Science.gov

Sample records for architecture supporting self-organisation

  1. Introducing Live ePortfolios to Support Self Organised Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Thomas; Winfield, Sandra; Smallwood, Angela; Coolin, Kirstie; Wood, Stuart; Searchwell, Louis

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a platform on which a new generation of applications targeted to aid the self-organised learner can be presented. The new application is enabled by innovations in trust-based security of data built upon emerging infrastructures to aid federated data access in the UK education sector. Within the proposed architecture, users and…

  2. Introducing Live ePortfolios to Support Self Organised Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Thomas; Winfield, Sandra; Smallwood, Angela; Coolin, Kirstie; Wood, Stuart; Searchwell, Louis

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a platform on which a new generation of applications targeted to aid the self-organised learner can be presented. The new application is enabled by innovations in trust-based security of data built upon emerging infrastructures to aid federated data access in the UK education sector. Within the proposed architecture, users and…

  3. Effects of the ISIS Recommender System for Navigation Support in Self-Organised Learning Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Hummel, Hans; van den Berg, Bert; Eshuis, Jannes; Waterink, Wim; Nadolski, Rob; Berlanga, Adriana; Boers, Nanda; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    The need to support users of the Internet with the selection of information is becoming more important. Learners in complex, self-organising Learning Networks have similar problems and need guidance to find and select most suitable learning activities, in order to attain their lifelong learning goals in the most efficient way. Several research…

  4. Support-vector-based emergent self-organising approach for emotional understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguwi, Yok-Yen; Cho, Siu-Yeung

    2010-12-01

    This study discusses the computational analysis of general emotion understanding from questionnaires methodology. The questionnaires method approaches the subject by investigating the real experience that accompanied the emotions, whereas the other laboratory approaches are generally associated with exaggerated elements. We adopted a connectionist model called support-vector-based emergent self-organising map (SVESOM) to analyse the emotion profiling from the questionnaires method. The SVESOM first identifies the important variables by giving discriminative features with high ranking. The classifier then performs the classification based on the selected features. Experimental results show that the top rank features are in line with the work of Scherer and Wallbott [(1994), 'Evidence for Universality and Cultural Variation of Differential Emotion Response Patterning', Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66, 310-328], which approached the emotions physiologically. While the performance measures show that using the full features for classifications can degrade the performance, the selected features provide superior results in terms of accuracy and generalisation.

  5. Self-Organisation and Capacity Building: Sustaining the Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Alan; Walker, Allan; Chan, Anissa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to describe the application of theoretical principles derived from a study of self-organisation and complex systems theory and their application to school-based capacity building to support planned change. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a case example in a Hong Kong School to illustrate the application of…

  6. Self-Organisation and Capacity Building: Sustaining the Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Alan; Walker, Allan; Chan, Anissa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to describe the application of theoretical principles derived from a study of self-organisation and complex systems theory and their application to school-based capacity building to support planned change. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a case example in a Hong Kong School to illustrate the application of…

  7. Self-organisation and motion in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenau, T. A.; Hesselberg, T.

    2014-03-01

    Self-organisation appeals to humans because difficult and repeated actions can be avoided through automation via bottom-up nonhierarchical processes. This is in contrast to the top-level controlled action strategy normally applied in automated products and in manufacturing. There are many situations where it is required that objects perform an action dependent on external stimuli. An example is automatic window blinds that open or closes in response to sunlight level. However, simpler and more robust designs could be made using the self-organising principles for movement found in many plants. Plants move to adapt to external conditions, e.g. sun-flower buds tracking the sun, touch-me-not Mimosa and Venus fly trap responding to mechanical stimuli by closing leaves to protect them and capture insects respectively. This paper describes 3 of the basic biomimetic principles used by plants to track the sun; i) light causing an inhibiting effect on the illuminated side causing it to bend, ii) light inducing a signal from the illuminated side that causes an action on the darker side and iii) light illuminating a number of sensing plates pointing upwards at an angle activate an expansion on the same side. A concept for mimicking the second principle is presented. It is a very simple and possible reliable self-organising structure that aligns a plate perpendicular to the source of illumination.

  8. On the equivalence between kernel self-organising maps and self-organising mixture density networks.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hujun

    2006-01-01

    The kernel method has become a useful trick and has been widely applied to various learning models to extend their nonlinear approximation and classification capabilities. Such extensions have also recently occurred to the Self-Organising Map (SOM). In this paper, two recently proposed kernel SOMs are reviewed, together with their link to an energy function. The Self-Organising Mixture Network is an extension of the SOM for mixture density modelling. This paper shows that with an isotropic, density-type kernel function, the kernel SOM is equivalent to a homoscedastic Self-Organising Mixture Network, an entropy-based density estimator. This revelation on the one hand explains that kernelising SOM can improve classification performance by acquiring better probability models of the data; but on the other hand it also explains that the SOM already naturally approximates the kernel method.

  9. Landscape self organisation: Modelling Sediment trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoorl, J. M.; Temme, A. J. A. M.; Veldkamp, A.

    2012-04-01

    Rivers tend to develop towards an equilibrium length profile, independently of exogenous factors. In general, although still under debate, this so-called self-organisation is assumed to be caused by simple feedbacks between sedimentation and erosion. Erosion correlates positively with gradient and discharge and sedimentation negatively. With the LAPSUS model, which was run for the catchment of the Sabinal, a small river in the South of Spain, this interplay of erosion and sedimentation results in sediment pulses (sequences of incision and sedimentation through time). These pulses are visualised in a short movie ( see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5LDUMvYZxU). In this case the LAPSUS model run did not take climate, base level nor tectonics into account. Therefore, these pulses can be considered independent of them. Furthermore, different scenarios show that the existence of the pulses is independent of precipitation, erodibility and sedimentation rate, although they control the number and shape of the pulses. A fieldwork check showed the plausibility of the occurrence of these sediment pulses. We conclude that the pulses as modelled with LAPSUS are indeed the consequence of the feedbacks between erosion and sedimentation and are not depending on exogenous factors. Keywords: Landscape self-organisation, Erosion, Deposition, LAPSUS, Modelling

  10. Microtubule self-organisation depends upon gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabony, J.; Pochon, N.; Papaseit, C.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular processes by which gravity is transduced into biological systems are poorly, if at all, understood. Under equilibrium conditions, chemical and biochemical structures do not depend upon gravity. It has been proposed that biological systems might show a gravity dependence by way of the bifurcation properties of certain types of non-linear chemical reactions that are far-from-equilibrium. We have found that in-vitro preparations of microtubules, an important element of the cellular cytoskeleton, show this type of behaviour. On earth, the solutions show macroscopic self-ordering, and the morphology of the structures that form depend upon the orientation of the sample with respect to gravity at a critical moment at an early stage in the development of the self-organised state. An experiment carried out in a sounding rocket, showed that as predicted by theories of this type, no self-organisation occurs when the microtubules are assembled under low gravity conditions. This is an experimental demonstration of how a very simple biochemical system, containing only two molecules, can be gravity sensitive. At a molecular level this behaviour results from an interaction of gravity with macroscopic concentration and density fluctuations that arise from the processes of microtubule contraction and elongation.

  11. Effects of supervised Self Organising Maps parameters on classification performance.

    PubMed

    Ballabio, Davide; Vasighi, Mahdi; Filzmoser, Peter

    2013-02-26

    Self Organising Maps (SOMs) are one of the most powerful learning strategies among neural networks algorithms. SOMs have several adaptable parameters and the selection of appropriate network architectures is required in order to make accurate predictions. The major disadvantage of SOMs is probably due to the network optimisation, since this procedure can be often time-expensive. Effects of network size, training epochs and learning rate on the classification performance of SOMs are known, whereas the effect of other parameters (type of SOMs, weights initialisation, training algorithm, topology and boundary conditions) are not so obvious. This study was addressed to analyse the effect of SOMs parameters on the network classification performance, as well as on their computational times, taking into consideration a significant number of real datasets, in order to achieve a comprehensive statistical comparison. Parameters were contemporaneously evaluated by means of an approach based on the design of experiments, which enabled the investigation of their interaction effects. Results highlighted the most important parameters which influence the classification performance and enabled the identification of the optimal settings, as well as the optimal architectures to reduce the computational time of SOMs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-organisation of symbolic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.

    2016-12-01

    Information is encountered in two different appearances, in native form by arbitrary physical structures, or in symbolic form by coded sequences of letters or the like. The self-organised emergence of symbolic information from structural information is referred to as a ritualisation transition. Occurring at some stage in evolutionary history, ritualisation transitions have in common that after the crossover, arbitrary symbols are issued and recognised by information-processing devices, by transmitters and receivers in the sense of Shannon's communication theory. Symbolic information-processing systems exhibit the fundamental code symmetry whose key features, such as largely lossless copying or persistence under hostile conditions, may elucidate the reasons for the repeated successful occurrence of ritualisation phenomena in evolution history. Ritualisation examples are briefly reviewed such as the origin of life, the appearance of human languages, the establishment of emergent social categories such as money, or the development of digital computers. In addition to their role as carriers of symbolic information, symbols are physical structures which also represent structural information. For a thermodynamic description of symbols and their arrangements, it appears reasonable to distinguish between Boltzmann entropy, Clausius entropy and Pauling entropy. Thermodynamic properties of symbols imply that their lifetimes are limited by the 2nd law.

  13. Self organising maps for visualising and modelling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the motivation of SOMs (Self Organising Maps) and how they are generally more accessible due to the wider available modern, more powerful, cost-effective computers. Their advantages compared to Principal Components Analysis and Partial Least Squares are discussed. These allow application to non-linear data, are not so dependent on least squares solutions, normality of errors and less influenced by outliers. In addition there are a wide variety of intuitive methods for visualisation that allow full use of the map space. Modern problems in analytical chemistry include applications to cultural heritage studies, environmental, metabolomic and biological problems result in complex datasets. Methods for visualising maps are described including best matching units, hit histograms, unified distance matrices and component planes. Supervised SOMs for classification including multifactor data and variable selection are discussed as is their use in Quality Control. The paper is illustrated using four case studies, namely the Near Infrared of food, the thermal analysis of polymers, metabolomic analysis of saliva using NMR, and on-line HPLC for pharmaceutical process monitoring. PMID:22594434

  14. Self organising maps for visualising and modelling.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Richard G

    2012-05-02

    The paper describes the motivation of SOMs (Self Organising Maps) and how they are generally more accessible due to the wider available modern, more powerful, cost-effective computers. Their advantages compared to Principal Components Analysis and Partial Least Squares are discussed. These allow application to non-linear data, are not so dependent on least squares solutions, normality of errors and less influenced by outliers. In addition there are a wide variety of intuitive methods for visualisation that allow full use of the map space. Modern problems in analytical chemistry include applications to cultural heritage studies, environmental, metabolomic and biological problems result in complex datasets. Methods for visualising maps are described including best matching units, hit histograms, unified distance matrices and component planes. Supervised SOMs for classification including multifactor data and variable selection are discussed as is their use in Quality Control. The paper is illustrated using four case studies, namely the Near Infrared of food, the thermal analysis of polymers, metabolomic analysis of saliva using NMR, and on-line HPLC for pharmaceutical process monitoring.

  15. Self-organisation of symbolic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Information is encountered in two different appearances, in native form by arbitrary physical structures, or in symbolic form by coded sequences of letters or the like. The self-organised emergence of symbolic information from structural information is referred to as a ritualisation transition. Occurring at some stage in evolutionary history, ritualisation transitions have in common that after the crossover, arbitrary symbols are issued and recognised by information-processing devices, by transmitters and receivers in the sense of Shannon's communication theory. Symbolic information-processing systems exhibit the fundamental code symmetry whose key features, such as largely lossless copying or persistence under hostile conditions, may elucidate the reasons for the repeated successful occurrence of ritualisation phenomena in evolution history. Ritualisation examples are briefly reviewed such as the origin of life, the appearance of human languages, the establishment of emergent social categories such as money, or the development of digital computers. In addition to their role as carriers of symbolic information, symbols are physical structures which also represent structural information. For a thermodynamic description of symbols and their arrangements, it appears reasonable to distinguish between Boltzmann entropy, Clausius entropy and Pauling entropy. Thermodynamic properties of symbols imply that their lifetimes are limited by the 2nd law.

  16. Emerged or imposed: a theory on the role of physical templates and self-organisation for vegetation patchiness.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Efrat; von Hardenberg, Jost; Yizhaq, Hezi; Shachak, Moshe; Meron, Ehud

    2013-02-01

    In this article, we develop a unifying framework for the understanding of spatial vegetation patterns in heterogeneous landscapes. While much recent research has focused on self-organised vegetation the prevailing view is still that biological patchiness is mostly due to top-down control by the physical landscape template, disturbances or predators. We suggest that vegetation patchiness in real landscapes is controlled both by the physical template and by self-organisation simultaneously, and introduce a conceptual model for the relative roles of the two mechanisms. The model considers four factors that control whether vegetation patchiness is emerged or imposed: soil patch size, plant size, resource input and resource availability. The last three factors determine the plant-patch size, and the plant-to-soil patch size ratio determines the impact of self-organisation, which becomes important when this ratio is sufficiently small. A field study and numerical simulations of a mathematical model support the conceptual model and give further insight by providing examples of self-organised and template-controlled vegetation patterns co-occurring in the same landscape. We conclude that real landscapes are generally mixtures of template-induced and self-organised patchiness. Patchiness variability increases due to source-sink resource relations, and decreases for species of larger patch sizes.

  17. Recent patents on self-organised magnetic nanodot arrays.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, J J; Bobek, T; Teichert, C

    2011-01-01

    As the continuous advance in the process of device miniaturisation reaches down to the nanometre range, fabrication techniques based on self-organisation, i.e., the spontaneous formation of ordered patterns on surfaces, are becoming increasingly attractive as potential, highly efficient alternatives to lithographic methods. In this article we review some of the methodologies that have been developed recently to produce ordered arrays of nanomagnets using self-organised surface templates, and we list the patents that have been filed recently to protect those fabrication procedures. We describe the underlying phenomena giving rise to the appearance of the ordered structures, and discuss their characteristics and the controllable parameters.

  18. Learning robot actions based on self-organising language memory.

    PubMed

    Wermter, Stefan; Elshaw, Mark

    2003-01-01

    In the MirrorBot project we examine perceptual processes using models of cortical assemblies and mirror neurons to explore the emergence of semantic representations of actions, percepts and concepts in a neural robot. The hypothesis under investigation is whether a neural model will produce a life-like perception system for actions. In this context we focus in this paper on how instructions for actions can be modeled in a self-organising memory. Current approaches for robot control often do not use language and ignore neural learning. However, our approach uses language instruction and draws from the concepts of regional distributed modularity, self-organisation and neural assemblies. We describe a self-organising model that clusters actions into different locations depending on the body part they are associated with. In particular, we use actual sensor readings from the MIRA robot to represent semantic features of the action verbs. Furthermore, we outline a hierarchical computational model for a self-organising robot action control system using language for instruction.

  19. Clustered Self Organising Migrating Algorithm for the Quadratic Assignment Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davendra, Donald; Zelinka, Ivan; Senkerik, Roman

    2009-08-01

    An approach of population dynamics and clustering for permutative problems is presented in this paper. Diversity indicators are created from solution ordering and its mapping is shown as an advantage for population control in metaheuristics. Self Organising Migrating Algorithm (SOMA) is modified using this approach and vetted with the Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP). Extensive experimentation is conducted on benchmark problems in this area.

  20. The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlenz, F.; Eveslage, I.; Fischer, J.; Fleming, K. M.; Lichtblau, B.; Milkereit, C.; Picozzi, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network (SOSEWIN) represents a new approach for Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS), consisting in taking advantage of novel wireless communications technologies without the need of a planned, centralised infrastructure. It also sets out to overcome problems of insufficient node density, which typically affects present existing early warning systems, by having the SOSEWIN seismological sensing units being comprised of low-cost components (generally bought "off-the-shelf"), with each unit initially costing 100's of Euros, in contrast to 1,000's to 10,000's for standard seismological stations. The reduced sensitivity of the new sensing units arising from the use of lower-cost components will be compensated by the network's density, which in the future is expected to number 100's to 1000's over areas served currently by the order of 10's of standard stations. The robustness, independence of infrastructure, spontaneous extensibility due to a self-healing/self-organizing character in the case of removing/failing or adding sensors makes SOSEWIN potentially useful for various use cases, e.g. monitoring of building structures or seismic microzonation. Nevertheless its main purpose is the earthquake early warning, for which reason the ground motion is continuously monitored by conventional accelerometers (3-component) and processed within a station. Based on this, the network itself decides whether an event is detected through cooperating stations. SEEDLink is used to store and provide access to the sensor data. Experiences and selected experiment results with the SOSEWIN-prototype installation in the Ataköy district of Istanbul (Turkey) are presented. SOSEWIN considers also the needs of earthquake task forces, which want to set-up a temporary seismic network rapidly and with light-weighted stations to record after-shocks. The wireless and self-organising character of this sensor network is of great value to do this

  1. The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network: Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlenz, F.; Fischer, J.; Eveslage, I.

    2009-04-01

    SAFER and EDIM working groups, the Department of Computer Science, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany, and Section 2.1 Earthquake Risk and Early Warning, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Germany Contact: Frank Kühnlenz, kuehnlenz@informatik.hu-berlin.de The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network (SOSEWIN) represents a new approach for Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS), consisting in taking advantage of novel wireless communications technologies without the need of a planned, centralised infrastructure. It also sets out to overcome problems of insufficient node density, which typically affects present existing early warning systems, by having the SOSEWIN seismological sensing units being comprised of low-cost components (generally bought "off-the-shelf"), with each unit initially costing 100's of Euros, in contrast to 1,000's to 10,000's for standard seismological stations. The reduced sensitivity of the new sensing units arising from the use of lower-cost components will be compensated by the network's density, which in the future is expected to number 100's to 1000's over areas served currently by the order of 10's of standard stations. The robustness, independence of infrastructure, spontaneous extensibility due to a self-healing/self-organizing character in the case of removing/failing or adding sensors makes SOSEWIN potentially useful for various use cases, e.g. monitoring of building structures or seismic microzonation. Nevertheless its main purpose is the earthquake early warning, for which reason the ground motion is continuously monitored by conventional accelerometers (3-component). It uses SEEDLink to store and provide access to the sensor data. SOSEWIN considers also the needs of earthquake task forces, which want to set-up a temporary seismic network rapidly and with light-weighted stations to record after-shocks. The wireless and self-organising character of this sensor network should be of great value

  2. Ground support system methodology and architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoen, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    A synergistic approach to systems test and support is explored. A building block architecture provides transportability of data, procedures, and knowledge. The synergistic approach also lowers cost and risk for life cycle of a program. The determination of design errors at the earliest phase reduces cost of vehicle ownership. Distributed scaleable architecture is based on industry standards maximizing transparency and maintainability. Autonomous control structure provides for distributed and segmented systems. Control of interfaces maximizes compatibility and reuse, reducing long term program cost. Intelligent data management architecture also reduces analysis time and cost (automation).

  3. Self-organisation processes in the chemistry of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2003-08-01

    The review concerns conservative and dissipative self-organisation phenomena in those physicochemical systems, whose evolution involves formation of diverse chemically complex products, including functional ceramics, supramolecular compounds, and nanocomposites as well as fractal, template and epitaxial structures. It is demonstrated that the use of nonlinear dynamics approaches facilitates organisation of the reaction zone during the synthesis of materials under nonequilibrium conditions in an optimum manner and that biomimetism and biomineralisation processes open up new prospects for materials design.

  4. Assured Mission Support Space Architecture (AMSSA) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamon, Rob

    1993-01-01

    The assured mission support space architecture (AMSSA) study was conducted with the overall goal of developing a long-term requirements-driven integrated space architecture to provide responsive and sustained space support to the combatant commands. Although derivation of an architecture was the focus of the study, there are three significant products from the effort. The first is a philosophy that defines the necessary attributes for the development and operation of space systems to ensure an integrated, interoperable architecture that, by design, provides a high degree of combat utility. The second is the architecture itself; based on an interoperable system-of-systems strategy, it reflects a long-range goal for space that will evolve as user requirements adapt to a changing world environment. The third product is the framework of a process that, when fully developed, will provide essential information to key decision makers for space systems acquisition in order to achieve the AMSSA goal. It is a categorical imperative that military space planners develop space systems that will act as true force multipliers. AMSSA provides the philosophy, process, and architecture that, when integrated with the DOD requirements and acquisition procedures, can yield an assured mission support capability from space to the combatant commanders. An important feature of the AMSSA initiative is the participation by every organization that has a role or interest in space systems development and operation. With continued community involvement, the concept of the AMSSA will become a reality. In summary, AMSSA offers a better way to think about space (philosophy) that can lead to the effective utilization of limited resources (process) with an infrastructure designed to meet the future space needs (architecture) of our combat forces.

  5. Assured Mission Support Space Architecture (AMSSA) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamon, Rob

    1993-01-01

    The assured mission support space architecture (AMSSA) study was conducted with the overall goal of developing a long-term requirements-driven integrated space architecture to provide responsive and sustained space support to the combatant commands. Although derivation of an architecture was the focus of the study, there are three significant products from the effort. The first is a philosophy that defines the necessary attributes for the development and operation of space systems to ensure an integrated, interoperable architecture that, by design, provides a high degree of combat utility. The second is the architecture itself; based on an interoperable system-of-systems strategy, it reflects a long-range goal for space that will evolve as user requirements adapt to a changing world environment. The third product is the framework of a process that, when fully developed, will provide essential information to key decision makers for space systems acquisition in order to achieve the AMSSA goal. It is a categorical imperative that military space planners develop space systems that will act as true force multipliers. AMSSA provides the philosophy, process, and architecture that, when integrated with the DOD requirements and acquisition procedures, can yield an assured mission support capability from space to the combatant commanders. An important feature of the AMSSA initiative is the participation by every organization that has a role or interest in space systems development and operation. With continued community involvement, the concept of the AMSSA will become a reality. In summary, AMSSA offers a better way to think about space (philosophy) that can lead to the effective utilization of limited resources (process) with an infrastructure designed to meet the future space needs (architecture) of our combat forces.

  6. Software system architecture for corporate user support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhopluyeva, V. S.; Kuznetsov, D. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, several existing ready-to-use solutions for the HelpDesk are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of these systems are identified. Architecture of software solution for a corporate user support system is presented in a form of the use case, state, and component diagrams described by using a unified modeling language (UML).

  7. Payload accommodations: Avionics payload support architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Technology issues/trade studies; candidate programs; key contacts/facilities: milestones; accomplishments; and major objectives of the payload accommodation are outlined. Topics covered include: avionics payload support architecture; satellite serving; P/L deploy systems and advanced manipulators; advanced telemetry systems; and on-board abort planning. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  8. Architectural prospects for lunar mission support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesarone, Robert J.; Abraham, Douglas S.; Deutsch, Leslie J.; Noreen, Gary K.; Soloff, Jason A.

    2005-01-01

    A top-level architectural approach facilitates the provision of communications and navigation support services to the anticipated lunar mission set. Following the time-honored principles of systems architecting, i.e., form follows function, the first step is to define the functions or services to be provided, both in terms of character and degree. These will include communication as well as trackin and navigation services.

  9. Architectural prospects for lunar mission support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesarone, Robert J.; Abraham, Douglas S.; Deutsch, Leslie J.; Noreen, Gary K.; Soloff, Jason A.

    2005-01-01

    A top-level architectural approach facilitates the provision of communications and navigation support services to the anticipated lunar mission set. Following the time-honored principles of systems architecting, i.e., form follows function, the first step is to define the functions or services to be provided, both in terms of character and degree. These will include communication as well as trackin and navigation services.

  10. How to Trigger Emergence and Self-Organisation in Learning Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouns, Francis; Fetter, Sibren; van Rosmalen, Peter

    The previous chapters of this section discussed why the social structure of Learning Networks is important and present guidelines on how to maintain and allow the emergence of communities in Learning Networks. Chapter 2 explains how Learning Networks rely on social interaction and active participations of the participants. Chapter 3 then continues by presenting guidelines and policies that should be incorporated into Learning Network Services in order to maintain existing communities by creating conditions that promote social interaction and knowledge sharing. Chapter 4 discusses the necessary conditions required for knowledge sharing to occur and to trigger communities to self-organise and emerge. As pointed out in Chap. 4, ad-hoc transient communities facilitate the emergence of social interaction in Learning Networks, self-organising them into communities, taking into account personal characteristics, community characteristics and general guidelines. As explained in Chap. 4 community members would benefit from a service that brings suitable people together for a specific purpose, because it will allow the participant to focus on the knowledge sharing process by reducing the effort or costs. In the current chapter, we describe an example of a peer support Learning Network Service based on the mechanism of peer tutoring in ad-hoc transient communities.

  11. Augmenting cognitive architectures to support diagrammatic imagination.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan; Banerjee, Bonny; Kurup, Unmesh; Lele, Omkar

    2011-10-01

    Diagrams are a form of spatial representation that supports reasoning and problem solving. Even when diagrams are external, not to mention when there are no external representations, problem solving often calls for internal representations, that is, representations in cognition, of diagrammatic elements and internal perceptions on them. General cognitive architectures--Soar and ACT-R, to name the most prominent--do not have representations and operations to support diagrammatic reasoning. In this article, we examine some requirements for such internal representations and processes in cognitive architectures. We discuss the degree to which DRS, our earlier proposal for such an internal representation for diagrams, meets these requirements. In DRS, the diagrams are not raw images, but a composition of objects that can be individuated and thus symbolized, while, unlike traditional symbols, the referent of the symbol is an object that retains its perceptual essence, namely, its spatiality. This duality provides a way to resolve what anti-imagists thought was a contradiction in mental imagery: the compositionality of mental images that seemed to be unique to symbol systems, and their support of a perceptual experience of images and some types of perception on them. We briefly review the use of DRS to augment Soar and ACT-R with a diagrammatic representation component. We identify issues for further research. Copyright © 2011 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Engineering self-organising helium bubble lattices in tungsten.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R W; Greaves, G; Hinks, J A; Donnelly, S E

    2017-08-10

    The self-organisation of void and gas bubbles in solids into superlattices is an intriguing nanoscale phenomenon. Despite the discovery of these lattices 45 years ago, the atomistics behind the ordering mechanisms responsible for the formation of these nanostructures are yet to be fully elucidated. Here we report on the direct observation via transmission electron microscopy of the formation of bubble lattices under He ion bombardment. By careful control of the irradiation conditions, it has been possible to engineer the bubble size and spacing of the superlattice leading to important conclusions about the significance of vacancy supply in determining the physical characteristics of the system. Furthermore, no bubble lattice alignment was observed in the <111> directions pointing to a key driving mechanism for the formation of these ordered nanostructures being the two-dimensional diffusion of self-interstitial atoms.

  13. A Self-Organising Model of Thermoregulatory Huddling

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Jonathan; Groß, Roderich; Stone, James V.; Wilson, Stuart P.

    2015-01-01

    Endotherms such as rats and mice huddle together to keep warm. The huddle is considered to be an example of a self-organising system, because complex properties of the collective group behaviour are thought to emerge spontaneously through simple interactions between individuals. Groups of rodent pups display two such emergent properties. First, huddling undergoes a ‘phase transition’, such that pups start to aggregate rapidly as the temperature of the environment falls below a critical temperature. Second, the huddle maintains a constant ‘pup flow’, where cooler pups at the periphery continually displace warmer pups at the centre. We set out to test whether these complex group behaviours can emerge spontaneously from local interactions between individuals. We designed a model using a minimal set of assumptions about how individual pups interact, by simply turning towards heat sources, and show in computer simulations that the model reproduces the first emergent property—the phase transition. However, this minimal model tends to produce an unnatural behaviour where several smaller aggregates emerge rather than one large huddle. We found that an extension of the minimal model to include heat exchange between pups allows the group to maintain one large huddle but eradicates the phase transition, whereas inclusion of an additional homeostatic term recovers the phase transition for large huddles. As an unanticipated consequence, the extended model also naturally gave rise to the second observed emergent property—a continuous pup flow. The model therefore serves as a minimal description of huddling as a self-organising system, and as an existence proof that group-level huddling dynamics emerge spontaneously through simple interactions between individuals. We derive a specific testable prediction: Increasing the capacity of the individual to generate or conserve heat will increase the range of ambient temperatures over which adaptive thermoregulatory huddling

  14. A Self-Organising Model of Thermoregulatory Huddling.

    PubMed

    Glancy, Jonathan; Groß, Roderich; Stone, James V; Wilson, Stuart P

    2015-09-01

    Endotherms such as rats and mice huddle together to keep warm. The huddle is considered to be an example of a self-organising system, because complex properties of the collective group behaviour are thought to emerge spontaneously through simple interactions between individuals. Groups of rodent pups display two such emergent properties. First, huddling undergoes a 'phase transition', such that pups start to aggregate rapidly as the temperature of the environment falls below a critical temperature. Second, the huddle maintains a constant 'pup flow', where cooler pups at the periphery continually displace warmer pups at the centre. We set out to test whether these complex group behaviours can emerge spontaneously from local interactions between individuals. We designed a model using a minimal set of assumptions about how individual pups interact, by simply turning towards heat sources, and show in computer simulations that the model reproduces the first emergent property--the phase transition. However, this minimal model tends to produce an unnatural behaviour where several smaller aggregates emerge rather than one large huddle. We found that an extension of the minimal model to include heat exchange between pups allows the group to maintain one large huddle but eradicates the phase transition, whereas inclusion of an additional homeostatic term recovers the phase transition for large huddles. As an unanticipated consequence, the extended model also naturally gave rise to the second observed emergent property--a continuous pup flow. The model therefore serves as a minimal description of huddling as a self-organising system, and as an existence proof that group-level huddling dynamics emerge spontaneously through simple interactions between individuals. We derive a specific testable prediction: Increasing the capacity of the individual to generate or conserve heat will increase the range of ambient temperatures over which adaptive thermoregulatory huddling will

  15. A Framework and Model for Evaluating Clinical Decision Support Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a four-phase model for evaluating architectures for clinical decision support that focuses on: defining a set of desirable features for a decision support architecture; building a proof-of-concept prototype; demonstrating that the architecture is useful by showing that it can be integrated with existing decision support systems and comparing its coverage to that of other architectures. We apply this framework to several well-known decision support architectures, including Arden Syntax, GLIF, SEBASTIAN and SAGE PMID:18462999

  16. Functional Interface Considerations within an Exploration Life Support System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    2016-01-01

    As notional life support system (LSS) architectures are developed and evaluated, myriad options must be considered pertaining to process technologies, components, and equipment assemblies. Each option must be evaluated relative to its impact on key functional interfaces within the LSS architecture. A leading notional architecture has been developed to guide the path toward realizing future crewed space exploration goals. This architecture includes atmosphere revitalization, water recovery and management, and environmental monitoring subsystems. Guiding requirements for developing this architecture are summarized and important interfaces within the architecture are discussed. The role of environmental monitoring within the architecture is described.

  17. Resilience of Self-Organised and Top-Down Planned Cities--A Case Study on London and Beijing Street Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaqiu

    2015-01-01

    The success or failure of the street network depends on its reliability. In this article, using resilience analysis, the author studies how the shape and appearance of street networks in self-organised and top-down planned cities influences urban transport. Considering London and Beijing as proxies for self-organised and top-down planned cities, the structural properties of London and Beijing networks first are investigated based on their primal and dual representations of planar graphs. The robustness of street networks then is evaluated in primal space and dual space by deactivating road links under random and intentional attack scenarios. The results show that the reliability of London street network differs from that of Beijing, which seems to rely more on its architecture and connectivity. It is found that top-down planned Beijing with its higher average degree in the dual space and assortativity in the primal space is more robust than self-organised London using the measures of maximum and second largest cluster size and network efficiency. The article offers an insight, from a network perspective, into the reliability of street patterns in self-organised and top-down planned city systems.

  18. Resilience of Self-Organised and Top-Down Planned Cities—A Case Study on London and Beijing Street Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaqiu

    2015-01-01

    The success or failure of the street network depends on its reliability. In this article, using resilience analysis, the author studies how the shape and appearance of street networks in self-organised and top-down planned cities influences urban transport. Considering London and Beijing as proxies for self-organised and top-down planned cities, the structural properties of London and Beijing networks first are investigated based on their primal and dual representations of planar graphs. The robustness of street networks then is evaluated in primal space and dual space by deactivating road links under random and intentional attack scenarios. The results show that the reliability of London street network differs from that of Beijing, which seems to rely more on its architecture and connectivity. It is found that top-down planned Beijing with its higher average degree in the dual space and assortativity in the primal space is more robust than self-organised London using the measures of maximum and second largest cluster size and network efficiency. The article offers an insight, from a network perspective, into the reliability of street patterns in self-organised and top-down planned city systems. PMID:26682551

  19. Scalable software architectures for decision support.

    PubMed

    Musen, M A

    1999-12-01

    Interest in decision-support programs for clinical medicine soared in the 1970s. Since that time, workers in medical informatics have been particularly attracted to rule-based systems as a means of providing clinical decision support. Although developers have built many successful applications using production rules, they also have discovered that creation and maintenance of large rule bases is quite problematic. In the 1980s, several groups of investigators began to explore alternative programming abstractions that can be used to build decision-support systems. As a result, the notions of "generic tasks" and of reusable problem-solving methods became extremely influential. By the 1990s, academic centers were experimenting with architectures for intelligent systems based on two classes of reusable components: (1) problem-solving methods--domain-independent algorithms for automating stereotypical tasks--and (2) domain ontologies that captured the essential concepts (and relationships among those concepts) in particular application areas. This paper highlights how developers can construct large, maintainable decision-support systems using these kinds of building blocks. The creation of domain ontologies and problem-solving methods is the fundamental end product of basic research in medical informatics. Consequently, these concepts need more attention by our scientific community.

  20. Cytoplasmic streaming emerges naturally from hydrodynamic self-organisation of a microfilament suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Francis; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is the ubiquitous phenomenon of deliberate, active circulation of the entire liquid contents of a plant or animal cell by the walking of motor proteins on polymer filament tracks. Its manifestation in the plant kingdom is particularly striking, where many cells exhibit highly organised patterns of flow. How these regimented flow templates develop is biologically unclear, but there is growing experimental evidence to support hydrodynamically-mediated self-organisation of the underlying microfilament tracks. Using the spirally-streaming giant internodal cells of the characean algae Chara and Nitella as our prototype, we model the developing sub-cortical streaming cytoplasm as a continuum microfilament suspension subject to hydrodynamic and geometric forcing. We show that our model successfully reproduces emergent streaming behaviour by evolving from a totally disordered initial state into a steady characean ``conveyor belt'' configuration as a consequence of the cell geometry, and discuss applicability to other classes of steadily streaming plant cells.

  1. Desert Stone Mantles: Quantification and Significance of Self-Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgitt, David; Rosser, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Desert stone mantles exhibit sorting patterns which are evidence of self-organisation. Previous investigations of stone mantles developed on Late Tertiary and Quaternary basalts in arid northeastern Jordan, revealed distinct variations in the nature of stone cover both downslope and between lithologies of different age. However, manual field measurements of clast size and shape did not preserve information about the spatial configuration of the stone surface. Improved digital image capture and analysis techniques, including using a kite-based platform for vertical photography of the surface, has permitted the nature of stone mantles to be examined and modelled in greater detail. Image analysis has been assisted by the strong contrast in colour between the basalt clasts and the underlying surface enabling a binary classification of images, from which data on size, shape and position of clasts can be readily acquired. Quantification of self-organisation through a box-counting technique for measuring fractal dimension and a procedure using Thiessen polygons to determine ‘locking structures' indicates a general increase in organisation of the stone mantle downslope. Recognition of emergent behaviour requires an explanation in terms of positive feedback between controlling process and the influence of surface form. A series of rainfall simulation and infiltration experiments have been undertaken on plots to assess the variation in surface hydrology as a response to variations in ground surface and slope profile form. The relative contribution of runoff events of varying size and the degree to which the ground surface configuration accelerates or restricts modification of the surface influences the overall evolution of slope profiles via the erosion, transfer and deposition of both surface clasts and the underlying fine grained sediments. Critical to this modification is the interplay between the surface configuration, rainfall and runoff. The experiments presented

  2. Self-organised criticality via retro-synaptic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Urbina, Victor; Herrmann, J. Michael

    2016-12-01

    The brain is a complex system par excellence. In the last decade the observation of neuronal avalanches in neocortical circuits suggested the presence of self-organised criticality in brain networks. The occurrence of this type of dynamics implies several benefits to neural computation. However, the mechanisms that give rise to critical behaviour in these systems, and how they interact with other neuronal processes such as synaptic plasticity are not fully understood. In this paper, we present a long-term plasticity rule based on retro-synaptic signals that allows the system to reach a critical state in which clusters of activity are distributed as a power-law, among other observables. Our synaptic plasticity rule coexists with other synaptic mechanisms such as spike-timing-dependent plasticity, which implies that the resulting synaptic modulation captures not only the temporal correlations between spiking times of pre- and post-synaptic units, which has been suggested as requirement for learning and memory in neural systems, but also drives the system to a state of optimal neural information processing.

  3. Self-organisation Processes In The Carbon ARC For Nanosynthis

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jonathan; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-02-26

    The atmospheric pressure carbon arc in inert gases such as helium is an important method for the production of nanomaterials. It has recently been shown that the formation of the carbon deposit on the cathode from gaseous carbon plays a crucial role in the operation of the arc, reaching the high temperatures necessary for thermionic emission to take place even with low melting point cathodes. Based on observed ablation and deposition rates, we explore the implications of deposit formation on the energy balance at the cathode surface, and show how the operation of the arc is self-organised process. Our results suggest that the can arc operate in two di erent regimes, one of which has an important contribution from latent heat to the cathode energy balance. This regime is characterised by the enhanced ablation rate, which may be favourable for high yield synthesis of nanomaterials. The second regime has a small and approximately constant ablation rate with a negligible contribution from latent heat.

  4. Emergence of self-organised oscillatory domains in fungal mycelia.

    PubMed

    Tlalka, M; Bebber, D P; Darrah, P R; Watkinson, S C; Fricker, M D

    2007-11-01

    Fungi play a central role in the nutrient cycles of boreal and temperate forests. In these biomes, the saprotrophic wood-decay fungi are the only organisms that can completely decompose woody plant litter. In particular, cord-forming basidiomycete fungi form extensive mycelial networks that scavenge scarce mineral nutrients and translocate them over long distances to exploit new food resources. Despite the importance of resource allocation, there is limited information on nutrient dynamics in these networks, particularly for nitrogen, as there is no suitable radioisotope available. We have mapped N-translocation using photon-counting scintillation imaging of the non-metabolised amino acid analogue, (14)C-aminoisobutyrate. We describe a number of novel phenomena, including rapid, preferential N-resource allocation to C-rich sinks, induction of simultaneous bi-directional N-transport, abrupt switching between different pre-existing transport routes, and emergence of locally synchronised, oscillatory phase domains. It is possible that such self-organised oscillatory behaviour is a mechanism to achieve global co-ordination in the mycelium.

  5. Self-organisation Processes In The Carbon ARC For Nanosynthis

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, J.; Raitses, Yefgeny

    2014-02-02

    The atmospheric pressure carbon arc in inert gases such as helium is an important method for the production of nanomaterials. It has recently been shown that the formation of the carbon deposit on the cathode from gaseous carbon plays a crucial role in the operation of the arc, reaching the high temperatures necessary for thermionic emission to take place even with low melting point cathodes. Based on observed ablation and deposition rates, we explore the implications of deposit formation on the energy balance at the cathode surface, and show how the operation of the arc is self-organised process. Our results suggest that the can arc operate in two di erent regimes, one of which has an important contribution from latent heat to the cathode energy balance. This regime is characterised by the enhanced ablation rate, which may be favourable for high yield synthesis of nanomaterials. The second regime has a small and approximately constant ablation rate with a negligible contribution from latent heat.

  6. Robustness of self-organised systems to changes in behaviour: an example from real and simulated self-organised snail aggregations.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Richard; Williams, Gray A; Davies, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    Group or population level self-organised systems comprise many individuals displaying group-level emergent properties. Current theory indicates that individual-level behaviours have an effect on the final group-level behaviour; that is, self-organised systems are sensitive to small changes in individual behaviour. Here we examine a self-organised behaviour in relation to environmentally-driven individual-level changes in behaviour, using both natural systems and computer simulations. We demonstrate that aggregations of intertidal snails slightly decrease in size when, owing to hotter and more desiccating conditions, individuals forage for shorter periods--a seemingly non-adaptive behaviour for the snails since aggregation reduces desiccation stress. This decrease, however, only occurs in simple experimental systems (and simulations of these systems). When studied in their natural and more complex environment, and simulations of such an environment, using the same reduced foraging time, no difference in aggregation behaviour was found between hot and cool days. These results give an indication of how robust self-organised systems are to changes in individual-level behaviour. The complexity of the natural environment and the interactions of individuals with this environment, therefore, can result in self-organised systems being more resilient to individual-level changes than previously assumed.

  7. Payload accommodations. Avionics payload support architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, Susan L.; Levy, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    Concepts for vehicle and payload avionics architectures for future NASA programs, including the Assured Shuttle Access program, Space Station Freedom (SSF), Shuttle-C, Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS), and the Lunar/Mars programs are discussed. Emphasis is on the potential available to increase payload services which will be required in the future, while decreasing the operational cost/complexity by utilizing state of the art advanced avionics systems and a distributed processing architecture. Also addressed are the trade studies required to determine the optimal degree of vehicle (NASA) to payload (customer) separation and the ramifications of these decisions.

  8. The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eveslage, Ingmar; Fischer, Joachim; Kühnlenz, Frank; Lichtblau, Björn; Milkereit, Claus; Picozzi, Matteo

    2010-05-01

    The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network (SOSEWIN) represents a new approach for Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS), consisting in taking advantage of novel wireless communications technologies without the need of a planned, centralised infrastructure. It also sets out to overcome problems of insufficient node density, which typically affects present existing early warning systems, by having the SOSEWIN seismological sensing units being comprised of low-cost components (generally bought "off-the-shelf"), with each unit initially costing 100's of Euros, in contrast to 1,000's to 10,000's for standard seismological stations. The reduced sensitivity of the new sensing units arising from the use of lower-cost components will be compensated by the network's density, which in the future is expected to number 100's to 1000's over areas served currently by the order of 10's of standard stations. The robustness, independence of infrastructure, spontaneous extensibility due to a self-healing/self-organizing character in the case of removing/failing or adding sensors makes SOSEWIN potentially useful for various use cases, e.g. monitoring of building structures (as we could proof during the L'Aquila earthquake) or technical systems and most recently for seismic microzonation. Nevertheless the main purpose SOSEWIN was initially invented for is the earthquake early warning and rapid response, for which reason the ground motion is continuously monitored by conventional accelerometers (3-component) and processed within a station. Based on this, the network itself decides whether an event is detected cooperatively in a two-level hierarchical alarming protocol. Experiences and experiment results with the SOSEWIN-prototype installation in the Ataköy district of Istanbul (Turkey) are presented. The limited size of this installation with currently 20 nodes allows not answering certain questions regarding the useful or possible size of a SOSEWIN installation

  9. Architectural Support for Detection and Recovery using Hardware Wrappers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    SECRYPT 2011, Seville, Spain 2011. 5. A. Baumgarten, M. Steffen, M. Clausman, and J. Zambreno. "A Case Study in Hardware Trojan Design and...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0204 Architectural Support for Detection and Recovery using Hardware Wrappers Bhagirath Narahari Rahul...Include area code) 02-26-2013 FINAL REPORT March 1, 2009 - Nov 30, 2012 Architectural Support for Detection and Recovery using Hardware Wrappers

  10. Self-organisation after embryonic kidney dissociation is driven via selective adhesion of ureteric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, James G; Chiu, Han S; Combes, Alexander N; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Ju, Ali; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Little, Melissa H

    2017-03-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells, after directed differentiation in vitro, can spontaneously generate complex tissues via self-organisation of the component cells. Self-organisation can also reform embryonic organ structure after tissue disruption. It has previously been demonstrated that dissociated embryonic kidneys can recreate component epithelial and mesenchymal relationships sufficient to allow continued kidney morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the timing and underlying mechanisms driving self-organisation after dissociation of the embryonic kidney using time-lapse imaging, high-resolution confocal analyses and mathematical modelling. Organotypic self-organisation sufficient for nephron initiation was observed within a 24 h period. This involved cell movement, with structure emerging after the clustering of ureteric epithelial cells, a process consistent with models of random cell movement with preferential cell adhesion. Ureteric epithelialisation rapidly followed the formation of ureteric cell clusters with the reformation of nephron-forming niches representing a later event. Disruption of P-cadherin interactions was seen to impair this ureteric epithelial cell clustering without affecting epithelial maturation. This understanding could facilitate improved regulation of patterning within organoids and facilitate kidney engineering approaches guided by cell-cell self-organisation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. In vitro organogenesis in three dimensions: self-organising stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sasai, Yoshiki; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Suga, Hidetaka

    2012-11-01

    Organ formation during embryogenesis is a complex process that involves various local cell-cell interactions at the molecular and mechanical levels. Despite this complexity, organogenesis can be modelled in vitro. In this article, we focus on two recent examples in which embryonic stem cells can self-organise into three-dimensional structures - the optic cup and the pituitary epithelium; and one case of self-organising adult stem cells - the gut epithelium. We summarise how these approaches have revealed intrinsic programs that drive locally autonomous modes of organogenesis and homeostasis. We also attempt to interpret the results of previous in vivo studies of retinal development in light of the self-organising nature of the retina.

  12. Biologically relevant neural network architectures for support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Neural network architectures that implement support vector machines (SVM) are investigated for the purpose of modeling perceptual one-shot learning in biological organisms. A family of SVM algorithms including variants of maximum margin, 1-norm, 2-norm and ν-SVM is considered. SVM training rules adapted for neural computation are derived. It is found that competitive queuing memory (CQM) is ideal for storing and retrieving support vectors. Several different CQM-based neural architectures are examined for each SVM algorithm. Although most of the sixty-four scanned architectures are unconvincing for biological modeling four feasible candidates are found. The seemingly complex learning rule of a full ν-SVM implementation finds a particularly simple and natural implementation in bisymmetric architectures. Since CQM-like neural structures are thought to encode skilled action sequences and bisymmetry is ubiquitous in motor systems it is speculated that trainable pattern recognition in low-level perception has evolved as an internalized motor programme.

  13. Self-organising disturbance attenuation for synchronised agents with individual dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunze, Jan

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a self-organising networked controller for disturbance attenuation in multi-agent systems. A disturbance affecting a single agent has some effect on all neighbouring agents through the communication network. To avoid large disturbance effects, the proposed self-organising controller switches off the communication whenever the effect of the disturbance on the corresponding agent exceeds a given bound. As a consequence, the structure of the networked controller is adjusted to the current disturbance. It is proved that the proposed controller bounds the effect of any disturbance on all undisturbed agents. The results are illustrated by their application to a robot formation problem.

  14. The Psychology of Delivering a Psychological Service: Self-Organised Learning as a Model for Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Steve; Jenner, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The article describes how one Educational Psychology Service in the UK developed a service delivery based on self-organised learning (SOL). This model is linked to the paradigms and discourses within which educational psychology and special educational needs work. The work described here is dedicated to the memory of Brian Roberts, academic, close…

  15. Effect of weightlessness on colloidal particle transport and segregation in self-organising microtubule preparations.

    PubMed

    Tabony, James; Rigotti, Nathalie; Glade, Nicolas; Cortès, Sandra

    2007-05-01

    Weightlessness is known to effect cellular functions by as yet undetermined processes. Many experiments indicate a role of the cytoskeleton and microtubules. Under appropriate conditions in vitro microtubule preparations behave as a complex system that self-organises by a combination of reaction and diffusion. This process also results in the collective transport and organisation of any colloidal particles present. In large centimetre-sized samples, self-organisation does not occur when samples are exposed to a brief early period of weightlessness. Here, we report both space-flight and ground-based (clinorotation) experiments on the effect of weightlessness on the transport and segregation of colloidal particles and chromosomes. In centimetre-sized containers, both methods show that a brief initial period of weightlessness strongly inhibits particle transport. In miniature cell-sized containers under normal gravity conditions, the particle transport that self-organisation causes results in their accumulation into segregated regions of high and low particle density. The gravity dependence of this behaviour is strongly shape dependent. In square wells, neither self-organisation nor particle transport and segregation occur under conditions of weightlessness. On the contrary, in rectangular canals, both phenomena are largely unaffected by weightlessness. These observations suggest, depending on factors such as cell and embryo shape, that major biological functions associated with microtubule driven particle transport and organisation might be strongly perturbed by weightlessness.

  16. Discrete Self-Organising Migrating Algorithm for Flow Shop Scheduling with no Wait Makespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davendra, Donald; Zelinka, Ivan; Senkerik, Roman; Jasek, Roman

    2011-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel discrete Self Organising Migrating Algorithm for the task of flowshop scheduling with no-wait makespan. The new algorithm is tested with the small and medium Taillard benchmark problems and the obtained results are competitive with the best performing heuristics in literature.

  17. The Psychology of Delivering a Psychological Service: Self-Organised Learning as a Model for Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Steve; Jenner, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The article describes how one Educational Psychology Service in the UK developed a service delivery based on self-organised learning (SOL). This model is linked to the paradigms and discourses within which educational psychology and special educational needs work. The work described here is dedicated to the memory of Brian Roberts, academic, close…

  18. Self-organising of wave and beach relief in storm: field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Olga; Saprykina, Yana; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Stremel, Margarita; Korsinin, Dmitry; Trifonova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    . Self-organising of bottom relief and waves were studied on a scale of several storms. Results of investigations show that increase of significant wave height and spectral peak period of wave entering in coastal zone as well as Ursell number lead to erosion, which was localised in first 100 m near on barred profile and covered whole observed profile in case without bar. Features of sediment transport by forming a mobile temporal underwater bar were examined for cases of flat sloping and barred underwater beach profiles. On timescale of one storm type of wave breaking affect sediment transport: plunging wave breaking is responsible for formation and evolution of underwater sand bar as well as decreasing of sediment amount in upper part of beach profile and shoreline regression, while spilling do not lead to significant bottom deformations. The work was supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research (grants 16-55-76002 (ERA-a), 16-35-00542 (mol_a), 15-05-08239, 15-05-04669).

  19. SANDS: An Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2007-01-01

    A new architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support) is introduced and its performance evaluated. The architecture provides a method for performing clinical decision support across a network, as in a health information exchange. Using the prototype we demonstrated that, first, a number of useful types of decision support can be carried out using our architecture; and, second, that the architecture exhibits desirable reliability and performance characteristics. PMID:18693950

  20. Reliability Impacts in Life Support Architecture and Technology Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative assessments of system reliability and equivalent system mass (ESM) were made for different life support architectures based primarily on International Space Station technologies. The analysis was applied to a one-year deep-space mission. System reliability was increased by adding redundancy and spares, which added to the ESM. Results were thus obtained allowing a comparison of the ESM for each architecture at equivalent levels of reliability. Although the analysis contains numerous simplifications and uncertainties, the results suggest that achieving necessary reliabilities for deep-space missions will add substantially to the life support ESM and could influence the optimal degree of life support closure. Approaches for reducing reliability impacts were investigated and are discussed.

  1. Self organisation of plasma turbulence: impact on radial correlation lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Estève, Damien; Garbet, Xavier; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Passeron, Chantal; Sarazin, Yanick

    2014-11-01

    The empirical scaling law used to support the projected ITER performance [1, 2] in analysed to determine the control parameters that must be considered in gyrokinetic simulations. The results of such an analysis are contradictory and do not appear to fit with present evidence from gyrokinetic simulations. Analysing the dependence of the correlation length on the ρ* parameter, we show that local values of the correlation length are governed by the shearing effect of the corrugation patterns, but that coarse graining this value, in time, radially or poloidally does not allow one to recover this match. A comparison to the scaling law must then rely on the scaling properties of the Probability Density Function of the correlation length that is found to exhibit heavy tails with algebraic decay.

  2. Lunar Surface Architecture Utilization and Logistics Support Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienhoff, Dallas; Findiesen, William; Bayer, Martin; Born, Andrew; McCormick, David

    2008-01-01

    Crew and equipment utilization and logistics support needs for the point of departure lunar outpost as presented by the NASA Lunar Architecture Team (LAT) and alternative surface architectures were assessed for the first ten years of operation. The lunar surface architectures were evaluated and manifests created for each mission. Distances between Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) landing sites and emplacement locations were estimated. Physical characteristics were assigned to each surface element and operational characteristics were assigned to each surface mobility element. Stochastic analysis was conducted to assess probable times to deploy surface elements, conduct exploration excursions, and perform defined crew activities. Crew time is divided into Outpost-related, exploration and science, overhead, and personal activities. Outpost-related time includes element deployment, EVA maintenance, IVA maintenance, and logistics resupply. Exploration and science activities include mapping, geological surveys, science experiment deployment, sample analysis and categorizing, and physiological and biological tests in the lunar environment. Personal activities include sleeping, eating, hygiene, exercising, and time off. Overhead activities include precursor or close-out tasks that must be accomplished but don't fit into the other three categories such as: suit donning and doffing, airlock cycle time, suit cleaning, suit maintenance, post-landing safing actions, and pre-departure preparations. Equipment usage time, spares, maintenance actions, and Outpost consumables are also estimated to provide input into logistics support planning. Results are normalized relative to the NASA LAT point of departure lunar surface architecture.

  3. Reliability Impacts in Life Support Architecture and Technology Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent System Mass (ESM) and reliability estimates were performed for different life support architectures based primarily on International Space Station (ISS) technologies. The analysis was applied to a hypothetical 1-year deep-space mission. High-level fault trees were initially developed relating loss of life support functionality to the Loss of Crew (LOC) top event. System reliability was then expressed as the complement (nonoccurrence) this event and was increased through the addition of redundancy and spares, which added to the ESM. The reliability analysis assumed constant failure rates and used current projected values of the Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF) from an ISS database where available. Results were obtained showing the dependence of ESM on system reliability for each architecture. Although the analysis employed numerous simplifications and many of the input parameters are considered to have high uncertainty, the results strongly suggest that achieving necessary reliabilities for deep-space missions will add substantially to the life support system mass. As a point of reference, the reliability for a single-string architecture using the most regenerative combination of ISS technologies without unscheduled replacement spares was estimated to be less than 1%. The results also demonstrate how adding technologies in a serial manner to increase system closure forces the reliability of other life support technologies to increase in order to meet the system reliability requirement. This increase in reliability results in increased mass for multiple technologies through the need for additional spares. Alternative parallel architecture approaches and approaches with the potential to do more with less are discussed. The tall poles in life support ESM are also reexamined in light of estimated reliability impacts.

  4. Life at the mesoscale: the self-organised cytoplasm and nucleoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Flaus, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The cell contains highly dynamic structures exploiting physical principles of self-organisation at the mesoscale (100 nm to 10 μm). Examples include non-membrane bound cytoplasmic bodies, cytoskeleton-based motor networks and multi-scale chromatin organisation. The challenges of mesoscale self-organisation were discussed at a CECAM workshop in July 2014. Biologists need approaches to observe highly dynamic, low affinity, low specificity associations and to perturb single structures, while biological physicists and biomathematicians need to work closely with biologists to build and validate quantitative models. A table of terminology is included to facilitate multidisciplinary efforts to reveal the richness and diversity of mesoscale cell biology.

  5. Any Answers? Self-Organised Criticality in the Third Decade after Btw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruessner, Gunnar

    2011-11-01

    Self-Organised Criticality, for more than a decade the most popular subject within Complexity, or even within Statistical Mechanics, was expected to be found everywhere, explaining not only earthquakes and forest fires, but hospital waiting times, wars and consciousness. Taking stock more than twenty years later, what are the core findings and what the open questions? I will attempt to give a fair assessment of the state of affairs. The understanding of Self Organised Criticality has advanced very far, not only on the basis of numerics, but also using technically more demanding methods developed in Statistical Mechanics. A few robust models have been identified and studied in detail, some even solved analytically. A number of puzzling phenomena and tempting problems remain, which I will try to highlight.

  6. A supportive architecture for CFD-based design optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ni; Su, Zeya; Bi, Zhuming; Tian, Chao; Ren, Zhiming; Gong, Guanghong

    2014-03-01

    Multi-disciplinary design optimisation (MDO) is one of critical methodologies to the implementation of enterprise systems (ES). MDO requiring the analysis of fluid dynamics raises a special challenge due to its extremely intensive computation. The rapid development of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique has caused a rise of its applications in various fields. Especially for the exterior designs of vehicles, CFD has become one of the three main design tools comparable to analytical approaches and wind tunnel experiments. CFD-based design optimisation is an effective way to achieve the desired performance under the given constraints. However, due to the complexity of CFD, integrating with CFD analysis in an intelligent optimisation algorithm is not straightforward. It is a challenge to solve a CFD-based design problem, which is usually with high dimensions, and multiple objectives and constraints. It is desirable to have an integrated architecture for CFD-based design optimisation. However, our review on existing works has found that very few researchers have studied on the assistive tools to facilitate CFD-based design optimisation. In the paper, a multi-layer architecture and a general procedure are proposed to integrate different CFD toolsets with intelligent optimisation algorithms, parallel computing technique and other techniques for efficient computation. In the proposed architecture, the integration is performed either at the code level or data level to fully utilise the capabilities of different assistive tools. Two intelligent algorithms are developed and embedded with parallel computing. These algorithms, together with the supportive architecture, lay a solid foundation for various applications of CFD-based design optimisation. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed architecture and algorithms, the case studies on aerodynamic shape design of a hypersonic cruising vehicle are provided, and the result has shown that the proposed architecture

  7. Bring It On, Complexity! Present and Future of Self-Organising Middle-Out Abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammen, Sebastian Von; Steghöfer, Jan-Philipp

    The following sections are included: * The Great Complexity Challenge * Self-Organising Middle-Out Abstraction * Optimising Graphics, Physics and Artificial Intelligence * Emergence and Hierarchies in a Natural System * The Technical Concept of SOMO * Observation of interactions * Interaction pattern recognition and behavioural abstraction * Creating and adjusting hierarchies * Confidence measures * Execution model * Learning SOMO: parameters, knowledge propagation, and procreation * Current Implementations * Awareness Beyond Virtuality * Integration and emergence * Model inference * SOMO net * SOMO after me * The Future of SOMO

  8. Continuum modelling of pedestrian flows: From microscopic principles to self-organised macroscopic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogendoorn, Serge P.; van Wageningen-Kessels, Femke L. M.; Daamen, Winnie; Duives, Dorine C.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of pedestrian flows can be captured in a continuum modelling framework. However, compared to vehicular flow, this is a much more challenging task. In particular the integration of flow propagation and path choice are known to be problematic. Furthermore, pedestrian flow is characterised by different self-organised phenomena, such as the formation of dynamic lanes and diagonal stripes, which have not yet been captured in a continuum modelling framework. This contribution puts forward a novel multi-class continuum model that captures some of the key features of pedestrian flows. It considers path choice behaviour on both the strategic (pre-trip) and tactical (en-route) level. To achieve this, we present a methodology to derive a continuum model from a microscopic walker model, in this case the social forces model. In doing so, we show that the interaction term present in the social forces model introduces a local path choice component in the equilibrium velocity. Having derived the model, we analyse its properties both by means of mathematical analyses and simulation studies. This reveals the general behaviour of the model, as well as the ability of the model to reproduce self-organised structures, and phase transitions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first continuum model that is able to reproduce these self-organised structures.

  9. Dynamic self-organisation of haematopoiesis and (a)symmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Måløy, Marthe; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Olav Brandsdal, Bjørn

    2017-02-07

    A model of haematopoiesis that links self-organisation with symmetric and asymmetric cell division is presented in this paper. It is assumed that all cell divisions are completely random events, and that the daughter cells resulting from symmetric and asymmetric stem cell divisions are, in general, phenotypically identical, and still, the haematopoietic system has the flexibility to self-renew, produce mature cells by differentiation, and regenerate undifferentiated and differentiated cells when necessary, due to self-organisation. As far as we know, no previous model implements symmetric and asymmetric division as the result of self-organisation. The model presented in this paper is inspired by experiments on the Drosophila germline stem cell, which imply that under normal conditions, the stem cells typically divide asymmetrically, whereas during regeneration, the rate of symmetric division increases. Moreover, the model can reproduce several of the results from experiments on female Safari cats. In particular, the model can explain why significant fluctuation in the phenotypes of haematopoietic cells was observed in some cats, when the haematopoietic system had reached normal population level after regeneration. To our knowledge, no previous model of haematopoiesis in Safari cats has captured this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-organisation and communication in groups of simulated and physical robots.

    PubMed

    Trianni, Vito; Dorigo, Marco

    2006-09-01

    In social insects, both self-organisation and communication play a crucial role for the accomplishment of many tasks at a collective level. Communication is performed with different modalities, which can be roughly classified into three classes: indirect (stigmergic) communication, direct interactions and direct communication. The use of stigmergic communication is predominant in social insects (e.g. the pheromone trails in ants), where, however, direct interactions (e.g. antennation in ants) and direct communication (e.g. the waggle dance in honey bees) can also be observed. Taking inspiration from insect societies, we present an experimental study of self-organising behaviours for a group of robots, which exploit communication to coordinate their activities. In particular, the robots are placed in an arena presenting holes and open borders, which they should avoid while moving coordinately. Artificial evolution is responsible for the synthesis in a simulated environment of the robot's neural controllers, which are subsequently tested on physical robots. We study different communication strategies among the robots: no direct communication, handcrafted signalling and a completely evolved approach. We show that the latter is the most efficient, suggesting that artificial evolution can produce behaviours that are more adaptive than those obtained with conventional design methodologies. Moreover, we show that the evolved controllers produce a self-organising system that is robust enough to be tested on physical robots, notwithstanding the huge gap between simulation and reality.

  11. Modular analytics management architecture for interoperability and decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, Stephen; Metzger, Max; Gorman, Joe; Sliva, Amy

    2016-05-01

    The Dual Node Decision Wheels (DNDW) architecture is a new approach to information fusion and decision support systems. By combining cognitive systems engineering organizational analysis tools, such as decision trees, with the Dual Node Network (DNN) technical architecture for information fusion, the DNDW can align relevant data and information products with an organization's decision-making processes. In this paper, we present the Compositional Inference and Machine Learning Environment (CIMLE), a prototype framework based on the principles of the DNDW architecture. CIMLE provides a flexible environment so heterogeneous data sources, messaging frameworks, and analytic processes can interoperate to provide the specific information required for situation understanding and decision making. It was designed to support the creation of modular, distributed solutions over large monolithic systems. With CIMLE, users can repurpose individual analytics to address evolving decision-making requirements or to adapt to new mission contexts; CIMLE's modular design simplifies integration with new host operating environments. CIMLE's configurable system design enables model developers to build analytical systems that closely align with organizational structures and processes and support the organization's information needs.

  12. Supporting Community Emergency Management Planning Through a Geocollaboration Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Wendy A.; Ganoe, Craig H.; Carroll, John M.

    Emergency management is more than just events occurring within an emergency situation. It encompasses a variety of persistent activities such as planning, training, assessment, and organizational change. We are studying emergency management planning practices in which geographic communities (towns and regions) prepare to respond efficiently to significant emergency events. Community emergency management planning is an extensive collaboration involving numerous stakeholders throughout the community and both reflecting and challenging the community’s structure and resources. Geocollaboration is one aspect of the effort. Emergency managers, public works directors, first responders, and local transportation managers need to exchange information relating to possible emergency event locations and their surrounding areas. They need to examine geospatial maps together and collaboratively develop emergency plans and procedures. Issues such as emergency vehicle traffic routes and staging areas for command posts, arriving media, and personal first responders’ vehicles must be agreed upon prior to an emergency event to ensure an efficient and effective response. This work presents a software architecture that facilitates the development of geocollaboration solutions. The architecture extends prior geocollaboration research and reuses existing geospatial information models. Emergency management planning is one application domain for the architecture. Geocollaboration tools can be developed that support community-wide emergency management planning and preparedness. This chapter describes how the software architecture can be used for the geospatial, emergency management planning activities of one community.

  13. Do Performance-Based Codes Support Universal Design in Architecture?

    PubMed

    Grangaard, Sidse; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2016-01-01

    The research project 'An analysis of the accessibility requirements' studies how Danish architectural firms experience the accessibility requirements of the Danish Building Regulations and it examines their opinions on how future regulative models can support innovative and inclusive design - Universal Design (UD). The empirical material consists of input from six workshops to which all 700 Danish Architectural firms were invited, as well as eight group interviews. The analysis shows that the current prescriptive requirements are criticized for being too homogenous and possibilities for differentiation and zoning are required. Therefore, a majority of professionals are interested in a performance-based model because they think that such a model will support 'accessibility zoning', achieving flexibility because of different levels of accessibility in a building due to its performance. The common understanding of accessibility and UD is directly related to buildings like hospitals and care centers. When the objective is both innovative and inclusive architecture, the request of a performance-based model should be followed up by a knowledge enhancement effort in the building sector. Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives is suggested as a tool for such a boost. The research project has been financed by the Danish Transport and Construction Agency.

  14. On Antenna-Architectures for Sensitive Radiometry to Support Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Klooster, Cornelis; Cappellin, Cecilia; Pontoppidan, Knud; Heighwood Nielsen, Per; Skou, Niels; Ivashina, Marianna; Iupikov, Oleg; Ihle, Alexander

    The presentation discusses different antenna architectures supporting radiometric tasks for oceanographic observations. With Aquarius and SMOS in orbit with their associated resolution and revisit capability in L-band, further enhancements are of interest. Following studies into desirable resolution and frequency band interests for oceanographic applications (ref: Microwat - an ESA study, see also https://www.ghrsst.org/ ), breaking through and desirable requirements have been derived. Investigations into potential antenna architectural realisations have been initiated. Included are radiometer sensor (read:antenna) scenarios, based on conical scanning, interferometric 1D and pushbroom coverage. A wide coverage is available from the first two architectures, and a very good sensitivity is available with the pushbroom scenario. There are a couple of interesting aspects, related to polarimetry capabilities, resolution, sensitivity, etc. The pushbroom architecture, at cost of some complexity offers a very good sensitivity with interesting antenna architecture solutions to offer breaking through capabilities, in particular concerning the sensitivity requirements, in combination with polarimetric capabilities. Coverage comes with some infrastructural antenna complexity, with the needs and creativity for a deployable antenna configuration. Following initial considerations for all three antenna configurations at overview level, the push-broom scenario is presented with more details. Interesting aspects include ongoing technology developments in other related fields with refined results to come would enable to consider antenna architectures are used in which focal plane arrays find a combination with shaped reflector assemblies. With processing capabilities further enhanced - with ongoing developments underway in other sectors as radio astronomers can confirm - one would be able to further improve and refine sensitivity aspects in combination with polarimetric capabilities

  15. Supporting shared data structures on distributed memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbel, Charles; Mehrotra, Piyush; Vanrosendale, John

    1990-01-01

    Programming nonshared memory systems is more difficult than programming shared memory systems, since there is no support for shared data structures. Current programming languages for distributed memory architectures force the user to decompose all data structures into separate pieces, with each piece owned by one of the processors in the machine, and with all communication explicitly specified by low-level message-passing primitives. A new programming environment is presented for distributed memory architectures, providing a global name space and allowing direct access to remote parts of data values. The analysis and program transformations required to implement this environment are described, and the efficiency of the resulting code on the NCUBE/7 and IPSC/2 hypercubes are described.

  16. Information Architecture for Quality Management Support in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Álvaro; Freixo, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    Quality Management occupies a strategic role in organizations, and the adoption of computer tools within an aligned information architecture facilitates the challenge of making more with less, promoting the development of a competitive edge and sustainability. A formal Information Architecture (IA) lends organizations an enhanced knowledge but, above all, favours management. This simplifies the reinvention of processes, the reformulation of procedures, bridging and the cooperation amongst the multiple actors of an organization. In the present investigation work we planned the IA for the Quality Management System (QMS) of a Hospital, which allowed us to develop and implement the QUALITUS (QUALITUS, name of the computer application developed to support Quality Management in a Hospital Unit) computer application. This solution translated itself in significant gains for the Hospital Unit under study, accelerating the quality management process and reducing the tasks, the number of documents, the information to be filled in and information errors, amongst others.

  17. [Psychosis sight from the complexity research--a model for the examination of the self organisation of a dysfunctional self].

    PubMed

    Toifl, Karl; Kimmel, Barbara; Mayring, Philipp; Mörth, Hans Marlies

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays the multifactorial genesis of psychotic illnesses is undisputed. The question of the integration of the multilayered results is open from the biological, emotional and social area. Based on the results of the complexity research (chaos theory, theory of the self organisation) the hypothesis was formulated for the emergence of psychotic illnesses that these are understood themselves as an expression of a dysfunctional self. Such a dysfunctional self arises in a self organizing process. The definition of the self was newly formulated. This happened on the knowledge of the complexity research and a bio- psycho-social model of illness and health. Ten main categories were defined, which seem essential for the development of a healthy, this means a flexible and autonomous self. In further consequence, based on these categories, a semistructured interview guide was developed. With this interview guide the information about the quality of the self organising process of the development of the self was collected. This guide was tested in the context of a master thesis in a multidimensional interview with a schizophrenic patient and his family. This interview was taken on video tap. The information on video became transcribed. Than the information was examined qualitatively to two aspects. This happened with the help of a qualitative contents analysis. The first aspect concerned the decision of the assignment to one or several of the ten categories. In a 2nd step it was judged, whether the examined information has to be classified as beneficial for the development of a healthy self or as impeding. The developed and used examination model is suitable to make the investigation of a self organizing self possible. At the individual case analysis of a patient with a schizophrenic psychosis the inhibiting influences for the development of a healthy self predominated at a large part of the 10 categories. This corresponded to the hypothesis. The used examination model seems

  18. Self-organised criticality in the evolution of a thermodynamic model of rodent thermoregulatory huddling

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of thermoregulatory huddling interactions between endotherms is developed. The model is presented as a Monte Carlo algorithm in which animals are iteratively exchanged between groups, with a probability of exchanging groups defined in terms of the temperature of the environment and the body temperatures of the animals. The temperature-dependent exchange of animals between groups is shown to reproduce a second-order critical phase transition, i.e., a smooth switch to huddling when the environment gets colder, as measured in recent experiments. A peak in the rate at which group sizes change, referred to as pup flow, is predicted at the critical temperature of the phase transition, consistent with a thermodynamic description of huddling, and with a description of the huddle as a self-organising system. The model was subjected to a simple evolutionary procedure, by iteratively substituting the physiologies of individuals that fail to balance the costs of thermoregulation (by huddling in groups) with the costs of thermogenesis (by contributing heat). The resulting tension between cooperative and competitive interactions was found to generate a phenomenon called self-organised criticality, as evidenced by the emergence of avalanches in fitness that propagate across many generations. The emergence of avalanches reveals how huddling can introduce correlations in fitness between individuals and thereby constrain evolutionary dynamics. Finally, a full agent-based model of huddling interactions is also shown to generate criticality when subjected to the same evolutionary pressures. The agent-based model is related to the Monte Carlo model in the way that a Vicsek model is related to an Ising model in statistical physics. Huddling therefore presents an opportunity to use thermodynamic theory to study an emergent adaptive animal behaviour. In more general terms, huddling is proposed as an ideal system for investigating the interaction between self-organisation

  19. The influence of the physical environment on the self-organised foraging patterns of ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrain, C.; Natan, C.; Deneubourg, J.-L.

    2001-04-01

    Among social insects such as ants, scouts that modulate their recruiting behaviour, following simple rules based on local information, generate collective patterns of foraging. Here we demonstrate that features of the abiotic environment, specifically the foraging substrate, may also be influential in the emergence of group-level decisions such as the choice of one foraging path. Experimental data and theoretical analyses show that the collective patterns can arise independently of behavioural changes of individual scouts and can result, through self-organising processes, from the physico-chemical properties of the environment that alter the dynamics of information transfer by chemical trails.

  20. A Multiagent System for Self-organisation of an 802.11 Mesh Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debenham, John; Prodan, Ante

    The self-organisation of telecommunications networks has to confront the two challenges of the scalability and the stability of the solution. This paper describes a distributed, co-operative multiagent system in which agents make decisions based only on local knowledge — that guarantees scalability. Extensive simulations indicate that stability is ensured by the agent’s making improvements to the network settings that improve the social performance for all agents in a two-hop range. Our overall goal is simply to reduce maintenance costs for such networks by removing the need for humans to tune the network settings.

  1. Self-organised microdots formed by dewetting in a highly volatile liquid.

    PubMed

    Toth, Rita; Heier, Jakob; Tisserant, Jean-Nicolas; Anna, Enyedy Eva; Braun, Artur; Graule, Thomas

    2012-07-15

    Dewetting induced self-organisation was used to prepare an ordered microstructure from a highly volatile liquid. Dewetting of an evaporating iron oxide precursor solute on silicon substrate resulted in arrays of microdots with nearly hexagonal and tetragonal symmetries. Ordered structures form either by stick-slip motion or fingering instability at the receding contact line of evaporating droplets. Subsequent thermal treatment at 550 °C yields crystalline Fe(2)O(3) microdots with a diameter range of 1-4 μm. The size, density and shape of the microdots can be changed by using patterned substrates with different surface energies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Data Strategies to Support Automated Multi-Sensor Data Fusion in a Service Oriented Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    is unlimited DATA STRATEGIES TO SUPPORT AUTOMATED MULTI- SENSOR DATA FUSION IN A SERVICE ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE by Kurt J. Rothenhaus...SUBTITLE: Data Strategies to Support Automated Multi- Sensor Data Fusion in a Service Oriented Architecture 6. AUTHOR: CDR Kurt Rothenhaus 5...end-to-end solutions promised by SOA technologies. Software architectural patterns in conjunction with broad data strategies are required to harness

  3. Self-organising mixture autoregressive model for non-stationary time series modelling.

    PubMed

    Ni, He; Yin, Hujun

    2008-12-01

    Modelling non-stationary time series has been a difficult task for both parametric and nonparametric methods. One promising solution is to combine the flexibility of nonparametric models with the simplicity of parametric models. In this paper, the self-organising mixture autoregressive (SOMAR) network is adopted as a such mixture model. It breaks time series into underlying segments and at the same time fits local linear regressive models to the clusters of segments. In such a way, a global non-stationary time series is represented by a dynamic set of local linear regressive models. Neural gas is used for a more flexible structure of the mixture model. Furthermore, a new similarity measure has been introduced in the self-organising network to better quantify the similarity of time series segments. The network can be used naturally in modelling and forecasting non-stationary time series. Experiments on artificial, benchmark time series (e.g. Mackey-Glass) and real-world data (e.g. numbers of sunspots and Forex rates) are presented and the results show that the proposed SOMAR network is effective and superior to other similar approaches.

  4. Symmetries and pattern formation in hyperbolic versus parabolic models of self-organised aggregation.

    PubMed

    Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Eftimie, Raluca

    2015-10-01

    The study of self-organised collective animal behaviour, such as swarms of insects or schools of fish, has become over the last decade a very active research area in mathematical biology. Parabolic and hyperbolic models have been used intensively to describe the formation and movement of various aggregative behaviours. While both types of models can exhibit aggregation-type patterns, studies on hyperbolic models suggest that these models can display a larger variety of spatial and spatio-temporal patterns compared to their parabolic counterparts. Here we use stability, symmetry and bifurcation theory to investigate this observation more rigorously, an approach not attempted before to compare and contrast aggregation patterns in models for collective animal behaviors. To this end, we consider a class of nonlocal hyperbolic models for self-organised aggregations that incorporate various inter-individual communication mechanisms, and take the formal parabolic limit to transform them into nonlocal parabolic models. We then discuss the symmetry of these nonlocal hyperbolic and parabolic models, and the types of bifurcations present or lost when taking the parabolic limit. We show that the parabolic limit leads to a homogenisation of the inter-individual communication, and to a loss of bifurcation dynamics (in particular loss of Hopf bifurcations). This explains the less rich patterns exhibited by the nonlocal parabolic models. However, for multiple interacting populations, by breaking the population interchange symmetry of the model, one can preserve the Hopf bifurcations that lead to the formation of complex spatio-temporal patterns that describe moving aggregations.

  5. Visual data mining with self-organising maps for ventricular fibrillation analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosado-Muñoz, Alfredo; Martínez-Martínez, José M; Escandell-Montero, Pablo; Soria-Olivas, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) at an early stage is being deeply studied in order to lower the risk of sudden death and allows the specialist to have greater reaction time to give the patient a good recovering therapy. Some works are focusing on detecting VF based on numerical analysis of time-frequency distributions, but in general the methods used do not provide insight into the problem. However, this study proposes a new methodology in order to obtain information about this problem. This work uses a supervised self-organising map (SOM) to obtain visually information among four important groups of patients: VF (ventricular fibrillation), VT (ventricular tachycardia), HP (healthy patients) and AHR (other anomalous heart rates and noise). A total number of 27 variables were obtained from continuous surface ECG recordings in standard databases (MIT and AHA), providing information in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains. self-organising maps (SOMs), trained with 11 of the 27 variables, were used to extract knowledge about the variable values for each group of patients. Results show that the SOM technique allows to determine the profile of each group of patients, assisting in gaining a deeper understanding of this clinical problem. Additionally, information about the most relevant variables is given by the SOM analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A constrained neural learning rule for eliminating the border effect in online self-organising maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chihli

    2008-03-01

    The self-organising map (SOM) is a concise and powerful algorithm for clustering and visualisation of high-dimensional data. However, this robust algorithm still suffers from the border effect. Most of the approaches proposed to eliminate this effect use a borderless topological structure. We prefer to keep the original topological structure of the SOM for visualisation. A novel approach is proposed for the elimination of the border effect from the perspective of self-organising learning. Based on an assumption that the best matching unit (BMU) should be the most active unit, the approach proposes that the BMU should move more towards its associated input sample than its neighbours in the fine-tuned learning stage. Our constrained approach emphasises the effect of the lateral connections and neutralises the effect on the distance between the input sample and units. This approach is able to make units of the map stretch wider than the traditional SOM and thus the border effect is alleviated. Our proposed approach is proved to satisfy the requirements of the topologically ordered neural networks and is evaluated by both qualitative and quantitative criteria. All experiments conclude that performance is improved if the proposed constrained learning rule is used.

  7. Female Dominance over Males in Primates: Self-Organisation and Sexual Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.; Wantia, Jan; Isler, Karin

    2008-01-01

    The processes that underlie the formation of the dominance hierarchy in a group are since long under debate. Models of self-organisation suggest that dominance hierarchies develop by the self-reinforcing effects of winning and losing fights (the so-called winner-loser effect), but according to ‘the prior attribute hypothesis’, dominance hierarchies develop from pre-existing individual differences, such as in body mass. In the present paper, we investigate the relevance of each of these two theories for the degree of female dominance over males. We investigate this in a correlative study in which we compare female dominance between groups of 22 species throughout the primate order. In our study female dominance may range from 0 (no female dominance) to 1 (complete female dominance). As regards ‘the prior attribute hypothesis’, we expected a negative correlation between female dominance over males and species-specific sexual dimorphism in body mass. However, to our surprise we found none (we use the method of independent contrasts). Instead, we confirm the self-organisation hypothesis: our model based on the winner-loser effect predicts that female dominance over males increases with the percentage of males in the group. We confirm this pattern at several levels in empirical data (among groups of a single species and between species of the same genus and of different ones). Since the winner-loser effect has been shown to work in many taxa including humans, these results may have broad implications. PMID:18628830

  8. Perichromosomal protein Ki67 supports mitotic chromosome architecture.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Natsume, Toyoaki; Kanemaki, Masato T; Imamoto, Naoko

    2016-10-01

    Although the condensin complexes and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) are the central players in mitotic chromosome formation, they are insufficient for its completion, and additional factors involved in the process have been extensively sought. In this study, we examined the possibility that Ki67, a perichromosomal protein widely used as a cell proliferation marker, is one such factor. Using a combination of auxin-inducible degron and CRISPR-Cas9-based gene editing technologies, we generated a human HCT116 cell line in which Ki67 is rapidly depleted in a few hours. The removal of Ki67 before mitotic entry did not impact the early mitotic chromosome assembly observed in prophase but subsequently resulted in the formation of misshapen mitotic chromosomes. When Ki67 was removed after mitotic entry, preassembled rod-shaped mitotic chromosomes became disorganized. In addition, we show that Ki67 and TopoIIα are reciprocally coimmunoprecipitated from mitotic cell extracts. These observations indicate that Ki67 aids the finalization of mitotic chromosome formation and helps maintain rod-shaped chromosome architecture, likely in collaboration with TopoIIα. Together, these findings represent a new model in which mitotic chromosome architecture is supported both internally and externally. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Clinical Decision Support Systems for Comorbidity: Architecture, Algorithms, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Aihua; Tang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for monitoring comorbid conditions. Specifically, we address the architecture of a CDSS by characterizing it from three layers and discuss the algorithms in each layer. Also we address the applications of CDSSs in a few real scenarios and analyze the accuracy of a CDSS in consideration of the potential conflicts when using multiple clinical practice guidelines concurrently. Finally, we compare the system performance in our design with that in the other design schemes. Our study shows that our proposed design can achieve a clinical decision in a shorter time than the other designs, while ensuring a high level of system accuracy. PMID:28373881

  10. Rollback-recovery techniques and architectural support for multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang Chungyang.

    1991-01-01

    The author proposes efficient and robust fault diagnosis and rollback-recovery techniques to enhance system availability as well as performance in both distributed-memory and shared-bus shared-memory multiprocessor systems. Architectural support for the proposed rollback-recovery technique in a bus-based shared-memory multiprocessor system is also investigated to adaptively fine tune the proposed rollback-recovery technique in this type of system. A comparison of the performance of the proposed techniques with other existing techniques is made, a topic on which little quantitative information is available in the literature. New diagnosis concepts are introduced to show that the author's diagnosis technique yields higher diagnosis coverage and facilitates the performance evaluation of various fault-diagnosis techniques.

  11. Exploration Clinical Decision Support System: Medical Data Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Tony; Shetye, Sandeep; Shaw, Tianna (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Clinical Decision Support (ECDS) System project is intended to enhance the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element for extended duration, deep-space mission planning in HRP. A major development guideline is the Risk of "Adverse Health Outcomes & Decrements in Performance due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Conditions". ECDS attempts to mitigate that Risk by providing crew-specific health information, actionable insight, crew guidance and advice based on computational algorithmic analysis. The availability of inflight health diagnostic computational methods has been identified as an essential capability for human exploration missions. Inflight electronic health data sources are often heterogeneous, and thus may be isolated or not examined as an aggregate whole. The ECDS System objective provides both a data architecture that collects and manages disparate health data, and an active knowledge system that analyzes health evidence to deliver case-specific advice. A single, cohesive space-ready decision support capability that considers all exploration clinical measurements is not commercially available at present. Hence, this Task is a newly coordinated development effort by which ECDS and its supporting data infrastructure will demonstrate the feasibility of intelligent data mining and predictive modeling as a biomedical diagnostic support mechanism on manned exploration missions. The initial step towards ground and flight demonstrations has been the research and development of both image and clinical text-based computer-aided patient diagnosis. Human anatomical images displaying abnormal/pathological features have been annotated using controlled terminology templates, marked-up, and then stored in compliance with the AIM standard. These images have been filtered and disease characterized based on machine learning of semantic and quantitative feature vectors. The next phase will evaluate disease treatment response via quantitative linear

  12. Architecture and life support systems for a rotating space habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Gaurav

    Life Support Systems are critical to sustain human habitation of space over long time periods. As orbiting space habitats become operational in the future, support systems such as atmo-sphere, food, water etc. will play a very pivotal role in sustaining life. To design a long-duration space habitat, it's important to consider the full gamut of human experience of the environment. Long-term viability depends on much more than just the structural or life support efficiency. A space habitat isn't just a machine; it's a life experience. To be viable, it needs to keep the inhabitants satisfied with their condition. This paper provides conceptual research on several key factors that influence the growth and sustainability of humans in a space habitat. Apart from the main life support system parameters, the architecture (both interior and exterior) of the habitat will play a crucial role in influencing the liveability in the space habitat. In order to ensure the best possible liveability for the inhabitants, a truncated (half cut) torus is proposed as the shape of the habitat. This structure rotating at an optimum rpm will en-sure 1g pseudo gravity to the inhabitants. The truncated torus design has several advantages over other proposed shapes such as a cylinder or a sphere. The design provides minimal grav-ity variation (delta g) in the living area, since its flat outer pole ensures a constant gravity. The design is superior in economy of structural and atmospheric mass. Interior architecture of the habitat addresses the total built environment, drawing from diverse disciplines includ-ing physiology, psychology, and sociology. Furthermore, factors such as line of sight, natural sunlight and overhead clearance have been discussed in the interior architecture. Substantial radiation shielding is also required in order to prevent harmful cosmic radiations and solar flares from causing damage to inhabitants. Regolith shielding of 10 tons per meter square is proposed for the

  13. Self-organisation in protoplanetary discs. Global, non-stratified Hall-MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William; Lesur, Geoffroy; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Context. Recent observations have revealed organised structures in protoplanetary discs, such as axisymmetric rings or horseshoe concentrations, evocative of large-scale vortices. These structures are often interpreted as the result of planet-disc interactions. However, these discs are also known to be unstable to the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) which is believed to be one of the dominant angular momentum transport mechanism in these objects. It is therefore natural to ask whether the MRI itself could produce these structures without invoking planets. Aims: The nonlinear evolution of the MRI is strongly affected by the low ionisation fraction in protoplanetary discs. The Hall effect in particular, which is dominant in dense and weakly ionised parts of these objects, has been shown to spontaneously drive self-organising flows in local, shearing box simulations. Here, we investigate the behaviour of global MRI-unstable disc models dominated by the Hall effect and characterise their dynamics. Methods: We validated our implementation of the Hall effect into the PLUTO code with predictions from a spectral method in cylindrical geometry. We then performed 3D unstratified Hall-MHD simulations of Keplerian discs for a broad range of Hall, Ohmic, and ambipolar Elsasser numbers. Results: We confirm the transition from a turbulent to an organised state as the intensity of the Hall effect is increased. We observe the formation of zonal flows, their number depending on the available magnetic flux and on the intensity of the Hall effect. For intermediate Hall intensity, the flow self-organises into long-lived magnetised vortices. Neither the addition of a toroidal field nor Ohmic or ambipolar diffusion change this picture drastically in the range of parameters we have explored. Conclusions: Self-organisation by the Hall effect is a robust phenomenon in global non-stratified simulations. It is able to quench turbulent transport and spontaneously produce axisymmetric

  14. New architectures support for ALMA common software: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menay, Camilo E.; Zamora, Gabriel A.; Tobar, Rodrigo J.; Avarias, Jorge A.; Dahl-skog, Kevin R.; von Brand, Horst H.; Chiozzi, Gianluca

    2010-07-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) is a distributed control framework based on CORBA that provides communication between distributed pieces of software. Because of its size and complexity it provides its own compilation system, a mix of several technologies. The current ACS compilation process depends on specific tools, compilers, code generation, and a strict dependency model induced by the large number of software components. This document presents a summary of several porting and compatibility attempts at using ACS on platforms other than the officially supported one. A porting of ACS to the Microsoft Windows Platform and to the ARM processor architecture were attempted, with different grades of success. Also, support for LINUX-PREEMPT (a set of real-time patches for the Linux kernel) using a new design for real-time services was implemented. These efforts were integrated with the ACS building and compilation system, while others were included in its design. Lessons learned in this process are presented, and a general approach is extracted from them.

  15. Tailoring broadband light trapping of GaAs and Si substrates by self-organised nanopatterning

    SciTech Connect

    Martella, C.; Chiappe, D.; Mennucci, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.

    2014-05-21

    We report on the formation of high aspect ratio anisotropic nanopatterns on crystalline GaAs (100) and Si (100) substrates exploiting defocused Ion Beam Sputtering assisted by a sacrificial self-organised Au stencil mask. The tailored optical properties of the substrates are characterised in terms of total reflectivity and haze by means of integrating sphere measurements as a function of the morphological modification at increasing ion fluence. Refractive index grading from sub-wavelength surface features induces polarisation dependent anti-reflection behaviour in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR) range, while light scattering at off-specular angles from larger structures leads to very high values of the haze functions in reflection. The results, obtained for an important class of technologically relevant materials, are appealing in view of photovoltaic and photonic applications aiming at photon harvesting in ultrathin crystalline solar cells.

  16. Descriptive Characteristics of Surface Water Quality in Hong Kong by a Self-Organising Map

    PubMed Central

    An, Yan; Zou, Zhihong; Li, Ranran

    2016-01-01

    In this study, principal component analysis (PCA) and a self-organising map (SOM) were used to analyse a complex dataset obtained from the river water monitoring stations in the Tolo Harbor and Channel Water Control Zone (Hong Kong), covering the period of 2009–2011. PCA was initially applied to identify the principal components (PCs) among the nonlinear and complex surface water quality parameters. SOM followed PCA, and was implemented to analyze the complex relationships and behaviors of the parameters. The results reveal that PCA reduced the multidimensional parameters to four significant PCs which are combinations of the original ones. The positive and inverse relationships of the parameters were shown explicitly by pattern analysis in the component planes. It was found that PCA and SOM are efficient tools to capture and analyze the behavior of multivariable, complex, and nonlinear related surface water quality data. PMID:26761018

  17. On multidimensional scaling and the embedding of self-organising maps.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hujun

    2008-01-01

    The self-organising map (SOM) and its variant, visualisation induced SOM (ViSOM), have been known to yield similar results to multidimensional scaling (MDS). However, the exact connection has not been established. In this paper, a review on the SOM and its cost function and topological measures is provided first. We then examine the exact scaling effect of the SOM and ViSOM from their objective functions. The SOM is shown to produce a qualitative, nonmetric scaling, while the local distance-preserving ViSOM produces a quantitative or metric scaling. Their relationship with the principal manifold is also discussed. The SOM-based methods not only produce topological or metric scaling but also provide a principal manifold. Furthermore a growing ViSOM is proposed to aid the adaptive embedding of highly nonlinear manifolds. Examples and comparisons with other embedding methods such as Isomap and local linear embedding are also presented.

  18. Self-organised formation of nanotubes from graphene ribbons. A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülep, Dávid; Zsoldos, Ibolya; László, István

    2016-10-01

    The conditions for self-organised formations of carbon nanotubes from two parallel graphene ribbons were studied in a density functional adjusted tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. We have found that the seemingly trivial process is significantly limited by the thermal motion of the carbon atoms. There are further difficulties as well, primarily the unfavourable position of the atoms at the edges of the zigzag graphene ribbons. In repeated molecular dynamics runs we analysed the conditions of perfect coalescences, the influence of the substrate and the impact of the zigzag graphene ribbon positions. We have obtained that contrary to the abovementioned unfavourable conditions perfect nanotube production can be obtained using substrates. As the positioning of the substrate can be made with piezoelectric devices, this can significantly help the experimental realisation of the nanotube formation as well.

  19. Descriptive Characteristics of Surface Water Quality in Hong Kong by a Self-Organising Map.

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Zou, Zhihong; Li, Ranran

    2016-01-08

    In this study, principal component analysis (PCA) and a self-organising map (SOM) were used to analyse a complex dataset obtained from the river water monitoring stations in the Tolo Harbor and Channel Water Control Zone (Hong Kong), covering the period of 2009-2011. PCA was initially applied to identify the principal components (PCs) among the nonlinear and complex surface water quality parameters. SOM followed PCA, and was implemented to analyze the complex relationships and behaviors of the parameters. The results reveal that PCA reduced the multidimensional parameters to four significant PCs which are combinations of the original ones. The positive and inverse relationships of the parameters were shown explicitly by pattern analysis in the component planes. It was found that PCA and SOM are efficient tools to capture and analyze the behavior of multivariable, complex, and nonlinear related surface water quality data.

  20. Self-organised criticality in base-pair breathing in DNA with a defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duduială, Ciprian-Ionuţ; Wattis, Jonathan A. D.; Laughton, Charles A.

    2011-08-01

    We analyse base-pair breathing in a DNA sequence of 12 base-pairs with a defective base at its centre. We use both all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a system of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). In both cases, Fourier analysis of the trajectories reveals self-organised critical behaviour in the breathing of base-pairs. The Fourier Transforms (FTs) of the inter-base distances show power-law behaviour with gradients close to -1. The scale-invariant behaviour we have found provides evidence for the view that base-pair breathing corresponds to the nucleation stage of large-scale DNA opening (or ‘melting’) and that this process is a (second-order) phase transition. Although the random forces in our SDE system were introduced as white noise, FTs of the displacements exhibit pink noise, as do the displacements in the AMBER/MD simulations.

  1. Self-Organisation, Thermotropic and Lyotropic Properties of Glycolipids Related to their Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Garidel, Patrick; Kaconis, Yani; Heinbockel, Lena; Wulf, Matthias; Gerber, Sven; Munk, Ariane; Vill, Volkmar; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Glycolipids are amphiphilic molecules which bear an oligo- or polysaccharide as hydrophilic head group and hydrocarbon chains in varying numbers and lengths as hydrophobic part. They play an important role in life science as well as in material science. Their biological and physiological functions are quite diverse, ranging from mediators of cell-cell recognition processes, constituents of membrane domains or as membrane-forming units. Glycolipids form an exceptional class of liquid-crystal mesophases due to the fact that their self-organisation obeys more complex rules as compared to classical monophilic liquid-crystals. Like other amphiphiles, the supra-molecular structures formed by glycolipids are driven by their chemical structure; however, the details of this process are still hardly understood. Based on the synthesis of specific glycolipids with a clearly defined chemical structure, e.g., type and length of the sugar head group, acyl chain linkage, substitution pattern, hydrocarbon chain lengths and saturation, combined with a profound physico-chemical characterisation of the formed mesophases, the principles of the organisation in different aggregate structures of the glycolipids can be obtained. The importance of the observed and formed phases and their properties are discussed with respect to their biological and physiological relevance. The presented data describe briefly the strategies used for the synthesis of the used glycolipids. The main focus, however, lies on the thermotropic as well as lyotropic characterisation of the self-organised structures and formed phases based on physico-chemical and biophysical methods linked to their potential biological implications and relevance. PMID:26464591

  2. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are:

  3. Self-Organisation and Intermittent Coherent Oscillations in the EXTRAP T2 Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Sallander, E.; Drake, J. R.

    Many reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments exhibit a coherent oscillatory behaviour that is characteristic of discrete dynamo events and is associated with intermittent current profile self-organisation phenomena. However, in the vast majority of the discharges in the resistive shell RFP experiment EXTRAP T2, the dynamo activity does not show global, coherent oscillatory behaviour. The internally resonant tearing modes are phase-aligned and wall-locked resulting in a large localised magnetic perturbation. Equilibrium and plasma parameters have a level of high frequency fluctuations but the average values are quasi-steady. For some discharges, however, the equilibrium parameters exhibit the oscillatory behaviour characteristic of the discrete dynamo events. For these discharges, the trend observed in the tearing mode spectra, associated with the onset of the discrete relaxation event behaviour, is a relative higher amplitude of m = 0 mode activity and relative lower amplitude of the m = 1 mode activity compared with their average values. Global plasma parameters and model profile calculations for sample discharges representing the two types of relaxation dynamics are presented.

  4. Ion-conduction pathways in self-organised ureidoarene-heteropolysiloxane hybrid membranes.

    PubMed

    Michau, Mathieu; Barboiu, Mihail; Caraballo, Rémi; Arnal-Hérault, Carole; Perriat, Pascal; van der Lee, Arie; Pasc, A

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on hybrid organic-inorganic dense membrane materials in which protons and ions are envisioned to diffuse along the hydrophilic pathways. The hierarchical generation of functional hybrid materials was realised in two steps. First, the self-assembling properties of 3-(ureidoarene)propyltriethoxysilane compounds 1-5 in aprotic solvents were determined, revealing the formation of supramolecular oligomers. Compounds 1-5 generate organogels in chloroform or in acetone, leading in a second sol-gel transcription step to hybrid membrane materials on a nanoscopic scale. The crystal structures of 1-5 indicate that the arrangement is mainly defined by periodic parallel sheets, resulting from the alignment of hydrophobic organic and inorganic silica layers. Hybrid materials MB 1-MB 4, with a similar lamellar structure, define particularly attractive functional transport devices; they are oriented along the organic layers and sandwiched between the two siloxane layers. These systems have been employed successfully to design solid dense membranes and illustrate how the self-organised hybrid materials perform interesting and potentially useful functions.

  5. Self-organisation in Cellular Automata with Coalescent Particles: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Benjamin; Sablik, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    This article introduces new tools to study self-organisation in a family of simple cellular automata which contain some particle-like objects with good collision properties (coalescence) in their time evolution. We draw an initial configuration at random according to some initial shift-ergodic measure, and use the limit measure to describe the asymptotic behaviour of the automata. We first take a qualitative approach, i.e. we obtain information on the limit measure(s). We prove that only particles moving in one particular direction can persist asymptotically. This provides some previously unknown information on the limit measures of various deterministic and probabilistic cellular automata: 3 and 4-cyclic cellular automata [introduced by Fisch (J Theor Probab 3(2):311-338, 1990; Phys D 45(1-3):19-25, 1990)], one-sided captive cellular automata [introduced by Theyssier (Captive Cellular Automata, 2004)], the majority-traffic cellular automaton, a self stabilisation process towards a discrete line [introduced by Regnault and Rémila (in: Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science 2015—40th International Symposium, MFCS 2015, Milan, Italy, Proceedings, Part I, 2015)]. In a second time we restrict our study to a subclass, the gliders cellular automata. For this class we show quantitative results, consisting in the asymptotic law of some parameters: the entry times [generalising K ůrka et al. (in: Proceedings of AUTOMATA, 2011)], the density of particles and the rate of convergence to the limit measure.

  6. Self-organisation of the human embryo in the absence of maternal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Recher, Gaelle; Hupalowska, Anna; Bolton, Virginia; Fogarty, Norah N. M.; Campbell, Alison; Devito, Liani; Ilic, Dusko; Khalaf, Yakoub; Niakan, Kathy K.; Fishel, Simon; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Remodelling of the human embryo at implantation is indispensable for successful pregnancy. Yet it has remained mysterious because of the experimental hurdles that beset the study of this developmental phase. Here, we establish an in vitro system to culture human embryos through implantation stages in the absence of maternal tissues and reveal the key events of early human morphogenesis. These include segregation of the pluripotent embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages and morphogenetic re-arrangements leading to: generation of a bi-laminar disc, formation of a pro-amniotic cavity within the embryonic lineage, appearance of the prospective yolk sac, and trophoblast differentiation. Using human embryos and human pluripotent stem cells, we show that the reorganisation of the embryonic lineage is mediated by cellular polarisation leading to cavity formation. Together, our results indicate that the critical remodelling events at this stage of human development are embryo-autonomous highlighting the remarkable and unanticipated self-organising properties of human embryos. PMID:27144686

  7. Design optimisation of powers-of-two FIR filter using self-organising random immigrants GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Abhijit; Chattopadhyay, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    In this communication, we propose a novel design strategy of multiplier-less low-pass finite impulse response (FIR) filter with the aid of a recent evolutionary optimisation technique, known as the self-organising random immigrants genetic algorithm. Individual impulse response coefficients of the proposed filter have been encoded as sum of signed powers-of-two. During the formulation of the cost function for the optimisation algorithm, both the frequency response characteristic and the hardware cost of the discrete coefficient FIR filter have been considered. The role of crossover probability of the optimisation technique has been evaluated on the overall performance of the proposed strategy. For this purpose, the convergence characteristic of the optimisation technique has been included in the simulation results. In our analysis, two design examples of different specifications have been taken into account. In order to substantiate the efficiency of our proposed structure, a number of state-of-the-art design strategies of multiplier-less FIR filter have also been included in this article for the purpose of comparison. Critical analysis of the result unambiguously establishes the usefulness of our proposed approach for the hardware efficient design of digital filter.

  8. Ecotoxicity and chemical sediment data classification by the use of self-organising maps.

    PubMed

    Tsakovski, Stefan; Kudlak, Blazej; Simeonov, Vasil; Wolska, Lidia; Namiesnik, Jacek

    2009-01-12

    The present paper deals with the presentation in a new interpretation of sediment quality assessment. This original approach studies the relationship between ecotoxicity parameters (acute and chronic toxicity) and chemical components (polluting species like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), heavy metals) of lake sediments samples from Turawa Lake, Poland by an application of self-organising maps (SOMs) to the monitoring dataset (59 samplesx44 parameters) in order to obtain visual images of the components distributed at each sampling site when all components are included in the classification and data projection procedure. From the SOMs obtained, it is possible to select groups of similar ecotoxicity (either acute or chronic) and to analyse within each one of them the relationship of the other chemicals to the toxicity determining parameters (EC(50) and mortality). Studies have shown, convincingly, that different regions from the Turawa Lake bottom indicate different patterns of ecotoxicity related to various chemical pollutants, such as the "heptachlor-B" pattern, "pesticide and PAH" pattern, "structural" pattern or "PCB congeners" pattern. Thus, an easy way of multivariate analysis of small datasets with ecotoxicity parameters involved becomes possible. Additionally, a distinction between the effects of pollution on acute and chronic toxicity seems reasonable.

  9. Using Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) to assess synchronies: an application to historical eucalypt flowering records.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Irene L; Keatley, Marie R; Lee, Shalem Y

    2011-11-01

    Self-Organising Map (SOM) clustering methods applied to the monthly and seasonal averaged flowering intensity records of eight Eucalypt species are shown to successfully quantify, visualise and model synchronisation of multivariate time series. The SOM algorithm converts complex, nonlinear relationships between high-dimensional data into simple networks and a map based on the most likely patterns in the multiplicity of time series that it trains. Monthly- and seasonal-based SOMs identified three synchronous species groups (clusters): E. camaldulensis, E. melliodora, E. polyanthemos; E. goniocalyx, E. microcarpa, E. macrorhyncha; and E. leucoxylon, E. tricarpa. The main factor in synchronisation (clustering) appears to be the season in which flowering commences. SOMs also identified the asynchronous relationship among the eight species. Hence, the likelihood of the production, or not, of hybrids between sympatric species is also identified. The SOM pattern-based correlation values mirror earlier synchrony statistics gleaned from Moran correlations obtained from the raw flowering records. Synchronisation of flowering is shown to be a complex mechanism that incorporates all the flowering characteristics: flowering duration, timing of peak flowering, of start and finishing of flowering, as well as possibly specific climate drivers for flowering. SOMs can accommodate for all this complexity and we advocate their use by phenologists and ecologists as a powerful, accessible and interpretable tool for visualisation and clustering of multivariate time series and for synchrony studies.

  10. The metaphor-gestalt synergy underlying the self-organisation of perception as a semiotic process.

    PubMed

    Rail, David

    2013-04-01

    Recently the basis of concept and language formation has been redefined by the proposal that they both stem from perception and embodiment. The experiential revolution has lead to a far more integrated and dynamic understanding of perception as a semiotic system. The emergence of meaning in the perceptual process stems from the interaction between two key mechanisms. These are first, the generation of schemata through recurrent sensorimotor activity (SM) that underlies category and language formation (L). The second is the interaction between metaphor (M) and gestalt mechanisms (G) that generate invariant mappings beyond the SM domain that both conserve and diversify our understanding and meaning potential. We propose an important advance in our understanding of perception as a semiotic system through exploring the affect of self-organising to criticality where hierarchical behaviour becomes widely integrated through 1/f process and isomorphisms. Our proposal leads to several important implications. First, that SM and L form a functional isomorphism depicted as SM <=> L. We contend that SM <=> L is emergent, corresponding to the phenomenal self. Second, meaning structures the isomorphism SM <=>L through the synergy between M and G (M-G). M-G synergy is based on a combination of structuring and imagination. We contend that the interaction between M-G and SM <=> L functions as a macro-micro comutation that governs perception as semiosis. We discuss how our model relates to current research in fractal time and verb formation.

  11. Classification of gender and race in the distal femur using self organising maps.

    PubMed

    van den Heever, David J; Scheffer, Cornie; Erasmus, Pieter; Dillon, Edwin

    2012-08-01

    In this study gender and race differences in distal femoral morphology were investigated. Reliable anatomic knee measurements were obtained for 60 knees via MRI and direct scanning of cadaver specimens. The MRI data comprised of 20 White males and 22 White females while the cadaver specimens comprised of 18 Black males. Possible differences were investigated using a type of artificial neural network to classify the data, namely the self-organising map (SOM). The SOM suggested that clear differences are present between genders when absolute measurements are used. Male knees tended to be larger over all the measurements considered. However, when data were normalised for size, the clear differences were diminished and definite clusters were difficult to define. Black male knees tended to have larger condyle radius to anterior-posterior length ratios compared to White males. White male knees tended to be wider than White female knees. It is however suggested than when corrected for size, there exists a large variation among individual knees regardless of gender or race. It is argued that with the large variation in populations it can become advantageous not to think about gender-specific or race-specific knee replacement designs, but rather patient-specific. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Distributed Computing Environment: An Architecture For Supporting Change?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) has been in development for about five years but has only been widely used in the last two years. It consists...these services form an architecture for distributed computing that enables users to carry out the new, cheaper operations they require with the

  13. Space Network IP Services (SNIS): An Architecture for Supporting Low Earth Orbiting IP Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Network (SN) supports a variety of missions using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which includes ground stations in White Sands, New Mexico and Guam. A Space Network IP Services (SNIS) architecture is being developed to support future users with requirements for end-to-end Internet Protocol (IP) communications. This architecture will support all IP protocols, including Mobile IP, over TDRSS Single Access, Multiple Access, and Demand Access Radio Frequency (RF) links. This paper will describe this architecture and how it can enable Low Earth Orbiting IP satellite missions.

  14. Using Growing Self-Organising Maps to Improve the Binning Process in Environmental Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chon-Kit Kenneth; Hsu, Arthur L.; Tang, Sen-Lin; Halgamuge, Saman K.

    2008-01-01

    Metagenomic projects using whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing produces many unassembled DNA sequences and small contigs. The step of clustering these sequences, based on biological and molecular features, is called binning. A reported strategy for binning that combines oligonucleotide frequency and self-organising maps (SOM) shows high potential. We improve this strategy by identifying suitable training features, implementing a better clustering algorithm, and defining quantitative measures for assessing results. We investigated the suitability of each of di-, tri-, tetra-, and pentanucleotide frequencies. The results show that dinucleotide frequency is not a sufficiently strong signature for binning 10 kb long DNA sequences, compared to the other three. Furthermore, we observed that increased order of oligonucleotide frequency may deteriorate the assignment result in some cases, which indicates the possible existence of optimal species-specific oligonucleotide frequency. We replaced SOM with growing self-organising map (GSOM) where comparable results are obtained while gaining 7%–15% speed improvement. PMID:18288261

  15. The influence of receptor-mediated interactions on reaction-diffusion mechanisms of cellular self-organisation.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Baker, Ruth E; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction.

  16. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  17. Conformational and functional analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Self-Organising Maps

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are powerful tools to investigate the conformational dynamics of proteins that is often a critical element of their function. Identification of functionally relevant conformations is generally done clustering the large ensemble of structures that are generated. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) were reported performing more accurately and providing more consistent results than traditional clustering algorithms in various data mining problems. We present a novel strategy to analyse and compare conformational ensembles of protein domains using a two-level approach that combines SOMs and hierarchical clustering. Results The conformational dynamics of the α-spectrin SH3 protein domain and six single mutants were analysed by MD simulations. The Cα's Cartesian coordinates of conformations sampled in the essential space were used as input data vectors for SOM training, then complete linkage clustering was performed on the SOM prototype vectors. A specific protocol to optimize a SOM for structural ensembles was proposed: the optimal SOM was selected by means of a Taguchi experimental design plan applied to different data sets, and the optimal sampling rate of the MD trajectory was selected. The proposed two-level approach was applied to single trajectories of the SH3 domain independently as well as to groups of them at the same time. The results demonstrated the potential of this approach in the analysis of large ensembles of molecular structures: the possibility of producing a topological mapping of the conformational space in a simple 2D visualisation, as well as of effectively highlighting differences in the conformational dynamics directly related to biological functions. Conclusions The use of a two-level approach combining SOMs and hierarchical clustering for conformational analysis of structural ensembles of proteins was proposed. It can easily be extended to other study cases and to conformational ensembles from

  18. The use of self-organising maps for anomalous behaviour detection in a digital investigation.

    PubMed

    Fei, B K L; Eloff, J H P; Olivier, M S; Venter, H S

    2006-10-16

    The dramatic increase in crime relating to the Internet and computers has caused a growing need for digital forensics. Digital forensic tools have been developed to assist investigators in conducting a proper investigation into digital crimes. In general, the bulk of the digital forensic tools available on the market permit investigators to analyse data that has been gathered from a computer system. However, current state-of-the-art digital forensic tools simply cannot handle large volumes of data in an efficient manner. With the advent of the Internet, many employees have been given access to new and more interesting possibilities via their desktop. Consequently, excessive Internet usage for non-job purposes and even blatant misuse of the Internet have become a problem in many organisations. Since storage media are steadily growing in size, the process of analysing multiple computer systems during a digital investigation can easily consume an enormous amount of time. Identifying a single suspicious computer from a set of candidates can therefore reduce human processing time and monetary costs involved in gathering evidence. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how, in a digital investigation, digital forensic tools and the self-organising map (SOM)--an unsupervised neural network model--can aid investigators to determine anomalous behaviours (or activities) among employees (or computer systems) in a far more efficient manner. By analysing the different SOMs (one for each computer system), anomalous behaviours are identified and investigators are assisted to conduct the analysis more efficiently. The paper will demonstrate how the easy visualisation of the SOM enhances the ability of the investigators to interpret and explore the data generated by digital forensic tools so as to determine anomalous behaviours.

  19. Ecological hierarchies and self-organisation - Pattern analysis, modelling and process integration across scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reuter, H.; Jopp, F.; Blanco-Moreno, J. M.; Damgaard, C.; Matsinos, Y.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    A continuing discussion in applied and theoretical ecology focuses on the relationship of different organisational levels and on how ecological systems interact across scales. We address principal approaches to cope with complex across-level issues in ecology by applying elements of hierarchy theory and the theory of complex adaptive systems. A top-down approach, often characterised by the use of statistical techniques, can be applied to analyse large-scale dynamics and identify constraints exerted on lower levels. Current developments are illustrated with examples from the analysis of within-community spatial patterns and large-scale vegetation patterns. A bottom-up approach allows one to elucidate how interactions of individuals shape dynamics at higher levels in a self-organisation process; e.g., population development and community composition. This may be facilitated by various modelling tools, which provide the distinction between focal levels and resulting properties. For instance, resilience in grassland communities has been analysed with a cellular automaton approach, and the driving forces in rodent population oscillations have been identified with an agent-based model. Both modelling tools illustrate the principles of analysing higher level processes by representing the interactions of basic components.The focus of most ecological investigations on either top-down or bottom-up approaches may not be appropriate, if strong cross-scale relationships predominate. Here, we propose an 'across-scale-approach', closely interweaving the inherent potentials of both approaches. This combination of analytical and synthesising approaches will enable ecologists to establish a more coherent access to cross-level interactions in ecological systems. ?? 2010 Gesellschaft f??r ??kologie.

  20. Summarising climate and air quality (ozone) data on self-organising maps: a Sydney case study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ningbo; Betts, Alan; Riley, Matt

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores the classification and visualisation utility of the self-organising map (SOM) method in the context of New South Wales (NSW), Australia, using gridded NCEP/NCAR geopotential height reanalysis for east Australia, together with multi-site meteorological and air quality data for Sydney from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Air Quality Monitoring Network. A twice-daily synoptic classification has been derived for east Australia for the period of 1958-2012. The classification has not only reproduced the typical synoptic patterns previously identified in the literature but also provided an opportunity to visualise the subtle, non-linear change in the eastward-migrating synoptic systems influencing NSW (including Sydney). The summarisation of long-term, multi-site air quality/meteorological data from the Sydney basin on the SOM plane has identified a set of typical air pollution/meteorological spatial patterns in the region. Importantly, the examination of these patterns in relation to synoptic weather types has provided important visual insights into how local and synoptic meteorological conditions interact with each other and affect the variability of air quality in tandem. The study illustrates that while synoptic circulation types are influential, the within-type variability in mesoscale flows plays a critical role in determining local ozone levels in Sydney. These results indicate that the SOM can be a useful tool for assessing the impact of weather and climatic conditions on air quality in the regional airshed. This study further promotes the use of the SOM method in environmental research.

  1. Conformational and functional analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by self-organising maps.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Pandini, Alessandro; Stella, Fabio; Bonati, Laura

    2011-05-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are powerful tools to investigate the conformational dynamics of proteins that is often a critical element of their function. Identification of functionally relevant conformations is generally done clustering the large ensemble of structures that are generated. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) were reported performing more accurately and providing more consistent results than traditional clustering algorithms in various data mining problems. We present a novel strategy to analyse and compare conformational ensembles of protein domains using a two-level approach that combines SOMs and hierarchical clustering. The conformational dynamics of the α-spectrin SH3 protein domain and six single mutants were analysed by MD simulations. The Cα's Cartesian coordinates of conformations sampled in the essential space were used as input data vectors for SOM training, then complete linkage clustering was performed on the SOM prototype vectors. A specific protocol to optimize a SOM for structural ensembles was proposed: the optimal SOM was selected by means of a Taguchi experimental design plan applied to different data sets, and the optimal sampling rate of the MD trajectory was selected. The proposed two-level approach was applied to single trajectories of the SH3 domain independently as well as to groups of them at the same time. The results demonstrated the potential of this approach in the analysis of large ensembles of molecular structures: the possibility of producing a topological mapping of the conformational space in a simple 2D visualisation, as well as of effectively highlighting differences in the conformational dynamics directly related to biological functions. The use of a two-level approach combining SOMs and hierarchical clustering for conformational analysis of structural ensembles of proteins was proposed. It can easily be extended to other study cases and to conformational ensembles from other sources.

  2. Self organising hypothesis networks: a new approach for representing and structuring SAR knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Thierry; Barber, Chris; Rosser, Edward; Vessey, Jonathan D; Webb, Samuel J; Werner, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Combining different sources of knowledge to build improved structure activity relationship models is not easy owing to the variety of knowledge formats and the absence of a common framework to interoperate between learning techniques. Most of the current approaches address this problem by using consensus models that operate at the prediction level. We explore the possibility to directly combine these sources at the knowledge level, with the aim to harvest potentially increased synergy at an earlier stage. Our goal is to design a general methodology to facilitate knowledge discovery and produce accurate and interpretable models. To combine models at the knowledge level, we propose to decouple the learning phase from the knowledge application phase using a pivot representation (lingua franca) based on the concept of hypothesis. A hypothesis is a simple and interpretable knowledge unit. Regardless of its origin, knowledge is broken down into a collection of hypotheses. These hypotheses are subsequently organised into hierarchical network. This unification permits to combine different sources of knowledge into a common formalised framework. The approach allows us to create a synergistic system between different forms of knowledge and new algorithms can be applied to leverage this unified model. This first article focuses on the general principle of the Self Organising Hypothesis Network (SOHN) approach in the context of binary classification problems along with an illustrative application to the prediction of mutagenicity. It is possible to represent knowledge in the unified form of a hypothesis network allowing interpretable predictions with performances comparable to mainstream machine learning techniques. This new approach offers the potential to combine knowledge from different sources into a common framework in which high level reasoning and meta-learning can be applied; these latter perspectives will be explored in future work.

  3. Self organising hypothesis networks: a new approach for representing and structuring SAR knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Combining different sources of knowledge to build improved structure activity relationship models is not easy owing to the variety of knowledge formats and the absence of a common framework to interoperate between learning techniques. Most of the current approaches address this problem by using consensus models that operate at the prediction level. We explore the possibility to directly combine these sources at the knowledge level, with the aim to harvest potentially increased synergy at an earlier stage. Our goal is to design a general methodology to facilitate knowledge discovery and produce accurate and interpretable models. Results To combine models at the knowledge level, we propose to decouple the learning phase from the knowledge application phase using a pivot representation (lingua franca) based on the concept of hypothesis. A hypothesis is a simple and interpretable knowledge unit. Regardless of its origin, knowledge is broken down into a collection of hypotheses. These hypotheses are subsequently organised into hierarchical network. This unification permits to combine different sources of knowledge into a common formalised framework. The approach allows us to create a synergistic system between different forms of knowledge and new algorithms can be applied to leverage this unified model. This first article focuses on the general principle of the Self Organising Hypothesis Network (SOHN) approach in the context of binary classification problems along with an illustrative application to the prediction of mutagenicity. Conclusion It is possible to represent knowledge in the unified form of a hypothesis network allowing interpretable predictions with performances comparable to mainstream machine learning techniques. This new approach offers the potential to combine knowledge from different sources into a common framework in which high level reasoning and meta-learning can be applied; these latter perspectives will be explored in future work. PMID

  4. Using Self-Organising Maps to investigate long-term changes in deep Adriatic water patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Mihanović, Hrvoje; Šepić, Jadranka; Matijević, Slavica

    2011-04-01

    The paper attempts to document long-term changes in deep Adriatic water patterns by applying the Self-Organising Maps (SOM) method to temperature, salinity, dissolved-oxygen content, orthophosphate and total inorganic nitrogen profiles sampled at a single deep station in the South Adriatic Pit (SAP) over a half century (1957-2009). Seasonality observed in upper layers has been removed by the least-squares fitting of the annual and semi-annual sinusoidal functions. The sensitivity of the SOM to various parameter combinations reveals the importance of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen for mapping different water patterns, while nutrients have less influence on quality and applicability of SOM solutions to the extraction of characteristic SAP water profiles. The quality of fit obtained for different combination of the measured parameters introduced to a SOM suggests that the incomplete combinations of input parameters increase an imperfection in the applicability of SOMs to the dataset. Two modes of long-term changes in the SAP obtained by the SOM analyses are discussed with respect to the processes that drive the variability in the area, e.g., the Adriatic-Ionian Bimodal Oscillation: where the first mode is characterised by rapid changes in the transition of SAP water masses, observed before 1980s (less adoptable by the SOMs), and the second mode is characterised by steady transitions (better adoptable by the SOMs), observed in the 1990s and the 2000s. The SOM method is found to have certain advantages when compared to other methods that have previously been used to distinguish the Adriatic water masses, as it does not depend on predefinition of water mass sources and allows for gaps in series.

  5. Rapid self-organised initiation of ad hoc sensor networks close above the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsnes, Reinert

    2010-07-01

    This work shows potentials for rapid self-organisation of sensor networks where nodes collaborate to relay messages to a common data collecting unit (sink node). The study problem is, in the sense of graph theory, to find a shortest path tree spanning a weighted graph. This is a well-studied problem where for example Dijkstra’s algorithm provides a solution for non-negative edge weights. The present contribution shows by simulation examples that simple modifications of known distributed approaches here can provide significant improvements in performance. Phase transition phenomena, which are known to take place in networks close to percolation thresholds, may explain these observations. An initial method, which here serves as reference, assumes the sink node starts organisation of the network (tree) by transmitting a control message advertising its availability for its neighbours. These neighbours then advertise their current cost estimate for routing a message to the sink. A node which in this way receives a message implying an improved route to the sink, advertises its new finding and remembers which neighbouring node the message came from. This activity proceeds until there are no more improvements to advertise to neighbours. The result is a tree network for cost effective transmission of messages to the sink (root). This distributed approach has potential for simple improvements which are of interest when minimisation of storage and communication of network information are a concern. Fast organisation of the network takes place when the number k of connections for each node ( degree) is close above its critical value for global network percolation and at the same time there is a threshold for the nodes to decide to advertise network route updates.

  6. Experimental Support for the Evolution of Symmetric Protein Architecture from a Simple Peptide Motif

    SciTech Connect

    J Lee; M Blaber

    2011-12-31

    The majority of protein architectures exhibit elements of structural symmetry, and 'gene duplication and fusion' is the evolutionary mechanism generally hypothesized to be responsible for their emergence from simple peptide motifs. Despite the central importance of the gene duplication and fusion hypothesis, experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway for a specific protein architecture has yet to be effectively demonstrated. To address this question, a unique 'top-down symmetric deconstruction' strategy was utilized to successfully identify a simple peptide motif capable of recapitulating, via gene duplication and fusion processes, a symmetric protein architecture (the threefold symmetric {beta}-trefoil fold). The folding properties of intermediary forms in this deconstruction agree precisely with a previously proposed 'conserved architecture' model for symmetric protein evolution. Furthermore, a route through foldable sequence-space between the simple peptide motif and extant protein fold is demonstrated. These results provide compelling experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway of symmetric protein architecture via gene duplication and fusion processes.

  7. National space transportation and support study/mission requirements and architecture studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durocher, C. L.; Darwin, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    The government approach to fulfilling the requirements of the National Space Transportation and Support Study is described. DOD and NASA were required to determine the architecture and technology that would be needed for civil and defense space transportation during the 1995-2010 time range. NASA collected data from the National Commission on Space and the DOD research focused on SDI requirements. The objectives and recommendations of the space transportation architecture, transportation and support systems, and technology assessment and planning tasks are discussed.

  8. MPLS switch architecture supporting Diffserv for high-speed switching and QoS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Won; Kim, Young-Chul; Lee, Mike M.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we propose the architecture of the MPLS switch supporting Differentiated Services in the MPLS-based network. The traffic conditioner consists of a classifier, a meter, and a marker. The VOQ-PHB module which combines input queue with each PHB queue is implemented to utilize the resources more efficiently, employing the Priority-iSLIP scheduling algorithm to support high-speed switching. The proposed MPLS switch architecture is modeled and synthesized by Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language (VHDL), verified and then implemented by commercialized CAD tools to justify the validity of the proposed hardware architecture.

  9. An architecture for intelligent interfaces - Outline of an approach to supporting operators of complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, W. B.; Geddes, N. D.; Curry, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    The conceptual design of a comprehensive support system for operators of complex systems is presented. Key functions within the support system architecture include information management, error monitoring, and adaptive aiding. One of the central knowledge bases underlying this functionality is an operator model that involves a 'matrix' of algorithmic and symbolic models for assessing and predicting an operator's activities, awareness resources, intentions, and performance. Functional block diagrams are presented for the overall architecture as well as the key elements within this architecture. A variety of difficult design issues are discussed and ongoing efforts aimed at resolving these issues are noted.

  10. A novel EPON architecture for supporting direct communication between ONUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liqian; Chen, Xue; Wang, Zhen

    2008-11-01

    In the traditional EPON network, optical signal from one ONU can not reach other ONUs. So ONUs can not directly transmit packets to other ONUs .The packets must be transferred by the OLT and it consumes both upstream bandwidth and downstream bandwidth. The bandwidth utilization is low and becomes lower when there are more packets among ONUs. When the EPON network carries P2P (Peer-to-Peer) applications and VPN applications, there would be a great lot of packets among ONUs and the traditional EPON network meets the problem of low bandwidth utilization. In the worst situation the bandwidth utilization of traditional EPON only is 50 percent. This paper proposed a novel EPON architecture and a novel medium access control protocol to realize direct packets transmission between ONUs. In the proposed EPON we adopt a novel circled architecture in the splitter. Due to the circled-splitter, optical signals from an ONU can reach the other ONUs and packets could be directly transmitted between two ONUs. The traffic between two ONUs only consumes upstream bandwidth and the bandwidth cost is reduced by 50 percent. Moreover, this kind of directly transmission reduces the packet's latency.

  11. An Interactive Design Space Supporting Development of Vehicle Architecture Concept Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Denver, Colorado, USA IMECE2011-64510 AN INTERACTIVE DESIGN SPACE SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT OF VEHICLE ARCHITECTURE CONCEPT MODELS Gary Osborne...early in the development cycle. Optimization taking place later in the cycle usually occurs at the detail design level, and tends to result in...architecture changes may be imposed, but such modifications are equivalent to a huge optimization cycle covering almost the entire design process, and

  12. A support architecture for reliable distributed computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Partha; Leblanc, Richard J., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Clouds project is well underway to its goal of building a unified distributed operating system supporting the object model. The operating system design uses the object concept of structuring software at all levels of the system. The basic operating system was developed and work is under progress to build a usable system.

  13. Innovative use of self-organising maps (SOMs) in model validation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Ben; McDonald, Adrian; Coggins, Jack

    2016-04-01

    We present an innovative combination of techniques for validation of numerical weather prediction (NWP) output against both observations and reanalyses using two classification schemes, demonstrated by a validation of the operational NWP 'AMPS' (the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System). Historically, model validation techniques have centred on case studies or statistics at various time scales (yearly/seasonal/monthly). Within the past decade the latter technique has been expanded by the addition of classification schemes in place of time scales, allowing more precise analysis. Classifications are typically generated for either the model or the observations, then used to create composites for both which are compared. Our method creates and trains a single self-organising map (SOM) on both the model output and observations, which is then used to classify both datasets using the same class definitions. In addition to the standard statistics on class composites, we compare the classifications themselves between the model and the observations. To add further context to the area studied, we use the same techniques to compare the SOM classifications with regimes developed for another study to great effect. The AMPS validation study compares model output against surface observations from SNOWWEB and existing University of Wisconsin-Madison Antarctic Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) during two months over the austral summer of 2014-15. Twelve SOM classes were defined in a '4 x 3' pattern, trained on both model output and observations of 2 m wind components, then used to classify both training datasets. Simple statistics (correlation, bias and normalised root-mean-square-difference) computed for SOM class composites showed that AMPS performed well during extreme weather events, but less well during lighter winds and poorly during the more changeable conditions between either extreme. Comparison of the classification time-series showed that, while correlations were lower

  14. Neurophysiological Research Supporting the Investigation of Adaptive Network Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-14

    D-aspartate may be involved in the mechanism supporting accelerated rates of conditioning. (Cooper and Woody, S Neurosci . Abstr., 9:330, 1983) PAGE 7...account for the increase in activity of these neurons in response to the auditory CS (Holmes and PAGE 10 Woody, Soc. Neurosci . Abstr., 1983, 1984). N...0.5 nA current injection in 94% of the cells (Berthier and Woody, Soc. Neurosci . Abstr., 1983). 8. Effects of PT stimulation on PSP nroduction were

  15. Scaling Impacts in Life Support Architecture and Technology Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    For long-duration space missions outside of Earth orbit, reliability considerations will drive higher levels of redundancy and/or on-board spares for life support equipment. Component scaling will be a critical element in minimizing overall launch mass while maintaining an acceptable level of system reliability. Building on an earlier reliability study (AIAA 2012-3491), this paper considers the impact of alternative scaling approaches, including the design of technology assemblies and their individual components to maximum, nominal, survival, or other fractional requirements. The optimal level of life support system closure is evaluated for deep-space missions of varying duration using equivalent system mass (ESM) as the comparative basis. Reliability impacts are included in ESM by estimating the number of component spares required to meet a target system reliability. Common cause failures are included in the analysis. ISS and ISS-derived life support technologies are considered along with selected alternatives. This study focusses on minimizing launch mass, which may be enabling for deep-space missions.

  16. Swarm intelligence in fish? The difficulty in demonstrating distributed and self-organised collective intelligence in (some) animal groups.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Christos C

    2016-10-11

    Larger groups often have a greater ability to solve cognitive tasks compared to smaller ones or lone individuals. This is well established in social insects, navigating flocks of birds, and in groups of prey collectively vigilant for predators. Research in social insects has convincingly shown that improved cognitive performance can arise from self-organised local interactions between individuals that integrates their contributions, often referred to as swarm intelligence. This emergent collective intelligence has gained in popularity and been directly applied to groups of other animals, including fish. Despite being a likely mechanism at least partially explaining group performance in vertebrates, I argue here that other possible explanations are rarely ruled out in empirical studies. Hence, evidence for self-organised collective (or 'swarm') intelligence in fish is not as strong as it would first appear. These other explanations, the 'pool-of-competence' and the greater cognitive ability of individuals when in larger groups, are also reviewed. Also discussed is why improved group performance in general may be less often observed in animals such as shoaling fish compared to social insects. This review intends to highlight the difficulties in exploring collective intelligence in animal groups, ideally leading to further empirical work to illuminate these issues.

  17. WDS Knowledge Network Architecture in Support of International Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrane, M.; Minster, J. B. H.; Hugo, W.

    2014-12-01

    ICSU (International Council for Science) created the World Data System (WDS) as an interdisciplinary body at its General Assembly in Maputo in 2008, and since then the membership of the WDS has grown to include 86 members, of whom 56 are institutions or data centers focused on providing quality-assured data and services to the scientific community, and 10 more are entire networks of such data facilities and services. In addition to its objective of providing universal and equitable access to scientific data and services, WDS is also active in promoting stewardship, standards and conventions, and improved access to products derived from data and services. Whereas WDS is in process of aggregating and harmonizing the metadata collections of its membership, it is clear that additional benefits can be obtained by supplementing such traditional metadata sources with information about members, authors, and the coverages of the data, as well as metrics such as citation indices, quality indicators, and usability. Moreover, the relationships between the actors and systems that populate this metadata landscape can be seen as a knowledge network that describes a subset of global scientific endeavor. Such a knowledge network is useful in many ways, supporting both machine-based and human requests for contextual information related to a specific data set, institution, author, topic, or other entities in the network. Specific use cases that can be realized include decision and policy support for funding agencies, identification of collaborators, ranking of data sources, availability of data for specific coverages, and many more. The paper defines the scope of and conceptual background to such a knowledge network, discusses some initial work done by WDS to establish the network, and proposes an implementation model for rapid operationalization. In this model, established interests such as DataCite, ORCID, and CrossRef have well-defined roles, and the standards, services, and

  18. Knowledge Network Architecture in Support of International Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Wim

    2015-04-01

    ICSU (The International Council for Science) created the World Data System (WDS) as an interdisciplinary body at its General Assembly in Maputo in 2008, and since then the membership of the WDS has grown to include 86 members, of whom 56 are institutions or data centres focused on providing quality-assured data and services to the scientific community. In addition to its objective of providing universal and equitable access to such data and services, WDS is also active in promoting stewardship, standards and conventions, and improved access to products derived from data and services. Whereas WDS is in process of aggregating and harmonizing the meta-data collections of its membership, it is clear that additional benefits can be obtained by supplementing such traditional meta-data sources with information about members, authors, and the coverages of the data, as well as metrics such as citation indices, quality indicators, and usability. Moreover, the relationships between the actors and systems that populate this meta-data landscape can be seen as a knowledge network that describes a sub-set of global scientific endeavor. Such a knowledge network is useful in many ways, supporting both machine-based and human requests for contextual information related to a specific data set, institution, author, topic, or other entities in the network. Specific use cases that can be realised include decision and policy support for funding agencies, identification of collaborators, ranking of data sources, availability of data for specific coverages, and many more. The paper defines the scope of and conceptual background to such a knowledge network, discusses some initial work done by WDS to establish the network, and proposes an implementation model for rapid operationalisation. In this model, established interests such as DataCITE, ORCID, and CrossRef have well-defined roles, and the standards, services, and registries required to build a community-maintained, scalable knowledge

  19. An Integrative Architecture for a Sensor-Supported Trust Management System

    PubMed Central

    Trček, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Trust plays a key role not only in e-worlds and emerging pervasive computing environments, but also already for millennia in human societies. Trust management solutions that have being around now for some fifteen years were primarily developed for the above mentioned cyber environments and they are typically focused on artificial agents, sensors, etc. However, this paper presents extensions of a new methodology together with architecture for trust management support that is focused on humans and human-like agents. With this methodology and architecture sensors play a crucial role. The architecture presents an already deployable tool for multi and interdisciplinary research in various areas where humans are involved. It provides new ways to obtain an insight into dynamics and evolution of such structures, not only in pervasive computing environments, but also in other important areas like management and decision making support. PMID:23112628

  20. FY04 Advanced Life Support Architecture and Technology Studies: Mid-Year Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin; Anderson, Molly; Duffield, Bruce; Hanford, Tony; Jeng, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Long-Term Objective: Identify optimal advanced life support system designs that meet existing and projected requirements for future human spaceflight missions. a) Include failure-tolerance, reliability, and safe-haven requirements. b) Compare designs based on multiple criteria including equivalent system mass (ESM), technology readiness level (TRL), simplicity, commonality, etc. c) Develop and evaluate new, more optimal, architecture concepts and technology applications.

  1. Architecture, Design, and Development of an HTML/JavaScript Web-Based Group Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Nicholas C., Jr.; Nunamaker, Jay F., Jr.; Briggs, Robert O.; Vogel, Douglas R.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the need for virtual workspaces and describes the architecture, design, and development of GroupSystems for the World Wide Web (GSWeb), an HTML/JavaScript Web-based Group Support System (GSS). GSWeb, an application interface similar to a Graphical User Interface (GUI), is currently used by teams around the world and relies on user…

  2. Architecture, Design, and Development of an HTML/JavaScript Web-Based Group Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Nicholas C., Jr.; Nunamaker, Jay F., Jr.; Briggs, Robert O.; Vogel, Douglas R.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the need for virtual workspaces and describes the architecture, design, and development of GroupSystems for the World Wide Web (GSWeb), an HTML/JavaScript Web-based Group Support System (GSS). GSWeb, an application interface similar to a Graphical User Interface (GUI), is currently used by teams around the world and relies on user…

  3. The middleware architecture supports heterogeneous network systems for module-based personal robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Seongho; Li, Vitaly; Choi, Dong Hee; Jung, Gi Deck; Park, Hong Seong; Ryuh, Youngsun

    2005-12-01

    On developing the personal robot system presently, the internal architecture is every module those occupy separated functions are connected through heterogeneous network system. This module-based architecture supports specialization and division of labor at not only designing but also implementation, as an effect of this architecture, it can reduce developing times and costs for modules. Furthermore, because every module is connected among other modules through network systems, we can get easy integrations and synergy effect to apply advanced mutual functions by co-working some modules. In this architecture, one of the most important technologies is the network middleware that takes charge communications among each modules connected through heterogeneous networks systems. The network middleware acts as the human nerve system inside of personal robot system; it relays, transmits, and translates information appropriately between modules that are similar to human organizations. The network middleware supports various hardware platform, heterogeneous network systems (Ethernet, Wireless LAN, USB, IEEE 1394, CAN, CDMA-SMS, RS-232C). This paper discussed some mechanisms about our network middleware to intercommunication and routing among modules, methods for real-time data communication and fault-tolerant network service. There have designed and implemented a layered network middleware scheme, distributed routing management, network monitoring/notification technology on heterogeneous networks for these goals. The main theme is how to make routing information in our network middleware. Additionally, with this routing information table, we appended some features. Now we are designing, making a new version network middleware (we call 'OO M/W') that can support object-oriented operation, also are updating program sources itself for object-oriented architecture. It is lighter, faster, and can support more operation systems and heterogeneous network systems, but other general

  4. A Distributed Architecture for Tsunami Early Warning and Collaborative Decision-support in Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moßgraber, J.; Middleton, S.; Hammitzsch, M.; Poslad, S.

    2012-04-01

    The presentation will describe work on the system architecture that is being developed in the EU FP7 project TRIDEC on "Collaborative, Complex and Critical Decision-Support in Evolving Crises". The challenges for a Tsunami Early Warning System (TEWS) are manifold and the success of a system depends crucially on the system's architecture. A modern warning system following a system-of-systems approach has to integrate various components and sub-systems such as different information sources, services and simulation systems. Furthermore, it has to take into account the distributed and collaborative nature of warning systems. In order to create an architecture that supports the whole spectrum of a modern, distributed and collaborative warning system one must deal with multiple challenges. Obviously, one cannot expect to tackle these challenges adequately with a monolithic system or with a single technology. Therefore, a system architecture providing the blueprints to implement the system-of-systems approach has to combine multiple technologies and architectural styles. At the bottom layer it has to reliably integrate a large set of conventional sensors, such as seismic sensors and sensor networks, buoys and tide gauges, and also innovative and unconventional sensors, such as streams of messages from social media services. At the top layer it has to support collaboration on high-level decision processes and facilitates information sharing between organizations. In between, the system has to process all data and integrate information on a semantic level in a timely manner. This complex communication follows an event-driven mechanism allowing events to be published, detected and consumed by various applications within the architecture. Therefore, at the upper layer the event-driven architecture (EDA) aspects are combined with principles of service-oriented architectures (SOA) using standards for communication and data exchange. The most prominent challenges on this layer

  5. The Setting is the Service: How the Architecture of Sober Living Residences Supports Community Based Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Wittman, Fried; Jee, Babette; Polcin, Douglas L.; Henderson, Diane

    2014-01-01

    The architecture of residential recovery settings is an important silent partner in the alcohol/drug recovery field. The settings significantly support or hinder recovery experiences of residents, and shape community reactions to the presence of sober living houses (SLH) in ordinary neighborhoods. Grounded in the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous, the SLH provides residents with settings designed to support peer based recovery; further, these settings operate in a community context that insists on sobriety and strongly encourages attendance at 12-step meetings. Little formal research has been conducted to show how architectural features of the recovery setting – building appearance, spatial layouts, furnishings and finishes, policies for use of the facilities, physical care and maintenance of the property, neighborhood features, aspects of location in the city – function to promote (or retard) recovery, and to build (or detract from) community support. This paper uses a case-study approach to analyze the architecture of a community-based residential recovery service that has demonstrated successful recovery outcomes for its residents, is popular in its community, and has achieved state-wide recognition. The Environmental Pattern Language (Alexander, Ishikawa, & Silverstein, 1977) is used to analyze its architecture in a format that can be tested, critiqued, and adapted for use by similar programs in many communities, providing a model for replication and further research. PMID:25328377

  6. The Setting is the Service: How the Architecture of Sober Living Residences Supports Community Based Recovery.

    PubMed

    Wittman, Fried; Jee, Babette; Polcin, Douglas L; Henderson, Diane

    2014-07-01

    The architecture of residential recovery settings is an important silent partner in the alcohol/drug recovery field. The settings significantly support or hinder recovery experiences of residents, and shape community reactions to the presence of sober living houses (SLH) in ordinary neighborhoods. Grounded in the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous, the SLH provides residents with settings designed to support peer based recovery; further, these settings operate in a community context that insists on sobriety and strongly encourages attendance at 12-step meetings. Little formal research has been conducted to show how architectural features of the recovery setting - building appearance, spatial layouts, furnishings and finishes, policies for use of the facilities, physical care and maintenance of the property, neighborhood features, aspects of location in the city - function to promote (or retard) recovery, and to build (or detract from) community support. This paper uses a case-study approach to analyze the architecture of a community-based residential recovery service that has demonstrated successful recovery outcomes for its residents, is popular in its community, and has achieved state-wide recognition. The Environmental Pattern Language (Alexander, Ishikawa, & Silverstein, 1977) is used to analyze its architecture in a format that can be tested, critiqued, and adapted for use by similar programs in many communities, providing a model for replication and further research.

  7. Exploring Hardware Support For Scaling Irregular Applications on Multi-node Multi-core Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Secchi, Simone; Ceriani, Marco; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste; Palermo, Gianluca; Raffo, Luigi

    2013-06-05

    With the recent emergence of large-scale knowledge dis- covery, data mining and social network analysis, irregular applications have gained renewed interest. Classic cache-based high-performance architectures do not provide optimal performances with such kind of workloads, mainly due to the very low spatial and temporal locality of the irregular control and memory access patterns. In this paper, we present a multi-node, multi-core, fine-grained multi-threaded shared-memory system architecture specifically designed for the execution of large-scale irregular applications, and built on top of three pillars, that we believe are fundamental to support these workloads. First, we offer transparent hardware support for Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) to provide a large globally-shared address space with no software library overhead. Second, we employ multi-threaded multi-core processing nodes to achieve the necessary latency tolerance required by accessing global memory, which potentially resides in a remote node. Finally, we devise hardware support for inter-thread synchronization on the whole global address space. We first model the performances by using an analytical model that takes into account the main architecture and application characteristics. We describe the hardware design of the proposed cus- tom architectural building blocks that provide support for the above- mentioned three pillars. Finally, we present a limited-scale evaluation of the system on a multi-board FPGA prototype with typical irregular kernels and benchmarks. The experimental evaluation demonstrates the architecture performance scalability for different configurations of the whole system.

  8. Service Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support: A Systematic Review and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems’ performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS PMID:25325996

  9. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS.

  10. A Supply Chain Architecture Based on Multi-agent Systems to Support Decentralized Collaborative Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Jorge E.; Poler, Raúl; Mula, Josefa

    In a supply chain management context, the enterprise architecture concept to efficiently support the collaborative processes among the supply chain members involved has been evolving. Each supply chain has an organizational structure that describes the hierarchical relationships among its members, ranging from centralized to decentralized organizations. From a decentralized perspective, each supply chain member is able to identify collaborative and non collaborative partners and the kind of information to be exchanged to support negotiation processes. The same concepts of organizational structure and negotiation rules can be applied to a multi-agent system. This paper proposes a novel supply chain architecture to support decentralized collaborative processes in supply chains by considering a multi-agent-based system modeling approach.

  11. Chlorinated solvents in a petrochemical wastewater treatment plant: an assessment of their removal using self-organising maps.

    PubMed

    Tobiszewski, Marek; Tsakovski, Stefan; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2012-05-01

    The self-organising map approach was used to assess the efficiency of chlorinated solvent removal from petrochemical wastewater in a refinery wastewater treatment plant. Chlorinated solvents and inorganic anions (11 variables) were determined in 72 wastewater samples, collected from three different purification streams. The classification of variables identified technical solvents, brine from oil desalting and runoff sulphates as pollution sources in the refinery, affecting the quality of wastewater treatment plant influent. The classification of samples revealed the formation of five clusters: the first three clusters contained samples collected from the drainage water, process water and oiled rainwater treatment streams. The fourth cluster consisted mainly of samples collected after biological treatment, and the fifth one of samples collected after an unusual event. SOM analysis showed that the biological treatment step significantly reduced concentrations of chlorinated solvents in wastewater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Distributed Sensor Architecture for Intelligent Control that Supports Quality of Control and Quality of Service

    PubMed Central

    Poza-Lujan, Jose-Luis; Posadas-Yagüe, Juan-Luis; Simó-Ten, José-Enrique; Simarro, Raúl; Benet, Ginés

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of a study of intelligent architectures for distributed control and communications systems. The study focuses on optimizing control systems by evaluating the performance of middleware through quality of service (QoS) parameters and the optimization of control using Quality of Control (QoC) parameters. The main aim of this work is to study, design, develop, and evaluate a distributed control architecture based on the Data-Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems (DDS) communication standard as proposed by the Object Management Group (OMG). As a result of the study, an architecture called Frame-Sensor-Adapter to Control (FSACtrl) has been developed. FSACtrl provides a model to implement an intelligent distributed Event-Based Control (EBC) system with support to measure QoS and QoC parameters. The novelty consists of using, simultaneously, the measured QoS and QoC parameters to make decisions about the control action with a new method called Event Based Quality Integral Cycle. To validate the architecture, the first five Braitenberg vehicles have been implemented using the FSACtrl architecture. The experimental outcomes, demonstrate the convenience of using jointly QoS and QoC parameters in distributed control systems. PMID:25723145

  13. Distributed sensor architecture for intelligent control that supports quality of control and quality of service.

    PubMed

    Poza-Lujan, Jose-Luis; Posadas-Yagüe, Juan-Luis; Simó-Ten, José-Enrique; Simarro, Raúl; Benet, Ginés

    2015-02-25

    This paper is part of a study of intelligent architectures for distributed control and communications systems. The study focuses on optimizing control systems by evaluating the performance of middleware through quality of service (QoS) parameters and the optimization of control using Quality of Control (QoC) parameters. The main aim of this work is to study, design, develop, and evaluate a distributed control architecture based on the Data-Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems (DDS) communication standard as proposed by the Object Management Group (OMG). As a result of the study, an architecture called Frame-Sensor-Adapter to Control (FSACtrl) has been developed. FSACtrl provides a model to implement an intelligent distributed Event-Based Control (EBC) system with support to measure QoS and QoC parameters. The novelty consists of using, simultaneously, the measured QoS and QoC parameters to make decisions about the control action with a new method called Event Based Quality Integral Cycle. To validate the architecture, the first five Braitenberg vehicles have been implemented using the FSACtrl architecture. The experimental outcomes, demonstrate the convenience of using jointly QoS and QoC parameters in distributed control systems.

  14. Fuzzylot: a novel self-organising fuzzy-neural rule-based pilot system for automated vehicles.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, M; Quek, C; Toh, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents part of our research work concerned with the realisation of an Intelligent Vehicle and the technologies required for its routing, navigation, and control. An automated driver prototype has been developed using a self-organising fuzzy rule-based system (POPFNN-CRI(S)) to model and subsequently emulate human driving expertise. The ability of fuzzy logic to represent vague information using linguistic variables makes it a powerful tool to develop rule-based control systems when an exact working model is not available, as is the case of any vehicle-driving task. Designing a fuzzy system, however, is a complex endeavour, due to the need to define the variables and their associated fuzzy sets, and determine a suitable rule base. Many efforts have thus been devoted to automating this process, yielding the development of learning and optimisation techniques. One of them is the family of POP-FNNs, or Pseudo-Outer Product Fuzzy Neural Networks (TVR, AARS(S), AARS(NS), CRI, Yager). These generic self-organising neural networks developed at the Intelligent Systems Laboratory (ISL/NTU) are based on formal fuzzy mathematical theory and are able to objectively extract a fuzzy rule base from training data. In this application, a driving simulator has been developed, that integrates a detailed model of the car dynamics, complete with engine characteristics and environmental parameters, and an OpenGL-based 3D-simulation interface coupled with driving wheel and accelerator/ brake pedals. The simulator has been used on various road scenarios to record from a human pilot driving data consisting of steering and speed control actions associated to road features. Specifically, the POPFNN-CRI(S) system is used to cluster the data and extract a fuzzy rule base modelling the human driving behaviour. Finally, the effectiveness of the generated rule base has been validated using the simulator in autopilot mode.

  15. Lunar Outpost Life Support Architecture Study Based on a High-Mobility Exploration Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of a life support architecture study based on a 2009 NASA lunar surface exploration scenario known as Scenario 12. The study focuses on the assembly complete outpost configuration and includes pressurized rovers as part of a distributed outpost architecture in both stand-alone and integrated configurations. A range of life support architectures are examined reflecting different levels of closure and distributed functionality. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the sensitivity of results to volatile high-impact mission variables, including the quantity of residual Lander oxygen and hydrogen propellants available for scavenging, the fraction of crew time away from the outpost on excursions, total extravehicular activity hours, and habitat leakage. Surpluses or deficits of water and oxygen are reported for each architecture, along with fixed and 10-year total equivalent system mass estimates relative to a reference case. System robustness is discussed in terms of the probability of no water or oxygen resupply as determined from the Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Experimental support for the evolution of symmetric protein architecture from a simple peptide motif

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The majority of protein architectures exhibit elements of structural symmetry, and “gene duplication and fusion” is the evolutionary mechanism generally hypothesized to be responsible for their emergence from simple peptide motifs. Despite the central importance of the gene duplication and fusion hypothesis, experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway for a specific protein architecture has yet to be effectively demonstrated. To address this question, a unique “top-down symmetric deconstruction” strategy was utilized to successfully identify a simple peptide motif capable of recapitulating, via gene duplication and fusion processes, a symmetric protein architecture (the threefold symmetric β-trefoil fold). The folding properties of intermediary forms in this deconstruction agree precisely with a previously proposed “conserved architecture” model for symmetric protein evolution. Furthermore, a route through foldable sequence-space between the simple peptide motif and extant protein fold is demonstrated. These results provide compelling experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway of symmetric protein architecture via gene duplication and fusion processes. PMID:21173271

  17. Multitier Portal Architecture for Thin- and Thick-client Neutron Scattering Experiment Support

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Mark L; Miller, Stephen D

    2007-01-01

    Integration of emerging technologies and design patterns into the three-tier client-server architecture is required in order to provide a scalable and flexible architecture for novice to sophisticated portal user groups. The ability to provide user customizable portal interfaces is rapidly becoming commonplace and is driving the expectations of researchers and scientists in the scientific community. This paper describes an architectural design that maximizes information technology service reuse while providing a customizable user interface that scales with user sophistication and requirements. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides a state-of-the-art facility ideal for implementation of this infrastructure. The SNS Java-based Science Portal (Tier I) and Open Grid Computing Environment (Tier II) provide thin-client support whereas the GumTree Eclipse Rich Client Platform (Tier III) and Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (Tier IV) provide thickclient support within a multitier portal architecture. Each tier incorporates all of the features of the previous tiers while adding new capabilities based on the user requirements.

  18. A Four-Phase Model of the Evolution of Clinical Decision Support Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence over many years suggests that clinical decision support systems can be helpful in improving both clinical outcomes and adherence to evidence-based guidelines. However, to this day, clinical decision support systems are not widely used outside of a small number of sites. One reason why decision support systems are not widely used is the relative difficulty of integrating such systems into clinical workflows and computer systems. Purpose To review and synthesize the history of clinical decision support systems, and to propose a model of various architectures for integrating clinical decision support systems with clinical systems. Methods The authors conducted an extensive review of the clinical decision support literature since 1959, sequenced the systems and developed a model. Results The model developed consists of four phases: standalone decision support systems, decision support integrated into clinical systems, standards for sharing clinical decision support content and service models for decision support. These four phases have not heretofore been identified, but they track remarkably well with the chronological history of clinical decision support, and show evolving and increasingly sophisticated attempts to ease integrating decision support systems into clinical workflows and other clinical systems. Conclusions Each of the four evolutionary approaches to decision support architecture has unique advantages and disadvantages. A key lesson was that there were common limitations that almost all the approaches faced, and no single approach has been able to entirely surmount: 1) fixed knowledge representation systems inherently circumscribe the type of knowledge that can be represented in them, 2) there are serious terminological issues, 3) patient data may be spread across several sources with no single source having a complete view of the patient, and 4) major difficulties exist in transferring successful interventions from one

  19. Providing conceptual framework support for distributed Web-based simulation within the high-level architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Ernest H.; Griffin, Sean P.; Rother, S. L.

    1998-08-01

    Web-based simulation, a subject of increasing interest to both simulation researchers and practitioners, has the potential to significantly influence the application and availability of simulation as a problem-solving technique. Web technologies also portend cost-effective distributed modeling and simulation. These applications will require solutions to the systems interoperability problem similar to the DoD High Level Architecture (HLA). The suitability of the HLA to serve 'mainstream' simulation is examined.Approaches for incorporating discrete event simulation conceptual frameworks within the HLA are described and ongoing research in this area noted. Issues raised include a discussion of the appropriate roles for a simulation-support language and a simulation-support architecture.

  20. Architectural Considerations for Highly Scalable Computing to Support On-demand Video Analytics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-19

    percentages across 3 different cameras (with resolutions as in Table I) are shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 2. Split up of time for an anlytic run It is...Architectural Considerations for Highly Scalable Computing to Support On-demand Video Analytics George Mathew Lincoln Laboratory Massachusetts...beginning in one pass. Using video- summarization, the time to capture frames from the VMS and time for processing the frames in a single thread as relative

  1. Extending Digital Repository Architectures to Support Disk Image Preservation and Access

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Extending Digital Repository Architectures to Support Disk Image Preservation and Access Kam Woods School of Information and Library Science University...of North Carolina 216 Lenoir Drive, CB #3360 1-(919)-966-3598 kamwoods@email.unc.edu Christopher A. Lee School of Information and Library ... Science University of North Carolina 216 Lenoir Drive, CB #3360 1-(919)-962-7204 callee@ils.unc.edu Simson Garfinkel Graduate School of

  2. An Interactive Design Space Supporting Development of Vehicle Architecture Concept Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-17

    ponents that are not designed to carry structural loads in the assembly, such as seats and other trim items. However, these inertial items have an...Denver, Colorado, USA IMECE2011-64510 AN INTERACTIVE DESIGN SPACE SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT OF VEHICLE ARCHITECTURE CONCEPT MODELS Gary Osborne...early in the development cycle. Optimization taking place later in the cycle usually occurs at the detail design level, and tends to result in

  3. A Framework for Evaluating Computer Architectures to Support Systems with Security Requirements, with Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-05

    develops a set of criteria for evaluating computer architectures that are to support sy’stemns v% ith securit % requirements. Central to these criteria is the...M.. u Fu ’VMR Appendix B DEC VAX-11/780 OVERVIEW The VAX-I1/780 is a 32-bit computer with a virtual memory space of up to 4G -bytes IBI]. The

  4. Earth Orbiting Support Systems for commercial low Earth orbit data relay: Assessing architectures through tradespace exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Gianluca; Golkar, Alessandro; Gaudenzi, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    As small satellites and Sun Synchronous Earth Observation systems are assuming an increased role in nowadays space activities, including commercial investments, it is of interest to assess how infrastructures could be developed to support the development of such systems and other spacecraft that could benefit from having a data relay service in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as opposed to traditional Geostationary relays. This paper presents a tradespace exploration study of the architecture of such LEO commercial satellite data relay systems, here defined as Earth Orbiting Support Systems (EOSS). The paper proposes a methodology to formulate architectural decisions for EOSS constellations, and enumerate the corresponding tradespace of feasible architectures. Evaluation metrics are proposed to measure benefits and costs of architectures; lastly, a multicriteria Pareto criterion is used to downselect optimal architectures for subsequent analysis. The methodology is applied to two case studies for a set of 30 and 100 customer-spacecraft respectively, representing potential markets for LEO services in Exploration, Earth Observation, Science, and CubeSats. Pareto analysis shows how increased performance of the constellation is always achieved by an increased node size, as measured by the gain of the communications antenna mounted on EOSS spacecraft. On the other hand, nonlinear trends in optimal orbital altitude, number of satellites per plane, and number of orbital planes, are found in both cases. An upward trend in individual node memory capacity is found, although never exceeding 256 Gbits of onboard memory for both cases that have been considered, assuming the availability of a polar ground station for EOSS data downlink. System architects can use the proposed methodology to identify optimal EOSS constellations for a given service pricing strategy and customer target, thus identifying alternatives for selection by decision makers.

  5. Lunar Outpost Life Support Architecture Study Based on a High Mobility Exploration Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2009-01-01

    As scenarios for lunar surface exploration and habitation continue to evolve within NASA s Constellation program, so must studies of optimal life support system architectures and technologies. This paper presents results of a life support architecture study based on a 2009 NASA scenario known as Scenario 12. Scenario 12 represents a consolidation of ideas from earlier NASA scenarios and includes an outpost near the Lunar South Pole comprised of three larger fixed surface elements and four attached pressurized rovers. The scenario places a high emphasis on surface mobility, with planning assuming that all four crewmembers spend roughly 50% of the time away from the outpost on 3-14 day excursions in two of the pressurized rovers. Some of the larger elements can also be mobilized for longer duration excursions. This emphasis on mobility poses a significant challenge for a regenerative life support system in terms of cost-effective waste collection and resource recovery across multiple elements, including rovers with very constrained infrastructure resources. The current study considers pressurized rovers as part of a distributed outpost life support architecture in both stand-alone and integrated configurations. A range of architectures are examined reflecting different levels of closure and distributed functionality. Different lander propellant scavenging options are also considered involving either initial conversion of residual oxygen and hydrogen propellants to water or initial direct oxygen scavenging. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the sensitivity of results to volatile high-impact mission variables, including the quantity of residual lander propellants available for scavenging, the fraction of crew time away from the outpost on excursions, total extravehicular activity hours, and habitat leakage. Architectures are evaluated by estimating surpluses or deficits of water and oxygen per 180-day mission and differences in fixed and 10-year

  6. Lunar Outpost Life Support Architecture Study Based on a High Mobility Exploration Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2009-01-01

    As scenarios for lunar surface exploration and habitation continue to evolve within NASA s Constellation program, so must studies of optimal life support system architectures and technologies. This paper presents results of a life support architecture study based on a 2009 NASA scenario known as Scenario 12. Scenario 12 represents a consolidation of ideas from earlier NASA scenarios and includes an outpost near the Lunar South Pole comprised of three larger fixed surface elements and four attached pressurized rovers. The scenario places a high emphasis on surface mobility, with planning assuming that all four crewmembers spend roughly 50% of the time away from the outpost on 3-14 day excursions in two of the pressurized rovers. Some of the larger elements can also be mobilized for longer duration excursions. This emphasis on mobility poses a significant challenge for a regenerative life support system in terms of cost-effective waste collection and resource recovery across multiple elements, including rovers with very constrained infrastructure resources. The current study considers pressurized rovers as part of a distributed outpost life support architecture in both stand-alone and integrated configurations. A range of architectures are examined reflecting different levels of closure and distributed functionality. Different lander propellant scavenging options are also considered involving either initial conversion of residual oxygen and hydrogen propellants to water or initial direct oxygen scavenging. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the sensitivity of results to volatile high-impact mission variables, including the quantity of residual lander propellants available for scavenging, the fraction of crew time away from the outpost on excursions, total extravehicular activity hours, and habitat leakage. Architectures are evaluated by estimating surpluses or deficits of water and oxygen per 180-day mission and differences in fixed and 10-year

  7. A Scalable Architecture for Rule Engine Based Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Soumi; Banerjee, Ansuman; Banerjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support systems (CDSS) have reached a fair level of sophistication and have emerged as the popular system of choice for their aid in clinical decision making. These decision support systems are based on rule engines navigate through a repertoire of clinical rules and multitudes of facts to assist a clinical expert to decide on the set of actuations in response to a medical situation. In this paper, we present the design of a scalable architecture for a rule engine based clinical decision system.

  8. An Architecture and Supporting Environment of Service-Oriented Computing Based-On Context Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianxiao; Wu, Gang; Huang, Jun

    Service-oriented computing (SOC) is emerging to be an important computing paradigm of the next future. Based on context awareness, this paper proposes an architecture of SOC. A definition of the context in open environments such as Internet is given, which is based on ontology. The paper also proposes a supporting environment for the context-aware SOC, which focus on services on-demand composition and context-awareness evolving. A reference implementation of the supporting environment based on OSGi[11] is given at last.

  9. Big Data Architectures for Operationalized Seismic and Subsurface Monitoring and Decision Support Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, D. H.; Rasheed, M.; Hillman, C.; O'Doherty, N.

    2012-12-01

    Oilfield management is moving to a more operational footing with near-realtime seismic and sensor monitoring governing drilling, fluid injection and hydrocarbon extraction workflows within safety, productivity and profitability constraints. To date, the geoscientific analytical architectures employed are configured for large volumes of data, computational power or analytical latency and compromises in system design must be made to achieve all three aspects. These challenges are encapsulated by the phrase 'Big Data' which has been employed for over a decade in the IT industry to describe the challenges presented by data sets that are too large, volatile and diverse for existing computational architectures and paradigms. We present a data-centric architecture developed to support a geoscientific and geotechnical workflow whereby: ●scientific insight is continuously applied to fresh data ●insights and derived information are incorporated into engineering and operational decisions ●data governance and provenance are routine within a broader data management framework Strategic decision support systems in large infrastructure projects such as oilfields are typically relational data environments; data modelling is pervasive across analytical functions. However, subsurface data and models are typically non-relational (i.e. file-based) in the form of large volumes of seismic imaging data or rapid streams of sensor feeds and are analysed and interpreted using niche applications. The key architectural challenge is to move data and insight from a non-relational to a relational, or structured, data environment for faster and more integrated analytics. We describe how a blend of MapReduce and relational database technologies can be applied in geoscientific decision support, and the strengths and weaknesses of each in such an analytical ecosystem. In addition we discuss hybrid technologies that use aspects of both and translational technologies for moving data and analytics

  10. Design and Parametric Sizing of Deep Space Habitats Supporting NASA'S Human Space Flight Architecture Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toups, Larry; Simon, Matthew; Smitherman, David; Spexarth, Gary

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight Architecture Team (HAT) is a multi-disciplinary, cross-agency study team that conducts strategic analysis of integrated development approaches for human and robotic space exploration architectures. During each analysis cycle, HAT iterates and refines the definition of design reference missions (DRMs), which inform the definition of a set of integrated capabilities required to explore multiple destinations. An important capability identified in this capability-driven approach is habitation, which is necessary for crewmembers to live and work effectively during long duration transits to and operations at exploration destinations beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This capability is captured by an element referred to as the Deep Space Habitat (DSH), which provides all equipment and resources for the functions required to support crew safety, health, and work including: life support, food preparation, waste management, sleep quarters, and housekeeping.The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the DSH capable of supporting crew during exploration missions. First, the paper describes the functionality required in a DSH to support the HAT defined exploration missions, the parameters affecting its design, and the assumptions used in the sizing of the habitat. Then, the process used for arriving at parametric sizing estimates to support additional HAT analyses is detailed. Finally, results from the HAT Cycle C DSH sizing are presented followed by a brief description of the remaining design trades and technological advancements necessary to enable the exploration habitation capability.

  11. Boeing Crew Exploration Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support System Architecture Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiidi, Mo; Lewis, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The Boeing Company under the teaming agreement with the Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation and in compliance with the NASA Phase 1 contract, had the responsibilities for the CEV architecture development of the Environmental control and life support (ECLS) system under the NASA Phase 1 contract. The ECLS system was comprised of the various subsystems which provided for a shirt-sleeve habitable environment for crew to live and work in the crew module of the CEV. This architecture met the NASA requirements to ferry cargo and crew to ISS, and Lunar sortie missions, with extensibility to long duration missions to Moon and MARS. This paper provides a summary overview of the CEV ECLS subsystems which was proposed in compliance with the contract activities.

  12. Boeing Crew Exploration Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support System Architecture Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiidi, Mo; Lewis, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The Boeing Company under the teaming agreement with the Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation and in compliance with the NASA Phase 1 contract, had the responsibilities for the CEV architecture development of the Environmental control and life support (ECLS) system under the NASA Phase 1 contract. The ECLS system was comprised of the various subsystems which provided for a shirt-sleeve habitable environment for crew to live and work in the crew module of the CEV. This architecture met the NASA requirements to ferry cargo and crew to ISS, and Lunar sortie missions, with extensibility to long duration missions to Moon and MARS. This paper provides a summary overview of the CEV ECLS subsystems which was proposed in compliance with the contract activities.

  13. Bio-signal analysis system design with support vector machines based on cloud computing service architecture.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chia-Ping; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Chen, Jia-Ming; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Chen, Chi-Huang; Lai, Feipei

    2010-01-01

    Today, many bio-signals such as Electroencephalography (EEG) are recorded in digital format. It is an emerging research area of analyzing these digital bio-signals to extract useful health information in biomedical engineering. In this paper, a bio-signal analyzing cloud computing architecture, called BACCA, is proposed. The system has been designed with the purpose of seamless integration into the National Taiwan University Health Information System. Based on the concept of. NET Service Oriented Architecture, the system integrates heterogeneous platforms, protocols, as well as applications. In this system, we add modern analytic functions such as approximated entropy and adaptive support vector machine (SVM). It is shown that the overall accuracy of EEG bio-signal analysis has increased to nearly 98% for different data sets, including open-source and clinical data sets.

  14. Exploring Life Support Architectures for Evolution of Deep Space Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly S.; Stambaugh, Imelda C.

    2015-01-01

    Life support system architectures for long duration space missions are often explored analytically in the human spaceflight community to find optimum solutions for mass, performance, and reliability. But in reality, many other constraints can guide the design when the life support system is examined within the context of an overall vehicle, as well as specific programmatic goals and needs. Between the end of the Constellation program and the development of the "Evolvable Mars Campaign", NASA explored a broad range of mission possibilities. Most of these missions will never be implemented but the lessons learned during these concept development phases may color and guide future analytical studies and eventual life support system architectures. This paper discusses several iterations of design studies from the life support system perspective to examine which requirements and assumptions, programmatic needs, or interfaces drive design. When doing early concept studies, many assumptions have to be made about technology and operations. Data can be pulled from a variety of sources depending on the study needs, including parametric models, historical data, new technologies, and even predictive analysis. In the end, assumptions must be made in the face of uncertainty. Some of these may introduce more risk as to whether the solution for the conceptual design study will still work when designs mature and data becomes available.

  15. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  16. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  17. Supporting Air and Space Expeditionary Forces: Expanded Operational Architecture for Combat Support Execution Planning and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    FYDP represents how DoD money will ____________ 4 At the time this analysis was performed, these were called regional supply squadrons ( RSSs ). Each... RSSs ) and CCPs to ensure adequate spares support. A notional example of contingency planning and execution can be found in Appendix B. 39 CHAPTER FOUR

  18. Integrating Naval Surface Fire Support into an Improved Joint Close Air Support Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    59 Joe Pappalardo . “Afghanistan Taught U.S. ‘Hard Lessons’ In Close Air Support...got stuck. 66 Pappalardo . 67 “Results of Investigation into Death of U.S. Service Member...could potentially be seamless. 124 Pappalardo . 61 V. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Historically

  19. Application of self-organising maps towards segmentation of soybean samples by determination of amino acids concentration.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lívia Ramazzoti Chanan; Angilelli, Karina Gomes; Cremasco, Hágata; Romagnoli, Érica Signori; Galão, Olívio Fernandes; Borsato, Dionisio; Moraes, Larissa Alexandra Cardoso; Mandarino, José Marcos Gontijo

    2016-09-01

    Soybeans are widely used both for human nutrition and animal feed, since they are an important source of protein, and they also provide components such as phytosterols, isoflavones, and amino acids. In this study, were determined the concentrations of the amino acids lysine, histidine, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glycine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine present in 14 samples of conventional soybeans and 6 transgenic, cultivated in two cities of the state of Paraná, Londrina and Ponta Grossa. The results were tabulated and presented to a self-organising map for segmentation according planting regions and conventional or transgenic varieties. A network with 7000 training epochs and a 10 × 10 topology was used, and it proved appropriate in the segmentation of the samples using the data analysed. The weight maps provided by the network, showed that all the amino acids were important in targeting the samples, especially isoleucine. Three clusters were formed, one with only Ponta Grossa samples (including transgenic (PGT) and common (PGC)), a second group with Londrina transgenic (LT) samples and the third with Londrina common (LC) samples.

  20. Detecting tactical patterns in basketball: comparison of merge self-organising maps and dynamic controlled neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Matthias; Grunz, Andreas; Memmert, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The soaring amount of data, especially spatial-temporal data, recorded in recent years demands for advanced analysis methods. Neural networks derived from self-organizing maps established themselves as a useful tool to analyse static and temporal data. In this study, we applied the merge self-organising map (MSOM) to spatio-temporal data. To do so, we investigated the ability of MSOM's to analyse spatio-temporal data and compared its performance to the common dynamical controlled network (DyCoN) approach to analyse team sport position data. The position data of 10 players were recorded via the Ubisense tracking system during a basketball game. Furthermore, three different pre-selected plays were recorded for classification. Following data preparation, the different nets were trained with the data of the first half. The training success of both networks was evaluated by achieved entropy. The second half of the basketball game was presented to both nets for automatic classification. Both approaches were able to present the trained data extremely well and to detect the pre-selected plays correctly. In conclusion, MSOMs are a useful tool to analyse spatial-temporal data, especially in team sports. By their direct inclusion of different time length of tactical patterns, they open up new opportunities within team sports.

  1. Application of self-organising maps towards segmentation of soybean samples by determination of inorganic compounds content.

    PubMed

    Cremasco, Hágata; Borsato, Dionísio; Angilelli, Karina Gomes; Galão, Olívio Fernandes; Bona, Evandro; Valle, Marcos Eduardo

    2016-01-15

    In this study, 20 samples of soybean, both transgenic and conventional cultivars, which were planted in two different regions, Londrina and Ponta Grossa, both located at Paraná, Brazil, were analysed. In order to verify whether the inorganic compound levels in soybeans varied with the region of planting, K, P, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu and B contents were analysed by an artificial neural network self-organising map. It was observed that with a topology 10 × 10, 8000 epochs, initial learning rate of 0.1 and initial neighbourhood ratio of 4.5, the network was able to differentiate samples according to region of origin. Among all of the variables analysed by the artificial neural network, the elements Zn, Ca and Mn were those which most contributed to the classification of the samples. The results indicated that samples planted in these two regions differ in their mineral content; however, conventional and transgenic samples grown in the same region show no difference in mineral contents in the grain. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Fully distributed monitoring architecture supporting multiple trackees and trackers in indoor mobile asset management application.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seol Young; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Kang, Soon Ju

    2014-03-21

    A tracking service like asset management is essential in a dynamic hospital environment consisting of numerous mobile assets (e.g., wheelchairs or infusion pumps) that are continuously relocated throughout a hospital. The tracking service is accomplished based on the key technologies of an indoor location-based service (LBS), such as locating and monitoring multiple mobile targets inside a building in real time. An indoor LBS such as a tracking service entails numerous resource lookups being requested concurrently and frequently from several locations, as well as a network infrastructure requiring support for high scalability in indoor environments. A traditional centralized architecture needs to maintain a geographic map of the entire building or complex in its central server, which can cause low scalability and traffic congestion. This paper presents a self-organizing and fully distributed indoor mobile asset management (MAM) platform, and proposes an architecture for multiple trackees (such as mobile assets) and trackers based on the proposed distributed platform in real time. In order to verify the suggested platform, scalability performance according to increases in the number of concurrent lookups was evaluated in a real test bed. Tracking latency and traffic load ratio in the proposed tracking architecture was also evaluated.

  3. Fully Distributed Monitoring Architecture Supporting Multiple Trackees and Trackers in Indoor Mobile Asset Management Application

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seol Young; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Kang, Soon Ju

    2014-01-01

    A tracking service like asset management is essential in a dynamic hospital environment consisting of numerous mobile assets (e.g., wheelchairs or infusion pumps) that are continuously relocated throughout a hospital. The tracking service is accomplished based on the key technologies of an indoor location-based service (LBS), such as locating and monitoring multiple mobile targets inside a building in real time. An indoor LBS such as a tracking service entails numerous resource lookups being requested concurrently and frequently from several locations, as well as a network infrastructure requiring support for high scalability in indoor environments. A traditional centralized architecture needs to maintain a geographic map of the entire building or complex in its central server, which can cause low scalability and traffic congestion. This paper presents a self-organizing and fully distributed indoor mobile asset management (MAM) platform, and proposes an architecture for multiple trackees (such as mobile assets) and trackers based on the proposed distributed platform in real time. In order to verify the suggested platform, scalability performance according to increases in the number of concurrent lookups was evaluated in a real test bed. Tracking latency and traffic load ratio in the proposed tracking architecture was also evaluated. PMID:24662407

  4. Architecture-Level Dependability Analysis of a Medical Decision Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Symons, Christopher T; Patton, Robert M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in techniques such as image analysis, text analysis and machine learning have shown great potential to assist physicians in detecting and diagnosing health issues in patients. In this paper, we describe the approach and findings of an architecture-level dependability analysis for a mammography decision support system that incorporates these techniques. The goal of the research described in this paper is to provide an initial understanding of the dependability issues, particularly the potential failure modes and severity, in order to identify areas of potential high risk. The results will guide design decisions and provide the basis of a dependability and performance evaluation program.

  5. Guiding Principles for Data Architecture to Support the Pathways Community HUB Model.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, Bernard P; Redding, Sarah; Leath, Brenda A; Carter, Ernest L; Russell, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The Pathways Community HUB Model provides a unique strategy to effectively supplement health care services with social services needed to overcome barriers for those most at risk of poor health outcomes. Pathways are standardized measurement tools used to define and track health and social issues from identification through to a measurable completion point. The HUB use Pathways to coordinate agencies and service providers in the community to eliminate the inefficiencies and duplication that exist among them. Experience with the Model has brought out the need for better information technology solutions to support implementation of the Pathways themselves through decision-support tools for care coordinators and other users to track activities and outcomes, and to facilitate reporting. Here we provide a basis for discussing recommendations for such a data infrastructure by developing a conceptual model that formalizes the Pathway concept underlying current implementations. The main contribution is a set of core recommendations as a framework for developing and implementing a data architecture to support implementation of the Pathways Community HUB Model. The objective is to present a tool for communities interested in adopting the Model to learn from and to adapt in their own development and implementation efforts. Experience with the Community Health Access Project (CHAP) data base system (the core implementation of the Model) has identified several issues and remedies that have been developed to address these issues. Based on analysis of issues and remedies, we present several key features for a data architecture meeting the just mentioned recommendations. Presentation of features is followed by a practical guide to their implementation allowing an organization to consider either tailoring off-the-shelf generic systems to meet the requirements or offerings that are specialized for community-based care coordination. Looking to future extensions, we discuss the

  6. DNA Tetrominoes: The Construction of DNA Nanostructures Using Self-Organised Heterogeneous Deoxyribonucleic Acids Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Rahim, Mohd Syafiq; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2015-01-01

    The unique programmability of nucleic acids offers alternative in constructing excitable and functional nanostructures. This work introduces an autonomous protocol to construct DNA Tetris shapes (L-Shape, B-Shape, T-Shape and I-Shape) using modular DNA blocks. The protocol exploits the rich number of sequence combinations available from the nucleic acid alphabets, thus allowing for diversity to be applied in designing various DNA nanostructures. Instead of a deterministic set of sequences corresponding to a particular design, the protocol promotes a large pool of DNA shapes that can assemble to conform to any desired structures. By utilising evolutionary programming in the design stage, DNA blocks are subjected to processes such as sequence insertion, deletion and base shifting in order to enrich the diversity of the resulting shapes based on a set of cascading filters. The optimisation algorithm allows mutation to be exerted indefinitely on the candidate sequences until these sequences complied with all the four fitness criteria. Generated candidates from the protocol are in agreement with the filter cascades and thermodynamic simulation. Further validation using gel electrophoresis indicated the formation of the designed shapes. Thus, supporting the plausibility of constructing DNA nanostructures in a more hierarchical, modular, and interchangeable manner. PMID:26258940

  7. Runtime and Architecture Support for Efficient Data Exchange in Multi-Accelerator Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas, Javier; Gelado, Isaac; Stone, John E.; Navarro, Nacho; Kirk, David B.; Hwu, Wen-mei

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous parallel computing applications often process large data sets that require multiple GPUs to jointly meet their needs for physical memory capacity and compute throughput. However, the lack of high-level abstractions in previous heterogeneous parallel programming models force programmers to resort to multiple code versions, complex data copy steps and synchronization schemes when exchanging data between multiple GPU devices, which results in high software development cost, poor maintainability, and even poor performance. This paper describes the HPE runtime system, and the associated architecture support, which enables a simple, efficient programming interface for exchanging data between multiple GPUs through either interconnects or cross-node network interfaces. The runtime and architecture support presented in this paper can also be used to support other types of accelerators. We show that the simplified programming interface reduces programming complexity. The research presented in this paper started in 2009. It has been implemented and tested extensively in several generations of HPE runtime systems as well as adopted into the NVIDIA GPU hardware and drivers for CUDA 4.0 and beyond since 2011. The availability of real hardware that support key HPE features gives rise to a rare opportunity for studying the effectiveness of the hardware support by running important benchmarks on real runtime and hardware. Experimental results show that in a exemplar heterogeneous system, peer DMA and double-buffering, pinned buffers, and software techniques can improve the inter-accelerator data communication bandwidth by 2×. They can also improve the execution speed by 1.6× for a 3D finite difference, 2.5× for 1D FFT, and 1.6× for merge sort, all measured on real hardware. The proposed architecture support enables the HPE runtime to transparently deploy these optimizations under simple portable user code, allowing system designers to freely employ devices of

  8. Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) as a Technical Framework for Web-Based Support Systems (WSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishav Vir

    Software-oriented architecture (SOA) is a very powerful Internet-based framework which can be targeted towards Web-based Support Systems (WSS). SOA equips these systems to supplement their intelligence, decision-making, and processing potential with the universality and ubiquity of the Internet. It makes the WSS 'agile', implying that these support systems can adapt their intelligence very quickly due to the swift access of data available in the form of a 'service' through SOA. No matter how distributed and specialized a data source is, and regardless of whether it is domain-independent or domain-dependent, these systems can just 'plug' into any technology they want by acting as consumers of a 'service'. This truly amplifies the performance and system response of WSS. This chapter follows this vision of defining the architectural technique of SOA and how its nuances interplay with the concept of WSS. A complete case study outlining the marriage of SOA and WSS has been provided to further illustrate the merits of such a combined system.

  9. Applying Service-Oriented Architecture on The Development of Groundwater Modeling Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; WANG, Y.; Chang, L. C.; Tsai, J. P.; Hsiao, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater simulation has become an essential step on the groundwater resources management and assessment. There are many stand-alone pre- and post-processing software packages to alleviate the model simulation loading, but the stand-alone software do not consider centralized management of data and simulation results neither do they provide network sharing functions. Hence, it is difficult to share and reuse the data and knowledge (simulation cases) systematically within or across companies. Therefore, this study develops a centralized and network based groundwater modeling support system to assist model construction. The system is based on service-oriented architecture and allows remote user to develop their modeling cases on internet. The data and cases (knowledge) are thus easy to manage centralized. MODFLOW is the modeling engine of the system, which is the most popular groundwater model in the world. The system provides a data warehouse to restore groundwater observations, MODFLOW Support Service, MODFLOW Input File & Shapefile Convert Service, MODFLOW Service, and Expert System Service to assist researchers to build models. Since the system architecture is service-oriented, it is scalable and flexible. The system can be easily extended to include the scenarios analysis and knowledge management to facilitate the reuse of groundwater modeling knowledge.

  10. A web-services architecture designed for intermittent connectivity to support medical response to disasters.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steve; Griswold, William; Lenert, Leslie A

    2005-01-01

    To support mobile computing systems for first responders at mass casualty sites, as part of the WIISARD (Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters) project, we have developed a data architecture to gracefully handle an environment with frequent network failure and, multiple writers that also supports rapid dissemination of updates that could be critical to the safety of responders. This is accomplished by allowing for a subset of the overall information available in a disaster scene to be cached locally on a responder's device and locally modified with or without network access. When the network is available, the local subset of the model is automatically synchronized with a server that contains the full model, and conflicts are resolved. When changes from a device are committed, the changes are instantly sent to any connected devices where the local subset would be modified by the changes.

  11. Guiding Principles for Data Architecture to Support the Pathways Community HUB Model

    PubMed Central

    Zeigler, Bernard P.; Redding, Sarah; Leath, Brenda A.; Carter, Ernest L.; Russell, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Pathways Community HUB Model provides a unique strategy to effectively supplement health care services with social services needed to overcome barriers for those most at risk of poor health outcomes. Pathways are standardized measurement tools used to define and track health and social issues from identification through to a measurable completion point. The HUB use Pathways to coordinate agencies and service providers in the community to eliminate the inefficiencies and duplication that exist among them. Pathways Community HUB Model and Formalization: Experience with the Model has brought out the need for better information technology solutions to support implementation of the Pathways themselves through decision-support tools for care coordinators and other users to track activities and outcomes, and to facilitate reporting. Here we provide a basis for discussing recommendations for such a data infrastructure by developing a conceptual model that formalizes the Pathway concept underlying current implementations. Requirements for Data Architecture to Support the Pathways Community HUB Model: The main contribution is a set of core recommendations as a framework for developing and implementing a data architecture to support implementation of the Pathways Community HUB Model. The objective is to present a tool for communities interested in adopting the Model to learn from and to adapt in their own development and implementation efforts. Problems with Quality of Data Extracted from the CHAP Database: Experience with the Community Health Access Project (CHAP) data base system (the core implementation of the Model) has identified several issues and remedies that have been developed to address these issues. Based on analysis of issues and remedies, we present several key features for a data architecture meeting the just mentioned recommendations. Implementation of Features: Presentation of features is followed by a practical guide to their implementation

  12. Modeling development of natural multi-sensory integration using neural self-organisation and probabilistic population codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johannes; Dávila-Chacón, Jorge; Wermter, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Humans and other animals have been shown to perform near-optimally in multi-sensory integration tasks. Probabilistic population codes (PPCs) have been proposed as a mechanism by which optimal integration can be accomplished. Previous approaches have focussed on how neural networks might produce PPCs from sensory input or perform calculations using them, like combining multiple PPCs. Less attention has been given to the question of how the necessary organisation of neurons can arise and how the required knowledge about the input statistics can be learned. In this paper, we propose a model of learning multi-sensory integration based on an unsupervised learning algorithm in which an artificial neural network learns the noise characteristics of each of its sources of input. Our algorithm borrows from the self-organising map the ability to learn latent-variable models of the input and extends it to learning to produce a PPC approximating a probability density function over the latent variable behind its (noisy) input. The neurons in our network are only required to perform simple calculations and we make few assumptions about input noise properties and tuning functions. We report on a neurorobotic experiment in which we apply our algorithm to multi-sensory integration in a humanoid robot to demonstrate its effectiveness and compare it to human multi-sensory integration on the behavioural level. We also show in simulations that our algorithm performs near-optimally under certain plausible conditions, and that it reproduces important aspects of natural multi-sensory integration on the neural level.

  13. Using self-organising maps to explore ozone profile validation results - SCIAMACHY limb compared to ground-based lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gijsel, J. A. E.; Zurita-Milla, R.; Stammes, P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Leblanc, T.; Marchand, M.; McDermid, I. S.; Stebel, K.; Steinbrecht, W.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional validation of atmospheric profiles is based on the intercomparison of two or more data sets in predefined ranges or classes of a given observational characteristic such as latitude or solar zenith angle. In this study we trained a self-organising map (SOM) with a full time series of relative difference profiles of SCIAMACHY limb v5.02 and lidar ozone profiles from seven observation sites. Each individual observation characteristic was then mapped to the obtained SOM to investigate to which degree variation in this characteristic is explanatory for the variation seen in the SOM map. For the studied data sets, altitude-dependent relations for the global data set were found between the difference profiles and studied variables. From the lowest altitude studied (18 km) ascending, the most influencing factors were found to be longitude, followed by solar zenith angle and latitude, sensor age and again solar zenith angle together with the day of the year at the highest altitudes studied here (up to 45 km). After accounting for both latitude and longitude, residual partial correlations with a reduced magnitude are seen for various factors. However, (partial) correlations cannot point out which (combination) of the factors drives the observed differences between the ground-based and satellite ozone profiles as most of the factors are inter-related. Clustering into three classes showed that there are also some local dependencies, with for instance one cluster having a much stronger correlation with the sensor age (days since launch) between 36 and 42 km. The proposed SOM-based approach provides a powerful tool for the exploration of differences between data sets without being limited to a priori defined data subsets.

  14. Insights into environmental drivers of acoustic angular response using a self-organising map and hierarchical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, James; Siwabessy, Justy; Nichol, Scott; Brooke, Brendan

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic backscatter from the seafloor is a complex function of signal frequency, seabed roughness, grain size distribution, benthos, bioturbation, volume reverberation, and other factors. Angular response is the variation in acoustic backscatter with incident angle and is considered be an intrinsic property of the seabed. An unsupervised classification technique combining a self-organising map (SOM) and hierarchical clustering was used to create an angular response facies map and explore the relationships between acoustic facies and ground truth data. Cluster validation routines indicated that a two cluster solution was optimal and separated sediment dominated environments from mixtures of sediment and hard ground. Low cluster separation limited cluster validation routines from identifying fine cluster structure visible with an AR density plot. Cluster validation, aided by a visual comparison with an AR density plot, indicated that a 14 cluster solution was also a suitable representation of the input dataset. Clusters that were a mixture of hard and unconsolidated substrates displayed an increase in backscatter with an increase in the occurrence of hard ground and highlighted the sensitivity of AR curves to the presence of even modest amounts of hard ground. Remapping video observations and sediment data onto the SOM matrix is innovative and depicts the relationship between ground truth data and cluster structure. Mapping environmental variables onto the SOM matrix can show broad trends and localised peaks and troughs and display the variability of ground truth data within designated clusters. These variables, when linked to AR curves via clusters, can indicate how environmental factors influence the shape of the curves. Once these links are established they can be incorporated into improved geoacoustic models that replicate field observations.

  15. Knowledge base and sensor bus messaging service architecture for critical tsunami warning and decision-support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabeur, Z. A.; Wächter, J.; Middleton, S. E.; Zlatev, Z.; Häner, R.; Hammitzsch, M.; Loewe, P.

    2012-04-01

    The intelligent management of large volumes of environmental monitoring data for early tsunami warning requires the deployment of robust and scalable service oriented infrastructure that is supported by an agile knowledge-base for critical decision-support In the TRIDEC project (TRIDEC 2010-2013), a sensor observation service bus of the TRIDEC system is being developed for the advancement of complex tsunami event processing and management. Further, a dedicated TRIDEC system knowledge-base is being implemented to enable on-demand access to semantically rich OGC SWE compliant hydrodynamic observations and operationally oriented meta-information to multiple subscribers. TRIDEC decision support requires a scalable and agile real-time processing architecture which enables fast response to evolving subscribers requirements as the tsunami crisis develops. This is also achieved with the support of intelligent processing services which specialise in multi-level fusion methods with relevance feedback and deep learning. The TRIDEC knowledge base development work coupled with that of the generic sensor bus platform shall be presented to demonstrate advanced decision-support with situation awareness in context of tsunami early warning and crisis management.

  16. An attention-gating recurrent working memory architecture for emergent speech representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaw, Mark; Moore, Roger K.; Klein, Michael

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes an attention-gating recurrent self-organising map approach for emergent speech representation. Inspired by evidence from human cognitive processing, the architecture combines two main neural components. The first component, the attention-gating mechanism, uses actor-critic learning to perform selective attention towards speech. Through this selective attention approach, the attention-gating mechanism controls access to working memory processing. The second component, the recurrent self-organising map memory, develops a temporal-distributed representation of speech using phone-like structures. Representing speech in terms of phonetic features in an emergent self-organised fashion, according to research on child cognitive development, recreates the approach found in infants. Using this representational approach, in a fashion similar to infants, should improve the performance of automatic recognition systems through aiding speech segmentation and fast word learning.

  17. Building the Knowledge Base to Support the Automatic Animation Generation of Chinese Traditional Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gongjin; Bai, Weijing; Yin, Meifang; Zhang, Songmao

    We present a practice of applying the Semantic Web technologies in the domain of Chinese traditional architecture. A knowledge base consisting of one ontology and four rule bases is built to support the automatic generation of animations that demonstrate the construction of various Chinese timber structures based on the user's input. Different Semantic Web formalisms are used, e.g., OWL DL, SWRL and Jess, to capture the domain knowledge, including the wooden components needed for a given building, construction sequence, and the 3D size and position of every piece of wood. Our experience in exploiting the current Semantic Web technologies in real-world application systems indicates their prominent advantages (such as the reasoning facilities and modeling tools) as well as the limitations (such as low efficiency).

  18. A cost-effective WDM-PON architecture simultaneously supporting wired, wireless and optical VPN services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanzhi; Ye, Tong; Zhang, Liang; Hu, Xiaofeng; Li, Xinwan; Su, Yikai

    2011-03-01

    It is believed that next-generation passive optical networks (PONs) are required to provide flexible and various services to users in a cost-effective way. To address this issue, for the first time, this paper proposes and demonstrates a novel wavelength-division-multiplexed PON (WDM-PON) architecture to simultaneously support three types of services: 1) wireless access traffic, 2) optical virtual passive network (VPN) communications, and 3) conventional wired services. In the optical line terminal (OLT), we use two cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) on each wavelength channel to generate an optical carrier, and produce the wireless and the downstream traffic using the orthogonal modulation technique. In each optical network unit (ONU), the obtained optical carrier is modulated by a single MZM to provide the VPN and upstream communications. Consequently, the light sources in the ONUs are saved and the system cost is reduced. The feasibility of our proposal is experimentally and numerically verified.

  19. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System architecture - Centralized versus distributed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, A. M.; Behrend, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    Both Centralized and Distributed approaches are being evaluated for the installation of Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) equipment in the Space Station. In the Centralized facility concept, integrated processing equipment is located in two modules with plumbing used to circulate ECLS services throughout the Station. The Distributed approach locates the ECLS subsystems in every module of the Space Station with each subsystem designed to meet its own module needs. This paper defines the two approaches and how the advantages and disadvantages of each are tied to the choice of Space Station architecture. Other considerations and evaluations include: crew movement, Station evolution and the ducting impact needed to circulate ECLS services from centrally located processing equipment.

  20. An Internet of Things platform architecture for supporting ambient assisted living environments.

    PubMed

    Tsirmpas, Charalampos; Kouris, Ioannis; Anastasiou, Athanasios; Giokas, Kostas; Iliopoulou, Dimitra; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2016-11-18

    Internet of Things (IoT) is the logical further development of today's Internet, enabling a huge amount of devices to communicate, compute, sense and act. IoT sensors placed in Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environments, enable the context awareness and allow the support of the elderly in their daily routines, ultimately allowing an independent and safe lifestyle. The vast amount of data that are generated and exchanged between the IoT nodes require innovative context modeling approaches that go beyond currently used models. Current paper presents and evaluates an open interoperable platform architecture in order to utilize the technical characteristics of IoT and handle the large amount of generated data, as a solution to the technical requirements of AAL applications.

  1. Service oriented architecture to support real-time implementation of artifact detection in critical care monitoring.

    PubMed

    Nizami, Shermeen; Green, James Robert; McGregor, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The quality of automated real-time critical care monitoring is impacted by the degree of signal artifact present in clinical data. This is further complicated when different clinical rules applied for disease detection require source data at different frequencies and different signal quality. This paper proposes a novel multidimensional framework based on service oriented architecture to support real-time implementation of clinical artifact detection in critical care settings. The framework is instantiated through a Neonatal Intensive Care case study which assesses signal quality of physiological data streams prior to detection of late-onset neonatal sepsis. In this case study requirements and provisions of artifact and clinical event detection are determined for real-time clinical implementation, which forms the second important contribution of this paper.

  2. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  3. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  4. Requirements for Designing Life Support System Architectures for Crewed Exploration Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David; Perry,Jay; Sargusingh, Miriam; Toomarian, Nikzad

    2016-01-01

    NASA's technology development roadmaps provide guidance to focus technological development on areas that enable crewed exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Specifically, the technology area roadmap on human health, life support and habitation systems describes the need for life support system (LSS) technologies that can improve reliability and in-situ maintainability within a minimally-sized package while enabling a high degree of mission autonomy. To address the needs outlined by the guiding technology area roadmap, NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program has commissioned the Life Support Systems (LSS) Project to lead technology development in the areas of water recovery and management, atmosphere revitalization, and environmental monitoring. A notional exploration LSS architecture derived from the International Space has been developed and serves as the developmental basis for these efforts. Functional requirements and key performance parameters that guide the exploration LSS technology development efforts are presented and discussed. Areas where LSS flight operations aboard the ISS afford lessons learned that are relevant to exploration missions are highlighted.

  5. Systems modeling of space medical support architecture: topological mapping of high level characteristics and constraints.

    PubMed

    Musson, David M; Doyle, Thomas E; Saary, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The challenges associated with providing medical support to astronauts on long duration lunar or planetary missions are significant. Experience to date in space has included short duration missions to the lunar surface and both short and long duration stays on board spacecraft and space stations in low Earth orbit. Live actor, terrestrial analogue setting simulation provides a means of studying multiple aspects of the medical challenges of exploration class space missions, though few if any published models exist upon which to construct systems-simulation test beds. Current proposed and projected moon mission scenarios were analyzed from a systems perspective to construct such a model. A resulting topological mapping of high-level architecture for a reference lunar mission with presumed EVA excursion and international mission partners is presented. High-level descriptions of crew operational autonomy, medical support related to crew-member status, and communication characteristics within and between multiple teams are presented. It is hoped this modeling will help guide future efforts to simulate medical support operations for research purposes, such as in the use of live actor simulations in terrestrial analogue environments.

  6. NASA's Earth Science Gateway: A Platform for Interoperable Services in Support of the GEOSS Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameh, N.; Bambacus, M.; Cole, M.

    2006-12-01

    Nasa's Earth Science as well as interdisciplinary research and applications activities require access to earth observations, analytical models and specialized tools and services, from diverse distributed sources. Interoperability and open standards for geospatial data access and processing greatly facilitate such access among the information and processing compo¬nents related to space¬craft, airborne, and in situ sensors; predictive models; and decision support tools. To support this mission, NASA's Geosciences Interoperability Office (GIO) has been developing the Earth Science Gateway (ESG; online at http://esg.gsfc.nasa.gov) by adapting and deploying a standards-based commercial product. Thanks to extensive use of open standards, ESG can tap into a wide array of online data services, serve a variety of audiences and purposes, and adapt to technology and business changes. Most importantly, the use of open standards allow ESG to function as a platform within a larger context of distributed geoscience processing, such as the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). ESG shares the goals of GEOSS to ensure that observations and products shared by users will be accessible, comparable, and understandable by relying on common standards and adaptation to user needs. By maximizing interoperability, modularity, extensibility and scalability, ESG's architecture fully supports the stated goals of GEOSS. As such, ESG's role extends beyond that of a gateway to NASA science data to become a shared platform that can be leveraged by GEOSS via: A modular and extensible architecture Consensus and community-based standards (e.g. ISO and OGC standards) A variety of clients and visualization techniques, including WorldWind and Google Earth A variety of services (including catalogs) with standard interfaces Data integration and interoperability Mechanisms for user involvement and collaboration Mechanisms for supporting interdisciplinary and domain-specific applications ESG

  7. A Proto-Architecture for Innate Directionally Selective Visual Maps

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Samantha V.; Harris, Chris M.

    2014-01-01

    Self-organizing artificial neural networks are a popular tool for studying visual system development, in particular the cortical feature maps present in real systems that represent properties such as ocular dominance (OD), orientation-selectivity (OR) and direction selectivity (DS). They are also potentially useful in artificial systems, for example robotics, where the ability to extract and learn features from the environment in an unsupervised way is important. In this computational study we explore a DS map that is already latent in a simple artificial network. This latent selectivity arises purely from the cortical architecture without any explicit coding for DS and prior to any self-organising process facilitated by spontaneous activity or training. We find DS maps with local patchy regions that exhibit features similar to maps derived experimentally and from previous modeling studies. We explore the consequences of changes to the afferent and lateral connectivity to establish the key features of this proto-architecture that support DS. PMID:25054209

  8. Architectures and Evaluation for Adjustable Control Autonomy for Space-Based Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    In the past five years, a number of automation applications for control of crew life support systems have been developed and evaluated in the Adjustable Autonomy Testbed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This paper surveys progress on an adjustable autonomous control architecture for situations where software and human operators work together to manage anomalies and other system problems. When problems occur, the level of control autonomy can be adjusted, so that operators and software agents can work together on diagnosis and recovery. In 1997 adjustable autonomy software was developed to manage gas transfer and storage in a closed life support test. Four crewmembers lived and worked in a chamber for 91 days, with both air and water recycling. CO2 was converted to O2 by gas processing systems and wheat crops. With the automation software, significantly fewer hours were spent monitoring operations. System-level validation testing of the software by interactive hybrid simulation revealed problems both in software requirements and implementation. Since that time, we have been developing multi-agent approaches for automation software and human operators, to cooperatively control systems and manage problems. Each new capability has been tested and demonstrated in realistic dynamic anomaly scenarios, using the hybrid simulation tool.

  9. Staircase temperature profiles and plasma transport self-organisation in a minimum kinetic model of turbulence based on the trapped ion mode instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Drouot, T.; Estève, D.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Norscini, C.; Passeron, C.

    2014-11-01

    A minimum model of plasma turbulence in a kinetic framework is presented. It is based on trapped ion turbulence, gyro and bounce averaged, and implemented in the versatile and efficient code TERESA. Zonal flow - streamer interplay are readily shown to be key players that govern the confinement properties of the model. The parameter space of the model is explored with brute force numerics. A generic result is either a streamer dominated pattern with large transport, or a staircase temperature profile with very marked corrugations and quenched transport. A case with off-axis heating is found to exhibit quasiperiodic relaxation events relevant to investigate dynamical turbulence self-organisation.

  10. A Scalable, Out-of-Band Diagnostics Architecture for International Space Station Systems Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Daryl P.; Alena, Rick; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The computational infrastructure of the International Space Station (ISS) is a dynamic system that supports multiple vehicle subsystems such as Caution and Warning, Electrical Power Systems and Command and Data Handling (C&DH), as well as scientific payloads of varying size and complexity. The dynamic nature of the ISS configuration coupled with the increased demand for payload support places a significant burden on the inherently resource constrained computational infrastructure of the ISS. Onboard system diagnostics applications are hosted on computers that are elements of the avionics network while ground-based diagnostic applications receive only a subset of available telemetry, down-linked via S-band communications. In this paper we propose a scalable, out-of-band diagnostics architecture for ISS systems support that uses a read-only connection for C&DH data acquisition, which provides a lower cost of deployment and maintenance (versus a higher criticality readwrite connection). The diagnostics processing burden is off-loaded from the avionics network to elements of the on-board LAN that have a lower overall cost of operation and increased computational capacity. A superset of diagnostic data, richer in content than the configured telemetry, is made available to Advanced Diagnostic System (ADS) clients running on wireless handheld devices, affording the crew greater mobility for troubleshooting and providing improved insight into vehicle state. The superset of diagnostic data is made available to the ground in near real-time via an out-of band downlink, providing a high level of fidelity between vehicle state and test, training and operational facilities on the ground.

  11. Architectural Room Planning Support System using Methods of Generating Spatial Layout Plans and Evolutionary Multi-objective Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Makoto; Takagi, Hideyuki

    Firstly, we propose a spatial planning algorithm inspired by cellar automaton and spatial growth rules for spatial planning support, i.e. generating multiple subspaces and making their layouts. Their features are that there is less restrictions in the shapes, sizes, and positions of the generated subspaces and gap sizes among the subspaces are controllable. We also show the framework of our final spatial planning support system that consists of (1) a spatial layout generator including the mentioned algorithm and rules as main parts and a visualization part generating layout diagrams and (2) an optimization part which main components, i.e. evolutionary multi-objective optimization (EMO) and interactive evolutionary computation, optimize the generated spatial plans. Secondly, we make a concrete architectural room planning support system based on some parts of the said framework and confirm that the EMO makes the generated architectural room plans converge, experimentally. We confirm the performance of the system using two EMO's with four and six objectives, respectively. We also evaluate the effect of introducing a niche technique into the EMO to obtain the variety of architectural room plans. The experiments showed that the convergence of each objective over generations and variety of architectural room plans among individuals of higher scores. This experimental evaluation implies that the combination of our proposed spatial planning algorithms and spatial growth rules is applicable to spatial planning support systems.

  12. Enhancing Architecture-Implementation Conformance with Change Management and Support for Behavioral Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yongjie

    2012-01-01

    Software architecture plays an increasingly important role in complex software development. Its further application, however, is challenged by the fact that software architecture, over time, is often found not conformant to its implementation. This is usually caused by frequent development changes made to both artifacts. Against this background,…

  13. Enhancing Architecture-Implementation Conformance with Change Management and Support for Behavioral Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yongjie

    2012-01-01

    Software architecture plays an increasingly important role in complex software development. Its further application, however, is challenged by the fact that software architecture, over time, is often found not conformant to its implementation. This is usually caused by frequent development changes made to both artifacts. Against this background,…

  14. A system architecture for decision-making support on ISR missions with stochastic needs and profit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Nan; Pizzocaro, Diego; La Porta, Thomas; Preece, Alun

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a system architecture for decision-making support on ISR (i.e., Intelligence, Surveil­lance, Reconnaissance) missions via optimizing resource allocation. We model a mission as a graph of tasks, each of which often requires exclusive access to some resources. Our system guides users through refinement of their needs through an interactive interface. To maximize the chances of executing new missions, the system searches for pre-existent information collected on the field that best fit the needs. If this search fails, a set of new requests representing users' requirements is considered to maximize the overall benefit constrained by limited resources. If an ISR request cannot be satisfied, feedback is generated to help the commander further refine or adjust their information requests in order to still provide support to the mission. In our work, we model both demands for resources and the importance of the information retrieved realistically in that they are not fully known at the time a mission is submitted and may change overtime during execution. The amount of resources consumed by a mission may not be deterministic; e.g., a mission may last slightly longer or shorter than expected, or more of a resource may be required to complete a task. Furthermore, the benefits received from the mission, which we call profits, may also be non-deterministic; e.g., successfully localizing a vehicle might be more important than expected for accomplishing the entire operation. Therefore, when satisfying ISR requirements we take into account both constraints on the underlying resources and uncertainty of demands and profits.

  15. A Novel Reticular Dermal Graft Leverages Architectural and Biological Properties to Support Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Anouska; Orgill, Dennis; Galiano, Robert D.; Zelen, Charles M.; Huang, Yen-Chen; Chnari, Evangelia; Li, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) are frequently used in reconstructive surgery and as scaffolds to treat chronic wounds. The 3-dimensional architecture and extracellular matrix provide structural and signaling cues for repair and remodeling. However, most ADMs are not uniformly porous, which can lead to heterogeneous host engraftment. In this study, we hypothesized that a novel human reticular ADM (HR-ADM; AlloPatch Pliable, Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, Edison, N.J.) when aseptically processed would have a more open uniform structure with retention of biological components known to facilitate wound healing. Methods: The reticular and papillary layers were compared through histology and scanning electron microscopy. Biomechanical properties were assessed through tensile testing. The impact of aseptic processing was evaluated by comparing unprocessed with processed reticular grafts. In vitro cell culture on fibroblasts and endothelial cells were performed to showcase functional cell activities on HR-ADMs. Results: Aseptically processed HR-ADMs have an open, interconnected uniform scaffold with preserved collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, and hyaluronic acid. HR-ADMs had significantly lower ultimate tensile strength and Young’s modulus versus the papillary layer, with a higher percentage elongation at break, providing graft flexibility. These preserved biological components facilitated fibroblast and endothelial cell attachment, cell infiltration, and new matrix synthesis (collagen IV, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor), which support granulation and angiogenic activities. Conclusions: The novel HR-ADMs provide an open, interconnected scaffold with native dermal mechanical and biological properties. Furthermore, aseptic processing retains key extracellular matrix elements in an organized framework and supports functional activities of fibroblasts and endothelial cells. PMID:27826469

  16. Communication architecture for AAL. Supporting patient care by health care providers in AAL-enhanced living quarters.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, T; Thiele, S; Häber, A; Winter, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". Concepts of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) support a long-term health monitoring and further medical and other services for multi-morbid patients with chronic diseases. In Germany many AAL and telemedical applications exist. Synergy effects by common agreements for essential application components and standards are not achieved. It is necessary to define a communication architecture which is based on common definitions of communication scenarios, application components and communication standards. The development of a communication architecture requires different steps. To gain a reference model for the problem area different AAL and telemedicine projects were compared and relevant data elements were generalized. The derived reference model defines standardized communication links. As a result the authors present an approach towards a reference architecture for AAL-communication. The focus of the architecture lays on the communication layer. The necessary application components are identified and a communication based on standards and their extensions is highlighted. The exchange of patient individual events supported by an event classification model, raw and aggregated data from the personal home area over a telemedicine center to health care providers is possible.

  17. Architecture and Functionality of the Advanced Life Support On-Line Project Information System (OPIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, John A.; Levri, Julie A.; Morrow, Rich; Cavazzoni, Jim; Rodriquez, Luis F.; Riano, Rebecca; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2004-01-01

    An ongoing effort is underway at NASA Amcs Research Center (ARC) tu develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The objective of this three-year project is to develop, test, revise and deploy OPIS to enhance the quality of decision-making metrics and attainment of Program goals through improved knowledge sharing. OPIS will centrally locate detailed project information solicited from investigators on an annual basis and make it readily accessible by the ALS Community via a web-accessible interface. The data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQL(Trademark) located on a secure server at NASA ARC. OPE will simultaneously serve several functions, including being an R&TD status information hub that can potentially serve as the primary annual reporting mechanism. Using OPIS, ALS managers and element leads will be able to carry out informed research and technology development investment decisions, and allow analysts to perform accurate systems evaluations. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will serve to educate technology developers of programmatic needs. OPIS will collect comprehensive information from all ALS projects as well as highly detailed information specific to technology development in each ALS area (Waste, Water, Air, Biomass, Food, Thermal, and Control). Because the scope of needed information can vary dramatically between areas, element-specific technology information is being compiled with the aid of multiple specialized working groups. This paper presents the current development status in terms of the architecture and functionality of OPIS. Possible implementation approaches for OPIS are also discussed.

  18. Architecture and Functionality of the Advanced Life Support On-Line Project Information System (OPIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, John A.; Levri, Julie A.; Morrow, Rich; Cavazzoni, Jim; Rodriquez, Luis F.; Riano, Rebecca; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2004-01-01

    An ongoing effort is underway at NASA Amcs Research Center (ARC) tu develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The objective of this three-year project is to develop, test, revise and deploy OPIS to enhance the quality of decision-making metrics and attainment of Program goals through improved knowledge sharing. OPIS will centrally locate detailed project information solicited from investigators on an annual basis and make it readily accessible by the ALS Community via a web-accessible interface. The data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQL(Trademark) located on a secure server at NASA ARC. OPE will simultaneously serve several functions, including being an R&TD status information hub that can potentially serve as the primary annual reporting mechanism. Using OPIS, ALS managers and element leads will be able to carry out informed research and technology development investment decisions, and allow analysts to perform accurate systems evaluations. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will serve to educate technology developers of programmatic needs. OPIS will collect comprehensive information from all ALS projects as well as highly detailed information specific to technology development in each ALS area (Waste, Water, Air, Biomass, Food, Thermal, and Control). Because the scope of needed information can vary dramatically between areas, element-specific technology information is being compiled with the aid of multiple specialized working groups. This paper presents the current development status in terms of the architecture and functionality of OPIS. Possible implementation approaches for OPIS are also discussed.

  19. Architecture and Functionality of the Advanced Life Support On-Line Project Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, John A.; Levri, Julie A.; Morrow, Rich; Cavazzoni, Jim; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Riano, Rebecca; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2004-01-01

    An ongoing effort is underway at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) to develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The objective of this three-year project is to develop, test, revise and deploy OPIS to enhance the quality of decision-making metrics and attainment of Program goals through improved knowledge sharing. OPIS will centrally locate detailed project information solicited from investigators on an annual basis and make it readily accessible by the ALS Community via a Web-accessible interface. The data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQL) located on a secure server at NASA ARC. OPE will simultaneously serve several functions, including being an research and technology development (R&TD) status information hub that can potentially serve as the primary annual reporting mechanism for ALS-funded projects. Using OPIS, ALS managers and element leads will be able to carry out informed R&TD investment decisions, and allow analysts to perform accurate systems evaluations. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will serve to educate technology developers of programmatic needs. OPIS will collect comprehensive information from all ALS projects as well as highly detailed information specific to technology development in each ALS area (Waste, Water, Air, Biomass, Food, Thermal, Controls and Systems Analysis). Because the scope of needed information can vary dramatically between areas, element-specific technology information is being compiled with the aid of multiple specialized working groups. This paper presents the current development status in terms of the architecture and functionality of OPIS. Possible implementation approaches for OPIS are also discussed.

  20. Opening up Architectures of Software-Intensive Systems: A Functional Decomposition to Support System Comprehension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    as on a state-of-the- art survey on system architecture recovery and comprehension. Following the conception of this functional decomposition, a...consideration the findings contained in a state-of- the- art survey on system architecture recovery and comprehension that was carried out as a previous phase...constituantes. Synthèse Fournit la capacité de combiner plusieurs faits qui ont été extraits pour former un nouveau tout à un niveau d’abstraction

  1. Usalpharma: A Cloud-Based Architecture to Support Quality Assurance Training Processes in Health Area Using Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J.; Pérez-Blanco, Jonás Samuel; Martín-Suárez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how cloud-based architectures can extend and enhance the functionality of the training environments based on virtual worlds and how, from this cloud perspective, we can provide support to analysis of training processes in the area of health, specifically in the field of training processes in quality assurance for pharmaceutical laboratories, presenting a tool for data retrieval and analysis that allows facing the knowledge discovery in the happenings inside the virtual worlds. PMID:24778593

  2. Usalpharma: a cloud-based architecture to support quality assurance training processes in health area using virtual worlds.

    PubMed

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J; Cruz-Benito, Juan; Maderuelo, Cristina; Pérez-Blanco, Jonás Samuel; Martín-Suárez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how cloud-based architectures can extend and enhance the functionality of the training environments based on virtual worlds and how, from this cloud perspective, we can provide support to analysis of training processes in the area of health, specifically in the field of training processes in quality assurance for pharmaceutical laboratories, presenting a tool for data retrieval and analysis that allows facing the knowledge discovery in the happenings inside the virtual worlds.

  3. NOAA Observing System Integrated Analysis (NOSIA): development and support to the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reining, R. C.; Cantrell, L. E., Jr.; Helms, D.; LaJoie, M.; Pratt, A. S.; Ries, V.; Taylor, J.; Yuen-Murphy, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    There is a deep relationship between NOSIA-II and the Federal Earth Observation Assessment (EOA) efforts (EOA 2012 and 2016) chartered under the National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability, co-chaired by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, NASA, NOAA, and USGS. NOSIA-1, which was conducted with a limited scope internal to NOAA in 2010, developed the methodology and toolset that was adopted for EOA 2012, and NOAA staffed the team that conducted the data collection, modeling, and analysis effort for EOA 2012. EOA 2012 was the first-ever integrated analysis of the relative impact of 379 observing systems and data sources contributing to the key objectives identified for 13 Societal Benefit Areas (SBA) including Weather, Climate, Disasters, Oceans and Coastal Resources, and Water Resources. This effort culminated in the first National Plan for Civil Earth Observations. NOAA conducted NOSIA-II starting in 2012 to extend the NOSIA methodology across all of NOAA's Mission Service Areas, covering a representative sample (over 1000) of NOAA's products and services. The detailed information from NOSIA-II is being integrated into EOA 2016 to underpin a broad array of Key Products, Services, and (science) Objectives (KPSO) identified by the inter-agency SBA teams. EOA 2016 is expected to provide substantially greater insight into the cross-agency impacts of observing systems contributing to a wide array of KPSOs, and by extension, to societal benefits flowing from these public-facing products. NOSIA-II is being adopted by NOAA as a corporate decision-analysis and support capability to inform leadership decisions on its integrated observing systems portfolio. Application examples include assessing the agency-wide impacts of planned decommissioning of ships and aircraft in NOAA's fleet, and the relative cost-effectiveness of alternative space-based architectures in the post-GOES-R and JPSS era

  4. Architecture of an E-Learning System with Embedded Authoring Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudry, Andreas; Bungenstock, Michael; Mertsching, Barbel

    This paper introduces an architecture for an e-learning system with an embedded authoring system. Based on the metaphor of a construction kit, this approach offers a general solution for specific content creation and publication. The learning resources are IMS "Content Packages" with a special structure to separate content and presentation. These…

  5. Cloud Computing Solutions for the Marine Corps: An Architecture to Support Expeditionary Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    computing architecture will need to possess firewalls and an updated anti- virus program that can automatically detect, isolate, and/or destroy viruses ...uscn to efficicntl y occeoo ~ teri ~ readineao i nformation required to etrectlvely .anagt thtir unit’G s upply ond ~a1ntenancc reAdiness posture

  6. The Use of Supporting Documentation for Information Architecture by Australian Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hider, Philip; Burford, Sally; Ferguson, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of an online survey that examined the development of information architecture of Australian library Web sites with reference to documented methods and guidelines. A broad sample of library Web managers responded from across the academic, public, and special sectors. A majority of libraries used either in-house or…

  7. The Use of Supporting Documentation for Information Architecture by Australian Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hider, Philip; Burford, Sally; Ferguson, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of an online survey that examined the development of information architecture of Australian library Web sites with reference to documented methods and guidelines. A broad sample of library Web managers responded from across the academic, public, and special sectors. A majority of libraries used either in-house or…

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spatial self-organisation of a defect generation wave and laser-induced formation of ordered and crystallographic-oriented regions of optical damage in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, Vladimir I.; Rogacheva, Aleksandra V.

    2004-06-01

    The spatial self-organisation of a defect generation wave (DGW) in laser-excited crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics is considered. It is shown that due to the elastic crystal anisotropy, for a Gaussian intensity distribution of exciting laser radiation, the DGW is focused along the crystallographic axes, resulting in the production of optical damage 'stars'.

  9. Hierarchical network architectures of carbon fiber paper supported cobalt oxide nanonet for high-capacity pseudocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Shuang; Ding, Yong; Zhu, Xingbao; Wang, Zhong Lin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-01-11

    We present a high-capacity pseudocapacitor based on a hierarchical network architecture consisting of Co(3)O(4) nanowire network (nanonet) coated on a carbon fiber paper. With this tailored architecture, the electrode shows ideal capacitive behavior (rectangular shape of cyclic voltammograms) and large specific capacitance (1124 F/g) at high charge/discharge rate (25.34 A/g), still retaining ~94% of the capacitance at a much lower rate of 0.25 A/g. The much-improved capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability may be attributed to the unique hierarchical network structures, which improves electron/ion transport, enhances the kinetics of redox reactions, and facilitates facile stress relaxation during cycling.

  10. The Architecture of Support: The Activation of Pre-existing Ties and Formation of New Ties for Tailored Support

    PubMed Central

    LaValley, Susan; Panagakis, Christina; Shelton, Rachel C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines differences in the resources, information, and support parents coping with pediatric cancer accessed from different types of network contacts. Using interviews with parents of childhood cancer patients (N = 80 parents), we examine (1) if parents rely on different types of network ties to access tailored information, resources or support; (2) differences in the nature or utility of information, resources, and support offered by different types of network contacts; and (3) the role of health-related professionals in brokering new network ties. Findings show that after a child’s cancer diagnosis, parents received support from a broad portfolio of network members, which included preexisting network ties to friends and families as well as the formation of new ties to other cancer families and health-related professionals. Family, friends, and neighbors offered logistical support that aided balancing preexisting work and household responsibilities with new obligations. Parents formed new ties to other families coping with cancer for tailored health-related emotional and informational support. Health-related professionals served as network brokers, who fostered the development of new network ties and connected parents with supportive resources. PMID:25888807

  11. Architecture and design to support rapid prototyping and multiple dynamic models for the Virtual SpacePlane project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.; Rothermel, Scott A.; Johnson, Troy D.

    1998-08-01

    The advent of requirements for rapid and economical deployment of national space assets in support of Air Force operational missions has resulted in the need for a Manned SpacePlane (MSP) that can perform military missions with minimal preflight preparation and little if any in-orbit support from a mission control center. In this new approach to space operations, successful mission accomplishment will depend almost completely upon the MSP crew and upon the on- board capabilities of the spaceplane. In recognition of the challenges that will be faced by the MSP crew and to begin to address these challenges, the USAF Air Force Research Laboratory (Phillips Laboratory) initiated the Virtual SpacePlane (VSP) project. To support the MSP, the VSP must demonstrate a broad, functional subset of the anticipated missions and capabilities of the MSP throughout its entire flight regime, from takeoff through space operations and on through landing. Additionally, the VSP must execute the anticipated MSP missions in a realistic and tactically sound manner within a distributed virtual environment. Furthermore, the VSP project must also uncover, refine and validate MSP user interface requirements, design and demonstrate an intelligent user interface for the VSP, and design and implement a prototype VSP that can be used to demonstrate Manned SpacePlane missions. To enable us to make rapid progress on the project, we employed portions of the Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler distributed virtual environment applications, and the Common Object Database (CODB) architecture tools developed in our labs. The Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler supplied baseline interface components and tools, 3D graphical models, vehicle motion dynamics models, and VE communication capabilities. We use the CODB architecture to facilitate our use of Rapid Evolutionary and Exploratory Prototyping to uncover application requirements and evaluate solutions. The Information Pod provides the paradigm

  12. Architectural design of a data warehouse to support operational and analytical queries across disparate clinical databases.

    PubMed

    Chelico, John D; Wilcox, Adam; Wajngurt, David

    2007-10-11

    As the clinical data warehouse of the New York Presbyterian Hospital has evolved innovative methods of integrating new data sources and providing more effective and efficient data reporting and analysis need to be explored. We designed and implemented a new clinical data warehouse architecture to handle the integration of disparate clinical databases in the institution. By examining the way downstream systems are populated and streamlining the way data is stored we create a virtual clinical data warehouse that is adaptable to future needs of the organization.

  13. High rate information systems - Architectural trends in support of the interdisciplinary investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas H., Jr.; Preheim, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    Data systems requirements in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Space Station Freedom (SSF) eras indicate increasing data volume, increased discipline interplay, higher complexity and broader data integration and interpretation. A response to the needs of the interdisciplinary investigator is proposed, considering the increasing complexity and rising costs of scientific investigation. The EOS Data Information System, conceived to be a widely distributed system with reliable communication links between central processing and the science user community, is described. Details are provided on information architecture, system models, intelligent data management of large complex databases, and standards for archiving ancillary data, using a research library, a laboratory and collaboration services.

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns of bank failure during extreme flood events: Evidence of nonlinearity and self-organised criticality at the basin scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. J.; Croke, J. C.; Grove, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Non-linearity in physical systems provides a conceptual framework to explain complex patterns and form that are derived from complex internal dynamics rather than external forcings, and can be used to inform modeling and improve landscape management. One process that has been investigated previously to explore the existence of self-organised critical system (SOC) in river systems at the basin-scale is bank failure. Spatial trends in bank failure have been previously quantified to determine if the distribution of bank failures at the basin scale exhibit the necessary power law magnitude/frequency distributions. More commonly bank failures are investigated at a small-scale using several cross-sections with strong emphasis on local-scale factors such as bank height, cohesion and hydraulic properties. Advancing our understanding of non-linearity in such processes, however, requires many more studies where both the spatial and temporal measurements of the process can be used to investigate the existence or otherwise of non-linearity and self-organised criticality. This study presents measurements of bank failure throughout the Lockyer catchment in southeast Queensland, Australia, which experienced an extreme flood event in January 2011 resulting in the loss of human lives and geomorphic channel change. The most dominant form of fluvial adjustment consisted of changes in channel geometry and notably widespread bank failures, which were readily identifiable as 'scalloped' shaped failure scarps. The spatial extents of these were mapped using high-resolution LiDAR derived digital elevation model and were verified by field surveys and air photos. Pre-flood event LiDAR coverage for the catchment also existed allowing direct comparison of the magnitude and frequency of bank failures from both pre and post-flood time periods. Data were collected and analysed within a GIS framework and investigated for power-law relationships. Bank failures appeared random and occurred

  15. Design of a decentralized reusable research database architecture to support data acquisition in large research projects.

    PubMed

    Iavindrasana, Jimison; Depeursinge, Adrien; Ruch, Patrick; Spahni, Stéphane; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Müller, Henning

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic processes, as well as the development of new treatments, are hindered by the fragmentation of information which underlies them. In a multi-institutional research study database, the clinical information system (CIS) contains the primary data input. An important part of the money of large scale clinical studies is often paid for data creation and maintenance. The objective of this work is to design a decentralized, scalable, reusable database architecture with lower maintenance costs for managing and integrating distributed heterogeneous data required as basis for a large-scale research project. Technical and legal aspects are taken into account based on various use case scenarios. The architecture contains 4 layers: data storage and access are decentralized at their production source, a connector as a proxy between the CIS and the external world, an information mediator as a data access point and the client side. The proposed design will be implemented inside six clinical centers participating in the @neurIST project as part of a larger system on data integration and reuse for aneurism treatment.

  16. Human Airway Primary Epithelial Cells Show Distinct Architectures on Membrane Supports Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-06-01

    To facilitate drug development for lung delivery, it is highly demanding to establish appropriate airway epithelial cell models as transport barriers to evaluate pharmacokinetic profiles of drug molecules. Besides the cancer-derived cell lines, as the primary cell model, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells have been used for drug screenings because of physiological relevance to in vivo. Therefore, to accurately interpret drug transport data in NHBE measured by different laboratories, it is important to know biophysical characteristics of NHBE grown on membranes in different culture conditions. In this study, NHBE was grown on the polyester membrane in a different medium and its transport barrier properties as well as cell architectures were fully characterized by functional assays and confocal imaging throughout the days of cultures. Moreover, NHBE cells on inserts in a different medium were subject to either of air-interfaced culture (AIC) or liquid-covered culture (LCC) condition. Cells in the AIC condition were cultivated on the membrane with medium in the basolateral side only, whereas cells with medium in apical and basolateral sides under the LCC condition. Quantitative microscopic imaging with biophysical examination revealed distinct multilayered architectures of differentiated NHBE cells, suggesting NHBE as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeting drug transport.

  17. Towards an open geospatial service architecture supporting heterogeneous Earth observation missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usländer, Thomas; Marchetti, Pier Giorgio; Coene, Yves

    2011-11-01

    Heterogeneous Earth Observation missions pose the problem that each of them offers its own way and technology of how to search for and access to mission results such as Earth observation datasets. Typically, these tasks are provided by ground segment software services which may be called through corresponding interfaces by client geospatial software applications. This paper presents the design and the architecture of the Heterogeneous Mission Accessibility (HMA) which is an interoperability initiative of the European/Canadian Ground Segment Coordination Body. The final objective of HMA is to leverage the idea of a service-oriented architectural style. This means, that the individual ground segment systems shall be loosely-coupled by means of an HMA Service Network. The paper is an excerpt of the comprehensive "HMA cookbook" to be published soon by the European Space Agency (ESA). It describes the HMA approach for user authentication and authorization based upon standard Web services and the discovery of, the access to and the presentation of datasets by means of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. It is outlined how the feasibility analysis of sensor observation tasks and the ordering of products may be expressed by the service and information models of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement initiative. The paper concludes with a discussion about the follow-on research topic of service-oriented design of Earth observation applications.

  18. Development of Groundwater Modeling Support System Based on Service-Oriented Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, Y.; Tsai, J. P.; Hsiao, C. T.; Chang, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater simulation has become an essential step on the groundwater resources management and assessment. There are many stand-alone pre and post processing software packages to alleviate the model simulation loading, but the stand-alone software do not consider centralized management of data and simulation results neither do they provide network sharing function. The model buildings are still implemented independently case to case when using these packages. Hence, it is difficult to share and reuse the data and knowledge (simulation cases) systematically within or across companies. Therefore, this study develops a centralized and network based groundwater model developing system to assist model simulation. The system is based on service-oriented architecture and allows remote user to develop their modeling cases on internet. The data and cases (knowledge) are thus easy to manage centralized. MODFLOW is the modeling engine of the system, which is the most popular groundwater model in the world. Other functions include the database management and variety of model developing assisted web services including auto digitalizing of geology profile map、groundwater missing data recovery assisting、graphic data demonstration and auto generation of MODFLOW input files from database that is the most important function of the system. Since the system architecture is service-oriented, it is scalable and flexible. The system can be easily extended to include the scenarios analysis and knowledge management to facilitate the reuse of groundwater modeling knowledge.

  19. ELPIDA: a general architecture for medical imaging systems supporting telemedicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lymberopoulos, Dimitris C.; Spiropoulos, Kostas V.; Anastassopoulos, George C.; Kotsopoulos, Stavros A.; Solomou, Katerina G.

    1995-01-01

    During the next years, profound changes are expected in computer and communication technologies that will offer the medical imaging systems (MIS) industry a challenge to develop advanced telemedicine applications of high performance. Medical industry, vendors, and specialists need to agree on a universal MIS structure that will provide a stack of functions, protocols, and interfaces suitable for coordination and management of high-level image consults, reports, and review activities. Doctors and engineers have worked together to determine the types, targets, and range of such activities within a medical group working domain and to posit their impact on MIS structure. As a result, the fundamental MIS functions have been posed and organized in the form of a general MIS architecture, denoted as ELPIDA. The structure of this architecture was kept as simple as possible to allow its extension to diverse multimode operational schemes handling medical and conversational audiovisual information of different classes. The fundamentals of ELPIDA and pulmonary image diagnostic aspects have been employed for the development of a prototype MIS.

  20. Self-assemble ZnMn2O4 hierarchical hollow microspheres into self-supporting architecture for enhanced biosensing performance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Cai, Bin; Ma, Ye; Cai, Hi; Huang, Jingyun; Pan, Xinhua; He, Haiping; Ye, Zhizhen

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrate a facile and scalable approach to fabricate and self-assemble the hierarchical hollow microspheres into self-supporting architecture by naturally grown branches. The supporting branches can afford integrated transport channels and significantly improve the kinetic performance and mechanical stability. Meanwhile, the supported hierarchical microspheres acting as functional cell can provide high active sites, multiple response and suitable environment for immobilizing biomolecules. Different enzymes are immobilized for biosensors. The experiments demonstrate that the effective assembly of hierarchical microspheres into large size ordered architecture by self-supporting branches can significantly enhance the biosensing performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Using a service oriented architecture approach to clinical decision support: performance results from two CDS Consortium demonstrations.

    PubMed

    Paterno, Marilyn D; Goldberg, Howard S; Simonaitis, Linas; Dixon, Brian E; Wright, Adam; Rocha, Beatriz H; Ramelson, Harley Z; Middleton, Blackford

    2012-01-01

    The Clinical Decision Support Consortium has completed two demonstration trials involving a web service for the execution of clinical decision support (CDS) rules in one or more electronic health record (EHR) systems. The initial trial ran in a local EHR at Partners HealthCare. A second EHR site, associated with Wishard Memorial Hospital, Indianapolis, IN, was added in the second trial. Data were gathered during each 6 month period and analyzed to assess performance, reliability, and response time in the form of means and standard deviations for all technical components of the service, including assembling and preparation of input data. The mean service call time for each period was just over 2 seconds. In this paper we report on the findings and analysis to date while describing the areas for further analysis and optimization as we continue to expand our use of a Services Oriented Architecture approach for CDS across multiple institutions.

  2. Novel architectured metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells with Mo-doped SrFeO3-δ electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yucun; Meng, Xie; Liu, Xuejiao; Pan, Xin; Li, Junliang; Ye, Xiaofeng; Nie, Huaiwen; Xia, Changrong; Wang, Shaorong; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2014-12-01

    Barriers to technological advancement of metal-supported SOFCs include nickel coarsening in the anode, metallic interdiffusion between the anode and the metal substrate, as well as poor cathode adhesion. Here we report a robust and novel architectured metal-supported SOFC that consists of a thin dense yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layer sandwiched between a porous 430L stainless steel substrate and a porous YSZ thin layer. The key feature is simultaneous use of impregnated nano-scale SrFe0.75Mo0.25O3-δ coatings on the internal surfaces of the porous 430L and YSZ backbones respectively as the anode and cathode catalyst. Such a fuel cell exhibits power densities of 0.74 W cm-2 at 800 °C and 0.40 W cm-2 at 700 °C when operating on hydrogen fuels and air oxidants.

  3. Challenges with Deploying and Integrating Environmental Control and Life Support Functions in a Lunar Architecture with High Degrees of Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Visions of lunar outposts often depict a collection of fixed elements such as pressurized habitats, in and around which human inhabitants spend the large majority of their surface stay time. In such an outpost, an efficient deployment of environmental control and life support equipment can be achieved by centralizing certain functions within one or a minimum number of habitable elements and relying on the exchange of gases and liquids between elements via atmosphere ventilation and plumbed interfaces. However, a rigidly fixed outpost can constrain the degree to which the total lunar landscape can be explored. The capability to enable widespread access across the landscape makes a lunar architecture with a high degree of surface mobility attractive. Such mobility presents unique challenges to the efficient deployment of environmental control and life support functions in multiple elements that may for long periods of time be operated independently. This paper describes some of those anticipated challenges.

  4. Clinical Document Architecture integration system to support patient referral and reply letters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hyun; Song, Joon Hyun; Kim, Il Kon; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2016-06-01

    Many Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) referrals and reply documents have been accumulated for patients since the deployment of the Health Information Exchange System (HIES) in Korea. Clinical data were scattered in many CDA documents and this took too much time for physicians to read. Physicians in Korea spend only limited time per patient as insurances in Korea follow a fee-for-service model. Therefore, physicians were not allowed sufficient time for making medical decisions, and follow-up care service was hindered. To address this, we developed CDA Integration Template (CIT) and CDA Integration System (CIS) for the HIES. The clinical items included in CIT were defined reflecting the Korean Standard for CDA Referral and Reply Letters and requests by physicians. CIS integrates CDA documents of a specified patient into a single CDA document following the format of CIT. Finally, physicians were surveyed after CIT/CIS adoption, and they indicated overall satisfaction.

  5. PNNI routing support for ad hoc mobile networking: A flat architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-12-01

    This contribution extends the Outside Nodal Hierarchy List (ONHL) procedures described in ATM Form Contribution 97-0766. These extensions allow multiple mobile networks to form either an ad hoc network or an extension of a fixed PNNI infrastructure. This contribution covers the simplest case where the top-most Logical Group Nodes (LGNs), in those mobile networks, all reside at the same level in a PNNI hierarchy. Future contributions will cover the general case where those top-most LGNs reside at different hierarchy levels. This contribution considers a flat ad hoc network architecture--in the sense that each mobile network always participates in the PNNI hierarchy at the preconfigured level of its top-most LGN.

  6. Three-wave interactions of surface defect-deformation waves and their manifestations in the self-organisation of nano- and microstructures in solids exposed to laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Emel'yanov, Vladimir I; Seval'nev, D M

    2009-07-31

    The self-organisation of the surface-relief nanostructures in solids under the action of energy and particle fluxes is interpreted as the instability of defect-deformation (DD) gratings produced by quasi-static Lamb and Rayleigh waves and defect-concentration waves. The allowance for the nonlocality in the defects-lattice atom interaction with a simultaneous account for both (normal and longitudinal) defect-induced forces bending the surface layer leads to the appearance of two maxima in the dependence of the instability growth rate of DD waves on the wave number. Three-wave interactions of quasi-static coupled DD waves (second harmonic generation and wave vector mixing) are considered for the first time, which are similar to three-wave interactions in nonlinear optics and acoustics and lead to the enrichment of the spectrum of surface-relief harmonics. Computer processing of experimental data on laser-induced generation of micro- and nanostructures of the surface relief reveals the presence of effects responsible for the second harmonic generation and wave vector mixing. (special issue devoted to the 80th birthday of S.A. Akhmanov)

  7. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Galiana, B.; Lorenz, K.; Palomares, FJ; Bahena, D.; Ballesteros, C.; Hernandez-Calderón, I.; Vázquez, L.

    2016-11-01

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe+ ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  8. Functional annotation of the mesophilic-like character of mutants in a cold-adapted enzyme by self-organising map analysis of their molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Tiberti, Matteo; Pandini, Alessandro; Bonati, Laura; Papaleo, Elena

    2012-10-01

    Multiple comparison of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) trajectories of mutants in a cold-adapted α-amylase (AHA) could be used to elucidate functional features required to restore mesophilic-like activity. Unfortunately it is challenging to identify the different dynamic behaviors and correctly relate them to functional activity by routine analysis. We here employed a previously developed and robust two-stage approach that combines Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) and hierarchical clustering to compare conformational ensembles of proteins. Moreover, we designed a novel strategy to identify the specific mutations that more efficiently convert the dynamic signature of the psychrophilic enzyme (AHA) to that of the mesophilic counterpart (PPA). The SOM trained on AHA and its variants was used to classify a PPA MD ensemble and successfully highlighted the relationships between the flexibilities of the target enzyme and of the different mutants. Moreover the local features of the mutants that mostly influence their global flexibility in a mesophilic-like direction were detected. It turns out that mutations of the cold-adapted enzyme to hydrophobic and aromatic residues are the most effective in restoring the PPA dynamic features and could guide the design of more mesophilic-like mutants. In conclusion, our strategy can efficiently extract specific dynamic signatures related to function from multiple comparisons of MD conformational ensembles. Therefore, it can be a promising tool for protein engineering.

  9. Horizontally Transferred Genetic Elements in the Tsetse Fly Genome: An Alignment-Free Clustering Approach Using Batch Learning Self-Organising Map (BLSOM).

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryo; Abe, Takashi; Funayama, Shunsuke; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) are the primary vectors of trypanosomes, which can cause human and animal African trypanosomiasis in Sub-Saharan African countries. The objective of this study was to explore the genome of Glossina morsitans morsitans for evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from microorganisms. We employed an alignment-free clustering method, that is, batch learning self-organising map (BLSOM), in which sequence fragments are clustered based on the similarity of oligonucleotide frequencies independently of sequence homology. After an initial scan of HGT events using BLSOM, we identified 3.8% of the tsetse fly genome as HGT candidates. The predicted donors of these HGT candidates included known symbionts, such as Wolbachia, as well as bacteria that have not previously been associated with the tsetse fly. We detected HGT candidates from diverse bacteria such as Bacillus and Flavobacteria, suggesting a past association between these taxa. Functional annotation revealed that the HGT candidates encoded loci in various functional pathways, such as metabolic and antibiotic biosynthesis pathways. These findings provide a basis for understanding the coevolutionary history of the tsetse fly and its microbes and establish the effectiveness of BLSOM for the detection of HGT events.

  10. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cubero, A; Galiana, B; Lorenz, K; Palomares, F J; Bahena, D; Ballesteros, C; Hernandez-Calderón, I; Vázquez, L

    2016-11-04

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe(+) ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  11. Horizontally Transferred Genetic Elements in the Tsetse Fly Genome: An Alignment-Free Clustering Approach Using Batch Learning Self-Organising Map (BLSOM)

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryo; Funayama, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) are the primary vectors of trypanosomes, which can cause human and animal African trypanosomiasis in Sub-Saharan African countries. The objective of this study was to explore the genome of Glossina morsitans morsitans for evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from microorganisms. We employed an alignment-free clustering method, that is, batch learning self-organising map (BLSOM), in which sequence fragments are clustered based on the similarity of oligonucleotide frequencies independently of sequence homology. After an initial scan of HGT events using BLSOM, we identified 3.8% of the tsetse fly genome as HGT candidates. The predicted donors of these HGT candidates included known symbionts, such as Wolbachia, as well as bacteria that have not previously been associated with the tsetse fly. We detected HGT candidates from diverse bacteria such as Bacillus and Flavobacteria, suggesting a past association between these taxa. Functional annotation revealed that the HGT candidates encoded loci in various functional pathways, such as metabolic and antibiotic biosynthesis pathways. These findings provide a basis for understanding the coevolutionary history of the tsetse fly and its microbes and establish the effectiveness of BLSOM for the detection of HGT events. PMID:28074180

  12. DoD Business Mission Area Service-Oriented Architecture to Support Business Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Notation ( BPMN ). The research also found strong support across vendors for the Business Process Execution Language standard, though there is also...emerging support for direct execution of BPMN through the use of the XML Process Definition Language, an XML serialization of BPMN . Many vendors also

  13. Thioflavin T-Silent Denaturation Intermediates Support the Main-Chain-Dominated Architecture of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Noda, Sayaka; So, Masatomo; Adachi, Masayuki; Kardos, József; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yuji

    2016-07-19

    Ultrasonication is considered one of the most effective agitations for inducing the spontaneous formation of amyloid fibrils. When we induced the ultrasonication-dependent fibrillation of β2-microglobulin and insulin monitored by amyloid-specific thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, both proteins showed a significant decrease in ThT fluorescence after the burst-phase increase. The decrease in ThT fluorescence was accelerated when the ultrasonic power was stronger, suggesting that this decrease was caused by the partial denaturation of preformed fibrils. The possible intermediates of denaturation retained amyloid-like morphologies, secondary structures, and seeding potentials. Similar denaturation intermediates were also observed when fibrils were denatured by guanidine hydrochloride or sodium dodecyl sulfate. The presence of these denaturation intermediates is consistent with the main-chain-dominated architecture of amyloid fibrils. Moreover, in the three types of denaturation experiments conducted, insulin fibrils were more stable than β2-microglobulin fibrils, suggesting that the relative stability of various fibrils is independent of the method of denaturation.

  14. Molecular architecture of myelinated peripheral nerves is supported by calorie restriction with aging.

    PubMed

    Rangaraju, Sunitha; Hankins, David; Madorsky, Irina; Madorsky, Evgenia; Lee, Wei-Hua; Carter, Christy S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-04-01

    Peripheral nerves from aged animals exhibit features of degeneration, including marked fiber loss, morphological irregularities in myelinated axons and notable reduction in the expression of myelin proteins. To investigate how protein homeostatic mechanisms change with age within the peripheral nervous system, we isolated Schwann cells from the sciatic nerves of young and old rats. The responsiveness of cells from aged nerves to stress stimuli is weakened, which in part may account for the observed age-associated alterations in glial and axonal proteins in vivo. Although calorie restriction is known to slow the aging process in the central nervous system, its influence on peripheral nerves has not been investigated in detail. To determine if dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve health and glial function, we studied sciatic nerves from rats of four distinct ages (8, 18, 29 and 38 months) kept on an ad libitum (AL) or a 40% calorie restricted diet. Age-associated reduction in the expression of the major myelin proteins and widening of the nodes of Ranvier are attenuated by the dietary intervention, which is paralleled with the maintenance of a differentiated Schwann cell phenotype. The improvements in nerve architecture with diet restriction, in part, are underlined by sustained expression of protein chaperones and markers of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Together, the in vitro and in vivo results suggest that there might be an age-limit by which dietary intervention needs to be initiated to elicit a beneficial response on peripheral nerve health.

  15. An Open Architecture to Support Social and Health Services in a Smart TV Environment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carlos Rivas; Anido-Rifon, Luis E; Fernandez-Iglesias, Manuel J

    2017-03-01

    To design, implement, and test a solution to provide social and health services for the elderly at home based on smart TV technologies and access to all services. The architecture proposed is based on an open software platform and standard personal computing hardware. This provides great flexibility to develop new applications over the underlying infrastructure or to integrate new devices, for instance to monitor a broad range of vital signs in those cases where home monitoring is required. An actual system as a proof-of-concept was designed, implemented, and deployed. Applications range from social network clients to vital signs monitoring; from interactive TV contests to conventional online care applications such as medication reminders or telemedicine. In both cases, the results have been very positive, confirming the initial perception of the TV as a convenient, easy-to-use technology to provide social and health care. The TV set is a much more familiar computing interface for most senior users, and as a consequence, smart TVs become a most convenient solution for the design and implementation of applications and services targeted to this user group. This proposal has been tested in real setting with 62 senior people at their homes. Users included both individuals with experience using computers and others reluctant to them.

  16. Agent-based modeling supporting the migration of registry systems to grid based architectures.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Martin E; Frey, Lewis

    2009-03-01

    With the increasing age and cost of operation of the existing NCI SEER platform core technologies, such essential resources in the fight against cancer as these will eventually have to be migrated to Grid based systems. In order to model this migration, a simulation is proposed based upon an agent modeling technology. This modeling technique allows for simulation of complex and distributed services provided by a large scale Grid computing platform such as the caBIG(™) project's caGRID. In order to investigate such a migration to a Grid based platform technology, this paper proposes using agent-based modeling simulations to predict the performance of current and Grid configurations of the NCI SEER system integrated with the existing translational opportunities afforded by caGRID. The model illustrates how the use of Grid technology can potentially improve system response time as systems under test are scaled. In modeling SEER nodes accessing multiple registry silos, we show that the performance of SEER applications re-implemented in a Grid native manner exhibits a nearly constant user response time with increasing numbers of distributed registry silos, compared with the current application architecture which exhibits a linear increase in response time for increasing numbers of silos.

  17. Does Supporting Multiple Student Strategies Lead to Greater Learning and Motivation? Investigating a Source of Complexity in the Architecture of Intelligent Tutoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waalkens, Maaike; Aleven, Vincent; Taatgen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) support students in learning a complex problem-solving skill. One feature that makes an ITS architecturally complex, and hard to build, is support for strategy freedom, that is, the ability to let students pursue multiple solution strategies within a given problem. But does greater freedom mean that students…

  18. Architectural proteins Pita, Zw5,and ZIPIC contain homodimerization domain and support specific long-range interactions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, Nikolay; Fedotova, Anna; Kyrchanova, Olga; Bonchuk, Artem; Penin, Aleksey A; Lando, Andrey S; Eliseeva, Irina A; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Maksimenko, Oksana; Georgiev, Pavel

    2016-09-06

    According to recent models, as yet poorly studied architectural proteins appear to be required for local regulation of enhancer-promoter interactions, as well as for global chromosome organization. Transcription factors ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 belong to the class of chromatin insulator proteins and preferentially bind to promoters near the TSS and extensively colocalize with cohesin and condensin complexes. ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 are structurally similar in containing the N-terminal zinc finger-associated domain (ZAD) and different numbers of C2H2-type zinc fingers at the C-terminus. Here we have shown that the ZAD domains of ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 form homodimers. In Drosophila transgenic lines, these proteins are able to support long-distance interaction between GAL4 activator and the reporter gene promoter. However, no functional interaction between binding sites for different proteins has been revealed, suggesting that such interactions are highly specific. ZIPIC facilitates long-distance stimulation of the reporter gene by GAL4 activator in yeast model system. Many of the genomic binding sites of ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 are located at the boundaries of topologically associated domains (TADs). Thus, ZAD-containing zinc-finger proteins can be attributed to the class of architectural proteins.

  19. Use of DoD Architectural Framework in Support of JFIIT Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-12

    ACCA ASCA Div FSCA BCT/Regt FSCA Bn FSCA TACP TACP TACP JFO/Observer Friendly Forces Air RCA OV-1 for TA 3.2.2 Conduct Close Air Support OV-1 for TA...3.2.2 Conduct Close Air Support Ground RCA ISR FSCA/ ACCA CAS Aircraft FAC(A) Indirect Surface Fires Hostile Targets WOC TACP GLO Legend ACCA Air...FAC(A)/CAS Aircrew A3.1.4 Control CAS A3.2.1 Coordinate with WOC/ ACCA /ASCA/ACA A3.2.2 Coordinate with JTAC A3.2.3 Provide CAS A3.3.1 Coordinate with

  20. Insight into the Supramolecular Architecture of Intact Diatom Biosilica from DNP-Supported Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jantschke, Anne; Koers, Eline; Mance, Deni; Weingarth, Markus; Brunner, Eike; Baldus, Marc

    2015-12-07

    Diatom biosilica is an inorganic/organic hybrid with interesting properties. The molecular architecture of the organic material at the atomic and nanometer scale has so far remained unknown, in particular for intact biosilica. A DNP-supported ssNMR approach assisted by microscopy, MS, and MD simulations was applied to study the structural organization of intact biosilica. For the first time, the secondary structure elements of tightly biosilica-associated native proteins in diatom biosilica were characterized in situ. Our data suggest that these proteins are rich in a limited set of amino acids and adopt a mixture of random-coil and β-strand conformations. Furthermore, biosilica-associated long-chain polyamines and carbohydrates were characterized, thereby leading to a model for the supramolecular organization of intact biosilica. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Towards surface-supported supramolecular architectures: tailored coordination assembly of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate and Fe on Cu(100).

    PubMed

    Lingenfelder, Magalí A; Spillmann, Hannes; Dmitriev, Alexandre; Stepanow, Sebastian; Lin, Nian; Barth, Johannes V; Kern, Klaus

    2004-04-19

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the modular assembly of surface-supported metal-organic coordination systems with specific topologies and high structural stability formed by vapor deposition of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid molecules and iron atoms on a Cu(100) surface under ultra-high vacuum conditions. By making use of the two carboxylate moieties available for lateral linkage to Fe atoms, we succeeded in the fabrication of distinct Fe-carboxylate coordination architectures at the surface by carefully adjusting the ligand and metal concentration ratio and the temperature of the post-deposition annealing treatment. The mononuclear, 1D-polymeric and fully 2D-reticulated metallosupramolecular arrangements obtained were characterized in situ at the single-molecule level by scanning tunneling microscopy.

  2. A Java-based enterprise system architecture for implementing a continuously supported and entirely Web-based exercise solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Kiryu, Tohru

    2006-04-01

    Since machine-based exercise still uses local facilities, it is affected by time and place. We designed a web-based system architecture based on the Java 2 Enterprise Edition that can accomplish continuously supported machine-based exercise. In this system, exercise programs and machines are loosely coupled and dynamically integrated on the site of exercise via the Internet. We then extended the conventional health promotion model, which contains three types of players (users, exercise trainers, and manufacturers), by adding a new player: exercise program creators. Moreover, we developed a self-describing strategy to accommodate a variety of exercise programs and provide ease of use to users on the web. We illustrate our novel design with examples taken from our feasibility study on a web-based cycle ergometer exercise system. A biosignal-based workload control approach was introduced to ensure that users performed appropriate exercise alone.

  3. An agent architecture for an integrated forest ecosystem management decision support system

    Treesearch

    Donald Nute; Walter D. Potter; Mayukh Dass; Astrid Glende; Frederick Maier; Hajime Uchiyama; Jin Wang; Mark Twery; Peter Knopp; Scott Thomasma; H. Michael Rauscher

    2003-01-01

    A wide variety of software tools are available to support decision in the management of forest ecosystems. These tools include databases, growth and yield models, wildlife models, silvicultural expert systems, financial models, geographical informations systems, and visualization tools. Typically, each of these tools has its own complex interface and data format. To...

  4. Self-organising maps and correlation analysis as a tool to explore patterns in excitation-emission matrix data sets and to discriminate dissolved organic matter fluorescence components.

    PubMed

    Ejarque-Gonzalez, Elisabet; Butturini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of organic compounds, ubiquitous in marine and freshwater systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy, by means of Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEM), has become an indispensable tool to study DOM sources, transport and fate in aquatic ecosystems. However the statistical treatment of large and heterogeneous EEM data sets still represents an important challenge for biogeochemists. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOM) has been proposed as a tool to explore patterns in large EEM data sets. SOM is a pattern recognition method which clusterizes and reduces the dimensionality of input EEMs without relying on any assumption about the data structure. In this paper, we show how SOM, coupled with a correlation analysis of the component planes, can be used both to explore patterns among samples, as well as to identify individual fluorescence components. We analysed a large and heterogeneous EEM data set, including samples from a river catchment collected under a range of hydrological conditions, along a 60-km downstream gradient, and under the influence of different degrees of anthropogenic impact. According to our results, chemical industry effluents appeared to have unique and distinctive spectral characteristics. On the other hand, river samples collected under flash flood conditions showed homogeneous EEM shapes. The correlation analysis of the component planes suggested the presence of four fluorescence components, consistent with DOM components previously described in the literature. A remarkable strength of this methodology was that outlier samples appeared naturally integrated in the analysis. We conclude that SOM coupled with a correlation analysis procedure is a promising tool for studying large and heterogeneous EEM data sets.

  5. Self-Organising Maps and Correlation Analysis as a Tool to Explore Patterns in Excitation-Emission Matrix Data Sets and to Discriminate Dissolved Organic Matter Fluorescence Components

    PubMed Central

    Ejarque-Gonzalez, Elisabet; Butturini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of organic compounds, ubiquitous in marine and freshwater systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy, by means of Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEM), has become an indispensable tool to study DOM sources, transport and fate in aquatic ecosystems. However the statistical treatment of large and heterogeneous EEM data sets still represents an important challenge for biogeochemists. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOM) has been proposed as a tool to explore patterns in large EEM data sets. SOM is a pattern recognition method which clusterizes and reduces the dimensionality of input EEMs without relying on any assumption about the data structure. In this paper, we show how SOM, coupled with a correlation analysis of the component planes, can be used both to explore patterns among samples, as well as to identify individual fluorescence components. We analysed a large and heterogeneous EEM data set, including samples from a river catchment collected under a range of hydrological conditions, along a 60-km downstream gradient, and under the influence of different degrees of anthropogenic impact. According to our results, chemical industry effluents appeared to have unique and distinctive spectral characteristics. On the other hand, river samples collected under flash flood conditions showed homogeneous EEM shapes. The correlation analysis of the component planes suggested the presence of four fluorescence components, consistent with DOM components previously described in the literature. A remarkable strength of this methodology was that outlier samples appeared naturally integrated in the analysis. We conclude that SOM coupled with a correlation analysis procedure is a promising tool for studying large and heterogeneous EEM data sets. PMID:24906009

  6. Evolution of self-organisation in Dictyostelia by adaptation of a non-selective phosphodiesterase and a matrix component for regulated cAMP degradation.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Weening, Karin E; Marquay-Markiewicz, Jacques; Schaap, Pauline

    2012-04-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas coordinate aggregation and morphogenesis by secreting cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pulses that propagate as waves through fields of cells and multicellular structures. To retrace how this mechanism for self-organisation evolved, we studied the origin of the cAMP phosphodiesterase PdsA and its inhibitor PdiA, which are essential for cAMP wave propagation. D. discoideum and other species that use cAMP to aggregate reside in group 4 of the four major groups of Dictyostelia. We found that groups 1-3 express a non-specific, low affinity orthologue of PdsA, which gained cAMP selectivity and increased 200-fold in affinity in group 4. A low affinity group 3 PdsA only partially restored aggregation of a D. discoideum pdsA-null mutant, but was more effective at restoring fruiting body morphogenesis. Deletion of a group 2 PdsA gene resulted in disruption of fruiting body morphogenesis, but left aggregation unaffected. Together, these results show that groups 1-3 use a low affinity PdsA for morphogenesis that is neither suited nor required for aggregation. PdiA belongs to a family of matrix proteins that are present in all Dictyostelia and consist mainly of cysteine-rich repeats. However, in its current form with several extensively modified repeats, PdiA is only present in group 4. PdiA is essential for initiating spiral cAMP waves, which, by organising large territories, generate the large fruiting structures that characterise group 4. We conclude that efficient cAMP-mediated aggregation in group 4 evolved by recruitment and adaptation of a non-selective phosphodiesterase and a matrix component into a system for regulated cAMP degradation.

  7. Guiding Requirements for Designing Life Support System Architectures for Crewed Exploration Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) technology development roadmaps provide guidance to focus technological development in areas that enable crewed exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Specifically, the technology area roadmap on human health, life support and habitation systems describes the need for life support system (LSS) technologies that can improve reliability and in-flight maintainability within a minimally-sized package while enabling a high degree of mission autonomy. To address the needs outlined by the guiding technology area roadmap, NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program has commissioned the Life Support Systems (LSS) Project to lead technology development in the areas of water recovery and management, atmosphere revitalization, and environmental monitoring. A notional exploration LSS architecture derived from the International Space has been developed and serves as the developmental basis for these efforts. Functional requirements and key performance parameters that guide the exploration LSS technology development efforts are presented and discussed. Areas where LSS flight operations aboard the ISS afford lessons learned that are relevant to exploration missions are highlighted.

  8. CranialCloud: A cloud-based architecture to support trans-institutional collaborative efforts in neuro-degenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Pierre-Francois; Konrad, Peter E.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Li, Rui; Prassad, Priyanka; Rodriguez, William; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Neurological diseases have a devastating impact on millions of individuals and their families. These diseases will continue to constitute a significant research focus for this century. The search for effective treatments and cures requires multiple teams of experts in clinical neurosciences, neuroradiology, engineering and industry. Hence, the need to communicate a large amount of information with accuracy and precision is more necessary than ever for this specialty. Method In this paper, we present a distributed system that supports this vision, which we call the CranialVault Cloud (CranialCloud). It consists in a network of nodes, each with the capability to store and process data, that share the same spatial normalization processes, thus guaranteeing a common reference space. We detail and justify design choices, the architecture and functionality of individual nodes, the way these nodes interact, and how the distributed system can be used to support inter-institutional research. Results We discuss the current state of the system that gathers data for more than 1,600 patients and how we envision it to grow. Conclusions We contend that the fastest way to find and develop promising treatments and cures is to permit teams of researchers to aggregate data, spatially normalize these data, and share them. The Cranialvault system is a system that supports this vision. PMID:25861055

  9. Software Architecture to Support the Evolution of the ISRU RESOLVE Engineering Breadboard Unit 2 (EBU2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, Thomas; Nurge, Mark; Perusich, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) software provides operation of the physical plant from a remote location with a high-level interface that can access and control the data from external software applications of other subsystems. This software allows autonomous control over the entire system with manual computer control of individual system/process components. It gives non-programmer operators the capability to easily modify the high-level autonomous sequencing while the software is in operation, as well as the ability to modify the low-level, file-based sequences prior to the system operation. Local automated control in a distributed system is also enabled where component control is maintained during the loss of network connectivity with the remote workstation. This innovation also minimizes network traffic. The software architecture commands and controls the latest generation of RESOLVE processes used to obtain, process, and quantify lunar regolith. The system is grouped into six sub-processes: Drill, Crush, Reactor, Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD), Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) (see example), and Regolith Oxygen Extraction (ROE). Some processes are independent, some are dependent on other processes, and some are independent but run concurrently with other processes. The first goal is to analyze the volatiles emanating from lunar regolith, such as water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen, and others. This is done by heating the soil and analyzing and capturing the volatilized product. The second goal is to produce water by reducing the soil at high temperatures with hydrogen. This is done by raising the reactor temperature in the range of 800 to 900 C, causing the reaction to progress by adding hydrogen, and then capturing the water product in a desiccant bed. The software needs to run the entire unit and all sub-processes; however

  10. A Client/Server Architecture for Supporting Science Data Using EPICS Version 4

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesio, Leo

    2015-04-21

    The Phase 1 grant that serves as a precursor to this proposal, prototyped complex storage techniques for high speed structured data that is being produced in accelerator diagnostics and beam line experiments. It demonstrates the technologies that can be used to archive and retrieve complex data structures and provide the performance required by our new accelerators, instrumentations, and detectors. Phase 2 is proposed to develop a high-performance platform for data acquisition and analysis to provide physicists and operators a better understanding of the beam dynamics. This proposal includes developing a platform for reading 109 MHz data at 10 KHz rates through a multicore front end processor, archiving the data to an archive repository that is then indexed for fast retrieval. The data is then retrieved from this data archive, integrated with the scalar data, to provide data sets to client applications for analysis, use in feedback, and to aid in identifying problem with the instrumentation, plant, beam steering, or model. This development is built on EPICS version 4 , which is being successfully deployed to implement physics applications. Through prior SBIR grants, EPICS version 4 has a solid communication protocol for middle layer services (PVAccess), structured data representation and methods for efficient transportation and access (PVData), an operational hierarchical record environment (JAVA IOC), and prototypes for standard structured data (Normative Types). This work was further developed through project funding to successfully deploy the first service based physics application environment with demonstrated services that provide arbitrary object views, save sets, model, lattice, and unit conversion. Thin client physics applications have been developed in Python that implement quad centering, orbit display, bump control, and slow orbit feedback. This service based architecture has provided a very modular and robust environment that enables commissioning teams

  11. A Design Architecture for an Integrated Training System Decision Support System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    integration of AETIS within the TRADOC Decision Support System ( TDSS ). Current plans are to replace AETIS with the Training Development Workload Management...implementation by FY 91. This initiative will create a TDWMS database as an integrated system within the Training Module of the TDSS . It will replace the...Systems Approach to Training as a submodule to the TDSS TRAMOD. A fully integrated ASAT, combining collective and individual training development, will

  12. Project I-COP - architecture of software tool for decision support in oncology.

    PubMed

    Blaha, Milan; Janča, Dalibor; Klika, Petr; Mužík, Jan; Dušek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    This article briefly describes the development of the I-COP tool, which is designed to promote education and decision making of clinical oncologists. It is based on real data from medical facilities, which are processed, stored in database, analyzed and finally displayed in an interactive software application. Used data sources are shortly described in individual sections together with the functionality of developed tools. The final goal of this project is to provide support for work and education within each involved partner center. Clinical oncologists are therefore supposed to be the authors and users at the same time.

  13. Fortran Transformational Tools in Support of Scientific Application Development for Petascale Computer Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Sottille, Matthew

    2013-09-12

    This document is the final report for a multi-year effort building infrastructure to support tool development for Fortran programs. We also investigated static analysis and code transformation methods relevant to scientific programmers who are writing Fortran programs for petascale-class high performance computing systems. This report details our accomplishments, technical approaches, and provides information on where the research results and code may be obtained from an open source software repository. The report for the first year of the project that was performed at the University of Oregon prior to the PI moving to Galois, Inc. is included as an appendix.

  14. Development of a Computer Architecture to Support the Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsinis, Constantine

    1996-01-01

    to execute the software in a modern single-processor workstation, and therefore real-time operation is currently not possible. A different number of iterations may be required to perform spectral data fitting per spectral sample. Yet, the OPAD system must be designed to maintain real-time performance in all cases. Although faster single-processor workstations are available for execution of the fitting and SPECTRA software, this option is unattractive due to the excessive cost associated with very fast workstations and also due to the fact that such hardware is not easily expandable to accommodate future versions of the software which may require more processing power. Initial research has already demonstrated that the OPAD software can take advantage of a parallel computer architecture to achieve the necessary speedup. Current work has improved the software by converting it into a form which is easily parallelizable. Timing experiments have been performed to establish the computational complexity and execution speed of major components of the software. This work provides the foundation of future work which will create a fully parallel version of the software executing in a shared-memory multiprocessor system.

  15. Design of a decision-support architecture for management of remotely monitored patients.

    PubMed

    Basilakis, Jim; Lovell, Nigel H; Redmond, Stephen J; Celler, Branko G

    2010-09-01

    Telehealth is the provision of health services at a distance. Typically, this occurs in unsupervised or remote environments, such as a patient's home. We describe one such telehealth system and the integration of extracted clinical measurement parameters with a decision-support system (DSS). An enterprise application-server framework, combined with a rules engine and statistical analysis tools, is used to analyze the acquired telehealth data, searching for trends and shifts in parameter values, as well as identifying individual measurements that exceed predetermined or adaptive thresholds. An overarching business process engine is used to manage the core DSS knowledge base and coordinate workflow outputs of the DSS. The primary role for such a DSS is to provide an effective means to reduce the data overload and to provide a means of health risk stratification to allow appropriate targeting of clinical resources to best manage the health of the patient. In this way, the system may ultimately influence changes in workflow by targeting scarce clinical resources to patients of most need. A single case study extracted from an initial pilot trial of the system, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure, will be reviewed to illustrate the potential benefit of integrating telehealth and decision support in the management of both acute and chronic disease.

  16. Designing a Clinical Data Warehouse Architecture to Support Quality Improvement Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Chelico, John D; Wilcox, Adam B; Vawdrey, David K; Kuperman, Gilad J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses, initially directed towards clinical research or financial analyses, are evolving to support quality improvement efforts, and must now address the quality improvement life cycle. In addition, data that are needed for quality improvement often do not reside in a single database, requiring easier methods to query data across multiple disparate sources. We created a virtual data warehouse at NewYork Presbyterian Hospital that allowed us to bring together data from several source systems throughout the organization. We also created a framework to match the maturity of a data request in the quality improvement life cycle to proper tools needed for each request. As projects progress in the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control stages of quality improvement, there is a proper matching of resources the data needs at each step. We describe the analysis and design creating a robust model for applying clinical data warehousing to quality improvement.

  17. Designing a Clinical Data Warehouse Architecture to Support Quality Improvement Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Chelico, John D.; Wilcox, Adam B.; Vawdrey, David K.; Kuperman, Gilad J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses, initially directed towards clinical research or financial analyses, are evolving to support quality improvement efforts, and must now address the quality improvement life cycle. In addition, data that are needed for quality improvement often do not reside in a single database, requiring easier methods to query data across multiple disparate sources. We created a virtual data warehouse at NewYork Presbyterian Hospital that allowed us to bring together data from several source systems throughout the organization. We also created a framework to match the maturity of a data request in the quality improvement life cycle to proper tools needed for each request. As projects progress in the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control stages of quality improvement, there is a proper matching of resources the data needs at each step. We describe the analysis and design creating a robust model for applying clinical data warehousing to quality improvement. PMID:28269833

  18. Lithospheric Architecture and Mantle-Supported Topography of the Colorado Plateau Constrained by Receiver Function Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D.; Aster, R. C.; Grand, S. P.; Ni, J. F.; Baldridge, W. S.

    2009-12-01

    After maintaining elevations near sea level for hundreds of millions years, the Colorado Plateau (CP) of the southwestern United States has a present average elevation of 2 km. However, the sources of buoyant support for this high elevation have long been unclear. We apply receiver function joint velocity analysis and imaging to data from the LA RISTRA experiment to construct a new seismic image of crust and upper mantle structure that constitutes the first complete seismic transect of its kind across the CP. We find that the central CP crust has variable thickness of 42-50 km that thins to 30-35 km at plateau margins. For the central CP, crustal Vp/Vs ratios average 1.71 to the northwest and 1.80 to the southeast of the Yavapai/Southern Yavapai province boundary. Higher Vp/Vs ratios to the southeast of the boundary indicates that the Southern Yavapai crust may on average be slightly more mafic which is consistent with the lower concentrations of incompatible elements found for this region. Isostatic calculations constrained by these observations show that only approximately 20% of central CP elevation can be explained by thickened crust alone, with the bowl-shaped, high-elevation edges of the CP requiring nearly total mantle compensation. We calculate an uplift budget which shows that the CP buoyancy arises from the combined effects of crustal thickening, Laramide/post-Laramide alteration of the lithospheric root, and dynamic support from mantle upwelling. Prior to the Laramide, thick crust and low-density uppermost mantle were balanced by a thick, dense Proterozoic lithospheric root that kept the CP near sea level. Laramide/post-Laramide tectonics altered this root most likely by a combination of metasomatism, post-Laramide thermal conduction and expansion, and perhaps minor tectonic erosion. This, combined with dynamic topography due to mantle upwelling produced by the foundering of the Farallon slab, resulted in buoyant CP uplift to the present high elevations

  19. Efficient Support for Matrix Computations on Heterogeneous Multi-core and Multi-GPU Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Fengguang; Tomov, Stanimire; Dongarra, Jack

    2011-06-01

    We present a new methodology for utilizing all CPU cores and all GPUs on a heterogeneous multicore and multi-GPU system to support matrix computations e ciently. Our approach is able to achieve the objectives of a high degree of parallelism, minimized synchronization, minimized communication, and load balancing. Our main idea is to treat the heterogeneous system as a distributed-memory machine, and to use a heterogeneous 1-D block cyclic distribution to allocate data to the host system and GPUs to minimize communication. We have designed heterogeneous algorithms with two di erent tile sizes (one for CPU cores and the other for GPUs) to cope with processor heterogeneity. We propose an auto-tuning method to determine the best tile sizes to attain both high performance and load balancing. We have also implemented a new runtime system and applied it to the Cholesky and QR factorizations. Our experiments on a compute node with two Intel Westmere hexa-core CPUs and three Nvidia Fermi GPUs demonstrate good weak scalability, strong scalability, load balance, and e ciency of our approach.

  20. Self-Organizing Distributed Architecture Supporting Dynamic Space Expanding and Reducing in Indoor LBS Environment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seol Young; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Kang, Soon Ju

    2015-01-01

    Indoor location-based services (iLBS) are extremely dynamic and changeable, and include numerous resources and mobile devices. In particular, the network infrastructure requires support for high scalability in the indoor environment, and various resource lookups are requested concurrently and frequently from several locations based on the dynamic network environment. A traditional map-based centralized approach for iLBSs has several disadvantages: it requires global knowledge to maintain a complete geographic indoor map; the central server is a single point of failure; it can also cause low scalability and traffic congestion; and it is hard to adapt to a change of service area in real time. This paper proposes a self-organizing and fully distributed platform for iLBSs. The proposed self-organizing distributed platform provides a dynamic reconfiguration of locality accuracy and service coverage by expanding and contracting dynamically. In order to verify the suggested platform, scalability performance according to the number of inserted or deleted nodes composing the dynamic infrastructure was evaluated through a simulation similar to the real environment. PMID:26016908

  1. An architecture for linking medical decision-support applications to clinical databases and its evaluation.

    PubMed

    German, Efrat; Leibowitz, Akiva; Shahar, Yuval

    2009-04-01

    We describe and evaluate a framework, the Medical Database Adaptor (MEIDA), for linking knowledge-based medical decision-support systems (MDSSs) to multiple clinical databases, using standard medical schemata and vocabularies. Our solution involves a set of tools for embedding standard terms and units within knowledge bases (KBs) of MDSSs; a set of methods and tools for mapping the local database (DB) schema and the terms and units relevant to the KB of the MDSS into standardized schema, terms and units, using three heuristics (choice of a vocabulary, choice of a key term, and choice of a measurement unit); and a set of tools which, at runtime, automatically map standard term queries originating from the KB, to queries formulated using the local DB's schema, terms and units. The methodology was successfully evaluated by mapping three KBs to three DBs. Using a unit-domain matching heuristic reduced the number of term-mapping candidates by a mean of 71% even after other heuristics were used. Runtime access of 10,000 records required one second. We conclude that mapping MDSSs to different local clinical DBs, using the three-phase methodology and several term-mapping heuristics, is both feasible and efficient.

  2. Long-Term Patterns in the Population Dynamics of Daphnia longispina, Leptodora kindtii and Cyanobacteria in a Shallow Reservoir: A Self-Organising Map (SOM) Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wojtal-Frankiewicz, Adrianna; Kruk, Andrzej; Frankiewicz, Piotr; Oleksińska, Zuzanna; Izydorczyk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of long-term patterns in the seasonal dynamics of Daphnia longispina, Leptodora kindtii and cyanobacteria is dependent upon their interactions, the water temperature and the hydrological conditions, which were all investigated between 1999 and 2008 in the lowland Sulejow Reservoir. The biomass of cyanobacteria, densities of D. longispina and L. kindtii, concentration of chlorophyll a and water temperature were assessed weekly from April to October at three sampling stations along the longitudinal reservoir axis. The retention time was calculated using data on the actual water inflow and reservoir volume. A self-organising map (SOM) was used due to high interannual variability in the studied parameters and their often non-linear relationships. Classification of the SOM output neurons into three clusters that grouped the sampling terms with similar biotic states allowed identification of the crucial abiotic factors responsible for the seasonal sequence of events: cluster CL-ExSp (extreme/spring) corresponded to hydrologically unstable cold periods (mostly spring) with extreme values and highly variable abiotic factors, which made abiotic control of the biota dominant; cluster CL-StSm (stable/summer) was associated with ordinary late spring and summer and was characterised by stable non-extreme abiotic conditions, which made biotic interactions more important; and the cluster CL-ExSm (extreme/summer), was associated with late spring/summer and characterised by thermal or hydrological extremes, which weakened the role of biotic factors. The significance of the differences between the SOM sub-clusters was verified by Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Dunn tests. The importance of the temperature and hydrological regimes as the key plankton-regulating factors in the dam reservoir, as shown by the SOM, was confirmed by the results of canonical correlation analyses (CCA) of each cluster. The demonstrated significance of hydrology in seasonal plankton dynamics

  3. Long-Term Patterns in the Population Dynamics of Daphnia longispina, Leptodora kindtii and Cyanobacteria in a Shallow Reservoir: A Self-Organising Map (SOM) Approach.

    PubMed

    Wojtal-Frankiewicz, Adrianna; Kruk, Andrzej; Frankiewicz, Piotr; Oleksińska, Zuzanna; Izydorczyk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of long-term patterns in the seasonal dynamics of Daphnia longispina, Leptodora kindtii and cyanobacteria is dependent upon their interactions, the water temperature and the hydrological conditions, which were all investigated between 1999 and 2008 in the lowland Sulejow Reservoir. The biomass of cyanobacteria, densities of D. longispina and L. kindtii, concentration of chlorophyll a and water temperature were assessed weekly from April to October at three sampling stations along the longitudinal reservoir axis. The retention time was calculated using data on the actual water inflow and reservoir volume. A self-organising map (SOM) was used due to high interannual variability in the studied parameters and their often non-linear relationships. Classification of the SOM output neurons into three clusters that grouped the sampling terms with similar biotic states allowed identification of the crucial abiotic factors responsible for the seasonal sequence of events: cluster CL-ExSp (extreme/spring) corresponded to hydrologically unstable cold periods (mostly spring) with extreme values and highly variable abiotic factors, which made abiotic control of the biota dominant; cluster CL-StSm (stable/summer) was associated with ordinary late spring and summer and was characterised by stable non-extreme abiotic conditions, which made biotic interactions more important; and the cluster CL-ExSm (extreme/summer), was associated with late spring/summer and characterised by thermal or hydrological extremes, which weakened the role of biotic factors. The significance of the differences between the SOM sub-clusters was verified by Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Dunn tests. The importance of the temperature and hydrological regimes as the key plankton-regulating factors in the dam reservoir, as shown by the SOM, was confirmed by the results of canonical correlation analyses (CCA) of each cluster. The demonstrated significance of hydrology in seasonal plankton dynamics

  4. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Supporting Interoperability through a Scalable Architecture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Lowe, D. R.; Murphy, K. J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2011-12-01

    Initiated in 1990, NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is currently a petabyte-scale archive of data designed to receive, process, distribute and archive several terabytes of science data per day from NASA's Earth science missions. Comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, EOSDIS manages over 6800 data products from many science disciplines and sources. NASA supports global climate change research by providing scalable open application layers to the EOSDIS distributed information framework. This allows many other value-added services to access NASA's vast Earth Science Collection and allows EOSDIS to interoperate with data archives from other domestic and international organizations. EOSDIS is committed to NASA's Data Policy of full and open sharing of Earth science data. As metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth science data lifecycle, EOSDIS provides a spatial and temporal metadata registry and order broker called the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) that allows efficient search and access of cross domain data and services through the Reverb Client and Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs). Another core metadata component of EOSDIS is NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) which represents more than 25,000 Earth science data set and service descriptions from all over the world, covering subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. With inputs from the ECHO, GCMD and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission metadata models, EOSDIS is developing a NASA ISO 19115 Best Practices Convention. Adoption of an international metadata standard enables a far greater level of interoperability among national and international data products. NASA recently concluded a 'Metadata Harmony Study' of EOSDIS metadata capabilities/processes of ECHO and NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), to evaluate opportunities for improved data access and use, reduce

  5. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Supporting Interoperability through a Scalable Architecture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Lowe, D. R.; Murphy, K. J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Initiated in 1990, NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is currently a petabyte-scale archive of data designed to receive, process, distribute and archive several terabytes of science data per day from NASA's Earth science missions. Comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, EOSDIS manages over 6800 data products from many science disciplines and sources. NASA supports global climate change research by providing scalable open application layers to the EOSDIS distributed information framework. This allows many other value-added services to access NASA's vast Earth Science Collection and allows EOSDIS to interoperate with data archives from other domestic and international organizations. EOSDIS is committed to NASA's Data Policy of full and open sharing of Earth science data. As metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth science data lifecycle, EOSDIS provides a spatial and temporal metadata registry and order broker called the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) that allows efficient search and access of cross domain data and services through the Reverb Client and Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs). Another core metadata component of EOSDIS is NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) which represents more than 25,000 Earth science data set and service descriptions from all over the world, covering subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. With inputs from the ECHO, GCMD and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission metadata models, EOSDIS is developing a NASA ISO 19115 Best Practices Convention. Adoption of an international metadata standard enables a far greater level of interoperability among national and international data products. NASA recently concluded a 'Metadata Harmony Study' of EOSDIS metadata capabilities/processes of ECHO and NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), to evaluate opportunities for improved data access and use, reduce

  6. A scalable architecture for incremental specification and maintenance of procedural and declarative clinical decision-support knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hatsek, Avner; Shahar, Yuval; Taieb-Maimon, Meirav; Shalom, Erez; Klimov, Denis; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2010-01-01

    Clinical guidelines have been shown to improve the quality of medical care and to reduce its costs. However, most guidelines exist in a free-text representation and, without automation, are not sufficiently accessible to clinicians at the point of care. A prerequisite for automated guideline application is a machine-comprehensible representation of the guidelines. In this study, we designed and implemented a scalable architecture to support medical experts and knowledge engineers in specifying and maintaining the procedural and declarative aspects of clinical guideline knowledge, resulting in a machine comprehensible representation. The new framework significantly extends our previous work on the Digital electronic Guidelines Library (DeGeL) The current study designed and implemented a graphical framework for specification of declarative and procedural clinical knowledge, Gesher. We performed three different experiments to evaluate the functionality and usability of the major aspects of the new framework: Specification of procedural clinical knowledge, specification of declarative clinical knowledge, and exploration of a given clinical guideline. The subjects included clinicians and knowledge engineers (overall, 27 participants). The evaluations indicated high levels of completeness and correctness of the guideline specification process by both the clinicians and the knowledge engineers, although the best results, in the case of declarative-knowledge specification, were achieved by teams including a clinician and a knowledge engineer. The usability scores were high as well, although the clinicians' assessment was significantly lower than the assessment of the knowledge engineers.

  7. A Scalable Architecture for Incremental Specification and Maintenance of Procedural and Declarative Clinical Decision-Support Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hatsek, Avner; Shahar, Yuval; Taieb-Maimon, Meirav; Shalom, Erez; Klimov, Denis; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2010-01-01

    Clinical guidelines have been shown to improve the quality of medical care and to reduce its costs. However, most guidelines exist in a free-text representation and, without automation, are not sufficiently accessible to clinicians at the point of care. A prerequisite for automated guideline application is a machine-comprehensible representation of the guidelines. In this study, we designed and implemented a scalable architecture to support medical experts and knowledge engineers in specifying and maintaining the procedural and declarative aspects of clinical guideline knowledge, resulting in a machine comprehensible representation. The new framework significantly extends our previous work on the Digital electronic Guidelines Library (DeGeL) The current study designed and implemented a graphical framework for specification of declarative and procedural clinical knowledge, Gesher. We performed three different experiments to evaluate the functionality and usability of the major aspects of the new framework: Specification of procedural clinical knowledge, specification of declarative clinical knowledge, and exploration of a given clinical guideline. The subjects included clinicians and knowledge engineers (overall, 27 participants). The evaluations indicated high levels of completeness and correctness of the guideline specification process by both the clinicians and the knowledge engineers, although the best results, in the case of declarative-knowledge specification, were achieved by teams including a clinician and a knowledge engineer. The usability scores were high as well, although the clinicians’ assessment was significantly lower than the assessment of the knowledge engineers. PMID:21611137

  8. PICNIC Architecture.

    PubMed

    Saranummi, Niilo

    2005-01-01

    The PICNIC architecture aims at supporting inter-enterprise integration and the facilitation of collaboration between healthcare organisations. The concept of a Regional Health Economy (RHE) is introduced to illustrate the varying nature of inter-enterprise collaboration between healthcare organisations collaborating in providing health services to citizens and patients in a regional setting. The PICNIC architecture comprises a number of PICNIC IT Services, the interfaces between them and presents a way to assemble these into a functioning Regional Health Care Network meeting the needs and concerns of its stakeholders. The PICNIC architecture is presented through a number of views relevant to different stakeholder groups. The stakeholders of the first view are national and regional health authorities and policy makers. The view describes how the architecture enables the implementation of national and regional health policies, strategies and organisational structures. The stakeholders of the second view, the service viewpoint, are the care providers, health professionals, patients and citizens. The view describes how the architecture supports and enables regional care delivery and process management including continuity of care (shared care) and citizen-centred health services. The stakeholders of the third view, the engineering view, are those that design, build and implement the RHCN. The view comprises four sub views: software engineering, IT services engineering, security and data. The proposed architecture is founded into the main stream of how distributed computing environments are evolving. The architecture is realised using the web services approach. A number of well established technology platforms and generic standards exist that can be used to implement the software components. The software components that are specified in PICNIC are implemented in Open Source.

  9. A Sustainable, Reliable Mission-Systems Architecture that Supports a System of Systems Approach to Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Steve; Orr, Jim; O'Neil, Graham

    2004-01-01

    A mission-systems architecture based on a highly modular "systems of systems" infrastructure utilizing open-standards hardware and software interfaces as the enabling technology is absolutely essential for an affordable and sustainable space exploration program. This architecture requires (a) robust communication between heterogeneous systems, (b) high reliability, (c) minimal mission-to-mission reconfiguration, (d) affordable development, system integration, and verification of systems, and (e) minimum sustaining engineering. This paper proposes such an architecture. Lessons learned from the space shuttle program are applied to help define and refine the model.

  10. ESPC Common Model Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    support for the Intel MIC architecture, the Apple Clang/LLVM C++ compiler is supported on both Linux and Darwin , and ESMF’s dependency on the NetCDF C...compiler on both Linux and Darwin systems. • Support was added to compile the ESMF library for the Intel MIC architecture under Linux. This allows

  11. Characterization of Architectural Distortion in Mammograms Based on Texture Analysis Using Support Vector Machine Classifier with Clinical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kamra, Amit; Jain, V K; Singh, Sukhwinder; Mittal, Sunil

    2016-02-01

    Architecture distortion (AD) is an important and early sign of breast cancer, but due to its subtlety, it is often missed on the screening mammograms. The objective of this study is to create a quantitative approach for texture classification of AD based on various texture models, using support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The texture analysis has been done on the region of interest (ROI) selected from the original mammogram. A comprehensive analysis has been done on samples from three databases; out of which, two data sets are from the public domain, and the third data set is for clinical evaluation. The public domain databases are IRMA version of digital database for screening mammogram (DDSM) and Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS). For clinical evaluation, the actual patient's database has been obtained from ACE Healthways, Diagnostic Centre Ludhiana, India. The significant finding of proposed study lies in appropriate selection of the size of ROIs. The experiments have been done on fixed size of ROIs as well as on the ground truth (variable size) ROIs. Best results pertain to an accuracy of 92.94 % obtained in case of DDSM database for fixed-size ROIs. In case of MIAS database, an accuracy of 95.34 % is achieved in AD versus non-AD (normal) cases for ground truth ROIs. Clinically, an accuracy of 88 % was achieved for ACE dataset. The results obtained in the present study are encouraging, as optimal result has been achieved for the proposed study in comparison with other related work in the same area.

  12. Solid-supported lipid bilayers to drive stem cell fate and tissue architecture using periosteum derived progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sarah F; Docheva, Denitsa; Bernecker, Anja; Colnot, Céline; Richter, Ralf P; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2013-03-01

    A challenge to mimicking nature's "bottom up" approach to generate tissue is the coordination of cellular self-assembly and emergent phenotype. Here we create a biosynthetic platform to mimic native cell-cell interactions and to drive emergent tissue behavior by human multipotent cells from the periosteal niche, i.e. PDCs, whose regenerative capacity is equal or greater to those from the bone marrow niche. Western blots showed that human PDCs express proteins for both N-cadherin, a hallmark of mesenchymal condensation, as well as for ZO-1, a tight junction membrane protein conferring epithelial barrier membrane properties. Hence, we functionalized a solid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membrane with recombinant N-cadherin and investigated the short term phenotype of PDCs seeded on unfunctionalized and N-cadherin functionalized SLBs compared to that of PDCs seeded on glass coverslips. After 24 h, SLB functionalization promoted aggregation of PDCs seeded at high density (35,000 cells/cm(2)), with no significant concomitant changes in transcription of N-cadherin (CDH2) as measured by rtPCR. In contrast, cells seeded on unfunctionalized SLBs remained non-adherent but showed a significant upregulation in transcription of N-cadherin. Furthermore, culture of PDCs at high density on N-cadherin functionalized SLBs was negatively correlated with expression of ZO-1, while culture on unfunctionalized SLBs was positively correlated with the expression of the tight junction membrane protein. High density seeding on N-cadherin functionalized and unfunctionalized SLBs places PDCs in distinct cellular contexts and relates to emergent behavior typical for mesenchymal condensation. These studies demonstrate a biosynthetic in vitro cell culture platform to elucidate and guide emergent tissue architectures by PDCs.

  13. An open and flexible interface proposal and proof of concept implementation to support service orientated architectures and interoperability in the tactical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    The development of SOAs in the tactical domain has been hindered by a lack of interface standards suitable for the environment of unpredictable and low bandwidth communications, low powered computers and dynamic ad-hoc grouping of tactical participants. Existing commercial SOA standards have assumed reliable access to central servers and services and having relatively static participants. The proposal describes an open and published message-oriented interface created to support the aims of the upcoming MOD Generic Base Architecture1 (GBA) Defence Standard and the associated Land Open Systems Architecture2. The aims are; a) to support multiple open transport protocols, such as HTTP, SMTP, DDS and MQTT; b) to be suitable for integrating together low-level utility functions with their controlling systems (such as water, waste and power) and integrating together high-level mission-support functions (such as ISTAR and C2); c) reduce operator burden by using automated discovery and configuration where possible; d) dynamically integrate with MOD Generic Vehicle Architecture3 platforms to link base and vehicle mission and logistics systems over tactical radio links; e) extensible to support features such as security classification; f) to be lightweight in implementation and bandwidth and not dependent on central servers for operation. The paper will present the proposed interface and describe the features required for a military tactical rather than a commercial environment, and will report the outcome of a MOD-funded proof of concept that uses the proposed interface to interoperate several military systems.

  14. An SMS-based System Architecture (Logical Model) to Support Management of Information Exchange in Emergency Stuations. poLINT-112-SMS PROJECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetulani, Zygmunt; Marciniak, Jacek; Konieczka, Pawel; Walkowska, Justyna

    In the paper we present the architecture of the POLINT-112-SMS system to support information management in emergency situations. The system interprets the text input in form of SMS messages, understands and interprets information provided by the human user. It is supposed to assist a human in taking decisions. The main modules of the system presented here are the following: the SMS gate, the NLP Module (processing Polish), the Situation Analysis Module (SAM) and the Dialogue Maintenance Module (DMM).

  15. Architectural design and tools to support the transparent access to hospital information systems, radiology information systems, and picture archiving and communication systems.

    PubMed

    Taira, R K; Breant, C M; Chan, H M; Huang, L; Valentino, D J

    1996-02-01

    The fragmentation of the electronic patient record among hospital information systems (HIS), radiology information systems (RIS), and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) makes the viewing of the complete medical patient record inconvenient. The purpose of this report is to describe the system architecture, development tools, and implementation issues related to providing transparent access to HIS, RIS, and PACS information. A client-mediator-server architecture was implemented to facilitate the gathering and visualization of electronic medical records from these independent heterogeneous information systems. The architecture features intelligent data access agents, run-time determination of data access strategies, and an active patient cache. The development and management of the agents were facilitated by data integration CASE (computer-assisted software engineering) tools. HIS, RIS, and PACS data access and translation agents were successfully developed. All pathology, radiology, medical, laboratory, admissions, and radiology reports for a patient are available for review from a single integrated workstation interface. A data caching system provides fast access to active patient data. New network architectures are evolving that support the integration of heterogeneous software subsystems. Commercial tools are available to assist in the integration procedure.

  16. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: A pattern language representation of a general architecture

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Ekberg, Joakim; Nordfeldt, Sam; Hanberger, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic disease management is a global health concern. By the time they reach adolescence, 10–15% of all children live with a chronic disease. The role of educational interventions in facilitating adaptation to chronic disease is receiving growing recognition, and current care policies advocate greater involvement of patients in self-care. Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for new collaborative Internet services characterized by user participation in developing and managing content. Key elements include Really Simple Syndication (RSS) to rapidly disseminate awareness of new information; weblogs (blogs) to describe new trends, wikis to share knowledge, and podcasts to make information available on personal media players. This study addresses the potential to develop Web 2.0 services for young persons with a chronic disease. It is acknowledged that the management of childhood chronic disease is based on interplay between initiatives and resources on the part of patients, relatives, and health care professionals, and where the balance shifts over time to the patients and their families. Methods Participatory action research was used to stepwise define a design specification in the form of a pattern language. Support for children diagnosed with diabetes Type 1 was used as the example area. Each individual design pattern was determined graphically using card sorting methods, and textually in the form Title, Context, Problem, Solution, Examples and References. Application references were included at the lowest level in the graphical overview in the pattern language but not specified in detail in the textual descriptions. Results The design patterns are divided into functional and non-functional design elements, and formulated at the levels of organizational, system, and application design. The design elements specify access to materials for development of the competences needed for chronic disease management in specific community settings, endorsement of self

  17. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: a pattern language representation of a general architecture.

    PubMed

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Ekberg, Joakim; Nordfeldt, Sam; Hanberger, Lena

    2008-11-28

    Chronic disease management is a global health concern. By the time they reach adolescence, 10-15% of all children live with a chronic disease. The role of educational interventions in facilitating adaptation to chronic disease is receiving growing recognition, and current care policies advocate greater involvement of patients in self-care. Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for new collaborative Internet services characterized by user participation in developing and managing content. Key elements include Really Simple Syndication (RSS) to rapidly disseminate awareness of new information; weblogs (blogs) to describe new trends, wikis to share knowledge, and podcasts to make information available on personal media players. This study addresses the potential to develop Web 2.0 services for young persons with a chronic disease. It is acknowledged that the management of childhood chronic disease is based on interplay between initiatives and resources on the part of patients, relatives, and health care professionals, and where the balance shifts over time to the patients and their families. Participatory action research was used to stepwise define a design specification in the form of a pattern language. Support for children diagnosed with diabetes Type 1 was used as the example area. Each individual design pattern was determined graphically using card sorting methods, and textually in the form Title, Context, Problem, Solution, Examples and References. Application references were included at the lowest level in the graphical overview in the pattern language but not specified in detail in the textual descriptions. The design patterns are divided into functional and non-functional design elements, and formulated at the levels of organizational, system, and application design. The design elements specify access to materials for development of the competences needed for chronic disease management in specific community settings, endorsement of self-learning through online peer

  18. High-level specification of a proposed information architecture for support of a bioterrorism early-warning system.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Murray R

    2013-01-01

    Current information systems for use in detecting bioterrorist attacks lack a consistent, overarching information architecture. An overview of the use of biological agents as weapons during a bioterrorist attack is presented. Proposed are the design, development, and implementation of a medical informatics system to mine pertinent databases, retrieve relevant data, invoke appropriate biostatistical and epidemiological software packages, and automatically analyze these data. The top-level information architecture is presented. Systems requirements and functional specifications for this level are presented. Finally, future studies are identified.

  19. A Tool for Managing Software Architecture Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes a tool for managing architectural knowledge and rationale. The tool has been developed to support a framework for capturing and using architectural knowledge to improve the architecture process. This paper describes the main architectural components and features of the tool. The paper also provides examples of using the tool for supporting wellknown architecture design and analysis methods.

  20. T and D-Bench--Innovative Combined Support for Education and Research in Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, S. N.; Wagner, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and Design Workbench (T&D-Bench) is a framework aimed at education and research in the areas of computer architecture and embedded systems. It includes a set of features not found in other educational environments. This set of features is the result of an original combination of design requirements for T&D-Bench: that the…

  1. T and D-Bench--Innovative Combined Support for Education and Research in Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, S. N.; Wagner, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and Design Workbench (T&D-Bench) is a framework aimed at education and research in the areas of computer architecture and embedded systems. It includes a set of features not found in other educational environments. This set of features is the result of an original combination of design requirements for T&D-Bench: that the…

  2. Implementation of a parametrizable router architecture for networks-on-chip (NoC) with quality of service (QoS) support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regidor, R.; Tobajas, F.; De Armas, V.; Rivero, J. M.; Sarmiento, R.

    2007-05-01

    Managing the complexity of designing Systems-on-Chip (SoC) containing billions of transistors requires decoupling computation from communication. Networks-on-Chip (NoC) have been proposed as a solution for managing this problem as they meet the reusability, scalability and parallelism requirements of these systems, while coping with power constraints and clock distribution. In this paper, the implementation of a router's architecture for NoC with both guaranteed and best-effort services support is described, and some synthesis results are presented. The proposed router architecture is parameterized on the number of virtual channels, the size of virtual channels, the number of virtual channels for guaranteed traffic, the relative priority of the guaranteed traffic, and the switching technique.

  3. Atlantis: An Open Architecture for Synergy of Process-Centered Environments and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Report CUCS-017-93, Columbia University Department of Computer Science, July 1993. PhD Thesis Proposal . [101] George T. Heineman. Automatic...AFRL-IF-RS-TR-1998-34 Final Technical Report April 1998 ATLANTIS: AN OPEN ARCHITECTURE FOR SYNERGY OF PROCESS-CENTERED ENVIRONMENTS AND COMPUTER...FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY INFORMATION DIRECTORATE ROME RESEARCH SITE ROME, NEW YORK ^V****«൉ This report has been reviewed by the Air Force

  4. Implementation of a metadata architecture and knowledge collection to support semantic interoperability in an enterprise data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Dhaval, Rakesh; Borlawsky, Tara; Ostrander, Michael; Santangelo, Jennifer; Kamal, Jyoti; Payne, Philip R O

    2008-11-06

    In order to enhance interoperability between enterprise systems, and improve data validity and reliability throughout The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC), we have initiated the development of an ontology-anchored metadata architecture and knowledge collection for our enterprise data warehouse. The metadata and corresponding semantic relationships stored in the OSUMC knowledge collection are intended to promote consistency and interoperability across the heterogeneous clinical, research, business and education information managed within the data warehouse.

  5. Proposal for fulfilling strategic objectives of the U.S. Roadmap for national action on clinical decision support through a service-oriented architecture leveraging HL7 services.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David F

    2007-01-01

    Despite their demonstrated effectiveness, clinical decision support (CDS) systems are not widely used within the U.S. The Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support, published in June 2006 by the American Medical Informatics Association, identifies six strategic objectives for achieving widespread adoption of effective CDS capabilities. In this manuscript, we propose a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) for CDS that facilitates achievement of these six objectives. Within the proposed framework, CDS capabilities are implemented through the orchestration of independent software services whose interfaces are being standardized by Health Level 7 and the Object Management Group through their joint Healthcare Services Specification Project (HSSP). Core services within this framework include the HSSP Decision Support Service, the HSSP Common Terminology Service, and the HSSP Retrieve, Locate, and Update Service. Our experiences, and those of others, indicate that the proposed SOA approach to CDS could enable the widespread adoption of effective CDS within the U.S. health care system.

  6. Proposal for Fulfilling Strategic Objectives of the U.S. Roadmap for National Action on Decision Support through a Service-oriented Architecture Leveraging HL7 Services

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Despite their demonstrated effectiveness, clinical decision support (CDS) systems are not widely used within the U.S. The Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support, published in June 2006 by the American Medical Informatics Association, identifies six strategic objectives for achieving widespread adoption of effective CDS capabilities. In this manuscript, we propose a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) for CDS that facilitates achievement of these six objectives. Within the proposed framework, CDS capabilities are implemented through the orchestration of independent software services whose interfaces are being standardized by Health Level 7 and the Object Management Group through their joint Healthcare Services Specification Project (HSSP). Core services within this framework include the HSSP Decision Support Service, the HSSP Common Terminology Service, and the HSSP Retrieve, Locate, and Update Service. Our experiences, and those of others, indicate that the proposed SOA approach to CDS could enable the widespread adoption of effective CDS within the U.S. health care system. PMID:17213489

  7. Psoas muscle architectural design, in vivo sarcomere length range, and passive tensile properties support its role as a lumbar spine stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Regev, Gilad J; Kim, Choll W; Tomiya, Akihito; Lee, Yu Po; Ghofrani, Hossein; Garfin, Steven R; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2011-12-15

    Controlled laboratory and cross-sectional study designs. To determine psoas major (PM) muscle architectural properties, in vivo sarcomere-length operating range, and passive mechanical properties. PM is an important hip flexor but its role in lumbar spine function is not fully understood. Several investigators have detailed the gross anatomy of PM, but comprehensive architectural data and in vivo length-tension and passive mechanical behaviors have not been documented. PM was isolated in 13 cadaver specimens, permitting architectural measurements of physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length (Lf), and Lf:muscle length (Lm) ratio. Sarcomere lengths were measured in vivo from intraoperative biopsies taken with the hip joint in flexed and extended positions. Single-fiber and fiber bundle tensile properties and titin molecular weight were then measured from separate biopsies. Architecturally, average PCSA was 18.45 ± 1.32 cm2, average Lf was 12.70 ± 2 cm, and average Lf: Lm was 0.48 ± 0.06. Intraoperative sarcomere length measurements revealed that the muscle operates from 3.18 ± 0.20 μm with hip flexed at 10.7° ± 13.9° to 3.03 ± 0.22 μm with hip flexed at 55.9° ± 21.4°. Passive mechanical data demonstrated that the elastic modulus of the PM muscle fibers was 37.44 ± 9.11 kPa and of fiber bundles was 55.3 ± 11.8 kPa. Analysis of PM architecture demonstrates that its average Lf and passive biomechanical properties resemble those of the lumbar erector spinae muscles. In addition, PM sarcomere lengths were confined to the descending portion of the length-tension curve allowing the muscle to become stronger as the hip is flexed and the spine assumes a forward leaning posture. These findings suggest that the human PM has architectural and physiologic features that support its role as both a flexor of the hip and a dynamic stabilizer of the lumbar spine.

  8. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  9. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  10. Joint Fire Support in 2020: Development of a Future Joint Fires Systems Architecture for Immediate, Unplanned Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    assessments of existing and planned command and control systems and organizations, a Centralized Joint Fire Support Network that incorporates and...simulation, and qualitative assessments of existing and planned command and control systems and organizations, a Centralized Joint Fire Support...Carrier Battle Group CWC Composite Warfare Commander DAFS Dynamic Allocation of Fires and Sensors DASC Direct Air Support Center DD Spruance

  11. Architecture Design of Healthcare Software-as-a-Service Platform for Cloud-Based Clinical Decision Support Service.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sungyoung; Cha, Jieun; Ji, Myungkyu; Kang, Hyekyung; Kim, Seok; Heo, Eunyoung; Han, Jong Soo; Kang, Hyunggoo; Chae, Hoseok; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2015-04-01

    To design a cloud computing-based Healthcare Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Platform (HSP) for delivering healthcare information services with low cost, high clinical value, and high usability. We analyzed the architecture requirements of an HSP, including the interface, business services, cloud SaaS, quality attributes, privacy and security, and multi-lingual capacity. For cloud-based SaaS services, we focused on Clinical Decision Service (CDS) content services, basic functional services, and mobile services. Microsoft's Azure cloud computing for Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) was used. The functional and software views of an HSP were designed in a layered architecture. External systems can be interfaced with the HSP using SOAP and REST/JSON. The multi-tenancy model of the HSP was designed as a shared database, with a separate schema for each tenant through a single application, although healthcare data can be physically located on a cloud or in a hospital, depending on regulations. The CDS services were categorized into rule-based services for medications, alert registration services, and knowledge services. We expect that cloud-based HSPs will allow small and mid-sized hospitals, in addition to large-sized hospitals, to adopt information infrastructures and health information technology with low system operation and maintenance costs.

  12. Interactions between subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP support a conserved eukaryotic RNase P/MRP architecture.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, Tanya V; Gordon, James M B; Bennett, Hayley J; Karahalios, Panagiotis; Bukowski, John-Paul; Walker, Scott C; Engelke, David R; Avis, Johanna M

    2007-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is an endonuclease, related to RNase P, which functions in eukaryotic pre-rRNA processing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RNase MRP comprises an RNA subunit and ten proteins. To improve our understanding of subunit roles and enzyme architecture, we have examined protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions in vitro, complementing existing yeast two-hybrid data. In total, 31 direct protein-protein interactions were identified, each protein interacting with at least three others. Furthermore, seven proteins self-interact, four strongly, pointing to subunit multiplicity in the holoenzyme. Six protein subunits interact directly with MRP RNA and four with pre-rRNA. A comparative analysis with existing data for the yeast and human RNase P/MRP systems enables confident identification of Pop1p, Pop4p and Rpp1p as subunits that lie at the enzyme core, with probable addition of Pop5p and Pop3p. Rmp1p is confirmed as an integral subunit, presumably associating preferentially with RNase MRP, rather than RNase P, via interactions with Snm1p and MRP RNA. Snm1p and Rmp1p may act together to assist enzyme specificity, though roles in substrate binding are also indicated for Pop4p and Pop6p. The results provide further evidence of a conserved eukaryotic RNase P/MRP architecture and provide a strong basis for studies of enzyme assembly and subunit function.

  13. Architecture Design of Healthcare Software-as-a-Service Platform for Cloud-Based Clinical Decision Support Service

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sungyoung; Cha, Jieun; Ji, Myungkyu; Kang, Hyekyung; Kim, Seok; Heo, Eunyoung; Han, Jong Soo; Kang, Hyunggoo; Chae, Hoseok; Hwang, Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To design a cloud computing-based Healthcare Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Platform (HSP) for delivering healthcare information services with low cost, high clinical value, and high usability. Methods We analyzed the architecture requirements of an HSP, including the interface, business services, cloud SaaS, quality attributes, privacy and security, and multi-lingual capacity. For cloud-based SaaS services, we focused on Clinical Decision Service (CDS) content services, basic functional services, and mobile services. Microsoft's Azure cloud computing for Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) was used. Results The functional and software views of an HSP were designed in a layered architecture. External systems can be interfaced with the HSP using SOAP and REST/JSON. The multi-tenancy model of the HSP was designed as a shared database, with a separate schema for each tenant through a single application, although healthcare data can be physically located on a cloud or in a hospital, depending on regulations. The CDS services were categorized into rule-based services for medications, alert registration services, and knowledge services. Conclusions We expect that cloud-based HSPs will allow small and mid-sized hospitals, in addition to large-sized hospitals, to adopt information infrastructures and health information technology with low system operation and maintenance costs. PMID:25995962

  14. Processor architecture and data buffering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Hans; Flynn, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    A set of architectures from three major architecture families: stack, register, and memory-to-memory is discussed. It is shown that scalable architectures are not applicable for low-density technologies because they require at least 32 words of local memory. Software support is shown to be capable of bridging the performance gap between scalable and nonscalable architectures. A register architecture with 32 words of local memory allocated interprocedurally outperforms scalable architectures with equal sizes local memories and even some with larger size local memories. The performance advantage of unscalable architectures becomes significant when in addition to quality compile-time support, a small cache is added to an unscalable architecture. A 32-register architecture with 512 byte cache executes 20 percent less cycles when compared with an 8-set multiple overlapping set organization.

  15. Robotic Intelligence Kernel: Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-16

    The INL Robotic Intelligence Kernel Architecture (RIK-A) is a multi-level architecture that supports a dynamic autonomy structure. The RIK-A is used to coalesce hardware for sensing and action as well as software components for perception, communication, behavior and world modeling into a framework that can be used to create behaviors for humans to interact with the robot.

  16. Nitric oxide is required for determining root architecture and lignin composition in sunflower. Supporting evidence from microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Corti Monzón, Georgina; Pinedo, Marcela; Di Rienzo, Julio; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Pomar, Federico; Lamattina, Lorenzo; de la Canal, Laura

    2014-05-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signal molecule involved in several physiological processes in plants, including root development. Despite the importance of NO as a root growth regulator, the knowledge about the genes and metabolic pathways modulated by NO in this process is still limited. A constraint to unravel these pathways has been the use of exogenous applications of NO donors that may produce toxic effects. We have analyzed the role of NO in root architecture through the depletion of endogenous NO using the scavenger cPTIO. Sunflower seedlings growing in liquid medium supplemented with cPTIO showed unaltered primary root length while the number of lateral roots was deeply reduced; indicating that endogenous NO participates in determining root branching in sunflower. The transcriptional changes induced by NO depletion have been analyzed using a large-scale approach. A microarray analysis showed 330 genes regulated in the roots (p≤0.001) upon endogenous NO depletion. A general cPTIO-induced up-regulation of genes involved in the lignin biosynthetic pathway was observed. Even if no detectable changes in total lignin content could be detected, cell walls analyses revealed that the ratio G/S lignin increased in roots treated with cPTIO. This means that endogenous NO may control lignin composition in planta. Our results suggest that a fine tuning regulation of NO levels could be used by plants to regulate root architecture and lignin composition. The functional implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolving earth-based and in-situ satellite network architectures for Mars communications and navigation support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Weinberg, Aaron; Mcomber, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Results of on-going studies to develop navigation/telecommunications network concepts to support future robotic and human missions to Mars are presented. The performance and connectivity improvements provided by the relay network will permit use of simpler, lower performance, and less costly telecom subsystems for the in-situ mission exploration elements. Orbiting relay satellites can serve as effective navigation aids by supporting earth-based tracking as well as providing Mars-centered radiometric data for mission elements approaching, in orbit, or on the surface of Mars. The relay satellite orbits may be selected to optimize navigation aid support and communication coverage for specific mission sets.

  18. Evolving earth-based and in-situ satellite network architectures for Mars communications and navigation support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Weinberg, Aaron; Mcomber, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Results of on-going studies to develop navigation/telecommunications network concepts to support future robotic and human missions to Mars are presented. The performance and connectivity improvements provided by the relay network will permit use of simpler, lower performance, and less costly telecom subsystems for the in-situ mission exploration elements. Orbiting relay satellites can serve as effective navigation aids by supporting earth-based tracking as well as providing Mars-centered radiometric data for mission elements approaching, in orbit, or on the surface of Mars. The relay satellite orbits may be selected to optimize navigation aid support and communication coverage for specific mission sets.

  19. Evolving earth-based and in-situ satellite network architectures for Mars communications and navigation support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Weinberg, Aaron; McOmber, Robert

    1991-09-01

    Results of on-going studies to develop navigation/telecommunications network concepts to support future robotic and human missions to Mars are presented. The performance and connectivity improvements provided by the relay network will permit use of simpler, lower performance, and less costly telecom subsystems for the in-situ mission exploration elements. Orbiting relay satellites can serve as effective navigation aids by supporting earth-based tracking as well as providing Mars-centered radiometric data for mission elements approaching, in orbit, or on the surface of Mars. The relay satellite orbits may be selected to optimize navigation aid support and communication coverage for specific mission sets.

  20. Architectural Choices and Challenges of Integrating Electronic Patient Questionnaires into the Electronic Medical Record to Support Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Barbara J; Gaehde, Stephan; Curtis, Clayton

    2008-01-01

    Strategies to deliver guideline-concordant, patient-centered care during office visits sometimes impose conflicting demands on clinicians. One way to help relieve time-constrained visits and to improve the patient-centeredness of care may be through patients electronically self-reporting data that flow automatically into an EMR note for clinician confirmation or editing, relieving physicians of some data entry and rote history-gathering tasks, thus freeing up time to allow clinicians to focus on significant issues and patient concerns while also increasing the likelihood that necessary data are gathered and available for decision-making. We developed a prototype to enable such data gathering and integration into the EMR. The lack of consistent provision of interfaces by vendors for sending data into EMRs and the idiosyncrasies of any particular EMR in the context of a particular organization’s IT infrastructure and policies pose architectural choices and challenges that healthcare organizations embarking on such IT projects may need to consider. PMID:18999024

  1. Extending multi-tenant architectures: a database model for a multi-target support in SaaS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, Antonio; Noguera, Manuel; Garrido, José Luis; Benghazi, Kawtar; Barjis, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Multi-tenant architectures (MTAs) are considered a cornerstone in the success of Software as a Service as a new application distribution formula. Multi-tenancy allows multiple customers (i.e. tenants) to be consolidated into the same operational system. This way, tenants run and share the same application instance as well as costs, which are significantly reduced. Functional needs vary from one tenant to another; either companies from different sectors run different types of applications or, although deploying the same functionality, they do differ in the extent of their complexity. In any case, MTA leaves one major concern regarding the companies' data, their privacy and security, which requires special attention to the data layer. In this article, we propose an extended data model that enhances traditional MTAs in respect of this concern. This extension - called multi-target - allows MT applications to host, manage and serve multiple functionalities within the same multi-tenant (MT) environment. The practical deployment of this approach will allow SaaS vendors to target multiple markets or address different levels of functional complexity and yet commercialise just one single MT application. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated via a case study of a real multi-tenancy multi-target (MT2) implementation, called Globalgest.

  2. Architectural choices and challenges of integrating electronic patient questionnaires into the electronic medical record to support patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Moore, Barbara J; Gaehde, Stephan; Curtis, Clayton

    2008-11-06

    Strategies to deliver guideline-concordant, patient-centered care during office visits sometimes impose conflicting demands on clinicians. One way to help relieve time-constrained visits and to improve the patient-centeredness of care may be through patients electronically self-reporting data that flow automatically into an EMR note for clinician confirmation or editing, relieving physicians of some data entry and rote history-gathering tasks, thus freeing up time to allow clinicians to focus on significant issues and patient concerns while also increasing the likelihood that necessary data are gathered and available for decision-making. We developed a prototype to enable such data gathering and integration into the EMR. The lack of consistent provision of interfaces by vendors for sending data into EMRs and the idiosyncrasies of any particular EMR in the context of a particular organizations IT infrastructure and policies pose architectural choices and challenges that healthcare organizations embarking on such IT projects may need to consider.

  3. The story of DB4GeO - A service-based geo-database architecture to support multi-dimensional data analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Martin; Kuper, Paul V.; Butwilowski, Edgar; Thomsen, Andreas; Jahn, Markus; Dittrich, André; Al-Doori, Mulhim; Golovko, Darya; Menninghaus, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    Multi-dimensional data analysis and visualization need efficient data handling to archive original data, to reproduce results on large data sets, and to retrieve space and time partitions just in time. This article tells the story of more than twenty years research resulting in the development of DB4GeO, a web service-based geo-database architecture for geo-objects to support the data handling of 3D/4D geo-applications. Starting from the roots and lessons learned, the concepts and implementation of DB4GeO are described in detail. Furthermore, experiences and extensions to DB4GeO are presented. Finally, conclusions and an outlook on further research also considering 3D/4D geo-applications for DB4GeO in the context of Dubai 2020 are given.

  4. An Approach for Hydrogen Recycling in a Closed-loop Life Support Architecture to Increase Oxygen Recovery Beyond State-of-the-Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee; Greenwood, Zachary; Alvarez, Giraldo

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art atmosphere revitalization life support technology on the International Space Station is theoretically capable of recovering 50% of the oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide via the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA). When coupled with a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA), oxygen recovery increases dramatically, thus drastically reducing the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane to predominantly form hydrogen and acetylene. Because of the unstable nature of acetylene, a down-stream separation system is required to remove acetylene from the hydrogen stream before it is recycled to the CRA. A new closed-loop architecture that includes a PPA and downstream Hydrogen Purification Assembly (HyPA) is proposed and discussed. Additionally, initial results of separation material testing are reported.

  5. MIC-SVM: Designing A Highly Efficient Support Vector Machine For Advanced Modern Multi-Core and Many-Core Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yang; Song, Shuaiwen; Fu, Haohuan; Marquez, Andres; Mehri Dehanavi, Maryam; Barker, Kevin J.; Cameron, Kirk; Randles, Amanda; Yang, Guangwen

    2014-08-16

    Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been widely used in data-mining and Big Data applications as modern commercial databases start to attach an increasing importance to the analytic capabilities. In recent years, SVM was adapted to the field of High Performance Computing for power/performance prediction, auto-tuning, and runtime scheduling. However, even at the risk of losing prediction accuracy due to insufficient runtime information, researchers can only afford to apply offline model training to avoid significant runtime training overhead. To address the challenges above, we designed and implemented MICSVM, a highly efficient parallel SVM for x86 based multi-core and many core architectures, such as the Intel Ivy Bridge CPUs and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor (MIC).

  6. Development of a real-time clinical decision support system upon the web mvc-based architecture for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A real-time clinical decision support system (RTCDSS) with interactive diagrams enables clinicians to instantly and efficiently track patients' clinical records (PCRs) and improve their quality of clinical care. We propose a RTCDSS to process online clinical informatics from multiple databases for clinical decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer based on Web Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture, by which the system can easily be adapted to different diseases and applications. Methods We designed a framework upon the Web MVC-based architecture in which the reusable and extractable models can be conveniently adapted to other hospital information systems and which allows for efficient database integration. Then, we determined the clinical variables of the prostate cancer treatment based on participating clinicians' opinions and developed a computational model to determine the pretreatment parameters. Furthermore, the components of the RTCDSS integrated PCRs and decision factors for real-time analysis to provide evidence-based diagrams upon the clinician-oriented interface for visualization of treatment guidance and health risk assessment. Results The resulting system can improve quality of clinical treatment by allowing clinicians to concurrently analyze and evaluate the clinical markers of prostate cancer patients with instantaneous clinical data and evidence-based diagrams which can automatically identify pretreatment parameters. Moreover, the proposed RTCDSS can aid interactions between patients and clinicians. Conclusions Our proposed framework supports online clinical informatics, evaluates treatment risks, offers interactive guidance, and provides real-time reference for decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer. The developed clinician-oriented interface can assist clinicians in conveniently presenting evidence-based information to patients and can be readily adapted to an existing hospital information system and be easily

  7. Development of a real-time clinical decision support system upon the Web MVC-based architecture for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsueh-Chun; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Chang, Chih-Hung; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Wen-Miin; Wang, Jong-Yi Wang

    2011-03-08

    A real-time clinical decision support system (RTCDSS) with interactive diagrams enables clinicians to instantly and efficiently track patients' clinical records (PCRs) and improve their quality of clinical care. We propose a RTCDSS to process online clinical informatics from multiple databases for clinical decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer based on Web Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture, by which the system can easily be adapted to different diseases and applications. We designed a framework upon the Web MVC-based architecture in which the reusable and extractable models can be conveniently adapted to other hospital information systems and which allows for efficient database integration. Then, we determined the clinical variables of the prostate cancer treatment based on participating clinicians' opinions and developed a computational model to determine the pretreatment parameters. Furthermore, the components of the RTCDSS integrated PCRs and decision factors for real-time analysis to provide evidence-based diagrams upon the clinician-oriented interface for visualization of treatment guidance and health risk assessment. The resulting system can improve quality of clinical treatment by allowing clinicians to concurrently analyze and evaluate the clinical markers of prostate cancer patients with instantaneous clinical data and evidence-based diagrams which can automatically identify pretreatment parameters. Moreover, the proposed RTCDSS can aid interactions between patients and clinicians. Our proposed framework supports online clinical informatics, evaluates treatment risks, offers interactive guidance, and provides real-time reference for decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer. The developed clinician-oriented interface can assist clinicians in conveniently presenting evidence-based information to patients and can be readily adapted to an existing hospital information system and be easily applied in other chronic diseases.

  8. Software architecture design domain

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Software architectures can provide a basis for the capture and subsequent reuse of design knowledge. The goal of software architecture is to allow the design of a system to take place at a higher level of abstraction; a level concerned with components, connections, constraints, rationale. This architectural view of software adds a new layer of abstraction to the traditional design phase of software development. It has resulted in a flurry of activity towards techniques, tools, and architectural design languages developed specifically to assist with this activity. An analysis of architectural descriptions, even though they differ in notation, shows a common set of key constructs that are present across widely varying domains. These common aspects form a core set of constructs that should belong to any ADL in order to for the language to offer the ability to specify software systems at the architectural level. This analysis also revealed a second set of constructs which served to expand the first set thereby improving the syntax and semantics. These constructs are classified according to whether they provide representation and analysis support for architectures belonging to many varying application domains (domain-independent construct class) or to a particular application domain (domain-dependent constructs). This paper presents the constructs of these two classes, their placement in the architecture design domain and shows how they may be used to classify, select, and analyze proclaimed architectural design languages (ADLs).

  9. Preparation of a self-supporting cell architecture mimic by water channel confined photocrosslinking within a lamellar structured hydrogel.

    SciTech Connect

    Grubjesic, S.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Firestone, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    A self-supporting biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water is described. An aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid, and a zwitterionic co-surfactant self-assembles into a multilamellar-structured physical gel at room temperature as determined by SAXS. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitiator within the water layers does not alter the self-assembled structure. ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy reveals that photoirradiation initiates the crosslinking between the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA, forming a polymeric network within the aqueous domains. The primitive cytoskeleton mimic serves to stabilize the amphiphile bilayer, converting the physical gel into an elastic self-supporting chemical gel. Storage under ambient conditions causes dehydration of the hydrogel to 5 wt % water which can be reversed by swelling in water. The fully water swollen gel (85 wt % water) remains self-supporting but converts to a non-lamellar structure. As water is lost the chemical gel regains its lamellar structure. Incubation of the hydrogel in nonpolar organic solvents that do not dissolve the uncrosslinked lipid component (hexane) allow for swelling without loss of structural integrity. Chloroform, which readily solubilizes the lipid, causes irreversible loss of the lamellar structure.

  10. Novel Architecture for supporting medical decision making of different data types based on Fuzzy Cognitive Map Framework.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Elpiniki; Stylios, Chrysostomos; Groumpos, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Medical problems involve different types of variables and data, which have to be processed, analyzed and synthesized in order to reach a decision and/or conclude to a diagnosis. Usually, information and data set are both symbolic and numeric but most of the well-known data analysis methods deal with only one kind of data. Even when fuzzy approaches are considered, which are not depended on the scales of variables, usually only numeric data is considered. The medical decision support methods usually are accessed in only one type of available data. Thus, sophisticated methods have been proposed such as integrated hybrid learning approaches to process symbolic and numeric data for the decision support tasks. Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM) is an efficient modelling method, which is based on human knowledge and experience and it can handle with uncertainty and it is constructed by extracted knowledge in the form of fuzzy rules. The FCM model can be enhanced if a fuzzy rule base (IF-THEN rules) is available. This rule base could be derived by a number of machine learning and knowledge extraction methods. Here it is introduced a hybrid attempt to handle situations with different types of available medical and/or clinical data and with difficulty to handle them for decision support tasks using soft computing techniques.

  11. Screening Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (CCDA) Documents for Sensitive Data Using a Rule-Based Decision Support System.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz H; Pabbathi, Deepika; Schaeffer, Molly; Goldberg, Howard S

    2017-02-08

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Stage 2 final rule requires that eligible hospitals provide a visit summary electronically at transitions of care in order to qualify for "meaningful use" incentive payments. However, Massachusetts state law and Federal law prohibit the transmission of documents containing "sensitive" data unless there is a new patient consent for each transmission. To describe the implementation and evaluation of a rule-based decision support system used to screen transition of care documents for sensitive data. We implemented a rule-based document screening system to identify transition of care documents that might contain sensitive data. The transmission of detected documents is withheld until a new patient consent is obtained. The documents that were flagged as containing sensitive data were reviewed in two different time periods to verify that the decision support system was not missing documents or withholding more documents than necessary. The rule-based screening system has been in regular production use for the past 18 months. During the first evaluation period, 3% of 5,841 documents were identified as containing sensitive data (true-positive rate of 44%). After additional enhancements to the rules, the system was evaluated a second time and 4.5% of 6,935 documents were identified as containing sensitive data (true-positive rate of 98.4%). The analysis of the system demonstrates that production rules can be used to automatically screen the content of transition of care documents for sensitive data. The utilization of the rule-based decision support system enabled our hospitals to achieve meaningful use and, at the same time, remain compliant with state and federal laws.

  12. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  13. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  14. Project Integration Architecture: Application Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications is enabled.

  15. Incomplete recovery of myocyte contractile function despite improvement of myocardial architecture with left ventricular assist device support.

    PubMed

    Ambardekar, Amrut V; Walker, John S; Walker, Lori A; Cleveland, Joseph C; Lowes, Brian D; Buttrick, Peter M

    2011-07-01

    Unloading a failing heart with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) can improve ejection fraction (EF) and LV size; however, recovery with LVAD explantation is rare. We hypothesized that evaluation of myocyte contractility and biochemistry at the sarcomere level before and after LVAD may explain organ-level changes. Paired LV tissue samples were frozen from 8 patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy at LVAD implantation (before LVAD) and before cardiac transplantation (after LVAD). These were compared with 8 nonfailing hearts. Isolated skinned myocytes were purified and attached to a force transducer, and dimensions, maximum calcium-saturated force, calcium sensitivity, and myofilament cooperativity were assessed. Relative isoform abundance and phosphorylation levels of sarcomeric contractile proteins were measured. With LVAD support, the unloaded EF improved (10.0±1.0% to 25.6±11.0%, P=0.007), LV size decreased (LV internal dimension at end diastole, 7.6±1.2 to 4.9±1.4 cm; P<0.001), and myocyte dimensions decreased (cross-sectional area, 1247±346 to 638±254 μm(2); P=0.001). Maximum calcium-saturated force improved after LVAD (3.6±0.9 to 7.3±1.8 mN/mm(2), P<0.001) implantation but was still lower than in nonfailing hearts (7.3±1.8 versus 17.6±1.8 mN/mm(2), P<0.001). An increase in troponin I (TnI) phosphorylation after LVAD implantation was noted, but protein kinase C phosphorylation of TnI decreased. Biochemical changes of other sarcomeric proteins were not observed after LVAD. There is significant improvement in LV and myocyte size with LVAD, but there is only partial recovery of EF and myocyte contractility. LVAD support was associated only with biochemical changes in TnI, suggesting that alternate mechanisms might contribute to contractile changes after LVAD and that additional interventions may be needed to alter biochemical remodeling of the sarcomere to further enhance myofilament and organ-level recovery.

  16. The Development of a Remote Sensor System and Decision Support Systems Architecture to Monitor Resistance Development in Transgenic Crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacas, Joseph; Glaser, John; Copenhaver, Kenneth; May, George; Stephens, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared that "significant benefits accrue to growers, the public, and the environment" from the use of transgenic pesticidal crops due to reductions in pesticide usage for crop pest management. Large increases in the global use of transgenic pesticidal crops has reduced the amounts of broad spectrum pesticides used to manage pest populations, improved yield and reduced the environmental impact of crop management. A significant threat to the continued use of this technology is the evolution of resistance in insect pest populations to the insecticidal Bt toxins expressed by the plants. Management of transgenic pesticidal crops with an emphasis on conservation of Bt toxicity in field populations of insect pests is important to the future of sustainable agriculture. A vital component of this transgenic pesticidal crop management is establishing the proof of concept basic understanding, situational awareness, and monitoring and decision support system tools for more than 133650 square kilometers (33 million acres) of bio-engineered corn and cotton for development of insect resistance . Early and recent joint NASA, US EPA and ITD remote imagery flights and ground based field experiments have provided very promising research results that will potentially address future requirements for crop management capabilities.

  17. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bradley R; Drake, Eric J; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C; Gulick, Andrew M

    2016-10-21

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  18. An integrated Rotorcraft Avionics/Controls Architecture to support advanced controls and low-altitude guidance flight research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, Robert A.; Doane, Douglas H.; Eshow, Michelle M.; Aiken, Edwin W.; Hindson, William S.

    1992-01-01

    Salient design features of a new NASA/Army research rotorcraft--the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) are described. Using a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter as a baseline vehicle, the RASCAL will be a flying laboratory capable of supporting the research requirements of major NASA and Army guidance, control, and display research programs. The paper describes the research facility requirements of these programs together with other critical constraints on the design of the research system. Research program schedules demand a phased development approach, wherein specific research capability milestones are met and flight research projects are flown throughout the complete development cycle of the RASCAL. This development approach is summarized, and selected features of the research system are described. The research system includes a real-time obstacle detection and avoidance system which will generate low-altitude guidance commands to the pilot on a wide field-of-view, color helmet-mounted display and a full-authority, programmable, fault-tolerant/fail-safe, fly-by-wire flight control system.

  19. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  20. Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, C.P.

    1999-05-14

    A Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture is described that allows a simulation to be automatically distributed over a heterogeneous network of computers and executed with very little human direction. A prototype Framework is presented that implements the elements of the Architecture and demonstrates the feasibility of the concepts. It provides a basis for a future, improved Framework that will support legacy models. Because the Framework is implemented in Java, it may be installed on almost any modern computer system.

  1. Architecture and Monumental (Study About form in Architecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pane, I. F.; Suwantoro, H.; Zahrah, W.; Sianipar, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    The architecture develops along with the development of human history. So architecture is the field of study related to human physically and non-physically. The development of architecture is a long process within the culture the architecture develops. Physically, architecture has different shape from every historical phase. The different shape has different historical background. The important building on one period is always impressed. This impression still remains until now, in this postmodern era. From the phenomena appear in architecture so this study focused on the monumental buildings by analyzing the form of the building in this era. The objects of the study are the buildings in Medan which represent the monumental impression (Maimun Palace). The qualitative approach is applied to give more knowledge in history, theory, and criticsm of architecture. The results of this study described that the monumental impression of the object of study and forms of building support that impression.

  2. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  3. Project Integration Architecture: Architectural Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2001-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. By being a single, self-revealing architecture, the ability to develop single tools, for example a single graphical user interface, to span all applications is enabled. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications becomes possible, Object-encapsulation further allows information to become in a sense self-aware, knowing things such as its own dimensionality and providing functionality appropriate to its kind.

  4. Experimental Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of the Centre for Architectural Structures and Technology at the University of Manitoba, including the educational context and design goals. Includes building plans and photographs. (EV)

  5. The flight telerobotic servicer: From functional architecture to computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, Ronald; Fiala, John

    1989-01-01

    After a brief tutorial on the NASA/National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Model for Telerobot Control System Architecture (NASREM) functional architecture, the approach to its implementation is shown. First, interfaces must be defined which are capable of supporting the known algorithms. This is illustrated by considering the interfaces required for the SERVO level of the NASREM functional architecture. After interface definition, the specific computer architecture for the implementation must be determined. This choice is obviously technology dependent. An example illustrating one possible mapping of the NASREM functional architecture to a particular set of computers which implements it is shown. The result of choosing the NASREM functional architecture is that it provides a technology independent paradigm which can be mapped into a technology dependent implementation capable of evolving with technology in the laboratory and in space.

  6. QUEST2: Sysdtem architecture deliverable set

    SciTech Connect

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-02-27

    This document contains the system architecture and related documents which were developed during the Preliminary Analysis/System Architecture phase of the Quality, Environmental, Safety T-racking System redesign (QUEST2) project. Each discreet document in this deliverable set applies to a analytic effort supporting the architectural model of QUEST2. The P+ methodology cites a list of P+ documents normally included in a ``typical`` system architecture. Some of these were deferred to the release development phase of the project. The documents included in this deliverable set represent the system architecture itself. Related to that architecture are some decision support documents which provided needed information for management reviews that occurred during April. Consequently, the deliverables in this set were logically grouped and provided to support customer requirements. The remaining System Architecture Phase deliverables will be provided as a ``Supporting Documents`` deliverable set for the first release.

  7. Lunar architecture and urbanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlement that dominate our current view. By adding modern topics in space engineering, planetology, life support, human factors, material invention, and conservation to their already renaissance array of expertise, urban designers can responsibly apply ancient, proven standards to the exciting new opportunities afforded by space. Inescapable facts about the Moon set real boundaries within which tenable lunar urbanism and its component architecture must eventually develop.

  8. Classifying Enterprise Architecture Analysis Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckl, Sabine; Matthes, Florian; Schweda, Christian M.

    Enterprise architecture (EA) management forms a commonly accepted means to enhance the alignment of business and IT, and to support the managed evolution of the enterprise. One major challenge of EA management is to provide decision support by analyzing as-is states of the architecture as well as assessing planned future states. Thus, different kinds of analysis regarding the EA exist, each relying on certain conditions and demands for models, methods, and techniques.

  9. Avionics System Architecture Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Hall, Ronald; Traylor, marcus; Whitfield, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT) is a computer program intended for use during the avionics-system-architecture- design phase of the process of designing a spacecraft for a specific mission. ASAT enables simulation of the dynamics of the command-and-data-handling functions of the spacecraft avionics in the scenarios in which the spacecraft is expected to operate. ASAT is built upon I-Logix Statemate MAGNUM, providing a complement of dynamic system modeling tools, including a graphical user interface (GUI), modeling checking capabilities, and a simulation engine. ASAT augments this with a library of predefined avionics components and additional software to support building and analyzing avionics hardware architectures using these components.

  10. Application of Reliability and Linear Regression to Enterprise Architecture in Support of the US Air Force’s Capability Review and Risk Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Choices. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall Inc, 1979. Hurwitz, Judith and others. Service Oriented Architecture for Dummies . Hoboken, NJ: For ... Dummies , 2006. HQ USAF. “10 Step Brief.” Briefing Slides. 15 September 2006. -----. “A5X-C Capability Based Assessment Methodology.” Briefing Slides

  11. Guiding Architects in Selecting Architectural Evolution Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Ciraci, Selim; Sozer, Hasan; Aksit, Mehmet

    2011-09-09

    Although there exist methods and tools to support architecture evolution, the derivation and evaluation of alternative evolution paths are realized manually. In this paper, we introduce an approach, where architecture specification is converted to a graph representation. Based on this representation, we automatically generate possible evolution paths, evalute quality attributes for different architecture configurations, and optimize the selection of a particular path accordingly. We illustrate our approach by modeling the software architecture evolution of a crisis management system.

  12. Architectural Drafting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ronald; Yancey, Bruce

    Designed to be used as a supplement to a two-book course in basic drafting, these instructional materials consisting of 14 units cover the process of drawing all working drawings necessary for residential buildings. The following topics are covered in the individual units: introduction to architectural drafting, lettering and tools, site…

  13. Box Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Project offers grades 3-8 students hands-on design practice creating built environments to solve a society-based architectural problem. Students plan buildings, draw floor plans, and make scale models of the structures that are then used in related interdisciplinary activities. (Author)

  14. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  15. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  16. Architectural Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doornek, Richard R.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan developed around the work of architectural muralist Richard Haas. Discusses the significance of mural painting and gives key concepts for the lesson. Lists class activities for the elementary and secondary grades. Provides a photograph of the Haas mural on the Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel, 1986. (GG)

  17. Architecture? Absolutely!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1973

    1973-01-01

    By designing processes to translate social needs into physical terms, the Urban Center at the University of Louisville is turning out its own unique brand of architecture -- one that produces no buildings but that has a real effect on the future of the physical environment. (Author)

  18. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  19. The NASA Space Communications Data Networking Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, David J.; Hooke, Adrian J.; Freeman, Kenneth; Rush, John J.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Space Communications Architecture Working Group (SCAWG) has recently been developing an integrated agency-wide space communications architecture in order to provide the necessary communication and navigation capabilities to support NASA's new Exploration and Science Programs. A critical element of the space communications architecture is the end-to-end Data Networking Architecture, which must provide a wide range of services required for missions ranging from planetary rovers to human spaceflight, and from sub-orbital space to deep space. Requirements for a higher degree of user autonomy and interoperability between a variety of elements must be accommodated within an architecture that necessarily features minimum operational complexity. The architecture must also be scalable and evolvable to meet mission needs for the next 25 years. This paper will describe the recommended NASA Data Networking Architecture, present some of the rationale for the recommendations, and will illustrate an application of the architecture to example NASA missions.

  20. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  1. Design, Implementation and Evaluation of an Architecture based on the CDA R2 Document Repository to Provide Support to the Contingency Plan.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fernando; Luna, Daniel; Sittig, Dean F; Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán González

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive use of electronic records in healthcare increases the dependency on technology due to the lack of physical backup for the records. Downtime in the Electronic Health Record system is unavoidable, due to software, infrastructure and power failures as well as natural disasters, so there is a need to develop a contingency plan ensuring patient care continuity and minimizing risks for health care delivery. To mitigate these risks, two applications were developed allowing healthcare delivery providers to retrieve clinical information using the Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2) document repository as the information source. In this paper we describe the strategy, implementation and results; and provide an evaluation of effectiveness.

  2. Space station needs, attributes, and architectural options study. Volume 2: Program options, architecture, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Mission scenarios and space station architectures are discussed. Electrical power subsystems (EPS), environmental control and life support, subsystems (ECLSS), and reaction control subsystem (RCS) architectures are addressed. Thermal control subsystems, (TCS), guidance/navigation and control (GN and C), information management systems IMS), communications and tracking (C and T), and propellant transfer and storage systems architectures are discussed.

  3. Space station needs, attributes, and architectural options study. Volume 2: Program options, architecture, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-04-01

    Mission scenarios and space station architectures are discussed. Electrical power subsystems (EPS), environmental control and life support, subsystems (ECLSS), and reaction control subsystem (RCS) architectures are addressed. Thermal control subsystems, (TCS), guidance/navigation and control (GN and C), information management systems IMS), communications and tracking (C and T), and propellant transfer and storage systems architectures are discussed.

  4. The importance of architectures for interoperability.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd; Oemig, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The paradigm changes health systems are faced with result in highly complex and distributed systems requiring flexibility, autonomy, but first of all advanced interoperability. In that context, understanding the architecture of the system to be supported as well as the process to meet the intended business objectives is crucial. Unfortunately, there is a lot of confusion around the term architecture, which doesn't facilitate the integration of systems. Using a reference architecture model and framework, relevant existing architectural approaches are analyzed, compared and critically discussed, but also harmonized using a reference architectural model and framework.

  5. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofinowski, E. J.; Behnke, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a comprehensive distributed system designed to support NASA's Earth Science missions. Designed in the early 1990’s, EOSDIS has been archiving, managing, and distributing Earth science data since 1994. During that time the system has evolved and adapted with new technology, additional data sources, and expanded services and products. EOSDIS supports the collection and management of a variety of Earth science data within a single system. We present the EOSDIS as a reference architecture for managing Earth science data. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture identifies areas of functionality, their interactions, and how they collectively serve to make Earth science data and data products available to users. It establishes a common terminology to identify the system elements, connections, styles and processes with which to discuss the variety of implementations across EOSDIS. Many of the system and subsystem elements used in EOSDIS are candidates for re-use by other existing or planned applications. Scenarios based on the diversity of data collection are presented and are used to describe representative implementations of the current system. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture serves as a template to facilitate future implementations of science data system functions and the incorporation of additional data providers (e.g., missions, instruments, or campaigns) into EOSDIS.

  6. Intuitive control of mobile robots: an architecture for autonomous adaptive dynamic behaviour integration.

    PubMed

    Melidis, Christos; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Marocco, Davide

    2017-06-05

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to human-robot control. Taking inspiration from behaviour-based robotics and self-organisation principles, we present an interfacing mechanism, with the ability to adapt both towards the user and the robotic morphology. The aim is for a transparent mechanism connecting user and robot, allowing for a seamless integration of control signals and robot behaviours. Instead of the user adapting to the interface and control paradigm, the proposed architecture allows the user to shape the control motifs in their way of preference, moving away from the case where the user has to read and understand an operation manual, or it has to learn to operate a specific device. Starting from a tabula rasa basis, the architecture is able to identify control patterns (behaviours) for the given robotic morphology and successfully merge them with control signals from the user, regardless of the input device used. The structural components of the interface are presented and assessed both individually and as a whole. Inherent properties of the architecture are presented and explained. At the same time, emergent properties are presented and investigated. As a whole, this paradigm of control is found to highlight the potential for a change in the paradigm of robotic control, and a new level in the taxonomy of human in the loop systems.

  7. Multiprocessor architecture: Synthesis and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1990-01-01

    Multiprocessor computed architecture evaluation for structural computations is the focus of the research effort described. Results obtained are expected to lead to more efficient use of existing architectures and to suggest designs for new, application specific, architectures. The brief descriptions given outline a number of related efforts directed toward this purpose. The difficulty is analyzing an existing architecture or in designing a new computer architecture lies in the fact that the performance of a particular architecture, within the context of a given application, is determined by a number of factors. These include, but are not limited to, the efficiency of the computation algorithm, the programming language and support environment, the quality of the program written in the programming language, the multiplicity of the processing elements, the characteristics of the individual processing elements, the interconnection network connecting processors and non-local memories, and the shared memory organization covering the spectrum from no shared memory (all local memory) to one global access memory. These performance determiners may be loosely classified as being software or hardware related. This distinction is not clear or even appropriate in many cases. The effect of the choice of algorithm is ignored by assuming that the algorithm is specified as given. Effort directed toward the removal of the effect of the programming language and program resulted in the design of a high-level parallel programming language. Two characteristics of the fundamental structure of the architecture (memory organization and interconnection network) are examined.

  8. A high performance architecture for prolog

    SciTech Connect

    Dobry, T.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence is entering the mainstream of computer applications and as techniques are developed and integrated into a wide variety of areas they are beginning to tax the processing power of conventional architecture. To meet this demand, specialized architectures providing support for the unique features of symbolic processing languages are emerging. The goal of the research presented here is to show that an architecture specialized for Prolog can achieve a ten-fold improvement in performance over conventional general-purpose architecture, and presents such an architecture for high performance execution of Prolog programs. The architecture is based on the abstract machine description known as the Warren Abstract Machine (WAM). The execution model of the WAM is described and extended to provide a complete Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) for Prolog known as the PLM. The ISA is then realized in a microarchitecture and finally in a hardware design.

  9. High-performance architecture for Prolog

    SciTech Connect

    Dobry, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is entering the mainstream of computer applications and, as techniques are developed and integrated into a wide variety of areas, they are beginning to tax the processing power of conventional architectures. To meet this demand, specialized architectures providing support for the unique features of symbolic processing languages are emerging. The goal of the research presented here is to show that an architecture specialized for Prolog can achieve a tenfold improvement in performance over conventional, general-purpose architectures. This dissertation presents such an architecture for high performance execution of Prolog programs. The architecture is based on the abstract machine description introduced by David H.D. Warren known as the Warren Abstract Machine (WAM). The execution model of the WAM is described and extended to provide a complete Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) for Prolog known as the PLM. This ISA is then realized in a microarchitecture and finally in a hardware design.

  10. Executable Architecture Research at Old Dominion University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolk, Andreas; Shuman, Edwin A.; Garcia, Johnny J.

    2011-01-01

    Executable Architectures allow the evaluation of system architectures not only regarding their static, but also their dynamic behavior. However, the systems engineering community do not agree on a common formal specification of executable architectures. To close this gap and identify necessary elements of an executable architecture, a modeling language, and a modeling formalism is topic of ongoing PhD research. In addition, systems are generally defined and applied in an operational context to provide capabilities and enable missions. To maximize the benefits of executable architectures, a second PhD effort introduces the idea of creating an executable context in addition to the executable architecture. The results move the validation of architectures from the current information domain into the knowledge domain and improve the reliability of such validation efforts. The paper presents research and results of both doctoral research efforts and puts them into a common context of state-of-the-art of systems engineering methods supporting more agility.

  11. Assured information flow capping architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, M. D.; Carvin, N. A.

    1985-05-01

    The Tactical Air Control System (TACS) is that set of Tactical Air Force assets used to assess the air and ground situation, and to plan, allocate, commit, and control assigned resources. Previous studies noted that the TACS elements should be more highly distributed to improve survivability in the battlefield of the future. This document reports on the results of the Assured Information Flow Capping Architecture study, which developed governing concepts for communications architectures that can support the information flow requirements of a future, distributed TACS. Architecture comprising existing and planned communications equipment were postulated and compared with a set of goals to identify deficiencies. Architectures using new equipment that resolve many of the deficiencies were then postulated, and areas needing further investigation were identified.

  12. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    support time-constrained publish-and- subscribe messaging consistent with the Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) architecture. eGents should run on any...Java platform; it was tested on NT/2000 machines; it connects to garden variety SMTP/POP3 email servers. A ported eGents runs on KVM (J2ME CLDC 1.0...applet that runs in IE and Netscape; its server uses Apache web server and Thunderstone’s Webinator 2.5 search engine, and can interface to other search

  13. Variation in photosynthetic performance and hydraulic architecture across European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) populations supports the case for local adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Ismael; Cano, Francisco Javier; Gascó, Antonio; Cochard, Hervé; Nardini, Andrea; Mancha, Jose Antonio; López, Rosana; Sánchez-Gómez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide new insights into how intraspecific variability in the response of key functional traits to drought dictates the interplay between gas-exchange parameters and the hydraulic architecture of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Considering the relationships between hydraulic and leaf functional traits, we tested whether local adaptation to water stress occurs in this species. To address these objectives, we conducted a glasshouse experiment in which 2-year-old saplings from six beech populations were subjected to different watering treatments. These populations encompassed central and marginal areas of the range, with variation in macro- and microclimatic water availability. The results highlight subtle but significant differences among populations in their functional response to drought. Interpopulation differences in hydraulic traits suggest that vulnerability to cavitation is higher in populations with higher sensitivity to drought. However, there was no clear relationship between variables related to hydraulic efficiency, such as xylem-specific hydraulic conductivity or stomatal conductance, and those that reflect resistance to xylem cavitation (i.e., Ψ(12), the water potential corresponding to a 12% loss of stem hydraulic conductivity). The results suggest that while a trade-off between photosynthetic capacity at the leaf level and hydraulic function of xylem could be established across populations, it functions independently of the compromise between safety and efficiency of the hydraulic system with regard to water use at the interpopulation level. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Integration of cell line and clinical trial genome-wide analyses supports a polygenic architecture of paclitaxel-induced sensory peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Heather E.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Wing, Claudia; Njiaju, Uchenna O.; Njoku, Chidiamara; Baldwin, R. Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Jiang, Chen; Watson, Dorothy; Shterev, Ivo; Kubo, Michiaki; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Winer, Eric; Hudis, Clifford; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ratain, Mark J.; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Cox, Nancy J.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We sought to demonstrate the relevance of a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) model in the discovery of clinically relevant genetic variants affecting chemotherapeutic response by comparing LCL genome-wide association study (GWAS) results to clinical GWAS results. Experimental Design A GWAS of paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity was performed in 247 LCLs from the HapMap Project and compared to a GWAS of sensory peripheral neuropathy in breast cancer patients (n=855) treated with paclitaxel in the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 40101 trial. Significant enrichment was assessed by permutation resampling analysis. Results We observed an enrichment of LCL cytotoxicity-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the sensory peripheral neuropathy-associated SNPs from the clinical trial with concordant allelic directions of effect (empirical P = 0.007). Of the 24 SNPs that overlap between the clinical trial (P < 0.05) and the preclinical cytotoxicity study (P < 0.001), 19 of them are expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), which is a significant enrichment of this functional class (empirical P = 0.0447). One of these eQTLs is located in RFX2, which encodes a member of the DNA-binding regulatory factor X family. Decreased expression of this gene by siRNA resulted in increased sensitivity of NS-1 (rat pheochromocytoma) cells to paclitaxel as measured by reduced neurite outgrowth and increased cytotoxicity, functionally validating the involvement of RFX2 in nerve cell response to paclitaxel. Conclusions The enrichment results and functional example imply that cellular models of chemotherapeutic toxicity may capture components of the underlying polygenic architecture of related traits in patients. PMID:23204130

  15. Architectural Methodology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhas, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The establishment of conventions between two communicating entities in the end systems is essential for communications. Examples of the kind of decisions that need to be made in establishing a protocol convention include the nature of the data representation, the for-mat and the speed of the date representation over the communications path, and the sequence of control messages (if any) which are sent. One of the main functions of a protocol is to establish a standard path between the communicating entities. This is necessary to create a virtual communications medium with certain desirable characteristics. In essence, it is the function of the protocol to transform the characteristics of the physical communications environment into a more useful virtual communications model. The final function of a protocol is to establish standard data elements for communications over the path; that is, the protocol serves to create a virtual data element for exchange. Other systems may be constructed in which the transferred element is a program or a job. Finally, there are special purpose applications in which the element to be transferred may be a complex structure such as all or part of a graphic display. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to describe the methodologies used in developing a protocol architecture for an in-space Internet node. The node would support NASA:s four mission areas: Earth Science; Space Science; Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS); Aerospace Technology. This report presents the methodology for developing the protocol architecture. The methodology addresses the architecture for a computer communications environment. It does not address an analog voice architecture.

  16. Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belshe, Andrea; Sutton, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    The Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture project was established to meet the certification requirements of the Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) V2.0 Federal Enterprise Architecture Certification (FEAC) Institute program and to provide added value to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Application Portfolio Management process. The MARS Architecture aims to: (1) address the NASA MSFC Chief Information Officer (CIO) strategic initiative to improve Application Portfolio Management (APM) by optimizing investments and improving portfolio performance, and (2) develop a decision-aiding capability by which applications registered within the MSFC application portfolio can be analyzed and considered for retirement or decommission. The MARS Architecture describes a to-be target capability that supports application portfolio analysis against scoring measures (based on value) and overall portfolio performance objectives (based on enterprise needs and policies). This scoring and decision-aiding capability supports the process by which MSFC application investments are realigned or retired from the application portfolio. The MARS Architecture is a multi-phase effort to: (1) conduct strategic architecture planning and knowledge development based on the DoDAF V2.0 six-step methodology, (2) describe one architecture through multiple viewpoints, (3) conduct portfolio analyses based on a defined operational concept, and (4) enable a new capability to support the MSFC enterprise IT management mission, vision, and goals. This report documents Phase 1 (Strategy and Design), which includes discovery, planning, and development of initial architecture viewpoints. Phase 2 will move forward the process of building the architecture, widening the scope to include application realignment (in addition to application retirement), and validating the underlying architecture logic before moving into Phase 3. The MARS Architecture key stakeholders are most

  17. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic - oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria

  18. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; ...

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic -more » oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria« less

  19. Operational Information Management Security Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This effort developed and demonstrated a basic security architecture for the Operational Information Management (OIM) project...previously known as Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI), with a particular focus on authentication and authorization. New security techniques...concepts of user privileges and access policies were investigated to support efficient and accreditable access control in a multi-level, secure environment

  20. Computer architecture and parallel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.; Faye, A.

    1984-01-01

    The book is intended as a text to support two semesters of courses in computer architecture at the college senior and graduate levels. There are excellent problems for students at the end of each chapter. The authors have divided the use of computers into the following four levels of sophistication: data processing, information processing, knowledge processing, and intelligence processing.

  1. Open Architecture / FORCEnet Experimentation Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-04

    Louis CNI LCS 11OA – FORCEnet Experimentation • Requirements input (SME/warfighters) • Metrics (MOP/MOE) • Data Collection and Analysis Plan ( DCAP ...MOE) • Data Collection and Analysis Plan ( DCAP ) Environment Design • Experiment Architecture • CONOPS/Scenario supporting metrics Fosters Teamwork

  2. Architecture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not…

  3. Architecture as Design Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1989-01-01

    Explores the use of analogies in architectural design, the importance of Gestalt theory and aesthetic cannons in understanding and being sensitive to architecture. Emphasizes the variation between public and professional appreciation of architecture. Notes that an understanding of architectural process enables students to improve the aesthetic…

  4. Architecture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not…

  5. MSAT network architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, N. G.; Skerry, B.

    1990-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) communications system will support mobile voice and data services using circuit switched and packet switched facilities with interconnection to the public switched telephone network and private networks. Control of the satellite network will reside in a Network Control System (NCS) which is being designed to be extremely flexible to provide for the operation of the system initially with one multi-beam satellite, but with capability to add additional satellites which may have other beam configurations. The architecture of the NCS is described. The signalling system must be capable of supporting the protocols for the assignment of circuits for mobile public telephone and private network calls as well as identifying packet data networks. The structure of a straw-man signalling system is discussed.

  6. Savannah River Site computing architecture migration guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-30

    The SRS Computing Architecture is a vision statement for site computing which enumerates the strategies which will guide SRS computing efforts for the 1990s. Each strategy is supported by a number of feature statements which clarify the strategy by providing additional detail. Since it is a strategic planning document, the Architecture has sitewide applicability and endorsement but does not attempt to specify implementation details. It does, however, specify that a document will be developed to guide the migration from the current site environment to that envisioned by the new architecture. The goal of this document, the SRS Computing Architecture Migration Guide, is to identify specific strategic and tactical tasks which would have to be completed to fully implement the architectural vision for site computing as well as a recommended sequence and timeframe for addressing these tasks. It takes into account the expected availability of technology, the existing installed base, and interdependencies among architectural components and objectives.

  7. Using Multimedia for Teaching Analysis in History of Modern Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perryman, Garry

    This paper presents a case for the development and support of a computer-based interactive multimedia program for teaching analysis in community college architecture design programs. Analysis in architecture design is an extremely important strategy for the teaching of higher-order thinking skills, which senior schools of architecture look for in…

  8. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture, Tutorial Part 2 - Detailed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handler, Louis

    2014-01-01

    The STRS architecture detail presentation presents each requirement in the STRS Architecture Standard with some examples and supporting information. The purpose is to give a platform provider, application provider, or application integrator a better, more detailed understanding of the STRS Architecture Standard and its use.

  9. On the Inevitable Intertwining of Requirements and Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutcliffe, Alistair

    The chapter investigates the relationship between architecture and requirements, arguing that architectural issues need to be addressed early in the RE process. Three trends are driving architectural implications for RE: the growth of intelligent, context-aware and adaptable systems. First the relationship between architecture and requirements is considered from a theoretical viewpoint of problem frames and abstract conceptual models. The relationships between architectural decisions and non-functional requirements is reviewed, and then the impact of architecture on the RE process is assessed using a case study of developing configurable, semi-intelligent software to support medical researchers in e-science domains.

  10. Trans-Global Mission Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Barbara V.

    1996-01-01

    Mission operations include the utilization of both space and ground resources to achieve mission objectives. Future architectures will make the spacecraft a node on a distributed system, thus expanding the scope of missions beyond the global scale. The history and evolution of planetary mission operations are outlined, together with the current global involvement in planetary missions. The modular nature and reuse of the supporting ground data systems, and the inclusion of automation and dedicated software in space missions, are discussed. A trans-global mission architecture is presented, and consists of an extension of a layered reusable mission operations architecture to create an open ground/space operations system. Concurrent mission engineering with such trans-global structures is discussed.

  11. Lunar Navigation Architecture Design Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Getchius, Joel; Holt, Greg; Moreau, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program is aiming to establish a long-term presence on the lunar surface. The Constellation elements (Orion, Altair, Earth Departure Stage, and Ares launch vehicles) will require a lunar navigation architecture for navigation state updates during lunar-class missions. Orion in particular has baselined earth-based ground direct tracking as the primary source for much of its absolute navigation needs. However, due to the uncertainty in the lunar navigation architecture, the Orion program has had to make certain assumptions on the capabilities of such architectures in order to adequately scale the vehicle design trade space. The following paper outlines lunar navigation requirements, the Orion program assumptions, and the impacts of these assumptions to the lunar navigation architecture design. The selection of potential sites was based upon geometric baselines, logistical feasibility, redundancy, and abort support capability. Simulated navigation covariances mapped to entry interface flightpath- angle uncertainties were used to evaluate knowledge errors. A minimum ground station architecture was identified consisting of Goldstone, Madrid, Canberra, Santiago, Hartebeeshoek, Dongora, Hawaii, Guam, and Ascension Island (or the geometric equivalent).

  12. The ALMA software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Joseph; Farris, Allen; Sommer, Heiko

    2004-09-01

    The software for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is being developed by many institutes on two continents. The software itself will function in a distributed environment, from the 0.5-14 kmbaselines that separate antennas to the larger distances that separate the array site at the Llano de Chajnantor in Chile from the operations and user support facilities in Chile, North America and Europe. Distributed development demands 1) interfaces that allow separated groups to work with minimal dependence on their counterparts at other locations; and 2) a common architecture to minimize duplication and ensure that developers can always perform similar tasks in a similar way. The Container/Component model provides a blueprint for the separation of functional from technical concerns: application developers concentrate on implementing functionality in Components, which depend on Containers to provide them with services such as access to remote resources, transparent serialization of entity objects to XML, logging, error handling and security. Early system integrations have verified that this architecture is sound and that developers can successfully exploit its features. The Containers and their services are provided by a system-orienteddevelopment team as part of the ALMA Common Software (ACS), middleware that is based on CORBA.

  13. Protocol Architecture Model Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhas, Chris

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to examine protocols and architectures for an In-Space Internet Node. CNS has developed a methodology for network reference models to support NASA's four mission areas: Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space (REDS), Aerospace Technology. This report applies the methodology to three space Internet-based communications scenarios for future missions. CNS has conceptualized, designed, and developed space Internet-based communications protocols and architectures for each of the independent scenarios. The scenarios are: Scenario 1: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) spacecraft inspace Internet node and a ground terminal Internet node via a Tracking and Data Rela Satellite (TDRS) transfer; Scenario 2: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) International Space Station and a ground terminal Internet node via a TDRS transfer; Scenario 3: Multicast Communications (or "Multicasting"), 1 Spacecraft to N Ground Receivers, N Ground Transmitters to 1 Ground Receiver via a Spacecraft.

  14. Modularity and mental architecture.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Debates about the modularity of cognitive architecture have been ongoing for at least the past three decades, since the publication of Fodor's landmark book The Modularity of Mind. According to Fodor, modularity is essentially tied to informational encapsulation, and as such is only found in the relatively low-level cognitive systems responsible for perception and language. According to Fodor's critics in the evolutionary psychology camp, modularity simply reflects the fine-grained functional specialization dictated by natural selection, and it characterizes virtually all aspects of cognitive architecture, including high-level systems for judgment, decision making, and reasoning. Though both of these perspectives on modularity have garnered support, the current state of evidence and argument suggests that a broader skepticism about modularity may be warranted. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:641-649. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1255 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  15. Secure Storage Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to clarify the challenges associated with storage for secure enclaves. The major focus areas for the report are: - review of relevant parallel filesystem technologies to identify assets and gaps; - review of filesystem isolation/protection mechanisms, to include native filesystem capabilities and auxiliary/layered techniques; - definition of storage architectures that can be used for customizable compute enclaves (i.e., clarification of use-cases that must be supported for shared storage scenarios); - investigate vendor products related to secure storage. This study provides technical details on the storage and filesystem used for HPC with particular attention on elements that contribute to creating secure storage. We outline the pieces for a a shared storage architecture that balances protection and performance by leveraging the isolation capabilities available in filesystems and virtualization technologies to maintain the integrity of the data. Key Points: There are a few existing and in-progress protection features in Lustre related to secure storage, which are discussed in (Chapter 3.1). These include authentication capabilities like GSSAPI/Kerberos and the in-progress work for GSSAPI/Host-keys. The GPFS filesystem provides native support for encryption, which is not directly available in Lustre. Additionally, GPFS includes authentication/authorization mechanisms for inter-cluster sharing of filesystems (Chapter 3.2). The limitations of key importance for secure storage/filesystems are: (i) restricting sub-tree mounts for parallel filesystem (which is not directly supported in Lustre or GPFS), and (ii) segregation of hosts on the storage network and practical complications with dynamic additions to the storage network, e.g., LNET. A challenge for VM based use cases will be to provide efficient IO forwarding of the parallel filessytem from the host to the guest (VM). There are promising options like para-virtualized filesystems to

  16. Elucidating the role of topological pattern discovery and support vector machine in generating predictive models for Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Chattopadhyay, Surajit

    2016-10-01

    The present paper reports a study, where growing hierarchical self-organising map (GHSOM) has been applied to achieve a visual cluster analysis to the Indian rainfall dataset consisting of 142 years of Indian rainfall data so that the yearly rainfall can be segregated into small groups to visualise the pattern of clustering behaviour of yearly rainfall due to changes in monthly rainfall for each year. Also, through support vector machine (SVM), it has been observed that generation of clusters impacts positively on the prediction of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Results have been presented through statistical and graphical analyses.

  17. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  18. The EPOS ICT Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Harrison, Matt; Bailo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    parallel the ICT team is tracking developments in ICT for relevance to EPOS-IP. In particular, the potential utilisation of e-Is (e-Infrastructures) such as GEANT(network), AARC (security), EGI (GRID computing), EUDAT (data curation), PRACE (High Performance Computing), HELIX-Nebula / Open Science Cloud (Cloud computing) are being assessed. Similarly relationships to other e-RIs (e-Research Infrastructures) such as ENVRI+, EXCELERATE and other ESFRI (European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures) projects are developed to share experience and technology and to promote interoperability. EPOS ICT team members are also involved in VRE4EIC, a project developing a reference architecture and component software services for a Virtual Research Environment to be superimposed on EPOS-ICS. The challenge which is being tackled now is therefore to keep consistency and interoperability among the different modules, initiatives and actors which participate to the process of running the EPOS platform. It implies both a continuous update about IT aspects of mentioned initiatives and a refinement of the e-architecture designed so far. One major aspect of EPOS-IP is the ICT support for legalistic, financial and governance aspects of the EPOS ERIC to be initiated during EPOS-IP. This implies a sophisticated AAAI (Authentication, authorization, accounting infrastructure) with consistency throughout the software, communications and data stack.

  19. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, T.R.; Zimmerman, J.J.

    2001-02-07

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) engineers John Zimmerman and Tom Bender directed separate projects within this CRADA. This Project Accomplishments Summary contains their reports independently. Zimmerman: In 1998 Honeywell FM&T partnered with the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) Cooperative Business Management Program to pilot the Supply Chain Integration Planning Prototype (SCIP). At the time, FM&T was developing an enterprise-wide supply chain management prototype called the Integrated Programmatic Scheduling System (IPSS) to improve the DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) supply chain. In the CRADA partnership, FM&T provided the IPSS technical and business infrastructure as a test bed for SCIP technology, and this would provide FM&T the opportunity to evaluate SCIP as the central schedule engine and decision support tool for IPSS. FM&T agreed to do the bulk of the work for piloting SCIP. In support of that aim, DAMA needed specific DOE Defense Programs opportunities to prove the value of its supply chain architecture and tools. In this partnership, FM&T teamed with Sandia National Labs (SNL), Division 6534, the other DAMA partner and developer of SCIP. FM&T tested SCIP in 1998 and 1999. Testing ended in 1999 when DAMA CRADA funding for FM&T ceased. Before entering the partnership, FM&T discovered that the DAMA SCIP technology had an array of applications in strategic, tactical, and operational planning and scheduling. At the time, FM&T planned to improve its supply chain performance by modernizing the NWC-wide planning and scheduling business processes and tools. The modernization took the form of a distributed client-server planning and scheduling system (IPSS) for planners and schedulers to use throughout the NWC on desktops through an off-the-shelf WEB browser. The planning and scheduling process within the NWC then, and today, is a labor-intensive paper-based method that plans and schedules more than 8,000 shipped parts

  20. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    2007 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative Mark Klein Third Annual SATURN Workshop May 2007 Report Documentation...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User

  1. High performance parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E. )

    1989-09-01

    In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Information architecture. Volume 1, The foundations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The Information Management Planning and Architecture Coordinating Team was formed to establish an information architecture framework to meet DOE`s current and future information needs. This department- wide activity was initiated in accordance with the DOE Information Management Strategic Plan; it also supports the Departmental Strategic Plan. It recognizes recent changes in emphasis as reflected in OMB Circular A-130 and the Information Resources Management Planning Process Improvement Team recommendations. Sections of this document provides the foundation for establishing DOE`s Information Architecture: Background, Business Case (reduced duplication of effort, increased integration of activities, improved operational capabilities), Baseline (technology baseline currently in place within DOE), Vision (guiding principles for future DOE Information Architecture), Standards Process, Policy and Process Integration (describes relations between information architecture and business processes), and Next Steps. Following each section is a scenario. A glossary of terms is provided.

  3. Adaptive reconfigurable distributed sensor architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akey, Mark L.

    1997-07-01

    The infancy of unattended ground based sensors is quickly coming to an end with the arrival of on-board GPS, networking, and multiple sensing capabilities. Unfortunately, their use is only first-order at best: GPS assists with sensor report registration; networks push sensor reports back to the warfighter and forwards control information to the sensors; multispectral sensing is a preset, pre-deployment consideration; and the scalability of large sensor networks is questionable. Current architectures provide little synergy among or within the sensors either before or after deployment, and do not map well to the tactical user's organizational structures and constraints. A new distributed sensor architecture is defined which moves well beyond single sensor, single task architectures. Advantages include: (1) automatic mapping of tactical direction to multiple sensors' tasks; (2) decentralized, distributed management of sensor resources and tasks; (3) software reconfiguration of deployed sensors; (4) network scalability and flexibility to meet the constraints of tactical deployments, and traditional combat organizations and hierarchies; and (5) adaptability to new battlefield communication paradigms such as BADD (Battlefield Analysis and Data Dissemination). The architecture is supported in two areas: a recursive, structural definition of resource configuration and management via loose associations; and a hybridization of intelligent software agents with tele- programming capabilities. The distributed sensor architecture is examined within the context of air-deployed ground sensors with acoustic, communication direction finding, and infra-red capabilities. Advantages and disadvantages of the architecture are examined. Consideration is given to extended sensor life (up to 6 months), post-deployment sensor reconfiguration, limited on- board sensor resources (processor and memory), and bandwidth. It is shown that technical tasking of the sensor suite can be automatically

  4. Airport Surface Network Architecture Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Lawas-Grodek, Fran; Ellis, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, airport surface communications are fragmented across multiple types of systems. These communication systems for airport operations at most airports today are based dedicated and separate architectures that cannot support system-wide interoperability and information sharing. The requirements placed upon the Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) systems in airports are rapidly growing and integration is urgently needed if the future vision of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) 2025 concept are to be realized. To address this and other problems such as airport surface congestion, the Space Based Technologies Project s Surface ICNS Network Architecture team at NASA Glenn Research Center has assessed airport surface communications requirements, analyzed existing and future surface applications, and defined a set of architecture functions that will help design a scalable, reliable and flexible surface network architecture to meet the current and future needs of airport operations. This paper describes the systems approach or methodology to networking that was employed to assess airport surface communications requirements, analyze applications, and to define the surface network architecture functions as the building blocks or components of the network. The systems approach used for defining these functions is relatively new to networking. It is viewing the surface network, along with its environment (everything that the surface network interacts with or impacts), as a system. Associated with this system are sets of services that are offered by the network to the rest of the system. Therefore, the surface network is considered as part of the larger system (such as the NAS), with interactions and dependencies between the surface network and its users, applications, and devices. The surface network architecture includes components such as addressing/routing, network management, network

  5. Architecture for Adaptive Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    We identify a class of niches to be occupied by 'adaptive intelligent systems (AISs)'. In contrast with niches occupied by typical AI agents, AIS niches present situations that vary dynamically along several key dimensions: different combinations of required tasks, different configurations of available resources, contextual conditions ranging from benign to stressful, and different performance criteria. We present a small class hierarchy of AIS niches that exhibit these dimensions of variability and describe a particular AIS niche, ICU (intensive care unit) patient monitoring, which we use for illustration throughout the paper. We have designed and implemented an agent architecture that supports all of different kinds of adaptation by exploiting a single underlying theoretical concept: An agent dynamically constructs explicit control plans to guide its choices among situation-triggered behaviors. We illustrate the architecture and its support for adaptation with examples from Guardian, an experimental agent for ICU monitoring.

  6. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  7. HRST architecture modeling and assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents work supporting the assessment of advanced concept options for the Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) study. It describes the development of computer models as the basis for creating an integrated capability to evaluate the economic feasibility and sustainability of a variety of system architectures. It summarizes modeling capabilities for use on the HRST study to perform sensitivity analysis of alternative architectures (consisting of different combinations of highly reusable vehicles, launch assist systems, and alternative operations and support concepts) in terms of cost, schedule, performance, and demand. In addition, the identification and preliminary assessment of alternative market segments for HRST applications, such as space manufacturing, space tourism, etc., is described. Finally, the development of an initial prototype model that can begin to be used for modeling alternative HRST concepts at the system level is presented. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. HRST architecture modeling and assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents work supporting the assessment of advanced concept options for the Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) study. It describes the development of computer models as the basis for creating an integrated capability to evaluate the economic feasibility and sustainability of a variety of system architectures. It summarizes modeling capabilities for use on the HRST study to perform sensitivity analysis of alternative architectures (consisting of different combinations of highly reusable vehicles, launch assist systems, and alternative operations and support concepts) in terms of cost, schedule, performance, and demand. In addition, the identification and preliminary assessment of alternative market segments for HRST applications, such as space manufacturing, space tourism, etc., is described. Finally, the development of an initial prototype model that can begin to be used for modeling alternative HRST concepts at the system level is presented.

  9. A reference architecture for integrated EHR in Colombia.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Edgar; Lopez, Diego M; Uribe, Gustavo; Gonzalez, Carolina; Blobel, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of national EHR infrastructures has to start by a detailed definition of the overall structure and behavior of the EHR system (system architecture). Architectures have to be open, scalable, flexible, user accepted and user friendly, trustworthy, based on standards including terminologies and ontologies. The GCM provides an architectural framework created with the purpose of analyzing any kind of system, including EHR system´s architectures. The objective of this paper is to propose a reference architecture for the implementation of an integrated EHR in Colombia, based on the current state of system´s architectural models, and EHR standards. The proposed EHR architecture defines a set of services (elements) and their interfaces, to support the exchange of clinical documents, offering an open, scalable, flexible and semantically interoperable infrastructure. The architecture was tested in a pilot tele-consultation project in Colombia, where dental EHR are exchanged.

  10. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  11. Modular Real Time Architectures For Image Understanding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, William W.

    1985-07-01

    Diverse image understanding (IU) system applications and attendant reduced life cycle cost requirements call for real time system architectures which are increasingly flexible, maintainable, reprogrammable, and upgradable. The requirements for algorithm mapping to architecture are sufficiently complex to require automated functional analysis tools. Algorithm complexity dictates higher order language (HOL) system programmability for acceptable software development cycles. Architecture complexity requires automated architecture simulation/emulation support for acceptable hardware development cycles. Honeywell, through external contracts and IR&D, is pursuing the definition and development of real time IU architectures (and algorithms) which cost-effectively support diverse applications including tactical targeting and reconnaissance, scene analysis, robot vision, and autonomous navigation. We are addressing the systems requirements of these applications with designs which are modular, expandable, and software configurable. Our presentation will overview the IU applications we are pursuing, our architectural approach to meeting system real time throughput requirements, and our underlying design methodology for architecture development.

  12. The UAS control segment architecture: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Douglas A.; Batavia, Parag; Coats, Mark; Allport, Chris; Jennings, Ann; Ernst, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) directed the Services in 2009 to jointly develop and demonstrate a common architecture for command and control of Department of Defense (DoD) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Groups 2 through 5. The UAS Control Segment (UCS) Architecture is an architecture framework for specifying and designing the softwareintensive capabilities of current and emerging UCS systems in the DoD inventory. The UCS Architecture is based on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) principles that will be adopted by each of the Services as a common basis for acquiring, integrating, and extending the capabilities of the UAS Control Segment. The UAS Task Force established the UCS Working Group to develop and support the UCS Architecture. The Working Group currently has over three hundred members, and is open to qualified representatives from DoD-approved defense contractors, academia, and the Government. The UCS Architecture is currently at Release 2.2, with Release 3.0 planned for July 2013. This paper discusses the current and planned elements of the UCS Architecture, and related activities of the UCS Community of Interest.

  13. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS): Technical Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG s SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA's current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  14. Generic architectures for future flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Generic architecture for future flight systems must be based on open system architectures (OSA). This provides the developer and integrator the flexibility to optimize the hardware and software systems to match diverse and unique applications requirements. When developed properly OSA provides interoperability, commonality, graceful upgradability, survivability and hardware/software transportability to greatly minimize life cycle costs and supportability. Architecture flexibility can be achieved to take advantage of commercial developments by basing these developments on vendor-neutral commercially accepted standards and protocols. Rome Laboratory presently has a program that addresses requirements for OSA.

  15. Domain tree-based analysis of protein architecture evolution.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Henricson, Anna; Hollich, Volker; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics behind domain architecture evolution is of great importance to unravel the functions of proteins. Complex architectures have been created throughout evolution by rearrangement and duplication events. An interesting question is how many times a particular architecture has been created, a form of convergent evolution or domain architecture reinvention. Previous studies have approached this issue by comparing architectures found in different species. We wanted to achieve a finer-grained analysis by reconstructing protein architectures on complete domain trees. The prevalence of domain architecture reinvention in 96 genomes was investigated with a novel domain tree-based method that uses maximum parsimony for inferring ancestral protein architectures. Domain architectures were taken from Pfam. To ensure robustness, we applied the method to bootstrap trees and only considered results with strong statistical support. We detected multiple origins for 12.4% of the scored architectures. In a much smaller data set, the subset of completely domain-assigned proteins, the figure was 5.6%. These results indicate that domain architecture reinvention is a much more common phenomenon than previously thought. We also determined which domains are most frequent in multiply created architectures and assessed whether specific functions could be attributed to them. However, no strong functional bias was found in architectures with multiple origins.

  16. An IT Architecture for Systems Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ganzinger, Matthias; Gietzelt, Matthias; Karmen, Christian; Firnkorn, Daniel; Knaup, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Systems medicine aims to support treatment of complex diseases like cancer by integrating all available data for the disease. To provide such a decision support in clinical practice, a suitable IT architecture is necessary. We suggest a generic architecture comprised of the following three layers: data representation, decision support, and user interface. For the systems medicine research project "Clinically-applicable, omics-based assessment of survival, side effects, and targets in multiple myeloma" (CLIOMMICS) we developed a concrete instance of the generic architecture. We use i2b2 for representing the harmonized data. Since no deterministic model exists for multiple myeloma we use case-based reasoning for decision support. For clinical practice, visualizations of the results must be intuitive and clear. At the same time, they must communicate the uncertainty immanent in stochastic processes. Thus, we develop a specific user interface for systems medicine based on the web portal software Liferay.

  17. Requirements for an Integrated UAS CNS Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, Fred L.; Jain, Raj; Sheffield, Greg; Taboso-Ballesteros, Pedro; Ponchak, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) requirements must be developed in order to establish a CNS architecture supporting Unmanned Air Systems integration in the National Air Space (UAS in the NAS). These requirements must address cybersecurity, future communications, satellite-based navigation and APNT, and scalable surveillance and situational awareness. CNS integration, consolidation and miniaturization requirements are also important to support the explosive growth in small UAS deployment. Air Traffic Management (ATM) must also be accommodated to support critical Command and Control (C2) for Air Traffic Controllers (ATC). This document therefore presents UAS CNS requirements that will guide the architecture.

  18. Parallel machine architecture and compiler design facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David J.; Yew, Pen-Chung; Padua, David; Sameh, Ahmed; Veidenbaum, Alex

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide an integrated simulation environment for studying and evaluating various issues in designing parallel systems, including machine architectures, parallelizing compiler techniques, and parallel algorithms. The status of Delta project (which objective is to provide a facility to allow rapid prototyping of parallelized compilers that can target toward different machine architectures) is summarized. Included are the surveys of the program manipulation tools developed, the environmental software supporting Delta, and the compiler research projects in which Delta has played a role.

  19. Distributed visualization framework architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Oleg; Raman, Sundaresan; Crawfis, Roger

    2010-01-01

    An architecture for distributed and collaborative visualization is presented. The design goals of the system are to create a lightweight, easy to use and extensible framework for reasearch in scientific visualization. The system provides both single user and collaborative distributed environment. System architecture employs a client-server model. Visualization projects can be synchronously accessed and modified from different client machines. We present a set of visualization use cases that illustrate the flexibility of our system. The framework provides a rich set of reusable components for creating new applications. These components make heavy use of leading design patterns. All components are based on the functionality of a small set of interfaces. This allows new components to be integrated seamlessly with little to no effort. All user input and higher-level control functionality interface with proxy objects supporting a concrete implementation of these interfaces. These light-weight objects can be easily streamed across the web and even integrated with smart clients running on a user's cell phone. The back-end is supported by concrete implementations wherever needed (for instance for rendering). A middle-tier manages any communication and synchronization with the proxy objects. In addition to the data components, we have developed several first-class GUI components for visualization. These include a layer compositor editor, a programmable shader editor, a material editor and various drawable editors. These GUI components interact strictly with the interfaces. Access to the various entities in the system is provided by an AssetManager. The asset manager keeps track of all of the registered proxies and responds to queries on the overall system. This allows all user components to be populated automatically. Hence if a new component is added that supports the IMaterial interface, any instances of this can be used in the various GUI components that work with this

  20. Knickpoint Retreat: the Role of Channel Self-Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baynes, E.; Lague, D.; Attal, M.

    2016-12-01

    Landscape connectivity occurs through the valley network, and the action of rivers within these valleys controls both landscape morphology, and landscape response to tectonic or climatic change. Such response to transient forcing is manifested in bedrock river profiles through migrating `knickzones' or `knickpoints', that separate a downstream reach, broadly in equilibrium with the new conditions and an upstream reach which is yet to adjust. Knickpoints therefore mark a dynamic boundary location within mountain landscapes, yet the complexities of the mechanisms of knickpoint retreat are often ignored in studies of landscape evolution. We carried out a series of box flume experiments (65 cm long, 30 cm wide), to explore the importance of mean discharge and substrate strength on the form and migration of knickpoints in a cohesive homogenous substrate. The retreat rate of knickpoints is independent of mean discharge, with knickpoints retreating faster through a weaker substrate. Despite an order of magnitude increase in discharge during our experiments, the bed shear stress remains almost constant due to a self-regulatory response of channel width to higher discharge, leading to no change in the upstream retreat rate of the waterfalls. These experiments challenge the established assumption in models of landscape evolution that a simple relationship exists between knickpoint retreat and discharge/drainage area, and we hypothesise that the correlation between knickpoint retreat and drainage area identified in some landscapes is caused by increasing bedload flux (the `tools' for erosion) with drainage area. Knickpoint retreat modelling approaches should therefore be re-evaluated, and greater attention paid to the role of bedload flux and connectivity between river channels and hillslopes.

  1. Franchisees in Crisis: Using Action Learning to Self-Organise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Carol

    2011-01-01

    The present article describes the use of action learning by a group of 30 franchisees to organise themselves and work through a period of upheaval and uncertainty when their parent company faced liquidation. Written from the perspective of one of the franchisees who found herself adopting action learning principles to facilitate the group, it…

  2. Self-organisation and forces in the microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Nédélec, François; Surrey, Thomas; Karsenti, Eric

    2003-02-01

    Modern microscopy techniques allow us to observe specifically tagged proteins in live cells. We can now see directly that many cellular structures, for example mitotic spindles, are in fact dynamic assemblies. Their apparent stability results from out-of-equilibrium stochastic interactions at the molecular level. Recent studies have shown that the spindles can form even after centrosomes are destroyed, and that they can even form around DNA-coated beads devoid of kinetochores. Moreover, conditions have been produced in which microtubule asters interact even in the absence of chromatin. Together, these observations suggest that the spindle can be experimentally deconstructed, and that its defining characteristics can be studied in a simplified context, in the absence of the full division machinery.

  3. Franchisees in Crisis: Using Action Learning to Self-Organise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Carol

    2011-01-01

    The present article describes the use of action learning by a group of 30 franchisees to organise themselves and work through a period of upheaval and uncertainty when their parent company faced liquidation. Written from the perspective of one of the franchisees who found herself adopting action learning principles to facilitate the group, it…

  4. SOMMER: self-organising maps for education and research.

    PubMed

    Schmuker, Michael; Schwarte, Florian; Brück, André; Proschak, Ewgenij; Tanrikulu, Yusuf; Givehchi, Alireza; Scheiffele, Kai; Schneider, Gisbert

    2007-01-01

    SOMMER is a publicly available, Java-based toolbox for training and visualizing two- and three-dimensional unsupervised self-organizing maps (SOMs). Various map topologies are implemented for planar rectangular, toroidal, cubic-surface and spherical projections. The software allows for visualization of the training process, which has been shown to be particularly valuable for teaching purposes.

  5. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

  6. Savannah River Site computing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-29

    A computing architecture is a framework for making decisions about the implementation of computer technology and the supporting infrastructure. Because of the size, diversity, and amount of resources dedicated to computing at the Savannah River Site (SRS), there must be an overall strategic plan that can be followed by the thousands of site personnel who make decisions daily that directly affect the SRS computing environment and impact the site's production and business systems. This plan must address the following requirements: There must be SRS-wide standards for procurement or development of computing systems (hardware and software). The site computing organizations must develop systems that end users find easy to use. Systems must be put in place to support the primary function of site information workers. The developers of computer systems must be given tools that automate and speed up the development of information systems and applications based on computer technology. This document describes a proposal for a site-wide computing architecture that addresses the above requirements. In summary, this architecture is standards-based data-driven, and workstation-oriented with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.

  7. Savannah River Site computing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-29

    A computing architecture is a framework for making decisions about the implementation of computer technology and the supporting infrastructure. Because of the size, diversity, and amount of resources dedicated to computing at the Savannah River Site (SRS), there must be an overall strategic plan that can be followed by the thousands of site personnel who make decisions daily that directly affect the SRS computing environment and impact the site`s production and business systems. This plan must address the following requirements: There must be SRS-wide standards for procurement or development of computing systems (hardware and software). The site computing organizations must develop systems that end users find easy to use. Systems must be put in place to support the primary function of site information workers. The developers of computer systems must be given tools that automate and speed up the development of information systems and applications based on computer technology. This document describes a proposal for a site-wide computing architecture that addresses the above requirements. In summary, this architecture is standards-based data-driven, and workstation-oriented with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.

  8. OS Friendly Microprocessor Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    writes a cache bank block of data to USB controller .......34 Fig. 29 Process stack example...Architecture Block Diagram Data Bus Program Address Bus Data Address Bus Read/ Write Program Memory Extended Harvard Processor Architecture Program...Bus Data Memory Data Address Bus Read/ Write Data Address Bus Read/ Write Register Mem Pipeline State Mem OS Friendly Architecture B us se s B us se

  9. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    2008 Carnegie Mellon University 2008 PLS March 2008 © 2008 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative SATURN 2008...SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Workshop, 30 Apr ? 1 May 2008, Pittsburgh, PA. 14

  10. Digital Architecture Planning Model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna Helene; Al Rashdan, Ahmad Yahya Mohammad; Bly, Aaron Douglas; Rice, Brandon Charles; Fitzgerald, Kirk; Wilson, Keith Leon

    2016-03-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, the Digital Architecture (DA) Project focuses on providing a model that nuclear utilities can refer to when planning deployment of advanced technologies. The digital architecture planning model (DAPM) is the methodology for mapping power plant operational and support activities into a DA that unifies all data sources needed by the utilities to operate their plants. The DA is defined as a collection of information technology capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for performance improvements of nuclear power plants. DA can be thought of as integration of the separate instrumentation and control and information systems already in place in nuclear power plants, which are brought together for the purpose of creating new levels of automation in plant work activities. A major objective in DAPM development was to survey all key areas that needed to be reviewed in order for a utility to make knowledgeable decisions regarding needs and plans to implement a DA at the plant. The development was done in two steps. First, researchers surveyed the nuclear industry in order to learn their near-term plans for adopting new advanced capabilities and implementing a network (i.e., wireless and wire) infrastructure throughout the plant, including the power block. Secondly, a literature review covering regulatory documents, industry standards, and technical research reports and articles was conducted. The objective of the review was to identify key areas to be covered by the DAPM, which included the following: 1. The need for a DA and its benefits to the plant 2. Resources required to implement the DA 3. Challenges that need to be addressed and resolved to implement the DA 4. Roles and responsibilities of the DA implementation plan. The DAPM was developed based on results from the survey and the literature review. Model development, including

  11. Grid Architecture 2

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  12. Middleware Architecture Evaluation for Dependable Self-managing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2008-10-10

    Middleware provides infrastructure support for creating dependable software systems. A specific middleware implementation plays a critical role in determining the quality attributes that satisfy a system’s dependability requirements. Evaluating a middleware architecture at an early development stage can help to pinpoint critical architectural challenges and optimize design decisions. In this paper, we present a method and its application to evaluate middleware architectures, driven by emerging architecture patterns for developing self-managing systems. Our approach focuses on two key attributes of dependability, reliability and maintainability by means of fault tolerance and fault prevention. We identify the architectural design patterns necessary to build an adaptive self-managing architecture that is capable of preventing or recovering from failures. These architectural patterns and their impacts on quality attributes create the context for middleware evaluation. Our approach is demonstrated by an example application -- failover control of a financial application on an enterprise service bus.

  13. Systems Architecture for a Nationwide Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Abin, Jorge; Nemeth, Horacio; Friedmann, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    From a national level to give Internet technology support, the Nationwide Integrated Healthcare System in Uruguay requires a model of Information Systems Architecture. This system has multiple healthcare providers (public and private), and a strong component of supplementary services. Thus, the data processing system should have an architecture that considers this fact, while integrating the central services provided by the Ministry of Public Health. The national electronic health record, as well as other related data processing systems, should be based on this architecture. The architecture model described here conceptualizes a federated framework of electronic health record systems, according to the IHE affinity model, HL7 standards, local standards on interoperability and security, as well as technical advice provided by AGESIC. It is the outcome of the research done by AGESIC and Systems Integration Laboratory (LINS) on the development and use of the e-Government Platform since 2008, as well as the research done by the team Salud.uy since 2013.

  14. A computer architecture for intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, D. R.; Saridis, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    The Theory of Intelligent Machines proposes a hierarchical organization for the functions of an autonomous robot based on the Principle of Increasing Precision With Decreasing Intelligence. An analytic formulation of this theory using information-theoretic measures of uncertainty for each level of the intelligent machine has been developed in recent years. A computer architecture that implements the lower two levels of the intelligent machine is presented. The architecture supports an event-driven programming paradigm that is independent of the underlying computer architecture and operating system. Details of Execution Level controllers for motion and vision systems are addressed, as well as the Petri net transducer software used to implement Coordination Level functions. Extensions to UNIX and VxWorks operating systems which enable the development of a heterogeneous, distributed application are described. A case study illustrates how this computer architecture integrates real-time and higher-level control of manipulator and vision systems.

  15. A computer architecture for intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, D. R.; Saridis, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of intelligent machines proposes a hierarchical organization for the functions of an autonomous robot based on the principle of increasing precision with decreasing intelligence. An analytic formulation of this theory using information-theoretic measures of uncertainty for each level of the intelligent machine has been developed. The authors present a computer architecture that implements the lower two levels of the intelligent machine. The architecture supports an event-driven programming paradigm that is independent of the underlying computer architecture and operating system. Execution-level controllers for motion and vision systems are briefly addressed, as well as the Petri net transducer software used to implement coordination-level functions. A case study illustrates how this computer architecture integrates real-time and higher-level control of manipulator and vision systems.

  16. ALMA software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Joseph; Raffi, Gianni

    2002-12-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is a joint project involving astronomical organizations in Europe and North America. ALMA will consist of at least 64 12-meter antennas operating in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range. It will be located at an altitude of about 5000m in the Chilean Atacama desert. The primary challenge to the development of the software architecture is the fact that both its development and runtime environments will be distributed. Groups at different institutes will develop the key elements such as Proposal Preparation tools, Instrument operation, On-line calibration and reduction, and Archiving. The Proposal Preparation software will be used primarily at scientists' home institutions (or on their laptops), while Instrument Operations will execute on a set of networked computers at the ALMA Operations Support Facility. The ALMA Science Archive, itself to be replicated at several sites, will serve astronomers worldwide. Building upon the existing ALMA Common Software (ACS), the system architects will prepare a robust framework that will use XML-encoded entity objects to provide an effective solution to the persistence needs of this system, while remaining largely independent of any underlying DBMS technology. Independence of distributed subsystems will be facilitated by an XML- and CORBA-based pass-by-value mechanism for exchange of objects. Proof of concept (as well as a guide to subsystem developers) will come from a prototype whose details will be presented.

  17. Architectures for Nanostructured Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubloff, Gary

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneous nanostructures offer profound opportunities for advancement in electrochemical energy storage, particularly with regard to power. However, their design and integration must balance ion transport, electron transport, and stability under charge/discharge cycling, involving fundamental physical, chemical and electrochemical mechanisms at nano length scales and across disparate time scales. In our group and in our DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (www.efrc.umd.edu) we have investigated single nanostructures and regular nanostructure arrays as batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and electrostatic capacitors to understand limiting mechanisms, using a variety of synthesis and characterization strategies. Primary lithiation pathways in heterogeneous nanostructures have been observed to include surface, interface, and both isotropic and anisotropic diffusion, depending on materials. Integrating current collection layers at the nano scale with active ion storage layers enhances power and can improve stability during cycling. For densely packed nanostructures as required for storage applications, we investigate both ``regular'' and ``random'' architectures consistent with transport requirements for spatial connectivity. Such configurations raise further important questions at the meso scale, such as dynamic ion and electron transport in narrow and tortuous channels, and the role of defect structures and their evolution during charge cycling. Supported as part of the Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DESC0001160

  18. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  19. Architectural Physics: Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, R. G.

    The author coordinates the many diverse branches of knowledge which have dealt with the field of lighting--physiology, psychology, engineering, physics, and architectural design. Part I, "The Elements of Architectural Physics", discusses the physiological aspects of lighting, visual performance, lighting design, calculations and measurements of…

  20. Applying neuroscience to architecture.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, John P

    2009-06-25

    Architectural practice and neuroscience research use our brains and minds in much the same way. However, the link between neuroscience knowledge and architectural design--with rare exceptions--has yet to be made. The concept of linking these two fields is a challenge worth considering.

  1. Generic POCC architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This document describes a generic POCC (Payload Operations Control Center) architecture based upon current POCC software practice, and several refinements to the architecture based upon object-oriented design principles and expected developments in teleoperations. The current-technology generic architecture is an abstraction based upon close analysis of the ERBS, COBE, and GRO POCC's. A series of three refinements is presented: these may be viewed as an approach to a phased transition to the recommended architecture. The third refinement constitutes the recommended architecture, which, together with associated rationales, will form the basis of the rapid synthesis environment to be developed in the remainder of this task. The document is organized into two parts. The first part describes the current generic architecture using several graphical as well as tabular representations or 'views.' The second part presents an analysis of the generic architecture in terms of object-oriented principles. On the basis of this discussion, refinements to the generic architecture are presented, again using a combination of graphical and tabular representations.

  2. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  3. Architectural Physics: Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, R. G.

    The author coordinates the many diverse branches of knowledge which have dealt with the field of lighting--physiology, psychology, engineering, physics, and architectural design. Part I, "The Elements of Architectural Physics", discusses the physiological aspects of lighting, visual performance, lighting design, calculations and measurements of…

  4. Architecture--a Celebration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ivor

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of architecture to society and the quality of life is explored in these areas: context, routes, environment, groupings, and interface. Architecture that grows out of interrelationships imposes order on a confused world and makes possible effective problem solving. (LBH)

  5. Emerging supercomputer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will examine the current and near future trends for commercially available high-performance computers with architectures that differ from the mainstream ''supercomputer'' systems in use for the last few years. These emerging supercomputer architectures are just beginning to have an impact on the field of high performance computing. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  6. VLSI and computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, R.; Fernandez, E.B. )

    1989-01-01

    This book provides a sense of realism concerning the potential of actual design principles and techniques for computer systems implemented in VLSI. With the knowledge gained from this book, the reader will be better able to understand and utilize the architectures that have been produced by the use of these techniques. Topics covered include Superconductive electronics, Multiprocessing, and Object-oriented architectures.

  7. The Technology of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work…

  8. The Technology of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work…

  9. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  10. De-Architecturization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wines, James

    1975-01-01

    De-architecturization is art about architecture, a catalyst suggesting that public art does not have to respond to formalist doctrine; but rather, may evolve from the informational reservoirs of the city environment, where phenomenology and structure become the fabric of its existence. (Author/RK)

  11. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  12. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  13. Options for a lunar base surface architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of the Space Exploration Initiative architectures involves making definitions of systems engineering designs for the construction of lunar and Mars bases for the support of science, exploration, and resource production on these planets. This paper discusses the results of the Space Resource Utilization Architecture study, which was initiated to develop the technical capability for extracting useful materials from the indigenous resources of the moon and Mars. For the moon, an infrastructure concept of a base is designed which can support a crew of 12. The major phases of the lunar-base development, the systems and the elements involved, and the physical layout and evolution of the base are described.

  14. Virtual environment architecture for rapid application development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstein, Georges G.; Southard, David A.; Lee, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the MITRE Virtual Environment Architecture (VEA), a product of nearly two years of investigations and prototypes of virtual environment technology. This paper discusses the requirements for rapid prototyping, and an architecture we are developing to support virtual environment construction. VEA supports rapid application development by providing a variety of pre-built modules that can be reconfigured for each application session. The modules supply interfaces for several types of interactive I/O devices, in addition to large-screen or head-mounted displays.

  15. Can architecture be barbaric?

    PubMed

    Hürol, Yonca

    2009-06-01

    The title of this article is adapted from Theodor W. Adorno's famous dictum: 'To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.' After the catastrophic earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey on the 17th of August 1999, in which more than 40,000 people died or were lost, Necdet Teymur, who was then the dean of the Faculty of Architecture of the Middle East Technical University, referred to Adorno in one of his 'earthquake poems' and asked: 'Is architecture possible after 17th of August?' The main objective of this article is to interpret Teymur's question in respect of its connection to Adorno's philosophy with a view to make a contribution to the politics and ethics of architecture in Turkey. Teymur's question helps in providing a new interpretation of a critical approach to architecture and architectural technology through Adorno's philosophy. The paper also presents a discussion of Adorno's dictum, which serves for a better understanding of its universality/particularity.

  16. The Simulation Intranet Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, V.P.; Linebarger, J.M.; Miller, D.J.; Vandewart, R.L.

    1998-12-02

    The Simdarion Infranet (S1) is a term which is being used to dcscribc one element of a multidisciplinary distributed and distance computing initiative known as DisCom2 at Sandia National Laboratory (http ct al. 1998). The Simulation Intranet is an architecture for satisfying Sandia's long term goal of providing an end- to-end set of scrviccs for high fidelity full physics simu- lations in a high performance, distributed, and distance computing environment. The Intranet Architecture group was formed to apply current distributed object technologies to this problcm. For the hardware architec- tures and software models involved with the current simulation process, a CORBA-based architecture is best suited to meet Sandia's needs. This paper presents the initial desi-a and implementation of this Intranct based on a three-tier Network Computing Architecture(NCA). The major parts of the architecture include: the Web Cli- ent, the Business Objects, and Data Persistence.

  17. Satellite ATM Networks: Architectures and Guidelines Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonDeak, Thomas C.; Yegendu, Ferit

    1999-01-01

    An important element of satellite-supported asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networking will involve support for the routing and rerouting of active connections. Work published under the auspices of the Telecommunications Industry Association (http://www.tiaonline.org), describes basic architectures and routing protocol issues for satellite ATM (SATATM) networks. The architectures and issues identified will serve as a basis for further development of technical specifications for these SATATM networks. Three ATM network architectures for bent pipe satellites and three ATM network architectures for satellites with onboard ATM switches were developed. The architectures differ from one another in terms of required level of mobility, supported data rates, supported terrestrial interfaces, and onboard processing and switching requirements. The documentation addresses low-, middle-, and geosynchronous-Earth-orbit satellite configurations. The satellite environment may require real-time routing to support the mobility of end devices and nodes of the ATM network itself. This requires the network to be able to reroute active circuits in real time. In addition to supporting mobility, rerouting can also be used to (1) optimize network routing, (2) respond to changing quality-of-service requirements, and (3) provide a fault tolerance mechanism. Traffic management and control functions are necessary in ATM to ensure that the quality-of-service requirements associated with each connection are not violated and also to provide flow and congestion control functions. Functions related to traffic management were identified and described. Most of these traffic management functions will be supported by on-ground ATM switches, but in a hybrid terrestrial-satellite ATM network, some of the traffic management functions may have to be supported by the onboard satellite ATM switch. Future work is planned to examine the tradeoffs of placing traffic management functions onboard a satellite as

  18. Static Extraction and Conformance Analysis of Hierarchical Runtime Architectural Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-14

    Architectural conformance 301 instead of class diagrams as the closer analogy for a runtime architecture (Clements et al. 2003, p. 103). Bauhaus (Raza et al...2006) is a static analysis toolkit that supports a points-to analysis, etc. Bauhaus lets a user specify the high-level module view (or a hypothesis...thereof) and map the concrete modules onto the architecture. Then Bauhaus compares a high-level module view to the concrete modules and their

  19. The Planning Execution Monitoring Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Ly, Bebe; Crocker, Alan; Schreckenghost, Debra; Mueller, Stephen; Phillips, Robert; Wadsworth, David; Sorensen, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The Planning Execution Monitoring (PEM) architecture is a design concept for developing autonomous cockpit command and control software. The PEM architecture is designed to reduce the operations costs in the space transportation system through the use of automation while improving safety and operability of the system. Specifically, the PEM autonomous framework enables automatic performance of many vehicle operations that would typically be performed by a human. Also, this framework supports varying levels of autonomous control, ranging from fully automatic to fully manual control. The PEM autonomous framework interfaces with the core flight software to perform flight procedures. It can either assist human operators in performing procedures or autonomously execute routine cockpit procedures based on the operational context. Most importantly, the PEM autonomous framework promotes and simplifies the capture, verification, and validation of the flight operations knowledge. Through a hierarchical decomposition of the domain knowledge, the vehicle command and control capabilities are divided into manageable functional "chunks" that can be captured and verified separately. These functional units, each of which has the responsibility to manage part of the vehicle command and control, are modular, re-usable, and extensible. Also, the functional units are self-contained and have the ability to plan and execute the necessary steps for accomplishing a task based upon the current mission state and available resources. The PEM architecture has potential for application outside the realm of spaceflight, including management of complex industrial processes, nuclear control, and control of complex vehicles such as submarines or unmanned air vehicles.

  20. A reference architecture for telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The Telecare Interactive Continuous Monitoring System exploits GPRS to provide an ambulatory device that monitors selected vital signs on a continuous basis. Alarms are sent when parameters fall outside preset limits, and accompanying physiological data may also be transmitted. The always-connected property of GPRS allows continuous interactive control of the device and its sensors, permitting changes to monitoring parameters or even enabling continuous monitoring of a sensor in emergency. A new personal area network (PAN) has been developed to support short-range wireless connection to sensors worn on the body including ECG and finger worn SpO2. Most notable is use of ultra low radio frequency to reduce power to minimum. The system has been designed to use a hierarchical architecture for sensors and "derived" signals, such as HR from ECG, so that each can be independently controlled and managed. Sensors are treated as objects, and functions are defined to control aspects of behaviour. These are refined in order to define a generic set of abstract functions to handle the majority of functions, leaving a minimum of sensor specific commands. The intention is to define a reference architecture in order to research the functionality and system architecture of a telemonitoring system. The Telecare project is funded through a grant from the European Commission (IST programme).

  1. SOIS and Software Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torelli, Felice; Taylor, Chris; Viana Sanchez, Aitor; Mendham, Peter; Fowell, Stuart

    2011-08-01

    In the recent years ESA, in conjunction with the European space industry, has supported a number of initiatives aimed at increasing the level of standardisation in the elements composing a spacecraft avionics system. This is an ongoing process with many contributors including SAVOIR, SAVOIR-FAIRE1, CCSDS SOIS and the ECSS protocol standardisation activities. The SOIS service framework and the accompanying ECSS protocols play a key role in the evolution of flight avionics as, on the one side they standardise the external hardware interfaces required for interconnection and on the other standardise the communication services seen by applications. Much still remains to be done, in particular, the communications based services defined by SOIS must be incorporated into a standard software architecture such that real implementations can take benefit from the standards. Aspects such as the use of Electronic Data Sheets2 need to be evaluated, as does the use of plug and play concepts. This paper will present the latest evolution of the SOIS architecture and related CCSDS recommendations including the relationship and status of the software reference architecture being developed under SAVOIR-FAIRE. The potential impacts on the design of a system adopting the standardised services will also be discussed in three main areas: communication with external equipments, abstraction of sensors & actuators and software bus.

  2. EHR architectures - comparison and trends.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    For meeting the requirements for high quality and safe of care as well as efficiency and productivity of health systems, latter have to move towards job sharing, communicating and cooperating structures. This paradigm change must be supported through sustainable and semantically interoperable architectures for health information systems, especially for Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems as the core application in any eHealth environment. Advanced system architectures are characterized as being highly distributed, component-oriented, model-based, service-oriented, knowledge-based, user-friendly, lawful and trustworthy, based on a unified development process, a harmonized ontology and reference terminologies. Existing and emerging approaches for EHR systems are to be compared using the Generic Component Model (GCM) as architectural reference. Any system can be assessed according to GCM dimensions: transparent domain representation, composition/decomposition behavior and reflection of the systems' viewpoints as well as their components' interoperability level. All those aspects have to be interrelated for real systems analysis, design, implementation, and deployment by that way enabling the migration of different EHR approaches on the basis of GCM.

  3. Fractal Geometry of Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

    In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

  4. Architecture for Verifiable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, William; Dvorak, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Verifiable MDS Architecture (VMA) is a software architecture that facilitates the construction of highly verifiable flight software for NASA s Mission Data System (MDS), especially for smaller missions subject to cost constraints. More specifically, the purpose served by VMA is to facilitate aggressive verification and validation of flight software while imposing a minimum of constraints on overall functionality. VMA exploits the state-based architecture of the MDS and partitions verification issues into elements susceptible to independent verification and validation, in such a manner that scaling issues are minimized, so that relatively large software systems can be aggressively verified in a cost-effective manner.

  5. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

    1997-03-18

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

  6. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; McDonald, Carolyn E.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  7. An Open Specification for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, A.; Heuser, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An 'open specification' for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures is under development in the Spacecraft Control Working Group of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astro- nautics. This architecture identifies 5 basic elements incorporated in the design of similar operations systems: Data, System Management, Control Interface, Decision Support Engine, & Space Messaging Service.

  8. Construct a Management Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-23

    Task: Consider management architecture options that better align functional and budget responsibility consistent with comprehensive strategic ... planning . Scope the leadership hierarchy to the appropriate management responsibilities, reduce layers of management and move decision making closer to issue identification.

  9. Robot Electronics Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Michael; Magnone, Lee; Aghazarian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Kennedy, Brett

    2008-01-01

    An electronics architecture has been developed to enable the rapid construction and testing of prototypes of robotic systems. This architecture is designed to be a research vehicle of great stability, reliability, and versatility. A system according to this architecture can easily be reconfigured (including expanded or contracted) to satisfy a variety of needs with respect to input, output, processing of data, sensing, actuation, and power. The architecture affords a variety of expandable input/output options that enable ready integration of instruments, actuators, sensors, and other devices as independent modular units. The separation of different electrical functions onto independent circuit boards facilitates the development of corresponding simple and modular software interfaces. As a result, both hardware and software can be made to expand or contract in modular fashion while expending a minimum of time and effort.

  10. NPOESS System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnant, F.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD and will provide continuity for the NASA Earth Observation System with the launch of the NPOESS Preparatory Project. This poster will provide a top level status update of the program, as well as an overview of the NPOESS system architecture, which includes four segments. The space segment includes satellites in two orbits that carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The NPOESS system design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users through a Command, Control, and Communication Segment (C3S). The data processing for NPOESS is accomplished through an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS)/Field Terminal Segment (FTS) that processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government as well as remote terminal users. The Launch Support Segment completes the four segments that make up the NPOESS system that will enhance the connectivity between research and operations and provide critical operational and scientific environmental measurements to military, civil, and scientific users until 2026.

  11. RASSP signal processing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Fred; Bassett, Bob; Letellier, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    The rapid prototyping of application specific signal processors (RASSP) program is an ARPA/tri-service effort to dramatically improve the process by which complex digital systems, particularly embedded signal processors, are specified, designed, documented, manufactured, and supported. The domain of embedded signal processing was chosen because it is important to a variety of military and commercial applications as well as for the challenge it presents in terms of complexity and performance demands. The principal effort is being performed by two major contractors, Lockheed Sanders (Nashua, NH) and Martin Marietta (Camden, NJ). For both, improvements in methodology are to be exercised and refined through the performance of individual 'Demonstration' efforts. The Lockheed Sanders' Demonstration effort is to develop an infrared search and track (IRST) processor. In addition, both contractors' results are being measured by a series of externally administered (by Lincoln Labs) six-month Benchmark programs that measure process improvement as a function of time. The first two Benchmark programs are designing and implementing a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor. Our demonstration team is using commercially available VME modules from Mercury Computer to assemble a multiprocessor system scalable from one to hundreds of Intel i860 microprocessors. Custom modules for the sensor interface and display driver are also being developed. This system implements either proprietary or Navy owned algorithms to perform the compute-intensive IRST function in real time in an avionics environment. Our Benchmark team is designing custom modules using commercially available processor ship sets, communication submodules, and reconfigurable logic devices. One of the modules contains multiple vector processors optimized for fast Fourier transform processing. Another module is a fiberoptic interface that accepts high-rate input data from the sensors and provides video-rate output data to a

  12. Architectural Knowledge in an SOA Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Olaf; Kopp, Petra; Pappe, Stefan

    In this chapter, we present an industrial case study for the creation and usage of architectural knowledge. We first introduce the business domain, service portfolio, and knowledge management approach of the company involved in the case. Next, we introduce a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) infrastructure reference architecture as a primary carrier of architectural knowledge in this company. Moreover, we present how we harvested architectural knowledge from industry projects to create this reference architecture. We also present feedback from early reference architecture users. Finally, we conclude and give an outlook to future work.

  13. A Practical Software Architecture for Virtual Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Peifeng; Shi, Yuanchun; Qin, Weijun

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces a practical software architecture called CUBES, which focuses on system integration and evolvement for online virtual universities. The key of CUBES is a supporting platform that helps to integrate and evolve heterogeneous educational applications developed by different organizations. Both standardized educational…

  14. Utilizing Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirton, E. F.; Lavoie, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss our approach to, success with and future direction in rapid prototyping for architectural modeling. The premise that this emerging technology has broad and exciting applications in the building design and construction industry will be supported by visual and physical evidence. This evidence will be presented in the form of…

  15. A Practical Software Architecture for Virtual Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Peifeng; Shi, Yuanchun; Qin, Weijun

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces a practical software architecture called CUBES, which focuses on system integration and evolvement for online virtual universities. The key of CUBES is a supporting platform that helps to integrate and evolve heterogeneous educational applications developed by different organizations. Both standardized educational…

  16. Network architecture functional description and design

    SciTech Connect

    Stans, L.; Bencoe, M.; Brown, D.; Kelly, S.; Pierson, L.; Schaldach, C.

    1989-05-25

    This report provides a top level functional description and design for the development and implementation of the central network to support the next generation of SNL, Albuquerque supercomputer in a UNIX{reg sign} environment. It describes the network functions and provides an architecture and topology.

  17. Utilizing Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirton, E. F.; Lavoie, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss our approach to, success with and future direction in rapid prototyping for architectural modeling. The premise that this emerging technology has broad and exciting applications in the building design and construction industry will be supported by visual and physical evidence. This evidence will be presented in the form of…

  18. Embedded Instrumentation Systems Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and continuous test and evaluation. The architecture can also be useful in monitoring, diagnostics, and health management, as well as protection in...section describes the demonstration platform used in the effort to validate the first reference instantiation of the architecture. It included...advantage of the IEEE 1451 family of standards for smart sensors and transducers (Lee and Song 2003; Song and Lee 2006). The EI Node uses the IEEE 1451.X

  19. A Modular Robotic Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    DATES COVERED AD-A232 007 Januar 1991 professional paper5 FUNOING NUMBERS A MODULAR ROBOTIC ARCHITECTURE PR: ZE92 WU: DN300029 PE: 0602936N - S. AUTHOR...mobile robots will help alleviate these problems, and, if made widely available, will promote standardization and compatibility among systems throughout...the industry. The Modular Robotic Architecture (MRA) is a generic control system that meets the above needs by providing developers with a standard set

  20. Dynamic Architecture Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Tecnology Air University In Partial Fulfillment of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Accession...architecture. The review assured that this study did not duplicate previous studies and provided the background information for this study. 4 Analysis of...a dynamic architecture computer based on the information obtained from the analysis outlined in the steps above. Analysis of Results. This concluding

  1. Languages for parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents mathematical methods for modelling parallel computer architectures, based on the results of ESPRIT's project 415 on computer languages for parallel architectures. Presented are investigations incorporating a wide variety of programming styles, including functional,logic, and object-oriented paradigms. Topics cover include Philips's parallel object-oriented language POOL, lazy-functional languages, the languages IDEAL, K-LEAF, FP2, and Petri-net semantics for the AADL language.

  2. Hybridization of Architectural Styles for Integrated Enterprise Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagusyte, Lina; Lupeikiene, Audrone

    Current enterprise systems engineering theory does not provide adequate support for the development of information systems on demand. To say more precisely, it is forming. This chapter proposes the main architectural decisions that underlie the design of integrated enterprise information systems. This chapter argues for the extending service-oriented architecture - for merging it with component-based paradigm at the design stage and using connectors of different architectural styles. The suitability of general-purpose language SysML for the modeling of integrated enterprise information systems architectures is described and arguments pros are presented.

  3. Evaluating science return in space exploration initiative architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budden, Nancy Ann; Spudis, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    Science is an important aspect of the Space Exploration Initiative, a program to explore the Moon and Mars with people and machines. Different SEI mission architectures are evaluated on the basis of three variables: access (to the planet's surface), capability (including number of crew, equipment, and supporting infrastructure), and time (being the total number of man-hours available for scientific activities). This technique allows us to estimate the scientific return to be expected from different architectures and from different implementations of the same architecture. Our methodology allows us to maximize the scientific return from the initiative by illuminating the different emphases and returns that result from the alternative architectural decisions.

  4. Message Bus Architectures - Simplicity in the Right Places

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan

    2010-01-01

    There will always be a new latest and greatest architecture for satellite ground systems. This paper discusses the use of a proven message-oriented middleware (MOM) architecture using publish/subscribe functions and the strengths it brings to these mission critical systems. An even newer approach gaining popularity is Service Oriented Architectures (SOAs). SOAs are generally considered more powerful than the MOM approach and address many mission-critical system challenges. A MOM vs SOA discussion can highlight capabilities supported or enabled by the underlying architecture and can identify benefits of MOMs and SOAs when applied to differing sets of mission requirements or evaluation criteria.

  5. Specifying structural constraints of architectural patterns in the ARCHERY language

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Barbosa, Luis S.; Riesco, Daniel

    2015-03-10

    ARCHERY is an architectural description language for modelling and reasoning about distributed, heterogeneous and dynamically reconfigurable systems in terms of architectural patterns. The language supports the specification of architectures and their reconfiguration. This paper introduces a language extension for precisely describing the structural design decisions that pattern instances must respect in their (re)configurations. The extension is a propositional modal logic with recursion and nominals referencing components, i.e., a hybrid µ-calculus. Its expressiveness allows specifying safety and liveness constraints, as well as paths and cycles over structures. Refinements of classic architectural patterns are specified.

  6. Beethoven: architecture for media telephony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskinarkaus, Anja; Ohtonen, Timo; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents a new architecture and techniques for media-based telephony over wireless/wireline IP networks, called `Beethoven'. The platform supports complex media transport and mobile conferencing for multi-user environments having a non-uniform access. New techniques are presented to provide advanced multimedia call management over different media types and their presentation. The routing and distribution of the media is rendered over the standards based protocol. Our approach offers a generic, distributed and object-oriented solution having interfaces, where signal processing and unified messaging algorithms are embedded as instances of core classes. The platform services are divided into `basic communication', `conferencing' and `media session'. The basic communication form platform core services and supports access from scalable user interface to network end-points. Conferencing services take care of media filter adaptation, conversion, error resiliency, multi-party connection and event signaling, while the media session services offer resources for application-level communication between the terminals. The platform allows flexible attachment of any number of plug-in modules, and thus we use it as a test bench for multiparty/multi-point conferencing and as an evaluation bench for signal coding algorithms. In tests, our architecture showed the ability to easily be scaled from simple voice terminal to complex multi-user conference sharing virtual data.

  7. Technology architecture guidelines for a health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, D T; Duncan, R; Langberg, M L; Shabot, M M

    2000-01-01

    Although the demand for use of information technology within the healthcare industry is intensifying, relatively little has been written about guidelines to optimize IT investments. A technology architecture is a set of guidelines for technology integration within an enterprise. The architecture is a critical tool in the effort to control information technology (IT) operating costs by constraining the number of technologies supported. A well-designed architecture is also an important aid to integrating disparate applications, data stores and networks. The authors led the development of a thorough, carefully designed technology architecture for a large and rapidly growing health care system. The purpose and design criteria are described, as well as the process for gaining consensus and disseminating the architecture. In addition, the processes for using, maintaining, and handling exceptions are described. The technology architecture is extremely valuable to health care organizations both in controlling costs and promoting integration.

  8. Technology architecture guidelines for a health care system.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D. T.; Duncan, R.; Langberg, M. L.; Shabot, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Although the demand for use of information technology within the healthcare industry is intensifying, relatively little has been written about guidelines to optimize IT investments. A technology architecture is a set of guidelines for technology integration within an enterprise. The architecture is a critical tool in the effort to control information technology (IT) operating costs by constraining the number of technologies supported. A well-designed architecture is also an important aid to integrating disparate applications, data stores and networks. The authors led the development of a thorough, carefully designed technology architecture for a large and rapidly growing health care system. The purpose and design criteria are described, as well as the process for gaining consensus and disseminating the architecture. In addition, the processes for using, maintaining, and handling exceptions are described. The technology architecture is extremely valuable to health care organizations both in controlling costs and promoting integration. PMID:11079913

  9. Neural Architectures for Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James K.

    1991-01-01

    The cerebellar model articulated controller (CMAC) neural architectures are shown to be viable for the purposes of real-time learning and control. Software tools for the exploration of CMAC performance are developed for three hardware platforms, the MacIntosh, the IBM PC, and the SUN workstation. All algorithm development was done using the C programming language. These software tools were then used to implement an adaptive critic neuro-control design that learns in real-time how to back up a trailer truck. The truck backer-upper experiment is a standard performance measure in the neural network literature, but previously the training of the controllers was done off-line. With the CMAC neural architectures, it was possible to train the neuro-controllers on-line in real-time on a MS-DOS PC 386. CMAC neural architectures are also used in conjunction with a hierarchical planning approach to find collision-free paths over 2-D analog valued obstacle fields. The method constructs a coarse resolution version of the original problem and then finds the corresponding coarse optimal path using multipass dynamic programming. CMAC artificial neural architectures are used to estimate the analog transition costs that dynamic programming requires. The CMAC architectures are trained in real-time for each obstacle field presented. The coarse optimal path is then used as a baseline for the construction of a fine scale optimal path through the original obstacle array. These results are a very good indication of the potential power of the neural architectures in control design. In order to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have run a seminar on neuro-control that has met once per week since 20 May 1991. This seminar has thoroughly discussed the CMAC architecture, relevant portions of classical control, back propagation through time, and adaptive critic designs.

  10. Comparing root architectural models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  11. The architectural relevance of cybernetics

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    This title is taken from an article by Gordon Pask in Architectural Design September 1969. It raises a number of questions which this article attempts to answer. How did Gordon come to be writing for an architectural publication? What was his contribution to architecture? How does he now come to be on the faculty of a school of architecture? And what indeed is the architectural relevance of cybernetics? 12 refs.

  12. Evolution and development of inflorescence architectures.

    PubMed

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Erasmus, Yvette; Lane, Brendan; Harder, Lawrence D; Coen, Enrico

    2007-06-08

    To understand the constraints on biological diversity, we analyzed how selection and development interact to control the evolution of inflorescences, the branching structures that bear flowers. We show that a single developmental model accounts for the restricted range of inflorescence types observed in nature and that this model is supported by molecular genetic studies. The model predicts associations between inflorescence architecture, climate, and life history, which we validated empirically. Paths, or evolutionary wormholes, link different architectures in a multidimensional fitness space, but the rate of evolution along these paths is constrained by genetic and environmental factors, which explains why some evolutionary transitions are rare between closely related plant taxa.

  13. Advanced HF anti-jam network architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E. M.; Horner, Robert W.; Cai, Khiem V.

    The Hughes HF2000 system was developed using a flexible architecture which utilizes a wideband RF front-end and extensive digital signal processing. The HF2000 antijamming (AJ) mode was field tested via an HF skywave path between Fullerton, CA and Carlsbad, CA (about 100 miles), and it was shown that reliable fast frequency-hopping data transmission is feasible at 2400 b/s without adaptive equalization. The necessary requirements of an HF communication network are discussed, and how the HF2000 AJ mode can be used to support those requirements is shown. The Hughes HF2000 AJ mode system architecture is presented.

  14. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options: Midterm main briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Space station missions, their requirements, and architectural solutions are presented. Analyses of the following five mission categories are summarized: (1) science/applications, (2) commercial, (3) national security, (4) operational support, and (5) technology development.

  15. Using an Integrated Distributed Test Architecture to Develop an Architecture for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othon, William L.

    2016-01-01

    The creation of a crew-rated spacecraft architecture capable of sending humans to Mars requires the development and integration of multiple vehicle systems and subsystems. Important new technologies will be identified and matured within each technical discipline to support the mission. Architecture maturity also requires coordination with mission operations elements and ground infrastructure. During early architecture formulation, many of these assets will not be co-located and will required integrated, distributed test to show that the technologies and systems are being developed in a coordinated way. When complete, technologies must be shown to function together to achieve mission goals. In this presentation, an architecture will be described that promotes and advances integration of disparate systems within JSC and across NASA centers.

  16. A Cloud-Oriented Cross-Domain Security Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    A Cloud-Oriented Cross -Domain Security Architecture Thuy D. Nguyen, Mark A. Gondree, David J. Shifflett, Jean Khosalim, Timothy E. Levin, Cynthia...to support a cloud of cross -domain services, hosted within a federation of multilevel secure (MLS) MYSEA servers. The MYSEA cloud supports single...sign on, service replication, and network-layer quality of security service. This new cross - domain, distributed architecture follows the consumption

  17. TALOS: A distributed architecture for intelligent monitoring and anomaly diagnosis of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Bryant G.

    1988-01-01

    Lockheed, the Hubble Space Telescope Mission Operations Contractor, is currently engaged in a project to develop a distributed architecture of communicating expert systems to support vehicle operations. This architecture, named Telemetry Analysis Logic for Operating Spacecraft (TALOS), has the potential for wide applicability in spacecraft operations. The architecture mirrors the organization of the human experts within an operations control center.

  18. Domain specific software architectures: Command and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Christine; Hatch, William; Ruegsegger, Theodore; Balzer, Bob; Feather, Martin; Goldman, Neil; Wile, Dave

    1992-01-01

    GTE is the Command and Control contractor for the Domain Specific Software Architectures program. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an architecture-driven, component-based capability for the automated generation of command and control (C2) applications. Such a capability will significantly reduce the cost of C2 applications development and will lead to improved system quality and reliability through the use of proven architectures and components. A major focus of GTE's approach is the automated generation of application components in particular subdomains. Our initial work in this area has concentrated in the message handling subdomain; we have defined and prototyped an approach that can automate one of the most software-intensive parts of C2 systems development. This paper provides an overview of the GTE team's DSSA approach and then presents our work on automated support for message processing.

  19. Nanorobot architecture for medical target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Adriano; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Freitas, Robert A., Jr.; Hogg, Tad

    2008-01-01

    This work has an innovative approach for the development of nanorobots with sensors for medicine. The nanorobots operate in a virtual environment comparing random, thermal and chemical control techniques. The nanorobot architecture model has nanobioelectronics as the basis for manufacturing integrated system devices with embedded nanobiosensors and actuators, which facilitates its application for medical target identification and drug delivery. The nanorobot interaction with the described workspace shows how time actuation is improved based on sensor capabilities. Therefore, our work addresses the control and the architecture design for developing practical molecular machines. Advances in nanotechnology are enabling manufacturing nanosensors and actuators through nanobioelectronics and biologically inspired devices. Analysis of integrated system modeling is one important aspect for supporting nanotechnology in the fast development towards one of the most challenging new fields of science: molecular machines. The use of 3D simulation can provide interactive tools for addressing nanorobot choices on sensing, hardware architecture design, manufacturing approaches, and control methodology investigation.

  20. Architecture for distributed design and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlrath, Michael B.; Boning, Duane S.; Troxel, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a flexible, distributed system architecture capable of supporting collaborative design and fabrication of semi-conductor devices and integrated circuits. Such capabilities are of particular importance in the development of new technologies, where both equipment and expertise are limited. Distributed fabrication enables direct, remote, physical experimentation in the development of leading edge technology, where the necessary manufacturing resources are new, expensive, and scarce. Computational resources, software, processing equipment, and people may all be widely distributed; their effective integration is essential in order to achieve the realization of new technologies for specific product requirements. Our architecture leverages is essential in order to achieve the realization of new technologies for specific product requirements. Our architecture leverages current vendor and consortia developments to define software interfaces and infrastructure based on existing and merging networking, CIM, and CAD standards. Process engineers and product designers access processing and simulation results through a common interface and collaborate across the distributed manufacturing environment.