on a spatial decomposition of the domain, as opposed to a decomposition with respect to the filtration. We rely on a classical construction, called the Mayer--Vietoris blowup complex, to glue global topological information about a space from its disjoint subsets. We introduce an efficient algorithm to perform this gluing operation, which may be of independent interest, and describe how to process the domain hierarchically. We report on a set of experiments that help assess the strengths and identify the limitations of our method.

  2. Structure of a 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase homolog from Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Spoonamore, James E.; Roberts, Sue A.; Heroux, Annie; Bandarian, Vahe

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS) homolog from Streptomyces coelicolor, SCO 6650, was solved at 1.5 Å resolution. SCO 6650 forms a hexameric T-fold that closely resembles other PTPS proteins. The biological activity of SCO 6650 is unknown, but it lacks both a required active-site zinc metal ion and the essential catalytic triad and does not catalyze the PTPS reaction. However, SCO 6650 maintains active-site residues consistent with binding a pterin-like substrate. PMID:18931427

  3. Polyethylene glycol-based homologated ligands for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors☆

    PubMed Central

    Scates, Bradley A.; Lashbrook, Bethany L.; Chastain, Benjamin C.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Elliott, Brandon T.; Theising, Nicholas J.; Baker, Thomas A.; Fitch, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    A homologous series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomethyl ethers were conjugated with three ligand series for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Conjugates of acetylaminocholine, the cyclic analog 1-acetyl-4,4-dimethylpiperazinium, and pyridyl ether A-84543 were prepared. Each series was found to retain significant affinity at nicotinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with tethers of up to six PEG units. Such compounds are hydrophilic ligands which may serve as models for fluorescent/affinity probes and multivalent ligands for nAChR. PMID:19006672

  4. P53 Suppression of Homologous Recombination and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    eEF2 kinase activity in a cell cycle- and amino acid -dependent manner. Embo J 27: 1005–1016. 40. Astanehe A, Arenillas D, Wasserman WW, Leung PC...followed by 433 amino acids of the duplicated exons 8 to 19. After deletion of one of the internal repeats by HR, a functional protein can be...homologous recombination events in mice in vivo. Nucleic Acids Res 38:7538–7545 - Ravi D, Chen Y, Karia B, Brown A, Gu TT, Li J, Carey MS, Hennessy BT

  5. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A.; Spilianakis, Charalampos G.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNFα locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnfα spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses. PMID:25770217

  6. The Arabidopsis KIN17 and its homolog KLP mediate different aspects of plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Xing, Shuping; Huijser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Proteins harboring the kin17 domain (KIN17) constitute a family of well-conserved eukaryotic nuclear proteins involved in nucleic acid metabolism. In mammals, KIN17 orthologs contribute to DNA replication, RNA splicing, and DNA integrity maintenance. Recently, we reported a functional characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana KIN17 homolog (AtKIN17) that uncovered a role for this protein in tuning physiological responses during copper (Cu) deficiency and oxidative stress. However, functions similar to those described in mammals may also be expected in plants given the conservation of functional domains in KIN17 orthologs. Here, we provide additional data consistent with the participation of AtKIN17 in controlling general plant growth and development, as well as in response to UV radiation. Furthermore, the Arabidopsis genome codes for a second homolog to KIN17, we referred to as KIN17-like-protein (KLP). KLP loss-of-function lines exhibited a reduced inhibition of root growth in response to copper excess and relatively elongated hypocotyls in etiolated seedlings. Altogether, our experimental data point to a general function of the kin17 domain proteins in plant growth and development.

  7. Functional diversity of five homologous Cu+-ATPases present in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarju J; Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Collins, Jessica M; Argüello, José M

    2014-06-01

    Copper is an important element in host-microbe interactions, acting both as a catalyst in enzymes and as a potential toxin. Cu(+)-ATPases drive cytoplasmic Cu(+) efflux and protect bacteria against metal overload. Many pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria contain multiple Cu(+)-ATPase genes within particular genetic environments, suggesting alternative roles for each resulting protein. This hypothesis was tested by characterizing five homologous Cu(+)-ATPases present in the symbiotic organism Sinorhizobium meliloti. Mutation of each gene led to different phenotypes and abnormal nodule development in the alfalfa host. Distinct responses were detected in free-living S. meliloti mutant strains exposed to metal and redox stresses. Differential gene expression was detected under Cu(+), oxygen or nitrosative stress. These observations suggest that CopA1a maintains the cytoplasmic Cu(+) quota and its expression is controlled by Cu(+) levels. CopA1b is also regulated by Cu(+) concentrations and is required during symbiosis for bacteroid maturation. CopA2-like proteins, FixI1 and FixI2, are necessary for the assembly of two different cytochrome c oxidases at different stages of bacterial life. CopA3 is a phylogenetically distinct Cu(+)-ATPase that does not contribute to Cu(+) tolerance. It is regulated by redox stress and required during symbiosis. We postulated a model where non-redundant homologous Cu(+)-ATPases, operating under distinct regulation, transport Cu(+) to different target proteins.

  8. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  9. A homology-based pipeline for global prediction of post-translational modification sites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Shi, Shao-Ping; Xu, Hao-Dong; Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-05-13

    The pathways of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been shown to play particularly important roles for almost any biological process. Identification of PTM substrates along with information on the exact sites is fundamental for fully understanding or controlling biological processes. Alternative computational strategies would help to annotate PTMs in a high-throughput manner. Traditional algorithms are suited for identifying the common organisms and tissues that have a complete PTM atlas or extensive experimental data. While annotation of rare PTMs in most organisms is a clear challenge. In this work, to this end we have developed a novel homology-based pipeline named PTMProber that allows identification of potential modification sites for most of the proteomes lacking PTMs data. Cross-promotion E-value (CPE) as stringent benchmark has been used in our pipeline to evaluate homology to known modification sites. Independent-validation tests show that PTMProber achieves over 58.8% recall with high precision by CPE benchmark. Comparisons with other machine-learning tools show that PTMProber pipeline performs better on general predictions. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to integrate this pipeline at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PTMProber/index.aspx. In addition to pre-constructed prediction models of PTM, the website provides an extensional functionality to allow users to customize models.

  10. Lipids Regulate Lck Protein Activity through Their Interactions with the Lck Src Homology 2 Domain.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ren; Jung, Da-Jung; Silkov, Antonina; Kim, Hyunjin; Singaram, Indira; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xin, Yao; Kim, Eui; Park, Mi-Jeong; Thiagarajan-Rosenkranz, Pallavi; Smrt, Sean; Honig, Barry; Baek, Kwanghee; Ryu, Sungho; Lorieau, Justin; Kim, You-Me; Cho, Wonhwa

    2016-08-19

    Lymphocyte-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (Lck) plays an essential role in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell development, but its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To explore the possibility that plasma membrane (PM) lipids control TCR signaling activities of Lck, we measured the membrane binding properties of its regulatory Src homology 2 (SH2) and Src homology 3 domains. The Lck SH2 domain binds anionic PM lipids with high affinity but with low specificity. Electrostatic potential calculation, NMR analysis, and mutational studies identified the lipid-binding site of the Lck SH2 domain that includes surface-exposed basic, aromatic, and hydrophobic residues but not the phospho-Tyr binding pocket. Mutation of lipid binding residues greatly reduced the interaction of Lck with the ζ chain in the activated TCR signaling complex and its overall TCR signaling activities. These results suggest that PM lipids, including phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, modulate interaction of Lck with its binding partners in the TCR signaling complex and its TCR signaling activities in a spatiotemporally specific manner via its SH2 domain. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. What Evidence Is There for the Homology of Protein-Protein Interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Anna C. F.; Jones, Nick S.; Porter, Mason A.; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    The notion that sequence homology implies functional similarity underlies much of computational biology. In the case of protein-protein interactions, an interaction can be inferred between two proteins on the basis that sequence-similar proteins have been observed to interact. The use of transferred interactions is common, but the legitimacy of such inferred interactions is not clear. Here we investigate transferred interactions and whether data incompleteness explains the lack of evidence found for them. Using definitions of homology associated with functional annotation transfer, we estimate that conservation rates of interactions are low even after taking interactome incompleteness into account. For example, at a blastp -value threshold of , we estimate the conservation rate to be about between S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens. Our method also produces estimates of interactome sizes (which are similar to those previously proposed). Using our estimates of interaction conservation we estimate the rate at which protein-protein interactions are lost across species. To our knowledge, this is the first such study based on large-scale data. Previous work has suggested that interactions transferred within species are more reliable than interactions transferred across species. By controlling for factors that are specific to within-species interaction prediction, we propose that the transfer of interactions within species might be less reliable than transfers between species. Protein-protein interactions appear to be very rarely conserved unless very high sequence similarity is observed. Consequently, inferred interactions should be used with care. PMID:23028270

  12. A human exchange factor for ARF contains Sec7- and pleckstrin-homology domains.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Paris, S; Antonny, B; Robineau, S; Béraud-Dufour, S; Jackson, C L; Chabre, M

    1996-12-05

    The small G protein ARF1 is involved in the coating of vesicles that bud from the Golgi compartments. Its activation is controlled by as-yet unidentified guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. Gea1, the first ARF exchange factor to be discovered in yeast, is a large protein containing a domain of homology with Sec7, another yeast protein that is also involved in secretion. Here we characterized a smaller human protein (relative molecular mass 47K) named ARNO, which contains a central Sec7 domain that promotes guanine-nucleotide exchange on ARF1. ARNO also contains an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif and a carboxy-terminal pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain. The PH domain mediates an enhancement of ARNO exchange activity by negatively charged phospholipid vesicles supplemented with phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. The exchange activity of ARNO is not inhibited by brefeldin A, an agent known to block vesicular transport and inhibit the exchange activity on ARF1 in cell extracts. This suggests that a regulatory component which is sensitive to brefeldin A associates with ARNO in vivo, possibly through the amino-terminal coiled-coil. We propose that other proteins with a Sec7 domain regulate different members of the ARF family.

  13. The American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis, encodes a functional histamine release factor homolog.

    PubMed

    Mulenga, Albert; Macaluso, Kevin R; Simser, Jason A; Azad, Abdu F

    2003-09-01

    We have identified a functional Dermacentor variabilis histamine release factor (DVHRF) homolog and shown that it is a secreted tick saliva protein. The 945 base pair (bp) full-length DVHRF cDNA has a 522 bp open reading frame that encodes a 20 kDa (173 amino acid) polypeptide. Sequence analysis showed that the two HRF signature amino acid sequences were conserved in DVHRF, indicating close structural similarity between DVHRF and other characterized HRF homologs. Northern and Western blotting analyses of partially fed and unfed ticks indicates that neither DVHRF transcriptional nor translational regulation were influenced by tick feeding activity. Like its counterparts from the mammalian system, tick DVHRF is expressed in various tissues, as assessed by both Northern and Western blotting analyses. Furthermore, an Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant DVHRF induced histamine secretion from a rat basophilic leukemic cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Extensive experimental evidence has shown that high levels of histamine at tick attachment sites impede the biological success of feeding ticks and, in response, ticks secrete histamine-binding proteins to minimize the adverse effects of histamine. Our results suggest the existence of a tick-derived multifaceted control mechanism for levels of histamine at tick feeding sites.

  14. Transformation of Aspergillus parasiticus with a homologous gene (pyrG) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Skory, C D; Horng, J S; Pestka, J J; Linz, J E

    1990-01-01

    The lack of efficient transformation methods for aflatoxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus has been a major constraint for the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis at the genetic level. A transformation system with efficiencies of 30 to 50 stable transformants per microgram of DNA was developed for A. parasiticus by using the homologous pyrG gene. The pyrG gene from A. parasiticus was isolated by in situ plaque hybridization of a lambda genomic DNA library. Uridine auxotrophs of A. parasiticus ATCC 36537, a mutant blocked in aflatoxin biosynthesis, were isolated by selection on 5-fluoroorotic acid following nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Isolates with mutations in the pyrG gene resulting in elimination of orotidine monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase activity were detected by assaying cell extracts for their ability to convert [14C]OMP to [14C]UMP. Transformation of A. parasiticus pyrG protoplasts with the homologous pyrG gene restored the fungal cells to prototrophy. Enzymatic analysis of cell extracts of transformant clones demonstrated that these extracts had the ability to convert [14C]OMP to [14C]UMP. Southern analysis of DNA purified from transformant clones indicated that both pUC19 vector sequences and pyrG sequences were integrated into the genome. The development of this pyrG transformation system should allow cloning of the aflatoxin-biosynthetic genes, which will be useful in studying the regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis and may ultimately provide a means for controlling aflatoxin production in the field. Images PMID:2176447

  15. A homology-based pipeline for global prediction of post-translational modification sites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Shi, Shao-Ping; Xu, Hao-Dong; Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-01

    The pathways of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been shown to play particularly important roles for almost any biological process. Identification of PTM substrates along with information on the exact sites is fundamental for fully understanding or controlling biological processes. Alternative computational strategies would help to annotate PTMs in a high-throughput manner. Traditional algorithms are suited for identifying the common organisms and tissues that have a complete PTM atlas or extensive experimental data. While annotation of rare PTMs in most organisms is a clear challenge. In this work, to this end we have developed a novel homology-based pipeline named PTMProber that allows identification of potential modification sites for most of the proteomes lacking PTMs data. Cross-promotion E-value (CPE) as stringent benchmark has been used in our pipeline to evaluate homology to known modification sites. Independent-validation tests show that PTMProber achieves over 58.8% recall with high precision by CPE benchmark. Comparisons with other machine-learning tools show that PTMProber pipeline performs better on general predictions. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to integrate this pipeline at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PTMProber/index.aspx. In addition to pre-constructed prediction models of PTM, the website provides an extensional functionality to allow users to customize models. PMID:27174170

  16. The Arabidopsis KIN17 and its homolog KLP mediate different aspects of plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Xing, Shuping; Huijser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Proteins harboring the kin17 domain (KIN17) constitute a family of well-conserved eukaryotic nuclear proteins involved in nucleic acid metabolism. In mammals, KIN17 orthologs contribute to DNA replication, RNA splicing, and DNA integrity maintenance. Recently, we reported a functional characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana KIN17 homolog (AtKIN17) that uncovered a role for this protein in tuning physiological responses during copper (Cu) deficiency and oxidative stress. However, functions similar to those described in mammals may also be expected in plants given the conservation of functional domains in KIN17 orthologs. Here, we provide additional data consistent with the participation of AtKIN17 in controlling general plant growth and development, as well as in response to UV radiation. Furthermore, the Arabidopsis genome codes for a second homolog to KIN17, we referred to as KIN17-LIKE-PROTEIN (KLP). KLP loss-of-function lines exhibited a reduced inhibition of root growth in response to copper excess and relatively elongated hypocotyls in etiolated seedlings. Altogether, our experimental data point to a general function of the kin17 domain proteins in plant growth and development. PMID:24713636

  17. Plant Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs Impinge on Wound Responsiveness and Development in Lycopersicon esculentumW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Moshe; Davydov, Olga; Orazova, Saltanat; Yesbergenova, Zhazira; Ophir, Ron; Stratmann, Johannes W.; Fluhr, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Plant respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rboh) are homologs of the human neutrophil pathogen-related gp91phox. Antisense technology was employed to ascertain the biological function of Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) Rboh. Lines with diminished Rboh activity showed a reduced level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the leaf, implying a role for Rboh in establishing the cellular redox milieu. Surprisingly, the antisense plants acquired a highly branched phenotype, switched from indeterminate to determinate growth habit, and had fasciated reproductive organs. Wound-induced systemic expression of proteinase inhibitor II was compromised in the antisense lines, indicating that ROS intermediates supplied by Rboh are required for this wound response. Extending these observations by transcriptome analysis revealed ectopic leaf expression of homeotic MADS box genes that are normally expressed only in reproductive organs. In addition, both Rboh-dependent and -independent wound-induced gene induction was detected as well as transcript changes related to redox maintenance. The results provide novel insights into how the steady state cellular level of ROS is controlled and portrays the role of Rboh as a signal transducer of stress and developmental responses. PMID:14973161

  18. Electroabsorption spectroscopy of β -carotene homologs: Anomalous enhancement of Δμ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Gardiner, Alastair T.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2005-05-01

    Electroabsorption spectroscopy was used to determine the change in polarizability (Δα) and the change in dipole moment (Δμ) upon photoexcitation of β -carotene homologs with an increasing number (n) of conjugated CC double bonds. The Δα values increased systematically with increasing n . Although the magnitude of the intrinsic Δμ values of the homologs was negligible because of their centrosymmetric structures, an anomalous increase in the value of Δμ was observed at n=9 . The stark-broadening mechanism originally proposed by Kulakov and Parschuk [Chem. Phys. Lett. 325, 517 (2000)] is a possible origin that can generate this anomaly. It is proposed that either the 3Ag-1 or another intermediate state whose group symmetry is Ag should be located close in energy to the 1Bu+1 state at n=9 . This increase in the value of Δμ leads to an enhancement of the third-order nonlinear polarizability. We suggest that the energy gap between the gerade- and ungerade-type excited states is an important factor controlling the magnitude of the optical nonlinearity of carotenoids.

  19. Visualization of human Bloom's syndrome helicase molecules bound to homologous recombination intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Gyimesi, Máté; Pires, Ricardo H.; Billington, Neil; Sarlós, Kata; Kocsis, Zsuzsa S.; Módos, Károly; Kellermayer, Miklós S. Z.; Kovács, Mihály

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a key process in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) that can initiate cancer or cell death. Human Bloom's syndrome RecQ-family DNA helicase (BLM) exerts complex activities to promote DSB repair while avoiding illegitimate HR. The oligomeric assembly state of BLM has been a key unresolved aspect of its activities. In this study we assessed the structure and oligomeric state of BLM, in the absence and presence of key HR-intermediate DNA structures, by using single-molecule visualization (electron microscopic and atomic force microscopic single-particle analysis) and solution biophysical (dynamic light scattering, kinetic and equilibrium binding) techniques. Besides full-length BLM, we used a previously characterized truncated construct (BLM642–1290) as a monomeric control. Contrary to previous models proposing a ring-forming oligomer, we found the majority of BLM molecules to be monomeric in all examined conditions. However, BLM showed a tendency to form dimers when bound to branched HR intermediates. Our results suggest that HR activities requiring single-stranded DNA translocation are performed by monomeric BLM, while complex DNA structures encountered and dissolved by BLM in later stages of HR induce partial oligomerization of the helicase.—Gyimesi, M., Pires, R.H., Billington, N., Sarlós, K., Kocsis, Z.S. Módos, K., Kellermayer, M. S. Z., Kovács, M. Visualization of human Bloom's syndrome helicase molecules bound to homologous recombination intermediates. PMID:24005907

  20. A homology-based pipeline for global prediction of post-translational modification sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Shi, Shao-Ping; Xu, Hao-Dong; Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-05-01

    The pathways of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been shown to play particularly important roles for almost any biological process. Identification of PTM substrates along with information on the exact sites is fundamental for fully understanding or controlling biological processes. Alternative computational strategies would help to annotate PTMs in a high-throughput manner. Traditional algorithms are suited for identifying the common organisms and tissues that have a complete PTM atlas or extensive experimental data. While annotation of rare PTMs in most organisms is a clear challenge. In this work, to this end we have developed a novel homology-based pipeline named PTMProber that allows identification of potential modification sites for most of the proteomes lacking PTMs data. Cross-promotion E-value (CPE) as stringent benchmark has been used in our pipeline to evaluate homology to known modification sites. Independent-validation tests show that PTMProber achieves over 58.8% recall with high precision by CPE benchmark. Comparisons with other machine-learning tools show that PTMProber pipeline performs better on general predictions. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to integrate this pipeline at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PTMProber/index.aspx. In addition to pre-constructed prediction models of PTM, the website provides an extensional functionality to allow users to customize models.

  1. Using Genetic Networks and Homology to Understand the Evolution of Phenotypic Traits

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Amy R; Schimenti, John C

    2012-01-01

    Homology can have different meanings for different kinds of biologists. A phylogenetic view holds that homology, defined by common ancestry, is rigorously identified through phylogenetic analysis. Such homologies are taxic homologies (=synapomorphies). A second interpretation, “biological homology” emphasizes common ancestry through the continuity of genetic information underlying phenotypic traits, and is favored by some developmental geneticists. A third kind of homology, deep homology, was recently defined as “the sharing of the genetic regulatory apparatus used to build morphologically and phylogenetically disparate features.” Here we explain the commonality among these three versions of homology. We argue that biological homology, as evidenced by a conserved gene regulatory network giving a trait its “essential identity” (a Character Identity Network or “ChIN”) must also be a taxic homology. In cases where a phenotypic trait has been modified over the course of evolution such that homology (taxic) is obscured (e.g. jaws are modified gill arches), a shared underlying ChIN provides evidence of this transformation. Deep homologies, where molecular and cellular components of a phenotypic trait precede the trait itself (are phylogenetically deep relative to the trait), are also taxic homologies, undisguised. Deep homologies inspire particular interest for understanding the evolutionary assembly of phenotypic traits. Mapping these deeply homologous building blocks on a phylogeny reveals the sequential steps leading to the origin of phenotypic novelties. Finally, we discuss how new genomic technologies will revolutionize the comparative genomic study of non-model organisms in a phylogenetic context, necessary to understand the evolution of phenotypic traits. PMID:22942677

  2. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  3. MHD simulations of homologous and cannibalistic coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhong; Chatterjee, Piyali

    2014-06-01

    We present magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the development of a homologous sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and demonstrate their so-called cannibalistic behavior. These CMEs originate from the repeated formations and partial eruptions of kink unstable flux ropes as a result of the continued emergence of a twisted flux rope across the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. The simulations show that a CME erupting into the open magnetic field created by a preceding CME has a higher speed, and therefore tends to be cannibalistic, catching up and merging with the preceding one into a single fast CME. All the CMEs attained speeds of about 1000 km/s as they exit the domain. The reformation of a twisted flux rope after each CME eruption during the sustained flux emergence can naturally explain the X-ray observations of repeated reformations of sigmoids and “sigmoid-under-cusp” configurations at a low-coronal source of homologous CMEs.

  4. Topological Strings, Double Affine Hecke Algebras, and Exceptional Knot Homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, Ross F.

    In this thesis, we consider two main subjects: refined, composite invariants and exceptional knot homologies of torus knots. The main technical tools are double affine Hecke algebras ("DAHA") and various insights from topological string theory. In particular,