Sample records for archive database sinbad

  1. Examples of Use of SINBAD Database for Nuclear Data and Code Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodeli, Ivan; Žerovnik, Gašper; Milocco, Alberto

    2017-09-01

    The SINBAD database currently contains compilations and evaluations of over 100 shielding benchmark experiments. The SINBAD database is widely used for code and data validation. Materials covered include: Air, N. O, H2O, Al, Be, Cu, graphite, concrete, Fe, stainless steel, Pb, Li, Ni, Nb, SiC, Na, W, V and mixtures thereof. Over 40 organisations from 14 countries and 2 international organisations have contributed data and work in support of SINBAD. Examples of the use of the database in the scope of different international projects, such as the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation of the OECD and the European Fusion Programme demonstrate the merit and possible usage of the database for the validation of modern nuclear data evaluations and new computer codes.

  2. Validation of Shielding Analysis Capability of SuperMC with SINBAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaobin; Yang, Qi; Wu, Bin; Han, Yuncheng; Song, Jing

    2017-09-01

    Abstract: The shielding analysis capability of SuperMC was validated with the Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive Database (SINBAD). The SINBAD was compiled by RSICC and NEA, it includes numerous benchmark experiments performed with the D-T fusion neutron source facilities of OKTAVIAN, FNS, IPPE, etc. The results from SuperMC simulation were compared with experimental data and MCNP results. Very good agreement with deviation lower than 1% was achieved and it suggests that SuperMC is reliable in shielding calculation.

  3. SINBAD flight software, the on-board software of NOMAD in ExoMars 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Morales, M. C.; Rodríguez-Gómez, Julio F.; Morales-Muñoz, Rafael; Gómez-López, Juan M.; Aparicio-del-Moral, Beatriz; Candini, Gian Paolo; Jerónimo-Zafra, Jose M.; López-Moreno, Jose J.; Robles-Muñoz, Nicolás. F.; Sanz-Mesa, Rosario; Neefs, Eddy; Vandaele, Ann C.; Drummond, Rachel; Thomas, Ian R.; Berkenbosch, Sophie; Clairquin, Roland; Delanoye, Sofie; Ristic, Bojan; Maes, Jeroen; Bonnewijn, Sabrina; Patel, Manish R.; Leese, Mark; Mason, Jon P.

    2016-07-01

    The Spacecraft INterface and control Board for NomAD (SINBAD) is an electronic interface designed by the Instituto de Astroffisica de Andalucfia (IAA-CSIC). It is part of the Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery instrument (NOMAD) on board in the ESAs ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission. This mission was launched in March 2016. The SINBAD Flight Software (SFS) is the software embedded in SINBAD. It is in charge of managing the interfaces, devices, data, observing sequences, patching and contingencies of NOMAD. It is presented in this paper the most remarkable aspects of the SFS design, likewise the main problems and lessons learned during the software development process.

  4. Sequence stratigraphy of the Lower Triassic Sinbad Formation, San Rafael Swell, east-central, Utah

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Goodspeed, T.H.; Elrick, M.; Lucas, S.G.

    1993-04-01

    The Lower Triassic Sinbad Fm (20--30 m thick) in the San Rafael Swell of east-central Utah is high energy carbonate deposits that conformably overlie tidal flat/fluvial channel deposits of the Black Dragon Fm. The Torrey Fm conformably overlies the Sinbad Fm and consists primarily of siliciclastic tidal flat and fluvial deposits. Five facies (in ascending order) are characteristic of the Sinbad Fm: (1) bioturbated calcisiltite with calcite-replaced evaporite nodules and ripple laminations, (2) skeletal-oolitic-intraclastic packstone and grainstone, (3) slightly bioturbated, mechanically laminated, pelletal calcisiltite (5) trough cross-bedded, peloidal to oolitic grainstone, and (5) thin-bedded, skeletal-pelletal-oolitic grainstone with mud to wackestonemore » drapes. Regional facies relationships of the Sinbad Fm indicate initial deepening followed by shallowing. The skeletal-intraclastic packstone and grainstone facies represents maximum flooding. This facies thickens to the northwest and contains an open marine molluscan fauna of ammonites, bivalves, gastropods and scaphopods. The ammonites are indicative of the Tardus Zone of late Smithian age. Deposits above the maximum flooding zone (MFZ) are restricted foreshoal, pelletal calcisiltite, oolitic shoal, and backshoal skeletal-oolitic (with a restricted fauna of molluscs and ostracods) deposits. This shallowing-upward sequence represents the early HST. The Sinbad Fm represents the MFZ and early HST of a 150-m-thick depositional sequence of rocks with the Black Dragon FM representing the TST, and the Torrey Fm representing the late HST.« less

  5. Potential applications of the dielectric wakefield accelerators in the SINBAD facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y. C.; Assmann, R.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B.; Weikum, M.; Zhu, J.; Hüning, M.

    2016-09-01

    Short, high-brightness relativistic electron bunches can drive ultra-high wakefields in the dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWFAs). This effect can be used to generate high power THz coherent Cherenkov radiation, accelerate a witness bunch with gradient two or three orders of magnitude larger than that in the conventional RF linear accelerators, introduce energy modulation within the driving bunch itself, etc. The paper studies potential applications of the DWFAs in the SINBAD facility at DESY. The simulations show that the ultra-short relativistic bunches from the SINBAD injector ARES can excite accelerating wakefields with peak amplitudes as high as GV/m at THz frequencies in proper DWFA structures. In addition, it illustrates that the DWFA structure can serve as a dechirper to compensate the correlated energy spread of the bunches accelerated by the laser plasma wakefield accelerator.

  6. The NSO FTS database program and archive (FTSDBM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the NSO Fourier transform spectrometer is being re-archived from half inch tape onto write-once compact disk. In the process, information about each spectrum and a low resolution copy of each spectrum is being saved into an on-line database. FTSDBM is a simple database management program in the NSO external package for IRAF. A command language allows the FTSDBM user to add entries to the database, delete entries, select subsets from the database based on keyword values including ranges of values, create new database files based on these subsets, make keyword lists, examine low resolution spectra graphically, and make disk number/file number lists. Once the archive is complete, FTSDBM will allow the database to be efficiently searched for data of interest to the user and the compact disk format will allow random access to that data.

  7. Astronomical Surveys, Catalogs, Databases, and Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    All-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their cataloged data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum are reviewed, from γ-ray to radio, such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in γ-ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and II based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio and many others, as well as most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS) and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). Most important astronomical databases and archives are reviewed as well, including Wide-Field Plate DataBase (WFPDB), ESO, HEASARC, IRSA and MAST archives, CDS SIMBAD, VizieR and Aladin, NED and HyperLEDA extragalactic databases, ADS and astro-ph services. They are powerful sources for many-sided efficient research using Virtual Observatory tools. Using and analysis of Big Data accumulated in astronomy lead to many new discoveries.

  8. The EXOSAT database and archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Parmar, A. N.

    1992-01-01

    The EXOSAT database provides on-line access to the results and data products (spectra, images, and lightcurves) from the EXOSAT mission as well as access to data and logs from a number of other missions (such as EINSTEIN, COS-B, ROSAT, and IRAS). In addition, a number of familiar optical, infrared, and x ray catalogs, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) guide star catalog are available. The complete database is located at the EXOSAT observatory at ESTEC in the Netherlands and is accessible remotely via a captive account. The database management system was specifically developed to efficiently access the database and to allow the user to perform statistical studies on large samples of astronomical objects as well as to retrieve scientific and bibliographic information on single sources. The system was designed to be mission independent and includes timing, image processing, and spectral analysis packages as well as software to allow the easy transfer of analysis results and products to the user's own institute. The archive at ESTEC comprises a subset of the EXOSAT observations, stored on magnetic tape. Observations of particular interest were copied in compressed format to an optical jukebox, allowing users to retrieve and analyze selected raw data entirely from their terminals. Such analysis may be necessary if the user's needs are not accommodated by the products contained in the database (in terms of time resolution, spectral range, and the finesse of the background subtraction, for instance). Long-term archiving of the full final observation data is taking place at ESRIN in Italy as part of the ESIS program, again using optical media, and ESRIN have now assumed responsibility for distributing the data to the community. Tests showed that raw observational data (typically several tens of megabytes for a single target) can be transferred via the existing networks in reasonable time.

  9. Qualitative Comparison of IGRA and ESRL Radiosonde Archived Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple databases of atmospheric profile information are freely available to individuals and groups such as the Natural Environments group. Two of the primary database archives provided by NOAA that are most frequently used are those from the Earth Science Research Laboratory (ESRL) and the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA). Inquiries have been made as to why one database is used as opposed to the other, yet to the best of knowledge, no formal comparison has been performed. The goal of this study is to provide a qualitative comparison of the ESRL and IGRA radiosonde databases. For part of this analyses, 14 upper air observation sites were selected. These sites all have the common attribute of having been used or are planned for use in the development of Range Reference Atmospheres (RRAs) in support of NASA's and DOD's current and future goals.

  10. NVST Data Archiving System Based On FastBit NoSQL Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying-bo; Wang, Feng; Ji, Kai-fan; Deng, Hui; Dai, Wei; Liang, Bo

    2014-06-01

    The New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) is a 1-meter vacuum solar telescope that aims to observe the fine structures of active regions on the Sun. The main tasks of the NVST are high resolution imaging and spectral observations, including the measurements of the solar magnetic field. The NVST has been collecting more than 20 million FITS files since it began routine observations in 2012 and produces a maximum observational records of 120 thousand files in a day. Given the large amount of files, the effective archiving and retrieval of files becomes a critical and urgent problem. In this study, we implement a new data archiving system for the NVST based on the Fastbit Not Only Structured Query Language (NoSQL) database. Comparing to the relational database (i.e., MySQL; My Structured Query Language), the Fastbit database manifests distinctive advantages on indexing and querying performance. In a large scale database of 40 million records, the multi-field combined query response time of Fastbit database is about 15 times faster and fully meets the requirements of the NVST. Our study brings a new idea for massive astronomical data archiving and would contribute to the design of data management systems for other astronomical telescopes.

  11. The Golosiiv on-line plate archive database, management and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, L.; Sergeeva, T.

    2007-08-01

    We intend to create online version of the database of the MAO NASU plate archive as VO-compatible structures in accordance with principles, developed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance in order to make them available for world astronomical community. The online version of the log-book database is constructed by means of MySQL+PHP. Data management system provides a user with user interface, gives a capability of detailed traditional form-filling radial search of plates, obtaining some auxiliary sampling, the listing of each collection and permits to browse the detail descriptions of collections. The administrative tool allows database administrator the data correction, enhancement with new data sets and control of the integrity and consistence of the database as a whole. The VO-compatible database is currently constructing under the demands and in the accordance with principles of international data archives and has to be strongly generalized in order to provide a possibility of data mining by means of standard interfaces and to be the best fitted to the demands of WFPDB Group for databases of the plate catalogues. On-going enhancements of database toward the WFPDB bring the problem of the verification of data to the forefront, as it demands the high degree of data reliability. The process of data verification is practically endless and inseparable from data management owing to a diversity of data errors nature, that means to a variety of ploys of their identification and fixing. The current status of MAO NASU glass archive forces the activity in both directions simultaneously: the enhancement of log-book database with new sets of observational data as well as generalized database creation and the cross-identification between them. The VO-compatible version of the database is supplying with digitized data of plates obtained with MicroTek ScanMaker 9800 XL TMA. The scanning procedure is not total but is conducted selectively in the frames of special

  12. The HARPS-N archive through a Cassandra, NoSQL database suite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Guerra, Jose; Harutyunyan, Avet; Lodi, Marcello; Martin, Adrian

    2016-07-01

    The TNG-INAF is developing the science archive for the WEAVE instrument. The underlying architecture of the archive is based on a non relational database, more precisely, on Apache Cassandra cluster, which uses a NoSQL technology. In order to test and validate the use of this architecture, we created a local archive which we populated with all the HARPSN spectra collected at the TNG since the instrument's start of operations in mid-2012, as well as developed tools for the analysis of this data set. The HARPS-N data set is two orders of magnitude smaller than WEAVE, but we want to demonstrate the ability to walk through a complete data set and produce scientific output, as valuable as that produced by an ordinary pipeline, though without accessing directly the FITS files. The analytics is done by Apache Solr and Spark and on a relational PostgreSQL database. As an example, we produce observables like metallicity indexes for the targets in the archive and compare the results with the ones coming from the HARPS-N regular data reduction software. The aim of this experiment is to explore the viability of a high availability cluster and distributed NoSQL database as a platform for complex scientific analytics on a large data set, which will then be ported to the WEAVE Archive System (WAS) which we are developing for the WEAVE multi object, fiber spectrograph.

  13. BAO Plate Archive Project: Digitization, Electronic Database and Research Programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Andreasyan, H. R.; Azatyan, N. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Khachatryan, K. G.; Knyazyan, A. V.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Nikoghosyan, E. H.; Paronyan, G. M.; Vardanyan, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The most important part of the astronomical observational heritage are astronomical plate archives created on the basis of numerous observations at many observatories. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) plate archive consists of 37,000 photographic plates and films, obtained at 2.6m telescope, 1m and 0.5m Schmidt type and other smaller telescopes during 1947-1991. In 2002-2005, the famous Markarian Survey (also called First Byurakan Survey, FBS) 1874 plates were digitized and the Digitized FBS (DFBS) was created. New science projects have been conducted based on these low-dispersion spectroscopic material. A large project on the whole BAO Plate Archive digitization, creation of electronic database and its scientific usage was started in 2015. A Science Program Board is created to evaluate the observing material, to investigate new possibilities and to propose new projects based on the combined usage of these observations together with other world databases. The Executing Team consists of 11 astronomers and 2 computer scientists and will use 2 EPSON Perfection V750 Pro scanners for the digitization, as well as Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO) database will be used to accommodate all new data. The project will run during 3 years in 2015-2017 and the final result will be an electronic database and online interactive sky map to be used for further research projects, mainly including high proper motion stars, variable objects and Solar System bodies.

  14. The MAO NASU Plate Archive Database. Current Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, L. K.; Sergeeva, T. P.

    2006-04-01

    The preliminary online version of the database of the MAO NASU plate archive is constructed on the basis of the relational database management system MySQL and permits an easy supplement of database with new collections of astronegatives, provides a high flexibility in constructing SQL-queries for data search optimization, PHP Basic Authorization protected access to administrative interface and wide range of search parameters. The current status of the database will be reported and the brief description of the search engine and means of the database integrity support will be given. Methods and means of the data verification and tasks for the further development will be discussed.

  15. BAO Plate Archive digitization, creation of electronic database and its scientific usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2015-08-01

    Astronomical plate archives created on the basis of numerous observations at many observatories are important part of the astronomical heritage. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) plate archive consists of 37,500 photographic plates and films, obtained at 2.6m telescope, 1m and 0.5m Schmidt telescopes and other smaller ones during 1947-1991. In 2002-2005, the famous Markarian Survey (First Byurakan Survey, FBS) 2000 plates were digitized and the Digitized FBS (DFBS, http://www.aras.am/Dfbs/dfbs.html) was created. New science projects have been conducted based on these low-dispersion spectroscopic material. In 2015, we have started a project on the whole BAO Plate Archive digitization, creation of electronic database and its scientific usage. A Science Program Board is created to evaluate the observing material, to investigate new possibilities and to propose new projects based on the combined usage of these observations together with other world databases. The Executing Team consists of 9 astronomers and 3 computer scientists and will use 2 EPSON Perfection V750 Pro scanners for the digitization, as well as Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO) database to accommodate all new data. The project will run during 3 years in 2015-2017 and the final result will be an electronic database and online interactive sky map to be used for further research projects.

  16. Archive and Database as Metaphor: Theorizing the Historical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manoff, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Digital media increase the visibility and presence of the past while also reshaping our sense of history. We have extraordinary access to digital versions of books, journals, film, television, music, art and popular culture from earlier eras. New theoretical formulations of database and archive provide ways to think creatively about these changes…

  17. Toward public volume database management: a case study of NOVA, the National Online Volumetric Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Alex; Yoo, Terry S.

    2004-04-01

    Public databases today can be constructed with a wide variety of authoring and management structures. The widespread appeal of Internet search engines suggests that public information be made open and available to common search strategies, making accessible information that would otherwise be hidden by the infrastructure and software interfaces of a traditional database management system. We present the construction and organizational details for managing NOVA, the National Online Volumetric Archive. As an archival effort of the Visible Human Project for supporting medical visualization research, archiving 3D multimodal radiological teaching files, and enhancing medical education with volumetric data, our overall database structure is simplified; archives grow by accruing information, but seldom have to modify, delete, or overwrite stored records. NOVA is being constructed and populated so that it is transparent to the Internet; that is, much of its internal structure is mirrored in HTML allowing internet search engines to investigate, catalog, and link directly to the deep relational structure of the collection index. The key organizational concept for NOVA is the Image Content Group (ICG), an indexing strategy for cataloging incoming data as a set structure rather than by keyword management. These groups are managed through a series of XML files and authoring scripts. We cover the motivation for Image Content Groups, their overall construction, authorship, and management in XML, and the pilot results for creating public data repositories using this strategy.

  18. The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Protein Crystal Growth Archive

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Gary L.; Tung, Michael; Ladner, Jane

    1996-01-01

    The NIST/NASA/CARB Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (BMCD), NIST Standard Reference Database 21, contains crystal data and crystallization conditions for biological macromolecules. The database entries include data abstracted from published crystallographic reports. Each entry consists of information describing the biological macromolecule crystallized and crystal data and the crystallization conditions for each crystal form. The BMCD serves as the NASA Protein Crystal Growth Archive in that it contains protocols and results of crystallization experiments undertaken in microgravity (space). These database entries report the results, whether successful or not, from NASA-sponsored protein crystal growth experiments in microgravity and from microgravity crystallization studies sponsored by other international organizations. The BMCD was designed as a tool to assist x-ray crystallographers in the development of protocols to crystallize biological macromolecules, those that have previously been crystallized, and those that have not been crystallized. PMID:11542472

  19. Archive of mass spectral data files on recordable CD-ROMs and creation and maintenance of a searchable computerized database.

    PubMed

    Amick, G D

    1999-01-01

    A database containing names of mass spectral data files generated in a forensic toxicology laboratory and two Microsoft Visual Basic programs to maintain and search this database is described. The data files (approximately 0.5 KB/each) were collected from six mass spectrometers during routine casework. Data files were archived on 650 MB (74 min) recordable CD-ROMs. Each recordable CD-ROM was given a unique name, and its list of data file names was placed into the database. The present manuscript describes the use of search and maintenance programs for searching and routine upkeep of the database and creation of CD-ROMs for archiving of data files.

  20. Towards the Interoperability of Web, Database, and Mass Storage Technologies for Petabyte Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan; Marciano, Richard; Wan, Michael; Sherwin, Tom; Frost, Richard

    1996-01-01

    At the San Diego Supercomputer Center, a massive data analysis system (MDAS) is being developed to support data-intensive applications that manipulate terabyte sized data sets. The objective is to support scientific application access to data whether it is located at a Web site, stored as an object in a database, and/or storage in an archival storage system. We are developing a suite of demonstration programs which illustrate how Web, database (DBMS), and archival storage (mass storage) technologies can be integrated. An application presentation interface is being designed that integrates data access to all of these sources. We have developed a data movement interface between the Illustra object-relational database and the NSL UniTree archival storage system running in a production mode at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. With this interface, an Illustra client can transparently access data on UniTree under the control of the Illustr DBMS server. The current implementation is based on the creation of a new DBMS storage manager class, and a set of library functions that allow the manipulation and migration of data stored as Illustra 'large objects'. We have extended this interface to allow a Web client application to control data movement between its local disk, the Web server, the DBMS Illustra server, and the UniTree mass storage environment. This paper describes some of the current approaches successfully integrating these technologies. This framework is measured against a representative sample of environmental data extracted from the San Diego Ba Environmental Data Repository. Practical lessons are drawn and critical research areas are highlighted.

  1. Enriching Great Britain's National Landslide Database by searching newspaper archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Faith E.; Malamud, Bruce D.; Freeborough, Katy; Demeritt, David

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of where landslide hazard and impact will be greatest is largely based on our knowledge of past events. Here, we present a method to supplement existing records of landslides in Great Britain by searching an electronic archive of regional newspapers. In Great Britain, the British Geological Survey (BGS) is responsible for updating and maintaining records of landslide events and their impacts in the National Landslide Database (NLD). The NLD contains records of more than 16,500 landslide events in Great Britain. Data sources for the NLD include field surveys, academic articles, grey literature, news, public reports and, since 2012, social media. We aim to supplement the richness of the NLD by (i) identifying additional landslide events, (ii) acting as an additional source of confirmation of events existing in the NLD and (iii) adding more detail to existing database entries. This is done by systematically searching the Nexis UK digital archive of 568 regional newspapers published in the UK. In this paper, we construct a robust Boolean search criterion by experimenting with landslide terminology for four training periods. We then apply this search to all articles published in 2006 and 2012. This resulted in the addition of 111 records of landslide events to the NLD over the 2 years investigated (2006 and 2012). We also find that we were able to obtain information about landslide impact for 60-90% of landslide events identified from newspaper articles. Spatial and temporal patterns of additional landslides identified from newspaper articles are broadly in line with those existing in the NLD, confirming that the NLD is a representative sample of landsliding in Great Britain. This method could now be applied to more time periods and/or other hazards to add richness to databases and thus improve our ability to forecast future events based on records of past events.

  2. Databases and archiving for cryoEM

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Ardan; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    Cryo-EM in structural biology is currently served by three public archives – EMDB for 3DEM reconstructions, PDB for models built from 3DEM reconstructions and EMPIAR for the raw 2D image data used to obtain the 3DEM reconstructions. These archives play a vital role for both the structural community and the wider biological community in making the data accessible so that results may be reused, reassessed and integrated with other structural and bioinformatics resources. The important role of the archives is underpinned by the fact that many journals mandate the deposition of data to PDB and EMDB on publication. The field is currently undergoing transformative changes where on the one hand high-resolution structures are becoming a routine occurrence while on the other hand electron tomography is enabling the study of macromolecules in the cellular context. Concomitantly the archives are evolving to best serve their stakeholder communities. In this chapter we describe the current state of the archives, resources available for depositing, accessing, searching, visualising and validating data, on-going community-wide initiatives and opportunities and challenges for the future. PMID:27572735

  3. Water level ingest, archive and processing system - an integral part of NOAA's tsunami database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, S. J.; Mungov, G.; Dunbar, P. K.; Price, D. J.; Mccullough, H.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and collocated World Data Service for Geophysics (WDS) provides long-term archive, data management, and access to national and global tsunami data. Archive responsibilities include the NOAA Global Historical Tsunami event and runup database, damage photos, as well as other related hazards data. Beginning in 2008, NGDC was given the responsibility of archiving, processing and distributing all tsunami and hazards-related water level data collected from NOAA observational networks in a coordinated and consistent manner. These data include the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) data provided by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), coastal-tide-gauge data from the National Ocean Service (NOS) network and tide-gauge data from the two National Weather Service (NWS) Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs) regional networks. Taken together, this integrated archive supports tsunami forecast, warning, research, mitigation and education efforts of NOAA and the Nation. Due to the variety of the water level data, the automatic ingest system was redesigned, along with upgrading the inventory, archive and delivery capabilities based on modern digital data archiving practices. The data processing system was also upgraded and redesigned focusing on data quality assessment in an operational manner. This poster focuses on data availability highlighting the automation of all steps of data ingest, archive, processing and distribution. Examples are given from recent events such as the October 2012 hurricane Sandy, the Feb 06, 2013 Solomon Islands tsunami, and the June 13, 2013 meteotsunami along the U.S. East Coast.

  4. The McIntosh Archive: A solar feature database spanning four solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Malanushenko, A. V.; Hewins, I.; McFadden, R.; Emery, B.; Webb, D. F.; Denig, W. F.

    2016-12-01

    The McIntosh Archive consists of a set of hand-drawn solar Carrington maps created by Patrick McIntosh from 1964 to 2009. McIntosh used mainly H-alpha, He-1 10830 and photospheric magnetic measurements from both ground-based and NASA satellite observations. With these he traced coronal holes, polarity inversion lines, filaments, sunspots and plage, yielding a unique 45-year record of the features associated with the large-scale solar magnetic field. We will present the results of recent efforts to preserve and digitize this archive. Most of the original hand-drawn maps have been scanned, a method for processing these scans into digital, searchable format has been developed and streamlined, and an archival repository at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) has been created. We will demonstrate how Solar Cycle 23 data may now be accessed and how it may be utilized for scientific applications. In addition, we will discuss how this database of human-recognized features, which overlaps with the onset of high-resolution, continuous modern solar data, may act as a training set for computer feature recognition algorithms.

  5. SPINS: standardized protein NMR storage. A data dictionary and object-oriented relational database for archiving protein NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Baran, Michael C; Moseley, Hunter N B; Sahota, Gurmukh; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2002-10-01

    Modern protein NMR spectroscopy laboratories have a rapidly growing need for an easily queried local archival system of raw experimental NMR datasets. SPINS (Standardized ProteIn Nmr Storage) is an object-oriented relational database that provides facilities for high-volume NMR data archival, organization of analyses, and dissemination of results to the public domain by automatic preparation of the header files required for submission of data to the BioMagResBank (BMRB). The current version of SPINS coordinates the process from data collection to BMRB deposition of raw NMR data by standardizing and integrating the storage and retrieval of these data in a local laboratory file system. Additional facilities include a data mining query tool, graphical database administration tools, and a NMRStar v2. 1.1 file generator. SPINS also includes a user-friendly internet-based graphical user interface, which is optionally integrated with Varian VNMR NMR data collection software. This paper provides an overview of the data model underlying the SPINS database system, a description of its implementation in Oracle, and an outline of future plans for the SPINS project.

  6. The ERESE Project: Interfacing with the ERDA Digital Archive and ERR Reference Database in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Mills, H.; Keller, M.; Wallace, A.; Bachman, N.; Helly, J.; Helly, M.; Miller, S. P.; Massell Symons, C.

    2004-12-01

    To bridge the gap between Earth science teachers, librarians, scientists and data archive managers, we have started the ERESE project that will create, archive and make available "Enduring Resources in Earth Science Education" through information technology (IT) portals. In the first phase of this National Science Digital Library (NSDL) project, we are focusing on the development of these ERESE resources for middle and high school teachers to be used in lesson plans with "plate tectonics" and "magnetics" as their main theme. In this presentation, we will show how these new ERESE resources are being generated, how they can be uploaded via online web wizards, how they are archived, how we make them available via the EarthRef.org Digital Archive (ERDA) and Reference Database (ERR), and how they relate to the SIOExplorer database containing data objects for all seagoing cruises carried out by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The EarthRef.org web resource uses the vision of a "general description" of the Earth as a geological system to provide an IT infrastructure for the Earth sciences. This emphasizes the marriage of the "scientific process" (and its results) with an educational cyber-infrastructure for teaching Earth sciences, on any level, from middle school to college and graduate levels. Eight different databases reside under EarthRef.org from which ERDA holds any digital object that has been uploaded by other scientists, teachers and students for free, while the ERR holds more than 80,000 publications. For more than 1,500 of these publications, this latter database makes available for downloading JPG/PDF images of the abstracts, data tables, methods and appendices, together with their digitized contents in Microsoft Word and Excel format. Both holdings are being used to store the ERESE objects that are being generated by a group of undergraduate students majoring in Environmental Systems (ESYS) program at the UCSD with an emphasis on the Earth Sciences

  7. NASA Records Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Lunsford, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Records Database, comprising a Web-based application program and a database, is used to administer an archive of paper records at Stennis Space Center. The system begins with an electronic form, into which a user enters information about records that the user is sending to the archive. The form is smart : it provides instructions for entering information correctly and prompts the user to enter all required information. Once complete, the form is digitally signed and submitted to the database. The system determines which storage locations are not in use, assigns the user s boxes of records to some of them, and enters these assignments in the database. Thereafter, the software tracks the boxes and can be used to locate them. By use of search capabilities of the software, specific records can be sought by box storage locations, accession numbers, record dates, submitting organizations, or details of the records themselves. Boxes can be marked with such statuses as checked out, lost, transferred, and destroyed. The system can generate reports showing boxes awaiting destruction or transfer. When boxes are transferred to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the system can automatically fill out NARA records-transfer forms. Currently, several other NASA Centers are considering deploying the NASA Records Database to help automate their records archives.

  8. Astronomical Archive at Tartu Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annuk, K.

    2007-10-01

    Archiving astronomical data is important task not only at large observatories but also at small observatories. Here we describe the astronomical archive at Tartu Observatory. The archive consists of old photographic plate images, photographic spectrograms, CCD direct--images and CCD spectroscopic data. The photographic plate digitizing project was started in 2005. An on-line database (based on MySQL) was created. The database includes CCD data as well photographic data. A PHP-MySQL interface was written for access to all data.

  9. DNApod: DNA polymorphism annotation database from next-generation sequence read archives.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takako; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Ohta, Tazro; Nikoh, Naruo; Shimizu, Tokurou; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kurata, Nori; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS), datasets for DNA polymorphisms among various species and strains have been produced, stored, and distributed. However, reliability varies among these datasets because the experimental and analytical conditions used differ among assays. Furthermore, such datasets have been frequently distributed from the websites of individual sequencing projects. It is desirable to integrate DNA polymorphism data into one database featuring uniform quality control that is distributed from a single platform at a single place. DNA polymorphism annotation database (DNApod; http://tga.nig.ac.jp/dnapod/) is an integrated database that stores genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets acquired under uniform analytical conditions, and this includes uniformity in the quality of the raw data, the reference genome version, and evaluation algorithms. DNApod genotypic data are re-analyzed whole-genome shotgun datasets extracted from sequence read archives, and DNApod distributes genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets and known-gene annotations for each DNA polymorphism. This new database was developed for storing genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets of plants, with crops being the first priority. Here, we describe our analyzed data for 679, 404, and 66 strains of rice, maize, and sorghum, respectively. The analytical methods are available as a DNApod workflow in an NGS annotation system of the DNA Data Bank of Japan and a virtual machine image. Furthermore, DNApod provides tables of links of identifiers between DNApod genotypic data and public phenotypic data. To advance the sharing of organism knowledge, DNApod offers basic and ubiquitous functions for multiple alignment and phylogenetic tree construction by using orthologous gene information.

  10. DNApod: DNA polymorphism annotation database from next-generation sequence read archives

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Takako; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Ohta, Tazro; Nikoh, Naruo; Shimizu, Tokurou; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kurata, Nori; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS), datasets for DNA polymorphisms among various species and strains have been produced, stored, and distributed. However, reliability varies among these datasets because the experimental and analytical conditions used differ among assays. Furthermore, such datasets have been frequently distributed from the websites of individual sequencing projects. It is desirable to integrate DNA polymorphism data into one database featuring uniform quality control that is distributed from a single platform at a single place. DNA polymorphism annotation database (DNApod; http://tga.nig.ac.jp/dnapod/) is an integrated database that stores genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets acquired under uniform analytical conditions, and this includes uniformity in the quality of the raw data, the reference genome version, and evaluation algorithms. DNApod genotypic data are re-analyzed whole-genome shotgun datasets extracted from sequence read archives, and DNApod distributes genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets and known-gene annotations for each DNA polymorphism. This new database was developed for storing genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets of plants, with crops being the first priority. Here, we describe our analyzed data for 679, 404, and 66 strains of rice, maize, and sorghum, respectively. The analytical methods are available as a DNApod workflow in an NGS annotation system of the DNA Data Bank of Japan and a virtual machine image. Furthermore, DNApod provides tables of links of identifiers between DNApod genotypic data and public phenotypic data. To advance the sharing of organism knowledge, DNApod offers basic and ubiquitous functions for multiple alignment and phylogenetic tree construction by using orthologous gene information. PMID:28234924

  11. The ISO Data Archive and Interoperability with Other Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Alberto; Arviset, Christophe; Hernández, José; Dowson, John; Osuna, Pedro

    The ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), an unprecedented observatory for infrared astronomy launched in November 1995, successfully made nearly 30,000 scientific observations in its 2.5-year mission. The ISO data can be retrieved from the ISO Data Archive, available at ISO Data Archive , and comprised of about 150,000 observations, including parallel and serendipity mode observations. A user-friendly Java interface permits queries to the database and data retrieval. The interface currently offers a wide variety of links to other archives, such as name resolution with NED and SIMBAD, access to electronic articles from ADS and CDS/VizieR, and access to IRAS data. In the past year development has been focused on improving the IDA interoperability with other astronomical archives, either by accessing other relevant archives or by providing direct access to the ISO data for external services. A mechanism of information transfer has been developed, allowing direct query to the IDA via a Java Server Page, returning quick look ISO images and relevant, observation-specific information embedded in an HTML page. This method has been used to link from the CDS/Vizier Data Centre and ADS, and work with IPAC to allow access to the ISO Archive from IRSA, including display capabilities of the observed sky regions onto other mission images, is in progress. Prospects for further links to and from other archives and databases are also addressed.

  12. Planetary Data Archiving Plan at JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Iku; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Yamamoto, Yukio; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Imamura, Takeshi; Sobue, Shinichi; Takashima, Takeshi; Terazono, Jun-Ya

    After the successful rendezvous of Hayabusa with the small-body planet Itokawa, and the successful launch of Kaguya to the moon, Japanese planetary community has gotten their own and full-scale data. However, at this moment, these datasets are only available from the data sites managed by each mission team. The databases are individually constructed in the different formats, and the user interface of these data sites is not compatible with foreign databases. To improve the usability of the planetary archives at JAXA and to enable the international data exchange smooth, we are investigating to make a new planetary database. Within a coming decade, Japan will have fruitful datasets in the planetary science field, Venus (Planet-C), Mercury (BepiColombo), and several missions in planning phase (small-bodies). In order to strongly assist the international scientific collaboration using these mission archive data, the planned planetary data archive at JAXA should be managed in an unified manner and the database should be constructed in the international planetary database standard style. In this presentation, we will show the current status and future plans of the planetary data archiving at JAXA.

  13. A MySQL Based EPICS Archiver

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Christopher Slominski

    2009-10-01

    Archiving a large fraction of the EPICS signals within the Jefferson Lab (JLAB) Accelerator control system is vital for postmortem and real-time analysis of the accelerator performance. This analysis is performed on a daily basis by scientists, operators, engineers, technicians, and software developers. Archiving poses unique challenges due to the magnitude of the control system. A MySQL Archiving system (Mya) was developed to scale to the needs of the control system; currently archiving 58,000 EPICS variables, updating at a rate of 11,000 events per second. In addition to the large collection rate, retrieval of the archived data must also bemore » fast and robust. Archived data retrieval clients obtain data at a rate over 100,000 data points per second. Managing the data in a relational database provides a number of benefits. This paper describes an archiving solution that uses an open source database and standard off the shelf hardware to reach high performance archiving needs. Mya has been in production at Jefferson Lab since February of 2007.« less

  14. BAO Plate Archive Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Andreasyan, H. R.; Azatyan, N. M.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Samsonyan, A. L.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Harutyunyan, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    We present the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) Plate Archive Project that is aimed at digitization, extraction and analysis of archival data and building an electronic database and interactive sky map. BAO Plate Archive consists of 37,500 photographic plates and films, obtained with 2.6m telescope, 1m and 0.5m Schmidt telescopes and other smaller ones during 1947-1991. The famous Markarian Survey (or the First Byurakan Survey, FBS) 2000 plates were digitized in 2002-2005 and the Digitized FBS (DFBS, www.aras.am/Dfbs/dfbs.html) was created. New science projects have been conducted based on this low-dispersion spectroscopic material. Several other smaller digitization projects have been carried out as well, such as part of Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) plates, photographic chain plates in Coma, where the blazar ON 231 is located and 2.6m film spectra of FBS Blue Stellar Objects. However, most of the plates and films are not digitized. In 2015, we have started a project on the whole BAO Plate Archive digitization, creation of electronic database and its scientific usage. Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) database will accommodate all new data. The project runs in collaboration with the Armenian Institute of Informatics and Automation Problems (IIAP) and will continues during 4 years in 2015-2018. The final result will be an Electronic Database and online Interactive Sky map to be used for further research projects. ArVO will provide all standards and tools for efficient usage of the scientific output and its integration in international databases.

  15. BAO plate archive digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Nikoghosyan, E. H.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Andreasyan, H. R.; Azatyan, N. M.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Khachatryan, K. G.; Vardanyan, A. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Knyazyan, A. V.

    Astronomical plate archives created on the basis of numerous observations at many observatories are important part of the astronomical heritage. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) plate archive consists of 37,000 photographic plates and films, obtained at 2.6m telescope, 1m and 0.5m Schmidt telescopes and other smaller ones during 1947-1991. In 2015, we have started a project on the whole BAO Plate Archive digitization, creation of electronic database and its scientific usage. A Science Program Board is created to evaluate the observing material, to investigate new possibilities and to propose new projects based on the combined usage of these observations together with other world databases. The Executing Team consists of 11 astronomers and 2 computer scientists and will use 2 EPSON Perfection V750 Pro scanners for the digitization. The project will run during 3 years in 2015-2017 and the final result will be an electronic database and online interactive sky map to be used for further research projects.

  16. Image Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Rune

    Different kinds of pictorial databases are described with respect to aims, user groups, search possibilities, storage, and distribution. Some specific examples are given for databases used for the following purposes: (1) labor markets for artists; (2) document management; (3) telling a story; (4) preservation (archives and museums); (5) research;…

  17. The Planetary Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Paulo F.; Trilling, David; Szalay, Alexander; Budavári, Tamás; Fuentes, César

    2014-11-01

    We are building the first system that will allow efficient data mining in the astronomical archives for observations of Solar System Bodies. While the Virtual Observatory has enabled data-intensive research making use of large collections of observations across multiple archives, Planetary Science has largely been denied this opportunity: most astronomical data services are built based on sky positions, and moving objects are often filtered out.To identify serendipitous observations of Solar System objects, we ingest the archive metadata. The coverage of each image in an archive is a volume in a 3D space (RA,Dec,time), which we can represent efficiently through a hierarchical triangular mesh (HTM) for the spatial dimensions, plus a contiguous time interval. In this space, an asteroid occupies a curve, which we determine integrating its orbit into the past. Thus when an asteroid trajectory intercepts the volume of an archived image, we have a possible observation of that body. Our pipeline then looks in the archive's catalog for a source with the corresponding coordinates, to retrieve its photometry. All these matches are stored into a database, which can be queried by object identifier.This database consists of archived observations of known Solar System objects. This means that it grows not only from the ingestion of new images, but also from the growth in the number of known objects. As new bodies are discovered, our pipeline can find archived observations where they could have been recorded, providing colors for these newly-found objects. This growth becomes more relevant with the new generation of wide-field surveys, particularly LSST.We also present one use case of our prototype archive: after ingesting the metadata for SDSS, 2MASS and GALEX, we were able to identify serendipitous observations of Solar System bodies in these 3 archives. Cross-matching these occurrences provided us with colors from the UV to the IR, a much wider spectral range than that

  18. The Role of Data Archives in Synoptic Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Kevin

    The detailed study of solar cycle variations requires analysis of recorded datasets spanning many years of observations, that is, a data archive. The use of digital data, combined with powerful database server software, gives such archives new capabilities to provide, quickly and flexibly, selected pieces of information to scientists. Use of standardized protocols will allow multiple databases, independently maintained, to be seamlessly joined, allowing complex searches spanning multiple archives. These data archives also benefit from being developed in parallel with the telescope itself, which helps to assure data integrity and to provide close integration between the telescope and archive. Development of archives that can guarantee long-term data availability and strong compatibility with other projects makes solar-cycle studies easier to plan and realize.

  19. The CHARA Array Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Schaefer, Gail; ten Brummelaar, Theo; Gies, Douglas; Farrington, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    We are building a searchable database for the CHARA Array data archive. The Array consists of six telescopes linked together as an interferometer, providing sub-milliarcsecond resolution in the optical and near-infrared. The Array enables a variety of scientific studies, including measuring stellar angular diameters, imaging stellar shapes and surface features, mapping the orbits of close binary companions, and resolving circumstellar environments. This database is one component of an NSF/MSIP funded program to provide open access to the CHARA Array to the broader astronomical community. This archive goes back to 2004 and covers all the beam combiners on the Array. We discuss the current status of and future plans for the public database, and give directions on how to access it.

  20. Simple re-instantiation of small databases using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tin Wee; Xie, Chao; De Silva, Mark; Lim, Kuan Siong; Patro, C Pawan K; Lim, Shen Jean; Govindarajan, Kunde Ramamoorthy; Tong, Joo Chuan; Choo, Khar Heng; Ranganathan, Shoba; Khan, Asif M

    2013-01-01

    Small bioinformatics databases, unlike institutionally funded large databases, are vulnerable to discontinuation and many reported in publications are no longer accessible. This leads to irreproducible scientific work and redundant effort, impeding the pace of scientific progress. We describe a Web-accessible system, available online at http://biodb100.apbionet.org, for archival and future on demand re-instantiation of small databases within minutes. Depositors can rebuild their databases by downloading a Linux live operating system (http://www.bioslax.com), preinstalled with bioinformatics and UNIX tools. The database and its dependencies can be compressed into an ".lzm" file for deposition. End-users can search for archived databases and activate them on dynamically re-instantiated BioSlax instances, run as virtual machines over the two popular full virtualization standard cloud-computing platforms, Xen Hypervisor or vSphere. The system is adaptable to increasing demand for disk storage or computational load and allows database developers to use the re-instantiated databases for integration and development of new databases. Herein, we demonstrate that a relatively inexpensive solution can be implemented for archival of bioinformatics databases and their rapid re-instantiation should the live databases disappear.

  1. Simple re-instantiation of small databases using cloud computing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small bioinformatics databases, unlike institutionally funded large databases, are vulnerable to discontinuation and many reported in publications are no longer accessible. This leads to irreproducible scientific work and redundant effort, impeding the pace of scientific progress. Results We describe a Web-accessible system, available online at http://biodb100.apbionet.org, for archival and future on demand re-instantiation of small databases within minutes. Depositors can rebuild their databases by downloading a Linux live operating system (http://www.bioslax.com), preinstalled with bioinformatics and UNIX tools. The database and its dependencies can be compressed into an ".lzm" file for deposition. End-users can search for archived databases and activate them on dynamically re-instantiated BioSlax instances, run as virtual machines over the two popular full virtualization standard cloud-computing platforms, Xen Hypervisor or vSphere. The system is adaptable to increasing demand for disk storage or computational load and allows database developers to use the re-instantiated databases for integration and development of new databases. Conclusions Herein, we demonstrate that a relatively inexpensive solution can be implemented for archival of bioinformatics databases and their rapid re-instantiation should the live databases disappear. PMID:24564380

  2. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  3. The European Radiobiology Archives (ERA)--content, structure and use illustrated by an example.

    PubMed

    Gerber, G B; Wick, R R; Kellerer, A M; Hopewell, J W; Di Majo, V; Dudoignon, N; Gössner, W; Stather, J

    2006-01-01

    The European Radiobiology Archives (ERA), supported by the European Commission and the European Late Effect Project Group (EULEP), together with the US National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) and the Japanese Radiobiology Archives (JRA) have collected all information still available on long-term animal experiments, including some selected human studies. The archives consist of a database in Microsoft Access, a website, databases of references and information on the use of the database. At present, the archives contain a description of the exposure conditions, animal strains, etc. from approximately 350,000 individuals; data on survival and pathology are available from approximately 200,000 individuals. Care has been taken to render pathological diagnoses compatible among different studies and to allow the lumping of pathological diagnoses into more general classes. 'Forms' in Access with an underlying computer code facilitate the use of the database. This paper describes the structure and content of the archives and illustrates an example for a possible analysis of such data.

  4. Databases for Microbiologists

    DOE PAGES

    Zhulin, Igor B.

    2015-05-26

    Databases play an increasingly important role in biology. They archive, store, maintain, and share information on genes, genomes, expression data, protein sequences and structures, metabolites and reactions, interactions, and pathways. All these data are critically important to microbiologists. Furthermore, microbiology has its own databases that deal with model microorganisms, microbial diversity, physiology, and pathogenesis. Thousands of biological databases are currently available, and it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with their development. Finally, the purpose of this minireview is to provide a brief survey of current databases that are of interest to microbiologists.

  5. Databases for Microbiologists

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhulin, Igor B.

    Databases play an increasingly important role in biology. They archive, store, maintain, and share information on genes, genomes, expression data, protein sequences and structures, metabolites and reactions, interactions, and pathways. All these data are critically important to microbiologists. Furthermore, microbiology has its own databases that deal with model microorganisms, microbial diversity, physiology, and pathogenesis. Thousands of biological databases are currently available, and it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with their development. Finally, the purpose of this minireview is to provide a brief survey of current databases that are of interest to microbiologists.

  6. Databases for Microbiologists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Databases play an increasingly important role in biology. They archive, store, maintain, and share information on genes, genomes, expression data, protein sequences and structures, metabolites and reactions, interactions, and pathways. All these data are critically important to microbiologists. Furthermore, microbiology has its own databases that deal with model microorganisms, microbial diversity, physiology, and pathogenesis. Thousands of biological databases are currently available, and it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with their development. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a brief survey of current databases that are of interest to microbiologists. PMID:26013493

  7. A MYSQL-BASED DATA ARCHIVER: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Matthew Bickley; Christopher Slominski

    2008-01-23

    Following an evaluation of the archival requirements of the Jefferson Laboratory accelerator’s user community, a prototyping effort was executed to determine if an archiver based on MySQL had sufficient functionality to meet those requirements. This approach was chosen because an archiver based on a relational database enables the development effort to focus on data acquisition and management, letting the database take care of storage, indexing and data consistency. It was clear from the prototype effort that there were no performance impediments to successful implementation of a final system. With our performance concerns addressed, the lab undertook the design and developmentmore » of an operational system. The system is in its operational testing phase now. This paper discusses the archiver system requirements, some of the design choices and their rationale, and presents the acquisition, storage and retrieval performance.« less

  8. New Variable Stars found in the NSVS Database (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Martin; Sutherland, Jane

    2006-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 a search for variable stars not listed in the General Catalogue of Variable Stars or in Sinbad was conducted by members of the Remote Astronomical Society in the publicly available data of the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS, Wozniak et al., 2004). NSVS fields were searched for candidates with both a sufficient number of observations to allow valid analysis and also with a significantly higher magnitude scatter than normal for stars of their magnitude.

  9. The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK)

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Walker; Amy L. Breen; Lisa A. Druckenmiller; Lisa W. Wirth; Will Fisher; Martha K. Raynolds; Jozef Šibík; Marilyn D. Walker; Stephan Hennekens; Keith Boggs; Tina Boucher; Marcel Buchhorn; Helga Bültmann; David J. Cooper; Fred J.A Daniëls; Scott J. Davidson; James J. Ebersole; Sara C. Elmendorf; Howard E. Epstein; William A. Gould; Robert D. Hollister; Colleen M. Iversen; M. Torre Jorgenson; Anja Kade; Michael T. Lee; William H. MacKenzie; Robert K. Peet; Jana L. Peirce; Udo Schickhoff; Victoria L. Sloan; Stephen S. Talbot; Craig E. Tweedie; Sandra Villarreal; Patrick J. Webber; Donatella Zona

    2016-01-01

    The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK, GIVD-ID: NA-US-014) is a free, publically available database archive of vegetation-plot data from the Arctic tundra region of northern Alaska. The archive currently contains 24 datasets with 3,026 non-overlapping plots. Of these, 74% have geolocation data with 25-m or better precision. Species cover data and header data are...

  10. Digitized Archival Primary Sources in STEM: A Selected Webliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Accessibility and findability of digitized archival resources can be a challenge, particularly for students or researchers not familiar with archival formats and digital interfaces, which adhere to different descriptive standards than more widely familiar library resources. Numerous aggregate archival collection databases exist, which provide a…

  11. Long-term data archiving

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Moore, David Steven

    2009-01-01

    Long term data archiving has much value for chemists, not only to retain access to research and product development records, but also to enable new developments and new discoveries. There are some recent regulatory requirements (e.g., FDA 21 CFR Part 11), but good science and good business both benefit regardless. A particular example of the benefits of and need for long term data archiving is the management of data from spectroscopic laboratory instruments. The sheer amount of spectroscopic data is increasing at a scary rate, and the pressures to archive come from the expense to create the data (or recreatemore » it if it is lost) as well as its high information content. The goal of long-term data archiving is to save and organize instrument data files as well as any needed meta data (such as sample ID, LIMS information, operator, date, time, instrument conditions, sample type, excitation details, environmental parameters, etc.). This editorial explores the issues involved in long-term data archiving using the example of Raman spectral databases. There are at present several such databases, including common data format libraries and proprietary libraries. However, such databases and libraries should ultimately satisfy stringent criteria for long term data archiving, including readability for long times into the future, robustness to changes in computer hardware and operating systems, and use of public domain data formats. The latter criterion implies the data format should be platform independent and the tools to create the data format should be easily and publicly obtainable or developable. Several examples of attempts at spectral libraries exist, such as the ASTM ANDI format, and the JCAMP-DX format. On the other hand, proprietary library spectra can be exchanged and manipulated using proprietary tools. As the above examples have deficiencies according to the three long term data archiving criteria, Extensible Markup Language (XML; a product of the World Wide

  12. Korean Variant Archive (KOVA): a reference database of genetic variations in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmoon; Seo, Jihae; Park, Jinman; Nam, Jae-Yong; Choi, Ahyoung; Ignatius, Jason S; Bjornson, Robert D; Chae, Jong-Hee; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Sanghyuk; Park, Woong-Yang; Baek, Daehyun; Choi, Murim

    2017-06-27

    Despite efforts to interrogate human genome variation through large-scale databases, systematic preference toward populations of Caucasian descendants has resulted in unintended reduction of power in studying non-Caucasians. Here we report a compilation of coding variants from 1,055 healthy Korean individuals (KOVA; Korean Variant Archive). The samples were sequenced to a mean depth of 75x, yielding 101 singleton variants per individual. Population genetics analysis demonstrates that the Korean population is a distinct ethnic group comparable to other discrete ethnic groups in Africa and Europe, providing a rationale for such independent genomic datasets. Indeed, KOVA conferred 22.8% increased variant filtering power in addition to Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) when used on Korean exomes. Functional assessment of nonsynonymous variant supported the presence of purifying selection in Koreans. Analysis of copy number variants detected 5.2 deletions and 10.3 amplifications per individual with an increased fraction of novel variants among smaller and rarer copy number variable segments. We also report a list of germline variants that are associated with increased tumor susceptibility. This catalog can function as a critical addition to the pre-existing variant databases in pursuing genetic studies of Korean individuals.

  13. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard; Williams, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format,more » for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.« less

  14. Profiles of international archives: Les archives Jean Piaget, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2013-05-01

    This research report provides a look behind closed doors at the Jean Piaget Archives in Geneva, Switzerland. It situates the potential visitor, contextualizes the Archives in its own history, and then describes what scholars can expect to find. New details about Piaget's views on Equal Rights and Equal Pay are also provided, including a look at how they affected the women who worked his factory (esp. Bärbel Inhelder). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. A database of archived drilling records of the drill cuttings piles at the North West Hutton oil platform.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Roy

    2003-05-01

    Drill cuttings piles are found underneath several hundred oil platforms in the North Sea, and are contaminated with hydrocarbons and chemical products. This study characterised the environmental risk posed by the cuttings pile at the North West Hutton (NWH) oil platform. Data on the drilling fluids and chemical products used over the platform's drilling history were transferred from archived well reports into a custom database, to which were added toxicological and safety data. Although the database contained many gaps, it established that only seven chemical products used at NWH were not in the lowest category of the Offshore Chemicals Notification Scheme, and were used in only small quantities. The study therefore supports the view that the main environmental risk posed by cuttings piles comes from hydrocarbon contamination. The (dated) well records could help future core sampling to be targeted at specific locations in the cuttings piles. Data from many platforms could also be pooled to determine generic 'discharge profiles.' Future study would benefit from the existence, in the public domain, of a standardised, 'legacy' database of chemical products.

  16. 2016 update of the PRIDE database and its related tools

    PubMed Central

    Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Csordas, Attila; del-Toro, Noemi; Dianes, José A.; Griss, Johannes; Lavidas, Ilias; Mayer, Gerhard; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Reisinger, Florian; Ternent, Tobias; Xu, Qing-Wei; Wang, Rui; Hermjakob, Henning

    2016-01-01

    The PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) database is one of the world-leading data repositories of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data. Since the beginning of 2014, PRIDE Archive (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/) is the new PRIDE archival system, replacing the original PRIDE database. Here we summarize the developments in PRIDE resources and related tools since the previous update manuscript in the Database Issue in 2013. PRIDE Archive constitutes a complete redevelopment of the original PRIDE, comprising a new storage backend, data submission system and web interface, among other components. PRIDE Archive supports the most-widely used PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative) data standard formats (mzML and mzIdentML) and implements the data requirements and guidelines of the ProteomeXchange Consortium. The wide adoption of ProteomeXchange within the community has triggered an unprecedented increase in the number of submitted data sets (around 150 data sets per month). We outline some statistics on the current PRIDE Archive data contents. We also report on the status of the PRIDE related stand-alone tools: PRIDE Inspector, PRIDE Converter 2 and the ProteomeXchange submission tool. Finally, we will give a brief update on the resources under development ‘PRIDE Cluster’ and ‘PRIDE Proteomes’, which provide a complementary view and quality-scored information of the peptide and protein identification data available in PRIDE Archive. PMID:26527722

  17. First results of MAO NASU SS bodies photographic archive digitizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, L.; Andruk, V.; Shatokhina, S.; Golovnya, V.; Yizhakevych, O.; Kulyk, I.

    2013-05-01

    MAO NASU glass archive encloses about 1800 photographic plates with planets and their satellites (including near 80 images of Uranus, Pluto and Neptune), about 1700 plates with minor planets and about 900 plates with comets. Plates were made during 1949-1999 using 11 telescopes of different focus, mostly the Double Wide-angle Astrograph (F/D=2000/400) and the Double Long-focus Astrograph (F/D=5500/400) of MAO NASU. Observational sites are Kyiv, Lviv (Ukraine), Biurakan (Armenia), Abastumani (Georgia), Mt. Maidanak (Uzbekistan), Quito (Equador). Tables contain data about the most significant numbers of plates sub-divided by years and objects. The database with metadata of plates (DBGPA) is available on the computer cluster of MAO (http://gua.db.ukr-vo.org) via open access. The database accumulates archives of four Ukrainian observatories, involving the UkrVO national project. Together with the archive managing system, the database serves as a test area for JDA - Joint Digital Archive - the core of the UkrVO.

  18. Ionospheric characteristics for archiving at the World Data Centers. Technical report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gamache, R.R.; Reinisch, B.W.

    1990-12-01

    A database structure for archiving ionospheric characteristics at uneven data rates was developed at the July 1989 Ionospheric Informatics Working Group (IIWG) Lowell Workshop in Digital Ionogram Data Formats for World Data Center Archiving. This structure is proposed as a new URSI standard and is being employed by the World Data Center A for solar terrestrial physics for archiving characteristics. Here the database has been slightly refined for the application and programs written to generate these database files using as input Digisonde 256 ARTIST data, post processed by the ULCAR ADEP (ARTIST Data Editing Program) system. The characteristics program asmore » well as supplemental programs developed for this task are described here. The new software will make it possible to archive the ionospheric characteristics from the Geophysics Laboratory high latitude Digisonde network, the AWS DISS and the international Digisonde networks, and other ionospheric sounding networks.« less

  19. The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK)

    DOE PAGES

    Walker, Donald; Breen, Amy; Druckenmiller, Lisa; ...

    2016-05-17

    The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK, GIVD-ID: NA-US-014) is a free, publically available database archive of vegetation-plot data from the Arctic tundra region of northern Alaska. The archive currently contains 24 datasets with 3,026 non-overlapping plots. Of these, 74% have geolocation data with 25-m or better precision. Species cover data and header data are stored in a Turboveg database. A standardized Pan Arctic Species List provides a consistent nomenclature for vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens in the archive. A web-based online Alaska Arctic Geoecological Atlas (AGA-AK) allows viewing and downloading the species data in a variety of formats, and providesmore » access to a wide variety of ancillary data. We conducted a preliminary cluster analysis of the first 16 datasets (1,613 plots) to examine how the spectrum of derived clusters is related to the suite of datasets, habitat types, and environmental gradients. Here, we present the contents of the archive, assess its strengths and weaknesses, and provide three supplementary files that include the data dictionary, a list of habitat types, an overview of the datasets, and details of the cluster analysis.« less

  20. The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Walker, Donald; Breen, Amy; Druckenmiller, Lisa

    The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK, GIVD-ID: NA-US-014) is a free, publically available database archive of vegetation-plot data from the Arctic tundra region of northern Alaska. The archive currently contains 24 datasets with 3,026 non-overlapping plots. Of these, 74% have geolocation data with 25-m or better precision. Species cover data and header data are stored in a Turboveg database. A standardized Pan Arctic Species List provides a consistent nomenclature for vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens in the archive. A web-based online Alaska Arctic Geoecological Atlas (AGA-AK) allows viewing and downloading the species data in a variety of formats, and providesmore » access to a wide variety of ancillary data. We conducted a preliminary cluster analysis of the first 16 datasets (1,613 plots) to examine how the spectrum of derived clusters is related to the suite of datasets, habitat types, and environmental gradients. Here, we present the contents of the archive, assess its strengths and weaknesses, and provide three supplementary files that include the data dictionary, a list of habitat types, an overview of the datasets, and details of the cluster analysis.« less

  1. AccuNet/AP (Associated Press) Multimedia Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The AccuNet/AP Multimedia Archive is an electronic library containing the AP's current photos and a selection of pictures from their enormous print and negative library, as well as text and graphic material. It is composed of two photo databases as well as graphics, text, and audio databases. The features of this database are briefly described in…

  2. Cassini Archive Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, Diane; Sayfi, Elias; Tinio, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The Cassini Archive Tracking System (CATS) is a computer program that enables tracking of scientific data transfers from originators to the Planetary Data System (PDS) archives. Without CATS, there is no systematic means of locating products in the archive process or ensuring their completeness. By keeping a database of transfer communications and status, CATS enables the Cassini Project and the PDS to efficiently and accurately report on archive status. More importantly, problem areas are easily identified through customized reports that can be generated on the fly from any Web-enabled computer. A Web-browser interface and clearly defined authorization scheme provide safe distributed access to the system, where users can perform functions such as create customized reports, record a transfer, and respond to a transfer. CATS ensures that Cassini provides complete science archives to the PDS on schedule and that those archives are available to the science community by the PDS. The three-tier architecture is loosely coupled and designed for simple adaptation to multimission use. Written in the Java programming language, it is portable and can be run on any Java-enabled Web server.

  3. Last Deglacial Sea Level: A Curated Database of Indicators of Past Sea Levels from Biological and Geomorphological Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbert, F. D.; Williams, F. H.; Fallon, S.; Rohling, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    The last deglacial was an interval of rapid climate and sea-level change, including the collapse of large continental ice sheets. This database collates carefully assessed sea-level data from peer-reviewed sources for the interval 0 to 25 thousand years ago (ka), from the last glacial maximum to the present interglacial conditions. In addition to facilitating site-specific reconstructions of past sea levels, the database provides a suite of data beyond the range of modern/instrumental variability that may help hone future sea-level projections. The database is global in scope, internally consistent, and contains U-series and radiocarbon dated indicators from both biological and geomorpohological archives. We focus on far-field data (i.e., away from the sites of the former continental ice sheets), but some key intermediate (i.e., from the Caribbean) data are also included. All primary fields (i.e., sample location, elevation, age and context) possess quantified uncertainties, which - in conjunction with available metadata - allows the reconstructed sea levels to be interpreted within both their uncertainties and geological context. Consistent treatment of each of the individual records in the database, and incorporation of fully expressed uncertainties, allows datasets to be easily compared. The compilation contains 145 studies from 40 locations (>2,000 data points) and includes all raw information and metadata.

  4. Yucca Mountain licensing support network archive assistant.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Bauer, Travis L.; Verzi, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    This report describes the Licensing Support Network (LSN) Assistant--a set of tools for categorizing e-mail messages and documents, and investigating and correcting existing archives of categorized e-mail messages and documents. The two main tools in the LSN Assistant are the LSN Archive Assistant (LSNAA) tool for recategorizing manually labeled e-mail messages and documents and the LSN Realtime Assistant (LSNRA) tool for categorizing new e-mail messages and documents. This report focuses on the LSNAA tool. There are two main components of the LSNAA tool. The first is the Sandia Categorization Framework, which is responsible for providing categorizations for documents in anmore » archive and storing them in an appropriate Categorization Database. The second is the actual user interface, which primarily interacts with the Categorization Database, providing a way for finding and correcting categorizations errors in the database. A procedure for applying the LSNAA tool and an example use case of the LSNAA tool applied to a set of e-mail messages are provided. Performance results of the categorization model designed for this example use case are presented.« less

  5. Integrating a local database into the StarView distributed user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    A distributed user interface to the Space Telescope Data Archive and Distribution Service (DADS) known as StarView is being developed. The DADS architecture consists of the data archive as well as a relational database catalog describing the archive. StarView is a client/server system in which the user interface is the front-end client to the DADS catalog and archive servers. Users query the DADS catalog from the StarView interface. Query commands are transmitted via a network and evaluated by the database. The results are returned via the network and are displayed on StarView forms. Based on the results, users decide which data sets to retrieve from the DADS archive. Archive requests are packaged by StarView and sent to DADS, which returns the requested data sets to the users. The advantages of distributed client/server user interfaces over traditional one-machine systems are well known. Since users run software on machines separate from the database, the overall client response time is much faster. Also, since the server is free to process only database requests, the database response time is much faster. Disadvantages inherent in this architecture are slow overall database access time due to the network delays, lack of a 'get previous row' command, and that refinements of a previously issued query must be submitted to the database server, even though the domain of values have already been returned by the previous query. This architecture also does not allow users to cross correlate DADS catalog data with other catalogs. Clearly, a distributed user interface would be more powerful if it overcame these disadvantages. A local database is being integrated into StarView to overcome these disadvantages. When a query is made through a StarView form, which is often composed of fields from multiple tables, it is translated to an SQL query and issued to the DADS catalog. At the same time, a local database table is created to contain the resulting rows of the query. The

  6. The new Gemini Observatory archive: a fast and low cost observatory data archive running in the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Paul; Cardenes, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    We have developed and deployed a new data archive for the Gemini Observatory. Focused on simplicity and ease of use, the archive provides a number of powerful and novel features including automatic association of calibration data with the science data, and the ability to bookmark searches. A simple but powerful API allows programmatic search and download of data. The archive is hosted on Amazon Web Services, which provides us excellent internet connectivity and significant cost savings in both operations and development over more traditional deployment options. The code is written in python, utilizing a PostgreSQL database and Apache web server.

  7. STScI Archive Manual, Version 7.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, Paolo

    1999-06-01

    The STScI Archive Manual provides information a user needs to know to access the HST archive via its two user interfaces: StarView and a World Wide Web (WWW) interface. It provides descriptions of the StarView screens used to access information in the database and the format of that information, and introduces the use to the WWW interface. Using the two interfaces, users can search for observations, preview public data, and retrieve data from the archive. Using StarView one can also find calibration reference files and perform detailed association searches. With the WWW interface archive users can access, and obtain information on, all Multimission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) data, a collection of mainly optical and ultraviolet datasets which include, amongst others, the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Final Archive. Both interfaces feature a name resolver which simplifies searches based on target name.

  8. Neuroimaging Data Sharing on the Neuroinformatics Database Platform

    PubMed Central

    Book, Gregory A; Stevens, Michael; Assaf, Michal; Glahn, David; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2015-01-01

    We describe the Neuroinformatics Database (NiDB), an open-source database platform for archiving, analysis, and sharing of neuroimaging data. Data from the multi-site projects Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE), Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes parts one and two (B-SNIP1, B-SNIP2), and Monetary Incentive Delay task (MID) are available for download from the public instance of NiDB, with more projects sharing data as it becomes available. As demonstrated by making several large datasets available, NiDB is an extensible platform appropriately suited to archive and distribute shared neuroimaging data. PMID:25888923

  9. PDS: A Performance Database Server

    DOE PAGES

    Berry, Michael W.; Dongarra, Jack J.; Larose, Brian H.; ...

    1994-01-01

    The process of gathering, archiving, and distributing computer benchmark data is a cumbersome task usually performed by computer users and vendors with little coordination. Most important, there is no publicly available central depository of performance data for all ranges of machines from personal computers to supercomputers. We present an Internet-accessible performance database server (PDS) that can be used to extract current benchmark data and literature. As an extension to the X-Windows-based user interface (Xnetlib) to the Netlib archival system, PDS provides an on-line catalog of public domain computer benchmarks such as the LINPACK benchmark, Perfect benchmarks, and the NAS parallelmore » benchmarks. PDS does not reformat or present the benchmark data in any way that conflicts with the original methodology of any particular benchmark; it is thereby devoid of any subjective interpretations of machine performance. We believe that all branches (research laboratories, academia, and industry) of the general computing community can use this facility to archive performance metrics and make them readily available to the public. PDS can provide a more manageable approach to the development and support of a large dynamic database of published performance metrics.« less

  10. BAPA Database: a Landslide Inventory in the Principality of Asturias (NW Spain) by Using Press Archives and Free Cartographic Servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, P.; Domínguez-Cuesta, M. J.; Jiménez-Sánchez, M.; Mora García, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its geological and climatic conditions, landslides are very common and widespread phenomena in the Principality of Asturias (NW of Spain), causing economic losses and, sometimes, human victims. In this scenario, temporal prediction of instabilities becomes particularly important. Although previous knowledge indicates that rainfall is the main trigger, the lack of data hinders the proper temporal forecast of landslides in the region. To resolve this deficiency, a new landslide inventory is being developed: the BAPA (Base de datos de Argayos del Principado de Asturias-Principality of Asturias Landslide Database). Data collection is mainly performed through the gathering of local newspaper archives, with special emphasis on the registration of spatial and temporal information. Moreover, a BAPA App and a BAPA website (http://geol.uniovi.es/BAPA) have been developed to easily obtain additional information from authorities and private individuals. Presently, dataset covers the period 1980-2015, registering more than 2000 individual landslide events. Fifty-two per cent of the records provide accurate dates, showing the usefulness of press archives as temporal records. The use of free cartographic servers, such as Google Maps, Google Street View and Iberpix (Government of Spain), combined with the spatial descriptions and photographs contained in the press releases, makes it possible to determine the exact location in fifty-eight per cent of the records. Field work performed to date has allowed the validation of the methodology proposed to obtain spatial data. In addition, BAPA database contain information about: source, typology of landslides, triggers, damages and costs.

  11. Toward a National Computerized Database for Moving Image Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartenberg, Jon

    This report summarizes a project conducted by a group of catalogers from film archives devoted to nitrate preservation, which explored ways of developing a database to provide a complete film and television information service that would be available nationwide and could contain filmographic data, information on holdings in archives and…

  12. The Longhorn Array Database (LAD): An Open-Source, MIAME compliant implementation of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD)

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Patrick J; Sherlock, Gavin; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2003-01-01

    Background The power of microarray analysis can be realized only if data is systematically archived and linked to biological annotations as well as analysis algorithms. Description The Longhorn Array Database (LAD) is a MIAME compliant microarray database that operates on PostgreSQL and Linux. It is a fully open source version of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), one of the largest microarray databases. LAD is available at Conclusions Our development of LAD provides a simple, free, open, reliable and proven solution for storage and analysis of two-color microarray data. PMID:12930545

  13. Current status of the international Halley Watch infrared net archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguinness, Brian B.

    1988-01-01

    The primary purposes of the Halley Watch have been to promote Halley observations, coordinate and standardize the observing where useful, and to archive the results in a database readily accessible to cometary scientists. The intention of IHW is to store the observations themselves, along with any information necessary to allow users to understand and use the data, but to exclude interpretations of these data. Each of the archives produced by the IHW will appear in two versions: a printed archive and a digital archive on CD-ROMs. The archive is expected to have a very long lifetime. The IHW has already produced an archive for P/Crommelin. This consists of one printed volume and two 1600 bpi tapes. The Halley archive will contain at least twenty gigabytes of information.

  14. Troubleshooting Public Data Archiving: Suggestions to Increase Participation

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Dominique G.; Lanfear, Robert; Binning, Sandra A.; Haff, Tonya M.; Schwanz, Lisa E.; Cain, Kristal E.; Kokko, Hanna; Jennions, Michael D.; Kruuk, Loeske E. B.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of publishers and funding agencies require public data archiving (PDA) in open-access databases. PDA has obvious group benefits for the scientific community, but many researchers are reluctant to share their data publicly because of real or perceived individual costs. Improving participation in PDA will require lowering costs and/or increasing benefits for primary data collectors. Small, simple changes can enhance existing measures to ensure that more scientific data are properly archived and made publicly available: (1) facilitate more flexible embargoes on archived data, (2) encourage communication between data generators and re-users, (3) disclose data re-use ethics, and (4) encourage increased recognition of publicly archived data. PMID:24492920

  15. The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute Archives: KOA and NStED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. B.; Ciardi, D.; Abajian, M.; Barlow, T.; Bryden, G.; von Braun, K.; Good, J.; Kane, S.; Kong, M.; Laity, A.; Lynn, M.; Elroy, D. M.; Plavchan, P.; Ramirez, S.; Schmitz, M.; Stauffer, J.; Wyatt, P.; Zhang, A.; Goodrich, R.; Mader, J.; Tran, H.; Tsubota, M.; Beekley, A.; Berukoff, S.; Chan, B.; Lau, C.; Regelson, M.; Saucedo, M.; Swain, M.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) maintains a series of archival services in support of NASA’s planet finding and characterization goals. Two of the larger archival services at NExScI are the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) and the NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED). KOA, a collaboration between the W. M. Keck Observatory and NExScI, serves raw data from the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) and extracted spectral browse products. As of June 2009, KOA hosts over 28 million files (4.7 TB) from over 2,000 nights. In Spring 2010, it will begin to serve data from the Near-Infrared Echelle Spectrograph (NIRSPEC). NStED is a general purpose archive with the aim of providing support for NASA’s planet finding and characterization goals, and stellar astrophysics. There are two principal components of NStED: a database of (currently) all known exoplanets, and images; and an archive dedicated to high precision photometric surveys for transiting exoplanets. NStED is the US portal to the CNES mission CoRoT, the first space mission dedicated to the discovery and characterization of exoplanets. These archives share a common software and hardware architecture with the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). The software architecture consists of standalone utilities that perform generic query and retrieval functions. They are called through program interfaces and plugged together to form applications through a simple executive library.

  16. Measurements of 100 'Critical' Minor Planets from NEAT Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Shishir

    2017-07-01

    Uncertainties associated with the orbits of minor planets can be reduced by analyzing archival imagery as attempted in the current investigation. Archival images from NEAT and NASA’s Skymorph database were analyzed using standard software to identify the minor planets listed in the critical list. Findings of each minor planet were submitted to Minor Planet Center (MPC) to offer better orbital solutions.

  17. Archive interoperability in the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Françoise

    2003-02-01

    Main goals of Virtual Observatory projects are to build interoperability between astronomical on-line services, observatory archives, databases and results published in journals, and to develop tools permitting the best scientific usage from the very large data sets stored in observatory archives and produced by large surveys. The different Virtual Observatory projects collaborate to define common exchange standards, which are the key for a truly International Virtual Observatory: for instance their first common milestone has been a standard allowing exchange of tabular data, called VOTable. The Interoperability Work Area of the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory project aims at networking European archives, by building a prototype using the CDS VizieR and Aladin tools, and at defining basic rules to help archive providers in interoperability implementation. The prototype is accessible for scientific usage, to get user feedback (and science results!) at an early stage of the project. ISO archive participates very actively to this endeavour, and more generally to information networking. The on-going inclusion of the ISO log in SIMBAD will allow higher level links for users.

  18. Evaluation of Database Coverage: A Comparison of Two Methodologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    1982-01-01

    Describes experiment which compared two techniques used for evaluating and comparing database coverage of a subject area, e.g., "bibliography" and "subject profile." Differences in time, cost, and results achieved are compared by applying techniques to field of volcanology using two databases, Geological Reference File and GeoArchive. Twenty…

  19. Radio data archiving system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; Zanichelli, A.; Dovgan, E.; Nanni, M.; Stagni, M.; Righini, S.; Sponza, M.; Bedosti, F.; Orlati, A.; Smareglia, R.

    2016-07-01

    Radio Astronomical Data models are becoming very complex since the huge possible range of instrumental configurations available with the modern Radio Telescopes. What in the past was the last frontiers of data formats in terms of efficiency and flexibility is now evolving with new strategies and methodologies enabling the persistence of a very complex, hierarchical and multi-purpose information. Such an evolution of data models and data formats require new data archiving techniques in order to guarantee data preservation following the directives of Open Archival Information System and the International Virtual Observatory Alliance for data sharing and publication. Currently, various formats (FITS, MBFITS, VLBI's XML description files and ancillary files) of data acquired with the Medicina and Noto Radio Telescopes can be stored and handled by a common Radio Archive, that is planned to be released to the (inter)national community by the end of 2016. This state-of-the-art archiving system for radio astronomical data aims at delegating as much as possible to the software setting how and where the descriptors (metadata) are saved, while the users perform user-friendly queries translated by the web interface into complex interrogations on the database to retrieve data. In such a way, the Archive is ready to be Virtual Observatory compliant and as much as possible user-friendly.

  20. Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, M.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Thomas, D.; Shackelford, K.

    2008-01-01

    In the early days of spaceflight, space life sciences data were been collected and stored in numerous databases, formats, media-types and geographical locations. While serving the needs of individual research teams, these data were largely unknown/unavailable to the scientific community at large. As a result, the Space Act of 1958 and the Science Data Management Policy mandated that research data collected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration be made available to the science community at large. The Biomedical Informatics and Health Care Systems Branch of the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC and the Data Archive Project at ARC, with funding from the Human Research Program through the Exploration Medical Capability Element, are fulfilling these requirements through the systematic population of the Life Sciences Data Archive. This program constitutes a formal system for the acquisition, archival and distribution of data for Life Sciences-sponsored experiments and investigations. The general goal of the archive is to acquire, preserve, and distribute these data using a variety of media which are accessible and responsive to inquiries from the science communities.

  1. Managing an Archive of Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Vince; Walter, David; Hallal, Charles; Jones, Helene; Callac, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The SSC Multimedia Archive is an automated electronic system to manage images, acquired both by film and digital cameras, for the Public Affairs Office (PAO) at Stennis Space Center (SSC). Previously, the image archive was based on film photography and utilized a manual system that, by today s standards, had become inefficient and expensive. Now, the SSC Multimedia Archive, based on a server at SSC, contains both catalogs and images for pictures taken both digitally and with a traditional, film-based camera, along with metadata about each image. After a "shoot," a photographer downloads the images into the database. Members of the PAO can use a Web-based application to search, view and retrieve images, approve images for publication, and view and edit metadata associated with the images. Approved images are archived and cross-referenced with appropriate descriptions and information. Security is provided by allowing administrators to explicitly grant access privileges to personnel to only access components of the system that they need to (i.e., allow only photographers to upload images, only PAO designated employees may approve images).

  2. Operating a petabyte class archive at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchar, Dieter; Lockhart, John S.; Burrows, Andrew

    2008-07-01

    The challenges of setting up and operating a Petabyte Class Archive will be described in terms of computer systems within a complex Data Centre environment. The computer systems, including the ESO Primary and Secondary Archive and the associated computational environments such as relational databases will be explained. This encompasses the entire system project cycle, including the technical specifications, procurement process, equipment installation and all further operational phases. The ESO Data Centre construction and the complexity of managing the environment will be presented. Many factors had to be considered during the construction phase, such as power consumption, targeted cooling and the accumulated load on the building structure to enable the smooth running of a Petabyte class Archive.

  3. New Capabilities in the Astrophysics Multispectral Archive Search Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. Y.; Kelley, S.; Roussopoulos, N.

    The Astrophysics Multispectral Archive Search Engine (AMASE) uses object-oriented database techniques to provide a uniform multi-mission and multi-spectral interface to search for data in the distributed archives. We describe our experience of porting AMASE from Illustra object-relational DBMS to the Informix Universal Data Server. New capabilities and utilities have been developed, including a spatial datablade that supports Nearest Neighbor queries.

  4. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a large suite of online resources for biological information and data, including the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database and the PubMed database of citations and abstracts for published life science journals. Additional NCBI resources focus on literature (Bookshelf, PubMed Central (PMC) and PubReader); medical genetics (ClinVar, dbMHC, the Genetic Testing Registry, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database and MedGen); genes and genomics (BioProject, BioSample, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, Gene, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Genome, HomoloGene, the Map Viewer, Nucleotide, PopSet, Probe, RefSeq, Sequence Read Archive, the Taxonomy Browser, Trace Archive and UniGene); and proteins and chemicals (Biosystems, COBALT, the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), Protein Clusters, Protein and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases). The Entrez system provides search and retrieval operations for many of these databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:25398906

  5. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a large suite of online resources for biological information and data, including the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database and the PubMed database of citations and abstracts for published life science journals. Additional NCBI resources focus on literature (PubMed Central (PMC), Bookshelf and PubReader), health (ClinVar, dbGaP, dbMHC, the Genetic Testing Registry, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database and MedGen), genomes (BioProject, Assembly, Genome, BioSample, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, the Map Viewer, Nucleotide, Probe, RefSeq, Sequence Read Archive, the Taxonomy Browser and the Trace Archive), genes (Gene, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), HomoloGene, PopSet and UniGene), proteins (Protein, the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), COBALT, Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB) and Protein Clusters) and chemicals (Biosystems and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases). The Entrez system provides search and retrieval operations for most of these databases. Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized datasets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:26615191

  6. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  7. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Data Archiving and Quality Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B.; Cui, C.; Fan, D.; Li, C.; Xiao, J.; Yu, C.; Wang, C.; Cao, Z.; Chen, J.; Yi, W.; Li, S.; Mi, L.; Yang, S.

    2015-09-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences)1(Cui et al. 2014). To archive the astronomical data in China, we present the implementation of the astronomical data archiving system (ADAS). Data archiving and quality control are the infrastructure for the AstroCloud. Throughout the data of the entire life cycle, data archiving system standardized data, transferring data, logging observational data, archiving ambient data, And storing these data and metadata in database. Quality control covers the whole process and all aspects of data archiving.

  8. An XML-based Generic Tool for Information Retrieval in Solar Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Isabelle F.; Legay, Eric; Linsolas, Romain

    This paper presents the current architecture of the `Solar Web Project' now in its development phase. This tool will provide scientists interested in solar data with a single web-based interface for browsing distributed and heterogeneous catalogs of solar observations. The main goal is to have a generic application that can be easily extended to new sets of data or to new missions with a low level of maintenance. It is developed with Java and XML is used as a powerful configuration language. The server, independent of any database scheme, can communicate with a client (the user interface) and several local or remote archive access systems (such as existing web pages, ftp sites or SQL databases). Archive access systems are externally described in XML files. The user interface is also dynamically generated from an XML file containing the window building rules and a simplified database description. This project is developed at MEDOC (Multi-Experiment Data and Operations Centre), located at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (Orsay, France). Successful tests have been conducted with other solar archive access systems.

  9. A global multiproxy database for temperature reconstructions of the Common Era.

    PubMed

    2017-07-11

    Reproducible climate reconstructions of the Common Era (1 CE to present) are key to placing industrial-era warming into the context of natural climatic variability. Here we present a community-sourced database of temperature-sensitive proxy records from the PAGES2k initiative. The database gathers 692 records from 648 locations, including all continental regions and major ocean basins. The records are from trees, ice, sediment, corals, speleothems, documentary evidence, and other archives. They range in length from 50 to 2000 years, with a median of 547 years, while temporal resolution ranges from biweekly to centennial. Nearly half of the proxy time series are significantly correlated with HadCRUT4.2 surface temperature over the period 1850-2014. Global temperature composites show a remarkable degree of coherence between high- and low-resolution archives, with broadly similar patterns across archive types, terrestrial versus marine locations, and screening criteria. The database is suited to investigations of global and regional temperature variability over the Common Era, and is shared in the Linked Paleo Data (LiPD) format, including serializations in Matlab, R and Python.

  10. A global multiproxy database for temperature reconstructions of the Common Era

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emile-Geay, Julian; McKay, Nicholas P.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; von Gunten, Lucien; Wang, Jianghao; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.; Abram, Nerilie J.; Addison, Jason A.; Curran, Mark A.J.; Evans, Michael N.; Henley, Benjamin J.; Hao, Zhixin; Martrat, Belen; McGregor, Helen V.; Neukom, Raphael; Pederson, Gregory T.; Stenni, Barbara; Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Werner, Johannes P.; Xu, Chenxi; Divine, Dmitry V.; Dixon, Bronwyn C.; Gergis, Joelle; Mundo, Ignacio A.; Nakatsuka, T.; Phipps, Steven J.; Routson, Cody C.; Steig, Eric J.; Tierney, Jessica E.; Tyler, Jonathan J.; Allen, Kathryn J.; Bertler, Nancy A. N.; Bjorklund, Jesper; Chase, Brian M.; Chen, Min-Te; Cook, Ed; de Jong, Rixt; DeLong, Kristine L.; Dixon, Daniel A.; Ekaykin, Alexey A.; Ersek, Vasile; Filipsson, Helena L.; Francus, Pierre; Freund, Mandy B.; Frezzotti, M.; Gaire, Narayan P.; Gajewski, Konrad; Ge, Quansheng; Goosse, Hugues; Gornostaeva, Anastasia; Grosjean, Martin; Horiuchi, Kazuho; Hormes, Anne; Husum, Katrine; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Kandasamy, Selvaraj; Kawamura, Kenji; Koc, Nalan; Leduc, Guillaume; Linderholm, Hans W.; Lorrey, Andrew M.; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Mortyn, P. Graham; Motoyama, Hideaki; Moy, Andrew D.; Mulvaney, Robert; Munz, Philipp M.; Nash, David J.; Oerter, Hans; Opel, Thomas; Orsi, Anais J.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitriy V.; Porter, Trevor J.; Roop, Heidi; Saenger, Casey; Sano, Masaki; Sauchyn, David; Saunders, K.M.; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Severi, Mirko; Shao, X.; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Sigl, Michael; Sinclair, Kate; St. George, Scott; St. Jacques, Jeannine-Marie; Thamban, Meloth; Thapa, Udya Kuwar; Thomas, E.; Turney, Chris; Uemura, Ryu; Viau, A.E.; Vladimirova, Diana O.; Wahl, Eugene; White, James W. C.; Yu, Z.; Zinke, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Reproducible climate reconstructions of the Common Era (1 CE to present) are key to placing industrial-era warming into the context of natural climatic variability. Here we present a community-sourced database of temperature-sensitive proxy records from the PAGES2k initiative. The database gathers 692 records from 648 locations, including all continental regions and major ocean basins. The records are from trees, ice, sediment, corals, speleothems, documentary evidence, and other archives. They range in length from 50 to 2000 years, with a median of 547 years, while temporal resolution ranges from biweekly to centennial. Nearly half of the proxy time series are significantly correlated with HadCRUT4.2 surface temperature over the period 1850–2014. Global temperature composites show a remarkable degree of coherence between high- and low-resolution archives, with broadly similar patterns across archive types, terrestrial versus marine locations, and screening criteria. The database is suited to investigations of global and regional temperature variability over the Common Era, and is shared in the Linked Paleo Data (LiPD) format, including serializations in Matlab, R and Python.

  11. A complete database for the Einstein imaging proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1991-01-01

    A complete database for the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) was completed. The original data that makes up the archive is described as well as the structure of the database, the Op-Ed analysis system, the technical advances achieved relative to the analysis of (IPC) data, the data products produced, and some uses to which the database has been put by scientists outside Columbia University over the past year.

  12. SysML model of exoplanet archive functionality and activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Solange

    2016-08-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Archive is an online service that serves data and information on exoplanets and their host stars to help astronomical research related to search for and characterization of extra-solar planetary systems. In order to provide the most up to date data sets to the users, the exoplanet archive performs weekly updates that include additions into the database and updates to the services as needed. These weekly updates are complex due to interfaces within the archive. I will be presenting a SysML model that helps us perform these update activities in a weekly basis.

  13. Studying Venus using a GIS database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Maribeth; Suppe, John

    1993-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) can significantly enhance geological studies on Venus because it facilitates concurrent analysis of many sources of data, as demonstrated by our work on topographic and deformation characteristics of tesserae. We are creating a database of structures referenced to real-world coordinates to encourage the archival of Venusian studies in digital format and to foster quantitative analysis of many combinations of data. Contributions to this database from all aspects of Venusian science are welcome.

  14. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Eric W.; Barrett, Tanya; Benson, Dennis A.; Bolton, Evan; Bryant, Stephen H.; Canese, Kathi; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Church, Deanna M.; DiCuccio, Michael; Federhen, Scott; Feolo, Michael; Fingerman, Ian M.; Geer, Lewis Y.; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Kapustin, Yuri; Krasnov, Sergey; Landsman, David; Lipman, David J.; Lu, Zhiyong; Madden, Thomas L.; Madej, Tom; Maglott, Donna R.; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Miller, Vadim; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Ostell, James; Panchenko, Anna; Phan, Lon; Pruitt, Kim D.; Schuler, Gregory D.; Sequeira, Edwin; Sherry, Stephen T.; Shumway, Martin; Sirotkin, Karl; Slotta, Douglas; Souvorov, Alexandre; Starchenko, Grigory; Tatusova, Tatiana A.; Wagner, Lukas; Wang, Yanli; Wilbur, W. John; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ye, Jian

    2012-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI Website. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Primer-BLAST, COBALT, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, Genome and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, BioProject, BioSample, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Probe, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), Biosystems, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:22140104

  15. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Eric W; Barrett, Tanya; Benson, Dennis A; Bolton, Evan; Bryant, Stephen H; Canese, Kathi; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Church, Deanna M; Dicuccio, Michael; Federhen, Scott; Feolo, Michael; Fingerman, Ian M; Geer, Lewis Y; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Kapustin, Yuri; Krasnov, Sergey; Landsman, David; Lipman, David J; Lu, Zhiyong; Madden, Thomas L; Madej, Tom; Maglott, Donna R; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Miller, Vadim; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Ostell, James; Panchenko, Anna; Phan, Lon; Pruitt, Kim D; Schuler, Gregory D; Sequeira, Edwin; Sherry, Stephen T; Shumway, Martin; Sirotkin, Karl; Slotta, Douglas; Souvorov, Alexandre; Starchenko, Grigory; Tatusova, Tatiana A; Wagner, Lukas; Wang, Yanli; Wilbur, W John; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ye, Jian

    2012-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI Website. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Primer-BLAST, COBALT, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, Genome and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, BioProject, BioSample, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Probe, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), Biosystems, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  16. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Primer-BLAST, COBALT, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, the Genetic Testing Registry, Genome and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, BioProject, BioSample, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Probe, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool, Biosystems, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page. PMID:23193264

  17. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Abigail; Agarwala, Richa; Barrett, Tanya; Beck, Jeff; Benson, Dennis A.; Bollin, Colleen; Bolton, Evan; Bryant, Stephen H.; Canese, Kathi; Church, Deanna M.; Clark, Karen; DiCuccio, Michael; Dondoshansky, Ilya; Federhen, Scott; Feolo, Michael; Geer, Lewis Y.; Gorelenkov, Viatcheslav; Hoeppner, Marilu; Johnson, Mark; Kelly, Christopher; Khotomlianski, Viatcheslav; Kimchi, Avi; Kimelman, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Krasnov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Anatoliy; Landsman, David; Lipman, David J.; Lu, Zhiyong; Madden, Thomas L.; Madej, Tom; Maglott, Donna R.; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Murphy, Terence; Ostell, James; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Panchenko, Anna; Phan, Lon; Pruitt, Don Preussm Kim D.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Sayers, Eric W.; Schneider, Valerie; Schuler, Gregory D.; Sequeira, Edwin; Sherry, Stephen T.; Shumway, Martin; Sirotkin, Karl; Siyan, Karanjit; Slotta, Douglas; Soboleva, Alexandra; Soussov, Vladimir; Starchenko, Grigory; Tatusova, Tatiana A.; Trawick, Bart W.; Vakatov, Denis; Wang, Yanli; Ward, Minghong; John Wilbur, W.; Yaschenko, Eugene; Zbicz, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, PubReader, Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link, Primer-BLAST, COBALT, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, the Genetic Testing Registry, Genome and related tools, the Map Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, BioProject, BioSample, ClinVar, MedGen, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Probe, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool, Biosystems, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page. PMID:24259429

  18. Digital Archiving: Where the Past Lives Again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    The process of digital archiving for variable star data by manual entry with an Excel spreadsheet is described. Excel-based tools including a Step Magnitude Calculator and a Julian Date Calculator for variable star observations where magnitudes and Julian dates have not been reduced are presented. Variable star data in the literature and the AAVSO International Database prior to 1911 are presented and reviewed, with recent archiving work being highlighted. Digitization using optical character recognition software conversion is also demonstrated, with editing and formatting suggestions for the OCR-converted text.

  19. Audio stream classification for multimedia database search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artese, M.; Bianco, S.; Gagliardi, I.; Gasparini, F.

    2013-03-01

    Search and retrieval of huge archives of Multimedia data is a challenging task. A classification step is often used to reduce the number of entries on which to perform the subsequent search. In particular, when new entries of the database are continuously added, a fast classification based on simple threshold evaluation is desirable. In this work we present a CART-based (Classification And Regression Tree [1]) classification framework for audio streams belonging to multimedia databases. The database considered is the Archive of Ethnography and Social History (AESS) [2], which is mainly composed of popular songs and other audio records describing the popular traditions handed down generation by generation, such as traditional fairs, and customs. The peculiarities of this database are that it is continuously updated; the audio recordings are acquired in unconstrained environment; and for the non-expert human user is difficult to create the ground truth labels. In our experiments, half of all the available audio files have been randomly extracted and used as training set. The remaining ones have been used as test set. The classifier has been trained to distinguish among three different classes: speech, music, and song. All the audio files in the dataset have been previously manually labeled into the three classes above defined by domain experts.

  20. Database systems for knowledge-based discovery.

    PubMed

    Jagarlapudi, Sarma A R P; Kishan, K V Radha

    2009-01-01

    Several database systems have been developed to provide valuable information from the bench chemist to biologist, medical practitioner to pharmaceutical scientist in a structured format. The advent of information technology and computational power enhanced the ability to access large volumes of data in the form of a database where one could do compilation, searching, archiving, analysis, and finally knowledge derivation. Although, data are of variable types the tools used for database creation, searching and retrieval are similar. GVK BIO has been developing databases from publicly available scientific literature in specific areas like medicinal chemistry, clinical research, and mechanism-based toxicity so that the structured databases containing vast data could be used in several areas of research. These databases were classified as reference centric or compound centric depending on the way the database systems were designed. Integration of these databases with knowledge derivation tools would enhance the value of these systems toward better drug design and discovery.

  1. Water and carbon stable isotope records from natural archives: a new database and interactive online platform for data browsing, visualizing and downloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolliet, Timothé; Brockmann, Patrick; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Bassinot, Franck; Daux, Valérie; Genty, Dominique; Landais, Amaelle; Lavrieux, Marlène; Michel, Elisabeth; Ortega, Pablo; Risi, Camille; Roche, Didier M.; Vimeux, Françoise; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-08-01

    Past climate is an important benchmark to assess the ability of climate models to simulate key processes and feedbacks. Numerous proxy records exist for stable isotopes of water and/or carbon, which are also implemented inside the components of a growing number of Earth system model. Model-data comparisons can help to constrain the uncertainties associated with transfer functions. This motivates the need of producing a comprehensive compilation of different proxy sources. We have put together a global database of proxy records of oxygen (δ18O), hydrogen (δD) and carbon (δ13C) stable isotopes from different archives: ocean and lake sediments, corals, ice cores, speleothems and tree-ring cellulose. Source records were obtained from the georeferenced open access PANGAEA and NOAA libraries, complemented by additional data obtained from a literature survey. About 3000 source records were screened for chronological information and temporal resolution of proxy records. Altogether, this database consists of hundreds of dated δ18O, δ13C and δD records in a standardized simple text format, complemented with a metadata Excel catalog. A quality control flag was implemented to describe age markers and inform on chronological uncertainty. This compilation effort highlights the need to homogenize and structure the format of datasets and chronological information as well as enhance the distribution of published datasets that are currently highly fragmented and scattered. We also provide an online portal based on the records included in this database with an intuitive and interactive platform (http://climateproxiesfinder.ipsl.fr/), allowing one to easily select, visualize and download subsets of the homogeneously formatted records that constitute this database, following a choice of search criteria, and to upload new datasets. In the last part, we illustrate the type of application allowed by our database by

  2. Making geospatial data in ASF archive readily accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.; Hogenson, K.; Wolf, V. G.; Drew, L.; Stern, T.; Stoner, M.; Shapran, M.

    2015-12-01

    The way geospatial data is searched, managed, processed and used has changed significantly in recent years. A data archive such as the one at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), one of NASA's twelve interlinked Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), used to be searched solely via user interfaces that were specifically developed for its particular archive and data sets. ASF then moved to using an application programming interface (API) that defined a set of routines, protocols, and tools for distributing the geospatial information stored in the database in real time. This provided a more flexible access to the geospatial data. Yet, it was up to user to develop the tools to get a more tailored access to the data they needed. We present two new approaches for serving data to users. In response to the recent Nepal earthquake we developed a data feed for distributing ESA's Sentinel data. Users can subscribe to the data feed and are provided with the relevant metadata the moment a new data set is available for download. The second approach was an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) web feature service (WFS). The WFS hosts the metadata along with a direct link from which the data can be downloaded. It uses the open-source GeoServer software (Youngblood and Iacovella, 2013) and provides an interface to include the geospatial information in the archive directly into the user's geographic information system (GIS) as an additional data layer. Both services are run on top of a geospatial PostGIS database, an open-source geographic extension for the PostgreSQL object-relational database (Marquez, 2015). Marquez, A., 2015. PostGIS essentials. Packt Publishing, 198 p. Youngblood, B. and Iacovella, S., 2013. GeoServer Beginner's Guide, Packt Publishing, 350 p.

  3. An Image Archive With The ACR/NEMA Message Formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Khalsa, Satjeet; Arenson, Ronald L.; Brikman, Inna; Davey, Michael J.

    1988-06-01

    An image archive has been designed to manage and store radiologic images received from within the main Hospital and a from a suburban orthopedic clinic. Images are stored on both magnetic as well as optical media. Prior comparison examinations are combined with the current examination to generate a 'viewing folder' that is sent to the display station for primary diagnosis. An 'archive-manager' controls the database managment, periodic optical disk backup and 'viewing-folder' generation. Images are converted into the ACR/NEMA message format before being written to the optical disk. The software design of the 'archive-manager' and its associated modules is presented. Enhancements to the system are discussed.

  4. A Database of Historical Information on Landslides and Floods in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, F.; Tonelli, G.

    2003-04-01

    For the past 12 years we have maintained and updated a database of historical information on landslides and floods in Italy, known as the National Research Council's AVI (Damaged Urban Areas) Project archive. The database was originally designed to respond to a specific request of the Minister of Civil Protection, and was aimed at helping the regional assessment of landslide and flood risk in Italy. The database was first constructed in 1991-92 to cover the period 1917 to 1990. Information of damaging landslide and flood event was collected by searching archives, by screening thousands of newspaper issues, by reviewing the existing technical and scientific literature on landslides and floods in Italy, and by interviewing landslide and flood experts. The database was then updated chiefly through the analysis of hundreds of newspaper articles, and it now covers systematically the period 1900 to 1998, and non-systematically the periods 1900 to 1916 and 1999 to 2002. Non systematic information on landslide and flood events older than 20th century is also present in the database. The database currently contains information on more than 32,000 landslide events occurred at more than 25,700 sites, and on more than 28,800 flood events occurred at more than 15,600 sites. After a brief outline of the history and evolution of the AVI Project archive, we present and discuss: (a) the present structure of the database, including the hardware and software solutions adopted to maintain, manage, use and disseminate the information stored in the database, (b) the type and amount of information stored in the database, including an estimate of its completeness, and (c) examples of recent applications of the database, including a web-based GIS systems to show the location of sites historically affected by landslides and floods, and an estimate of geo-hydrological (i.e., landslide and flood) risk in Italy based on the available historical information.

  5. A global multiproxy database for temperature reconstructions of the Common Era

    PubMed Central

    Emile-Geay, Julien; McKay, Nicholas P.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; von Gunten, Lucien; Wang, Jianghao; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.; Abram, Nerilie J.; Addison, Jason A.; Curran, Mark A.J.; Evans, Michael N.; Henley, Benjamin J.; Hao, Zhixin; Martrat, Belen; McGregor, Helen V.; Neukom, Raphael; Pederson, Gregory T.; Stenni, Barbara; Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Werner, Johannes P.; Xu, Chenxi; Divine, Dmitry V.; Dixon, Bronwyn C.; Gergis, Joelle; Mundo, Ignacio A.; Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Phipps, Steven J.; Routson, Cody C.; Steig, Eric J.; Tierney, Jessica E.; Tyler, Jonathan J.; Allen, Kathryn J.; Bertler, Nancy A.N.; Björklund, Jesper; Chase, Brian M.; Chen, Min-Te; Cook, Ed; de Jong, Rixt; DeLong, Kristine L.; Dixon, Daniel A.; Ekaykin, Alexey A.; Ersek, Vasile; Filipsson, Helena L.; Francus, Pierre; Freund, Mandy B.; Frezzotti, Massimo; Gaire, Narayan P.; Gajewski, Konrad; Ge, Quansheng; Goosse, Hugues; Gornostaeva, Anastasia; Grosjean, Martin; Horiuchi, Kazuho; Hormes, Anne; Husum, Katrine; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Kandasamy, Selvaraj; Kawamura, Kenji; Kilbourne, K. Halimeda; Koç, Nalan; Leduc, Guillaume; Linderholm, Hans W.; Lorrey, Andrew M.; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Mortyn, P. Graham; Motoyama, Hideaki; Moy, Andrew D.; Mulvaney, Robert; Munz, Philipp M.; Nash, David J.; Oerter, Hans; Opel, Thomas; Orsi, Anais J.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitriy V.; Porter, Trevor J.; Roop, Heidi A.; Saenger, Casey; Sano, Masaki; Sauchyn, David; Saunders, Krystyna M.; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Severi, Mirko; Shao, Xuemei; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Sigl, Michael; Sinclair, Kate; St. George, Scott; St. Jacques, Jeannine-Marie; Thamban, Meloth; Kuwar Thapa, Udya; Thomas, Elizabeth R.; Turney, Chris; Uemura, Ryu; Viau, Andre E.; Vladimirova, Diana O.; Wahl, Eugene R.; White, James W.C.; Yu, Zicheng; Zinke, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Reproducible climate reconstructions of the Common Era (1 CE to present) are key to placing industrial-era warming into the context of natural climatic variability. Here we present a community-sourced database of temperature-sensitive proxy records from the PAGES2k initiative. The database gathers 692 records from 648 locations, including all continental regions and major ocean basins. The records are from trees, ice, sediment, corals, speleothems, documentary evidence, and other archives. They range in length from 50 to 2000 years, with a median of 547 years, while temporal resolution ranges from biweekly to centennial. Nearly half of the proxy time series are significantly correlated with HadCRUT4.2 surface temperature over the period 1850–2014. Global temperature composites show a remarkable degree of coherence between high- and low-resolution archives, with broadly similar patterns across archive types, terrestrial versus marine locations, and screening criteria. The database is suited to investigations of global and regional temperature variability over the Common Era, and is shared in the Linked Paleo Data (LiPD) format, including serializations in Matlab, R and Python. PMID:28696409

  6. The ATLAS TAGS database distribution and management - Operational challenges of a multi-terabyte distributed database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, F.; Malon, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Dimitrov, G.; Nowak, M.; Nairz, A.; Goossens, L.; Gallas, E.; Gamboa, C.; Wong, A.; Vinek, E.

    2010-04-01

    The TAG files store summary event quantities that allow a quick selection of interesting events. This data will be produced at a nominal rate of 200 Hz, and is uploaded into a relational database for access from websites and other tools. The estimated database volume is 6TB per year, making it the largest application running on the ATLAS relational databases, at CERN and at other voluntary sites. The sheer volume and high rate of production makes this application a challenge to data and resource management, in many aspects. This paper will focus on the operational challenges of this system. These include: uploading the data from files to the CERN's and remote sites' databases; distributing the TAG metadata that is essential to guide the user through event selection; controlling resource usage of the database, from the user query load to the strategy of cleaning and archiving of old TAG data.

  7. Mass-storage management for distributed image/video archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, Santina; Guarda, Roberto; Prampolini, Franco

    1993-04-01

    The realization of image/video database requires a specific design for both database structures and mass storage management. This issue has addressed the project of the digital image/video database system that has been designed at IBM SEMEA Scientific & Technical Solution Center. Proper database structures have been defined to catalog image/video coding technique with the related parameters, and the description of image/video contents. User workstations and servers are distributed along a local area network. Image/video files are not managed directly by the DBMS server. Because of their wide size, they are stored outside the database on network devices. The database contains the pointers to the image/video files and the description of the storage devices. The system can use different kinds of storage media, organized in a hierarchical structure. Three levels of functions are available to manage the storage resources. The functions of the lower level provide media management. They allow it to catalog devices and to modify device status and device network location. The medium level manages image/video files on a physical basis. It manages file migration between high capacity media and low access time media. The functions of the upper level work on image/video file on a logical basis, as they archive, move and copy image/video data selected by user defined queries. These functions are used to support the implementation of a storage management strategy. The database information about characteristics of both storage devices and coding techniques are used by the third level functions to fit delivery/visualization requirements and to reduce archiving costs.

  8. NADIR: A Flexible Archiving System Current Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; De Marco, M.; Smareglia, R.; Molinaro, M.

    2014-05-01

    The New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR) is under development at the Italian center for Astronomical Archives (IA2) to increase the performances of the current archival software tools at the data center. Traditional softwares usually offer simple and robust solutions to perform data archive and distribution but are awkward to adapt and reuse in projects that have different purposes. Data evolution in terms of data model, format, publication policy, version, and meta-data content are the main threats to re-usage. NADIR, using stable and mature framework features, answers those very challenging issues. Its main characteristics are a configuration database, a multi threading and multi language environment (C++, Java, Python), special features to guarantee high scalability, modularity, robustness, error tracking, and tools to monitor with confidence the status of each project at each archiving site. In this contribution, the development of the core components is presented, commenting also on some performance and innovative features (multi-cast and publisher-subscriber paradigms). NADIR is planned to be developed as simply as possible with default configurations for every project, first of all for LBT and other IA2 projects.

  9. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Eric W; Barrett, Tanya; Benson, Dennis A; Bolton, Evan; Bryant, Stephen H; Canese, Kathi; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Church, Deanna M; DiCuccio, Michael; Federhen, Scott; Feolo, Michael; Fingerman, Ian M; Geer, Lewis Y; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Kapustin, Yuri; Landsman, David; Lipman, David J; Lu, Zhiyong; Madden, Thomas L; Madej, Tom; Maglott, Donna R; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Miller, Vadim; Mizrachi, Ilene; Ostell, James; Panchenko, Anna; Phan, Lon; Pruitt, Kim D; Schuler, Gregory D; Sequeira, Edwin; Sherry, Stephen T; Shumway, Martin; Sirotkin, Karl; Slotta, Douglas; Souvorov, Alexandre; Starchenko, Grigory; Tatusova, Tatiana A; Wagner, Lukas; Wang, Yanli; Wilbur, W John; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ye, Jian

    2011-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through the NCBI Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, MyNCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Primer-BLAST, COBALT, Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Splign, ProSplign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Trace Archive, Sequence Read Archive, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), IBIS, Biosystems, Peptidome, OMSSA, Protein Clusters and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  10. Enhancement of real-time EPICS IOC PV management for the data archiving system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Ha

    2015-10-01

    The operation of a 100-MeV linear proton accelerator, the major driving values and experimental data need to be archived. According to the experimental conditions, different data are required. Functions that can add new data and delete data in real time need to be implemented. In an experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS) input output controller (IOC), the value of process variables (PVs) are matched with the driving values and data. The PV values are archived in text file format by using the channel archiver. There is no need to create a database (DB) server, just a need for large hard disk. Through the web, the archived data can be loaded, and new PV values can be archived without stopping the archive engine. The details of the implementation of a data archiving system with channel archiver are presented, and some preliminary results are reported.

  11. STARS 2.0: 2nd-generation open-source archiving and query software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winegar, Tom

    2008-07-01

    The Subaru Telescope is in process of developing an open-source alternative to the 1st-generation software and databases (STARS 1) used for archiving and query. For STARS 2, we have chosen PHP and Python for scripting and MySQL as the database software. We have collected feedback from staff and observers, and used this feedback to significantly improve the design and functionality of our future archiving and query software. Archiving - We identified two weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS archiving software: a complex and inflexible table structure and uncoordinated system administration for our business model: taking pictures from the summit and archiving them in both Hawaii and Japan. We adopted a simplified and normalized table structure with passive keyword collection, and we are designing an archive-to-archive file transfer system that automatically reports real-time status and error conditions and permits error recovery. Query - We identified several weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS query software: inflexible query tools, poor sharing of calibration data, and no automatic file transfer mechanisms to observers. We are developing improved query tools and sharing of calibration data, and multi-protocol unassisted file transfer mechanisms for observers. In the process, we have redefined a 'query': from an invisible search result that can only transfer once in-house right now, with little status and error reporting and no error recovery - to a stored search result that can be monitored, transferred to different locations with multiple protocols, reporting status and error conditions and permitting recovery from errors.

  12. The DNA Data Bank of Japan launches a new resource, the DDBJ Omics Archive of functional genomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuichi; Mashima, Jun; Kaminuma, Eli; Gojobori, Takashi; Ogasawara, Osamu; Takagi, Toshihisa; Okubo, Kousaku; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2012-01-01

    The DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ; http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) maintains and provides archival, retrieval and analytical resources for biological information. The central DDBJ resource consists of public, open-access nucleotide sequence databases including raw sequence reads, assembly information and functional annotation. Database content is exchanged with EBI and NCBI within the framework of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). In 2011, DDBJ launched two new resources: the 'DDBJ Omics Archive' (DOR; http://trace.ddbj.nig.ac.jp/dor) and BioProject (http://trace.ddbj.nig.ac.jp/bioproject). DOR is an archival database of functional genomics data generated by microarray and highly parallel new generation sequencers. Data are exchanged between the ArrayExpress at EBI and DOR in the common MAGE-TAB format. BioProject provides an organizational framework to access metadata about research projects and the data from the projects that are deposited into different databases. In this article, we describe major changes and improvements introduced to the DDBJ services, and the launch of two new resources: DOR and BioProject.

  13. Selection and implementation of a distributed phased archive for a multivendor incremental approach to PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Edward M.; Wandtke, John; Robinson, Arvin E.

    1999-07-01

    The selection criteria for the archive were based on the objectives of the Medical Information, Communication and Archive System (MICAS), a multi-vendor incremental approach to PACS. These objectives include interoperability between all components, seamless integration of the Radiology Information System (RIS) with MICAS and eventually other hospital databases, all components must demonstrate DICOM compliance prior to acceptance and automated workflow that can be programmed to meet changes in the healthcare environment. The long-term multi-modality archive is being implemented in 3 or more phases with the first phase designed to provide a 12 to 18 month storage solution. This decision was made because the cost per GB of storage is rapidly decreasing and the speed at which data can be retrieved is increasing with time. The open-solution selected allows incorporation of leading edge, 'best of breed' hardware and software and provides maximum jukeboxes, provides maximum flexibility of workflow both within and outside of radiology. The selected solution is media independent, supports multiple jukeboxes, provides expandable storage capacity and will provide redundancy and fault tolerance at minimal cost. Some of the required attributes of the archive include scalable archive strategy, virtual image database with global query and object-oriented database. The selection process took approximately 10 months with Cemax-Icon being the vendor selected. Prior to signing a purchase order, Cemax-Icon performed a site survey, agreed upon the acceptance test protocol and provided a written guarantee of connectivity between their archive and the imaging modalities and other MICAS components.

  14. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

    PubMed

    2016-01-04

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a large suite of online resources for biological information and data, including the GenBank(®) nucleic acid sequence database and the PubMed database of citations and abstracts for published life science journals. Additional NCBI resources focus on literature (PubMed Central (PMC), Bookshelf and PubReader), health (ClinVar, dbGaP, dbMHC, the Genetic Testing Registry, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database and MedGen), genomes (BioProject, Assembly, Genome, BioSample, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, the Map Viewer, Nucleotide, Probe, RefSeq, Sequence Read Archive, the Taxonomy Browser and the Trace Archive), genes (Gene, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), HomoloGene, PopSet and UniGene), proteins (Protein, the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), COBALT, Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB) and Protein Clusters) and chemicals (Biosystems and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases). The Entrez system provides search and retrieval operations for most of these databases. Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized datasets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a large suite of online resources for biological information and data, including the GenBank(®) nucleic acid sequence database and the PubMed database of citations and abstracts for published life science journals. Additional NCBI resources focus on literature (Bookshelf, PubMed Central (PMC) and PubReader); medical genetics (ClinVar, dbMHC, the Genetic Testing Registry, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database and MedGen); genes and genomics (BioProject, BioSample, dbSNP, dbVar, Epigenomics, Gene, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Genome, HomoloGene, the Map Viewer, Nucleotide, PopSet, Probe, RefSeq, Sequence Read Archive, the Taxonomy Browser, Trace Archive and UniGene); and proteins and chemicals (Biosystems, COBALT, the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), Protein Clusters, Protein and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases). The Entrez system provides search and retrieval operations for many of these databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. An Electronic Finding Aid Using Extensible Markup Language (XML) and Encoded Archival Description (EAD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, May

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development of electronic finding aids for archives at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign that used XML (extensible markup language) and EAD (encoded archival description) to enable more flexible information management and retrieval than using MARC or a relational database management system. EAD template is appended.…

  17. Macromolecular Structure Database. Final Progress Report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gilliland, Gary L.

    2003-09-23

    The central activity of the PDB continues to be the collection, archiving and distribution of high quality structural data to the scientific community on a timely basis. In support of these activities NIST has continued its roles in developing the physical archive, in developing data uniformity, in dealing with NMR issues and in the distribution of PDB data through CD-ROMs. The physical archive holdings have been organized, inventoried, and a database has been created to facilitate their use. Data from individual PDB entries have been annotated to produce uniform values improving tremendously the accuracy of results of queries. Working withmore » the NMR community we have established data items specific for NMR that will be included in new entries and facilitate data deposition. The PDB CD-ROM production has continued on a quarterly basis, and new products are being distributed.« less

  18. samiDB: A Prototype Data Archive for Big Science Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Green, A. W.; Cortese, L.; Foster, C.; Scott, N.

    2015-04-01

    samiDB is an archive, database, and query engine to serve the spectra, spectral hypercubes, and high-level science products that make up the SAMI Galaxy Survey. Based on the versatile Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5), samiDB does not depend on relational database structures and hence lightens the setup and maintenance load imposed on science teams by metadata tables. The code, written in Python, covers the ingestion, querying, and exporting of data as well as the automatic setup of an HTML schema browser. samiDB serves as a maintenance-light data archive for Big Science and can be adopted and adapted by science teams that lack the means to hire professional archivists to set up the data back end for their projects.

  19. Archiving Microgravity Flight Data and Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    To obtain help in evaluating its current strategy for archiving data and samples obtained in microgravity research, NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) asked the Space Studies Board's Committee on Microgravity Research for guidance on the following questions: What data should be archived and where should it be kept? In what form should the data be maintained (electronic files, photographs, hard copy, samples)? What should the general format of the database be? To what extent should it be universally accessible and through what mechanisms? Should there be a period of time for which principal investigators have proprietary access? If so, how long should proprietary data be stored? What provisions should be made for data obtained from ground-based experiments? What should the deadline be for investigators placing their data in the archive? How long should data be saved? How long should data be easily accessible? As a prelude to making recommendations for optimum selection and storage of microgravity data and samples, the committee in this report briefly describes NASA's past archiving practices and outlines MSAD's current archiving strategy. Although the committee found that only a limited number of experiments have thus far been archived, it concluded that the general archiving strategy, characterized by MSAD as minimalist, appears viable. A central focus of attention is the Experiment Data Management Plan (EDMP), MSAD's recently instituted data management and archiving framework for flight experiments. Many of the report's recommendations are aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the EDMP approach, which the committee regards as an appropriate data management method for MSAD. Other recommendations provide guidance on broader issues related to the questions listed above. This report does not address statutory or regulatory records retention requirements.

  20. LBT Distributed Archive: Status and Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.; Thompson, D.; Grede, G.

    2011-07-01

    After the first release of the LBT Distributed Archive, this successful collaboration is continuing within the LBT corporation. The IA2 (Italian Center for Astronomical Archive) team had updated the LBT DA with new features in order to facilitate user data retrieval while abiding by VO standards. To facilitate the integration of data from any new instruments, we have migrated to a new database, developed new data distribution software, and enhanced features in the LBT User Interface. The DBMS engine has been changed to MySQL. Consequently, the data handling software now uses java thread technology to update and synchronize the main storage archives on Mt. Graham and in Tucson, as well as archives in Trieste and Heidelberg, with all metadata and proprietary data. The LBT UI has been updated with additional features allowing users to search by instrument and some of the more important characteristics of the images. Finally, instead of a simple cone search service over all LBT image data, new instrument specific SIAP and cone search services have been developed. They will be published in the IVOA framework later this fall.

  1. St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center's Core Archive Portal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reich, Chris; Streubert, Matt; Dwyer, Brendan; Godbout, Meg; Muslic, Adis; Umberger, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This Web site contains information on rock cores archived at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC). Archived cores consist of 3- to 4-inch-diameter coral cores, 1- to 2-inch-diameter rock cores, and a few unlabeled loose coral and rock samples. This document - and specifically the archive Web site portal - is intended to be a 'living' document that will be updated continually as additional cores are collected and archived. This document may also contain future references and links to a catalog of sediment cores. Sediment cores will include vibracores, pushcores, and other loose sediment samples collected for research purposes. This document will: (1) serve as a database for locating core material currently archived at the USGS SPCMSC facility; (2) provide a protocol for entry of new core material into the archive system; and, (3) set the procedures necessary for checking out core material for scientific purposes. Core material may be loaned to other governmental agencies, academia, or non-governmental organizations at the discretion of the USGS SPCMSC curator.

  2. LDEF meteoroid and debris database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardano, C. B.; See, Thomas H.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) database is maintained at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas, and consists of five data tables containing information about individual features, digitized images of selected features, and LDEF hardware (i.e., approximately 950 samples) archived at JSC. About 4000 penetrations (greater than 300 micron in diameter) and craters (greater than 500 micron in diameter) were identified and photodocumented during the disassembly of LDEF at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), while an additional 4500 or so have subsequently been characterized at JSC. The database also contains some data that have been submitted by various PI's, yet the amount of such data is extremely limited in its extent, and investigators are encouraged to submit any and all M&D-type data to JSC for inclusion within the M&D database. Digitized stereo-image pairs are available for approximately 4500 features through the database.

  3. Programmed database system at the Chang Gung Craniofacial Center: part II--digitizing photographs.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shiow-Shuh; Hung, Kai-Fong; de Villa, Glenda H; Chen, Philip K T; Lo, Lun-Jou; Chang, Sophia C N; Yu, Chung-Chih; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2003-07-01

    The archival tools used for digital images in advertising are not to fulfill the clinic requisition and are just beginning to develop. The storage of a large amount of conventional photographic slides needs a lot of space and special conditions. In spite of special precautions, degradation of the slides still occurs. The most common degradation is the appearance of fungus flecks. With the recent advances in digital technology, it is now possible to store voluminous numbers of photographs on a computer hard drive and keep them for a long time. A self-programmed interface has been developed to integrate database and image browser system that can build and locate needed files archive in a matter of seconds with the click of a button. This system requires hardware and software were market provided. There are 25,200 patients recorded in the database that involve 24,331 procedures. In the image files, there are 6,384 patients with 88,366 digital pictures files. From 1999 through 2002, NT400,000 dollars have been saved using the new system. Photographs can be managed with the integrating Database and Browse software for database archiving. This allows labeling of the individual photographs with demographic information and browsing. Digitized images are not only more efficient and economical than the conventional slide images, but they also facilitate clinical studies.

  4. Aero/fluids database system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, John E.; Violett, Duane L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The AFAS Database System was developed to provide the basic structure of a comprehensive database system for the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Structures and Dynamics Laboratory Aerophysics Division. The system is intended to handle all of the Aerophysics Division Test Facilities as well as data from other sources. The system was written for the DEC VAX family of computers in FORTRAN-77 and utilizes the VMS indexed file system and screen management routines. Various aspects of the system are covered, including a description of the user interface, lists of all code structure elements, descriptions of the file structures, a description of the security system operation, a detailed description of the data retrieval tasks, a description of the session log, and a description of the archival system.

  5. PMAG: Relational Database Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Genevey, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Scripps center for Physical and Chemical Earth References (PACER) was established to help create databases for reference data and make them available to the Earth science community. As part of these efforts PACER supports GERM, REM and PMAG and maintains multiple online databases under the http://earthref.org umbrella website. This website has been built on top of a relational database that allows for the archiving and electronic access to a great variety of data types and formats, permitting data queries using a wide range of metadata. These online databases are designed in Oracle 8.1.5 and they are maintained at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. They are directly available via http://earthref.org/databases/. A prototype of the PMAG relational database is now operational within the existing EarthRef.org framework under http://earthref.org/databases/PMAG/. As will be shown in our presentation, the PMAG design focuses around the general workflow that results in the determination of typical paleo-magnetic analyses. This ensures that individual data points can be traced between the actual analysis and the specimen, sample, site, locality and expedition it belongs to. These relations guarantee traceability of the data by distinguishing between original and derived data, where the actual (raw) measurements are performed on the specimen level, and data on the sample level and higher are then derived products in the database. These relations may also serve to recalculate site means when new data becomes available for that locality. The PMAG data records are extensively described in terms of metadata. These metadata are used when scientists search through this online database in order to view and download their needed data. They minimally include method descriptions for field sampling, laboratory techniques and statistical analyses. They also include selection criteria used during the interpretation of the data and, most importantly, critical information about the

  6. Managing Rock and Paleomagnetic Data Flow with the MagIC Database: from Measurement and Analysis to Comprehensive Archive and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Minnett, R. C.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Donadini, F.

    2008-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all measurements and derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). Organizing data for presentation in peer-reviewed publications or for ingestion into databases is a time-consuming task, and to facilitate these activities, three tightly integrated tools have been developed: MagIC-PY, the MagIC Console Software, and the MagIC Online Database. A suite of Python scripts is available to help users port their data into the MagIC data format. They allow the user to add important metadata, perform basic interpretations, and average results at the specimen, sample and site levels. These scripts have been validated for use as Open Source software under the UNIX, Linux, PC and Macintosh© operating systems. We have also developed the MagIC Console Software program to assist in collating rock and paleomagnetic data for upload to the MagIC database. The program runs in Microsoft Excel© on both Macintosh© computers and PCs. It performs routine consistency checks on data entries, and assists users in preparing data for uploading into the online MagIC database. The MagIC website is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and has two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual FlashMap interface to browse and select locations. Users can also browse the database by data type (inclination, intensity, VGP, hysteresis, susceptibility) or by data compilation to view all contributions associated with previous databases, such as PINT, GMPDB or TAFI or other user

  7. The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and related tools 2005 update

    PubMed Central

    Alfarano, C.; Andrade, C. E.; Anthony, K.; Bahroos, N.; Bajec, M.; Bantoft, K.; Betel, D.; Bobechko, B.; Boutilier, K.; Burgess, E.; Buzadzija, K.; Cavero, R.; D'Abreo, C.; Donaldson, I.; Dorairajoo, D.; Dumontier, M. J.; Dumontier, M. R.; Earles, V.; Farrall, R.; Feldman, H.; Garderman, E.; Gong, Y.; Gonzaga, R.; Grytsan, V.; Gryz, E.; Gu, V.; Haldorsen, E.; Halupa, A.; Haw, R.; Hrvojic, A.; Hurrell, L.; Isserlin, R.; Jack, F.; Juma, F.; Khan, A.; Kon, T.; Konopinsky, S.; Le, V.; Lee, E.; Ling, S.; Magidin, M.; Moniakis, J.; Montojo, J.; Moore, S.; Muskat, B.; Ng, I.; Paraiso, J. P.; Parker, B.; Pintilie, G.; Pirone, R.; Salama, J. J.; Sgro, S.; Shan, T.; Shu, Y.; Siew, J.; Skinner, D.; Snyder, K.; Stasiuk, R.; Strumpf, D.; Tuekam, B.; Tao, S.; Wang, Z.; White, M.; Willis, R.; Wolting, C.; Wong, S.; Wrong, A.; Xin, C.; Yao, R.; Yates, B.; Zhang, S.; Zheng, K.; Pawson, T.; Ouellette, B. F. F.; Hogue, C. W. V.

    2005-01-01

    The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND) (http://bind.ca) archives biomolecular interaction, reaction, complex and pathway information. Our aim is to curate the details about molecular interactions that arise from published experimental research and to provide this information, as well as tools to enable data analysis, freely to researchers worldwide. BIND data are curated into a comprehensive machine-readable archive of computable information and provides users with methods to discover interactions and molecular mechanisms. BIND has worked to develop new methods for visualization that amplify the underlying annotation of genes and proteins to facilitate the study of molecular interaction networks. BIND has maintained an open database policy since its inception in 1999. Data growth has proceeded at a tremendous rate, approaching over 100 000 records. New services provided include a new BIND Query and Submission interface, a Standard Object Access Protocol service and the Small Molecule Interaction Database (http://smid.blueprint.org) that allows users to determine probable small molecule binding sites of new sequences and examine conserved binding residues. PMID:15608229

  8. Introducing the PRIDE Archive RESTful web services.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Florian; del-Toro, Noemi; Ternent, Tobias; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The PRIDE (PRoteomics IDEntifications) database is one of the world-leading public repositories of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data and it is a founding member of the ProteomeXchange Consortium of proteomics resources. In the original PRIDE database system, users could access data programmatically by accessing the web services provided by the PRIDE BioMart interface. New REST (REpresentational State Transfer) web services have been developed to serve the most popular functionality provided by BioMart (now discontinued due to data scalability issues) and address the data access requirements of the newly developed PRIDE Archive. Using the API (Application Programming Interface) it is now possible to programmatically query for and retrieve peptide and protein identifications, project and assay metadata and the originally submitted files. Searching and filtering is also possible by metadata information, such as sample details (e.g. species and tissues), instrumentation (mass spectrometer), keywords and other provided annotations. The PRIDE Archive web services were first made available in April 2014. The API has already been adopted by a few applications and standalone tools such as PeptideShaker, PRIDE Inspector, the Unipept web application and the Python-based BioServices package. This application is free and open to all users with no login requirement and can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/ws/archive/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. The Midwest State Archives Guide Project: Collateral Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Max J.; And Others

    This document comprises four reports related to the Midwest State Archives Guide Project. The first report, "Producing In-House Finding Aids and Administrative Reports: An Expanded Data Base Design," details an expanded SPINDEX database design that could be used to produce a variety of administrative reports. Specific examples are given…

  10. Database Resources of the BIG Data Center in 2018.

    PubMed

    2018-01-04

    The BIG Data Center at Beijing Institute of Genomics (BIG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provides freely open access to a suite of database resources in support of worldwide research activities in both academia and industry. With the vast amounts of omics data generated at ever-greater scales and rates, the BIG Data Center is continually expanding, updating and enriching its core database resources through big-data integration and value-added curation, including BioCode (a repository archiving bioinformatics tool codes), BioProject (a biological project library), BioSample (a biological sample library), Genome Sequence Archive (GSA, a data repository for archiving raw sequence reads), Genome Warehouse (GWH, a centralized resource housing genome-scale data), Genome Variation Map (GVM, a public repository of genome variations), Gene Expression Nebulas (GEN, a database of gene expression profiles based on RNA-Seq data), Methylation Bank (MethBank, an integrated databank of DNA methylomes), and Science Wikis (a series of biological knowledge wikis for community annotations). In addition, three featured web services are provided, viz., BIG Search (search as a service; a scalable inter-domain text search engine), BIG SSO (single sign-on as a service; a user access control system to gain access to multiple independent systems with a single ID and password) and Gsub (submission as a service; a unified submission service for all relevant resources). All of these resources are publicly accessible through the home page of the BIG Data Center at http://bigd.big.ac.cn. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Database Resources of the BIG Data Center in 2018

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingjian; Hao, Lili; Zhu, Junwei; Tang, Bixia; Zhou, Qing; Song, Fuhai; Chen, Tingting; Zhang, Sisi; Dong, Lili; Lan, Li; Wang, Yanqing; Sang, Jian; Hao, Lili; Liang, Fang; Cao, Jiabao; Liu, Fang; Liu, Lin; Wang, Fan; Ma, Yingke; Xu, Xingjian; Zhang, Lijuan; Chen, Meili; Tian, Dongmei; Li, Cuiping; Dong, Lili; Du, Zhenglin; Yuan, Na; Zeng, Jingyao; Zhang, Zhewen; Wang, Jinyue; Shi, Shuo; Zhang, Yadong; Pan, Mengyu; Tang, Bixia; Zou, Dong; Song, Shuhui; Sang, Jian; Xia, Lin; Wang, Zhennan; Li, Man; Cao, Jiabao; Niu, Guangyi; Zhang, Yang; Sheng, Xin; Lu, Mingming; Wang, Qi; Xiao, Jingfa; Zou, Dong; Wang, Fan; Hao, Lili; Liang, Fang; Li, Mengwei; Sun, Shixiang; Zou, Dong; Li, Rujiao; Yu, Chunlei; Wang, Guangyu; Sang, Jian; Liu, Lin; Li, Mengwei; Li, Man; Niu, Guangyi; Cao, Jiabao; Sun, Shixiang; Xia, Lin; Yin, Hongyan; Zou, Dong; Xu, Xingjian; Ma, Lina; Chen, Huanxin; Sun, Yubin; Yu, Lei; Zhai, Shuang; Sun, Mingyuan; Zhang, Zhang; Zhao, Wenming; Xiao, Jingfa; Bao, Yiming; Song, Shuhui; Hao, Lili; Li, Rujiao; Ma, Lina; Sang, Jian; Wang, Yanqing; Tang, Bixia; Zou, Dong; Wang, Fan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The BIG Data Center at Beijing Institute of Genomics (BIG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provides freely open access to a suite of database resources in support of worldwide research activities in both academia and industry. With the vast amounts of omics data generated at ever-greater scales and rates, the BIG Data Center is continually expanding, updating and enriching its core database resources through big-data integration and value-added curation, including BioCode (a repository archiving bioinformatics tool codes), BioProject (a biological project library), BioSample (a biological sample library), Genome Sequence Archive (GSA, a data repository for archiving raw sequence reads), Genome Warehouse (GWH, a centralized resource housing genome-scale data), Genome Variation Map (GVM, a public repository of genome variations), Gene Expression Nebulas (GEN, a database of gene expression profiles based on RNA-Seq data), Methylation Bank (MethBank, an integrated databank of DNA methylomes), and Science Wikis (a series of biological knowledge wikis for community annotations). In addition, three featured web services are provided, viz., BIG Search (search as a service; a scalable inter-domain text search engine), BIG SSO (single sign-on as a service; a user access control system to gain access to multiple independent systems with a single ID and password) and Gsub (submission as a service; a unified submission service for all relevant resources). All of these resources are publicly accessible through the home page of the BIG Data Center at http://bigd.big.ac.cn. PMID:29036542

  12. Quality control of EUVE databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, L. M.; Drake, J.

    1992-01-01

    The publicly accessible databases for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer include: the EUVE Archive mailserver; the CEA ftp site; the EUVE Guest Observer Mailserver; and the Astronomical Data System node. The EUVE Performance Assurance team is responsible for verifying that these public EUVE databases are working properly, and that the public availability of EUVE data contained therein does not infringe any data rights which may have been assigned. In this poster, we describe the Quality Assurance (QA) procedures we have developed from the approach of QA as a service organization, thus reflecting the overall EUVE philosophy of Quality Assurance integrated into normal operating procedures, rather than imposed as an external, post facto, control mechanism.

  13. Better Living Through Metadata: Examining Archive Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.; Winkelman, S.; Rots, A.

    2013-10-01

    The primary purpose of an observatory's archive is to provide access to the data through various interfaces. User interactions with the archive are recorded in server logs, which can be used to answer basic questions like: Who has downloaded dataset X? When did she do this? Which tools did she use? The answers to questions like these fill in patterns of data access (e.g., how many times dataset X has been downloaded in the past three years). Analysis of server logs provides metrics of archive usage and provides feedback on interface use which can be used to guide future interface development. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is fortunate in that a database to track data access and downloads has been continuously recording such transactions for years; however, it is overdue for an update. We will detail changes we hope to effect and the differences the changes may make to our usage metadata picture. We plan to gather more information about the geographic location of users without compromising privacy; create improved archive statistics; and track and assess the impact of web “crawlers” and other scripted access methods on the archive. With the improvements to our download tracking we hope to gain a better understanding of the dissemination of Chandra's data; how effectively it is being done; and perhaps discover ideas for new services.

  14. An overview on integrated data system for archiving and sharing marine geology and geophysical data in Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Sung Dae; Park, Hyuk Min; Lee, SeungHa

    2016-04-01

    We established and have operated an integrated data system for managing, archiving and sharing marine geology and geophysical data around Korea produced from various research projects and programs in Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST). First of all, to keep the consistency of data system with continuous data updates, we set up standard operating procedures (SOPs) for data archiving, data processing and converting, data quality controls, and data uploading, DB maintenance, etc. Database of this system comprises two databases, ARCHIVE DB and GIS DB for the purpose of this data system. ARCHIVE DB stores archived data as an original forms and formats from data providers for data archive and GIS DB manages all other compilation, processed and reproduction data and information for data services and GIS application services. Relational data management system, Oracle 11g, adopted for DBMS and open source GIS techniques applied for GIS services such as OpenLayers for user interface, GeoServer for application server, PostGIS and PostgreSQL for GIS database. For the sake of convenient use of geophysical data in a SEG Y format, a viewer program was developed and embedded in this system. Users can search data through GIS user interface and save the results as a report.

  15. An automated, web-enabled and searchable database system for archiving electrogram and related data from implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Zong, W; Wang, P; Leung, B; Moody, G B; Mark, R G

    2002-01-01

    The advent of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) has resulted in significant reductions in mortality in patients at high risk for sudden cardiac death. Extensive related basic research and clinical investigation continue. ICDs typically record intracardiac electrograms and inter-beat intervals along with device settings during episodes of device delivery of therapy. Researchers wishing to study these data further have until now been limited to viewing paper plots. In support of multi-center clinical studies of patients with ICDs, we have developed a web based searchable ICD data archiving system, which allows users to use a web browser to upload ICD data from diskettes to a server where the data are automatically processed and archived. Users can view and download the archived ICD data directly via the web. The entire system is built from open source software. At present more than 500 patient ICD data sets have been uploaded to and archived in the system. This project will be of value not only to those who wish to conduct research using ICD data, but also to clinicians who need to archive and review ICD data collected from their patients.

  16. Using and Distributing Spaceflight Data: The Johnson Space Center Life Sciences Data Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, J. A.; Buckey, J. C.; Turner, J. N.; White, T. S.; Havelka,J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Life sciences data collected before, during and after spaceflight are valuable and often irreplaceable. The Johnson Space Center Life is hard to find, and much of the data (e.g. Sciences Data Archive has been designed to provide researchers, engineers, managers and educators interactive access to information about and data from human spaceflight experiments. The archive system consists of a Data Acquisition System, Database Management System, CD-ROM Mastering System and Catalog Information System (CIS). The catalog information system is the heart of the archive. The CIS provides detailed experiment descriptions (both written and as QuickTime movies), hardware descriptions, hardware images, documents, and data. An initial evaluation of the archive at a scientific meeting showed that 88% of those who evaluated the catalog want to use the system when completed. The majority of the evaluators found the archive flexible, satisfying and easy to use. We conclude that the data archive effectively provides key life sciences data to interested users.

  17. The Social and Organizational Life Data Archive (SOLDA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Ken; Blunsdon, Betsy; Rimme, Malcolm

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the rationale and design of the Social and Organizational Life Data Archive (SOLDA), an on-line collection of survey and other statistical data relevant to research in the fields of management, organizational studies, industrial relations, marketing, and related social sciences. The database uses CD-ROM technology and the World Wide Web…

  18. Archival Research Capabilities of the WFIRST Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Alexander

    WFIRST's unique combination of a large (~0.3 deg2) field of view and HST-like angular resolution and sensitivity in the near infrared will produce spectacular new insights into the origins of stars, galaxies, and structure in the cosmos. We propose a WFIRST Archive Science Investigation Team (SIT-F) to define an archival, query, and analysis system that will enable scientific discovery in all relevant areas of astrophysics and maximize the overall scientific yield of the mission. Guest investigators (GIs), guest observers (GOs), the WFIRST SIT's, WFIRST Science Center(s), and astronomers using data from other surveys will all benefit from the extensive, easy, fast and reliable use of the WFIRST archives. We propose to develop the science requirements for the archive and work to understand its interactions with other elements of the WFIRST mission. To accomplish this, we will conduct case studies to derive performance requirements for the WFIRST archives. These will clarify what is needed for GIs to make important scientific discoveries across a broad range of astrophysics. While other SITs will primarily address the science capabilities of the WFIRST instruments, we will look ahead to the science enabling capabilities of the WFIRST archives. We will demonstrate how the archive can be optimized to take advantage of the extraordinary science capabilities of the WFIRST instruments as well as major space and ground observatories to maximize the science return of the mission. We will use the "20 queries" methodology, formulated by Jim Gray, to cover the most important science analysis patterns and use these to establish the performance required of the WFIRST archive. The case studies will be centered on studying galaxy evolution as a function of cosmic time, environment and intrinsic properties. The analyses will require massive angular and spatial cross correlations between key galaxy properties to search for new fundamental scaling relations that may only become

  19. Evaluation of Glaucoma Progression in Large-Scale Clinical Data: The Japanese Archive of Multicentral Databases in Glaucoma (JAMDIG).

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yuri; Asaoka, Ryo; Murata, Hiroshi; Miki, Atsuya; Tanito, Masaki; Mizoue, Shiro; Mori, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Yamashita, Takehiro; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Shoji, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    To develop a large-scale real clinical database of glaucoma (Japanese Archive of Multicentral Databases in Glaucoma: JAMDIG) and to investigate the effect of treatment. The study included a total of 1348 eyes of 805 primary open-angle glaucoma patients with 10 visual fields (VFs) measured with 24-2 or 30-2 Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) and intraocular pressure (IOP) records in 10 institutes in Japan. Those with 10 reliable VFs were further identified (638 eyes of 417 patients). Mean total deviation (mTD) of the 52 test points in the 24-2 HFA VF was calculated, and the relationship between mTD progression rate and seven variables (age, mTD of baseline VF, average IOP, standard deviation (SD) of IOP, previous argon/selective laser trabeculoplasties (ALT/SLT), previous trabeculectomy, and previous trabeculotomy) was analyzed. The mTD in the initial VF was -6.9 ± 6.2 dB and the mTD progression rate was -0.26 ± 0.46 dB/year. Mean IOP during the follow-up period was 13.5 ± 2.2 mm Hg. Age and SD of IOP were related to mTD progression rate. However, in eyes with average IOP below 15 and also 13 mm Hg, only age and baseline VF mTD were related to mTD progression rate. Age and the degree of VF damage were related to future progression. Average IOP was not related to the progression rate; however, fluctuation of IOP was associated with faster progression, although this was not the case when average IOP was below 15 mm Hg.

  20. Newspaper archives + text mining = rich sources of historical geo-spatial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yzaguirre, A.; Smit, M.; Warren, R.

    2016-04-01

    Newspaper archives are rich sources of cultural, social, and historical information. These archives, even when digitized, are typically unstructured and organized by date rather than by subject or location, and require substantial manual effort to analyze. The effort of journalists to be accurate and precise means that there is often rich geo-spatial data embedded in the text, alongside text describing events that editors considered to be of sufficient importance to the region or the world to merit column inches. A regional newspaper can add over 100,000 articles to its database each year, and extracting information from this data for even a single country would pose a substantial Big Data challenge. In this paper, we describe a pilot study on the construction of a database of historical flood events (location(s), date, cause, magnitude) to be used in flood assessment projects, for example to calibrate models, estimate frequency, establish high water marks, or plan for future events in contexts ranging from urban planning to climate change adaptation. We then present a vision for extracting and using the rich geospatial data available in unstructured text archives, and suggest future avenues of research.

  1. A Geospatial Database that Supports Derivation of Climatological Features of Severe Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, M.; Ansari, S.; Del Greco, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI) at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) provides user access to archives of several datasets critical to the detection and evaluation of severe weather. These datasets include archives of: · NEXRAD Level-III point features describing general storm structure, hail, mesocyclone and tornado signatures · National Weather Service Storm Events Database · National Weather Service Local Storm Reports collected from storm spotters · National Weather Service Warnings · Lightning strikes from Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) SWDI archives all of these datasets in a spatial database that allows for convenient searching and subsetting. These data are accessible via the NCDC web site, Web Feature Services (WFS) or automated web services. The results of interactive web page queries may be saved in a variety of formats, including plain text, XML, Google Earth's KMZ, standards-based NetCDF and Shapefile. NCDC's Storm Risk Assessment Project (SRAP) uses data from the SWDI database to derive gridded climatology products that show the spatial distributions of the frequency of various events. SRAP also can relate SWDI events to other spatial data such as roads, population, watersheds, and other geographic, sociological, or economic data to derive products that are useful in municipal planning, emergency management, the insurance industry, and other areas where there is a need to quantify and qualify how severe weather patterns affect people and property.

  2. Archival policies and collections database for the Woods Hole Science Center's marine sediment samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buczkowski, Brian J.; Kelsey, Sarah A.

    2007-01-01

    The Woods Hole Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been an active member of the Woods Hole research community, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for over 40 years. In that time there have been many projects that involved the collection of sediment samples conducted by USGS scientists and technicians for the research and study of seabed environments and processes. These samples were collected at sea or near shore and then brought back to the Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) for analysis. While at the center, samples are stored in ambient temperature, refrigerated and freezing conditions ranging from +2º Celsius to -18º Celsius, depending on the best mode of preparation for the study being conducted or the duration of storage planned for the samples. Recently, storage methods and available storage space have become a major concern at the WHSC. The core and sediment archive program described herein has been initiated to set standards for the management, methods, and duration of sample storage. A need has arisen to maintain organizational consistency and define storage protocol. This handbook serves as a reference and guide to all parties interested in using and accessing the WHSC's sample archive and also defines all the steps necessary to construct and maintain an organized collection of geological samples. It answers many questions as to the way in which the archive functions.

  3. U.S. Geological Survey archived data recovery in Texas, 2008-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wehmeyer, Loren L.; Reece, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    The 2008–11 data rescue and recovery efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center resulted in an efficient workflow process, database, and Web user interface for scientists and citizens to access archived environmental information with practical applications. Much of this information is unique and has never been readily available to the public. The methods developed and lessons learned during this effort are now being applied to facilitate recovering archived information requested by USGS scientists, cooperators, and the general public.

  4. The archive of the History of Psychology at the University of Rome, Sapienza.

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Chiara; Fox Lee, Shayna

    2016-02-01

    The History of Psychology Archive at the University of Rome, Sapienza was founded in 2008 in the Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology. The archive aspires to become an indispensable tool to (a) understand the currents, schools, and research traditions that have marked the path of Italian psychology, (b) focus on issues of general and applied psychology developed in each university, (c) identify experimental and clinical-differential methodologies specific to each lab, (d) reconstruct the genesis and consolidation of psychology institutions and, ultimately, (e) write a "story," set according to the most recent historiographical criteria. The archive is designed according to scholarship on the history of Italian psychology from the past two decades. The online archive is divided into five sections for ease of access. The Sapienza archive is a work in progress and it has plans for expansion. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. DICOM-compliant PACS with CD-based image archival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Robert D.; Henri, Christopher J.; Rubin, Richard K.; Bret, Patrice M.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a low- cost PACS conforming to the DICOM 3.0 standard. The goal was to provide an efficient image archival and management solution on a heterogeneous hospital network as a basis for filmless radiology. The system follows a distributed, client/server model and was implemented at a fraction of the cost of a commercial PACS. It provides reliable archiving on recordable CD and allows access to digital images throughout the hospital and on the Internet. Dedicated servers have been designed for short-term storage, CD-based archival, data retrieval and remote data access or teleradiology. The short-term storage devices provide DICOM storage and query/retrieve services to scanners and workstations and approximately twelve weeks of 'on-line' image data. The CD-based archival and data retrieval processes are fully automated with the exception of CD loading and unloading. The system employs lossless compression on both short- and long-term storage devices. All servers communicate via the DICOM protocol in conjunction with both local and 'master' SQL-patient databases. Records are transferred from the local to the master database independently, ensuring that storage devices will still function if the master database server cannot be reached. The system features rules-based work-flow management and WWW servers to provide multi-platform remote data access. The WWW server system is distributed on the storage, retrieval and teleradiology servers allowing viewing of locally stored image data directly in a WWW browser without the need for data transfer to a central WWW server. An independent system monitors disk usage, processes, network and CPU load on each server and reports errors to the image management team via email. The PACS was implemented using a combination of off-the-shelf hardware, freely available software and applications developed in-house. The system has enabled filmless operation in CT, MR and ultrasound within

  6. A VBA Desktop Database for Proposal Processing at National Optical Astronomy Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christa L.

    National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) has developed a relational Microsoft Windows desktop database using Microsoft Access and the Microsoft Office programming language, Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The database is used to track data relating to observing proposals from original receipt through the review process, scheduling, observing, and final statistical reporting. The database has automated proposal processing and distribution of information. It allows NOAO to collect and archive data so as to query and analyze information about our science programs in new ways.

  7. IUEAGN: A database of ultraviolet spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, G.; Edelson, R.; Shull, J. M.; Saken, J.

    1993-01-01

    In 13 years of operation, IUE has gathered approximately 5000 spectra of almost 600 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to undertake AGN studies which require large amounts of data, we are consistently reducing this entire archive and creating a homogeneous, easy-to-use database. First, the spectra are extracted using the Optimal extraction algorithm. Continuum fluxes are then measured across predefined bands, and line fluxes are measured with a multi-component fit. These results, along with source information such as redshifts and positions, are placed in the IUEAGN relational database. Analysis algorithms, statistical tests, and plotting packages run within the structure, and this flexible database can accommodate future data when they are released. This archival approach has already been used to survey line and continuum variability in six bright Seyfert 1s and rapid continuum variability in 14 blazars. Among the results that could only be obtained using a large archival study is evidence that blazars show a positive correlation between degree of variability and apparent luminosity, while Seyfert 1s show an anti-correlation. This suggests that beaming dominates the ultraviolet properties for blazars, while thermal emission from an accretion disk dominates for Seyfert 1s. Our future plans include a survey of line ratios in Seyfert 1s, to be fitted with photoionization models to test the models and determine the range of temperatures, densities and ionization parameters. We will also include data from IRAS, Einstein, EXOSAT, and ground-based telescopes to measure multi-wavelength correlations and broadband spectral energy distributions.

  8. Recommendations for a service framework to access astronomical archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travisano, J. J.; Pollizzi, J.

    1992-01-01

    There are a large number of astronomical archives and catalogs on-line for network access, with many different user interfaces and features. Some systems are moving towards distributed access, supplying users with client software for their home sites which connects to servers at the archive site. Many of the issues involved in defining a standard framework of services that archive/catalog suppliers can use to achieve a basic level of interoperability are described. Such a framework would simplify the development of client and server programs to access the wide variety of astronomical archive systems. The primary services that are supplied by current systems include: catalog browsing, dataset retrieval, name resolution, and data analysis. The following issues (and probably more) need to be considered in establishing a standard set of client/server interfaces and protocols: Archive Access - dataset retrieval, delivery, file formats, data browsing, analysis, etc.; Catalog Access - database management systems, query languages, data formats, synchronous/asynchronous mode of operation, etc.; Interoperability - transaction/message protocols, distributed processing mechanisms (DCE, ONC/SunRPC, etc), networking protocols, etc.; Security - user registration, authorization/authentication mechanisms, etc.; Service Directory - service registration, lookup, port/task mapping, parameters, etc.; Software - public vs proprietary, client/server software, standard interfaces to client/server functions, software distribution, operating system portability, data portability, etc. Several archive/catalog groups, notably the Astrophysics Data System (ADS), are already working in many of these areas. In the process of developing StarView, which is the user interface to the Space Telescope Data Archive and Distribution Service (ST-DADS), these issues and the work of others were analyzed. A framework of standard interfaces for accessing services on any archive system which would benefit

  9. Database citation in full text biomedical articles.

    PubMed

    Kafkas, Şenay; Kim, Jee-Hyub; McEntyre, Johanna R

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biology and literature databases represent essential infrastructure for life science research. Effective integration of these data resources requires that there are structured cross-references at the level of individual articles and biological records. Here, we describe the current patterns of how database entries are cited in research articles, based on analysis of the full text Open Access articles available from Europe PMC. Focusing on citation of entries in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), UniProt and Protein Data Bank, Europe (PDBe), we demonstrate that text mining doubles the number of structured annotations of database record citations supplied in journal articles by publishers. Many thousands of new literature-database relationships are found by text mining, since these relationships are also not present in the set of articles cited by database records. We recommend that structured annotation of database records in articles is extended to other databases, such as ArrayExpress and Pfam, entries from which are also cited widely in the literature. The very high precision and high-throughput of this text-mining pipeline makes this activity possible both accurately and at low cost, which will allow the development of new integrated data services.

  10. Database Citation in Full Text Biomedical Articles

    PubMed Central

    Kafkas, Şenay; Kim, Jee-Hyub; McEntyre, Johanna R.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biology and literature databases represent essential infrastructure for life science research. Effective integration of these data resources requires that there are structured cross-references at the level of individual articles and biological records. Here, we describe the current patterns of how database entries are cited in research articles, based on analysis of the full text Open Access articles available from Europe PMC. Focusing on citation of entries in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), UniProt and Protein Data Bank, Europe (PDBe), we demonstrate that text mining doubles the number of structured annotations of database record citations supplied in journal articles by publishers. Many thousands of new literature-database relationships are found by text mining, since these relationships are also not present in the set of articles cited by database records. We recommend that structured annotation of database records in articles is extended to other databases, such as ArrayExpress and Pfam, entries from which are also cited widely in the literature. The very high precision and high-throughput of this text-mining pipeline makes this activity possible both accurately and at low cost, which will allow the development of new integrated data services. PMID:23734176

  11. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: A prototype data archive for Big Science exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Green, A. W.; Foster, C.; Scott, N.; Allen, J. T.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Sweet, S. M.; Hopkins, A. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Croom, S. M.; Goodwin, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    We describe the data archive and database for the SAMI Galaxy Survey, an ongoing observational program that will cover ≈3400 galaxies with integral-field (spatially-resolved) spectroscopy. Amounting to some three million spectra, this is the largest sample of its kind to date. The data archive and built-in query engine use the versatile Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5), which precludes the need for external metadata tables and hence the setup and maintenance overhead those carry. The code produces simple outputs that can easily be translated to plots and tables, and the combination of these tools makes for a light system that can handle heavy data. This article acts as a contextual companion to the SAMI Survey Database source code repository, samiDB, which is freely available online and written entirely in Python. We also discuss the decisions related to the selection of tools and the creation of data visualisation modules. It is our aim that the work presented in this article-descriptions, rationale, and source code-will be of use to scientists looking to set up a maintenance-light data archive for a Big Science data load.

  12. Organizations challenged by global database development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturdevant, J.A.; Eidenshink, J.C.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    1991-01-01

    Several international programs have identified the need for a global 1-kilometer spatial database for land cover and land characterization studies. In 1992, the US Geological Survey (USGS) EROS Data Center (EDC), the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will collect and archive all 1-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data acquired during afternoon orbital passes over land.

  13. Illuminating the Depths of the MagIC (Magnetics Information Consortium) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.; Minnett, R.; Jarboe, N.; Jonestrask, L.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the paleo-, geo-, and rock magnetic scientific community. Its mission is to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from magnetics studies on natural and synthetic samples. Many of these valuable data are legacy datasets that were never published in their entirety, some resided in other databases that are no longer maintained, and others were never digitized from the field notebooks and lab work. Due to the volume of data collected, most studies, modern and legacy, only publish the interpreted results and, occasionally, a subset of the raw data. MagIC is making an extraordinary effort to archive these data in a single data model, including the raw instrument measurements if possible. This facilitates the reproducibility of the interpretations, the re-interpretation of the raw data as the community introduces new techniques, and the compilation of heterogeneous datasets that are otherwise distributed across multiple formats and physical locations. MagIC has developed tools to assist the scientific community in many stages of their workflow. Contributors easily share studies (in a private mode if so desired) in the MagIC Database with colleagues and reviewers prior to publication, publish the data online after the study is peer reviewed, and visualize their data in the context of the rest of the contributions to the MagIC Database. From organizing their data in the MagIC Data Model with an online editable spreadsheet, to validating the integrity of the dataset with automated plots and statistics, MagIC is continually lowering the barriers to transforming dark data into transparent and reproducible datasets. Additionally, this web application generalizes to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so that the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences

  14. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) version 2017: a database for worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Ohmura, Atsumu; Schär, Christoph; Müller, Guido; Folini, Doris; Schwarz, Matthias; Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2017-08-01

    The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) is a database for the central storage of the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface, maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland). This paper documents the status of the GEBA version 2017 dataset, presents the new web interface and user access, and reviews the scientific impact that GEBA data had in various applications. GEBA has continuously been expanded and updated and contains in its 2017 version around 500 000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components measured at 2500 locations. The database contains observations from 15 surface energy flux components, with the most widely measured quantity available in GEBA being the shortwave radiation incident at the Earth's surface (global radiation). Many of the historic records extend over several decades. GEBA contains monthly data from a variety of sources, namely from the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) in St. Petersburg, from national weather services, from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD), from peer-reviewed publications, project and data reports, and from personal communications. Quality checks are applied to test for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA has played a key role in various research applications, such as in the quantification of the global energy balance, in the discussion of the anomalous atmospheric shortwave absorption, and in the detection of multi-decadal variations in global radiation, known as global dimming and brightening. GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible through the internet via http://www.geba.ethz.ch. Supplementary data are available at

  15. Designing a Multi-Petabyte Database for LSST

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Becla, Jacek; Hanushevsky, Andrew; Nikolaev, Sergei

    2007-01-10

    The 3.2 giga-pixel LSST camera will produce approximately half a petabyte of archive images every month. These data need to be reduced in under a minute to produce real-time transient alerts, and then added to the cumulative catalog for further analysis. The catalog is expected to grow about three hundred terabytes per year. The data volume, the real-time transient alerting requirements of the LSST, and its spatio-temporal aspects require innovative techniques to build an efficient data access system at reasonable cost. As currently envisioned, the system will rely on a database for catalogs and metadata. Several database systems are beingmore » evaluated to understand how they perform at these data rates, data volumes, and access patterns. This paper describes the LSST requirements, the challenges they impose, the data access philosophy, results to date from evaluating available database technologies against LSST requirements, and the proposed database architecture to meet the data challenges.« less

  16. MIMIC II: a massive temporal ICU patient database to support research in intelligent patient monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeed, M.; Lieu, C.; Raber, G.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Development and evaluation of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) decision-support systems would be greatly facilitated by the availability of a large-scale ICU patient database. Following our previous efforts with the MIMIC (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care) Database, we have leveraged advances in networking and storage technologies to develop a far more massive temporal database, MIMIC II. MIMIC II is an ongoing effort: data is continuously and prospectively archived from all ICU patients in our hospital. MIMIC II now consists of over 800 ICU patient records including over 120 gigabytes of data and is growing. A customized archiving system was used to store continuously up to four waveforms and 30 different parameters from ICU patient monitors. An integrated user-friendly relational database was developed for browsing of patients' clinical information (lab results, fluid balance, medications, nurses' progress notes). Based upon its unprecedented size and scope, MIMIC II will prove to be an important resource for intelligent patient monitoring research, and will support efforts in medical data mining and knowledge-discovery.

  17. RoMEO Studies 8: Self-Archiving: The Logic behind the Colour-Coding Used in the Copyright Knowledge Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Celia; Probets, Steve; Oppenheim, Charles; Hubbard, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to show how the self-archiving of journal papers is a major step towards providing open access to research. However, copyright transfer agreements (CTAs) that are signed by an author prior to publication often indicate whether, and in what form, self-archiving is allowed. The SHERPA/RoMEO database enables…

  18. A Support Database System for Integrated System Health Management (ISHM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Jorge F.; Turowski, Mark; Morris, John

    2007-01-01

    The development, deployment, operation and maintenance of Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) applications require the storage and processing of tremendous amounts of low-level data. This data must be shared in a secure and cost-effective manner between developers, and processed within several heterogeneous architectures. Modern database technology allows this data to be organized efficiently, while ensuring the integrity and security of the data. The extensibility and interoperability of the current database technologies also allows for the creation of an associated support database system. A support database system provides additional capabilities by building applications on top of the database structure. These applications can then be used to support the various technologies in an ISHM architecture. This presentation and paper propose a detailed structure and application description for a support database system, called the Health Assessment Database System (HADS). The HADS provides a shared context for organizing and distributing data as well as a definition of the applications that provide the required data-driven support to ISHM. This approach provides another powerful tool for ISHM developers, while also enabling novel functionality. This functionality includes: automated firmware updating and deployment, algorithm development assistance and electronic datasheet generation. The architecture for the HADS has been developed as part of the ISHM toolset at Stennis Space Center for rocket engine testing. A detailed implementation has begun for the Methane Thruster Testbed Project (MTTP) in order to assist in developing health assessment and anomaly detection algorithms for ISHM. The structure of this implementation is shown in Figure 1. The database structure consists of three primary components: the system hierarchy model, the historical data archive and the firmware codebase. The system hierarchy model replicates the physical relationships between

  19. Puncture-proof picture archiving and communication system.

    PubMed

    Willis, C E; McCluggage, C W; Orand, M R; Parker, B R

    2001-06-01

    As we become increasingly dependent on our picture archiving and communications system (PACS) for the clinical practice of medicine, the demand for improved reliability becomes urgent. Borrowing principles from the discipline of Reliability Engineering, we have identified components of our system that constitute single points of failure and have endeavored to eliminate these through redundant components and manual work-around procedures. To assess the adequacy of our preparations, we have identified a set of plausible events that could interfere with the function of one or more of our PACS components. These events could be as simple as the loss of the network connection to a single component or as broad as the loss of our central data center. We have identified the need to continue to operate during adverse conditions, as well as the requirement to recover rapidly from major disruptions in service. This assessment led us to modify the physical locations of central PACS components within our physical plant. We are also taking advantage of actual disruptive events coincident with a major expansion of our facility to test our recovery procedures. Based on our recognition of the vital nature of our electronic images for patient care, we are now recording electronic images in two copies on disparate media. The image database is critical to both continued operations and recovery. Restoration of the database from periodic tape backups with a 24-hour cycle time may not support our clinical scenario: acquisition modalities have a limited local storage capacity, some of which will not contain the daily workload. Restoration of the database from the archived media is an exceedingly slow process, that will likely not meet our requirement to restore clinical operations without significant delay. Our PACS vendor is working on concurrent image databases that would be capable of nearly immediate switchover and recovery.

  20. A New Archive of UKIRT Legacy Data at CADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, G. S.; Currie, M. J.; Redman, R. O.; Purves, M.; Jenness, T.

    2014-05-01

    We describe a new archive of legacy data from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) containing all available data from the Cassegrain instruments. The desire was to archive the raw data in as close to the original format as possible, so where the data followed our current convention of having a single data file per observation, it was archived without alteration, except for minor fixes to headers of data in FITS format to allow it to pass fitsverify and be accepted by CADC. Some of the older data comprised multiple integrations in separate files per observation, stored in either Starlink NDF or Figaro DST format. These were placed inside HDS container files, and DST files were rearranged into NDF format. The describing the observations is ingested into the CAOM-2 repository via an intermediate MongoDB header database, which will also be used to guide the ORAC-DR pipeline in generating reduced data products.

  1. A spatio-temporal landslide inventory for the NW of Spain: BAPA database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Pablo; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Mora García, Manuel Antonio; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat

    2017-09-01

    A landslide database has been created for the Principality of Asturias, NW Spain: the BAPA (Base de datos de Argayos del Principado de Asturias - Principality of Asturias Landslide Database). Data collection is mainly performed through searching local newspaper archives. Moreover, a BAPA App and a BAPA website (http://geol.uniovi.es/BAPA) have been developed to obtain additional information from citizens and institutions. Presently, the dataset covers the period 1980-2015, recording 2063 individual landslides. The use of free cartographic servers, such as Google Maps, Google Street View and Iberpix (Government of Spain), combined with the spatial descriptions and pictures contained in the press news, makes it possible to assess different levels of spatial accuracy. In the database, 59% of the records show an exact spatial location, and 51% of the records provided accurate dates, showing the usefulness of press archives as temporal records. Thus, 32% of the landslides show the highest spatial and temporal accuracy levels. The database also gathers information about the type and characteristics of the landslides, the triggering factors and the damage and costs caused. Field work was conducted to validate the methodology used in assessing the spatial location, temporal occurrence and characteristics of the landslides.

  2. Getting Personal: Personal Archives in Archival Programs and Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    In 2001, Catherine Hobbs referred to silences around personal archives, suggesting that these types of archives were not given as much attention as organizational archives in the development of archival theory and methodology. The aims of this article are twofold: 1) to investigate the extent to which such silences exist in archival education…

  3. Cost-effective data storage/archival subsystem for functional PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.; Kim, Yongmin

    1993-09-01

    Not the least of the requirements of a workable PACS is the ability to store and archive vast amounts of information. A medium-size hospital will generate between 1 and 2 TBytes of data annually on a fully functional PACS. A high-speed image transmission network coupled with a comparably high-speed central data storage unit can make local memory and magnetic disks in the PACS workstations less critical and, in an extreme case, unnecessary. Under these circumstances, the capacity and performance of the central data storage subsystem and database is critical in determining the response time at the workstations, thus significantly affecting clinical acceptability. The central data storage subsystem not only needs to provide sufficient capacity to store about ten days worth of images (five days worth of new studies, and on the average, about one comparison study for each new study), but also supplies images to the requesting workstation in a timely fashion. The database must provide fast retrieval responses upon users' requests for images. This paper analyzes both advantages and disadvantages of multiple parallel transfer disks versus RAID disks for short-term central data storage subsystem, as well as optical disk jukebox versus digital recorder tape subsystem for long-term archive. Furthermore, an example high-performance cost-effective storage subsystem which integrates both the RAID disks and high-speed digital tape subsystem as a cost-effective PACS data storage/archival unit are presented.

  4. GRAFLAB 2.3 for UNIX - A MATLAB database, plotting, and analysis tool: User`s guide

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dunn, W.N.

    1998-03-01

    This report is a user`s manual for GRAFLAB, which is a new database, analysis, and plotting package that has been written entirely in the MATLAB programming language. GRAFLAB is currently used for data reduction, analysis, and archival. GRAFLAB was written to replace GRAFAID, which is a FORTRAN database, analysis, and plotting package that runs on VAX/VMS.

  5. PACS archive upgrade and data migration: clinical experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Documet, Luis; Sarti, Dennis A.; Huang, H. K.; Donnelly, John

    2002-05-01

    Saint John's Health Center PACS data volumes have increased dramatically since the hospital became filmless in April of 1999. This is due in part of continuous image accumulation, and the integration of a new multi-slice detector CT scanner into PACS. The original PACS archive would not be able to handle the distribution and archiving load and capacity in the near future. Furthermore, there is no secondary copy backup of all the archived PACS image data for disaster recovery purposes. The purpose of this paper is to present a clinical and technical process template to upgrade and expand the PACS archive, migrate existing PACs image data to the new archive, and provide a back-up and disaster recovery function not currently available. Discussion of the technical and clinical pitfalls and challenges involved in this process will be presented as well. The server hardware configuration was upgraded and a secondary backup implemented for disaster recovery. The upgrade includes new software versions, database reconfiguration, and installation of a new tape jukebox to replace the current MOD jukebox. Upon completion, all PACS image data from the original MOD jukebox was migrated to the new tape jukebox and verified. The migration was performed during clinical operation continuously in the background. Once the data migration was completed the MOD jukebox was removed. All newly acquired PACS exams are now archived to the new tape jukebox. All PACs image data residing on the original MOD jukebox have been successfully migrated into the new archive. In addition, a secondary backup of all PACS image data has been implemented for disaster recovery and has been verified using disaster scenario testing. No PACS image data was lost during the entire process and there was very little clinical impact during the entire upgrade and data migration. Some of the pitfalls and challenges during this upgrade process included hardware reconfiguration for the original archive server, clinical

  6. JAMSTEC DARWIN Database Assimilates GANSEKI and COEDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, T.; Toyoda, Y.; Horikawa, H.; Sasaki, T.; Fukuda, K.; Hase, H.; Saito, H.

    2017-12-01

    Introduction: Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) archives data and samples obtained by JAMSTEC research vessels and submersibles. As a common property of the human society, JAMSTEC archive is open for public users with scientific/educational purposes [1]. For publicizing its data and samples online, JAMSTEC is operating NUUNKUI data sites [2], a group of several databases for various data and sample types. For years, data and metadata of JAMSTEC rock samples, sediment core samples and cruise/dive observation were publicized through databases named GANSEKI, COEDO, and DARWIN, respectively. However, because they had different user interfaces and data structures, these services were somewhat confusing for unfamiliar users. Maintenance costs of multiple hardware and software were also problematic for performing sustainable services and continuous improvements. Database Integration: In 2017, GANSEKI, COEDO and DARWIN were integrated into DARWIN+ [3]. The update also included implementation of map-search function as a substitute of closed portal site. Major functions of previous systems were incorporated into the new system; users can perform the complex search, by thumbnail browsing, map area, keyword filtering, and metadata constraints. As for data handling, the new system is more flexible, allowing the entry of variety of additional data types. Data Management: After the DARWIN major update, JAMSTEC data & sample team has been dealing with minor issues of individual sample data/metadata which sometimes need manual modification to be transferred to the new system. Some new data sets, such as onboard sample photos and surface close-up photos of rock samples, are getting available online. Geochemical data of sediment core samples will supposedly be added in the near future. Reference: [1] http://www.jamstec.go.jp/e/database/data_policy.html [2] http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/jmedia/portal/e/ [3] http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/darwin/e/

  7. ESA Science Archives, VO tools and remote Scientific Data reduction in Grid Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, C.; Barbarisi, I.; de La Calle, I.; Fajersztejn, N.; Freschi, M.; Gabriel, C.; Gomez, P.; Guainazzi, M.; Ibarra, A.; Laruelo, A.; Leon, I.; Micol, A.; Parrilla, E.; Ortiz, I.; Osuna, P.; Salgado, J.; Stebe, A.; Tapiador, D.

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the latest functionalities of the ESA Science Archives located at ESAC, Spain, in particular, the following archives : the ISO Data Archive (IDA {http://iso.esac.esa.int/ida}), the XMM-Newton Science Archive (XSA {http://xmm.esac.esa.int/xsa}), the Integral SOC Science Data Archive (ISDA {http://integral.esac.esa.int/isda}) and the Planetary Science Archive (PSA {http://www.rssd.esa.int/psa}), both the classical and the map-based Mars Express interfaces. Furthermore, the ESA VOSpec {http://esavo.esac.esa.int/vospecapp} spectra analysis tool is described, which allows to access and display spectral information from VO resources (both real observational and theoretical spectra), including access to Lines database and recent analysis functionalities. In addition, we detail the first implementation of RISA (Remote Interface for Science Analysis), a web service providing remote users the ability to create fully configurable XMM-Newton data analysis workflows, and to deploy and run them on the ESAC Grid. RISA makes fully use of the inter-operability provided by the SIAP (Simple Image Access Protocol) services as data input, and at the same time its VO-compatible output can directly be used by general VO-tools.

  8. A Complete Public Archive for the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Consistent with our proposal to the Astrophysics Data Program in 1992, we have completed the design, construction, documentation, and distribution of a flexible and complete archive of the data collected by the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter. Along with software and data delivered to the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center at Goddard Space Flight Center, we have compiled and, where appropriate, published catalogs of point sources, soft sources, hard sources, extended sources, and transient flares detected in the database along with extensive analyses of the instrument's backgrounds and other anomalies. We include in this document a brief summary of the archive's functionality, a description of the scientific catalogs and other results, a bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part under this contract, and a list of personnel whose pre- and post-doctoral education consisted in part in participation in this project.

  9. A case Study of Applying Object-Relational Persistence in Astronomy Data Archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, S. S.; Hiriart, R.; Barg, I.; Warner, P.; Gasson, D.

    2005-12-01

    The NOAO Science Archive (NSA) team is developing a comprehensive domain model to capture the science data in the archive. Java and an object model derived from the domain model weil address the application layer of the archive system. However, since RDBMS is the best proven technology for data management, the challenge is the paradigm mismatch between the object and the relational models. Transparent object-relational mapping (ORM) persistence is a successful solution to this challenge. In the data modeling and persistence implementation of NSA, we are using Hibernate, a well-accepted ORM tool, to bridge the object model in the business tier and the relational model in the database tier. Thus, the database is isolated from the Java application. The application queries directly on objects using a DBMS-independent object-oriented query API, which frees the application developers from the low level JDBC and SQL so that they can focus on the domain logic. We present the detailed design of the NSA R3 (Release 3) data model and object-relational persistence, including mapping, retrieving and caching. Persistence layer optimization and performance tuning will be analyzed. The system is being built on J2EE, so the integration of Hibernate into the EJB container and the transaction management are also explored.

  10. Development of geotechnical analysis and design modules for the Virginia Department of Transportation's geotechnical database.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, an Internet-based Geotechnical Database Management System (GDBMS) was developed for the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) using distributed Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology for data management, archival, retrieval, ...

  11. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA): A database for the worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Ohmura, Atsumu; Schär, Christoph; Müller, Guido; Hakuba, Maria Z.; Mystakidis, Stefanos; Arsenovic, Pavle; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) is a database for the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface. GEBA is maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland) and has been founded in the 1980s by Prof. Atsumu Ohmura. It has continuously been updated and currently contains around 2500 stations with 500`000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components. Many of the records extend over several decades. The most widely measured quantity available in GEBA is the solar radiation incident at the Earth's surface ("global radiation"). The data sources include, in addition to the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) in St. Petersburg, data reports from National Weather Services, data from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD), data published in peer-reviewed publications and data obtained through personal communications. Different quality checks are applied to check for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA is used in various research applications, such as for the quantification of the global energy balance and its spatiotemporal variation, or for the estimation of long-term trends in the surface fluxes, which enabled the detection of multi-decadal variations in surface solar radiation, known as "global dimming" and "brightening". GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible over the internet via www.geba.ethz.ch.

  12. Sentence-Based Metadata: An Approach and Tool for Viewing Database Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, John M.; Gunge, Jakob; Bryden, John; Librowski, Kaz; Hanna, Hsin-Yi

    2002-01-01

    Describes MARS (Museum Archive Retrieval System), a research tool which enables organizations to exchange digital images and documents by means of a common thesaurus structure, and merge the descriptive data and metadata of their collections. Highlights include theoretical basis; searching the MARS database; and examples in European museums.…

  13. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Delta)lambda equals 3 A) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original datareduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quicklook plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  14. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-04-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Δλ = 3 Å) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original data-reduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quick-look plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  15. GenderMedDB: an interactive database of sex and gender-specific medical literature.

    PubMed

    Oertelt-Prigione, Sabine; Gohlke, Björn-Oliver; Dunkel, Mathias; Preissner, Robert; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Searches for sex and gender-specific publications are complicated by the absence of a specific algorithm within search engines and by the lack of adequate archives to collect the retrieved results. We previously addressed this issue by initiating the first systematic archive of medical literature containing sex and/or gender-specific analyses. This initial collection has now been greatly enlarged and re-organized as a free user-friendly database with multiple functions: GenderMedDB (http://gendermeddb.charite.de). GenderMedDB retrieves the included publications from the PubMed database. Manuscripts containing sex and/or gender-specific analysis are continuously screened and the relevant findings organized systematically into disciplines and diseases. Publications are furthermore classified by research type, subject and participant numbers. More than 11,000 abstracts are currently included in the database, after screening more than 40,000 publications. The main functions of the database include searches by publication data or content analysis based on pre-defined classifications. In addition, registrants are enabled to upload relevant publications, access descriptive publication statistics and interact in an open user forum. Overall, GenderMedDB offers the advantages of a discipline-specific search engine as well as the functions of a participative tool for the gender medicine community.

  16. Human Variome Project Quality Assessment Criteria for Variation Databases.

    PubMed

    Vihinen, Mauno; Hancock, John M; Maglott, Donna R; Landrum, Melissa J; Schaafsma, Gerard C P; Taschner, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Numerous databases containing information about DNA, RNA, and protein variations are available. Gene-specific variant databases (locus-specific variation databases, LSDBs) are typically curated and maintained for single genes or groups of genes for a certain disease(s). These databases are widely considered as the most reliable information source for a particular gene/protein/disease, but it should also be made clear they may have widely varying contents, infrastructure, and quality. Quality is very important to evaluate because these databases may affect health decision-making, research, and clinical practice. The Human Variome Project (HVP) established a Working Group for Variant Database Quality Assessment. The basic principle was to develop a simple system that nevertheless provides a good overview of the quality of a database. The HVP quality evaluation criteria that resulted are divided into four main components: data quality, technical quality, accessibility, and timeliness. This report elaborates on the developed quality criteria and how implementation of the quality scheme can be achieved. Examples are provided for the current status of the quality items in two different databases, BTKbase, an LSDB, and ClinVar, a central archive of submissions about variants and their clinical significance. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  17. NASDA's earth observation satellite data archive policy for the earth observation data and information system (EOIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobue, Shin-ichi; Yoshida, Fumiyoshi; Ochiai, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    NASDA's new Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is scheduled for launch in August, 1996. ADEOS carries 8 sensors to observe earth environmental phenomena and sends their data to NASDA, NASA, and other foreign ground stations around the world. The downlink data bit rate for ADEOS is 126 MB/s and the total volume of data is about 100 GB per day. To archive and manage such a large quantity of data with high reliability and easy accessibility it was necessary to develop a new mass storage system with a catalogue information database using advanced database management technology. The data will be archived and maintained in the Master Data Storage Subsystem (MDSS) which is one subsystem in NASDA's new Earth Observation data and Information System (EOIS). The MDSS is based on a SONY ID1 digital tape robotics system. This paper provides an overview of the EOIS system, with a focus on the Master Data Storage Subsystem and the NASDA Earth Observation Center (EOC) archive policy for earth observation satellite data.

  18. A database of charged cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, D.; Melot, F.; Taillet, R.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: This paper gives a description of a new online database and associated online tools (data selection, data export, plots, etc.) for charged cosmic-ray measurements. The experimental setups (type, flight dates, techniques) from which the data originate are included in the database, along with the references to all relevant publications. Methods: The database relies on the MySQL5 engine. The web pages and queries are based on PHP, AJAX and the jquery, jquery.cluetip, jquery-ui, and table-sorter third-party libraries. Results: In this first release, we restrict ourselves to Galactic cosmic rays with Z ≤ 30 and a kinetic energy per nucleon up to a few tens of TeV/n. This corresponds to more than 200 different sub-experiments (i.e., different experiments, or data from the same experiment flying at different times) in as many publications. Conclusions: We set up a cosmic-ray database (CRDB) and provide tools to sort and visualise the data. New data can be submitted, providing the community with a collaborative tool to archive past and future cosmic-ray measurements. http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/crdb; Contact: crdatabase@lpsc.in2p3.fr

  19. The Primate Life History Database: A unique shared ecological data resource

    PubMed Central

    Strier, Karen B.; Altmann, Jeanne; Brockman, Diane K.; Bronikowski, Anne M.; Cords, Marina; Fedigan, Linda M.; Lapp, Hilmar; Liu, Xianhua; Morris, William F.; Pusey, Anne E.; Stoinski, Tara S.; Alberts, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The importance of data archiving, data sharing, and public access to data has received considerable attention. Awareness is growing among scientists that collaborative databases can facilitate these activities.We provide a detailed description of the collaborative life history database developed by our Working Group at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) to address questions about life history patterns and the evolution of mortality and demographic variability in wild primates.Examples from each of the seven primate species included in our database illustrate the range of data incorporated and the challenges, decision-making processes, and criteria applied to standardize data across diverse field studies. In addition to the descriptive and structural metadata associated with our database, we also describe the process metadata (how the database was designed and delivered) and the technical specifications of the database.Our database provides a useful model for other researchers interested in developing similar types of databases for other organisms, while our process metadata may be helpful to other groups of researchers interested in developing databases for other types of collaborative analyses. PMID:21698066

  20. The National Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Database: A Comprehensive Resource for United States Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornback, M.; Hourigan, T.; Etnoyer, P.; McGuinn, R.; Cross, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Research on deep-sea corals has expanded rapidly over the last two decades, as scientists began to realize their value as long-lived structural components of high biodiversity habitats and archives of environmental information. The NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program's National Database for Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges is a comprehensive resource for georeferenced data on these organisms in U.S. waters. The National Database currently includes more than 220,000 deep-sea coral records representing approximately 880 unique species. Database records from museum archives, commercial and scientific bycatch, and from journal publications provide baseline information with relatively coarse spatial resolution dating back as far as 1842. These data are complemented by modern, in-situ submersible observations with high spatial resolution, from surveys conducted by NOAA and NOAA partners. Management of high volumes of modern high-resolution observational data can be challenging. NOAA is working with our data partners to incorporate this occurrence data into the National Database, along with images and associated information related to geoposition, time, biology, taxonomy, environment, provenance, and accuracy. NOAA is also working to link associated datasets collected by our program's research, to properly archive them to the NOAA National Data Centers, to build a robust metadata record, and to establish a standard protocol to simplify the process. Access to the National Database is provided through an online mapping portal. The map displays point based records from the database. Records can be refined by taxon, region, time, and depth. The queries and extent used to view the map can also be used to download subsets of the database. The database, map, and website is already in use by NOAA, regional fishery management councils, and regional ocean planning bodies, but we envision it as a model that can expand to accommodate data on a global scale.

  1. An environmental database for Venice and tidal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, L.; Fant, S.; Marani, A.; Scalvini, G.; Zane, O.

    2003-04-01

    The natural environment is a complex, highly variable and physically non reproducible system (not in laboratory, nor in a confined territory). Environmental experimental studies are thus necessarily based on field measurements distributed in time and space. Only extensive data collections can provide the representative samples of the system behavior which are essential for scientific advancement. The assimilation of large data collections into accessible archives must necessarily be implemented in electronic databases. In the case of tidal environments in general, and of the Venice lagoon in particular, it is useful to establish a database, freely accessible to the scientific community, documenting the dynamics of such systems and their response to anthropic pressures and climatic variability. At the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti in Venice (Italy) two internet environmental databases has been developed: one collects information regarding in detail the Venice lagoon; the other co-ordinate the research consortium of the "TIDE" EU RTD project, that attends to three different tidal areas: Venice Lagoon (Italy), Morecambe Bay (England), and Forth Estuary (Scotland). The archives may be accessed through the URL: www.istitutoveneto.it. The first one is freely available and applies to anyone is interested. It is continuously updated and has been structured in order to promote documentation concerning Venetian environment and disseminate this information for educational purposes (see "Dissemination" section). The second one is supplied by scientists and engineers working on this tidal system for various purposes (scientific, management, conservation purposes, etc.); it applies to interested researchers and grows with their own contributions. Both intend to promote scientific communication, to contribute to the realization of a distributed information system collecting homogeneous themes, and to initiate the interconnection among databases regarding different

  2. Development of bilateral data transferability in the Virginia Department of Transportation's Geotechnical Database Management System Framework.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-01-01

    An Internet-based, spatiotemporal Geotechnical Database Management System (GDBMS) Framework was designed, developed, and implemented at the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) in 2002 to retrieve, manage, archive, and analyze geotechnical da...

  3. Rosetta Planetary Science Archive (PSA) Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Kristin R.; Cardesin, A.; Barthelemy, M.; Diaz del Rio, J.; Zender, J.; Arviset, C.

    2006-09-01

    The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) is an online database (accessible via http://www.rssd.esa.int/PSA) implemented by ESA/RSSD. Currently the PSA contains the science data from the Giotto (Halley), Mars Express and SMART-1 (Moon) missions, and the Rosetta Supplementary Archive (Wirtanen). The PSA user is offered a broad range of search possibilities. Search queries can be combined without restrictions and are executed across the whole database. The PSA utilizes the Planetary Data System (PDS) standard. In spring 2007 the PSA will provide the first science and engineering data collected by Rosetta. In preparation for the initial Peer Review to be performed before publication of these data, an Internal Review was held in March 2006, executed by staff internal to the organizations responsible for the Rosetta archiving (ESA, PDS, CNES). The Internal Reviewers identified shortcomings in documentation, data structures, and completeness of the data delivery. They recommended the usage of unified conventions and formats across different instruments. Work is ongoing to include standardized geometry information in the datasets. Rosetta was launched in March 2004 to rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) in May 2014. After having placed a lander on the comet's surface, the Rosetta orbiter will continue to orbit C-G and accompany the comet through perihelion. Rosetta makes use of three Earth swingbys and one Mars swingby in order to reach C-G. Rosetta will also perform close flybys at two asteroids, namely 2867 Steins in September 2008 and 21 Lutetia in July 2010. In addition, Rosetta makes scientific observations of targets of opportunity, e.g. lightcurves of the flyby asteroids to study the rotation, and plasma measurements when passing through cometary ion tails or meteoroid streams. Rosetta continuously monitored the encounter of the Deep Impact probe with comet 9P/Tempel 1 over an extended period of 16 days around the impact on 4 July 2005.

  4. Gaia archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hypki, Arkadiusz; Brown, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    The Gaia archive is being designed and implemented by the DPAC Consortium. The purpose of the archive is to maximize the scientific exploitation of the Gaia data by the astronomical community. Thus, it is crucial to gather and discuss with the community the features of the Gaia archive as much as possible. It is especially important from the point of view of the GENIUS project to gather the feedback and potential use cases for the archive. This paper presents very briefly the general ideas behind the Gaia archive and presents which tools are already provided to the community.

  5. Atlas of Iberian water beetles (ESACIB database).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Millán, Andrés; Abellán, Pedro; Picazo, Félix; Carbonell, José A; Ribera, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The ESACIB ('EScarabajos ACuáticos IBéricos') database is provided, including all available distributional data of Iberian and Balearic water beetles from the literature up to 2013, as well as from museum and private collections, PhD theses, and other unpublished sources. The database contains 62,015 records with associated geographic data (10×10 km UTM squares) for 488 species and subspecies of water beetles, 120 of them endemic to the Iberian Peninsula and eight to the Balearic Islands. This database was used for the elaboration of the "Atlas de los Coleópteros Acuáticos de España Peninsular". In this dataset data of 15 additional species has been added: 11 that occur in the Balearic Islands or mainland Portugal but not in peninsular Spain and an other four with mainly terrestrial habits within the genus Helophorus (for taxonomic coherence). The complete dataset is provided in Darwin Core Archive format.

  6. Atlas of Iberian water beetles (ESACIB database)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Millán, Andrés; Abellán, Pedro; Picazo, Félix; Carbonell, José A.; Ribera, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ESACIB (‘EScarabajos ACuáticos IBéricos’) database is provided, including all available distributional data of Iberian and Balearic water beetles from the literature up to 2013, as well as from museum and private collections, PhD theses, and other unpublished sources. The database contains 62,015 records with associated geographic data (10×10 km UTM squares) for 488 species and subspecies of water beetles, 120 of them endemic to the Iberian Peninsula and eight to the Balearic Islands. This database was used for the elaboration of the “Atlas de los Coleópteros Acuáticos de España Peninsular”. In this dataset data of 15 additional species has been added: 11 that occur in the Balearic Islands or mainland Portugal but not in peninsular Spain and an other four with mainly terrestrial habits within the genus Helophorus (for taxonomic coherence). The complete dataset is provided in Darwin Core Archive format. PMID:26448717

  7. Space Station Freedom environmental database system (FEDS) for MSFC testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Gail S.; Williams, Wendy; Chiu, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The Water Recovery Test (WRT) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the first demonstration of integrated water recovery systems for potable and hygiene water reuse as envisioned for Space Station Freedom (SSF). In order to satisfy the safety and health requirements placed on the SSF program and facilitate test data assessment, an extensive laboratory analysis database was established to provide a central archive and data retrieval function. The database is required to store analysis results for physical, chemical, and microbial parameters measured from water, air and surface samples collected at various locations throughout the test facility. The Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) was utilized to implement a secured on-line information system with the ECLSS WRT program as the foundation for this system. The database is supported on a VAX/VMS 8810 series mainframe and is accessible from the Marshall Information Network System (MINS). This paper summarizes the database requirements, system design, interfaces, and future enhancements.

  8. RADIUS: Research Archive on Disability in the United States. [CD-ROMs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This Research Archive on Disability in the United States (RADIUS), a database on CD-ROM, contains 19 data sets on the prevalence, incidence, correlates, and consequences of disability in the United States. The 19 data sets are: (1) 1991 National Maternal and Infant Health Follow-Up Survey; (2) National Pediatric Trauma Registry, 1988-1994; (3)…

  9. Archive & Data Management Activities for ISRO Science Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Navita; Moorthi, Manthira; Gopala Krishna, Barla; Prashar, Ajay; Srinivasan, T. P.

    2012-07-01

    ISRO has kept a step ahead by extending remote sensing missions to planetary and astronomical exploration. It has started with Chandrayaan-1 and successfully completed the moon imaging during its life time in the orbit. Now, in future ISRO is planning to launch Chandrayaan-2 (next moon mission), Mars Mission and Astronomical mission ASTROSAT. All these missions are characterized by the need to receive process, archive and disseminate the acquired science data to the user community for analysis and scientific use. All these science missions will last for a few months to a few years but the data received are required to be archived, interoperable and requires a seamless access to the user community for the future. ISRO has laid out definite plans to archive these data sets in specified standards and develop relevant access tools to be able to serve the user community. To achieve this goal, a Data Center is set up at Bangalore called Indian Space Science Data Center (ISSDC). This is the custodian of all the data sets of the current and future science missions of ISRO . Chandrayaan-1 is the first among the planetary missions launched/to be launched by ISRO and we had taken the challenge and developed a system for data archival and dissemination of the payload data received. For Chandrayaan-1 the data collected from all the instruments are processed and is archived in the archive layer in the Planetary Data System (PDS 3.0) standards, through the automated pipeline. But the dataset once stored is of no use unless it is made public, which requires a Web-based dissemination system that can be accessible to all the planetary scientists/data users working in this field. Towards this, a Web- based Browse and Dissemination system has been developed, wherein users can register and search for their area of Interest and view the data archived for TMC & HYSI with relevant Browse chips and Metadata of the data. Users can also order the data and get it on their desktop in the PDS

  10. The Self-Organized Archive: SPASE, PDS and Archive Cooperatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. A.; Hughes, J. S.; Roberts, D. A.; Walker, R. J.; Joy, S. P.

    2005-05-01

    Information systems with high quality metadata enable uses and services which often go beyond the original purpose. There are two types of metadata: annotations which are items that comment on or describe the content of a resource and identification attributes which describe the external properties of the resource itself. For example, annotations may indicate which columns are present in a table of data, whereas an identification attribute would indicate source of the table, such as the observatory, instrument, organization, and data type. When the identification attributes are collected and used as the basis of a search engine, a user can constrain on an attribute, the archive can then self-organize around the constraint, presenting the user with a particular view of the archive. In an archive cooperative where each participating data system or archive may have its own metadata standards, providing a multi-system search engine requires that individual archive metadata be mapped to a broad based standard. To explore how cooperative archives can form a larger self-organized archive we will show how the Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) data model will allow different systems to create a cooperative and will use Planetary Data System (PDS) plus existing space physics activities as a demonstration.

  11. PAGES-Powell North America 2k database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, N.

    2014-12-01

    Syntheses of paleoclimate data in North America are essential for understanding long-term spatiotemporal variability in climate and for properly assessing risk on decadal and longer timescales. Existing reconstructions of the past 2,000 years rely almost exclusively on tree-ring records, which can underestimate low-frequency variability and rarely extend beyond the last millennium. Meanwhile, many records from the full spectrum of paleoclimate archives are available and hold the potential of enhancing our understanding of past climate across North America over the past 2000 years. The second phase of the Past Global Changes (PAGES) North America 2k project began in 2014, with a primary goal of assembling these disparate paleoclimate records into a unified database. This effort is currently supported by the USGS Powell Center together with PAGES. Its success requires grassroots support from the community of researchers developing and interpreting paleoclimatic evidence relevant to the past 2000 years. Most likely, fewer than half of the published records appropriate for this database are publicly archived, and far fewer include the data needed to quantify geochronologic uncertainty, or to concisely describe how best to interpret the data in context of a large-scale paleoclimatic synthesis. The current version of the database includes records that (1) have been published in a peer-reviewed journal (including evidence of the record's relationship to climate), (2) cover a substantial portion of the past 2000 yr (>300 yr for annual records, >500 yr for lower frequency records) at relatively high resolution (<50 yr/observation), and (3) have reasonably small and quantifiable age uncertainty. Presently, the database includes records from boreholes, ice cores, lake and marine sediments, speleothems, and tree rings. This poster presentation will display the site locations and basic metadata of the records currently in the database. We invite anyone with interest in

  12. Astronomical database and VO-tools of Nikolaev Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhaev, A. E.; Protsyuk, Yu. I.

    2010-05-01

    Results of work in 2006-2009 on creation of astronomical databases aiming at development of Nikolaev Virtual Observatory (NVO) are presented in this abstract. Results of observations and theirreduction, which were obtained during the whole history of Nikolaev Astronomical Observatory (NAO), are included in the databases. The databases may be considered as a basis for construction of a data centre. Images of different regions of the celestial sphere have been stored in NAO since 1929. About 8000 photo plates were obtained during observations in the 20th century. Observations with CCD have been started since 1996. Annually, telescopes of NAO, using CCD cameras, create data volume of several tens of gigabytes (GB) in the form of CCD images and up to 100 GB of video records. At the end of 2008, the volume of accumulated data in the form of CCD images was about 300 GB. Problems of data volume growth are common in astronomy, nuclear physics and bioinformatics. Therefore, the astronomical community needs to use archives, databases and distributed grid computing to cope with this problem in astronomy. The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) was formed in June 2002 with a mission to "enable the international utilization of astronomical archives..." The NVO was created at the NAO website in 2008, and consists of three main parts. The first part contains 27 astrometric stellar catalogues with short descriptions. The files of catalogues were compiled in the standard VOTable format using eXtensible Markup Language (XML), and they are available for downloading. This is an example of the so-called science-ready product. The VOTable format was developed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) for exchange of tabular data. A user may download these catalogues and open them using any standalone application that supports standards of the IVOA. There are several directions of development for such applications, for example, search of catalogues and images

  13. Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA) in the Post-Shuttle Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Mary A.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Havelka, Jacque; Thomas, Diedre

    2009-01-01

    Now, more than ever before, NASA is realizing the value and importance of their intellectual assets. Principles of knowledge management, the systematic use and reuse of information/experience/expertise to achieve a specific goal, are being applied throughout the agency. LSDA is also applying these solutions, which rely on a combination of content and collaboration technologies, to enable research teams to create, capture, share, and harness knowledge to do the things they do well, even better. In the early days of spaceflight, space life sciences data were been collected and stored in numerous databases, formats, media-types and geographical locations. These data were largely unknown/unavailable to the research community. The Biomedical Informatics and Health Care Systems Branch of the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC and the Data Archive Project at ARC, with funding from the Human Research Program through the Exploration Medical Capability Element, are fulfilling these requirements through the systematic population of the Life Sciences Data Archive. This project constitutes a formal system for the acquisition, archival and distribution of data for HRP-related experiments and investigations. The general goal of the archive is to acquire, preserve, and distribute these data and be responsive to inquiries from the science communities.

  14. Kellogg Library and Archive Retrieval System (KLARS) Document Capture Manual. Draft Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, Jane

    This manual is designed to supply background information for Kellogg Library and Archive Retrieval System (KLARS) processors and others who might work with the system, outline detailed policies and procedures for processors who prepare and enter data into the adult education database on KLARS, and inform general readers about the system. KLARS is…

  15. A complete public archive for the Einstein IPC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents progress made in the period 24 Sept. 1993 - 23 Sept. 1995 on the project described in our proposal 'A Complete Public Archive for the Einstein IPC' which was approved under the Astrophysics Data Program in 1992. We have completed most of the principal objectives of the original proposal; a NFE was recently approved so that costs for publications in press can be covered and we can complete the public record for the Einstein IPC database.

  16. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  17. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  18. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David L.; Barrett, Tanya; Benson, Dennis A.; Bryant, Stephen H.; Canese, Kathi; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Church, Deanna M.; DiCuccio, Michael; Edgar, Ron; Federhen, Scott; Feolo, Michael; Geer, Lewis Y.; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Kapustin, Yuri; Khovayko, Oleg; Landsman, David; Lipman, David J.; Madden, Thomas L.; Maglott, Donna R.; Miller, Vadim; Ostell, James; Pruitt, Kim D.; Schuler, Gregory D.; Shumway, Martin; Sequeira, Edwin; Sherry, Steven T.; Sirotkin, Karl; Souvorov, Alexandre; Starchenko, Grigory; Tatusov, Roman L.; Tatusova, Tatiana A.; Wagner, Lukas; Yaschenko, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data available through NCBI's web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, My NCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link, Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genome, Genome Project and related tools, the Trace, Assembly, and Short Read Archives, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Influenza Viral Resources, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Database of Genotype and Phenotype, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. These resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:18045790

  19. Back to the Future: Long-Term Seismic Archives Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring seismic activity. These archives typically consist of waveforms of seismic events and associated parametric data such as phase arrival time picks and the location of hypocenters. Catalogs of earthquake locations are fundamental data in seismology, and even in the Earth sciences in general. Yet, these locations have notoriously low spatial resolution because of errors in both the picks and the models commonly used to locate events one at a time. This limits their potential to address fundamental questions concerning the physics of earthquakes, the structure and composition of the Earth's interior, and the seismic hazards associated with active faults. We report on the comprehensive use of modern waveform cross-correlation based methodologies for high- resolution earthquake location - as applied to regional and global long-term seismic databases. By simultaneous re-analysis of two decades of the digital seismic archive of Northern California, reducing pick errors via cross-correlation and model errors via double-differencing, we achieve up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. The relocated events image networks of discrete faults at seismogenic depths across various tectonic settings that until now have been hidden in location uncertainties. Similar location improvements are obtained for earthquakes recorded at global networks by re- processing 40 years of parametric data from the ISC and corresponding waveforms archived at IRIS. Since our methods are scaleable and run on inexpensive Beowulf clusters, periodic re-analysis of entire archives may thus become a routine procedure to continuously improve resolution in existing catalogs. We demonstrate the role of seismic archives

  20. A comprehensive clinical research database based on CDISC ODM and i2b2.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Frank A; Stäubert, Sebastian; Löbe, Matthias; Winter, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    We present a working approach for a clinical research database as part of an archival information system. The CDISC ODM standard is target for clinical study and research relevant routine data, thus decoupling the data ingest process from the access layer. The presented research database is comprehensive as it covers annotating, mapping and curation of poorly annotated source data. Besides a conventional relational database the medical data warehouse i2b2 serves as main frontend for end-users. The system we developed is suitable to support patient recruitment, cohort identification and quality assurance in daily routine.

  1. The Cambridge Structural Database: a quarter of a million crystal structures and rising.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now contains data for more than a quarter of a million small-molecule crystal structures. The information content of the CSD, together with methods for data acquisition, processing and validation, are summarized, with particular emphasis on the chemical information added by CSD editors. Nearly 80% of new structural data arrives electronically, mostly in CIF format, and the CCDC acts as the official crystal structure data depository for 51 major journals. The CCDC now maintains both a CIF archive (more than 73,000 CIFs dating from 1996), as well as the distributed binary CSD archive; the availability of data in both archives is discussed. A statistical survey of the CSD is also presented and projections concerning future accession rates indicate that the CSD will contain at least 500,000 crystal structures by the year 2010.

  2. Documentation of the U.S. Geological Survey Oceanographic Time-Series Measurement Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Martini, Marinna A.; Lightsom, Frances L.; Butman, Bradford

    2008-01-02

    This report describes the instrumentation and platforms used to make the measurements; the methods used to process, apply quality-control criteria, and archive the data; the data storage format, and how the data are released and distributed. The report also includes instructions on how to access the data from the online database at http://stellwagen.er.usgs.gov/. As of 2016, the database contains about 5,000 files, which may include observations of current velocity, wave statistics, ocean temperature, conductivity, pressure, and light transmission at one or more depths over some duration of time.

  3. Recovery and archiving key Arctic Alaska vegetation map and plot data for the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Field Experiment (ABoVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. A.; Breen, A. L.; Broderson, D.; Epstein, H. E.; Fisher, W.; Grunblatt, J.; Heinrichs, T.; Raynolds, M. K.; Walker, M. D.; Wirth, L.

    2013-12-01

    Abundant ground-based information will be needed to inform remote-sensing and modeling studies of NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE). A large body of plot and map data collected by the Alaska Geobotany Center (AGC) and collaborators from the Arctic regions of Alaska and the circumpolar Arctic over the past several decades is being archived and made accessible to scientists and the public via the Geographic Information Network of Alaska's (GINA's) 'Catalog' display and portal system. We are building two main types of data archives: Vegetation Plot Archive: For the plot information we use a Turboveg database to construct the Alaska portion of the international Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA) http://www.geobotany.uaf.edu/ava/. High quality plot data and non-digital legacy datasets in danger of being lost have highest priority for entry into the archive. A key aspect of the database is the PanArctic Species List (PASL-1), developed specifically for the AVA to provide a standard of species nomenclature for the entire Arctic biome. A wide variety of reports, documents, and ancillary data are linked to each plot's geographic location. Geoecological Map Archive: This database includes maps and remote sensing products and links to other relevant data associated with the maps, mainly those produced by the Alaska Geobotany Center. Map data include GIS shape files of vegetation, land-cover, soils, landforms and other categorical variables and digital raster data of elevation, multispectral satellite-derived data, and data products and metadata associated with these. The map archive will contain all the information that is currently in the hierarchical Toolik-Arctic Geobotanical Atlas (T-AGA) in Alaska http://www.arcticatlas.org, plus several additions that are in the process of development and will be combined with GINA's already substantial holdings of spatial data from northern Alaska. The Geoecological Atlas Portal uses GINA's Catalog tool to develop a

  4. The Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis (LAMBDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathan; LAMBDA

    2018-01-01

    The Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis (LAMBDA) provides CMB researchers with archival data for cosmology missions, software tools, and links to other sites of interest. LAMBDA is one-stop shopping for CMB researchers. It hosts data from WMAP along with many suborbital experiments. Over the past year, LAMBDA has acquired new data from SPTpol, SPIDER and ACTPol. In addition to the primary CMB, LAMBDA also provides foreground data.LAMBDA has several ongoing efforts to provide tools for CMB researchers. These tools include a web interface for CAMB and a web interface for a CMB survey footprint database and plotting tool. Additionally, we have recently developed a Docker container with standard CMB analysis tools and demonstrations in the form of Jupyter notebooks. These containers will be publically available through Docker's container repository and the source will be available on github.

  5. Science information systems: Archive, access, and retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop technology for the automated characterization and interactive retrieval and visualization of very large, complex scientific data sets. Technologies will be developed for the following specific areas: (1) rapidly archiving data sets; (2) automatically characterizing and labeling data in near real-time; (3) providing users with the ability to browse contents of databases efficiently and effectively; (4) providing users with the ability to access and retrieve system independent data sets electronically; and (5) automatically alerting scientists to anomalies detected in data.

  6. RefSeq microbial genomes database: new representation and annotation strategy.

    PubMed

    Tatusova, Tatiana; Ciufo, Stacy; Fedorov, Boris; O'Neill, Kathleen; Tolstoy, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The source of the microbial genomic sequences in the RefSeq collection is the set of primary sequence records submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database public archives. These can be accessed through the Entrez search and retrieval system at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome. Next-generation sequencing has enabled researchers to perform genomic sequencing at rates that were unimaginable in the past. Microbial genomes can now be sequenced in a matter of hours, which has led to a significant increase in the number of assembled genomes deposited in the public archives. This huge increase in DNA sequence data presents new challenges for the annotation, analysis and visualization bioinformatics tools. New strategies have been developed for the annotation and representation of reference genomes and sequence variations derived from population studies and clinical outbreaks.

  7. Service Management Database for DSN Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zendejas, Silvino; Bui, Tung; Bui, Bach; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie; Wolgast, Paul; Allen, Christopher; Luong, Ivy; Chang, George; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    This data- and event-driven persistent storage system leverages the use of commercial software provided by Oracle for portability, ease of maintenance, scalability, and ease of integration with embedded, client-server, and multi-tiered applications. In this role, the Service Management Database (SMDB) is a key component of the overall end-to-end process involved in the scheduling, preparation, and configuration of the Deep Space Network (DSN) equipment needed to perform the various telecommunication services the DSN provides to its customers worldwide. SMDB makes efficient use of triggers, stored procedures, queuing functions, e-mail capabilities, data management, and Java integration features provided by the Oracle relational database management system. SMDB uses a third normal form schema design that allows for simple data maintenance procedures and thin layers of integration with client applications. The software provides an integrated event logging system with ability to publish events to a JMS messaging system for synchronous and asynchronous delivery to subscribed applications. It provides a structured classification of events and application-level messages stored in database tables that are accessible by monitoring applications for real-time monitoring or for troubleshooting and analysis over historical archives.

  8. A precipitation database of station-based daily and monthly measurements for West Africa: Overview, quality control and harmonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliefernicht, Jan; Waongo, Moussa; Annor, Thompson; Laux, Patrick; Lorenz, Manuel; Salack, Seyni; Kunstmann, Harald

    2017-04-01

    West Africa is a data sparse region. High quality and long-term precipitation data are often not readily available for applications in hydrology, agriculture, meteorology and other needs. To close this gap, we use multiple data sources to develop a precipitation database with long-term daily and monthly time series. This database was compiled from 16 archives including global databases e.g. from the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN), databases from research projects (e.g. the AMMA database) and databases of the national meteorological services of some West African countries. The collection consists of more than 2000 precipitation gauges with measurements dating from 1850 to 2015. Due to erroneous measurements (e.g. temporal offsets, unit conversion errors), missing values and inconsistent meta-data, the merging of this precipitation dataset is not straightforward and requires a thorough quality control and harmonization. To this end, we developed geostatistical-based algorithms for quality control of individual databases and harmonization to a joint database. The algorithms are based on a pairwise comparison of the correspondence of precipitation time series in dependence to the distance between stations. They were tested for precipitation time series from gages located in a rectangular domain covering Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and Togo. This harmonized and quality controlled precipitation database was recently used for several applications such as the validation of a high resolution regional climate model and the bias correction of precipitation projections provided the Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX). In this presentation, we will give an overview of the novel daily and monthly precipitation database and the algorithms used for quality control and harmonization. We will also highlight the quality of global and regional archives (e.g. GHCN, GSOD, AMMA database) in comparison to the precipitation databases provided by the

  9. Conversion of a traditional image archive into an image resource on compact disc.

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, S M; Benbow, E W

    1997-01-01

    The conversion of a traditional archive of pathology images was organised on 35 mm slides into a database of images stored on compact disc (CD-ROM), and textual descriptions were added to each image record. Students on a didactic pathology course found this resource useful as an aid to revision, despite relative computer illiteracy, and it is anticipated that students on a new problem based learning course, which incorporates experience with information technology, will benefit even more readily when they use the database as an educational resource. A text and image database on CD-ROM can be updated repeatedly, and the content manipulated to reflect the content and style of the courses it supports. Images PMID:9306931

  10. HLLV avionics requirements study and electronic filing system database development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This final report provides a summary of achievements and activities performed under Contract NAS8-39215. The contract's objective was to explore a new way of delivering, storing, accessing, and archiving study products and information and to define top level system requirements for Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) avionics that incorporate Vehicle Health Management (VHM). This report includes technical objectives, methods, assumptions, recommendations, sample data, and issues as specified by DPD No. 772, DR-3. The report is organized into two major subsections, one specific to each of the two tasks defined in the Statement of Work: the Index Database Task and the HLLV Avionics Requirements Task. The Index Database Task resulted in the selection and modification of a commercial database software tool to contain the data developed during the HLLV Avionics Requirements Task. All summary information is addressed within each task's section.

  11. The SuperCOSMOS Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambly, N.; Read, M.; Mann, R.; Sutorius, E.; Bond, I.; MacGillivray, H.; Williams, P.; Lawrence, A.

    2004-07-01

    The SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey (SSS {http://www-wfau.roe.ac.uk/sss}; Hambly et al., 2001) consists of digitised scans of Schmidt photographic survey material in a multi-colour (BRI), multi-epoch, uniformly calibrated product. It covers the whole southern hemisphere, with an extension into the north currently underway. Public online access to the 2 Tbytes of SSS pixel data and object catalogues has been available for some time; data are being downloaded at a rate of several gigabytes per week, and many new science results are emerging from community use of the data. In this poster we describe the terabyte-scale SuperCOSMOS Science Archive {http://thoth.roe.ac.uk/ssa} (SSA), which is a recasting of the SSS object catalogue system from flat files into an RDBMS, with an enhanced user interface. We describe some aspects of the hardware and schema design of the SSA, which aims to produce a high performance, VO-compatible database, suitable for data mining by `power users', while maintaining the ease of use praised in the old SSS system. Initially, the SSA will allow access through web forms and a flexible SQL interface. It acts as the prototype for the next generation survey archives to be hosted by the University of Edinburgh's Wide Field Astronomy Unit, such as the WFCAM Science Archive of infrared sky survey data, as well as being a scalability testbed for use by AstroGrid, the UK's Virtual Observatory project. As a result of these roles, it will display subsequently an expanding functionality, as web - and later, Grid - services are deployed on it.

  12. The Starchive: An open access, open source archive of nearby and young stars and their planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Gelino, Chris; Elfeki, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Historically, astronomers have utilized a piecemeal set of archives such as SIMBAD, the Washington Double Star Catalog, various exoplanet encyclopedias and electronic tables from the literature to cobble together stellar and exo-planetary parameters in the absence of corresponding images and spectra. As the search for planets around young stars through direct imaging, transits and infrared/optical radial velocity surveys blossoms, there is a void in the available set of to create comprehensive lists of the stellar parameters of nearby stars especially for important parameters such as metallicity and stellar activity indicators. For direct imaging surveys, we need better resources for downloading existing high contrast images to help confirm new discoveries and find ideal target stars. Once we have discovered new planets, we need a uniform database of stellar and planetary parameters from which to look for correlations to better understand the formation and evolution of these systems. As a solution to these issues, we are developing the Starchive - an open access stellar archive in the spirit of the open exoplanet catalog, the Kepler Community Follow-up Program and many others. The archive will allow users to download various datasets, upload new images, spectra and metadata and will contain multiple plotting tools to use in presentations and data interpretations. While we will highly regulate and constantly validate the data being placed into our archive the open nature of its design is intended to allow the database to be expanded efficiently and have a level of versatility which is necessary in today's fast moving, big data community. Finally, the front-end scripts will be placed on github and users will be encouraged to contribute new plotting tools. Here, I will introduce the community to the content and expected capabilities of the archive and query the audience for community feedback.

  13. The SSABLE system - Automated archive, catalog, browse and distribution of satellite data in near-real time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James J.; Harkins, Daniel N.

    1993-01-01

    Historically, locating and browsing satellite data has been a cumbersome and expensive process. This has impeded the efficient and effective use of satellite data in the geosciences. SSABLE is a new interactive tool for the archive, browse, order, and distribution of satellite date based upon X Window, high bandwidth networks, and digital image rendering techniques. SSABLE provides for automatically constructing relational database queries to archived image datasets based on time, data, geographical location, and other selection criteria. SSABLE also provides a visual representation of the selected archived data for viewing on the user's X terminal. SSABLE is a near real-time system; for example, data are added to SSABLE's database within 10 min after capture. SSABLE is network and machine independent; it will run identically on any machine which satisfies the following three requirements: 1) has a bitmapped display (monochrome or greater); 2) is running the X Window system; and 3) is on a network directly reachable by the SSABLE system. SSABLE has been evaluated at over 100 international sites. Network response time in the United States and Canada varies between 4 and 7 s for browse image updates; reported transmission times to Europe and Australia typically are 20-25 s.

  14. The BioGRID interaction database: 2017 update

    PubMed Central

    Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Oughtred, Rose; Boucher, Lorrie; Rust, Jennifer; Chang, Christie; Kolas, Nadine K.; O'Donnell, Lara; Oster, Sara; Theesfeld, Chandra; Sellam, Adnane; Stark, Chris; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID: https://thebiogrid.org) is an open access database dedicated to the annotation and archival of protein, genetic and chemical interactions for all major model organism species and humans. As of September 2016 (build 3.4.140), the BioGRID contains 1 072 173 genetic and protein interactions, and 38 559 post-translational modifications, as manually annotated from 48 114 publications. This dataset represents interaction records for 66 model organisms and represents a 30% increase compared to the previous 2015 BioGRID update. BioGRID curates the biomedical literature for major model organism species, including humans, with a recent emphasis on central biological processes and specific human diseases. To facilitate network-based approaches to drug discovery, BioGRID now incorporates 27 501 chemical–protein interactions for human drug targets, as drawn from the DrugBank database. A new dynamic interaction network viewer allows the easy navigation and filtering of all genetic and protein interaction data, as well as for bioactive compounds and their established targets. BioGRID data are directly downloadable without restriction in a variety of standardized formats and are freely distributed through partner model organism databases and meta-databases. PMID:27980099

  15. Amateur Planetary Radio Data Archived for Science and Education: Radio Jove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Cecconi, B.; Sky, J.; Garcia, L. N.; King, T. A.; Higgins, C. A.; Fung, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project is a hands-on educational activity in which students, teachers, and the general public build simple radio telescopes, usually from a kit, to observe single frequency decameter wavelength radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and the Earth usually with simple dipole antennas. Some of the amateur observers have upgraded their receivers to spectrographs and their antennas have become more sophisticated as well. The data records compare favorably to more sophisticated professional radio telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the Nancay Decametric Array. Since these data are often carefully calibrated and recorded around the clock in widely scattered locations they represent a valuable database useful not only to amateur radio astronomers but to the professional science community as well. Some interesting phenomena have been noted in the data that are of interest to the professionals familiar with such records. The continuous monitoring of radio emissions from Jupiter could serve as useful "ground truth" data during the coming Juno mission's radio observations of Jupiter. Radio Jove has long maintained an archive for thousands of Radio Jove observations, but the database was intended for use by the Radio Jove participants only. Now, increased scientific interest in the use of these data has resulted in several proposals to translate the data into a science community data format standard and store the data in professional archives. Progress is being made in translating Radio Jove data to the Common Data Format (CDF) and also in generating new observations in that format as well. Metadata describing the Radio Jove data would follow the Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) standard. The proposed archive to be used for long term preservation would be the Planetary Data System (PDS). Data sharing would be achieved through the PDS and the Paris Astronomical Data Centre (PADC) and the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO

  16. Conflation and integration of archived geologic maps and associated uncertainties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoberg, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Old, archived geologic maps are often available with little or no associated metadata. This creates special problems in terms of extracting their data to use with a modern database. This research focuses on some problems and uncertainties associated with conflating older geologic maps in regions where modern geologic maps are, as yet, non-existent as well as vertically integrating the conflated maps with layers of modern GIS data (in this case, The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey). Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri was chosen as the test area. It is covered by six archived geologic maps constructed in the years between 1928 and 1994. Conflating these maps results in a map that is internally consistent with these six maps, is digitally integrated with hydrography, elevation and orthoimagery data, and has a 95% confidence interval useful for further data set integration.

  17. Naval sensor data database (NSDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Candace J.; Tubridy, Lisa H.

    1999-08-01

    The Naval Sensor Data database (NSDD) is a multi-year effort to archive, catalogue, and disseminate data from all types of sensors to the mine warfare, signal and image processing, and sensor development communities. The purpose is to improve and accelerate research and technology. Providing performers with the data required to develop and validate improvements in hardware, simulation, and processing will foster advances in sensor and system performance. The NSDD will provide a centralized source of sensor data in its associated ground truth, which will support an improved understanding will be benefited in the areas of signal processing, computer-aided detection and classification, data compression, data fusion, and geo-referencing, as well as sensor and sensor system design.

  18. AntiJen: a quantitative immunology database integrating functional, thermodynamic, kinetic, biophysical, and cellular data

    PubMed Central

    Toseland, Christopher P; Clayton, Debra J; McSparron, Helen; Hemsley, Shelley L; Blythe, Martin J; Paine, Kelly; Doytchinova, Irini A; Guan, Pingping; Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Flower, Darren R

    2005-01-01

    AntiJen is a database system focused on the integration of kinetic, thermodynamic, functional, and cellular data within the context of immunology and vaccinology. Compared to its progenitor JenPep, the interface has been completely rewritten and redesigned and now offers a wider variety of search methods, including a nucleotide and a peptide BLAST search. In terms of data archived, AntiJen has a richer and more complete breadth, depth, and scope, and this has seen the database increase to over 31,000 entries. AntiJen provides the most complete and up-to-date dataset of its kind. While AntiJen v2.0 retains a focus on both T cell and B cell epitopes, its greatest novelty is the archiving of continuous quantitative data on a variety of immunological molecular interactions. This includes thermodynamic and kinetic measures of peptide binding to TAP and the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), peptide-MHC complexes binding to T cell receptors, antibodies binding to protein antigens and general immunological protein-protein interactions. The database also contains quantitative specificity data from position-specific peptide libraries and biophysical data, in the form of diffusion co-efficients and cell surface copy numbers, on MHCs and other immunological molecules. The uses of AntiJen include the design of vaccines and diagnostics, such as tetramers, and other laboratory reagents, as well as helping parameterize the bioinformatic or mathematical in silico modeling of the immune system. The database is accessible from the URL: . PMID:16305757

  19. Automating Data Submission to a National Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Work, T. T.; Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Allison, M. D.; Gegg, S. R.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    In late 2006, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanographic Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to work closely with investigators to manage oceanographic data generated from their research projects. One of the final data management tasks is to ensure that the data are permanently archived at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) or other appropriate national archiving facility. In the past, BCO-DMO submitted data to NODC as an email with attachments including a PDF file (a manually completed metadata record) and one or more data files. This method is no longer feasible given the rate at which data sets are contributed to BCO-DMO. Working with collaborators at NODC, a more streamlined and automated workflow was developed to keep up with the increased volume of data that must be archived at NODC. We will describe our new workflow; a semi-automated approach for contributing data to NODC that includes a Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant Extensible Markup Language (XML) metadata file accompanied by comma-delimited data files. The FGDC XML file is populated from information stored in a MySQL database. A crosswalk described by an Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) is used to transform the XML formatted MySQL result set to a FGDC compliant XML metadata file. To ensure data integrity, the MD5 algorithm is used to generate a checksum and manifest of the files submitted to NODC for permanent archive. The revised system supports preparation of detailed, standards-compliant metadata that facilitate data sharing and enable accurate reuse of multidisciplinary information. The approach is generic enough to be adapted for use by other data management groups.

  20. Application of XML to Journal Table Archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, E. J.; Blackwell, J. H.; Gass, J. E.; Kargatis, V. E.; Schneider, G. L.; Weiland, J. L.; Borne, K. D.; White, R. A.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1998-12-01

    The Astronomical Data Center (ADC) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a major archive for machine-readable astronomical data tables. Many ADC tables are derived from published journal articles. Article tables are reformatted to be machine-readable and documentation is crafted to facilitate proper reuse by researchers. The recent switch of journals to web based electronic format has resulted in the generation of large amounts of tabular data that could be captured into machine-readable archive format at fairly low cost. The large data flow of the tables from all major North American astronomical journals (a factor of 100 greater than the present rate at the ADC) necessitates the development of rigorous standards for the exchange of data between researchers, publishers, and the archives. We have selected a suitable markup language that can fully describe the large variety of astronomical information contained in ADC tables. The eXtensible Markup Language XML is a powerful internet-ready documentation format for data. It provides a precise and clear data description language that is both machine- and human-readable. It is rapidly becoming the standard format for business and information transactions on the internet and it is an ideal common metadata exchange format. By labelling, or "marking up", all elements of the information content, documents are created that computers can easily parse. An XML archive can easily and automatically be maintained, ingested into standard databases or custom software, and even totally restructured whenever necessary. Structuring astronomical data into XML format will enable efficient and focused search capabilities via off-the-shelf software. The ADC is investigating XML's expanded hyperlinking power to enhance connectivity within the ADC data/metadata and developing XSL display scripts to enhance display of astronomical data. The ADC XML Definition Type Document can be viewed at http://messier.gsfc.nasa.gov/dtdhtml/DTD-TREE.html

  1. From Field to Laboratory: A New Database Approach for Linking Microbial Field Ecology with Laboratory Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Leslie; Keller, R.; Miller, S.; Jahnke, L.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Ames Exobiology Culture Collection Database (AECC-DB) has been developed as a collaboration between microbial ecologists and information technology specialists. It allows for extensive web-based archiving of information regarding field samples to document microbial co-habitation of specific ecosystem micro-environments. Documentation and archiving continues as pure cultures are isolated, metabolic properties determined, and DNA extracted and sequenced. In this way metabolic properties and molecular sequences are clearly linked back to specific isolates and the location of those microbes in the ecosystem of origin. Use of this database system presents a significant advancement over traditional bookkeeping wherein there is generally little or no information regarding the environments from which microorganisms were isolated. Generally there is only a general ecosystem designation (i.e., hot-spring). However within each of these there are a myriad of microenvironments with very different properties and determining exactly where (which microenvironment) a given microbe comes from is critical in designing appropriate isolation media and interpreting physiological properties. We are currently using the database to aid in the isolation of a large number of cyanobacterial species and will present results by PI's and students demonstrating the utility of this new approach.

  2. Incorporating Oracle on-line space management with long-term archival technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Steven M.; Zak, Victor J.

    1996-01-01

    The storage requirements of today's organizations are exploding. As computers continue to escalate in processing power, applications grow in complexity and data files grow in size and in number. As a result, organizations are forced to procure more and more megabytes of storage space. This paper focuses on how to expand the storage capacity of a Very Large Database (VLDB) cost-effectively within a Oracle7 data warehouse system by integrating long term archival storage sub-systems with traditional magnetic media. The Oracle architecture described in this paper was based on an actual proof of concept for a customer looking to store archived data on optical disks yet still have access to this data without user intervention. The customer had a requirement to maintain 10 years worth of data on-line. Data less than a year old still had the potential to be updated thus will reside on conventional magnetic disks. Data older than a year will be considered archived and will be placed on optical disks. The ability to archive data to optical disk and still have access to that data provides the system a means to retain large amounts of data that is readily accessible yet significantly reduces the cost of total system storage. Therefore, the cost benefits of archival storage devices can be incorporated into the Oracle storage medium and I/O subsystem without loosing any of the functionality of transaction processing, yet at the same time providing an organization access to all their data.

  3. [Current status of DNA databases in the forensic field: new progress, new legal needs].

    PubMed

    Baeta, Miriam; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña

    2009-01-01

    One of the most polemic issues regarding the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the legal sphere, refers to the creation of DNA databases. Until relatively recently, Spain did not have a law to support the establishment of a national DNA profile bank for forensic purposes, and preserve the fundamental rights of subjects whose data are archived therein. The regulatory law of police databases regarding identifiers obtained from DNA approved in 2007, covers this void in the Spanish legislation and responds to the incessant need to adapt the laws to continuous scientific and technological progress.

  4. VLBA Archive &Distribution Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    Signals from the 10 antennas of NRAO's VLBA [Very Long Baseline Array] are processed by a Correlator. The complex fringe visibilities produced by the Correlator are archived on magnetic cartridges using a low-cost architecture which is capable of scaling and evolving. Archive files are copied to magnetic media to be distributed to users in FITS format, using the BINTABLE extension. Archive files are labelled using SQL INSERT statements, in order to bind the DBMS-based archive catalog to the archive media.

  5. Fast in-database cross-matching of high-cadence, high-density source lists with an up-to-date sky model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheers, B.; Bloemen, S.; Mühleisen, H.; Schellart, P.; van Elteren, A.; Kersten, M.; Groot, P. J.

    2018-04-01

    Coming high-cadence wide-field optical telescopes will image hundreds of thousands of sources per minute. Besides inspecting the near real-time data streams for transient and variability events, the accumulated data archive is a wealthy laboratory for making complementary scientific discoveries. The goal of this work is to optimise column-oriented database techniques to enable the construction of a full-source and light-curve database for large-scale surveys, that is accessible by the astronomical community. We adopted LOFAR's Transients Pipeline as the baseline and modified it to enable the processing of optical images that have much higher source densities. The pipeline adds new source lists to the archive database, while cross-matching them with the known cataloguedsources in order to build a full light-curve archive. We investigated several techniques of indexing and partitioning the largest tables, allowing for faster positional source look-ups in the cross matching algorithms. We monitored all query run times in long-term pipeline runs where we processed a subset of IPHAS data that have image source density peaks over 170,000 per field of view (500,000 deg-2). Our analysis demonstrates that horizontal table partitions of declination widths of one-degree control the query run times. Usage of an index strategy where the partitions are densely sorted according to source declination yields another improvement. Most queries run in sublinear time and a few (< 20%) run in linear time, because of dependencies on input source-list and result-set size. We observed that for this logical database partitioning schema the limiting cadence the pipeline achieved with processing IPHAS data is 25 s.

  6. High Tech High School Interns Develop a Mid-Ocean Ridge Database for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, D.; Delaney, R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.; Miller, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges (MOR) represent one of the most important geographical and geological features on planet Earth. MORs are the locations where plates spread apart, they are the locations of the majority of the Earths' volcanoes that harbor some of the most extreme life forms. These concepts attract much research, but mid-ocean ridges are still effectively underrepresented in the Earth science class rooms. As two High Tech High School students, we began an internship at Scripps to develop a database for mid-ocean ridges as a resource for science and education. This Ridge Catalog will be accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/RC/ and applies a similar structure, design and data archival principle as the Seamount Catalog under EarthRef.org. Major research goals of this project include the development of (1) an archival structure for multibeam and sidescan data, standard bathymetric maps (including ODP-DSDP drill site and dredge locations) or any other arbitrary digital objects relating to MORs, and (2) to compile a global data set for some of the most defining characteristics of every ridge segment including ridge segment length, depth and azimuth and half spreading rates. One of the challenges included the need of making MOR data useful to the scientist as well as the teacher in the class room. Since the basic structure follows the design of the Seamount Catalog closely, we could move our attention to the basic data population of the database. We have pulled together multibeam data for the MOR segments from various public archives (SIOExplorer, SIO-GDC, NGDC, Lamont), and pre-processed it for public use. In particular, we have created individual bathymetric maps for each ridge segment, while merging the multibeam data with global satellite bathymetry data from Smith & Sandwell (1997). The global scale of this database will give it the ability to be used for any number of applications, from cruise planning to data

  7. Databases as policy instruments. About extending networks as evidence-based policy.

    PubMed

    de Bont, Antoinette; Stoevelaar, Herman; Bal, Roland

    2007-12-07

    This article seeks to identify the role of databases in health policy. Access to information and communication technologies has changed traditional relationships between the state and professionals, creating new systems of surveillance and control. As a result, databases may have a profound effect on controlling clinical practice. We conducted three case studies to reconstruct the development and use of databases as policy instruments. Each database was intended to be employed to control the use of one particular pharmaceutical in the Netherlands (growth hormone, antiretroviral drugs for HIV and Taxol, respectively). We studied the archives of the Dutch Health Insurance Board, conducted in-depth interviews with key informants and organized two focus groups, all focused on the use of databases both in policy circles and in clinical practice. Our results demonstrate that policy makers hardly used the databases, neither for cost control nor for quality assurance. Further analysis revealed that these databases facilitated self-regulation and quality assurance by (national) bodies of professionals, resulting in restrictive prescription behavior amongst physicians. The databases fulfill control functions that were formerly located within the policy realm. The databases facilitate collaboration between policy makers and physicians, since they enable quality assurance by professionals. Delegating regulatory authority downwards into a network of physicians who control the use of pharmaceuticals seems to be a good alternative for centralized control on the basis of monitoring data.

  8. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David L; Barrett, Tanya; Benson, Dennis A; Bryant, Stephen H; Canese, Kathi; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Church, Deanna M; DiCuccio, Michael; Edgar, Ron; Federhen, Scott; Geer, Lewis Y; Kapustin, Yuri; Khovayko, Oleg; Landsman, David; Lipman, David J; Madden, Thomas L; Maglott, Donna R; Ostell, James; Miller, Vadim; Pruitt, Kim D; Schuler, Gregory D; Sequeira, Edwin; Sherry, Steven T; Sirotkin, Karl; Souvorov, Alexandre; Starchenko, Grigory; Tatusov, Roman L; Tatusova, Tatiana A; Wagner, Lukas; Yaschenko, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI's Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, My NCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link(BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genome, Genome Project and related tools, the Trace and Assembly Archives, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs), Viral Genotyping Tools, Influenza Viral Resources, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART) and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. These resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  9. Kingfisher: a system for remote sensing image database management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzo, Michele; Giordano, Ferdinando; Dellepiane, Silvana G.

    2003-04-01

    At present retrieval methods in remote sensing image database are mainly based on spatial-temporal information. The increasing amount of images to be collected by the ground station of earth observing systems emphasizes the need for database management with intelligent data retrieval capabilities. The purpose of the proposed method is to realize a new content based retrieval system for remote sensing images database with an innovative search tool based on image similarity. This methodology is quite innovative for this application, at present many systems exist for photographic images, as for example QBIC and IKONA, but they are not able to extract and describe properly remote image content. The target database is set by an archive of images originated from an X-SAR sensor (spaceborne mission, 1994). The best content descriptors, mainly texture parameters, guarantees high retrieval performances and can be extracted without losses independently of image resolution. The latter property allows DBMS (Database Management System) to process low amount of information, as in the case of quick-look images, improving time performance and memory access without reducing retrieval accuracy. The matching technique has been designed to enable image management (database population and retrieval) independently of dimensions (width and height). Local and global content descriptors are compared, during retrieval phase, with the query image and results seem to be very encouraging.

  10. International Ultraviolet Explorer Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CSC processed IUE images through the Final Archive Data Processing System. Raw images were obtained from both NDADS and the IUEGTC optical disk platters for processing on the Alpha cluster, and from the IUEGTC optical disk platters for DECstation processing. Input parameters were obtained from the IUE database. Backup tapes of data to send to VILSPA were routinely made on the Alpha cluster. IPC handled more than 263 requests for priority NEWSIPS processing during the contract. Staff members also answered various questions and requests for information and sent copies of IUE documents to requesters. CSC implemented new processing capabilities into the NEWSIPS processing systems as they became available. In addition, steps were taken to improve efficiency and throughput whenever possible. The node TORTE was reconfigured as the I/O server for Alpha processing in May. The number of Alpha nodes used for the NEWSIPS processing queue was increased to a maximum of six in measured fashion in order to understand the dependence of throughput on the number of nodes and to be able to recognize when a point of diminishing returns was reached. With Project approval, generation of the VD FITS files was dropped in July. This action not only saved processing time but, even more significantly, also reduced the archive storage media requirements, and the time required to perform the archiving, drastically. The throughput of images verified through CDIVS and processed through NEWSIPS for the contract period is summarized below. The number of images of a given dispersion type and camera that were processed in any given month reflects several factors, including the availability of the required NEWSIPS software system, the availability of the corresponding required calibrations (e.g., the LWR high-dispersion ripple correction and absolute calibration), and the occurrence of reprocessing efforts such as that conducted to incorporate the updated SWP sensitivity-degradation correction in May.

  11. myPhyloDB: a local web-server and database for the storage and analysis of metagenomics data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has resulted in an explosion of metagenomics data associated with microbial communities from a variety of ecosystems. However, no database and/or analytical software is currently available that allows for archival and cross-study comparison of such data. my...

  12. My Dream Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience as he traveled from island to island with a single objective--to reach the archives. He found out that not all archives are the same. In recent months, his daydreaming in various facilities has yielded a recurrent question on what would constitute the Ideal Archive. What follows, in no particular…

  13. Experience with ATLAS MySQL PanDA database service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Y.; Wlodek, T.; De, K.; Hover, J.; Ozturk, N.; Smith, J.; Wenaus, T.; Yu, D.

    2010-04-01

    The PanDA distributed production and analysis system has been in production use for ATLAS data processing and analysis since late 2005 in the US, and globally throughout ATLAS since early 2008. Its core architecture is based on a set of stateless web services served by Apache and backed by a suite of MySQL databases that are the repository for all PanDA information: active and archival job queues, dataset and file catalogs, site configuration information, monitoring information, system control parameters, and so on. This database system is one of the most critical components of PanDA, and has successfully delivered the functional and scaling performance required by PanDA, currently operating at a scale of half a million jobs per week, with much growth still to come. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of the PanDA database system, its architecture of MySQL servers deployed at BNL and CERN, backup strategy and monitoring tools. The system has been developed, thoroughly tested, and brought to production to provide highly reliable, scalable, flexible and available database services for ATLAS Monte Carlo production, reconstruction and physics analysis.

  14. Author! author!: creating a digital archive of publications in a hospital library setting.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Diane; Samsundar, Devica Ramjit; Shalini, Channapatna

    2005-01-01

    Baptist Hospital of Miami has been honoring its staff authors annually during National Library Week since 1979, at the time the library was relocated. Upon "doing the math" and realizing that twenty-five years had passed, a special event was planned to celebrate the occasion in 2004. A merger of four hospitals in 1995 to form Baptist Health South Florida, and an addition of a fifth hospital in 2003 added into the complexity of these publications. Organizing the event led to the conclusion that there had to be a "better way" to manage the publication archive. This paper will include a look back at the event's past, present efforts to develop an archival database, and future plans to make articles available electronically to users, copyright permitting.

  15. A new dataset validation system for the Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaud, N.; Zender, J.; Heather, D.; Martinez, S.

    2007-08-01

    The Planetary Science Archive is the official archive for the Mars Express mission. It has received its first data by the end of 2004. These data are delivered by the PI teams to the PSA team as datasets, which are formatted conform to the Planetary Data System (PDS). The PI teams are responsible for analyzing and calibrating the instrument data as well as the production of reduced and calibrated data. They are also responsible of the scientific validation of these data. ESA is responsible of the long-term data archiving and distribution to the scientific community and must ensure, in this regard, that all archived products meet quality. To do so, an archive peer-review is used to control the quality of the Mars Express science data archiving process. However a full validation of its content is missing. An independent review board recently recommended that the completeness of the archive as well as the consistency of the delivered data should be validated following well-defined procedures. A new validation software tool is being developed to complete the overall data quality control system functionality. This new tool aims to improve the quality of data and services provided to the scientific community through the PSA, and shall allow to track anomalies in and to control the completeness of datasets. It shall ensure that the PSA end-users: (1) can rely on the result of their queries, (2) will get data products that are suitable for scientific analysis, (3) can find all science data acquired during a mission. We defined dataset validation as the verification and assessment process to check the dataset content against pre-defined top-level criteria, which represent the general characteristics of good quality datasets. The dataset content that is checked includes the data and all types of information that are essential in the process of deriving scientific results and those interfacing with the PSA database. The validation software tool is a multi-mission tool that

  16. Telecommunications issues of intelligent database management for ground processing systems in the EOS era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touch, Joseph D.

    1994-01-01

    Future NASA earth science missions, including the Earth Observing System (EOS), will be generating vast amounts of data that must be processed and stored at various locations around the world. Here we present a stepwise-refinement of the intelligent database management (IDM) of the distributed active archive center (DAAC - one of seven regionally-located EOSDIS archive sites) architecture, to showcase the telecommunications issues involved. We develop this architecture into a general overall design. We show that the current evolution of protocols is sufficient to support IDM at Gbps rates over large distances. We also show that network design can accommodate a flexible data ingestion storage pipeline and a user extraction and visualization engine, without interference between the two.

  17. Defining the Core Archive Data Standards of the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Crichton, Dan; Beebe, Reta; Guinness, Ed; Heather, David; Zender, Joe

    2007-01-01

    A goal of the International Planetary Data Alliance (lPDA) is to develop a set of archive data standards that enable the sharing of scientific data across international agencies and missions. To help achieve this goal, the IPDA steering committee initiated a six month proj ect to write requirements for and draft an information model based on the Planetary Data System (PDS) archive data standards. The project had a special emphasis on data formats. A set of use case scenarios were first developed from which a set of requirements were derived for the IPDA archive data standards. The special emphasis on data formats was addressed by identifying data formats that have been used by PDS nodes and other agencies in the creation of successful data sets for the Planetary Data System (PDS). The dependency of the IPDA information model on the PDS archive standards required the compilation of a formal specification of the archive standards currently in use by the PDS. An ontology modelling tool was chosen to capture the information model from various sources including the Planetary Science Data Dictionary [I] and the PDS Standards Reference [2]. Exports of the modelling information from the tool database were used to produce the information model document using an object-oriented notation for presenting the model. The tool exports can also be used for software development and are directly accessible by semantic web applications.

  18. An Investigation of the Fine Spatial Structure of Meteor Streams Using the Relational Database ``Meteor''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, A. V.; Yumagulov, E. Z.

    2003-05-01

    We have restored and ordered the archive of meteor observations carried out with a meteor radar complex ``KGU-M5'' since 1986. A relational database has been formed under the control of the Database Management System (DBMS) Oracle 8. We also improved and tested a statistical method for studying the fine spatial structure of meteor streams with allowance for the specific features of application of the DBMS. Statistical analysis of the results of observations made it possible to obtain information about the substance distribution in the Quadrantid, Geminid, and Perseid meteor streams.

  19. The Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata archive (G-SIM): A compilation of global streamflow time series indices and meta-data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hong; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Leonard, Michael; Westra, Seth; Senerivatne, Sonia

    2017-04-01

    In-situ observations of daily streamflow with global coverage are a crucial asset for understanding large-scale freshwater resources which are an essential component of the Earth system and a prerequisite for societal development. Here we present the Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata archive (G-SIM), a collection indices derived from more than 20,000 daily streamflow time series across the globe. These indices are designed to support global assessments of change in wet and dry extremes, and have been compiled from 12 free-to-access online databases (seven national databases and five international collections). The G-SIM archive also includes significant metadata to help support detailed understanding of streamflow dynamics, with the inclusion of drainage area shapefile and many essential catchment properties such as land cover type, soil and topographic characteristics. The automated procedure in data handling and quality control of the project makes G-SIM a reproducible, extendible archive and can be utilised for many purposes in large-scale hydrology. Some potential applications include the identification of observational trends in hydrological extremes, the assessment of climate change impacts on streamflow regimes, and the validation of global hydrological models.

  20. GAUDI: A Preparatory Archive for the COROT Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, E.; Catala, C.; Garrido, R.; Poretti, E.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Gutiérrez, R.; González, R.; Mantegazza, L.; Neiner, C.; Fremat, Y.; Charpinet, S.; Weiss, W.; Amado, P. J.; Rainer, M.; Tsymbal, V.; Lyashko, D.; Ballereau, D.; Bouret, J. C.; Hua, T.; Katz, D.; Lignières, F.; Lüftinger, T.; Mittermayer, P.; Nesvacil, N.; Soubiran, C.; van't Veer-Menneret, C.; Goupil, M. J.; Costa, V.; Rolland, A.; Antonello, E.; Bossi, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Rodrigo, C.; Aerts, C.; Butler, C. J.; Guenther, E.; Hatzes, A.

    2005-01-01

    The GAUDI database (Ground-based Asteroseismology Uniform Database Interface) is a preparatory archive for the COROT (Convection, Rotation, and Planetary Transits) mission developed at the Laboratorio de Astrofísica Espacial y Física Fundamental (Laboratory for Space Astrophysics and Theoretical Physics, Spain). Its intention is to make the ground-based observations obtained in preparation of the asteroseismology program available in a simple and efficient way. It contains spectroscopic and photometric data together with inferred physical parameters for more than 1500 objects gathered since 1998 January 1998 in 6 years of observational campaigns. In this paper, the main functions and characteristics of the system are described. Based on observations collected at La Silla (ESO proposals 67.D-0169, 69.D-0166, and 70.D-0110), Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (proposal 6-20-068), Observatoire de Haute-Provence, the South African Astronomical Observatory, Tautenburg Observatory, and Sierra Nevada Observatory.

  1. Release of the gPhoton Database of GALEX Photon Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Million, Chase; Shiao, Bernie; Tucker, Michael; Loyd, R. O. Parke

    2016-01-01

    The GALEX spacecraft surveyed much of the sky in two ultraviolet bands between 2003 and 2013 with non-integrating microchannel plate detectors. The Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) has made more than one trillion photon events observed by the spacecraft available, stored as a 130 TB database, along with an open-source, python-based software package to query this database and create calibrated lightcurves or images from these data at user-defined spatial and temporal scales. In particular, MAST users can now conduct photometry at the intra-visit level (timescales of seconds and minutes). The software, along with the fully populated database, was officially released in Aug. 2015, and improvements to both software functionality and data calibration are ongoing. We summarize the current calibration status of the gPhoton software, along with examples of early science enabled by gPhoton that include stellar flares, AGN, white dwarfs, exoplanet hosts, novae, and nearby galaxies.

  2. RESIS-II: An Updated Version of the Original Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Katherine V.; Mixon, David M.; Sundquist, Eric T.; Stallard, Robert F.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Stewart, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) database, originally compiled by the Soil Conservation Service (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service) in collaboration with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, is the most comprehensive compilation of data from reservoir sedimentation surveys throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.). The database is a cumulative historical archive that includes data from as early as 1755 and as late as 1993. The 1,823 reservoirs included in the database range in size from farm ponds to the largest U.S. reservoirs (such as Lake Mead). Results from 6,617 bathymetric surveys are available in the database. This Data Series provides an improved version of the original RESIS database, termed RESIS-II, and a report describing RESIS-II. The RESIS-II relational database is stored in Microsoft Access and includes more precise location coordinates for most of the reservoirs than the original database but excludes information on reservoir ownership. RESIS-II is anticipated to be a template for further improvements in the database.

  3. The Digitization of Early English Books: A Database Comparison of Internet Archive and Early English Books Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightenburg, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    The use of digital books is diverse, ranging from casual reading to in-depth primary source research. Digitization of early English printed books in particular, has provided greater access to a previously limited resource for academic faculty and researchers. Internet Archive, a free, internet website and Early English Books Online, a subscription…

  4. Wide-Field Plate Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M. K.; Stavrev, K. Y.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Semkov, E. H.; Mutatov, A. S.

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) and the possibilities for its application as a research tool in observational astronomy are presented. Currently the WFPDB comprises the descriptive data for 400 000 archival wide field photographic plates obtained with 77 instruments, from a total of 1 850 000 photographs stored in 269 astronomical archives all over the world since the end of last century. The WFPDB is already accessible for the astronomical community, now only in batch mode through user requests sent by e-mail. We are working on on-line interactive access to the data via INTERNET from Sofia and parallel from the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg. (Initial information can be found on World Wide Web homepage URL http://www.wfpa.acad.bg.) The WFPDB may be useful in studies of a variety of astronomical objects and phenomena, andespecially for long-term investigations of variable objects and for multi-wavelength research. We have analysed the data in the WFPDB in order to derive the overall characteristics of the totality of wide-field observations, such as the sky coverage, the distributions by observation time and date, by spectral band, and by object type. We have also examined the totality of wide-field observations from point of view of their quality, availability and digitisation. The usefulness of the WFPDB is demonstrated by the results of identification and investigation of the photometrical behaviour of optical analogues of gamma-ray bursts.

  5. International Database of Volcanic Ash Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K.; Cameron, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Jenkins, S.; Brown, S.; Leonard, G.; Deligne, N.; Stewart, C.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash creates extensive impacts to people and property, yet we lack a global ash impacts catalog to organize, distribute, and archive this important information. Critical impact information is often stored in ephemeral news articles or other isolated resources, which cannot be queried or located easily. A global ash impacts database would improve 1) warning messages, 2) public and lifeline emergency preparation, and 3) eruption response and recovery. Ashfall can have varying consequences, such as disabling critical lifeline infrastructure (e.g. electrical generation and transmission, water supplies, telecommunications, aircraft and airports) or merely creating limited and expensive inconvenience to local communities. Impacts to the aviation sector can be a far-reaching global issue. The international volcanic ash impacts community formed a committee to develop a database to catalog the impacts of volcanic ash. We identify three user populations for this database: 1) research teams, who would use the database to assist in systematic collection, recording, and storage of ash impact data, and to prioritize impact assessment trips and lab experiments 2) volcanic risk assessment scientists who rely on impact data for assessments (especially vulnerability/fragility assessments); a complete dataset would have utility for global, regional, national and local scale risk assessments, and 3) citizen science volcanic hazard reporting. Publication of an international ash impacts database will encourage standardization and development of best practices for collecting and reporting impact information. Data entered will be highly categorized, searchable, and open source. Systematic cataloging of impact data will allow users to query the data and extract valuable information to aid in the development of improved emergency preparedness, response and recovery measures.

  6. Database architectures for Space Telescope Science Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen

    1993-08-01

    At STScI nearly all large applications require database support. A general purpose architecture has been developed and is in use that relies upon an extended client-server paradigm. Processing is in general distributed across three processes, each of which generally resides on its own processor. Database queries are evaluated on one such process, called the DBMS server. The DBMS server software is provided by a database vendor. The application issues database queries and is called the application client. This client uses a set of generic DBMS application programming calls through our STDB/NET programming interface. Intermediate between the application client and the DBMS server is the STDB/NET server. This server accepts generic query requests from the application and converts them into the specific requirements of the DBMS server. In addition, it accepts query results from the DBMS server and passes them back to the application. Typically the STDB/NET server is local to the DBMS server, while the application client may be remote. The STDB/NET server provides additional capabilities such as database deadlock restart and performance monitoring. This architecture is currently in use for some major STScI applications, including the ground support system. We are currently investigating means of providing ad hoc query support to users through the above architecture. Such support is critical for providing flexible user interface capabilities. The Universal Relation advocated by Ullman, Kernighan, and others appears to be promising. In this approach, the user sees the entire database as a single table, thereby freeing the user from needing to understand the detailed schema. A software layer provides the translation between the user and detailed schema views of the database. However, many subtle issues arise in making this transformation. We are currently exploring this scheme for use in the Hubble Space Telescope user interface to the data archive system (DADS).

  7. Fermilab History and Archives Project | Home

    Science.gov Websites

    Fermilab History and Archives Project Fermilab History and Archives Project Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Home About the Archives History & Archives Online Request Contact Us Site Index SEARCH the site: History & Archives Project Fermilab History and Archives Project The History of

  8. Hosting and pulishing astronomical data in SQL databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Anastasia; Klar, Jochen; Riebe, Kristin; Matokevic, Gal; Enke, Harry

    2017-04-01

    In astronomy, terabytes and petabytes of data are produced by ground instruments, satellite missions and simulations. At Leibniz-Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) we host and publish terabytes of cosmological simulation and observational data. The public archive at AIP has now reached a size of 60TB and growing and helps to produce numerous scientific papers. The web framework Daiquiri offers a dedicated web interface for each of the hosted scientific databases. Scientists all around the world run SQL queries which include specific astrophysical functions and get their desired data in reasonable time. Daiquiri supports the scientific projects by offering a number of administration tools such as database and user management, contact messages to the staff and support for organization of meetings and workshops. The webpages can be customized and the Wordpress integration supports the participating scientists in maintaining the documentation and the projects' news sections.

  9. gPhoton: The GALEX Photon Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Million, Chase; Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, Bernie; Seibert, Mark; Loyd, Parke; Tucker, Michael; Smith, Myron; Thompson, Randy; White, Richard L.

    2016-12-01

    gPhoton is a new database product and software package that enables analysis of GALEX ultraviolet data at the photon level. The project’s stand-alone, pure-Python calibration pipeline reproduces the functionality of the original mission pipeline to reduce raw spacecraft data to lists of time-tagged, sky-projected photons, which are then hosted in a publicly available database by the Mikulski Archive at Space Telescope. This database contains approximately 130 terabytes of data describing approximately 1.1 trillion sky-projected events with a timestamp resolution of five milliseconds. A handful of Python and command-line modules serve as a front end to interact with the database and to generate calibrated light curves and images from the photon-level data at user-defined temporal and spatial scales. The gPhoton software and source code are in active development and publicly available under a permissive license. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of the calibration pipeline, database, and tools, with emphasis on divergence from prior work, as well as challenges created by the large data volume. We summarize the astrometric and photometric performance of gPhoton relative to the original mission pipeline. For a brief example of short time-domain science capabilities enabled by gPhoton, we show new flares from the known M-dwarf flare star CR Draconis. The gPhoton software has permanent object identifiers with the ASCL (ascl:1603.004) and DOI (doi:10.17909/T9CC7G). This paper describes the software as of version v1.27.2.

  10. gPhoton: THE GALEX PHOTON DATA ARCHIVE

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Million, Chase; Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, Bernie

    gPhoton is a new database product and software package that enables analysis of GALEX ultraviolet data at the photon level. The project’s stand-alone, pure-Python calibration pipeline reproduces the functionality of the original mission pipeline to reduce raw spacecraft data to lists of time-tagged, sky-projected photons, which are then hosted in a publicly available database by the Mikulski Archive at Space Telescope. This database contains approximately 130 terabytes of data describing approximately 1.1 trillion sky-projected events with a timestamp resolution of five milliseconds. A handful of Python and command-line modules serve as a front end to interact with the database andmore » to generate calibrated light curves and images from the photon-level data at user-defined temporal and spatial scales. The gPhoton software and source code are in active development and publicly available under a permissive license. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of the calibration pipeline, database, and tools, with emphasis on divergence from prior work, as well as challenges created by the large data volume. We summarize the astrometric and photometric performance of gPhoton relative to the original mission pipeline. For a brief example of short time-domain science capabilities enabled by gPhoton, we show new flares from the known M-dwarf flare star CR Draconis. The gPhoton software has permanent object identifiers with the ASCL (ascl:1603.004) and DOI (doi:10.17909/T9CC7G). This paper describes the software as of version v1.27.2.« less

  11. Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID), eGRID2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) is a comprehensive source of data on the environmental characteristics of almost all electric power generated in the United States. These environmental characteristics include air emissions for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide; emissions rates; net generation; resource mix; and many other attributes. eGRID2012 Version 1.0 is the eighth edition of eGRID, which contains the complete release of year 2009 data, as well as year 2007, 2005, and 2004 data. For year 2009 data, all the data are contained in a single Microsoft Excel workbook, which contains boiler, generator, plant, state, power control area, eGRID subregion, NERC region, U.S. total and grid gross loss factor tabs. Full documentation, summary data, eGRID subregion and NERC region representational maps, and GHG emission factors are also released in this edition. The fourth edition of eGRID, eGRID2002 Version 2.01, containing year 1996 through 2000 data is located on the eGRID Archive page (http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/egrid/archive.html). The current edition of eGRID and the archived edition of eGRID contain the following years of data: 1996 - 2000, 2004, 2005, and 2007. eGRID has no other years of data.

  12. Archiving and Distributing Seismic Data at the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, V. L.

    2002-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) archives and provides public access to earthquake parametric and waveform data gathered by the Southern California Seismic Network and since January 1, 2001, the TriNet seismic network, southern California's earthquake monitoring network. The parametric data in the archive includes earthquake locations, magnitudes, moment-tensor solutions and phase picks. The SCEDC waveform archive prior to TriNet consists primarily of short-period, 100-samples-per-second waveforms from the SCSN. The addition of the TriNet array added continuous recordings of 155 broadband stations (20 samples per second or less), and triggered seismograms from 200 accelerometers and 200 short-period instruments. Since the Data Center and TriNet use the same Oracle database system, new earthquake data are available to the seismological community in near real-time. Primary access to the database and waveforms is through the Seismogram Transfer Program (STP) interface. The interface enables users to search the database for earthquake information, phase picks, and continuous and triggered waveform data. Output is available in SAC, miniSEED, and other formats. Both the raw counts format (V0) and the gain-corrected format (V1) of COSMOS (Consortium of Organizations for Strong-Motion Observation Systems) are now supported by STP. EQQuest is an interface to prepackaged waveform data sets for select earthquakes in Southern California stored at the SCEDC. Waveform data for large-magnitude events have been prepared and new data sets will be available for download in near real-time following major events. The parametric data from 1981 to present has been loaded into the Oracle 9.2.0.1 database system and the waveforms for that time period have been converted to mSEED format and are accessible through the STP interface. The DISC optical-disk system (the "jukebox") that currently serves as the mass-storage for the SCEDC is in the process of being replaced

  13. ClearedLeavesDB: an online database of cleared plant leaf images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leaf vein networks are critical to both the structure and function of leaves. A growing body of recent work has linked leaf vein network structure to the physiology, ecology and evolution of land plants. In the process, multiple institutions and individual researchers have assembled collections of cleared leaf specimens in which vascular bundles (veins) are rendered visible. In an effort to facilitate analysis and digitally preserve these specimens, high-resolution images are usually created, either of entire leaves or of magnified leaf subsections. In a few cases, collections of digital images of cleared leaves are available for use online. However, these collections do not share a common platform nor is there a means to digitally archive cleared leaf images held by individual researchers (in addition to those held by institutions). Hence, there is a growing need for a digital archive that enables online viewing, sharing and disseminating of cleared leaf image collections held by both institutions and individual researchers. Description The Cleared Leaf Image Database (ClearedLeavesDB), is an online web-based resource for a community of researchers to contribute, access and share cleared leaf images. ClearedLeavesDB leverages resources of large-scale, curated collections while enabling the aggregation of small-scale collections within the same online platform. ClearedLeavesDB is built on Drupal, an open source content management platform. It allows plant biologists to store leaf images online with corresponding meta-data, share image collections with a user community and discuss images and collections via a common forum. We provide tools to upload processed images and results to the database via a web services client application that can be downloaded from the database. Conclusions We developed ClearedLeavesDB, a database focusing on cleared leaf images that combines interactions between users and data via an intuitive web interface. The web interface

  14. ClearedLeavesDB: an online database of cleared plant leaf images.

    PubMed

    Das, Abhiram; Bucksch, Alexander; Price, Charles A; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-03-28

    Leaf vein networks are critical to both the structure and function of leaves. A growing body of recent work has linked leaf vein network structure to the physiology, ecology and evolution of land plants. In the process, multiple institutions and individual researchers have assembled collections of cleared leaf specimens in which vascular bundles (veins) are rendered visible. In an effort to facilitate analysis and digitally preserve these specimens, high-resolution images are usually created, either of entire leaves or of magnified leaf subsections. In a few cases, collections of digital images of cleared leaves are available for use online. However, these collections do not share a common platform nor is there a means to digitally archive cleared leaf images held by individual researchers (in addition to those held by institutions). Hence, there is a growing need for a digital archive that enables online viewing, sharing and disseminating of cleared leaf image collections held by both institutions and individual researchers. The Cleared Leaf Image Database (ClearedLeavesDB), is an online web-based resource for a community of researchers to contribute, access and share cleared leaf images. ClearedLeavesDB leverages resources of large-scale, curated collections while enabling the aggregation of small-scale collections within the same online platform. ClearedLeavesDB is built on Drupal, an open source content management platform. It allows plant biologists to store leaf images online with corresponding meta-data, share image collections with a user community and discuss images and collections via a common forum. We provide tools to upload processed images and results to the database via a web services client application that can be downloaded from the database. We developed ClearedLeavesDB, a database focusing on cleared leaf images that combines interactions between users and data via an intuitive web interface. The web interface allows storage of large collections

  15. (Per)Forming Archival Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaillet, Lynee Lewis

    2012-01-01

    This article raises multiple issues associated with archival research methodologies and methods. Based on a survey of recent scholarship and interviews with experienced archival researchers, this overview of the current status of archival research both complicates traditional conceptions of archival investigation and encourages scholars to adopt…

  16. Home - Libraries, Archives, & Museums - Libraries, Archives, & Museums at

    Science.gov Websites

    Alaska State Library Skip to main content State of Alaska myAlaska Departments State Employees Statewide Links × Upcoming Holiday Closure for Memorial Day The Alaska State Libraries, Archives, & Tuesday, May 29. Department of Education and Early Development Alaska State Libraries, Archives, and

  17. Chroni - an Android Application for Geochronologists to Access Archived Sample Analyses from the NSF-Funded Geochron.Org Data Repository.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, J. J.; Bowring, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    NSF requires data management plans as part of funding proposals and geochronologists, among other scientists, are archiving their data and results to the public cloud archives managed by the NSF-funded Integrated Earth Data Applications, or IEDA. GeoChron is a database for geochronology housed within IEDA. The software application U-Pb_Redux developed at the Cyber Infrastructure Research and Development Lab for the Earth Sciences (CIRDLES.org) at the College of Charleston provides seamless connectivity to GeoChron for uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronologists to automatically upload and retrieve their data and results. U-Pb_Redux also manages publication-quality documents including report tables and graphs. CHRONI is a lightweight mobile application for Android devices that provides easy access to these archived data and results. With CHRONI, U-Pb geochronologists can view archived data and analyses downloaded from the Geochron database, or any other location, in a customizable format. CHRONI uses the same extensible markup language (XML) schema and documents used by U-Pb_Redux and GeoChron. Report Settings are special XML files that can be customized in U-Pb_Redux, stored in the cloud, and then accessed and used in CHRONI to create the same customized data display on the mobile device. In addition to providing geologists effortless and mobile access to archived data and analyses, CHRONI allows users to manage their GeoChron credentials, quickly download private and public files via a specified IEDA International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) or URL, and view specialized graphics associated with particular IGSNs. Future versions of CHRONI will be developed to support iOS compatible devices. CHRONI is an open source project under the Apache 2 license and is hosted at https://github.com/CIRDLES/CHRONI. We encourage community participation in its continued development.

  18. Palaeo-sea-level and palaeo-ice-sheet databases: problems, strategies, and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düsterhus, André; Rovere, Alessio; Carlson, Anders E.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Klemann, Volker; Tarasov, Lev; Barlow, Natasha L. M.; Bradwell, Tom; Clark, Jorie; Dutton, Andrea; Gehrels, W. Roland; Hibbert, Fiona D.; Hijma, Marc P.; Khan, Nicole; Kopp, Robert E.; Sivan, Dorit; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    2016-04-01

    Sea-level and ice-sheet databases have driven numerous advances in understanding the Earth system. We describe the challenges and offer best strategies that can be adopted to build self-consistent and standardised databases of geological and geochemical information used to archive palaeo-sea-levels and palaeo-ice-sheets. There are three phases in the development of a database: (i) measurement, (ii) interpretation, and (iii) database creation. Measurement should include the objective description of the position and age of a sample, description of associated geological features, and quantification of uncertainties. Interpretation of the sample may have a subjective component, but it should always include uncertainties and alternative or contrasting interpretations, with any exclusion of existing interpretations requiring a full justification. During the creation of a database, an approach based on accessibility, transparency, trust, availability, continuity, completeness, and communication of content (ATTAC3) must be adopted. It is essential to consider the community that creates and benefits from a database. We conclude that funding agencies should not only consider the creation of original data in specific research-question-oriented projects, but also include the possibility of using part of the funding for IT-related and database creation tasks, which are essential to guarantee accessibility and maintenance of the collected data.

  19. Acta Informatica Medica Is Indexed In Pubmed And Archived In Pubmed Central

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    Acta Informatica Medica journal has been accepted for archiving in PubMed Central from 2011 onward. The journal started in 1993 as the official journal of the Society for Medical Informatics of Bosnia and Herzegovina. During the last 3 years, Acta Informatica Medica has een included in almost all prestigious online databases, including PubMed, Scopus and EMBASE. The 20th volume of the journal is fully international, with papers from 18 countries. PMID:23572852

  20. Acta informatica medica is indexed in pubmed and archived in pubmed central.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2013-03-01

    Acta Informatica Medica journal has been accepted for archiving in PubMed Central from 2011 onward. The journal started in 1993 as the official journal of the Society for Medical Informatics of Bosnia and Herzegovina. During the last 3 years, Acta Informatica Medica has een included in almost all prestigious online databases, including PubMed, Scopus and EMBASE. The 20th volume of the journal is fully international, with papers from 18 countries.

  1. The MATISSE analysis of large spectral datasets from the ESO Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, C.; de Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Hill, V.; Vernisse, Y.; Ordenovic, C.; Bijaoui, A.

    2010-12-01

    The automated stellar classification algorithm, MATISSE, has been developed at the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA) in order to determine stellar temperatures, gravities and chemical abundances for large datasets of stellar spectra. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) has selected MATISSE as one of the key programmes to be used in the analysis of the Gaia Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) spectra. MATISSE is currently being used to analyse large datasets of spectra from the ESO archive with the primary goal of producing advanced data products to be made available in the ESO database via the Virtual Observatory. This is also an invaluable opportunity to identify and address issues that can be encountered with the analysis large samples of real spectra prior to the launch of Gaia in 2012. The analysis of the archived spectra of the FEROS spectrograph is currently underway and preliminary results are presented.

  2. A Unified Flash Flood Database across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gourley, Jonathan J.; Hong, Yang; Flamig, Zachary L.; Arthur, Ami; Clark, Robert; Calianno, Martin; Ruin, Isabelle; Ortel, Terry W.; Wieczorek, Michael; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Clark, Edward; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite flash flooding being one of the most deadly and costly weather-related natural hazards worldwide, individual datasets to characterize them in the United States are hampered by limited documentation and can be difficult to access. This study is the first of its kind to assemble, reprocess, describe, and disseminate a georeferenced U.S. database providing a long-term, detailed characterization of flash flooding in terms of spatiotemporal behavior and specificity of impacts. The database is composed of three primary sources: 1) the entire archive of automated discharge observations from the U.S. Geological Survey that has been reprocessed to describe individual flooding events, 2) flash-flooding reports collected by the National Weather Service from 2006 to the present, and 3) witness reports obtained directly from the public in the Severe Hazards Analysis and Verification Experiment during the summers 2008–10. Each observational data source has limitations; a major asset of the unified flash flood database is its collation of relevant information from a variety of sources that is now readily available to the community in common formats. It is anticipated that this database will be used for many diverse purposes, such as evaluating tools to predict flash flooding, characterizing seasonal and regional trends, and improving understanding of dominant flood-producing processes. We envision the initiation of this community database effort will attract and encompass future datasets.

  3. The GEISA Spectroscopic Database System in its latest Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Crépeau, L.; Capelle, V.; Scott, N. A.; Armante, R.; Chédin, A.

    2009-04-01

    GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information)[1] is a computer-accessible spectroscopic database system, designed to facilitate accurate forward planetary radiative transfer calculations using a line-by-line and layer-by-layer approach. It was initiated in 1976. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities related to the assessment of the capabilities of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer on board the METOP European satellite -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/)) through the GEISA/IASI database[2] derived from GEISA. Since the Metop (http://www.eumetsat.int) launch (October 19th 2006), GEISA/IASI is the reference spectroscopic database for the validation of the level-1 IASI data, using the 4A radiative transfer model[3] (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and Noveltis with the support of CNES). Also, GEISA is involved in planetary research, i.e.: modelling of Titan's atmosphere, in the comparison with observations performed by Voyager: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/, or by ground-based telescopes, and by the instruments on board the Cassini-Huygens mission: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Cassini-Huygens/index.html. The updated 2008 edition of GEISA (GEISA-08), a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted, respectively, to line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols, will be described. Spectroscopic parameters quality requirement will be discussed in the context of comparisons between observed or simulated Earth's and other planetary atmosphere spectra. GEISA is implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. More than 350 researchers are

  4. Lessons learned from planetary science archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, J.; Grayzeck, E.

    2006-01-01

    The need for scientific archiving of past, current, and future planetary scientific missions, laboratory data, and modeling efforts is indisputable. To quote from a message by G. Santayama carved over the entrance of the US Archive in Washington DC “Those who can not remember the past are doomed to repeat it.” The design, implementation, maintenance, and validation of planetary science archives are however disputed by the involved parties. The inclusion of the archives into the scientific heritage is problematic. For example, there is the imbalance between space agency requirements and institutional and national interests. The disparity of long-term archive requirements and immediate data analysis requests are significant. The discrepancy between the space missions archive budget and the effort required to design and build the data archive is large. An imbalance exists between new instrument development and existing, well-proven archive standards. The authors present their view on the problems and risk areas in the archiving concepts based on their experience acquired within NASA’s Planetary Data System (PDS) and ESA’s Planetary Science Archive (PSA). Individual risks and potential problem areas are discussed based on a model derived from a system analysis done upfront. The major risk for a planetary mission science archive is seen in the combination of minimal involvement by Mission Scientists and inadequate funding. The authors outline how the risks can be reduced. The paper ends with the authors view on future planetary archive implementations including the archive interoperability aspect.

  5. Integrating the IA2 Astronomical Archive in the VO: The VO-Dance Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, M.; Laurino, O.; Smareglia, R.

    2012-09-01

    Virtual Observatory (VO) protocols and standards are getting mature and the astronomical community asks for astrophysical data to be easily reachable. This means data centers have to intensify their efforts to provide the data they manage not only through proprietary portals and services but also through interoperable resources developed on the basis of the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) recommendations. Here we present the work and ideas developed at the IA2 (Italian Astronomical Archive) data center hosted by the INAF-OATs (Italian Institute for Astrophysics - Trieste Astronomical Observatory) to reach this goal. The core point is the development of an application that from existing DB and archive structures can translate their content to VO compliant resources: VO-Dance (written in Java). This application, in turn, relies on a database (potentially DBMS independent) to store the translation layer information of each resource and auxiliary content (UCDs, field names, authorizations, policies, etc.). The last token is an administrative interface (currently developed using the Django python framework) to allow the data center administrators to set up and maintain resources. This deployment, platform independent, with database and administrative interface highly customizable, means the package, when stable and easily distributable, can be also used by single astronomers or groups to set up their own resources from their public datasets.

  6. A Database of Young Star Clusters for Five Hundred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jessica; Whitmore, B. C.; Lindsay, K.; Chandar, R.; Larsen, S.

    2009-01-01

    The study of young massive stellar clusters has faced a series of observational challenges, such as the use of inconsistent data sets and low number statistics. To rectify these shortcomings, this project will use the source lists developed as part of the Hubble Legacy Archive to obtain a large, uniform database of super star clusters in nearby star-forming galaxies in order to address two fundamental astronomical questions: 1) To what degree is the cluster luminosity (and mass) function of star clusters universal? 2) What fraction of super star clusters are "missing" in optical studies (i.e., are hidden by dust)? The archive's recent data release (Data Release 2 - September, 2008) will help us achieve the large sample necessary (N 50 galaxies for multi-wavelength, N 500 galaxies for ACS F814W). The uniform data set will comprise of ACS, WFPC2, and NICMOS data, with DAOphot used for object detection. This database will also support comparisons with new Monte-Carlo simulations that have independently been developed in the past few years, and will be used to test the Whitmore, Chandar, Fall (2007) framework designed to understand the demographics of star clusters in all star forming galaxies. The catalogs will increase the number of galaxies with measured mass and luminosity functions by an order of magnitude, and will provide a powerful new tool for comparative studies, both ours and the community's. The poster will describe our preliminary investigation for the first 30 galaxies in the sample.

  7. The Rosetta Science Archive: Status and Plans for Enhancing the Archive Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heather, David; Barthelemy, Maud; Besse, Sebastien; Fraga, Diego; Grotheer, Emmanuel; O'Rourke, Laurence; Taylor, Matthew; Vallat, Claire

    2017-04-01

    On 30 September 2016, Rosetta completed its incredible mission by landing on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Although this marked an end to the spacecraft's active operations, intensive work is still ongoing with instrument teams preparing their final science data deliveries for ingestion into ESA's Planetary Science Archive (PSA). In addition, ESA is establishing contracts with some instrument teams to enhance their data and documentation in an effort to provide the best long-term archive possible for the Rosetta mission. Currently, the majority of teams have delivered all of their data from the nominal mission (end of 2015), and are working on their remaining increments from the 1-year mission extension. The aim is to complete the nominal archiving with data from the complete mission by the end of this year, when a full mission archive review will be held. This review will assess the complete data holdings from Rosetta and ensure that the archive is ready for the long-term. With the resources from the operational mission coming to an end, ESA has established a number of 'enhanced archiving' contracts to ensure that the best possible data are delivered to the archive before instrument teams disband. Updates are focused on key aspects of an instrument's calibration or the production of higher level data / information, and are therefore specific to each instrument's needs. These contracts are currently being kicked off, and will run for various lengths depending upon the activities to be undertaken. The full 'archive enhancement' process will run until September 2019, when the post operations activities for Rosetta will end. Within these contracts, most instrument teams will work on providing a Science User Guide for their data, as well as updating calibrations. Several teams will also be delivering higher level and derived products. For example, the VIRTIS team will be updating both their spectral and geometrical calibrations, and will aim to

  8. Archiving Derrida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Marla

    2003-01-01

    Derrida's archive, broadly speaking, is brilliantly mad, for he digs exegetically into the most difficult textual material and combines the most unlikely texts--from Socrates to Freud, from postcards to encyclopedias, from madness(es) to the archive, from primal scenes to death. In this paper, the author would like to do a brief study of the…

  9. Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Bruce; Eckert, Ellen; Proffitt, Merrilee

    2013-01-01

    In April and May of 2012, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) Research conducted a survey of users of archives to learn more about their habits and preferences. In particular, they focused on the roles that social media, recommendations, reviews, and other forms of user-contributed annotation play in archival research. OCLC surveyed faculty,…

  10. Aided generation of search interfaces to astronomical archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Sonia; Bignamini, Andrea; Cepparo, Francesco; Knapic, Cristina; Molinaro, Marco; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical data provider organizations that host web based interfaces to provide access to data resources have to cope with possible changes in data management that imply partial rewrites of web applications. To avoid doing this manually it was decided to develop a dynamically configurable Java EE web application that can set itself up reading needed information from configuration files. Specification of what information the astronomical archive database has to expose is managed using the TAP SCHEMA schema from the IVOA TAP recommendation, that can be edited using a graphical interface. When configuration steps are done the tool will build a war file to allow easy deployment of the application.

  11. Integration of a clinical trial database with a PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Herk, M.

    2014-03-01

    Many clinical trials use Electronic Case Report Forms (ECRF), e.g., from OpenClinica. Trial data is augmented if DICOM scans, dose cubes, etc. from the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) are included for data mining. Unfortunately, there is as yet no structured way to collect DICOM objects in trial databases. In this paper, we obtain a tight integration of ECRF and PACS using open source software. Methods: DICOM identifiers for selected images/series/studies are stored in associated ECRF events (e.g., baseline) as follows: 1) JavaScript added to OpenClinica communicates using HTML with a gateway server inside the hospitals firewall; 2) On this gateway, an open source DICOM server runs scripts to query and select the data, returning anonymized identifiers; 3) The scripts then collects, anonymizes, zips and transmits selected data to a central trial server; 4) Here data is stored in a DICOM archive which allows authorized ECRF users to view and download the anonymous images associated with each event. Results: All integration scripts are open source. The PACS administrator configures the anonymization script and decides to use the gateway in passive (receiving) mode or in an active mode going out to the PACS to gather data. Our ECRF centric approach supports automatic data mining by iterating over the cases in the ECRF database, providing the identifiers to load images and the clinical data to correlate with image analysis results. Conclusions: Using open source software and web technology, a tight integration has been achieved between PACS and ECRF.

  12. Status of worldwide Landsat archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warriner, Howard W.

    1987-01-01

    In cooperation with the International Landsat community, and through the Landsat Technical Working Group (LTWG), NOAA is assembling information about the status of the Worldwide Landsat Archive. During LTWG 9, member nations agreed to participate in a survey of International Landsat data holding and of their archive experiences with Landsat data. The goal of the effort was two-fold; one, to document the Landsat archive to date, and, two, to ensure that specific nations' experience with long-term Landsat archival problems were available to others. The survey requested details such as amount of data held, the format of the archive holdings by Spacecraft/Sensor, and acquisition years; the estimated costs to accumulated process, and replace the data (if necessary); the storage space required, and any member nation's plans that would establish the insurance of continuing quality. As a group, the LTWG nations are concerned about the characteristics and reliability of long-term magnetic media storage. Each nation's experience with older data retrieval is solicited in the survey. This information will allow nations to anticipate and plan for required changes to their archival holdings. Also solicited were reports of any upgrades to a nation's archival system that are currently planned and all results of attempts to reduce archive holdings including methodology, current status, and the planned access rates and product support that are anticipated for responding to future archival usage.

  13. The INGV Real Time Strong Motion Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Marco; D'Alema, Ezio; Mascandola, Claudia; Lovati, Sara; Scafidi, Davide; Gomez, Antonio; Carannante, Simona; Franceschina, Gianlorenzo; Mirenna, Santi; Augliera, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    The INGV real time strong motion data sharing is assured by the INGV Strong Motion Database. ISMD (http://ismd.mi.ingv.it) was designed in the last months of 2011 in cooperation among different INGV departments, with the aim to organize the distribution of the INGV strong-motion data using standard procedures for data acquisition and processing. The first version of the web portal was published soon after the occurrence of the 2012 Emilia (Northern Italy), Mw 6.1, seismic sequence. At that time ISMD was the first European real time web portal devoted to the engineering seismology community. After four years of successfully operation, the thousands of accelerometric waveforms collected in the archive need necessary a technological improvement of the system in order to better organize the new data archiving and to make more efficient the answer to the user requests. ISMD 2.0 was based on PostgreSQL (www.postgresql.org), an open source object- relational database. The main purpose of the web portal is to distribute few minutes after the origin time the accelerometric waveforms and related metadata of the Italian earthquakes with ML≥3.0. Data are provided both in raw SAC (counts) and automatically corrected ASCII (gal) formats. The web portal also provide, for each event, a detailed description of the ground motion parameters (i.e. Peak Ground Acceleration, Velocity and Displacement, Arias and Housner Intensities) data converted in velocity and displacement, response spectra up to 10.0 s and general maps concerning the recent and the historical seismicity of the area together with information about its seismic hazard. The focal parameters of the events are provided by the INGV National Earthquake Center (CNT, http://cnt.rm.ingv.it). Moreover, the database provides a detailed site characterization section for each strong motion station, based on geological, geomorphological and geophysical information. At present (i.e. January 2017), ISMD includes 987 (121

  14. The electronic Rothamsted Archive (e-RA), an online resource for data from the Rothamsted long-term experiments

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, Sarah A. M.; Castells-Brooke, Nathalie I. D.; Glendining, Margaret J.; Goulding, Keith W. T.; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Macdonald, Andy J.; Ostler, Richard J.; Poulton, Paul R.; Rawlings, Christopher J.; Scott, Tony; Verrier, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    The electronic Rothamsted Archive, e-RA (www.era.rothamsted.ac.uk) provides a permanent managed database to both securely store and disseminate data from Rothamsted Research’s long-term field experiments (since 1843) and meteorological stations (since 1853). Both historical and contemporary data are made available via this online database which provides the scientific community with access to a unique continuous record of agricultural experiments and weather measured since the mid-19th century. Qualitative information, such as treatment and management practices, plans and soil information, accompanies the data and are made available on the e-RA website. e-RA was released externally to the wider scientific community in 2013 and this paper describes its development, content, curation and the access process for data users. Case studies illustrate the diverse applications of the data, including its original intended purposes and recent unforeseen applications. Usage monitoring demonstrates the data are of increasing interest. Future developments, including adopting FAIR data principles, are proposed as the resource is increasingly recognised as a unique archive of data relevant to sustainable agriculture, agroecology and the environment. PMID:29762552

  15. The electronic Rothamsted Archive (e-RA), an online resource for data from the Rothamsted long-term experiments.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Sarah A M; Castells-Brooke, Nathalie I D; Glendining, Margaret J; Goulding, Keith W T; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Macdonald, Andy J; Ostler, Richard J; Poulton, Paul R; Rawlings, Christopher J; Scott, Tony; Verrier, Paul J

    2018-05-15

    The electronic Rothamsted Archive, e-RA (www.era.rothamsted.ac.uk) provides a permanent managed database to both securely store and disseminate data from Rothamsted Research's long-term field experiments (since 1843) and meteorological stations (since 1853). Both historical and contemporary data are made available via this online database which provides the scientific community with access to a unique continuous record of agricultural experiments and weather measured since the mid-19 th century. Qualitative information, such as treatment and management practices, plans and soil information, accompanies the data and are made available on the e-RA website. e-RA was released externally to the wider scientific community in 2013 and this paper describes its development, content, curation and the access process for data users. Case studies illustrate the diverse applications of the data, including its original intended purposes and recent unforeseen applications. Usage monitoring demonstrates the data are of increasing interest. Future developments, including adopting FAIR data principles, are proposed as the resource is increasingly recognised as a unique archive of data relevant to sustainable agriculture, agroecology and the environment.

  16. The NASA Navigator Program Ground Based Archives at the Michelson Science Center: Supporting the Search for Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. B.; Ciardi, D. R.; Good, J. C.; Laity, A. C.; Zhang, A.

    2006-07-01

    At ADASS XIV, we described how the W. M. Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) re-uses and extends the component based architecture of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) to ingest and serve level 0 observations made with HIRES, the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer. Since August 18, the KOA has ingested 325 GB of data from 135 nights of observations. The architecture exploits a service layer between the mass storage layer and the user interface. This service layer consists of standalone utilities called through a simple executive that perform generic query and retrieval functions, such as query generation, database table sub-setting, and return page generation etc. It has been extended to implement proprietary access to data through deployment of query management middleware developed for the National Virtual Observatory. The MSC archives have recently extended this design to query and retrieve complex data sets describing the properties of potential target stars for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) missions. The archives can now support knowledge based retrieval, as well as data retrieval. This paper describes how extensions to the IRSA architecture, which is applicable across all wavelengths and astronomical datatypes, supports the design and development of the MSC NP archives at modest cost.

  17. The GTC Public Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alacid, J. Manuel; Solano, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    The Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) archive is operational since November 2011. The archive, maintained by the Data Archive Unit at CAB in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory project, provides access to both raw and science ready data and has been designed in compliance with the standards defined by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) to guarantee a high level of data accessibility and handling. In this presentation I will describe the main capabilities the GTC archive offers to the community, in terms of functionalities and data collections, to carry out an efficient scientific exploitation of GTC data.

  18. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  19. A TEX86 surface sediment database and extended Bayesian calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jessica E.; Tingley, Martin P.

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative estimates of past temperature changes are a cornerstone of paleoclimatology. For a number of marine sediment-based proxies, the accuracy and precision of past temperature reconstructions depends on a spatial calibration of modern surface sediment measurements to overlying water temperatures. Here, we present a database of 1095 surface sediment measurements of TEX86, a temperature proxy based on the relative cyclization of marine archaeal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids. The dataset is archived in a machine-readable format with geospatial information, fractional abundances of lipids (if available), and metadata. We use this new database to update surface and subsurface temperature calibration models for TEX86 and demonstrate the applicability of the TEX86 proxy to past temperature prediction. The TEX86 database confirms that surface sediment GDGT distribution has a strong relationship to temperature, which accounts for over 70% of the variance in the data. Future efforts, made possible by the data presented here, will seek to identify variables with secondary relationships to GDGT distributions, such as archaeal community composition.

  20. Costs of landslides and floods in XX Century in a Calabrian town starting from the data stored in the Historical Archive of IRPI (Cosenza)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampa', Vincenzo; Pasqua, A. Aurora; Petrucci, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The paper firstly presents the historical archive of Cosenza IRPI Section and the historical database that has been built basing on the data contained in it. Then, an application of these data to Catanzaro, the town that is the administrative center of Calabria region (Southern Italy), is presented. The gathering of historical data on past floods and landslides in Cosenza IRPI Section has been started since 1996, and it is still in progress. In 2005, some donations coming from regional and municipal Public Works offices greatly increased the documental corpus, and required a more incisive classification and management that led us to organize the documents in a real historical archive. Documents were sorted according to municipalities they concerned. In this way, for each of the 409 municipalities of Calabria a set of documents, maps and images was available. Collected documents mainly concern damage caused by the occurrence, since XIX century, of phenomena as floods, flash floods and landslides triggered by extreme meteorological events, or even damage caused by strong earthquakes. At the beginning of 2014, the central office of IRPI (Perugia) funded a project aiming to the digitalization of the archive and the subsequent publication of it on a web-platform. In this paper, the procedure adopted to build the archive and implement the database is described. Then, the elaboration of the historical series of data on Catanzaro town, which has been frequently damaged by rainfall-induced landslides and floods, is also presented. Basing on the documents coming from the archive of Ministry Public Works and stored in our Historical Archive, an assessment of costs related to damage that during XX century affected the houses of this town has been performed. The research pointed out the types of most damaging phenomena, the municipal sectors most frequently damaged, and the evolution of damaged areas throughout the years according to the increasing urbanization.

  1. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Kim D.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) provides a non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomic data, transcripts and proteins. Although the goal is to provide a comprehensive dataset representing the complete sequence information for any given species, the database pragmatically includes sequence data that are currently publicly available in the archival databases. The database incorporates data from over 2400 organisms and includes over one million proteins representing significant taxonomic diversity spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses. Nucleotide and protein sequences are explicitly linked, and the sequences are linked to other resources including the NCBI Map Viewer and Gene. Sequences are annotated to include coding regions, conserved domains, variation, references, names, database cross-references, and other features using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, automated annotation, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff. PMID:15608248

  2. Fermilab History and Archives Project | Norman F. Ramsey

    Science.gov Websites

    Fermilab History and Archives Project Fermilab History and Archives Project Fermilab History and Archives Project Home About the Archives History and Archives Online Request Contact Us History & ; Archives Project Fermilab History and Archives Project Norman F. Ramsey Back to History and Archives

  3. Toward a standard reference database for computer-aided mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Júlia E. E.; Gueld, Mark O.; de A. Araújo, Arnaldo; Ott, Bastian; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2008-03-01

    Because of the lack of mammography databases with a large amount of codified images and identified characteristics like pathology, type of breast tissue, and abnormality, there is a problem for the development of robust systems for computer-aided diagnosis. Integrated to the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA) project, we present an available mammography database developed from the union of: The Mammographic Image Analysis Society Digital Mammogram Database (MIAS), The Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and routine images from the Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen. Using the IRMA code, standardized coding of tissue type, tumor staging, and lesion description was developed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) tissue codes and the ACR breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). The import was done automatically using scripts for image download, file format conversion, file name, web page and information file browsing. Disregarding the resolution, this resulted in a total of 10,509 reference images, and 6,767 images are associated with an IRMA contour information feature file. In accordance to the respective license agreements, the database will be made freely available for research purposes, and may be used for image based evaluation campaigns such as the Cross Language Evaluation Forum (CLEF). We have also shown that it can be extended easily with further cases imported from a picture archiving and communication system (PACS).

  4. MetPetDB: A database for metamorphic geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Frank S.; Hallett, Benjamin; Pyle, Joseph M.; Adalı, Sibel; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.; Waters, Anthony; Linder, Zak; Pearce, Shawn O.; Fyffe, Matthew; Goldfarb, Dennis; Glickenhouse, Nickolas; Buletti, Heather

    2009-12-01

    We present a data model for the initial implementation of MetPetDB, a geochemical database specific to metamorphic rock samples. The database is designed around the concept of preservation of spatial relationships, at all scales, of chemical analyses and their textural setting. Objects in the database (samples) represent physical rock samples; each sample may contain one or more subsamples with associated geochemical and image data. Samples, subsamples, geochemical data, and images are described with attributes (some required, some optional); these attributes also serve as search delimiters. All data in the database are classified as published (i.e., archived or published data), public or private. Public and published data may be freely searched and downloaded. All private data is owned; permission to view, edit, download and otherwise manipulate private data may be granted only by the data owner; all such editing operations are recorded by the database to create a data version log. The sharing of data permissions among a group of collaborators researching a common sample is done by the sample owner through the project manager. User interaction with MetPetDB is hosted by a web-based platform based upon the Java servlet application programming interface, with the PostgreSQL relational database. The database web portal includes modules that allow the user to interact with the database: registered users may save and download public and published data, upload private data, create projects, and assign permission levels to project collaborators. An Image Viewer module provides for spatial integration of image and geochemical data. A toolkit consisting of plotting and geochemical calculation software for data analysis and a mobile application for viewing the public and published data is being developed. Future issues to address include population of the database, integration with other geochemical databases, development of the analysis toolkit, creation of data models for

  5. Development of a website and biobank database for the Nanosized Cancer Polymarker Biochip Project: a Multicenter Italian Experience.

    PubMed

    Leon, Antonette E; Fabricio, Aline S C; Benvegnù, Fabio; Michilin, Silvia; Secco, Annamaria; Spangaro, Omar; Meo, Sabrina; Gion, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The Nanosized Cancer Polymarker Biochip Project (RBLA03S4SP) funded by an Italian MIUR-FIRB grant (Italian Ministry of University and Research - Investment Funds for Basic Research) has led to the creation of a free-access dynamic website, available at the web address https://serviziweb.ulss12.ve.it/firbabo, and of a centralized database with password-restricted access. The project network is composed of 9 research units (RUs) and has been active since 2005. The aim of the FIRB project was the design, production and validation of optoelectronic and chemoelectronic biosensors for the simultaneous detection of a novel class of cancer biomarkers associated with immunoglobulins of the M class (IgM) for early diagnosis of cancer. Biomarker immune complexes (BM-ICs) were assessed on samples of clinical cases and matched controls for breast, colorectal, liver, ovarian and prostate malignancies. This article describes in detail the architecture of the project website, the central database application, and the biobank developed for the FIRB Nanosized Cancer Polymarker Biochip Project. The article also illustrates many unique aspects that should be considered when developing a database within a multidisciplinary scenario. The main deliverables of the project were numerous, including the development of an online database which archived 1400 case report forms (700 cases and 700 matched controls) and more than 2700 experimental results relative to the BM-ICs assayed. The database also allowed for the traceability and retrieval of 21,000 aliquots archived in the centralized bank and stored as backup in the RUs, and for the development of a centralized biological bank in the coordinating unit with 6300 aliquots of serum. The constitution of the website and biobank database enabled optimal coordination of the RUs involved, highlighting the importance of sharing samples and scientific data in a multicenter setting for the achievement of the project goals.

  6. Interdisciplinary Collaboration amongst Colleagues and between Initiatives with the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.; Shaar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science grand challenges often require interdisciplinary and geographically distributed scientific collaboration to make significant progress. However, this organic collaboration between researchers, educators, and students only flourishes with the reduction or elimination of technological barriers. The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the geo-, paleo-, and rock magnetic scientific community to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from studies on natural and synthetic samples. MagIC is dedicated to facilitating scientific progress towards several highly multidisciplinary grand challenges and the MagIC Database team is currently beta testing a new MagIC Search Interface and API designed to be flexible enough for the incorporation of large heterogeneous datasets and for horizontal scalability to tens of millions of records and hundreds of requests per second. In an effort to reduce the barriers to effective collaboration, the search interface includes a simplified data model and upload procedure, support for online editing of datasets amongst team members, commenting by reviewers and colleagues, and automated contribution workflows and data retrieval through the API. This web application has been designed to generalize to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences Network (http://earthref.org/SBN/), EarthRef Digital Archive (http://earthref.org/ERDA/) and EarthRef Reference Database (http://earthref.org/ERR/) will benefit from its development.

  7. Binding Sites Analyser (BiSA): Software for Genomic Binding Sites Archiving and Overlap Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khushi, Matloob; Liddle, Christopher; Clarke, Christine L.; Graham, J. Dinny

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA), for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net PMID:24533055

  8. In-database processing of a large collection of remote sensing data: applications and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikhtenko, Vladimir; Mamash, Elena; Chubarov, Dmitri; Voronina, Polina

    2016-04-01

    Large archives of remote sensing data are now available to scientists, yet the need to work with individual satellite scenes or product files constrains studies that span a wide temporal range or spatial extent. The resources (storage capacity, computing power and network bandwidth) required for such studies are often beyond the capabilities of individual geoscientists. This problem has been tackled before in remote sensing research and inspired several information systems. Some of them such as NASA Giovanni [1] and Google Earth Engine have already proved their utility for science. Analysis tasks involving large volumes of numerical data are not unique to Earth Sciences. Recent advances in data science are enabled by the development of in-database processing engines that bring processing closer to storage, use declarative query languages to facilitate parallel scalability and provide high-level abstraction of the whole dataset. We build on the idea of bridging the gap between file archives containing remote sensing data and databases by integrating files into relational database as foreign data sources and performing analytical processing inside the database engine. Thereby higher level query language can efficiently address problems of arbitrary size: from accessing the data associated with a specific pixel or a grid cell to complex aggregation over spatial or temporal extents over a large number of individual data files. This approach was implemented using PostgreSQL for a Siberian regional archive of satellite data products holding hundreds of terabytes of measurements from multiple sensors and missions taken over a decade-long span. While preserving the original storage layout and therefore compatibility with existing applications the in-database processing engine provides a toolkit for provisioning remote sensing data in scientific workflows and applications. The use of SQL - a widely used higher level declarative query language - simplifies interoperability

  9. A data and information system for processing, archival, and distribution of data for global change research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sara J.

    1994-01-01

    Work on this project was focused on information management techniques for Marshall Space Flight Center's EOSDIS Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The centerpiece of this effort has been participation in EOSDIS catalog interoperability research, the result of which is a distributed Information Management System (IMS) allowing the user to query the inventories of all the DAAC's from a single user interface. UAH has provided the MSFC DAAC database server for the distributed IMS, and has contributed to definition and development of the browse image display capabilities in the system's user interface. Another important area of research has been in generating value-based metadata through data mining. In addition, information management applications for local inventory and archive management, and for tracking data orders were provided.

  10. Ethics and Truth in Archival Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The complexities of the ethics and truth in archival research are often unrecognised or invisible in educational research. This paper complicates the process of collecting data in the archives, as it problematises notions of ethics and truth in the archives. The archival research took place in the former Czechoslovakia and its turbulent political…

  11. sc-PDB: a 3D-database of ligandable binding sites—10 years on

    PubMed Central

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Bret, Guillaume; Rognan, Didier; Kellenberger, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The sc-PDB database (available at http://bioinfo-pharma.u-strasbg.fr/scPDB/) is a comprehensive and up-to-date selection of ligandable binding sites of the Protein Data Bank. Sites are defined from complexes between a protein and a pharmacological ligand. The database provides the all-atom description of the protein, its ligand, their binding site and their binding mode. Currently, the sc-PDB archive registers 9283 binding sites from 3678 unique proteins and 5608 unique ligands. The sc-PDB database was publicly launched in 2004 with the aim of providing structure files suitable for computational approaches to drug design, such as docking. During the last 10 years we have improved and standardized the processes for (i) identifying binding sites, (ii) correcting structures, (iii) annotating protein function and ligand properties and (iv) characterizing their binding mode. This paper presents the latest enhancements in the database, specifically pertaining to the representation of molecular interaction and to the similarity between ligand/protein binding patterns. The new website puts emphasis in pictorial analysis of data. PMID:25300483

  12. Online database for documenting clinical pathology resident education.

    PubMed

    Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Chou, David; Astion, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Training of clinical pathologists is evolving and must now address the 6 core competencies described by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which include patient care. A substantial portion of the patient care performed by the clinical pathology resident takes place while the resident is on call for the laboratory, a practice that provides the resident with clinical experience and assists the laboratory in providing quality service to clinicians in the hospital and surrounding community. Documenting the educational value of these on-call experiences and providing evidence of competence is difficult for residency directors. An online database of these calls, entered by residents and reviewed by faculty, would provide a mechanism for documenting and improving the education of clinical pathology residents. With Microsoft Access we developed an online database that uses active server pages and secure sockets layer encryption to document calls to the clinical pathology resident. Using the data collected, we evaluated the efficacy of 3 interventions aimed at improving resident education. The database facilitated the documentation of more than 4 700 calls in the first 21 months it was online, provided archived resident-generated data to assist in serving clients, and demonstrated that 2 interventions aimed at improving resident education were successful. We have developed a secure online database, accessible from any computer with Internet access, that can be used to easily document clinical pathology resident education and competency.

  13. OASIS: A Data Fusion System Optimized for Access to Distributed Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. B.; Kong, M.; Good, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    The On-Line Archive Science Information Services (OASIS) is accessible as a java applet through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive home page. It uses Geographical Information System (GIS) technology to provide data fusion and interaction services for astronomers. These services include the ability to process and display arbitrarily large image files, and user-controlled contouring, overlay regeneration and multi-table/image interactions. OASIS has been optimized for access to distributed archives and data sets. Its second release (June 2002) provides a mechanism that enables access to OASIS from "third-party" services and data providers. That is, any data provider who creates a query form to an archive containing a collection of data (images, catalogs, spectra) can direct the result files from the query into OASIS. Similarly, data providers who serve links to datasets or remote services on a web page can access all of these data with one instance of OASIS. In this was any data or service provider is given access to the full suite of capabilites of OASIS. We illustrate the "third-party" access feature with two examples: queries to the high-energy image datasets accessible from GSFC SkyView, and links to data that are returned from a target-based query to the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED). The second release of OASIS also includes a file-transfer manager that reports the status of multiple data downloads from remote sources to the client machine. It is a prototype for a request management system that will ultimately control and manage compute-intensive jobs submitted through OASIS to computing grids, such as request for large scale image mosaics and bulk statistical analysis.

  14. The GEISA 2009 Spectroscopic Database System and its CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Center Interactive Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, Nicole; Crépeau, Laurent; Capelle, Virginie; Scott, Noëlle; Armante, Raymond; Chédin, Alain; Boonne, Cathy; Poulet-Crovisier, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    The GEISA (1) (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer-accessible database, initiated in 1976, is developed and maintained at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted respectively to : line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols. The updated 2009 edition (GEISA-09) archives, in its line transition parameters sub-section, 50 molecules, corresponding to 111 isotopes, for a total of 3,807,997 entries, in the spectral range from 10-6 to 35,877.031 cm-1. Detailed description of the whole database contents will be documented. GEISA and GEISA/IASI are implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. These facilities will be described and widely illustrated, as well. Interactive demonstrations will be given if technical possibilities are feasible at the time of the Poster Display Session. More than 350 researchers are registered for on line use of GEISA on Ether. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities (2) related to the remote sensing of the terrestrial atmosphere thanks to the sounding performances of new generation of hyperspectral Earth' atmospheric sounders, like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder -http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov/), in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/) in Europe, using the 4A radiative transfer model (3) (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and NOVELTIS -http://www.noveltis.fr/) with the support of CNES (2006). Refs: (1) Jacquinet-Husson N., N.A. Scott, A. Chédin,L. Crépeau, R. Armante, V. Capelle

  15. Design and implementation of scalable tape archiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemoto, Toshihiro; Kitsuregawa, Masaru; Takagi, Mikio

    1996-01-01

    In order to reduce costs, computer manufacturers try to use commodity parts as much as possible. Mainframes using proprietary processors are being replaced by high performance RISC microprocessor-based workstations, which are further being replaced by the commodity microprocessor used in personal computers. Highly reliable disks for mainframes are also being replaced by disk arrays, which are complexes of disk drives. In this paper we try to clarify the feasibility of a large scale tertiary storage system composed of 8-mm tape archivers utilizing robotics. In the near future, the 8-mm tape archiver will be widely used and become a commodity part, since recent rapid growth of multimedia applications requires much larger storage than disk drives can provide. We designed a scalable tape archiver which connects as many 8-mm tape archivers (element archivers) as possible. In the scalable archiver, robotics can exchange a cassette tape between two adjacent element archivers mechanically. Thus, we can build a large scalable archiver inexpensively. In addition, a sophisticated migration mechanism distributes frequently accessed tapes (hot tapes) evenly among all of the element archivers, which improves the throughput considerably. Even with the failures of some tape drives, the system dynamically redistributes hot tapes to the other element archivers which have live tape drives. Several kinds of specially tailored huge archivers are on the market, however, the 8-mm tape scalable archiver could replace them. To maintain high performance in spite of high access locality when a large number of archivers are attached to the scalable archiver, it is necessary to scatter frequently accessed cassettes among the element archivers and to use the tape drives efficiently. For this purpose, we introduce two cassette migration algorithms, foreground migration and background migration. Background migration transfers cassettes between element archivers to redistribute frequently accessed

  16. NCBI GEO: archive for functional genomics data sets—update

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tanya; Wilhite, Stephen E.; Ledoux, Pierre; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F.; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A.; Phillippy, Katherine H.; Sherman, Patti M.; Holko, Michelle; Yefanov, Andrey; Lee, Hyeseung; Zhang, Naigong; Robertson, Cynthia L.; Serova, Nadezhda; Davis, Sean; Soboleva, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) is an international public repository for high-throughput microarray and next-generation sequence functional genomic data sets submitted by the research community. The resource supports archiving of raw data, processed data and metadata which are indexed, cross-linked and searchable. All data are freely available for download in a variety of formats. GEO also provides several web-based tools and strategies to assist users to query, analyse and visualize data. This article reports current status and recent database developments, including the release of GEO2R, an R-based web application that helps users analyse GEO data. PMID:23193258

  17. NCBI GEO: archive for functional genomics data sets--update.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Holko, Michelle; Yefanov, Andrey; Lee, Hyeseung; Zhang, Naigong; Robertson, Cynthia L; Serova, Nadezhda; Davis, Sean; Soboleva, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) is an international public repository for high-throughput microarray and next-generation sequence functional genomic data sets submitted by the research community. The resource supports archiving of raw data, processed data and metadata which are indexed, cross-linked and searchable. All data are freely available for download in a variety of formats. GEO also provides several web-based tools and strategies to assist users to query, analyse and visualize data. This article reports current status and recent database developments, including the release of GEO2R, an R-based web application that helps users analyse GEO data.

  18. Visual Systems for Interactive Exploration and Mining of Large-Scale Neuroimaging Data Archives

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Van Horn, John D.

    2012-01-01

    While technological advancements in neuroimaging scanner engineering have improved the efficiency of data acquisition, electronic data capture methods will likewise significantly expedite the populating of large-scale neuroimaging databases. As they do and these archives grow in size, a particular challenge lies in examining and interacting with the information that these resources contain through the development of compelling, user-driven approaches for data exploration and mining. In this article, we introduce the informatics visualization for neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework for the graphical rendering of, and dynamic interaction with the contents of large-scale neuroimaging data sets. We describe the rationale behind INVIZIAN, detail its development, and demonstrate its usage in examining a collection of over 900 T1-anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image volumes from across a diverse set of clinical neuroimaging studies drawn from a leading neuroimaging database. Using a collection of cortical surface metrics and means for examining brain similarity, INVIZIAN graphically displays brain surfaces as points in a coordinate space and enables classification of clusters of neuroanatomically similar MRI images and data mining. As an initial step toward addressing the need for such user-friendly tools, INVIZIAN provides a highly unique means to interact with large quantities of electronic brain imaging archives in ways suitable for hypothesis generation and data mining. PMID:22536181

  19. PARPs database: A LIMS systems for protein-protein interaction data mining or laboratory information management system

    PubMed Central

    Droit, Arnaud; Hunter, Joanna M; Rouleau, Michèle; Ethier, Chantal; Picard-Cloutier, Aude; Bourgais, David; Poirier, Guy G

    2007-01-01

    Background In the "post-genome" era, mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important method for the analysis of proteins and the rapid advancement of this technique, in combination with other proteomics methods, results in an increasing amount of proteome data. This data must be archived and analysed using specialized bioinformatics tools. Description We herein describe "PARPs database," a data analysis and management pipeline for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics. PARPs database is a web-based tool whose features include experiment annotation, protein database searching, protein sequence management, as well as data-mining of the peptides and proteins identified. Conclusion Using this pipeline, we have successfully identified several interactions of biological significance between PARP-1 and other proteins, namely RFC-1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. PMID:18093328

  20. The Ethics of Archival Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Heidi A.; Porter, James E.

    2012-01-01

    What are the key ethical issues involved in conducting archival research? Based on examination of cases and interviews with leading archival researchers in composition, this article discusses several ethical questions and offers a heuristic to guide ethical decision making. Key to this process is recognizing the person-ness of archival materials.…

  1. James Webb Space Telescope XML Database: From the Beginning to Today

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Fatig, Curtis C.

    2005-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has been defining, developing, and exercising the use of a common eXtensible Markup Language (XML) for the command and telemetry (C&T) database structure. JWST is the first large NASA space mission to use XML for databases. The JWST project started developing the concepts for the C&T database in 2002. The database will need to last at least 20 years since it will be used beginning with flight software development, continuing through Observatory integration and test (I&T) and through operations. Also, a database tool kit has been provided to the 18 various flight software development laboratories located in the United States, Europe, and Canada that allows the local users to create their own databases. Recently the JWST Project has been working with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Object Management Group (OMG) XML Telemetry and Command Exchange (XTCE) personnel to provide all the information needed by JWST and JPL for exchanging database information using a XML standard structure. The lack of standardization requires custom ingest scripts for each ground system segment, increasing the cost of the total system. Providing a non-proprietary standard of the telemetry and command database definition formation will allow dissimilar systems to communicate without the need for expensive mission specific database tools and testing of the systems after the database translation. The various ground system components that would benefit from a standardized database are the telemetry and command systems, archives, simulators, and trending tools. JWST has exchanged the XML database with the Eclipse, EPOCH, ASIST ground systems, Portable spacecraft simulator (PSS), a front-end system, and Integrated Trending and Plotting System (ITPS) successfully. This paper will discuss how JWST decided to use XML, the barriers to a new concept, experiences utilizing the XML structure, exchanging databases with other users, and issues that have

  2. Earth observation archive activities at DRA Farnborough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, M. D.; Williams, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Space Sector, Defence Research Agency (DRA), Farnborough have been actively involved in the acquisition and processing of Earth Observation data for over 15 years. During that time an archive of over 20,000 items has been built up. This paper describes the major archive activities, including: operation and maintenance of the main DRA Archive, the development of a prototype Optical Disc Archive System (ODAS), the catalog systems in use at DRA, the UK Processing and Archive Facility for ERS-1 data, and future plans for archiving activities.

  3. TAPAS, a VO archive at the IRAM 30-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Stephane; Espigares, Victor; Ruíz, José Enrique; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Mauersberger, Rainer; Brunswig, Walter; Kramer, Carsten; Santander-Vela, Juan de Dios; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Astronomical observatories are today generating increasingly large volumes of data. For an efficient use of them, databases have been built following the standards proposed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA), providing a common protocol to query them and make them interoperable. The IRAM 30-m radio telescope, located in Sierra Nevada (Granada, Spain) is a millimeter wavelength telescope with a constantly renewed, extensive choice of instruments, and capable of covering the frequency range between 80 and 370 GHz. It is continuously producing a large amount of data thanks to the more than 200 scientific projects observed each year. The TAPAS archive at the IRAM 30-m telescope is aimed to provide public access to the headers describing the observations performed with the telescope, according to a defined data policy, making as well the technical data available to the IRAM staff members. A special emphasis has been made to make it Virtual Observatory (VO) compliant, and to offer a VO compliant web interface allowing to make the information available to the scientific community. TAPAS is built using the Django Python framework on top of a relational MySQL database, and is fully integrated with the telescope control system. The TAPAS data model (DM) is based on the Radio Astronomical DAta Model for Single dish radio telescopes (RADAMS), to allow for easy integration into the VO infrastructure. A metadata modeling layer is used by the data-filler to allow an implementation free from assumptions about the control system and the underlying database. TAPAS and its public web interface ( http://tapas.iram.es ) provides a scalable system that can evolve with new instruments and observing modes. A meta description of the DM has been introduced in TAPAS in order to both avoid undesired coupling between the code and the DM and to provide a better

  4. Archive and records management-Fiscal year 2010 offline archive media trade study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodoh, Tom; Boettcher, Ken; Gacke, Ken; Greenhagen, Cheryl; Engelbrecht, Al

    2010-01-01

    This document is a trade study comparing offline digital archive storage technologies. The document compares and assesses several technologies and recommends which technologies could be deployed as the next generation standard for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Archives must regularly migrate to the next generation of digital archive technology, and the technology selected must maintain data integrity until the next migration. This document is the fiscal year 2010 (FY10) revision of a study completed in FY01 and revised in FY03, FY04, FY06, and FY08.

  5. gEVE: a genome-based endogenous viral element database provides comprehensive viral protein-coding sequences in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, So; Takahashi, Mahoko Ueda

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, approximately 10% of genome sequences correspond to endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which are derived from ancient viral infections of germ cells. Although most EVEs have been inactivated, some open reading frames (ORFs) of EVEs obtained functions in the hosts. However, EVE ORFs usually remain unannotated in the genomes, and no databases are available for EVE ORFs. To investigate the function and evolution of EVEs in mammalian genomes, we developed EVE ORF databases for 20 genomes of 19 mammalian species. A total of 736,771 non-overlapping EVE ORFs were identified and archived in a database named gEVE (http://geve.med.u-tokai.ac.jp). The gEVE database provides nucleotide and amino acid sequences, genomic loci and functional annotations of EVE ORFs for all 20 genomes. In analyzing RNA-seq data with the gEVE database, we successfully identified the expressed EVE genes, suggesting that the gEVE database facilitates studies of the genomic analyses of various mammalian species.Database URL: http://geve.med.u-tokai.ac.jp. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. gEVE: a genome-based endogenous viral element database provides comprehensive viral protein-coding sequences in mammalian genomes

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, So; Takahashi, Mahoko Ueda

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, approximately 10% of genome sequences correspond to endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which are derived from ancient viral infections of germ cells. Although most EVEs have been inactivated, some open reading frames (ORFs) of EVEs obtained functions in the hosts. However, EVE ORFs usually remain unannotated in the genomes, and no databases are available for EVE ORFs. To investigate the function and evolution of EVEs in mammalian genomes, we developed EVE ORF databases for 20 genomes of 19 mammalian species. A total of 736,771 non-overlapping EVE ORFs were identified and archived in a database named gEVE (http://geve.med.u-tokai.ac.jp). The gEVE database provides nucleotide and amino acid sequences, genomic loci and functional annotations of EVE ORFs for all 20 genomes. In analyzing RNA-seq data with the gEVE database, we successfully identified the expressed EVE genes, suggesting that the gEVE database facilitates studies of the genomic analyses of various mammalian species. Database URL: http://geve.med.u-tokai.ac.jp PMID:27242033

  7. NCBI GEO: mining tens of millions of expression profiles--database and tools update.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Soboleva, Alexandra; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Edgar, Ron

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) archives and freely disseminates microarray and other forms of high-throughput data generated by the scientific community. The database has a minimum information about a microarray experiment (MIAME)-compliant infrastructure that captures fully annotated raw and processed data. Several data deposit options and formats are supported, including web forms, spreadsheets, XML and Simple Omnibus Format in Text (SOFT). In addition to data storage, a collection of user-friendly web-based interfaces and applications are available to help users effectively explore, visualize and download the thousands of experiments and tens of millions of gene expression patterns stored in GEO. This paper provides a summary of the GEO database structure and user facilities, and describes recent enhancements to database design, performance, submission format options, data query and retrieval utilities. GEO is accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/

  8. The HIPPO Project Archive: Carbon Cycle and Greenhouse Gas Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, S. W.; Aquino, J.; Hook, L.; Williams, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    , atmospheric chemistry and aerosol measurements made by several teams of investigators. Files are in ASCII text format. Selected data products have been loaded into a relational database for customized data subsetting and export formatting. We anticipate adding model-generated products to the archive. Metadata records have been compiled into a searchable CDIAC index and have been submitted to climate change research metadata clearinghouses (e.g., GCMD). Each data product is given a complete bibliographic citation and a persistent identifier (DOI) to facilitate attribution and access. A data policy was adopted that balances the needs of the project investigators with the interests of the scientific user community.

  9. Dynamic Data Management Based on Archival Process Integration at the Centre for Environmental Data Archival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Esther; Waterfall, Alison; Pepler, Sam; Newey, Charles

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we decribe a business process modelling approach to the integration of exisiting archival activities. We provide a high level overview of existing practice and discuss how procedures can be extended and supported through the description of preservation state. The aim of which is to faciliate the dynamic controlled management of scientific data through its lifecycle. The main types of archival processes considered are: • Management processes that govern the operation of an archive. These management processes include archival governance (preservation state management, selection of archival candidates and strategic management) . • Operational processes that constitute the core activities of the archive which maintain the value of research assets. These operational processes are the acquisition, ingestion, deletion, generation of metadata and preservation actvities, • Supporting processes, which include planning, risk analysis and monitoring of the community/preservation environment. We then proceed by describing the feasability testing of extended risk management and planning procedures which integrate current practices. This was done through the CEDA Archival Format Audit which inspected British Atmospherics Data Centre and National Earth Observation Data Centre Archival holdings. These holdings are extensive, comprising of around 2PB of data and 137 million individual files which were analysed and characterised in terms of format based risk. We are then able to present an overview of the risk burden faced by a large scale archive attempting to maintain the usability of heterogeneous environmental data sets. We conclude by presenting a dynamic data management information model that is capable of describing the preservation state of archival holdings throughout the data lifecycle. We provide discussion of the following core model entities and their relationships: • Aspirational entities, which include Data Entity definitions and their associated

  10. The Master Lens Database and The Orphan Lenses Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas

    2012-10-01

    Strong gravitational lenses are uniquely suited for the study of dark matter structure and substructure within massive halos of many scales, act as gravitational telescopes for distant faint objects, and can give powerful and competitive cosmological constraints. While hundreds of strong lenses are known to date, spanning five orders of magnitude in mass scale, thousands will be identified this decade. To fully exploit the power of these objects presently, and in the near future, we are creating the Master Lens Database. This is a clearinghouse of all known strong lens systems, with a sophisticated and modern database of uniformly measured and derived observational and lens-model derived quantities, using archival Hubble data across several instruments. This Database enables new science that can be done with a comprehensive sample of strong lenses. The operational goal of this proposal is to develop the process and the code to semi-automatically stage Hubble data of each system, create appropriate masks of the lensing objects and lensing features, and derive gravitational lens models, to provide a uniform and fairly comprehensive information set that is ingested into the Database. The scientific goal for this team is to use the properties of the ensemble of lenses to make a new study of the internal structure of lensing galaxies, and to identify new objects that show evidence of strong substructure lensing, for follow-up study. All data, scripts, masks, model setup files, and derived parameters, will be public, and free. The Database will be accessible online and through a sophisticated smartphone application, which will also be free.

  11. The Astrobiology Habitable Environments Database (AHED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, B.; Stone, N.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T.; Fonda, M.; Pires, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Astrobiology Habitable Environments Database (AHED) is a central, high quality, long-term searchable repository for archiving and collaborative sharing of astrobiologically relevant data, including, morphological, textural and contextural images, chemical, biochemical, isotopic, sequencing, and mineralogical information. The aim of AHED is to foster long-term innovative research by supporting integration and analysis of diverse datasets in order to: 1) help understand and interpret planetary geology; 2) identify and characterize habitable environments and pre-biotic/biotic processes; 3) interpret returned data from present and past missions; 4) provide a citable database of NASA-funded published and unpublished data (after an agreed-upon embargo period). AHED uses the online open-source software "The Open Data Repository's Data Publisher" (ODR - http://www.opendatarepository.org) [1], which provides a user-friendly interface that research teams or individual scientists can use to design, populate and manage their own database according to the characteristics of their data and the need to share data with collaborators or the broader scientific community. This platform can be also used as a laboratory notebook. The database will have the capability to import and export in a variety of standard formats. Advanced graphics will be implemented including 3D graphing, multi-axis graphs, error bars, and similar scientific data functions together with advanced online tools for data analysis (e. g. the statistical package, R). A permissions system will be put in place so that as data are being actively collected and interpreted, they will remain proprietary. A citation system will allow research data to be used and appropriately referenced by other researchers after the data are made public. This project is supported by the Science-Enabling Research Activity (SERA) and NASA NNX11AP82A, Mars Science Laboratory Investigations. [1] Nate et al. (2015) AGU, submitted.

  12. SIRSALE: integrated video database management tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunie, Lionel; Favory, Loic; Gelas, J. P.; Lefevre, Laurent; Mostefaoui, Ahmed; Nait-Abdesselam, F.

    2002-07-01

    Video databases became an active field of research during the last decade. The main objective in such systems is to provide users with capabilities to friendly search, access and playback distributed stored video data in the same way as they do for traditional distributed databases. Hence, such systems need to deal with hard issues : (a) video documents generate huge volumes of data and are time sensitive (streams must be delivered at a specific bitrate), (b) contents of video data are very hard to be automatically extracted and need to be humanly annotated. To cope with these issues, many approaches have been proposed in the literature including data models, query languages, video indexing etc. In this paper, we present SIRSALE : a set of video databases management tools that allow users to manipulate video documents and streams stored in large distributed repositories. All the proposed tools are based on generic models that can be customized for specific applications using ad-hoc adaptation modules. More precisely, SIRSALE allows users to : (a) browse video documents by structures (sequences, scenes, shots) and (b) query the video database content by using a graphical tool, adapted to the nature of the target video documents. This paper also presents an annotating interface which allows archivists to describe the content of video documents. All these tools are coupled to a video player integrating remote VCR functionalities and are based on active network technology. So, we present how dedicated active services allow an optimized video transport for video streams (with Tamanoir active nodes). We then describe experiments of using SIRSALE on an archive of news video and soccer matches. The system has been demonstrated to professionals with a positive feedback. Finally, we discuss open issues and present some perspectives.

  13. Historical seismometry database project: A comprehensive relational database for historical seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The recovery and preservation of the patrimony made of the instrumental registrations regarding the historical earthquakes is with no doubt a subject of great interest. This attention, besides being purely historical, must necessarily be also scientific. In fact, the availability of a great amount of parametric information on the seismic activity in a given area is a doubtless help to the seismologic researcher's activities. In this article the project of the Sismos group of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology of Rome new database is presented. In the structure of the new scheme the matured experience of five years of activity is summarized. We consider it useful for those who are approaching to "recovery and reprocess" computer based facilities. In the past years several attempts on Italian seismicity have followed each other. It has almost never been real databases. Some of them have had positive success because they were well considered and organized. In others it was limited in supplying lists of events with their relative hypocentral standards. What makes this project more interesting compared to the previous work is the completeness and the generality of the managed information. For example, it will be possible to view the hypocentral information regarding a given historical earthquake; it will be possible to research the seismograms in raster, digital or digitalized format, the information on times of arrival of the phases in the various stations, the instrumental standards and so on. The relational modern logic on which the archive is based, allows the carrying out of all these operations with little effort. The database described below will completely substitute Sismos' current data bank. Some of the organizational principles of this work are similar to those that inspire the database for the real-time monitoring of the seismicity in use in the principal offices of international research. A modern planning logic in a distinctly historical

  14. NASA's Astrophysics Data Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, H.; Hanisch, R.; Bredekamp, J.

    2000-09-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science has established a series of archival centers where science data acquired through its space science missions is deposited. The availability of high quality data to the general public through these open archives enables the maximization of science return of the flight missions. The Astrophysics Data Centers Coordinating Council, an informal collaboration of archival centers, coordinates data from five archival centers distiguished primarily by the wavelength range of the data deposited there. Data are available in FITS format. An overview of NASA's data centers and services is presented in this paper. A standard front-end modifyer called `Astrowbrowse' is described. Other catalog browsers and tools include WISARD and AMASE supported by the National Space Scince Data Center, as well as ISAIA, a follow on to Astrobrowse.

  15. Evolution of the use of relational and NoSQL databases in the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberis, D.

    2016-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment used for many years a large database infrastructure based on Oracle to store several different types of non-event data: time-dependent detector configuration and conditions data, calibrations and alignments, configurations of Grid sites, catalogues for data management tools, job records for distributed workload management tools, run and event metadata. The rapid development of "NoSQL" databases (structured storage services) in the last five years allowed an extended and complementary usage of traditional relational databases and new structured storage tools in order to improve the performance of existing applications and to extend their functionalities using the possibilities offered by the modern storage systems. The trend is towards using the best tool for each kind of data, separating for example the intrinsically relational metadata from payload storage, and records that are frequently updated and benefit from transactions from archived information. Access to all components has to be orchestrated by specialised services that run on front-end machines and shield the user from the complexity of data storage infrastructure. This paper describes this technology evolution in the ATLAS database infrastructure and presents a few examples of large database applications that benefit from it.

  16. SODA: Smart Objects, Dumb Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Zubair, Mohammad; Shen, Stewart N. T.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) model for digital libraries (DLs). The SODA model transfers functionality traditionally associated with archives to the archived objects themselves. We are exploiting this shift of responsibility to facilitate other DL goals, such as interoperability, object intelligence and mobility, and heterogeneity. Objects in a SODA DL negotiate presentation of content and handle their own terms and conditions. In this paper we present implementations of our smart objects, buckets, and our dumb archive (DA). We discuss the status of buckets and DA and how they are used in a variety of DL projects.

  17. Building an archive of Arctic-Boreal animal movements and links to remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, G.; Handler, M.; Davidson, S. C.; Boelman, N.

    2017-12-01

    Climate is changing in the Arctic and Boreal regions of North America more quickly than anywhere else on the planet. The impact of climate changes on wildlife in the region is difficult to assess, as they occur over decades, while wildlife monitoring programs have been in place for relatively short periods, have used a variety of data collection methods, and are not integrated across studies and governmental agencies. Further, linking wildlife movements to measures of weather and climate is impeded by the challenge of accessing environmental data products and differences in spatiotemporal scale. To analyze the impact of long-term changes in weather and habitat conditions on wildlife movements, we built an archive of avian, predator and ungulate movements throughout the Arctic-Boreal region. The archive is compiled and hosted in Movebank, a free, web-based service for managing animal movement data. Using Movebank allows us to securely manage data within a single database while supporting project-specific terms of use and access rights. By importing the data to the Movebank database, they are converted to a standard data format, reviewed for quality and completeness, and made easily accessible for analysis through the R package 'move'. In addition, the Env-DATA System in Movebank allows easy annotation of these and related time-location records with hundreds of environmental variables provided by global remote sensing and weather data products, including MODIS Land, Snow and Ice products, the ECMWF and NARR weather reanalyses, and others. The ABoVE Animal Movement Archive includes 6.6 million locations of over 3,000 animals collected by 50 programs and studies, contributed by over 25 collaborating institutions, with data extending from 1988 to the present. Organizing the data on Movebank has enabled collaboration and metaanalysis and has also improved their quality and completeness. The ABoVE Animal Movement Archive provides a platform actively used by data

  18. Archives: New Horizons in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobis, L.; Laurenceau, A.

    2010-10-01

    The scientific archives in the Paris Observatory's library date back to the XVIIth century. In addition to the preservation and the valorisation of these historic archives, the library is also responsible for the efficient and timely management of contemporary documents to ensure their optimum conservation and identification once they become historical. Oral, iconographic and electronic documents complement these paper archives.

  19. A method to add richness to the National Landslide Database of Great Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Faith; Freeborough, Katy; Malamud, Bruce; Demeritt, David

    2014-05-01

    Landslides in Great Britain (GB) pose a risk to infrastructure, property and livelihoods. Our understanding of where landslide hazard and impact will be greatest is based on our knowledge of past events. Here, we present a method to supplement existing records of landslides in GB by searching electronic archives of local and regional newspapers. In Great Britain, the British Geological Survey (BGS) are responsible for updating and maintaining records of GB landslide events and their impacts in the National Landslide Database (NLD). The NLD contains records of approximately 16,500 landslide events in Great Britain. Data sources for the NLD include field surveys, academic articles, grey literature, news, public reports and, since 2012, social media. Here we aim to supplement the richness of the NLD by (i) identifying additional landslide events and (ii) adding more detail to existing database entries. This is done by systematically searching the LexisNexis digital archive of 568 local and regional newspapers published in the UK. The first step in the methodology was to construct Boolean search criteria that optimised the balance between minimising the number of irrelevant articles (e.g. "a landslide victory") and maximising those referring to landslide events. This keyword search was then applied to the LexisNexis archive of newspapers for all articles published between 1 January and 31 December 2012, resulting in 1,668 articles. These articles were assessed to determine whether they related to a landslide event. Of the 1,668 articles, approximately 30% (~700) referred to landslide events, with others referring to landslides more generally or themes unrelated to landslides. Examples of information obtained from newspaper articles included: date/time of landslide occurrence, spatial location, size, impact, landslide type and triggering mechanism, although the amount of detail and precision attainable from individual articles was variable. Of the 700 articles found for

  20. ARCTOS: a relational database relating specimens, specimen-based science, and archival documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrell, Gordon H.; Ramotnik, Cindy A.; McDonald, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Data are preserved when they are perpetually discoverable, but even in the Information Age, discovery of legacy data appropriate to particular investigations is uncertain. Secure Internet storage is necessary but insufficient. Data can be discovered only when they are adequately described, and visibility increases markedly if the data are related to other data that are receiving usage. Such relationships can be built within (1) the framework of a relational database, or (1) they can be built among separate resources, within the framework of the Internet. Evolving primarily around biological collections, Arctos is a database that does both of these tasks. It includes data structures for a diversity of specimen attributes, essentially all collection-management tasks, plus literature citations, project descriptions, etc. As a centralized collaboration of several university museums, Arctos is an ideal environment for capitalizing on the many relationships that often exist between items in separate collections. Arctos is related to NIH’s DNA-sequence repository (GenBank) with record-to-record reciprocal linkages, and it serves data to several discipline-specific web portals, including the Global Biodiversity Information Network (GBIF). The University of Alaska Museum’s paleontological collection is Arctos’s recent extension beyond the constraints of neontology. With about 1.3 million cataloged items, additional collections are being added each year.

  1. Community archiving of imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Steven L.; Roys, Steven R.; Munjal, Sunita

    1996-05-01

    The quantity of image data created in a large radiology practice has long been a challenge for available archiving technology. Traditional methods ofarchiving the large quantity of films generated in radiology have relied on warehousing in remote sites, with courier delivery of film files for historical comparisons. A digital community archive, accessible via a wide area network, represents a feasible solution to the problem of archiving digital images from a busy practice. In addition, it affords a physician caring for a patient access to imaging studies performed at a variety ofhealthcare institutions without the need to repeat studies. Security problems include both network security issues in the WAN environment and access control for patient, physician and imaging center. The key obstacle to developing a community archive is currently political. Reluctance to participate in a community archive can be reduced by appropriate design of the access mechanisms.

  2. ALDB: a domestic-animal long noncoding RNA database.

    PubMed

    Li, Aimin; Zhang, Junying; Zhou, Zhongyin; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yujuan; Liu, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted significant attention in recent years due to their important roles in many biological processes. Domestic animals constitute a unique resource for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic variation and are ideal models relevant to diverse areas of biomedical research. With improving sequencing technologies, numerous domestic-animal lncRNAs are now available. Thus, there is an immediate need for a database resource that can assist researchers to store, organize, analyze and visualize domestic-animal lncRNAs. The domestic-animal lncRNA database, named ALDB, is the first comprehensive database with a focus on the domestic-animal lncRNAs. It currently archives 12,103 pig intergenic lncRNAs (lincRNAs), 8,923 chicken lincRNAs and 8,250 cow lincRNAs. In addition to the annotations of lincRNAs, it offers related data that is not available yet in existing lncRNA databases (lncRNAdb and NONCODE), such as genome-wide expression profiles and animal quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of domestic animals. Moreover, a collection of interfaces and applications, such as the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), the Generic Genome Browser (GBrowse) and flexible search functionalities, are available to help users effectively explore, analyze and download data related to domestic-animal lncRNAs. ALDB enables the exploration and comparative analysis of lncRNAs in domestic animals. A user-friendly web interface, integrated information and tools make it valuable to researchers in their studies. ALDB is freely available from http://res.xaut.edu.cn/aldb/index.jsp.

  3. The BioGRID Interaction Database: 2011 update

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Chris; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Boucher, Lorrie; Oughtred, Rose; Livstone, Michael S.; Nixon, Julie; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wang, Xiaodong; Shi, Xiaoqi; Reguly, Teresa; Rust, Jennifer M.; Winter, Andrew; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) is a public database that archives and disseminates genetic and protein interaction data from model organisms and humans (http://www.thebiogrid.org). BioGRID currently holds 347 966 interactions (170 162 genetic, 177 804 protein) curated from both high-throughput data sets and individual focused studies, as derived from over 23 000 publications in the primary literature. Complete coverage of the entire literature is maintained for budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), and efforts to expand curation across multiple metazoan species are underway. The BioGRID houses 48 831 human protein interactions that have been curated from 10 247 publications. Current curation drives are focused on particular areas of biology to enable insights into conserved networks and pathways that are relevant to human health. The BioGRID 3.0 web interface contains new search and display features that enable rapid queries across multiple data types and sources. An automated Interaction Management System (IMS) is used to prioritize, coordinate and track curation across international sites and projects. BioGRID provides interaction data to several model organism databases, resources such as Entrez-Gene and other interaction meta-databases. The entire BioGRID 3.0 data collection may be downloaded in multiple file formats, including PSI MI XML. Source code for BioGRID 3.0 is freely available without any restrictions. PMID:21071413

  4. The COROT Archive at LAEFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Almudena; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Solano, Enrique; García-Torres, Miguel; López, Mauro; Sarro, Luis Manuel

    We describe here the main capabilities of the COROT archive. The archive (http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/corotfa/jsp/searchform.jsp), managed at LAEFF in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory (http://svo.laeff.inta.es), has been developed following the standards and requirements defined by IVOA (http://www.ivoa.net). The COROT archive at LAEFF will be publicly available by the end of 2008.

  5. The extreme ultraviolet explorer archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polomski, E.; Drake, J. J.; Dobson, C.; Christian, C.

    1993-09-01

    The Extreme Ultrviolet Explorer (EUVE) public archive was created to handle the storage, maintenance, and distribution of EUVE data and ancillary documentation, information, and software. Access to the archive became available to the public on July 17, 1992, only 40 days after the launch of the EUVE satellite. A brief overview of the archive's contents and the various methods of access will be described.

  6. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2013-04-01

    (SEVIRI, TRIMM, PARASOL...) stored in the ICARE data archive using OpeNDAP protocole The website will soon propose new facilities. In particular, many in situ datasets will be homogenized and inserted in a relational database, in order to enable more accurate data selection and download of different datasets in a shared format. In order to meet the operational needs of the airborne and ground based observational teams during the ChArMEx 2012 pre-campaign and the 2013 experiment, a day-to-day quick look and report display website has been developed too: http://choc.sedoo.org. It offers a convenient way to browse weather conditions and chemical composition during the campaign periods.

  7. The Gaia Archive at ESAC: a VO-inside archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Nunez, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ESDC (ESAC Science Data Center) is one of the active members of the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) that have defined a set of standards, libraries and concepts that allows to create flexible,scalable and interoperable architectures on the data archives development. In the case of astronomy science that involves the use of big catalogues, as in Gaia or Euclid, TAP, UWS and VOSpace standards can be used to create an architecture that allows the explotation of this valuable data from the community. Also, new challenges arise like the implementation of the new paradigm "move code close to the data", what can be partially obtained by the extension of the protocols (TAP+, UWS+, etc) or the languages (ADQL). We explain how we have used VO standards and libraries for the Gaia Archive that, not only have producing an open and interoperable archive but, also, minimizing the developement on certain areas. Also we will explain how we have extended these protocols and the future plans.

  8. MOSAIC: An organic geochemical and sedimentological database for marine surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavagna, Maria Luisa; Usman, Muhammed; De Avelar, Silvania; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Modern ocean sediments serve as the interface between the biosphere and the geosphere, play a key role in biogeochemical cycles and provide a window on how contemporary processes are written into the sedimentary record. Research over past decades has resulted in a wealth of information on the content and composition of organic matter in marine sediments, with ever-more sophisticated techniques continuing to yield information of greater detail and as an accelerating pace. However, there has been no attempt to synthesize this wealth of information. We are establishing a new database that incorporates information relevant to local, regional and global-scale assessment of the content, source and fate of organic materials accumulating in contemporary marine sediments. In the MOSAIC (Modern Ocean Sediment Archive and Inventory of Carbon) database, particular emphasis is placed on molecular and isotopic information, coupled with relevant contextual information (e.g., sedimentological properties) relevant to elucidating factors that influence the efficiency and nature of organic matter burial. The main features of MOSAIC include: (i) Emphasis on continental margin sediments as major loci of carbon burial, and as the interface between terrestrial and oceanic realms; (ii) Bulk to molecular-level organic geochemical properties and parameters, including concentration and isotopic compositions; (iii) Inclusion of extensive contextual data regarding the depositional setting, in particular with respect to sedimentological and redox characteristics. The ultimate goal is to create an open-access instrument, available on the web, to be utilized for research and education by the international community who can both contribute to, and interrogate the database. The submission will be accomplished by means of a pre-configured table available on the MOSAIC webpage. The information on the filled tables will be checked and eventually imported, via the Structural Query Language (SQL), into

  9. The Archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism: Documenting 100 Years of Carnegie Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington document more than a century of geophysical and astronomical investigations. Primary source materials available for historical research include field and laboratory notebooks, equipment designs, plans for observatories and research vessels, scientists' correspondence, and thousands of expedition and instrument photographs. Yet despite its history, DTM long lacked a systematic approach to managing its documentary heritage. A preliminary records survey conducted in 2001 identified more than 1,000 linear feet of historically-valuable records languishing in dusty, poorly-accessible storerooms. Intellectual control at that time was minimal. With support from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the "Carnegie Legacy Project" was initiated in 2003 to preserve, organize, and facilitate access to DTM's archival records, as well as those of the Carnegie Institution's administrative headquarters and Geophysical Laboratory. Professional archivists were hired to process the 100-year backlog of records. Policies and procedures were established to ensure that all work conformed to national archival standards. Records were appraised, organized, and rehoused in acid-free containers, and finding aids were created for the project web site. Standardized descriptions of each collection were contributed to the WorldCat bibliographic database and the AIP International Catalog of Sources for History of Physics. Historic photographs and documents were digitized for online exhibitions to raise awareness of the archives among researchers and the general public. The success of the Legacy Project depended on collaboration between archivists, librarians, historians, data specialists, and scientists. This presentation will discuss key aspects (funding, staffing, preservation, access, outreach) of the Legacy Project and is aimed at personnel in observatories, research

  10. Database documentation of marine mammal stranding and mortality: current status review and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derek K P; Tsui, Henry C L; Kot, Brian C W

    2017-11-21

    Databases are systematic tools to archive and manage information related to marine mammal stranding and mortality events. Stranding response networks, governmental authorities and non-governmental organizations have established regional or national stranding networks and have developed unique standard stranding response and necropsy protocols to document and track stranded marine mammal demographics, signalment and health data. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe and review the current status of marine mammal stranding and mortality databases worldwide, including the year established, types of database and their goals; and (2) summarize the geographic range included in the database, the number of cases recorded, accessibility, filter and display methods. Peer-reviewed literature was searched, focussing on published databases of live and dead marine mammal strandings and mortality and information released from stranding response organizations (i.e. online updates, journal articles and annual stranding reports). Databases that were not published in the primary literature or recognized by government agencies were excluded. Based on these criteria, 10 marine mammal stranding and mortality databases were identified, and strandings and necropsy data found in these databases were evaluated. We discuss the results, limitations and future prospects of database development. Future prospects include the development and application of virtopsy, a new necropsy investigation tool. A centralized web-accessed database of all available postmortem multimedia from stranded marine mammals may eventually support marine conservation and policy decisions, which will allow the use of marine animals as sentinels of ecosystem health, working towards a 'One Ocean-One Health' ideal.

  11. Archival Information Management System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    management system named Archival Information Management System (AIMS), designed to meet the audit trail requirement for studies completed under the...are to be archived to the extent that future reproducibility and interrogation of results will exist. This report presents a prototype information

  12. sc-PDB: a 3D-database of ligandable binding sites--10 years on.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Bret, Guillaume; Rognan, Didier; Kellenberger, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The sc-PDB database (available at http://bioinfo-pharma.u-strasbg.fr/scPDB/) is a comprehensive and up-to-date selection of ligandable binding sites of the Protein Data Bank. Sites are defined from complexes between a protein and a pharmacological ligand. The database provides the all-atom description of the protein, its ligand, their binding site and their binding mode. Currently, the sc-PDB archive registers 9283 binding sites from 3678 unique proteins and 5608 unique ligands. The sc-PDB database was publicly launched in 2004 with the aim of providing structure files suitable for computational approaches to drug design, such as docking. During the last 10 years we have improved and standardized the processes for (i) identifying binding sites, (ii) correcting structures, (iii) annotating protein function and ligand properties and (iv) characterizing their binding mode. This paper presents the latest enhancements in the database, specifically pertaining to the representation of molecular interaction and to the similarity between ligand/protein binding patterns. The new website puts emphasis in pictorial analysis of data. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu.

    PubMed

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H; Tinker, Martin T; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/databaseui).

  14. Volcanic observation data and simulation database at NIED, Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, E.; Ueda, H.; Kozono, T.

    2009-12-01

    NIED (Nat’l Res. Inst. for Earth Sci. & Disast. Prev.) has a project to develop two volcanic database systems: (1) volcanic observation database; (2) volcanic simulation database. The volcanic observation database is the data archive center obtained by the geophysical observation networks at Mt. Fuji, Miyake, Izu-Oshima, Iwo-jima and Nasu volcanoes, central Japan. The data consist of seismic (both high-sensitivity and broadband), ground deformation (tiltmeter, GPS) and those from other sensors (e.g., rain gauge, gravimeter, magnetometer, pressure gauge.) These data is originally stored in “WIN format,” the Japanese standard format, which is also at the Hi-net (High sensitivity seismic network Japan, http://www.hinet.bosai.go.jp/). NIED joins to WOVOdat and we have prepared to upload our data, via XML format. Our concept of the XML format is 1)a common format for intermediate files to upload into the WOVOdat DB, 2) for data files downloaded from the WOVOdat DB, 3) for data exchanges between observatories without the WOVOdat DB, 4) for common data files in each observatory, 5) for data communications between systems and softwares and 6)a for softwares. NIED is now preparing for (2) the volcanic simulation database. The objective of this project is to support to develop a “real-time” hazard map, i.e., the system which is effective to evaluate volcanic hazard in case of emergency, including the up-to-date conditions. Our system will include lava flow simulation (LavaSIM) and pyroclastic flow simulation (grvcrt). The database will keep many cases of assumed simulations and we can pick up the most probable case as the first evaluation in case the eruption started. The final goals of the both database will realize the volcanic eruption prediction and forecasting in real time by the combination of monitoring data and numerical simulations.

  15. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeples, M.; Tumlinson, J.; Fox, A.; Aloisi, A.; Fleming, S.; Jedrzejewski, R.; Oliveira, C.; Ayres, T.; Danforth, C.; Keeney, B.; Jenkins, E.

    2017-04-01

    With no future space ultraviolet instruments currently planned, the data from the UV spectrographs aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have a legacy value beyond their initial science goals. The goal of the Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive(HSLA) is to provide to the community new science-grade combined spectra for all publicly available data obtained by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS)and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). These data are packaged into "smart archives" according to target type and scientific themes to facilitate the construction of archival samples for common science uses. A new "quick look" capability makes the data easy for users to quickly access, assess the quality of,and download for archival science. The first generation of these products for the far-ultraviolet (FUV) modes of COS was made available online via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) in early 2016 and updated in early 2017; future releases will include COS/NUV and STIS/UV data.

  16. A generic archive protocol and an implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Mcglynn, T. A.; Ruggiero, N. G.; Serlemitsos, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Archiving vast amounts of data has become a major part of every scientific space mission today. The Generic Archive/Retrieval Services Protocol (GRASP) addresses the question of how to archive the data collected in an environment where the underlying hardware archives may be rapidly changing. GRASP is a device independent specification defining a set of functions for storing and retrieving data from an archive, as well as other support functions. GRASP is divided into two levels: the Transfer Interface and the Action Interface. The Transfer Interface is computer/archive independent code while the Action Interface contains code which is dedicated to each archive/computer addressed. Implementations of the GRASP specification are currently available for DECstations running Ultrix, Sparcstations running SunOS, and microVAX/VAXstation 3100's. The underlying archive is assumed to function as a standard Unix or VMS file system. The code, written in C, is a single suite of files. Preprocessing commands define the machine unique code sections in the device interface. The implementation was written, to the greatest extent possible, using only ANSI standard C functions.

  17. A multidisciplinary database for geophysical time series management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, P.; Aliotta, M.; Cassisi, C.; Prestifilippo, M.; Cannata, A.

    2013-12-01

    The variables collected by a sensor network constitute a heterogeneous data source that needs to be properly organized in order to be used in research and geophysical monitoring. With the time series term we refer to a set of observations of a given phenomenon acquired sequentially in time. When the time intervals are equally spaced one speaks of period or sampling frequency. Our work describes in detail a possible methodology for storage and management of time series using a specific data structure. We designed a framework, hereinafter called TSDSystem (Time Series Database System), in order to acquire time series from different data sources and standardize them within a relational database. The operation of standardization provides the ability to perform operations, such as query and visualization, of many measures synchronizing them using a common time scale. The proposed architecture follows a multiple layer paradigm (Loaders layer, Database layer and Business Logic layer). Each layer is specialized in performing particular operations for the reorganization and archiving of data from different sources such as ASCII, Excel, ODBC (Open DataBase Connectivity), file accessible from the Internet (web pages, XML). In particular, the loader layer performs a security check of the working status of each running software through an heartbeat system, in order to automate the discovery of acquisition issues and other warning conditions. Although our system has to manage huge amounts of data, performance is guaranteed by using a smart partitioning table strategy, that keeps balanced the percentage of data stored in each database table. TSDSystem also contains modules for the visualization of acquired data, that provide the possibility to query different time series on a specified time range, or follow the realtime signal acquisition, according to a data access policy from the users.

  18. About Fermilab - History and Archives Project

    Science.gov Websites

    Fermilab Organization Chart Diversity Architecture History and Archives Project Sustainability Nature Accommodations Recreation Architecture & History Nature/Ecology Order Fermilab Merchandise Online Education K Fermilab History and Archives Project Archives Project main page | Fermilab History main page A Brief

  19. Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) - A New U.S. DOE Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, D.; Varadharajan, C.; Cholia, S.; Snavely, C.; Hendrix, V.; Gunter, D.; Riley, W. J.; Jones, M.; Budden, A. E.; Vieglais, D.

    2017-12-01

    The ESS-DIVE archive is a new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data archive designed to provide long-term stewardship and use of data from observational, experimental, and modeling activities in the earth and environmental sciences. The ESS-DIVE infrastructure is constructed with the long-term vision of enabling broad access to and usage of the DOE sponsored data stored in the archive. It is designed as a scalable framework that incentivizes data providers to contribute well-structured, high-quality data to the archive and that enables the user community to easily build data processing, synthesis, and analysis capabilities using those data. The key innovations in our design include: (1) application of user-experience research methods to understand the needs of users and data contributors; (2) support for early data archiving during project data QA/QC and before public release; (3) focus on implementation of data standards in collaboration with the community; (4) support for community built tools for data search, interpretation, analysis, and visualization tools; (5) data fusion database to support search of the data extracted from packages submitted and data available in partner data systems such as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and DataONE; and (6) support for archiving of data packages that are not to be released to the public. ESS-DIVE data contributors will be able to archive and version their data and metadata, obtain data DOIs, search for and access ESS data and metadata via web and programmatic portals, and provide data and metadata in standardized forms. The ESS-DIVE archive and catalog will be federated with other existing catalogs, allowing cross-catalog metadata search and data exchange with existing systems, including DataONE's Metacat search. ESS-DIVE is operated by a multidisciplinary team from Berkeley Lab, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), and DataONE. The primarily data copies are hosted at DOE's NERSC

  20. The GTC scientific archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, R.; Solano, E.

    2011-11-01

    At present, data management in telescopes ofclass 8-10 meters is very inefficient. The Gran Telescopio Canarias(GTC) scientific archive that is being developed by the Centro deAstrobiología (CAB) in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatoryis aimed at avoiding this situation, providing the telescope with anarchive accessible via internet, guaranteeing the accessibility,efficiency, visibility and data security demanded by a telescope of itsentity. The GTC archive will also be adapted to the standards defined bythe International Virtual Observatory, maximizing the visibility of thedata produced by the telescope. The main characteristics of the GTCscientific archive are described in this poster.

  1. The Hong Kong/AAO/Strasbourg Hα (HASH) Planetary Nebula Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojičić, Ivan S.; Parker, Quentin A.; Frew, David J.

    2017-10-01

    The Hong Kong/AAO/Strasbourg Hα (HASH) planetary nebula database is an online research platform providing free and easy access to the largest and most comprehensive catalogue of known Galactic PNe and a repository of observational data (imaging and spectroscopy) for these and related astronomical objects. The main motivation for creating this system is resolving some of long standing problems in the field e.g. problems with mimics and dubious and/or misidentifications, errors in observational data and consolidation of the widely scattered data-sets. This facility allows researchers quick and easy access to the archived and new observational data and creating and sharing of non-redundant PN samples and catalogues.

  2. A Background to Motion Picture Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James E.; Bolen, Donald L., Jr.

    The emphasis of archives is on the maintenance and preservation of materials for scholarly research and professional reference. Archives may be established as separate entities or as part of a library or museum. Film archives may include camera originals (positive and negative), sound recordings, outtakes, scripts, contracts, advertising…

  3. Collecting, archiving and processing DNA from wildlife samples using FTA® databasing paper

    PubMed Central

    Smith, LM; Burgoyne, LA

    2004-01-01

    Background Methods involving the analysis of nucleic acids have become widespread in the fields of traditional biology and ecology, however the storage and transport of samples collected in the field to the laboratory in such a manner to allow purification of intact nucleic acids can prove problematical. Results FTA® databasing paper is widely used in human forensic analysis for the storage of biological samples and for purification of nucleic acids. The possible uses of FTA® databasing paper in the purification of DNA from samples of wildlife origin were examined, with particular reference to problems expected due to the nature of samples of wildlife origin. The processing of blood and tissue samples, the possibility of excess DNA in blood samples due to nucleated erythrocytes, and the analysis of degraded samples were all examined, as was the question of long term storage of blood samples on FTA® paper. Examples of the end use of the purified DNA are given for all protocols and the rationale behind the processing procedures is also explained to allow the end user to adjust the protocols as required. Conclusions FTA® paper is eminently suitable for collection of, and purification of nucleic acids from, biological samples from a wide range of wildlife species. This technology makes the collection and storage of such samples much simpler. PMID:15072582

  4. CARMENES. Mining public archives for stellar parameters and spectra of M dwarfs with master thesis students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.; Montes, D.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; González-Álvarez, E.; Hidalgo, D.; Holgado, G.; Martínez-Rodríguez, H.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; López-Santiago, J.

    2015-05-01

    We are compiling the most comprehensive database of M dwarfs ever built, CARMENCITA, the CARMENES Cool dwarf Information and daTa Archive, which will be the CARMENES 'input catalogue'. In addition to the science preparation with low- and high-resolution spectrographs and lucky imagers, we compile a huge pile of public data on over 2200 M dwarfs, and analyse them, mostly using virtual-observatory tools. Here we describe four specific actions carried out by master students. They mine public archives for additional high-resolution spectroscopy (UVES, FEROS and HARPS), multi-band photometry (FUV-NUV-u-B-g-V-r-R-i-J-H-Ks-W1-W2-W3-W4), X-ray data (ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra), and periods, rotational velocities and Hα pseudo-equivalent widths. As described, there are many interdependences between all these data.

  5. Internet FAQ Archives - Online Education - faqs.org

    Science.gov Websites

    faqs.org Internet FAQ Archives - Online Education faqs.org faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives Internet FAQ Archives Online Education Internet RFC Index Usenet FAQ Index Other FAQs Documents Tools IFC Rated FAQs Internet RFC/STD/FYI/BCP Archives The Internet RFC series of documents is also available from

  6. Image dissemination and archiving.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian

    2007-08-01

    Images generated as part of the sonographic examination are an integral part of the medical record and must be retained according to local regulations. The standard medical image format, known as DICOM (Digital Imaging and COmmunications in Medicine) makes it possible for images from many different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, to be distributed via a standard internet network to distant viewing workstations and a central archive in an almost seamless fashion. The DICOM standard is a truly universal standard for the dissemination of medical images. When purchasing an ultrasound unit, the consumer should research the unit's capacity to generate images in a DICOM format, especially if one wishes interconnectivity with viewing workstations and an image archive that stores other medical images. PACS, an acronym for Picture Archive and Communication System refers to the infrastructure that links modalities, workstations, the image archive, and the medical record information system into an integrated system, allowing for efficient electronic distribution and storage of medical images and access to medical record data.

  7. Building a COTS archive for satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Ken; Terril, Dave; Kelly, Jack; Nichols, Cathy

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the NOAA/NESDIS Active Archive was to provide a method of access to an online archive of satellite data. The archive had to manage and store the data, let users interrogate the archive, and allow users to retrieve data from the archive. Practical issues of the system design such as implementation time, cost and operational support were examined in addition to the technical issues. There was a fixed window of opportunity to create an operational system, along with budget and staffing constraints. Therefore, the technical solution had to be designed and implemented subject to constraint imposed by the practical issues. The NOAA/NESDIS Active Archive came online in July of 1994, meeting all of its original objectives.

  8. SEA: a super-enhancer archive.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanjun; Zhang, Shumei; Shang, Shipeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Song; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Fang; Su, Jianzhong; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-04

    Super-enhancers are large clusters of transcriptional enhancers regarded as having essential roles in driving the expression of genes that control cell identity during development and tumorigenesis. The construction of a genome-wide super-enhancer database is urgently needed to better understand super-enhancer-directed gene expression regulation for a given biology process. Here, we present a specifically designed web-accessible database, Super-Enhancer Archive (SEA, http://sea.edbc.org). SEA focuses on integrating super-enhancers in multiple species and annotating their potential roles in the regulation of cell identity gene expression. The current release of SEA incorporates 83 996 super-enhancers computationally or experimentally identified in 134 cell types/tissues/diseases, including human (75 439, three of which were experimentally identified), mouse (5879, five of which were experimentally identified), Drosophila melanogaster (1774) and Caenorhabditis elegans (904). To facilitate data extraction, SEA supports multiple search options, including species, genome location, gene name, cell type/tissue and super-enhancer name. The response provides detailed (epi)genetic information, incorporating cell type specificity, nearby genes, transcriptional factor binding sites, CRISPR/Cas9 target sites, evolutionary conservation, SNPs, H3K27ac, DNA methylation, gene expression and TF ChIP-seq data. Moreover, analytical tools and a genome browser were developed for users to explore super-enhancers and their roles in defining cell identity and disease processes in depth. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Stewardship of very large digital data archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Patric

    1991-01-01

    An archive is a permanent store. There are relatively few very large digital data archives in existence. Most business records are expired within five or ten years. Many kinds of business records that do have long lives are embedded in data bases that are continually updated and re-issued cyclically. Also, a great deal of permanent business records are actually archived as microfilm, fiche, or optical disk images - their digital version being an operational convenience rather than an archive. The problems forseen in stewarding the very large digital data archives that will accumulate during the mission of the Earth Observing System (EOS) are addressed. It focuses on the function of shepherding archived digital data into an endless future. Stewardship entails storing and protecting the archive and providing meaningful service to the community of users. The steward will (1) provide against loss due to physical phenomena; (2) assure that data is not lost due to storage technology obsolescence; and (3) maintain data in a current formatting methodology.

  10. HST archive primer, version 4.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruchter, A. (Editor); Baum, S. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This version of the HST Archive Primer provides the basic information a user needs to know to access the HST archive via StarView the new user interface to the archive. Using StarView, users can search for observations interest, find calibration reference files, and retrieve data from the archive. Both the terminal version of StarView and the X-windows version feature a name resolver which simplifies searches of the HST archive based on target name. In addition, the X-windows version of StarView allows preview of all public HST data; compressed versions of public images are displayed via SAOIMAGE, while spectra are plotted using the public plotting package, XMGR. Finally, the version of StarView described here features screens designed for observers preparing Cycle 5 HST proposals.

  11. Overview of FEED, the feeding experiments end-user database.

    PubMed

    Wall, Christine E; Vinyard, Christopher J; Williams, Susan H; Gapeyev, Vladimir; Liu, Xianhua; Lapp, Hilmar; German, Rebecca Z

    2011-08-01

    The Feeding Experiments End-user Database (FEED) is a research tool developed by the Mammalian Feeding Working Group at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center that permits synthetic, evolutionary analyses of the physiology of mammalian feeding. The tasks of the Working Group are to compile physiologic data sets into a uniform digital format stored at a central source, develop a standardized terminology for describing and organizing the data, and carry out a set of novel analyses using FEED. FEED contains raw physiologic data linked to extensive metadata. It serves as an archive for a large number of existing data sets and a repository for future data sets. The metadata are stored as text and images that describe experimental protocols, research subjects, and anatomical information. The metadata incorporate controlled vocabularies to allow consistent use of the terms used to describe and organize the physiologic data. The planned analyses address long-standing questions concerning the phylogenetic distribution of phenotypes involving muscle anatomy and feeding physiology among mammals, the presence and nature of motor pattern conservation in the mammalian feeding muscles, and the extent to which suckling constrains the evolution of feeding behavior in adult mammals. We expect FEED to be a growing digital archive that will facilitate new research into understanding the evolution of feeding anatomy.

  12. The state of the art of medical imaging technology: from creation to archive and back.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations.

  13. The State of the Art of Medical Imaging Technology: from Creation to Archive and Back

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations. PMID:21915232

  14. Building a Massive Volcano Archive and the Development of a Tool for the Science Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linick, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has traditionally housed one of the world's largest databases of volcanic satellite imagery, the ASTER Volcano Archive (10Tb), making these data accessible online for public and scientific use. However, a series of changes in how satellite imagery is housed by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data Information System has meant that JPL has been unable to systematically maintain its database for the last several years. We have provided a fast, transparent, machine-to-machine client that has updated JPL's database and will keep it current in near real-time. The development of this client has also given us the capability to retrieve any data provided by NASA's Earth Observing System Clearinghouse (ECHO) that covers a volcanic event reported by U.S. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). We will also provide a publicly available tool that interfaces with ECHO that can provide functionality not available in any of ECHO's Earth science discovery tools.

  15. Providing comprehensive and consistent access to astronomical observatory archive data: the NASA archive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Thomas; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Accomazzi, Alberto; Smale, Alan; White, Richard L.; Donaldson, Thomas; Aloisi, Alessandra; Dower, Theresa; Mazzerella, Joseph M.; Ebert, Rick; Pevunova, Olga; Imel, David; Berriman, Graham B.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Groom, Steve L.; Desai, Vandana R.; Landry, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Since the turn of the millennium a constant concern of astronomical archives have begun providing data to the public through standardized protocols unifying data from disparate physical sources and wavebands across the electromagnetic spectrum into an astronomical virtual observatory (VO). In October 2014, NASA began support for the NASA Astronomical Virtual Observatories (NAVO) program to coordinate the efforts of NASA astronomy archives in providing data to users through implementation of protocols agreed within the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). A major goal of the NAVO collaboration has been to step back from a piecemeal implementation of IVOA standards and define what the appropriate presence for the US and NASA astronomy archives in the VO should be. This includes evaluating what optional capabilities in the standards need to be supported, the specific versions of standards that should be used, and returning feedback to the IVOA, to support modifications as needed. We discuss a standard archive model developed by the NAVO for data archive presence in the virtual observatory built upon a consistent framework of standards defined by the IVOA. Our standard model provides for discovery of resources through the VO registries, access to observation and object data, downloads of image and spectral data and general access to archival datasets. It defines specific protocol versions, minimum capabilities, and all dependencies. The model will evolve as the capabilities of the virtual observatory and needs of the community change.

  16. Providing Comprehensive and Consistent Access to Astronomical Observatory Archive Data: The NASA Archive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGlynn, Thomas; Guiseppina, Fabbiano A; Accomazzi, Alberto; Smale, Alan; White, Richard L.; Donaldson, Thomas; Aloisi, Alessandra; Dower, Theresa; Mazzerella, Joseph M.; Ebert, Rick; hide

    2016-01-01

    Since the turn of the millennium a constant concern of astronomical archives have begun providing data to the public through standardized protocols unifying data from disparate physical sources and wavebands across the electromagnetic spectrum into an astronomical virtual observatory (VO). In October 2014, NASA began support for the NASA Astronomical Virtual Observatories (NAVO) program to coordinate the efforts of NASA astronomy archives in providing data to users through implementation of protocols agreed within the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). A major goal of the NAVO collaboration has been to step back from a piecemeal implementation of IVOA standards and define what the appropriate presence for the US and NASA astronomy archives in the VO should be. This includes evaluating what optional capabilities in the standards need to be supported, the specific versions of standards that should be used, and returning feedback to the IVOA, to support modifications as needed. We discuss a standard archive model developed by the NAVO for data archive presence in the virtual observatory built upon a consistent framework of standards defined by the IVOA. Our standard model provides for discovery of resources through the VO registries, access to observation and object data, downloads of image and spectral data and general access to archival datasets. It defines specific protocol versions, minimum capabilities, and all dependencies. The model will evolve as the capabilities of the virtual observatory and needs of the community change.

  17. The new European Hubble archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Arevalo, Maria; Merin, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The European Hubble Archive (hereafter eHST), hosted at ESA's European Space Astronomy Centre, has been released for public use in October 2015. The eHST is now fully integrated with the other ESA science archives to ensure long-term preservation of the Hubble data, consisting of more than 1 million observations from 10 different scientific instruments. The public HST data, the Hubble Legacy Archive, and the high-level science data products are now all available to scientists through a single, carefully designed and user friendly web interface. In this talk, I will show how the the eHST can help boost archival research, including how to search on sources in the field of view thanks to precise footprints projected onto the sky, how to obtain enhanced previews of imaging data and interactive spectral plots, and how to directly link observations with already published papers. To maximise the scientific exploitation of Hubble's data, the eHST offers connectivity to virtual observatory tools, easily integrates with the recently released Hubble Source Catalog, and is fully accessible through ESA's archives multi-mission interface.

  18. A New Database of Digitized Regional Seismic Waveforms from Nuclear Explosions in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, I. N.; Richards, P. G.; Kim, W. Y.; Mikhailova, N. N.

    2014-12-01

    Seismology is an observational science. Hence, the effort to understand details of seismic signals from underground nuclear explosions requires analysis of waveforms recorded from past nuclear explosions. Of principal interest, are regional signals from explosions too small to be reliably identified via teleseismic recording. But the great majority of stations operated today, even those in networks for nuclear explosion monitoring, have never recorded explosion signals at regional distances, because most stations were installed long after the period when most underground nuclear explosions were conducted; and the few nuclear explosions since the early 1990s were mostly recorded only at teleseismic distances. We have therefore gathered thousands of nuclear explosion regional seismograms from more than 200 analog stations operated in the former Soviet Union. Most of them lie in a region stretching approximately 6000 km East-West and 2000 km North-South and including much of Central Asia. We have digitized them and created a modern digital database, including significant metadata. Much of this work has been done in Kazakhstan. Most of the explosions were underground, but several were conducted in the atmosphere. This presentation will characterize the content and overall quality of the new database for signals from nuclear explosions in Eurasia, which were conducted across substantial ranges of yield and shot-point depth, and under a great variety of different geological conditions. This work complements a 20-year collaborative effort which made the original digital recordings of the Borovoye Geophysical Observatory, Kazakhstan, openly available in a modern format (see http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/Monitoring/Data/). For purposes of characterizing explosive sources, it would be of assistance to have seismogram archives from explosions conducted in all regions including the Pacific, North Africa, and the United States (including the Aleutians). Openly available

  19. The Rosetta Science Archive: Status and Plans for Completing and Enhancing the Archive Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heather, D.; Barthelemy, M.; Fraga, D.; Grotheer, E.; O'Rourke, L.; Taylor, M.

    2017-09-01

    On 30 September 2016, Rosetta's signal flat-lined, confirming that the spacecraft had completed its incredible mission by landing on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Although this marked an end to the spacecraft's active operations, intensive work is still on-going with instrument teams preparing their final science data increments for delivery and ingestion into ESA's Planetary Science Archive (PSA). In addition to this, ESA is establishing contracts with a number of instrument teams to enhance and improve their data and documentation in an effort to provide the best long- term archive possible for the Rosetta mission. This presentation will outline the current status of the Rosetta archive, as well as highlighting some of the 'enhanced archiving' activities planned and underway with the various instrument teams on Rosetta to ensure the scientific legacy of the mission.

  20. The Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata Archive (GSIM) - Part 1: The production of a daily streamflow archive and metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hong Xuan; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Leonard, Michael; Westra, Seth

    2018-04-01

    This is the first part of a two-paper series presenting the Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata archive (GSIM), a worldwide collection of metadata and indices derived from more than 35 000 daily streamflow time series. This paper focuses on the compilation of the daily streamflow time series based on 12 free-to-access streamflow databases (seven national databases and five international collections). It also describes the development of three metadata products (freely available at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.887477): (1) a GSIM catalogue collating basic metadata associated with each time series, (2) catchment boundaries for the contributing area of each gauge, and (3) catchment metadata extracted from 12 gridded global data products representing essential properties such as land cover type, soil type, and climate and topographic characteristics. The quality of the delineated catchment boundary is also made available and should be consulted in GSIM application. The second paper in the series then explores production and analysis of streamflow indices. Having collated an unprecedented number of stations and associated metadata, GSIM can be used to advance large-scale hydrological research and improve understanding of the global water cycle.

  1. Transportation plan repository and archive.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    This project created a repository and archive for transportation planning documents in Texas within the : established Texas A&M Repository (http://digital.library.tamu.edu). This transportation planning archive : and repository provides ready access ...

  2. NOAA Data Rescue of Key Solar Databases and Digitization of Historical Solar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, H. E.

    2006-08-01

    Over a number of years, the staff at NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) has worked to rescue key solar databases by converting them to digital format and making them available via the World Wide Web. NOAA has had several data rescue programs where staff compete for funds to rescue important and critical historical data that are languishing in archives and at risk of being lost due to deteriorating condition, loss of any metadata or descriptive text that describe the databases, lack of interest or funding in maintaining databases, etc. The Solar-Terrestrial Physics Division at NGDC was able to obtain funds to key in some critical historical tabular databases. Recently the NOAA Climate Database Modernization Program (CDMP) funded a project to digitize historical solar images, producing a large online database of historical daily full disk solar images. The images include the wavelengths Calcium K, Hydrogen Alpha, and white light photos, as well as sunspot drawings and the comprehensive drawings of a multitude of solar phenomena on one daily map (Fraunhofer maps and Wendelstein drawings). Included in the digitization are high resolution solar H-alpha images taken at the Boulder Solar Observatory 1967-1984. The scanned daily images document many phases of solar activity, from decadal variation to rotational variation to daily changes. Smaller versions are available online. Larger versions are available by request. See http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/SOLAR/ftpsolarimages.html. The tabular listings and solar imagery will be discussed.

  3. YPED: An Integrated Bioinformatics Suite and Database for Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Christopher M.; Shifman, Mark; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Stone, Kathryn L.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Gulcicek, Erol E.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Wu, Terence; Bjornson, Robert D.; Bruce, Can; Nairn, Angus C.; Rinehart, Jesse; Miller, Perry L.; Williams, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a significantly-enhanced bioinformatics suite and database for proteomics research called Yale Protein Expression Database (YPED) that is used by investigators at more than 300 institutions worldwide. YPED meets the data management, archival, and analysis needs of a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics research ranging from a single laboratory, group of laboratories within and beyond an institution, to the entire proteomics community. The current version is a significant improvement over the first version in that it contains new modules for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) database search results, label and label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, and several scoring outputs for phosphopeptide site localization. In addition, we have added both peptide and protein comparative analysis tools to enable pairwise analysis of distinct peptides/proteins in each sample and of overlapping peptides/proteins between all samples in multiple datasets. We have also implemented a targeted proteomics module for automated multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)/selective reaction monitoring (SRM) assay development. We have linked YPED’s database search results and both label-based and label-free fold-change analysis to the Skyline Panorama repository for online spectra visualization. In addition, we have built enhanced functionality to curate peptide identifications into an MS/MS peptide spectral library for all of our protein database search identification results. PMID:25712262

  4. YPED: an integrated bioinformatics suite and database for mass spectrometry-based proteomics research.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, Christopher M; Shifman, Mark; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Stone, Kathryn L; Carriero, Nicholas J; Gulcicek, Erol E; Lam, TuKiet T; Wu, Terence; Bjornson, Robert D; Bruce, Can; Nairn, Angus C; Rinehart, Jesse; Miller, Perry L; Williams, Kenneth R

    2015-02-01

    We report a significantly-enhanced bioinformatics suite and database for proteomics research called Yale Protein Expression Database (YPED) that is used by investigators at more than 300 institutions worldwide. YPED meets the data management, archival, and analysis needs of a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics research ranging from a single laboratory, group of laboratories within and beyond an institution, to the entire proteomics community. The current version is a significant improvement over the first version in that it contains new modules for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) database search results, label and label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, and several scoring outputs for phosphopeptide site localization. In addition, we have added both peptide and protein comparative analysis tools to enable pairwise analysis of distinct peptides/proteins in each sample and of overlapping peptides/proteins between all samples in multiple datasets. We have also implemented a targeted proteomics module for automated multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)/selective reaction monitoring (SRM) assay development. We have linked YPED's database search results and both label-based and label-free fold-change analysis to the Skyline Panorama repository for online spectra visualization. In addition, we have built enhanced functionality to curate peptide identifications into an MS/MS peptide spectral library for all of our protein database search identification results. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Challenges of archiving science data from long duration missions: the Rosetta case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heather, David

    2016-07-01

    following the new 'PDS4' standards, which are using a very different format and require significant changes to the archive itself to manage. There are no plans at ESA to convert the data to PDS4 formats, but the community may need this to be completed in the long term if we are to realise the full scientific potential of the mission. There is a Memorandum of Understanding between ESA and NASA that commits to there being a full copy of the Rosetta science data holdings both within the Planetary Science Archive (PSA) at ESA and with NASA's Planetary Data System, at the Small Bodies Node (SBN) in Maryland. The requirements from each archiving authority place sometimes contradictory restrictions on the formatting and structure of the data content, and there has also been a significant evolution of the archives on both side of the Atlantic. The SBN have themselves expressed a desire to 'convert' the Rosetta data to PDS4 formats, so this will need to be carefully managed between the archiving authorities to ensure consistency in the Rosetta archive overall. Validation of the returned data to ensure full compliance with both the PSA and the PDS archives has required the development of a specific tool (DVal) that can be configured to manage the specificities of each instrument team's science data. Unlike the PDS, which comprises an affiliation of 'nodes', each specialising in a planetary science discipline, the PSA is a single archive designed to host data from all of ESA's planetary science missions. There have been significant challenges in evolving the archive to meet Rosetta's needs as a long-term project, without compromising the service provided to the other ongoing missions. Partly in response to this, the PSA is currently implementing a number of significant changes, both to its web-based interface to the scientific community, and to its database structure. The newly designed PSA will aim to provide easier and more direct access to the Rosetta data (and all of ESA

  6. The French Astronomical Archives Alidade Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debarbat, S.; Bobis, L.

    2004-12-01

    The present state of Alidade, an archival project of Paris Observatory, including not only archival papers, but also instruments, documents, iconography, paintings etc., of various institutions, is described. Documents and collections, e.g. from donations or purchases, are still integrated into the archives, and selected material is displayed in temporary exhibits at the Observatory. Modern uses of old material are briefly mentioned

  7. An Online Database for Informing Ecological Network Models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu

    PubMed Central

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Tinker, Martin T.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/databaseui). PMID:25343723

  8. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Tinker, M. Tim; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison C.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/data​baseui).

  9. A Vision of Archival Education at the Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibbo, Helen R.

    1997-01-01

    Issues critical to the development of an archival education degree program are discussed including number of credit hours and courses. Archival educators continue to revise the Society of American Archivists (SAA) Master's of Archival Studies (M.A.S.) guidelines as higher education and the world changes. Archival educators must cooperate with…

  10. Duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies in the primary nucleotide databases: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-01

    GenBank, the EMBL European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA DataBank of Japan, known collectively as the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration or INSDC, are the three most significant nucleotide sequence databases. Their records are derived from laboratory work undertaken by different individuals, by different teams, with a range of technologies and assumptions and over a period of decades. As a consequence, they contain a great many duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies, but neither the prevalence nor the characteristics of various types of duplicates have been rigorously assessed. Existing duplicate detection methods in bioinformatics only address specific duplicate types, with inconsistent assumptions; and the impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases has not been carefully assessed, making it difficult to judge the value of such methods. Our goal is to assess the scale, kinds and impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases, through a retrospective analysis of merged groups in INSDC databases. Our outcomes are threefold: (1) We analyse a benchmark dataset consisting of duplicates manually identified in INSDC—a dataset of 67 888 merged groups with 111 823 duplicate pairs across 21 organisms from INSDC databases – in terms of the prevalence, types and impacts of duplicates. (2) We categorize duplicates at both sequence and annotation level, with supporting quantitative statistics, showing that different organisms have different prevalence of distinct kinds of duplicate. (3) We show that the presence of duplicates has practical impact via a simple case study on duplicates, in terms of GC content and melting temperature. We demonstrate that duplicates not only introduce redundancy, but can lead to inconsistent results for certain tasks. Our findings lead to a better understanding of the problem of duplication in biological databases. Database URL: the merged records are available at https

  11. ASP archiving solution of regional HUSpacs.

    PubMed

    Pohjonen, Hanna; Kauppinen, Tomi; Ahovuo, Juhani

    2004-09-01

    The application service provider (ASP) model is not novel, but widely used in several non-health care-related business areas. In this article, ASP is described as a potential solution for long-term and back-up archiving of the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) of the Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa (HUS). HUSpacs is a regional PACS for 21 HUS hospitals serving altogether 1.4 million citizens. The ultimate goal of this study was to define the specifications for the ASP archiving service and to compare different commercial options for archiving solutions (costs derived by unofficial requests for proposal): in-house PACS components, the regional ASP concept and the hospital-based ASP concept. In conclusion, the large scale of the HUS installation enables a cost-effective regional ASP archiving, resulting in a four to five times more economical solution than hospital-based ASP.

  12. The ``One Archive'' for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G.; Kyprianou, M.; Levay, K.; Sienkewicz, M.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Swam, M.; Bushouse, H.; Greenfield, P.; Kidwell, R.; Wolfe, D.; Gardner, L.; Nieto-Santisteban, M.; Swade, D.; McLean, B.; Abney, F.; Alexov, A.; Binegar, S.; Aloisi, A.; Slowinski, S.; Gousoulin, J.

    2015-09-01

    The next generation for the Space Telescope Science Institute data management system is gearing up to provide a suite of archive system services supporting the operation of the James Webb Space Telescope. We are now completing the initial stage of integration and testing for the preliminary ground system builds of the JWST Science Operations Center which includes multiple components of the Data Management Subsystem (DMS). The vision for astronomical science and research with the JWST archive introduces both solutions to formal mission requirements and innovation derived from our existing mission systems along with the collective shared experience of our global user community. We are building upon the success of the Hubble Space Telescope archive systems, standards developed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance, and collaborations with our archive data center partners. In proceeding forward, the “one archive” architectural model presented here is designed to balance the objectives for this new and exciting mission. The STScI JWST archive will deliver high quality calibrated science data products, support multi-mission data discovery and analysis, and provide an infrastructure which supports bridges to highly valued community tools and services.

  13. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeples, Molly S.; Tumlinson, Jason; Fox, Andrew; Aloisi, Alessandra; Ayres, Thomas R.; Danforth, Charles; Fleming, Scott W.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Keeney, Brian A.; Oliveira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    With no future space ultraviolet instruments currently planned, the data from the UV spectrographs aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have a legacy value beyond their initial science goals. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive will provide to the community new science-grade combined spectra for all publicly available data obtained by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). These data will be packaged into "smart archives" according to target type and scientific themes to facilitate the construction of archival samples for common science uses. A new "quick look" capability will make the data easy for users to quickly access, assess the quality of, and download for archival science starting in Cycle 24, with the first generation of these products for the FUV modes of COS available online via MAST in early 2016.

  14. MetaboLights: An Open-Access Database Repository for Metabolomics Data.

    PubMed

    Kale, Namrata S; Haug, Kenneth; Conesa, Pablo; Jayseelan, Kalaivani; Moreno, Pablo; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Nainala, Venkata Chandrasekhar; Spicer, Rachel A; Williams, Mark; Li, Xuefei; Salek, Reza M; Griffin, Julian L; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2016-03-24

    MetaboLights is the first general purpose, open-access database repository for cross-platform and cross-species metabolomics research at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). Based upon the open-source ISA framework, MetaboLights provides Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) compliant metadata and raw experimental data associated with metabolomics experiments. Users can upload their study datasets into the MetaboLights Repository. These studies are then automatically assigned a stable and unique identifier (e.g., MTBLS1) that can be used for publication reference. The MetaboLights Reference Layer associates metabolites with metabolomics studies in the archive and is extensively annotated with data fields such as structural and chemical information, NMR and MS spectra, target species, metabolic pathways, and reactions. The database is manually curated with no specific release schedules. MetaboLights is also recommended by journals for metabolomics data deposition. This unit provides a guide to using MetaboLights, downloading experimental data, and depositing metabolomics datasets using user-friendly submission tools. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. SIOExplorer: Opening Archives for Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. P.; Staudigl, H.; Johnson, C.; Helly, J.; Day, D.

    2003-04-01

    The SIOExplorer project began with a desire to organize the data archives of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which include the observations from 822 cruises over 50 years. Most of the data volume comes from 244 multibeam seafloor swath mapping cruises since 1982. Rather than just create an online archive or a website, the decision was made to build a fully searchable digital library, and to include related historical images and documents from the SIO Archives in the SIO Library. It soon became apparent that much of the material would be appealing to students of all ages, as well as the general public. Access to several global databases was added, along with the seamount catalog and geochemical resources of www.earthref.org. SIOExplorer has now become a part of the National Science Digital Library (www.nsdl.org) and can be accessed directly at http://SIOExplorer.ucsd.edu. From the beginning, it was obvious that a scalable Information Technology architecture would be needed. Data and documents from three separate organizations would need to be integrated initially, with more to follow in subsequent years. Each organization had its own data standards and formats. Almost no metadata existed. With millions of files and approximately 1 terabyte of data, we realized that a team approach would be required, combining the expertise of SIO, the UCSD Libraries and the San Diego Supercomputer Center. General purpose tools have now been developed to automate collection development, create and manage metadata, and geographically search the library. Each digital object in the library has an associated metadata structure, which includes a Dublin Core block along with domain-specific blocks, as needed. Objects can be searched geospatially, temporally, by keyword, and by expert-level. For example, expert-level classification makes it possible to screen out research-grade contents, revealing material appropriate for the selected grade, such as K-6. Now that the library has

  16. Chess databases as a research vehicle in psychology: Modeling large data.

    PubMed

    Vaci, Nemanja; Bilalić, Merim

    2017-08-01

    The game of chess has often been used for psychological investigations, particularly in cognitive science. The clear-cut rules and well-defined environment of chess provide a model for investigations of basic cognitive processes, such as perception, memory, and problem solving, while the precise rating system for the measurement of skill has enabled investigations of individual differences and expertise-related effects. In the present study, we focus on another appealing feature of chess-namely, the large archive databases associated with the game. The German national chess database presented in this study represents a fruitful ground for the investigation of multiple longitudinal research questions, since it collects the data of over 130,000 players and spans over 25 years. The German chess database collects the data of all players, including hobby players, and all tournaments played. This results in a rich and complete collection of the skill, age, and activity of the whole population of chess players in Germany. The database therefore complements the commonly used expertise approach in cognitive science by opening up new possibilities for the investigation of multiple factors that underlie expertise and skill acquisition. Since large datasets are not common in psychology, their introduction also raises the question of optimal and efficient statistical analysis. We offer the database for download and illustrate how it can be used by providing concrete examples and a step-by-step tutorial using different statistical analyses on a range of topics, including skill development over the lifetime, birth cohort effects, effects of activity and inactivity on skill, and gender differences.

  17. Design of a Multi Dimensional Database for the Archimed DataWarehouse.

    PubMed

    Bréant, Claudine; Thurler, Gérald; Borst, François; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2005-01-01

    The Archimed data warehouse project started in 1993 at the Geneva University Hospital. It has progressively integrated seven data marts (or domains of activity) archiving medical data such as Admission/Discharge/Transfer (ADT) data, laboratory results, radiology exams, diagnoses, and procedure codes. The objective of the Archimed data warehouse is to facilitate the access to an integrated and coherent view of patient medical in order to support analytical activities such as medical statistics, clinical studies, retrieval of similar cases and data mining processes. This paper discusses three principal design aspects relative to the conception of the database of the data warehouse: 1) the granularity of the database, which refers to the level of detail or summarization of data, 2) the database model and architecture, describing how data will be presented to end users and how new data is integrated, 3) the life cycle of the database, in order to ensure long term scalability of the environment. Both, the organization of patient medical data using a standardized elementary fact representation and the use of the multi dimensional model have proved to be powerful design tools to integrate data coming from the multiple heterogeneous database systems part of the transactional Hospital Information System (HIS). Concurrently, the building of the data warehouse in an incremental way has helped to control the evolution of the data content. These three design aspects bring clarity and performance regarding data access. They also provide long term scalability to the system and resilience to further changes that may occur in source systems feeding the data warehouse.

  18. Improving the security of international ISO container traffic by centralizing the archival of inspection results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, Alex

    2004-09-01

    To increase the security and throughput of ISO traffic through international terminals more technology must be applied to the problem. A transnational central archive of inspection records is discussed that can be accessed by national agencies as ISO containers approach their borders. The intent is to improve the throughput and security of the cargo inspection process. A review of currently available digital media archiving technologies is presented and their possible application to the tracking of international ISO container shipments. Specific image formats employed by current x-ray inspection systems are discussed. Sample x-ray data from systems in use today are shown that could be entered into such a system. Data from other inspection technologies are shown to be easily integrated, as well as the creation of database records suitable for interfacing with other computer systems. Overall system performance requirements are discussed in terms of security, response time and capacity. Suggestions for pilot projects based on existing border inspection processes are made also.

  19. BIND: the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Gary D.; Betel, Doron; Hogue, Christopher W. V.

    2003-01-01

    The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND: http://bind.ca) archives biomolecular interaction, complex and pathway information. A web-based system is available to query, view and submit records. BIND continues to grow with the addition of individual submissions as well as interaction data from the PDB and a number of large-scale interaction and complex mapping experiments using yeast two hybrid, mass spectrometry, genetic interactions and phage display. We have developed a new graphical analysis tool that provides users with a view of the domain composition of proteins in interaction and complex records to help relate functional domains to protein interactions. An interaction network clustering tool has also been developed to help focus on regions of interest. Continued input from users has helped further mature the BIND data specification, which now includes the ability to store detailed information about genetic interactions. The BIND data specification is available as ASN.1 and XML DTD. PMID:12519993

  20. FBIS: A regional DNA barcode archival & analysis system for Indian fishes.

    PubMed

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Rashid, Iliyas; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Singh, Shri Prakash; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcode is a new tool for taxon recognition and classification of biological organisms based on sequence of a fragment of mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase I (COI). In view of the growing importance of the fish DNA barcoding for species identification, molecular taxonomy and fish diversity conservation, we developed a Fish Barcode Information System (FBIS) for Indian fishes, which will serve as a regional DNA barcode archival and analysis system. The database presently contains 2334 sequence records of COI gene for 472 aquatic species belonging to 39 orders and 136 families, collected from available published data sources. Additionally, it contains information on phenotype, distribution and IUCN Red List status of fishes. The web version of FBIS was designed using MySQL, Perl and PHP under Linux operating platform to (a) store and manage the acquisition (b) analyze and explore DNA barcode records (c) identify species and estimate genetic divergence. FBIS has also been integrated with appropriate tools for retrieving and viewing information about the database statistics and taxonomy. It is expected that FBIS would be useful as a potent information system in fish molecular taxonomy, phylogeny and genomics. The database is available for free at http://mail.nbfgr.res.in/fbis/

  1. FBIS: A regional DNA barcode archival & analysis system for Indian fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Rashid, Iliyas; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Singh, Shri Prakash; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcode is a new tool for taxon recognition and classification of biological organisms based on sequence of a fragment of mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase I (COI). In view of the growing importance of the fish DNA barcoding for species identification, molecular taxonomy and fish diversity conservation, we developed a Fish Barcode Information System (FBIS) for Indian fishes, which will serve as a regional DNA barcode archival and analysis system. The database presently contains 2334 sequence records of COI gene for 472 aquatic species belonging to 39 orders and 136 families, collected from available published data sources. Additionally, it contains information on phenotype, distribution and IUCN Red List status of fishes. The web version of FBIS was designed using MySQL, Perl and PHP under Linux operating platform to (a) store and manage the acquisition (b) analyze and explore DNA barcode records (c) identify species and estimate genetic divergence. FBIS has also been integrated with appropriate tools for retrieving and viewing information about the database statistics and taxonomy. It is expected that FBIS would be useful as a potent information system in fish molecular taxonomy, phylogeny and genomics. Availability The database is available for free at http://mail.nbfgr.res.in/fbis/ PMID:22715304

  2. HEASARC Software Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor); Murray, Stephen S.

    2003-01-01

    (1) Chandra Archive: SAO has maintained the interfaces through which HEASARC gains access to the Chandra Data Archive. At HEASARC's request, we have implemented an anonymous ftp copy of a major part of the public archive and we keep that archive up-to- date. SAO has participated in the ADEC interoperability working group, establishing guidelines or interoperability standards and prototyping such interfaces. We have provided an NVO-based prototype interface, intending to serve the HEASARC-led NVO demo project. HEASARC's Astrobrowse interface was maintained and updated. In addition, we have participated in design discussions surrounding HEASARC's Caldb project. We have attended the HEASARC Users Group meeting and presented CDA status and developments. (2) Chandra CALDB: SA0 has maintained and expanded the Chandra CALDB by including four new data file types, defining the corresponding CALDB keyword/identification structures. We have provided CALDB upgrades for the public (CIAO) and for Standard Data Processing. Approximately 40 new files have been added to the CALDB in these version releases. There have been in the past year ten of these CALDB upgrades, each with unique index configurations. In addition, with the inputs from software, archive, and calibration scientists, as well as CIAO/SDP software developers, we have defined a generalized expansion of the existing CALDB interface and indexing structure. The purpose of this is to make the CALDB more generally applicable and useful in new and future missions that will be supported archivally by HEASARC. The generalized interface will identify additional configurational keywords and permit more extensive calibration parameter and boundary condition specifications for unique file selection. HEASARC scientists and developers from SAO and GSFC have become involved in this work, which is expected to produce a new interface for general use within the current year. (3) DS9: One of the decisions that came from last year

  3. 36 CFR 1253.1 - National Archives Building.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Archives Building... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE LOCATION OF RECORDS AND HOURS OF USE § 1253.1 National Archives Building. (a) The National Archives Building is located at 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20408...

  4. A Generic Archive Protocol and an Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J. M.; Jennings, D. G.; McGlynn, T. A.; Ruggiero, N. G.; Serlemitsos, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Archiving vast amounts of data has become a major part of every scientific space mission today. GRASP, the Generic Retrieval/Ar\\-chive Services Protocol, addresses the question of how to archive the data collected in an environment where the underlying hardware archives and computer hosts may be rapidly changing.

  5. Using an image-extended relational database to support content-based image retrieval in a PACS.

    PubMed

    Traina, Caetano; Traina, Agma J M; Araújo, Myrian R B; Bueno, Josiane M; Chino, Fabio J T; Razente, Humberto; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo M

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a new Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), called cbPACS, which has content-based image retrieval capabilities. The cbPACS answers range and k-nearest- neighbor similarity queries, employing a relational database manager extended to support images. The images are compared through their features, which are extracted by an image-processing module and stored in the extended relational database. The database extensions were developed aiming at efficiently answering similarity queries by taking advantage of specialized indexing methods. The main concept supporting the extensions is the definition, inside the relational manager, of distance functions based on features extracted from the images. An extension to the SQL language enables the construction of an interpreter that intercepts the extended commands and translates them to standard SQL, allowing any relational database server to be used. By now, the system implemented works on features based on color distribution of the images through normalized histograms as well as metric histograms. Metric histograms are invariant regarding scale, translation and rotation of images and also to brightness transformations. The cbPACS is prepared to integrate new image features, based on texture and shape of the main objects in the image.

  6. The System for Quick Search of the Astronomical Objects and Events in the Digital Plate Archives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A. V.; Sergeeva, T. P.

    From the middle of the XIX century observatories all over the world have accumulated about three millions astronomical plates contained the unique information about the Universe which can not be obtained or restored with the help of any newest facilities and technologies but may be useful for many modern astronomical investigations. The threat of astronomical plate archives loss caused by economical, technical or some other causes have put before world astronomical community a problem: the preservation of the unique information kept on those plates. The problem can be solved by transformation of the information from plates to digital form and keeping it on electronic data medium. We began a creation of a system for quick search and analysing of astronomical events and objects in digital plate archive of the Ukrainian Main astronomical observatory of NAS. Connection of the system to Internet will allow a remote user (astronomer or observer) to have access to digital plate archive and to work with it. For providing of the high efficiency of this work the plate database (list of the plates with all information about them and access software) are preparing. Modular structure of the system basic software and standard format of the plate image files allow future development of problem-oriented software for special astronomical researches.

  7. The Preservation of Paper Collections in Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Cynthia Ann

    The preservation methods used for paper collections in archives were studied through a survey of archives in the metropolitan Atlanta (Georgia) area. The preservation policy or program was studied, and the implications for conservators and preservation officers were noted. Twelve of 15 archives responded (response rate of 80 percent). Basic…

  8. Records & Information Management Services | Alaska State Archives

    Science.gov Websites

    Search Search in: Archives State of Alaska Home About Records Management (RIMS) For Researchers Collections Imaging (IMS) ASHRAB Libraries, Archives, & Museums Archives Records Management (RIMS) Records records and information management for the State of Alaska. Frequently Asked Questions Submit Records

  9. 3DNALandscapes: a database for exploring the conformational features of DNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guohui; Colasanti, Andrew V; Lu, Xiang-Jun; Olson, Wilma K

    2010-01-01

    3DNALandscapes, located at: http://3DNAscapes.rutgers.edu, is a new database for exploring the conformational features of DNA. In contrast to most structural databases, which archive the Cartesian coordinates and/or derived parameters and images for individual structures, 3DNALandscapes enables searches of conformational information across multiple structures. The database contains a wide variety of structural parameters and molecular images, computed with the 3DNA software package and known to be useful for characterizing and understanding the sequence-dependent spatial arrangements of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, sugar-base side groups, base pairs, base-pair steps, groove structure, etc. The data comprise all DNA-containing structures--both free and bound to proteins, drugs and other ligands--currently available in the Protein Data Bank. The web interface allows the user to link, report, plot and analyze this information from numerous perspectives and thereby gain insight into DNA conformation, deformability and interactions in different sequence and structural contexts. The data accumulated from known, well-resolved DNA structures can serve as useful benchmarks for the analysis and simulation of new structures. The collective data can also help to understand how DNA deforms in response to proteins and other molecules and undergoes conformational rearrangements.

  10. Picture archiving and communication in radiology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marzia; Nanni, Marinella; Cimarra, Stefania; Crisafulli, Letizia; Campioni, Paolo; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    After over 80 years of exclusive archiving of radiologic films, at present, in Radiology, digital archiving is increasingly gaining ground. Digital archiving allows a considerable reduction in costs and space saving, but most importantly, immediate or remote consultation of all examinations and reports in the hospital clinical wards, is feasible. The RIS system, in this case, is the starting point of the process of electronic archiving which however is the task of PACS. The latter can be used as radiologic archive in accordance with the law provided that it is in conformance with some specifications as the use of optical long-term storage media or with electronic track of change. PACS archives, in a hierarchical system, all digital images produced by each diagnostic imaging modality. Images and patient data can be retrieved and used for consultation or remote consultation by the reporting radiologist who requires images and reports of previous radiologic examinations or by the referring physician of the ward. Modern PACS owing to the WEB server allow remote access to extremely simplified images and data however ensuring the due regulations and access protections. Since the PACS enables a simpler data communication within the hospital, security and patient privacy should be protected. A secure and reliable PACS should be able to minimize the risk of accidental data destruction, and should prevent non authorized access to the archive with adequate security measures in relation to the acquired knowledge and based on the technological advances. Archiving of data produced by modern digital imaging is a problem now present also in small Radiology services. The technology is able to readily solve problems which were extremely complex up to some years ago as the connection between equipment and archiving system owing also to the universalization of the DICOM 3.0 standard. The evolution of communication networks and the use of standard protocols as TCP/IP can minimize

  11. The Design of Archives Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faye, Bernard

    1982-01-01

    Studies specific problems arising from design of archives buildings and examines three main purposes of this type of building, namely conservation, classification and restoration of archives, and the provision of access to them by administrators and research workers. Three references are listed. (Author/EJS)

  12. Archival storage solutions for PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunn, Timothy

    1997-05-01

    While they are many, one of the inhibitors to the wide spread diffusion of PACS systems has been robust, cost effective digital archive storage solutions. Moreover, an automated Nearline solution is key to a central, sharable data repository, enabling many applications such as PACS, telemedicine and teleradiology, and information warehousing and data mining for research such as patient outcome analysis. Selecting the right solution depends on a number of factors: capacity requirements, write and retrieval performance requirements, scaleability in capacity and performance, configuration architecture and flexibility, subsystem availability and reliability, security requirements, system cost, achievable benefits and cost savings, investment protection, strategic fit and more.This paper addresses many of these issues. It compares and positions optical disk and magnetic tape technologies, which are the predominant archive mediums today. Price and performance comparisons will be made at different archive capacities, plus the effect of file size on storage system throughput will be analyzed. The concept of automated migration of images from high performance, high cost storage devices to high capacity, low cost storage devices will be introduced as a viable way to minimize overall storage costs for an archive. The concept of access density will also be introduced and applied to the selection of the most cost effective archive solution.

  13. Building an archives in a medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Sammis, S K

    1984-01-01

    In 1979 the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey established an archives to collect, preserve, and retrieve important documentation related to its history. This paper examines various steps in building an archives and the development of a coherent collection policy, including potential sources for archival material. Problems and possible solutions concerning what to preserve from the vast quantities of material generated by an institution are considered. The relationship between the archives and the medical library and the requirements of the physical plant are discussed, including the storage and preservation of materials. PMID:6743876

  14. Rrsm: The European Rapid Raw Strong-Motion Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, C.; Clinton, J. F.; Sleeman, R.; Domingo Ballesta, J.; Kaestli, P.; Galanis, O.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce the European Rapid Raw Strong-Motion database (RRSM), a Europe-wide system that provides parameterised strong motion information, as well as access to waveform data, within minutes of the occurrence of strong earthquakes. The RRSM significantly differs from traditional earthquake strong motion dissemination in Europe, which has focused on providing reviewed, processed strong motion parameters, typically with significant delays. As the RRSM provides rapid open access to raw waveform data and metadata and does not rely on external manual waveform processing, RRSM information is tailored to seismologists and strong-motion data analysts, earthquake and geotechnical engineers, international earthquake response agencies and the educated general public. Access to the RRSM database is via a portal at http://www.orfeus-eu.org/rrsm/ that allows users to query earthquake information, peak ground motion parameters and amplitudes of spectral response; and to select and download earthquake waveforms. All information is available within minutes of any earthquake with magnitude ≥ 3.5 occurring in the Euro-Mediterranean region. Waveform processing and database population are performed using the waveform processing module scwfparam, which is integrated in SeisComP3 (SC3; http://www.seiscomp3.org/). Earthquake information is provided by the EMSC (http://www.emsc-csem.org/) and all the seismic waveform data is accessed at the European Integrated waveform Data Archive (EIDA) at ORFEUS (http://www.orfeus-eu.org/index.html), where all on-scale data is used in the fully automated processing. As the EIDA community is continually growing, the already significant number of strong motion stations is also increasing and the importance of this product is expected to also increase. Real-time RRSM processing started in June 2014, while past events have been processed in order to provide a complete database back to 2005.

  15. HST Archival Imaging of the Light Echoes of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, S. S.; Hayon, M.; Sugerman, B. E. K.; Crotts, A. P. S.

    2002-12-01

    We have undertaken a search for light echo signals from Supernova 1987A that have been serendipitously recorded in images taken near the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud by HST. We used the MAST interface to create a database of the 1282 WF/PC, WFPC2 and STIS images taken within 15 arcminutes of the supernova, between 1992 April and 2002 June. These 1282 images are grouped into 125 distinct epochs and pointings, with each epoch containing between 1 and 42 separate exposures. Sorting this database with various programs, aided by the STScI Visual Target Tuner, we have identified 63 pairs of WFPC2 imaging epochs that are not centered on the supernova but that have a significant amount of spatial overlap between their fields of view. These image data were downloaded from the public archive, cleaned of cosmic rays, and blinked to search for light echoes at radii larger than 2 arcminutes from the supernova. Our search to date has focused on those pairs of epochs with the largest degree of overlap. Of 16 pairs of epochs scanned to date, we have detected 3 strong light echoes and one faint, tentative echo signal. We will present direct and difference images of these and any further echoes, as well as the 3-D geometric, photometric and color properties of the echoing dust structures. In addition, a set of 20 epochs of WF/PC and WFPC2 imaging centered on SN 1987A remain to be searched for echoes within 2 arcminutes of the supernova. We will discuss our plans to integrate the high spatial-resolution HST snapshots of the echoes with our extensive, well-time-sampled, ground-based imaging data. We gratefully acknowledge the support of this undergraduate research project through an HST Archival Research Grant (HST-AR-09209.01-A).

  16. Hubble Space Telescope: the new telemetry archiving system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miebach, Manfred P.

    2000-07-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the first of NASA's Great Observatories, was launched on April 24, 1990. The HST was designed for a minimum fifteen-year mission with on-orbit servicing by the Space Shuttle System planned at approximately three-year intervals. Major changes to the HST ground system have been implemented for the third servicing mission in December 1999. The primary objectives of the ground system re- engineering effort, a project called 'Vision 2000 Control Center System (CCS),' are to reduce both development and operating costs significantly for the remaining years of HST's lifetime. Development costs are reduced by providing a more modern hardware and software architecture and utilizing commercial off the shelf (COTS) products wherever possible. Part of CCS is a Space Telescope Engineering Data Store, the design of which is based on current Data Warehouse technology. The Data Warehouse (Red Brick), as implemented in the CCS Ground System that operates and monitors the Hubble Space Telescope, represents the first use of a commercial Data Warehouse to manage engineering data. The purpose of this data store is to provide a common data source of telemetry data for all HST subsystems. This data store will become the engineering data archive and will provide a queryable database for the user to analyze HST telemetry. The access to the engineering data in the Data Warehouse is platform-independent from an office environment using commercial standards (Unix, Windows98/NT). The latest Internet technology is used to reach the HST engineering community. A WEB-based user interface allows easy access to the data archives. This paper will provide a CCS system overview and will illustrate some of the CCS telemetry capabilities: in particular the use of the new Telemetry Archiving System. Vision 20001 is an ambitious project, but one that is well under way. It will allow the HST program to realize reduced operations costs for the Third Servicing Mission and

  17. HEROD: a human ethnic and regional specific omics database.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xian; Tao, Lin; Zhang, Peng; Qin, Chu; Chen, Shangying; He, Weidong; Tan, Ying; Xia Liu, Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2017-10-15

    Genetic and gene expression variations within and between populations and across geographical regions have substantial effects on the biological phenotypes, diseases, and therapeutic response. The development of precision medicines can be facilitated by the OMICS studies of the patients of specific ethnicity and geographic region. However, there is an inadequate facility for broadly and conveniently accessing the ethnic and regional specific OMICS data. Here, we introduced a new free database, HEROD, a human ethnic and regional specific OMICS database. Its first version contains the gene expression data of 53 070 patients of 169 diseases in seven ethnic populations from 193 cities/regions in 49 nations curated from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), the ArrayExpress Archive of Functional Genomics Data (ArrayExpress), the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC). Geographic region information of curated patients was mainly manually extracted from referenced publications of each original study. These data can be accessed and downloaded via keyword search, World map search, and menu-bar search of disease name, the international classification of disease code, geographical region, location of sample collection, ethnic population, gender, age, sample source organ, patient type (patient or healthy), sample type (disease or normal tissue) and assay type on the web interface. The HEROD database is freely accessible at http://bidd2.nus.edu.sg/herod/index.php. The database and web interface are implemented in MySQL, PHP and HTML with all major browsers supported. phacyz@nus.edu.sg. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Archives of Memory and Memories of Archive: CMS Women's Letters and Diaries 1823-35

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2005-01-01

    Searching for evidence written about or by women regarding past lives and experiences has raised challenges about what counts as an archive. Archives provide a form of connection between past and present and are a form of memory storing, memory-recording and memory-making. Records such as letters, diaries, and journals that may have been…

  19. Identification of mycotoxins by UHPLC–QTOF MS in airborne fungi and fungi isolated from industrial paper and antique documents from the Archive of Bogotá

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Castillo, Nancy I.; Ibáñez, María; Beltrán, Eduardo

    Mold deterioration of historical documents in archives and libraries is a frequent and complex phenomenon that may have important economic and cultural consequences. In addition, exposure to toxic fungal metabolites might produce health problems. In this work, samples of broths of fungal species isolated from the documentary material and from indoor environmental samples of the Archive of Bogotá have been analyzed to investigate the presence of mycotoxins. High resolution mass spectrometry made possible to search for a large number of mycotoxins, even without reference standards available at the laboratory. For this purpose, a screening strategy based on ultra-high pressure liquidmore » chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC–QTOF MS) under MS{sup E} mode was applied. A customized home-made database containing elemental composition for around 600 mycotoxins was compiled. The presence of the (de)protonated molecule measured at its accurate mass was evaluated in the samples. When a peak was detected, collision induced dissociation fragments and characteristic isotopic ions were also evaluated and used for tentative identification, based on structure compatibility and comparison with literature data (if existing). Up to 44 mycotoxins were tentatively identified by UHPLC–QTOF MS. 34 of these tentative compounds were confirmed by subsequent analysis using a targeted LC–MS/MS method, supporting the strong potential of QTOF MS for identification/elucidation purposes. The presence of mycotoxins in these samples might help to reinforce safety measures for researchers and staff who work on reception, restoration and conservation of archival material, not only at the Archive of Bogotá but worldwide. - Highlights: • Mold deterioration of historical documents is a frequent and complex phenomenon. • Samples of broths of fungal species isolated from Archive of Bogotá analyzed. • UHPLC–QTOF MS (MS{sup E}) applied for

  20. GPCALMA: A Tool For Mammography With A GRID-Connected Distributed Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottigli, U.; Cerello, P.; Cheran, S.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Fauci, F.; Golosio, B.; Lauria, A.; Lopez Torres, E.; Magro, R.; Masala, G. L.; Oliva, P.; Palmiero, R.; Raso, G.; Retico, A.; Stumbo, S.; Tangaro, S.

    2003-09-01

    The GPCALMA (Grid Platform for Computer Assisted Library for MAmmography) collaboration involves several departments of physics, INFN (National Institute of Nuclear Physics) sections, and italian hospitals. The aim of this collaboration is developing a tool that can help radiologists in early detection of breast cancer. GPCALMA has built a large distributed database of digitised mammographic images (about 5500 images corresponding to 1650 patients) and developed a CAD (Computer Aided Detection) software which is integrated in a station that can also be used to acquire new images, as archive and to perform statistical analysis. The images (18×24 cm2, digitised by a CCD linear scanner with a 85 μm pitch and 4096 gray levels) are completely described: pathological ones have a consistent characterization with radiologist's diagnosis and histological data, non pathological ones correspond to patients with a follow up at least three years. The distributed database is realized throught the connection of all the hospitals and research centers in GRID tecnology. In each hospital local patients digital images are stored in the local database. Using GRID connection, GPCALMA will allow each node to work on distributed database data as well as local database data. Using its database the GPCALMA tools perform several analysis. A texture analysis, i.e. an automated classification on adipose, dense or glandular texture, can be provided by the system. GPCALMA software also allows classification of pathological features, in particular massive lesions (both opacities and spiculated lesions) analysis and microcalcification clusters analysis. The detection of pathological features is made using neural network software that provides a selection of areas showing a given "suspicion level" of lesion occurrence. The performance of the GPCALMA system will be presented in terms of the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves. The results of GPCALMA system as "second reader" will also

  1. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  2. The Protein Data Bank: unifying the archive

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, John; Feng, Zukang; Jain, Shri; Bhat, T. N.; Thanki, Narmada; Ravichandran, Veerasamy; Gilliland, Gary L.; Bluhm, Wolfgang F.; Weissig, Helge; Greer, Douglas S.; Bourne, Philip E.; Berman, Helen M.

    2002-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB; http://www.pdb.org/) is the single worldwide archive of structural data of biological macromolecules. This paper describes the progress that has been made in validating all data in the PDB archive and in releasing a uniform archive for the community. We have now produced a collection of mmCIF data files for the PDB archive (ftp://beta.rcsb.org/pub/pdb/uniformity/data/mmCIF/). A utility application that converts the mmCIF data files to the PDB format (called CIFTr) has also been released to provide support for existing software. PMID:11752306

  3. The BioGRID interaction database: 2013 update.

    PubMed

    Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Heinicke, Sven; Boucher, Lorrie; Winter, Andrew; Stark, Chris; Nixon, Julie; Ramage, Lindsay; Kolas, Nadine; O'Donnell, Lara; Reguly, Teresa; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Sellam, Adnane; Chen, Daici; Chang, Christie; Rust, Jennifer; Livstone, Michael; Oughtred, Rose; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID: http//thebiogrid.org) is an open access archive of genetic and protein interactions that are curated from the primary biomedical literature for all major model organism species. As of September 2012, BioGRID houses more than 500 000 manually annotated interactions from more than 30 model organisms. BioGRID maintains complete curation coverage of the literature for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A number of themed curation projects in areas of biomedical importance are also supported. BioGRID has established collaborations and/or shares data records for the annotation of interactions and phenotypes with most major model organism databases, including Saccharomyces Genome Database, PomBase, WormBase, FlyBase and The Arabidopsis Information Resource. BioGRID also actively engages with the text-mining community to benchmark and deploy automated tools to expedite curation workflows. BioGRID data are freely accessible through both a user-defined interactive interface and in batch downloads in a wide variety of formats, including PSI-MI2.5 and tab-delimited files. BioGRID records can also be interrogated and analyzed with a series of new bioinformatics tools, which include a post-translational modification viewer, a graphical viewer, a REST service and a Cytoscape plugin.

  4. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park are...

  5. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park are...

  6. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park are...

  7. 36 CFR 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Archives Library? 1280.66 Section 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park are...

  8. Archives of Transformation: A Case Study of the International Women's Network against Militarism's Archival System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cachola, Ellen-Rae Cabebe

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation describes the International Women's Network Against Militarism's (IWNAM) political epistemology of security from an archival perspective, and how they create community archives to evidence this epistemology. This research examines records created by Women for Genuine Security (WGS) and Women's Voices Women Speak (WVWS), U.S. and…

  9. European distributed seismological data archives infrastructure: EIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, John; Hanka, Winfried; Mazza, Salvatore; Pederson, Helle; Sleeman, Reinoud; Stammler, Klaus; Strollo, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    The European Integrated waveform Data Archive (EIDA) is a distributed Data Center system within ORFEUS that (a) securely archives seismic waveform data and related metadata gathered by European research infrastructures, and (b) provides transparent access to the archives for the geosciences research communities. EIDA was founded in 2013 by ORFEUS Data Center, GFZ, RESIF, ETH, INGV and BGR to ensure sustainability of a distributed archive system and the implementation of standards (e.g. FDSN StationXML, FDSN webservices) and coordinate new developments. Under the mandate of the ORFEUS Board of Directors and Executive Committee the founding group is responsible for steering and maintaining the technical developments and organization of the European distributed seismic waveform data archive and the integration within broader multidisciplanry frameworks like EPOS. EIDA currently offers uniform data access to unrestricted data from 8 European archives (www.orfeus-eu.org/eida), linked by the Arclink protocol, hosting data from 75 permanent networks (1800+ stations) and 33 temporary networks (1200+) stations). Moreover, each archive may also provide unique, restricted datasets. A webinterface, developed at GFZ, offers interactive access to different catalogues (EMSC, GFZ, USGS) and EIDA waveform data. Clients and toolboxes like arclink_fetch and ObsPy can connect directly to any EIDA node to collect data. Current developments are directed to the implementation of quality parameters and strong motion parameters.

  10. Strategies to explore functional genomics data sets in NCBI's GEO database.

    PubMed

    Wilhite, Stephen E; Barrett, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is a major repository that stores high-throughput functional genomics data sets that are generated using both microarray-based and sequence-based technologies. Data sets are submitted to GEO primarily by researchers who are publishing their results in journals that require original data to be made freely available for review and analysis. In addition to serving as a public archive for these data, GEO has a suite of tools that allow users to identify, analyze, and visualize data relevant to their specific interests. These tools include sample comparison applications, gene expression profile charts, data set clusters, genome browser tracks, and a powerful search engine that enables users to construct complex queries.

  11. NASA Data Archive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Haight, Kyle G.; Lindstrom, Ted

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to expose a range of naive individuals to the NASA Data Archive and to obtain feedback from them, with the goal of learning how useful people with varied backgrounds would find the Archive for research and other purposes. We processed 36 subjects in four experimental categories, designated in this report as C+R+, C+R-, C-R+ and C-R-, for computer experienced researchers, computer experienced non-researchers, non-computer experienced researchers, and non-computer experienced non-researchers, respectively. This report includes an assessment of general patterns of subject responses to the various aspects of the NASA Data Archive. Some of the aspects examined were interface-oriented, addressing such issues as whether the subject was able to locate information, figure out how to perform desired information retrieval tasks, etc. Other aspects were content-related. In doing these assessments, answers given to different questions were sometimes combined. This practice reflects the tendency of the subjects to provide answers expressing their experiences across question boundaries. Patterns of response are cross-examined by subject category in order to bring out deeper understandings of why subjects reacted the way they did to the archive. After the general assessment, there will be a more extensive summary of the replies received from the test subjects.

  12. Database on unstable rock slopes in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Nordahl, Bo; Bunkholt, Halvor; Nicolaisen, Magnus; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Böhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2014-05-01

    Several large rockslides have occurred in historic times in Norway causing many casualties. Most of these casualties are due to displacement waves triggered by a rock avalanche and affecting coast lines of entire lakes and fjords. The Geological Survey of Norway performs systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway and has detected up to now more than 230 unstable slopes with significant postglacial deformation. This systematic mapping aims to detect future rock avalanches before they occur. The registered unstable rock slopes are stored in a database on unstable rock slopes developed and maintained by the Geological Survey of Norway. The main aims of this database are (1) to serve as a national archive for unstable rock slopes in Norway; (2) to serve for data collection and storage during field mapping; (3) to provide decision-makers with hazard zones and other necessary information on unstable rock slopes for land-use planning and mitigation; and (4) to inform the public through an online map service. The database is organized hierarchically with a main point for each unstable rock slope to which several feature classes and tables are linked. This main point feature class includes several general attributes of the unstable rock slopes, such as site name, general and geological descriptions, executed works, recommendations, technical parameters (volume, lithology, mechanism and others), displacement rates, possible consequences, hazard and risk classification and so on. Feature classes and tables linked to the main feature class include the run-out area, the area effected by secondary effects, the hazard and risk classification, subareas and scenarios of an unstable rock slope, field observation points, displacement measurement stations, URL links for further documentation and references. The database on unstable rock slopes in Norway will be publicly consultable through the online map service on www.skrednett.no in 2014. Only publicly relevant parts of

  13. Alaska Geochemical Database - Mineral Exploration Tool for the 21st Century - PDF of presentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granitto, Matthew; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Labay, Keith A.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has created a geochemical database of geologic material samples collected in Alaska. This database is readily accessible to anyone with access to the Internet. Designed as a tool for mineral or environmental assessment, land management, or mineral exploration, the initial version of the Alaska Geochemical Database - U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 637 - contains geochemical, geologic, and geospatial data for 264,158 samples collected from 1962-2009: 108,909 rock samples; 92,701 sediment samples; 48,209 heavy-mineral-concentrate samples; 6,869 soil samples; and 7,470 mineral samples. In addition, the Alaska Geochemical Database contains mineralogic data for 18,138 nonmagnetic-fraction heavy mineral concentrates, making it the first U.S. Geological Survey database of this scope that contains both geochemical and mineralogic data. Examples from the Alaska Range will illustrate potential uses of the Alaska Geochemical Database in mineral exploration. Data from the Alaska Geochemical Database have been extensively checked for accuracy of sample media description, sample site location, and analytical method using U.S. Geological Survey sample-submittal archives and U.S. Geological Survey publications (plus field notebooks and sample site compilation base maps from the Alaska Technical Data Unit in Anchorage, Alaska). The database is also the repository for nearly all previously released U.S. Geological Survey Alaska geochemical datasets. Although the Alaska Geochemical Database is a fully relational database in Microsoft® Access 2003 and 2010 formats, these same data are also provided as a series of spreadsheet files in Microsoft® Excel 2003 and 2010 formats, and as ASCII text files. A DVD version of the Alaska Geochemical Database was released in October 2011, as U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 637, and data downloads are available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/637/. Also, all Alaska Geochemical Database data have been incorporated into

  14. Data-Oriented Astrophysics at NOAO: The Science Archive & The Data Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stephanie; NOAO Data Lab, NOAO Science Archive

    2018-06-01

    As we keep progressing into an era of increasingly large astronomy datasets, NOAO’s data-oriented mission is growing in prominence. The NOAO Science Archive, which captures and processes the pixel data from mountaintops in Chile and Arizona, now contains holdings at Petabyte scales. Working at the intersection of astronomy and data science, the main goal of the NOAO Data Lab is to provide users with a suite of tools to work close to this data, the catalogs derived from them, as well as externally provided datasets, and thus optimize the scientific productivity of the astronomy community. These tools and services include databases, query tools, virtual storage space, workflows through our Jupyter Notebook server, and scripted analysis. We currently host datasets from NOAO facilities such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the DESI imaging Legacy Surveys (LS), the Dark Energy Camera Plane Survey (DECaPS), and the nearly all-sky NOAO Source Catalog (NSC). We are further preparing for large spectroscopy datasets such as DESI. After a brief overview of the Science Archive, the Data Lab and datasets, I will briefly showcase scientific applications showing use of our data holdings. Lastly, I will describe our vision for future developments as we tackle the next technical and scientific challenges.

  15. The development of a new database of gas emissions: MAGA, a collaborative web environment for collecting data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Frigeri, A.; Bagnato, E.; Aiuppa, A.; McCormick, B.

    2013-12-01

    a data-driven web service, where software clients can request data directly from the database. This way Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Virtual Globes (e.g., Google Earth) can easily access the database, and data can be exchanged with other database. In details the database now includes: i) more than 1000 flux data about volcanic plume degassing from Etna (4 summit craters and bulk degassing) and Stromboli volcanoes, with time averaged CO2 fluxes of ~ 18000 and 766 t/d, respectively; ii) data from ~ 30 sites of diffuse soil degassing from Napoletan volcanoes, Azores, Canary, Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano Island, with a wide range of CO2 fluxes (from les than 1 to 1500 t/d) and iii) several data on fumarolic emissions (~ 7 sites) with CO2 fluxes up to 1340 t/day (i.e., Stromboli). When available, time series of compositional data have been archived in the database (e.g., for Campi Flegrei fumaroles). We believe MAGA data-base is an important starting point to develop a large scale, expandable data-base aimed to excite, inspire, and encourage participation among researchers. In addition, the possibility to archive location and qualitative information for gas emission/sites not yet investigated, could stimulate the scientific community for future researches and will provide an indication on the current uncertainty on deep carbon fluxes global estimates.

  16. Software for Managing an Archive of Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallai, Charles; Jones, Helene; Callac, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This is a revised draft by Innovators concerning the report on Software for Managing and Archive of Images.The SSC Multimedia Archive is an automated electronic system to manage images, acquired both by film and digital cameras, for the Public Affairs Office (PAO) at Stennis Space Center (SSC). Previously, the image archive was based on film photography and utilized a manual system that, by todays standards, had become inefficient and expensive. Now, the SSC Multimedia Archive, based on a server at SSC, contains both catalogs and images for pictures taken both digitally and with a traditional film-based camera, along with metadata about each image.

  17. Landslide databases for applied landslide impact research: the example of the landslide database for the Federal Republic of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, Bodo; Klose, Martin

    2014-05-01

    This contribution presents an initiative to develop a national landslide database for the Federal Republic of Germany. It highlights structure and contents of the landslide database and outlines its major data sources and the strategy of information retrieval. Furthermore, the contribution exemplifies the database potentials in applied landslide impact research, including statistics of landslide damage, repair, and mitigation. The landslide database offers due to systematic regional data compilation a differentiated data pool of more than 5,000 data sets and over 13,000 single data files. It dates back to 1137 AD and covers landslide sites throughout Germany. In seven main data blocks, the landslide database stores besides information on landslide types, dimensions, and processes, additional data on soil and bedrock properties, geomorphometry, and climatic or other major triggering events. A peculiarity of this landslide database is its storage of data sets on land use effects, damage impacts, hazard mitigation, and landslide costs. Compilation of landslide data is based on a two-tier strategy of data collection. The first step of information retrieval includes systematic web content mining and exploration of online archives of emergency agencies, fire and police departments, and news organizations. Using web and RSS feeds and soon also a focused web crawler, this enables effective nationwide data collection for recent landslides. On the basis of this information, in-depth data mining is performed to deepen and diversify the data pool in key landslide areas. This enables to gather detailed landslide information from, amongst others, agency records, geotechnical reports, climate statistics, maps, and satellite imagery. Landslide data is extracted from these information sources using a mix of methods, including statistical techniques, imagery analysis, and qualitative text interpretation. The landslide database is currently migrated to a spatial database system

  18. Evaluation of the Military Functional Assessment Program: Preliminary Assessment of the Construct Validity Using an Archived Database of Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Amanda M; Ranes, Bethany M; Estrada, Art; Grandizio, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Several important factors must be considered when deciding to return a soldier to duty after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Premature return increases risk for not only second-impact syndrome during the acute phase but also permanent changes from repetitive concussions. Thus, there is a critical need for return-to-duty (RTD) assessment criteria that encompass the spectrum of injury and disease experienced by US soldiers, particularly TBI. To provide evidence-based standards to eventually serve as criteria for operational competence and performance of a soldier after injury. Specifically, the relationships between clinical assessments and novel military-specific tasks were evaluated. Exploratory analyses (including nonparametric tests and Spearman rank correlations) of an archived database. A total of 79 patients with TBI who participated in an RTD assessment program at a US Army rehabilitation and recovery center. Military Functional Assessment Program (to determine a soldier's operational competence and performance after TBI) tasks; Dizziness Handicap Inventory; Dynamic Visual Acuity (vestibular function); Sensory Organization Test (postural control); Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (neuropsychological screening test); Beck Depression Inventory-II; Beck Anxiety Inventory; Comprehensive Trail Making Test (visual search and sequencing); posttraumatic stress disorder checklist military version; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test; Epworth Sleepiness Scale; Patient Health Questionnaire; and Military Acute Concussion Evaluation. Selected military operational assessment tasks correlated significantly with clinical measures of vestibular function, psychological well-being, and cognitive function. Differences on occupational therapy assessments, a concussion screening tool, and a self-report health questionnaire were seen between those who passed and those who failed the RTD assessment. Specifically, those who passed the RTD

  19. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 20: The SeaWiFS bio-optical archive and storage system (SeaBASS), part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Mcclain, Charles R.; Firestone, James K.; Westphal, Todd L.; Yeh, Eueng-Nan; Ge, Yuntao; Firestone, Elaine R.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides an overview of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Bio-Optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS), which will serve as a repository for numerous data sets of interest to the SeaWiFS Science Team and other approved investigators in the oceanographic community. The data collected will be those data sets suitable for the development and evaluation of bio-optical algorithms which include results from SeaWiFS Intercalibration Round-Robin Experiments (SIRREXs), prelaunch characterization of the SeaWiFS instrument by its manufacturer -- Hughes/Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC), Marine Optical Characterization Experiment (MOCE) cruises, Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) deployments and refurbishments, and field studies of other scientists outside of NASA. The primary goal of the data system is to provide a simple mechanism for querying the available archive and requesting specific items, while assuring that the data is made available only to authorized users. The design, construction, and maintenance of SeaBASS is the responsibility of the SeaWiFS Calibration and Validation Team (CVT). This report is concerned with documenting the execution of this task by the CVT and consists of a series of chapters detailing the various data sets involved. The topics presented are as follows: 1) overview of the SeaBASS file architecture, 2) the bio-optical data system, 3) the historical pigment database, 4) the SIRREX database, and 5) the SBRC database.

  20. Archival Services and Technologies for Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jörg; Hardt, Marcus; Streit, Achim; van Wezel, Jos

    2014-06-01

    After analysis and publication, there is no need to keep experimental data online on spinning disks. For reliability and costs inactive data is moved to tape and put into a data archive. The data archive must provide reliable access for at least ten years following a recommendation of the German Science Foundation (DFG), but many scientific communities wish to keep data available much longer. Data archival is on the one hand purely a bit preservation activity in order to ensure the bits read are the same as those written years before. On the other hand enough information must be archived to be able to use and interpret the content of the data. The latter is depending on many also community specific factors and remains an areas of much debate among archival specialists. The paper describes the current practice of archival and bit preservation in use for different science communities at KIT for which a combination of organizational services and technical tools are required. The special monitoring to detect tape related errors, the software infrastructure in use as well as the service certification are discussed. Plans and developments at KIT also in the context of the Large Scale Data Management and Analysis (LSDMA) project are presented. The technical advantages of the T10 SCSI Stream Commands (SSC-4) and the Linear Tape File System (LTFS) will have a profound impact on future long term archival of large data sets.

  1. A Magnetic Petrology Database for Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, K.; Wasilewski, P.; Didenko, A.; Genshaft, Y.; Pashkevich, I.

    2002-05-01

    A Magnetic Petrology Database (MPDB) is now being compiled at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in cooperation with Russian and Ukrainian Institutions. The purpose of this database is to provide the geomagnetic community with a comprehensive and user-friendly method of accessing magnetic petrology data via Internet for more realistic interpretation of satellite magnetic anomalies. Magnetic Petrology Data had been accumulated in NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, United Institute of Physics of the Earth (Russia) and Institute of Geophysics (Ukraine) over several decades and now consists of many thousands of records of data in our archives. The MPDB was, and continues to be in big demand especially since recent launching in near Earth orbit of the mini-constellation of three satellites - Oersted (in 1999), Champ (in 2000), and SAC-C (in 2000) which will provide lithospheric magnetic maps with better spatial and amplitude resolution (about 1 nT). The MPDB is focused on lower crustal and upper mantle rocks and will include data on mantle xenoliths, serpentinized ultramafic rocks, granulites, iron quartzites and rocks from Archean-Proterozoic metamorphic sequences from all around the world. A substantial amount of data is coming from the area of unique Kursk Magnetic Anomaly and Kola Deep Borehole (which recovered 12 km of continental crust). A prototype MPDB can be found on the Geodynamics Branch web server of Goddard Space Flight Center at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/magnpetr.html. The MPDB employs a searchable relational design and consists of 7 interrelated tables. The schema of database is shown at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/doc.html. MySQL database server was utilized to implement MPDB. The SQL (Structured Query Language) is used to query the database. To present the results of queries on WEB and for WEB programming we utilized PHP scripting language and CGI scripts. The prototype MPDB is designed to search database by major satellite magnetic

  2. Real-time data archiving for GTA

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cole, R.A.; Atkins, W.H.

    1992-09-01

    The architecture of the GTA control system, the nature of a typical GTA commissioning activity, and the varied interests of those analyzing the data make it challenging to develop a general-purpose scheme for archiving data and making the data available to those who will use it. Addressing the needs of those who develop and trouble-shoot hardware and software increases the challenge. This paper describes the aspects of GTA that affect archiving operations and discusses how the features of the EPICS archiving module meet a variety of needs for storing and accessing data.

  3. Real-time data archiving for GTA

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cole, R.A.; Atkins, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    The architecture of the GTA control system, the nature of a typical GTA commissioning activity, and the varied interests of those analyzing the data make it challenging to develop a general-purpose scheme for archiving data and making the data available to those who will use it. Addressing the needs of those who develop and trouble-shoot hardware and software increases the challenge. This paper describes the aspects of GTA that affect archiving operations and discusses how the features of the EPICS archiving module meet a variety of needs for storing and accessing data.

  4. Measuring disease prevalence: a comparison of musculoskeletal disease using four general practice consultation databases

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Kelvin; Clarke, Alexandra M; Symmons, Deborah PM; Fleming, Douglas; Porcheret, Mark; Kadam, Umesh T; Croft, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Primary care consultation data are an important source of information on morbidity prevalence. It is not known how reliable such figures are. Aim To compare annual consultation prevalence estimates for musculoskeletal conditions derived from four general practice consultation databases. Design of study Retrospective study of general practice consultation records. Setting Three national general practice consultation databases: i) Fourth Morbidity Statistics from General Practice (MSGP4, 1991/92), ii) Royal College of General Practitioners Weekly Returns Service (RCGP WRS, 2001), and iii) General Practice Research Database (GPRD, 1991 and 2001); and one regional database (Consultations in Primary Care Archive, 2001). Method Age-sex standardised persons consulting annual prevalence rates for musculoskeletal conditions overall, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and arthralgia were derived for patients aged 15 years and over. Results GPRD prevalence of any musculoskeletal condition, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis was lower than that of the other databases. This is likely to be due to GPs not needing to record every consultation made for a chronic condition. MSGP4 gave the highest prevalence for osteoarthritis but low prevalence of arthralgia which reflects encouragement for GPs to use diagnostic rather than symptom codes. Conclusion Considerable variation exists in consultation prevalence estimates for musculoskeletal conditions. Researchers and health service planners should be aware that estimates of disease occurrence based on consultation will be influenced by choice of database. This is likely to be true for other chronic diseases and where alternative symptom labels exist for a disease. RCGP WRS may give the most reliable prevalence figures for musculoskeletal and other chronic diseases. PMID:17244418

  5. Opening the Landsat Archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The USGS Landsat archive holds an unequaled 36-year record of the Earth's surface that is invaluable to climate change studies, forest and resource management activities, and emergency response operations. An aggressive effort is taking place to provide all Landsat imagery [scenes currently held in the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center archive, as well as newly acquired scenes daily] free of charge to users with electronic access via the Web by the end of December 2008. The entire Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) archive acquired since 1999 and any newly acquired Landsat 7 ETM+ images that have less than 40 percent cloud cover are currently available for download. When this endeavor is complete all Landsat 1-5 data will also be available for download. This includes Landsat 1-5 Multispectral Scanner (MSS) scenes, as well as Landsat 4 and 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) scenes.

  6. Technologically Enhanced Archival Collections: Using the Buddy System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holz, Dayna

    2006-01-01

    Based in the context of challenges faced by archives when managing digital projects, this article explores options of looking outside the existing expertise of archives staff to find collaborative partners. In teaming up with other departments and organizations, the potential scope of traditional archival digitization projects is expanded beyond…

  7. Cassini/Huygens Program Archive Plan for Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Cassini/Huygens science data archive system which includes policy, roles and responsibilities, description of science and supplementary data products or data sets, metadata, documentation, software, and archive schedule and methods for archive transfer to the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS).

  8. A comprehensive cost model for NASA data archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Klenk, K. F.; Treinish, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple archive cost model has been developed to help predict NASA's archiving costs. The model covers data management activities from the beginning of the mission through launch, acquisition, and support of retrospective users by the long-term archive; it is capable of determining the life cycle costs for archived data depending on how the data need to be managed to meet user requirements. The model, which currently contains 48 equations with a menu-driven user interface, is available for use on an IBM PC or AT.

  9. Data archiving for animal cognition research: report of an NIMH workshop.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Howard S; Church, Russell M; Crystal, Jonathon D

    2002-11-01

    In July 2001, the National Institute of Mental Health sponsored a workshop titled "Data Archiving for Animal Cognition Research." Participants included scientists as well as experts in archiving, publishing, policy, and law. As is described in this report, the workshop resulted in a set of conclusions and recommendations concerning (A) the impact of data archiving on research, (B) how to incorporate data archiving into research practice, (C) contents of data archives, (D) technical and archival standards, and (E) organizational, financing, and policy issues. The animal cognition research community is encouraged to begin now to establish archives, deposit data and related materials, and make use of archived materials in new scientific projects.

  10. Large Scale Landslide Database System Established for the Reservoirs in Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsai-Tsung; Tsai, Kuang-Jung; Shieh, Chjeng-Lun

    2017-04-01

    Typhoon Morakot seriously attack southern Taiwan awaken the public awareness of large scale landslide disasters. Large scale landslide disasters produce large quantity of sediment due to negative effects on the operating functions of reservoirs. In order to reduce the risk of these disasters within the study area, the establishment of a database for hazard mitigation / disaster prevention is necessary. Real time data and numerous archives of engineering data, environment information, photo, and video, will not only help people make appropriate decisions, but also bring the biggest concern for people to process and value added. The study tried to define some basic data formats / standards from collected various types of data about these reservoirs and then provide a management platform based on these formats / standards. Meanwhile, in order to satisfy the practicality and convenience, the large scale landslide disasters database system is built both provide and receive information abilities, which user can use this large scale landslide disasters database system on different type of devices. IT technology progressed extreme quick, the most modern system might be out of date anytime. In order to provide long term service, the system reserved the possibility of user define data format /standard and user define system structure. The system established by this study was based on HTML5 standard language, and use the responsive web design technology. This will make user can easily handle and develop this large scale landslide disasters database system.

  11. Duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies in the primary nucleotide databases: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-01

    GenBank, the EMBL European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA DataBank of Japan, known collectively as the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration or INSDC, are the three most significant nucleotide sequence databases. Their records are derived from laboratory work undertaken by different individuals, by different teams, with a range of technologies and assumptions and over a period of decades. As a consequence, they contain a great many duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies, but neither the prevalence nor the characteristics of various types of duplicates have been rigorously assessed. Existing duplicate detection methods in bioinformatics only address specific duplicate types, with inconsistent assumptions; and the impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases has not been carefully assessed, making it difficult to judge the value of such methods. Our goal is to assess the scale, kinds and impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases, through a retrospective analysis of merged groups in INSDC databases. Our outcomes are threefold: (1) We analyse a benchmark dataset consisting of duplicates manually identified in INSDC-a dataset of 67 888 merged groups with 111 823 duplicate pairs across 21 organisms from INSDC databases - in terms of the prevalence, types and impacts of duplicates. (2) We categorize duplicates at both sequence and annotation level, with supporting quantitative statistics, showing that different organisms have different prevalence of distinct kinds of duplicate. (3) We show that the presence of duplicates has practical impact via a simple case study on duplicates, in terms of GC content and melting temperature. We demonstrate that duplicates not only introduce redundancy, but can lead to inconsistent results for certain tasks. Our findings lead to a better understanding of the problem of duplication in biological databases.Database URL: the merged records are available at https

  12. A Database of Young Star Clusters for Five Hundred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Brad

    2009-07-01

    We propose to use the source lists developed as part of the Hubble Legacy Archive {HLA: Data Release 1 - February 8, 2008} to obtain a large {N 50 galaxies for multi-wavelength, N 500 galaxies for ACS F814W}, uniform {ACS + WFPC2 + NICMOS: DAOphot used for object detection} database of super star clusters in nearby star-forming galaxies in order to address two fundamental astronomical questions: 1} To what degree is the cluster luminosity {and mass} function of star clusters universal ? 2} What fraction of super star clusters are "missing" in optical studies {i.e., are hidden by dust}? This database will also support comparisons with new Monte-Carlo simulations that have independently been developed in the past few years by co-I Larsen and PI Whitmore, and will be used to test the Whitmore, Chandar, Fall {2007} framework designed to understand the demographics of star clusters in all star forming galaxies. The catalogs will increase the number of galaxies with measured mass and luminosity functions by an order of magnitude, and will provide a powerful new tool for comparative studies, both ours and the community's.

  13. A new archival infrastructure for highly-structured astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovgan, Erik; Knapic, Cristina; Sponza, Massimo; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2018-03-01

    With the advent of the 2020 Radio Astronomy Telescopes era, the amount and format of the radioastronomical data is becoming a massive and performance-critical challenge. Such an evolution of data models and data formats require new data archiving techniques that allow massive and fast storage of data that are at the same time also efficiently processed. A useful expertise for efficient archiviation has been obtained through data archiving of Medicina and Noto Radio Telescopes. The presented archival infrastructure named the Radio Archive stores and handles various formats, such as FITS, MBFITS, and VLBI's XML, which includes description and ancillary files. The modeling and architecture of the archive fulfill all the requirements of both data persistence and easy data discovery and exploitation. The presented archive already complies with the Virtual Observatory directives, therefore future service implementations will also be VO compliant. This article presents the Radio Archive services and tools, from the data acquisition to the end-user data utilization.

  14. Physicians utilisation of internet medical databases at the tertiary health institutions in Osun State, south west, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Shabi, Iwok N; Shabi, Olabode M; Akewukereke, Modupe A; Udofia, Emem P

    2011-12-01

    To determine the extent, purpose, determinants and the impact of the utilization of Internet medical databases among the respondents. A descriptive cross sectional survey of 540 randomly selected physicians at the two tertiary health institutions in Osun State, south west, Nigeria. A total of 444 (82.2%) physicians completed the questionnaires. All the respondents have used the internet medical databases within the last 4 weeks of the study. Majority, (53.8%) used the internet resources at least once in 2 weeks, while 12.2% used the resources every day. The online resources are mainly sought for Routine patient care and for Research purposes. pubmed (70.3%), hinari (69.0%), and Free medical journals (60.1%) are the frequently used online databases/digital archives. The internet resources has positively impacted the Clinical practice (40.0%) and Research output (65.5%) of the physicians. There had been considerable increase in the extent and quality of utilization of online medical databases which has positively impacted on the Clinical practice and Research output of the physicians. Ease of finding the needed information and the availability of evidence based resources are the major determinants of the databases utilized. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  15. Finding "Science" in the Archives of the Spanish Monarchy.

    PubMed

    Portuondo, Maria M

    2016-03-01

    This essay explores the history of several archives that house the early modern records of Spanish imperial science. The modern "archival turn" urges us to think critically about archives and to recognize in the history of these collections an embedded, often implicit, history that--unless properly recognized, acknowledged, and understood--can distort the histories we are trying to tell. This essay uses a curious episode in the history of science to illustrate how Spanish archives relate to each other and shape the collections they house. During the late eighteenth century a young navy officer, Martín Fernández de Navarrete, was dispatched to all the principal archives of the Spanish monarchy with a peculiar mission: he was to search for evidence that the Spanish in fact had a scientific tradition. This essay uses his mission to explain how the original purpose of an archive--the archive's telos--may persist as a strong and potentially deterministic force in the work of historians of science. In the case of the archives discussed, this telos was shaped by issues as wide ranging as defending a nation's reputation against claims of colonial neglect and as idiosyncratic as an archivist's selection criteria.

  16. An enhanced archive facilitating climate impacts analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, E.P.; Brekke, L.; Pruitt, T.; Thrasher, B.; Long, J.; Duffy, P.; Dettinger, M.; Cayan, D.; Arnold, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the expansion of a publicly available archive of downscaled climate and hydrology projections for the United States. Those studying or planning to adapt to future climate impacts demand downscaled climate model output for local or regional use. The archive we describe attempts to fulfill this need by providing data in several formats, selectable to meet user needs. Our archive has served as a resource for climate impacts modelers, water managers, educators, and others. Over 1,400 individuals have transferred more than 50 TB of data from the archive. In response to user demands, the archive has expanded from monthly downscaled data to include daily data to facilitate investigations of phenomena sensitive to daily to monthly temperature and precipitation, including extremes in these quantities. New developments include downscaled output from the new Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) climate model simulations at both the monthly and daily time scales, as well as simulations of surface hydrologi- cal variables. The web interface allows the extraction of individual projections or ensemble statistics for user-defined regions, promoting the rapid assessment of model consensus and uncertainty for future projections of precipitation, temperature, and hydrology. The archive is accessible online (http://gdo-dcp.ucllnl.org/downscaled_ cmip_projections).

  17. A Global Digital Database and Atlas of Quaternary Dune Fields and Sand Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, N.; Halfen, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Sand seas and dune fields are globally significant sedimentary deposits, which archive the effects of climate and sea level change on a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Dune systems provide a valuable source of information on past climate conditions, including evidence for periods of aridity and unique data on past wind regimes. Researchers have compiled vast quantities of geomorphic and chronological data from these dune systems for nearly half a century, however, these data remain disconnected, making comparisons of dune systems challenging at global and regional scales. The primary goal of this project is to develop a global digital database of chronologic information for periods of desert sand dune accumulation and stabilization, as well as, pertinent stratigraphic and geomorphic information. This database can then be used by scientists to 1) document the history of aeolian processes in arid regions with emphasis on dune systems in low and mid latitude deserts, 2) correlate periods of sand accumulation and stability with other terrestrial and marine paleoclimatic proxies and records, and 3) develop an improved understanding of the response of dune systems to climate change. The database currently resides in Microsoft Access format, which allows searching and filtering of data. The database includes 4 linked tables containing information on the site, chronological control (radiocarbon or luminescence), and the pertinent literature citations. Thus far the database contains information for 838 sites world wide, comprising 2598 luminescence and radiocarbon ages, though these numbers increase regularly as new data is added. The database is only available on request at this time, however, an online, GIS database is being developed and will be available in the near future. Data outputs from the online database will include PDF reports and Google Earth formatted data sets for quick viewing of data. Additionally, data will be available in a gridded format for

  18. Digital Archival Image Collections: Who Are the Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herold, Irene M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Archival digital image collections are a relatively new phenomenon in college library archives. Digitizing archival image collections may make them accessible to users worldwide. There has been no study to explore whether collections on the Internet lead to users who are beyond the institution or a comparison of users to a national or…

  19. A database of biological and geomorphological sea-level markers from the Last Glacial Maximum to present

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, F.D.; Williams, F.H.; Fallon, S.J.; Rohling, E.J.

    2018-01-01

    The last deglacial was an interval of rapid climate and sea-level change, including the collapse of large continental ice sheets. This database collates carefully assessed sea-level data from peer-reviewed sources for the interval 0 to 25 thousand years ago (ka), from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present interglacial. In addition to facilitating site-specific reconstructions of past sea levels, the database provides a suite of data beyond the range of modern/instrumental variability that may help hone future sea-level projections. The database is global in scope, internally consistent, and contains U-series and radiocarbon dated indicators from both biological and geomorpohological archives. We focus on far-field data (i.e., away from the sites of the former continental ice sheets), but some key intermediate (i.e., from the Caribbean) data are also included. All primary fields (i.e., sample location, elevation, age and context) possess quantified uncertainties, which—in conjunction with available metadata—allows the reconstructed sea levels to be interpreted within both their uncertainties and geological context. PMID:29809175

  20. Evolution of Archival Storage (from Tape to Memory)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, there has been a significant evolution in storage technologies supporting archival of remote sensing data. This section provides a brief survey of how these technologies have evolved. Three main technologies are considered - tape, hard disk and solid state disk. Their historical evolution is traced, summarizing how reductions in cost have helped being able to store larger volumes of data on faster media. The cost per GB of media is only one of the considerations in determining the best approach to archival storage. Active archives generally require faster response to user requests for data than permanent archives. The archive costs have to consider facilities and other capital costs, operations costs, software licenses, utilities costs, etc. For meeting requirements in any organization, typically a mix of technologies is needed.

  1. A novel method for efficient archiving and retrieval of biomedical images using MPEG-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Joerg; Pahwa, Ash

    2004-10-01

    Digital archiving and efficient retrieval of radiological scans have become critical steps in contemporary medical diagnostics. Since more and more images and image sequences (single scans or video) from various modalities (CT/MRI/PET/digital X-ray) are now available in digital formats (e.g., DICOM-3), hospitals and radiology clinics need to implement efficient protocols capable of managing the enormous amounts of data generated daily in a typical clinical routine. We present a method that appears to be a viable way to eliminate the tedious step of manually annotating image and video material for database indexing. MPEG-7 is a new framework that standardizes the way images are characterized in terms of color, shape, and other abstract, content-related criteria. A set of standardized descriptors that are automatically generated from an image is used to compare an image to other images in a database, and to compute the distance between two images for a given application domain. Text-based database queries can be replaced with image-based queries using MPEG-7. Consequently, image queries can be conducted without any prior knowledge of the keys that were used as indices in the database. Since the decoding and matching steps are not part of the MPEG-7 standard, this method also enables searches that were not planned by the time the keys were generated.

  2. Landslide databases to compare regional repair and mitigation strategies of transportation infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlers, Annika; Damm, Bodo

    2017-04-01

    Regional data of the Central German Uplands are extracted from the German landslide database in order to understand the complex interactions between landslide risks and public risk awareness considering transportation infrastructure. Most information within the database is gathered by means of archive studies from inventories of emergency agencies, state, press and web archives, company and department records as well as scientific and (geo)technical literature. The information includes land use practices, repair and mitigation measures with resultant costs of the German road network as well as railroad and waterway networks. It therefore contains valuable information of historical and current landslide impacts, elements at risk and provides an overview of spatiotemporal changes in social exposure and vulnerability to landslide hazards over the last 120 years. On a regional scale the recorded infrastructure damages, and consequential repair or mitigation measures were categorized and classified, according to relevant landslide types, processes and types of infrastructure. In a further step, the data of recent landslides are compared with historical and modern repair and mitigation measures and are correlated with socioeconomic concepts. As a result, it is possible to identify some complex interactions between landslide hazard, risk perception, and damage impact, including time lags and intensity thresholds. The data reveal distinct concepts of repairing respectively mitigating landslides on different types of transportation infrastructure, which are not exclusively linked to higher construction efforts (e.g. embankments on railroads and channels), but changing levels of economic losses and risk perception as well. In addition, a shift from low cost prevention measures such as the removal of loose rock and vegetation, rock blasting, and catch barriers towards expensive mitigation measures such as catch fences, soil anchoring and rock nailing over time can be noticed

  3. Speeches Archive

    Science.gov Websites

    Speeches Archive Former AF Top 3 Viewpoints and Speeches Air Force Warrior Games 2017 Events 2018 Air Force Strategic Documents Desert Storm 25th Anniversary Observances DoD Warrior Games Portraits in Courage

  4. A public database of macromolecular diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Marek; Langner, Karol M; Cymborowski, Marcin; Porebski, Przemyslaw J; Sroka, Piotr; Zheng, Heping; Cooper, David R; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Elsliger, Marc André; Burley, Stephen K; Minor, Wladek

    2016-11-01

    The low reproducibility of published experimental results in many scientific disciplines has recently garnered negative attention in scientific journals and the general media. Public transparency, including the availability of `raw' experimental data, will help to address growing concerns regarding scientific integrity. Macromolecular X-ray crystallography has led the way in requiring the public dissemination of atomic coordinates and a wealth of experimental data, making the field one of the most reproducible in the biological sciences. However, there remains no mandate for public disclosure of the original diffraction data. The Integrated Resource for Reproducibility in Macromolecular Crystallography (IRRMC) has been developed to archive raw data from diffraction experiments and, equally importantly, to provide related metadata. Currently, the database of our resource contains data from 2920 macromolecular diffraction experiments (5767 data sets), accounting for around 3% of all depositions in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), with their corresponding partially curated metadata. IRRMC utilizes distributed storage implemented using a federated architecture of many independent storage servers, which provides both scalability and sustainability. The resource, which is accessible via the web portal at http://www.proteindiffraction.org, can be searched using various criteria. All data are available for unrestricted access and download. The resource serves as a proof of concept and demonstrates the feasibility of archiving raw diffraction data and associated metadata from X-ray crystallographic studies of biological macromolecules. The goal is to expand this resource and include data sets that failed to yield X-ray structures in order to facilitate collaborative efforts that will improve protein structure-determination methods and to ensure the availability of `orphan' data left behind for various reasons by individual investigators and/or extinct structural genomics

  5. Digital image archiving: challenges and choices.

    PubMed

    Dumery, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    In the last five years, imaging exam volume has grown rapidly. In addition to increased image acquisition, there is more patient information per study. RIS-PACS integration and information-rich DICOM headers now provide us with more patient information relative to each study. The volume of archived digital images is increasing and will continue to rise at a steeper incline than film-based storage of the past. Many filmless facilities have been caught off guard by this increase, which has been stimulated by many factors. The most significant factor is investment in new digital and DICOM-compliant modalities. A huge volume driver is the increase in images per study from multi-slice technology. Storage requirements also are affected by disaster recovery initiatives and state retention mandates. This burgeoning rate of imaging data volume presents many challenges: cost of ownership, data accessibility, storage media obsolescence, database considerations, physical limitations, reliability and redundancy. There are two basic approaches to archiving--single tier and multi-tier. Each has benefits. With a single-tier approach, all the data is stored on a single media that can be accessed very quickly. A redundant copy of the data is then stored onto another less expensive media. This is usually a removable media. In this approach, the on-line storage is increased incrementally as volume grows. In a multi-tier approach, storage levels are set up based on access speed and cost. In other words, all images are stored at the deepest archiving level, which is also the least expensive. Images are stored on or moved back to the intermediate and on-line levels if they will need to be accessed more quickly. It can be difficult to decide what the best approach is for your organization. The options include RAIDs (redundant array of independent disks), direct attached RAID storage (DAS), network storage using RAIDs (NAS and SAN), removable media such as different types of tape, compact

  6. Archiving for Rosetta: Lessons for IPDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heather, David

    The Rosetta Project is unusual, possibly unique, in that all data must be archived both in NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS), and in ESA's Planetary Science Archive (PSA), ac-cording to an inter-agency agreement that predates the existence of ESA's PSA. This requires that all data are formatted according to NASA's PDS3 Standards. Scientific peer reviews of the data content for Rosetta have been carried out both in the US and in Europe and there was a very large overlap of the issues raised, illustrating the general scientific agreement, independent of geography, in what an archive must contain to be useful to the broader community of planetary scientists. However, validation of the data against the PDS Standards using both PSA and PDS devel-oped software has led to the discovery that many of the items that are validated are unstated assumptions in the written PDS Standards and are related, at least in large part, to how the two archiving systems operate rather than to the actual content that a scientist needs to use the data. The talk will illustrate some of these discrepancies with examples and suggest how to avoid such issues in future, optimizing the scientific return on the investment in archiving while minimizing the costs.

  7. Examining Activism in Practice: A Qualitative Study of Archival Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Joy Rainbow

    2013-01-01

    While archival literature has increasingly discussed activism in the context of archives, there has been little examination of the extent to which archivists in the field have accepted or incorporated archival activism into practice. Scholarship that has explored the practical application of archival activism has predominately focused on case…

  8. Designing for Peta-Scale in the LSST Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, J.; Axelrod, T.; Becla, J.; Cook, K.; Nikolaev, S.; Gray, J.; Plante, R.; Nieto-Santisteban, M.; Szalay, A.; Thakar, A.

    2007-10-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), a proposed ground-based 8.4 m telescope with a 10 deg^2 field of view, will generate 15 TB of raw images every observing night. When calibration and processed data are added, the image archive, catalogs, and meta-data will grow 15 PB yr^{-1} on average. The LSST Data Management System (DMS) must capture, process, store, index, replicate, and provide open access to this data. Alerts must be triggered within 30 s of data acquisition. To do this in real-time at these data volumes will require advances in data management, database, and file system techniques. This paper describes the design of the LSST DMS and emphasizes features for peta-scale data. The LSST DMS will employ a combination of distributed database and file systems, with schema, partitioning, and indexing oriented for parallel operations. Image files are stored in a distributed file system with references to, and meta-data from, each file stored in the databases. The schema design supports pipeline processing, rapid ingest, and efficient query. Vertical partitioning reduces disk input/output requirements, horizontal partitioning allows parallel data access using arrays of servers and disks. Indexing is extensive, utilizing both conventional RAM-resident indexes and column-narrow, row-deep tag tables/covering indices that are extracted from tables that contain many more attributes. The DMS Data Access Framework is encapsulated in a middleware framework to provide a uniform service interface to all framework capabilities. This framework will provide the automated work-flow, replication, and data analysis capabilities necessary to make data processing and data quality analysis feasible at this scale.

  9. Strategies to Explore Functional Genomics Data Sets in NCBI’s GEO Database

    PubMed Central

    Wilhite, Stephen E.; Barrett, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is a major repository that stores high-throughput functional genomics data sets that are generated using both microarray-based and sequence-based technologies. Data sets are submitted to GEO primarily by researchers who are publishing their results in journals that require original data to be made freely available for review and analysis. In addition to serving as a public archive for these data, GEO has a suite of tools that allow users to identify, analyze and visualize data relevant to their specific interests. These tools include sample comparison applications, gene expression profile charts, data set clusters, genome browser tracks, and a powerful search engine that enables users to construct complex queries. PMID:22130872

  10. A user`s guide to LUGSAN II. A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dunn, W.N.

    1998-03-01

    LUG and Sway brace ANalysis (LUGSAN) II is an analysis and database computer program that is designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads for aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN II combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85, with a Macintosh Hypercard database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the LUGSAN II application program, which operates on the Macintosh System (Hypercard 2.2 or later) and includes function descriptions, layout examples, and sample sessions. Although this report is primarily a user`s manual, a brief overview of the LUGSAN II computer code is included with suggestedmore » resources for programmers.« less

  11. Archiving California’s historical duck nesting data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.; Brady, Caroline; Eadie, John M.; Yarris, Greg S.

    2015-07-14

    With the conclusion of this project, most duck nest data have been entered, but all nest-captured hen data and other breeding waterfowl data that were outside the scope of this project have still not been entered and electronically archived. Maintaining an up-to-date archive will require additional resources to archive and enter the new duck nest data each year in an iterative process. Further, data proofing should be conducted whenever possible, and also should be considered an iterative process as there was sometimes missing data that could not be filled in without more direct knowledge of specific projects. Despite these disclaimers, this duck data archive represents a massive and useful dataset to inform future research and management questions.

  12. Medical image digital archive: a comparison of storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunn, Timothy; Hutchings, Matt

    1998-07-01

    A cost effective, high capacity digital archive system is one of the remaining key factors that will enable a radiology department to eliminate film as an archive medium. The ever increasing amount of digital image data is creating the need for huge archive systems that can reliably store and retrieve millions of images and hold from a few terabytes of data to possibly hundreds of terabytes. Selecting the right archive solution depends on a number of factors: capacity requirements, write and retrieval performance requirements, scaleability in capacity and performance, conformance to open standards, archive availability and reliability, security, cost, achievable benefits and cost savings, investment protection, and more. This paper addresses many of these issues. It compares and positions optical disk and magnetic tape technologies, which are the predominant archive mediums today. New technologies will be discussed, such as DVD and high performance tape. Price and performance comparisons will be made at different archive capacities, plus the effect of file size on random and pre-fetch retrieval time will be analyzed. The concept of automated migration of images from high performance, RAID disk storage devices to high capacity, NearlineR storage devices will be introduced as a viable way to minimize overall storage costs for an archive.

  13. The Footprint Database and Web Services of the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, László; Varga-Verebélyi, Erika; Verdugo, Eva; Teyssier, David; Exter, Katrina; Valtchanov, Ivan; Budavári, Tamás; Kiss, Csaba

    2016-10-01

    Data from the Herschel Space Observatory is freely available to the public but no uniformly processed catalogue of the observations has been published so far. To date, the Herschel Science Archive does not contain the exact sky coverage (footprint) of individual observations and supports search for measurements based on bounding circles only. Drawing on previous experience in implementing footprint databases, we built the Herschel Footprint Database and Web Services for the Herschel Space Observatory to provide efficient search capabilities for typical astronomical queries. The database was designed with the following main goals in mind: (a) provide a unified data model for meta-data of all instruments and observational modes, (b) quickly find observations covering a selected object and its neighbourhood, (c) quickly find every observation in a larger area of the sky, (d) allow for finding solar system objects crossing observation fields. As a first step, we developed a unified data model of observations of all three Herschel instruments for all pointing and instrument modes. Then, using telescope pointing information and observational meta-data, we compiled a database of footprints. As opposed to methods using pixellation of the sphere, we represent sky coverage in an exact geometric form allowing for precise area calculations. For easier handling of Herschel observation footprints with rather complex shapes, two algorithms were implemented to reduce the outline. Furthermore, a new visualisation tool to plot footprints with various spherical projections was developed. Indexing of the footprints using Hierarchical Triangular Mesh makes it possible to quickly find observations based on sky coverage, time and meta-data. The database is accessible via a web site http://herschel.vo.elte.hu and also as a set of REST web service functions, which makes it readily usable from programming environments such as Python or IDL. The web service allows downloading footprint data

  14. A Quality-Control-Oriented Database for a Mesoscale Meteorological Observation Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussana, C.; Ranci, M.; Uboldi, F.

    2012-04-01

    In the operational context of a local weather service, data accessibility and quality related issues must be managed by taking into account a wide set of user needs. This work describes the structure and the operational choices made for the operational implementation of a database system storing data from highly automated observing stations, metadata and information on data quality. Lombardy's environmental protection agency, ARPA Lombardia, manages a highly automated mesoscale meteorological network. A Quality Assurance System (QAS) ensures that reliable observational information is collected and disseminated to the users. The weather unit in ARPA Lombardia, at the same time an important QAS component and an intensive data user, has developed a database specifically aimed to: 1) providing quick access to data for operational activities and 2) ensuring data quality for real-time applications, by means of an Automatic Data Quality Control (ADQC) procedure. Quantities stored in the archive include hourly aggregated observations of: precipitation amount, temperature, wind, relative humidity, pressure, global and net solar radiation. The ADQC performs several independent tests on raw data and compares their results in a decision-making procedure. An important ADQC component is the Spatial Consistency Test based on Optimal Interpolation. Interpolated and Cross-Validation analysis values are also stored in the database, providing further information to human operators and useful estimates in case of missing data. The technical solution adopted is based on a LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and Php) system, constituting an open source environment suitable for both development and operational practice. The ADQC procedure itself is performed by R scripts directly interacting with the MySQL database. Users and network managers can access the database by using a set of web-based Php applications.

  15. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Archival tags. 635.33 Section 635.33 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ATLANTIC HIGHLY MIGRATORY SPECIES Management Measures § 635.33 Archival tags. (a...

  16. Turkish meteor surveillance systems and network: Impact craters and meteorites database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsalan, O.; Ozel, M. E.; Derman, I. E.; Terzioglu, Z.; Kaygisiz, E.; Temel, T.; Topoyan, D.; Solmaz, A.; Yilmaz Kocahan, O.; Esenoglu, H. H.; Emrahoglu, N.; Yilmaz, A.; Yalcinkaya, B. O.

    2014-07-01

    In our project, we aim toward constructing Turkish Meteor Surveillance Systems and Network in Turkey. For this goal, video observational systems from SonotaCo (Japan) were chosen. Meteors are going to be observed with the specific cameras, their orbits will be calculated by the software from SonotaCo, and the places where they will be falling / impacting will be examined by field trips. The collected meteorites will be investigated by IR-Raman Spectroscopic techniques and SEM-EDX analyses in order to setup a database. On the other hand, according to our Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives, there are huge amounts of reports of falls for the past centuries. In order to treat these data properly, it is obvious that processing systems should be constructed and developed.

  17. HASH: the Hong Kong/AAO/Strasbourg Hα planetary nebula database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Quentin A.; Bojičić, Ivan S.; Frew, David J.

    2016-07-01

    By incorporating our major recent discoveries with re-measured and verified contents of existing catalogues we provide, for the first time, an accessible, reliable, on-line SQL database for essential, up-to date information for all known Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). We have attempted to: i) reliably remove PN mimics/false ID's that have biased previous studies and ii) provide accurate positions, sizes, morphologies, multi-wavelength imagery and spectroscopy. We also provide a link to CDS/Vizier for the archival history of each object and other valuable links to external data. With the HASH interface, users can sift, select, browse, collate, investigate, download and visualise the entire currently known Galactic PNe diversity. HASH provides the community with the most complete and reliable data with which to undertake new science.

  18. 36 CFR § 1280.66 - May I use the National Archives Library?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Archives Library? § 1280.66 Section § 1280.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... Facilities in the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.66 May I use the National Archives Library? The National Archives Library facilities in the National Archives Building and in the National Archives at College Park...

  19. Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a technical report for use in developing a consensus on what is required to operate a permanent, or indefinite long-term, archive of digital information. It may be useful as a starting point for a similar document addressing the indefinite long-term preservation of non-digital information. This report establishes a common framework of terms and concepts which comprise an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). It allows existing and future archives to be more meaningfully compared and contrasted. It provides a basis for further standardization of within an archival context and it should promote greater vendor awareness of, and support of , archival requirements. Through the process of normal evolution, it is expected that expansion, deletion, or modification to this document may occur. This report is therefore subject to CCSDS document management and change control procedures.

  20. ModelArchiver—A program for facilitating the creation of groundwater model archives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, Richard B.

    2018-03-01

    ModelArchiver is a program designed to facilitate the creation of groundwater model archives that meet the requirements of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) policy (Office of Groundwater Technical Memorandum 2016.02, https://water.usgs.gov/admin/memo/GW/gw2016.02.pdf, https://water.usgs.gov/ogw/policy/gw-model/). ModelArchiver version 1.0 leads the user step-by-step through the process of creating a USGS groundwater model archive. The user specifies the contents of each of the subdirectories within the archive and provides descriptions of the archive contents. Descriptions of some files can be specified automatically using file extensions. Descriptions also can be specified individually. Those descriptions are added to a readme.txt file provided by the user. ModelArchiver moves the content of the archive to the archive folder and compresses some folders into .zip files.As part of the archive, the modeler must create a metadata file describing the archive. The program has a built-in metadata editor and provides links to websites that can aid in creation of the metadata. The built-in metadata editor is also available as a stand-alone program named FgdcMetaEditor version 1.0, which also is described in this report. ModelArchiver updates the metadata file provided by the user with descriptions of the files in the archive. An optional archive list file generated automatically by ModelMuse can streamline the creation of archives by identifying input files, output files, model programs, and ancillary files for inclusion in the archive.

  1. An Invitation to the ALA Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckel, Deborah; Brichford, Maynard

    1984-01-01

    Description of materials found in American Library Association Archives located at University of Illinois highlights 1905 letter defending Melvil Dewey, the 1900 Saguenay River Trip, children's librarians, library education, 1926 visit to President Coolidge by foreign librarians, and the American Library in Mexico. Notes on using the archives are…

  2. Broadsides & Posters from the National Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet evolved from research for the exhibition "Uncle Sam Speaks: Broadsides and Posters from the National Archives," which opened at the National Archives in February 1986. The booklet is presented chronologically, beginning with broadsides from the American Revolution and ending with posters of the 1980's. Accompanying text…

  3. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  4. Flexible server-side processing of climate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juckes, Martin; Stephens, Ag; Damasio da Costa, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The flexibility and interoperability of OGC Web Processing Services are combined with an extensive range of data processing operations supported by the Climate Data Operators (CDO) library to facilitate processing of the CMIP5 climate data archive. The challenges posed by this peta-scale archive allow us to test and develop systems which will help us to deal with approaching exa-scale challenges. The CEDA WPS package allows users to manipulate data in the archive and export the results without first downloading the data -- in some cases this can drastically reduce the data volumes which need to be transferred and greatly reduce the time needed for the scientists to get their results. Reductions in data transfer are achieved at the expense of an additional computational load imposed on the archive (or near-archive) infrastructure. This is managed with a load balancing system. Short jobs may be run in near real-time, longer jobs will be queued. When jobs are queued the user is provided with a web dashboard displaying job status. A clean split between the data manipulation software and the request management software is achieved by exploiting the extensive CDO library. This library has a long history of development to support the needs of the climate science community. Use of the library ensures that operations run on data by the system can be reproduced by users using the same operators installed on their own computers. Examples using the system deployed for the CMIP5 archive will be shown and issues which need to be addressed as archive volumes expand into the exa-scale will be discussed.

  5. Flexible server-side processing of climate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juckes, M. N.; Stephens, A.; da Costa, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    The flexibility and interoperability of OGC Web Processing Services are combined with an extensive range of data processing operations supported by the Climate Data Operators (CDO) library to facilitate processing of the CMIP5 climate data archive. The challenges posed by this peta-scale archive allow us to test and develop systems which will help us to deal with approaching exa-scale challenges. The CEDA WPS package allows users to manipulate data in the archive and export the results without first downloading the data -- in some cases this can drastically reduce the data volumes which need to be transferred and greatly reduce the time needed for the scientists to get their results. Reductions in data transfer are achieved at the expense of an additional computational load imposed on the archive (or near-archive) infrastructure. This is managed with a load balancing system. Short jobs may be run in near real-time, longer jobs will be queued. When jobs are queued the user is provided with a web dashboard displaying job status. A clean split between the data manipulation software and the request management software is achieved by exploiting the extensive CDO library. This library has a long history of development to support the needs of the climate science community. Use of the library ensures that operations run on data by the system can be reproduced by users using the same operators installed on their own computers. Examples using the system deployed for the CMIP5 archive will be shown and issues which need to be addressed as archive volumes expand into the exa-scale will be discussed.

  6. Contents of the JPL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive, version 2-91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A. (Editor); Lassanyi, Ruby A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea surface height, surface wind vector, sea surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and surface pigment concentration. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and will be the United States distribution site for the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  7. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Online Database: Uploading, Searching and Visualizing Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Pisarevsky, S. A.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.; Banerjee, S.; Johnson, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by both rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all measurements and the derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). MagIC is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and has two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual map interface to browse and select locations. The query result set is displayed in a digestible tabular format allowing the user to descend through hierarchical levels such as from locations to sites, samples, specimens, and measurements. At each stage, the result set can be saved and, if supported by the data, can be visualized by plotting global location maps, equal area plots, or typical Zijderveld, hysteresis, and various magnetization and remanence diagrams. User contributions to the MagIC database are critical to achieving a useful research tool. We have developed a standard data and metadata template (Version 2.1) that can be used to format and upload all data at the time of publication in Earth Science journals. Software tools are provided to facilitate population of these templates within Microsoft Excel. These tools allow for the import/export of text files and provide advanced functionality to manage and edit the data, and to perform various internal checks to maintain data integrity and prepare for uploading. The MagIC Contribution Wizard at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/upload.htm executes the upload and takes only a few minutes to process several thousand data records. The standardized MagIC template files are stored in the digital archives of EarthRef.org where they

  8. A system approach to archival storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction and viewgraphs of a discussion on a system approach to archival storage presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. The use of D-2 iron particles for archival storage is discussed along with how acceleration factors relating short-term tests to archival life times can be justified. Ampex Recording Systems is transferring D-2 video technology to data storage applications, and encountering concerns about corrosion. To protect the D-2 standard, Battelle tests were done on all four tapes in the Class 2 environment. Error rates were measured before and after the test on both exposed and control groups.

  9. Historical hydrology and database on flood events (Apulia, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonigro, Teresa; Basso, Alessia; Gentile, Francesco; Polemio, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    Historical data about floods represent an important tool for the comprehension of the hydrological processes, the estimation of hazard scenarios as a basis for Civil Protection purposes, as a basis of the rational land use management, especially in karstic areas, where time series of river flows are not available and the river drainage is rare. The research shows the importance of the improvement of existing flood database with an historical approach, finalized to collect past or historical floods event, in order to better assess the occurrence trend of floods, in the case for the Apulian region (south Italy). The main source of records of flood events for Apulia was the AVI (the acronym means Italian damaged areas) database, an existing Italian database that collects data concerning damaging floods from 1918 to 1996. The database was expanded consulting newspapers, publications, and technical reports from 1996 to 2006. In order to expand the temporal range further data were collected searching in the archives of regional libraries. About 700 useful news from 17 different local newspapers were found from 1876 to 1951. From a critical analysis of the 700 news collected since 1876 to 1952 only 437 were useful for the implementation of the Apulia database. The screening of these news showed the occurrence of about 122 flood events in the entire region. The district of Bari, the regional main town, represents the area in which the great number of events occurred; the historical analysis confirms this area as flood-prone. There is an overlapping period (from 1918 to 1952) between old AVI database and new historical dataset obtained by newspapers. With regard to this period, the historical research has highlighted new flood events not reported in the existing AVI database and it also allowed to add more details to the events already recorded. This study shows that the database is a dynamic instrument, which allows a continuous implementation of data, even in real time

  10. A Robust, Low-Cost Virtual Archive for Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Despite their expense tape silos are still often the only affordable option for petabytescale science data archives, particularly when other factors such as data reliability, floor space, power and cooling load are accounted for. However, the complexity, management software, hardware reliability and access latency of tape silos make online data storage ever more attractive. Drastic reductions in low-cost mass-market PC disk drivers help to make this more affordable (approx. 1$/GB), but are challenging to scale to the petabyte range and of questionable reliability for archival use, On the other hand, if much of the science archive could be "virtualized", i.e., produced on demand when requested by users, we would need store only a fraction of the data online, perhaps bringing an online-only system into in affordable range. Radiance data from the satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument provides a good opportunity for such a virtual archive: the raw data amount to 140 GB/day, but these are small relative to the 550 GB/day making up the radiance products. These data are routinely processed as inputs for geophysical parameter products and then archived on tape at the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive (GES DAAC) for distributing to users. Virtualizing them would be an immediate and signifcant reduction in the amount of data being stored in the tape archives and provide more customizable products. A prototype of such a virtual archive is being developed to prove the concept and develop ways of incorporating the robustness that a science data archive requires.

  11. 36 CFR 1253.1 - National Archives Building.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Hours for the Research Center and the Central Research Room are posted at http://www.archives.gov. The exhibit areas' hours of operation are also posted at http://www.archives.gov. Last admission to the...

  12. 36 CFR 1253.1 - National Archives Building.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Hours for the Research Center and the Central Research Room are posted at http://www.archives.gov. The exhibit areas' hours of operation are also posted at http://www.archives.gov. Last admission to the...

  13. 36 CFR 1253.1 - National Archives Building.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Hours for the Research Center and the Central Research Room are posted at http://www.archives.gov. The exhibit areas' hours of operation are also posted at http://www.archives.gov. Last admission to the...

  14. Life Sciences Data Archive Scientific Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckey, Jay C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Life Sciences Data Archive will provide scientists, managers and the general public with access to biomedical data collected before, during and after spaceflight. These data are often irreplaceable and represent a major resource from the space program. For these data to be useful, however, they must be presented with enough supporting information, description and detail so that an interested scientist can understand how, when and why the data were collected. The goal of this contract was to provide a scientific consultant to the archival effort at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. This consultant (Jay C. Buckey, Jr., M.D.) is a scientist, who was a co-investigator on both the Spacelab Life Sciences-1 and Spacelab Life Sciences-2 flights. In addition he was an alternate payload specialist for the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 flight. In this role he trained on all the experiments on the flight and so was familiar with the protocols, hardware and goals of all the experiments on the flight. Many of these experiments were flown on both SLS-1 and SLS-2. This background was useful for the archive, since the first mission to be archived was Spacelab Life Sciences-1. Dr. Buckey worked directly with the archive effort to ensure that the parameters, scientific descriptions, protocols and data sets were accurate and useful.

  15. Dynamic taxonomies applied to a web-based relational database for geo-hydrological risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacco, G. M.; Nigrelli, G.; Bosio, A.; Chiarle, M.; Luino, F.

    2012-02-01

    In its 40 years of activity, the Research Institute for Geo-hydrological Protection of the Italian National Research Council has amassed a vast and varied collection of historical documentation on landslides, muddy-debris flows, and floods in northern Italy from 1600 to the present. Since 2008, the archive resources have been maintained through a relational database management system. The database is used for routine study and research purposes as well as for providing support during geo-hydrological emergencies, when data need to be quickly and accurately retrieved. Retrieval speed and accuracy are the main objectives of an implementation based on a dynamic taxonomies model. Dynamic taxonomies are a general knowledge management model for configuring complex, heterogeneous information bases that support exploratory searching. At each stage of the process, the user can explore or browse the database in a guided yet unconstrained way by selecting the alternatives suggested for further refining the search. Dynamic taxonomies have been successfully applied to such diverse and apparently unrelated domains as e-commerce and medical diagnosis. Here, we describe the application of dynamic taxonomies to our database and compare it to traditional relational database query methods. The dynamic taxonomy interface, essentially a point-and-click interface, is considerably faster and less error-prone than traditional form-based query interfaces that require the user to remember and type in the "right" search keywords. Finally, dynamic taxonomy users have confirmed that one of the principal benefits of this approach is the confidence of having considered all the relevant information. Dynamic taxonomies and relational databases work in synergy to provide fast and precise searching: one of the most important factors in timely response to emergencies.

  16. CruiseViewer: SIOExplorer Graphical Interface to Metadata and Archives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, D. W.; Helly, J. J.; Miller, S. P.; Chase, A.; Clark, D.

    2002-12-01

    We are introducing "CruiseViewer" as a prototype graphical interface for the SIOExplorer digital library project, part of the overall NSF National Science Digital Library (NSDL) effort. When complete, CruiseViewer will provide access to nearly 800 cruises, as well as 100 years of documents and images from the archives of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). The project emphasizes data object accessibility, a rich metadata format, efficient uploading methods and interoperability with other digital libraries. The primary function of CruiseViewer is to provide a human interface to the metadata database and to storage systems filled with archival data. The system schema is based on the concept of an "arbitrary digital object" (ADO). Arbitrary in that if the object can be stored on a computer system then SIOExplore can manage it. Common examples are a multibeam swath bathymetry file, a .pdf cruise report, or a tar file containing all the processing scripts used on a cruise. We require a metadata file for every ADO in an ascii "metadata interchange format" (MIF), which has proven to be highly useful for operability and extensibility. Bulk ADO storage is managed using the Storage Resource Broker, SRB, data handling middleware developed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center that centralizes management and access to distributed storage devices. MIF metadata are harvested from several sources and housed in a relational (Oracle) database. For CruiseViewer, cgi scripts resident on an Apache server are the primary communication and service request handling tools. Along with the CruiseViewer java application, users can query, access and download objects via a separate method that operates through standard web browsers, http://sioexplorer.ucsd.edu. Both provide the functionability to query and view object metadata, and select and download ADOs. For the CruiseViewer application Java 2D is used to add a geo-referencing feature that allows users to select basemap images

  17. Resources for Archives: Developing Collections, Constituents, Colleagues, and Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primer, Ben

    2009-01-01

    The essential element for archival success is to be found in the quality of management decisions made and public services provided. Archivists can develop first-class archives operations through understanding the organizational context; planning; hiring, retaining, and developing staff; meeting archival standards for storage and access; and…

  18. Method and system for the diagnosis of disease using retinal image content and an archive of diagnosed human patient data

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Kenneth W; Karnowski, Thomas P; Chaum, Edward

    2013-08-06

    A method for diagnosing diseases having retinal manifestations including retinal pathologies includes the steps of providing a CBIR system including an archive of stored digital retinal photography images and diagnosed patient data corresponding to the retinal photography images, the stored images each indexed in a CBIR database using a plurality of feature vectors, the feature vectors corresponding to distinct descriptive characteristics of the stored images. A query image of the retina of a patient is obtained. Using image processing, regions or structures in the query image are identified. The regions or structures are then described using the plurality of feature vectors. At least one relevant stored image from the archive based on similarity to the regions or structures is retrieved, and an eye disease or a disease having retinal manifestations in the patient is diagnosed based on the diagnosed patient data associated with the relevant stored image(s).

  19. Life Sciences Data Archives (LSDA) in the Post-Shuttle Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Mary A.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Havelka, Jacque; Thomas, Diedre

    2010-01-01

    Now, more than ever before, NASA is realizing the value and importance of their intellectual assets. Principles of knowledge management-the systematic use and reuse of information, experience, and expertise to achieve a specific goal-are being applied throughout the agency. LSDA is also applying these solutions, which rely on a combination of content and collaboration technologies, to enable research teams to create, capture, share, and harness knowledge to do the things they do well, even better. In the early days of spaceflight, space life sciences data were collected and stored in numerous databases, formats, media-types and geographical locations. These data were largely unknown/unavailable to the research community. The Biomedical Informatics and Health Care Systems Branch of the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC and the Data Archive Project at ARC, with funding from the Human Research Program through the Exploration Medical Capability Element, are fulfilling these requirements through the systematic population of the Life Sciences Data Archive. This project constitutes a formal system for the acquisition, archival and distribution of data for HRP-related experiments and investigations. The general goal of the archive is to acquire, preserve, and distribute these data and be responsive to inquiries for the science communities. Information about experiments and data, as well as non-attributable human data and data from other species' are available on our public Web site http://lsda.jsc.nasa.gov. The Web site also includes a repository for biospecimens, and a utilization process. NASA has undertaken an initiative to develop a Shuttle Data Archive repository. The Shuttle program is nearing its end in 2010 and it is critical that the medical and research data related to the Shuttle program be captured, retained, and usable for research, lessons learned, and future mission planning. Communities of practice are groups of people who share a concern or a passion

  20. ROSETTA: How to archive more than 10 years of mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Maud; Heather, D.; Grotheer, E.; Besse, S.; Andres, R.; Vallejo, F.; Barnes, T.; Kolokolova, L.; O'Rourke, L.; Fraga, D.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Martin, P.; Taylor, M. G. G. T.

    2018-01-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft was launched in 2004 and, after several planetary and two asteroid fly-bys, arrived at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. After escorting the comet for two years and executing its scientific observations, the mission ended on 30 September 2016 through a touch down on the comet surface. This paper describes how the Planetary Science Archive (PSA) and the Planetary Data System - Small Bodies Node (PDS-SBN) worked with the Rosetta instrument teams to prepare the science data collected over the course of the Rosetta mission for inclusion in the science archive. As Rosetta is an international mission in collaboration between ESA and NASA, all science data from the mission are fully archived within both the PSA and the PDS. The Rosetta archiving process, supporting tools, archiving systems, and their evolution throughout the mission are described, along with a discussion of a number of the challenges faced during the Rosetta implementation. The paper then presents the current status of the archive for each of the science instruments, before looking to the improvements planned both for the archive itself and for the Rosetta data content. The lessons learned from the first 13 years of archiving on Rosetta are finally discussed with an aim to help future missions plan and implement their science archives.

  1. 76 FR 19147 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives... Electronic Records Archives (ACERA). The meeting has been consolidated into one day. This meeting will be... number of individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Electronic Records Archives Program at...

  2. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  3. An open access database for the evaluation of heart sound algorithms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyu; Springer, David; Li, Qiao; Moody, Benjamin; Juan, Ricardo Abad; Chorro, Francisco J; Castells, Francisco; Roig, José Millet; Silva, Ikaro; Johnson, Alistair E W; Syed, Zeeshan; Schmidt, Samuel E; Papadaniil, Chrysa D; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios; Naseri, Hosein; Moukadem, Ali; Dieterlen, Alain; Brandt, Christian; Tang, Hong; Samieinasab, Maryam; Samieinasab, Mohammad Reza; Sameni, Reza; Mark, Roger G; Clifford, Gari D

    2016-12-01

    In the past few decades, analysis of heart sound signals (i.e. the phonocardiogram or PCG), especially for automated heart sound segmentation and classification, has been widely studied and has been reported to have the potential value to detect pathology accurately in clinical applications. However, comparative analyses of algorithms in the literature have been hindered by the lack of high-quality, rigorously validated, and standardized open databases of heart sound recordings. This paper describes a public heart sound database, assembled for an international competition, the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology (CinC) Challenge 2016. The archive comprises nine different heart sound databases sourced from multiple research groups around the world. It includes 2435 heart sound recordings in total collected from 1297 healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions, including heart valve disease and coronary artery disease. The recordings were collected from a variety of clinical or nonclinical (such as in-home visits) environments and equipment. The length of recording varied from several seconds to several minutes. This article reports detailed information about the subjects/patients including demographics (number, age, gender), recordings (number, location, state and time length), associated synchronously recorded signals, sampling frequency and sensor type used. We also provide a brief summary of the commonly used heart sound segmentation and classification methods, including open source code provided concurrently for the Challenge. A description of the PhysioNet/CinC Challenge 2016, including the main aims, the training and test sets, the hand corrected annotations for different heart sound states, the scoring mechanism, and associated open source code are provided. In addition, several potential benefits from the public heart sound database are discussed.

  4. Description of the NASA Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Database (1982-1998)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, J. H., III; Conkin, J.

    2008-01-01

    The availability of high-speed computers, data analysis software, and internet communication are compelling reasons to describe and make available computer databases from many disciplines. Methods: Human research using hypobaric chambers to understand and then prevent decompression sickness (DCS) during space walks has been conducted at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) from 1982 to 1998. The data are archived in the NASA Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Database, within an Access 2003 Relational Database. Results: There are 548 records from 237 individuals that participated in 31 unique tests. Each record includes physical characteristics, the denitrogenation procedure that was tested, and the outcome of the test, such as the report of a DCS symptom and the intensity of venous gas emboli (VGE) detected with an ultrasound Doppler bubble detector as they travel in the venous blood along the pulmonary artery on the way to the lungs. We documented 84 cases of DCS and 226 cases where VGE were detected. The test altitudes were 10.2, 10.1, 6.5, 6.0, and 4.3 pounds per square inch absolute (psia). 346 records are from tests conducted at 4.3 psia, the operating pressure of the current U.S. space suit. 169 records evaluate the Staged 10.2 psia Decompression Protocol used by the Space Shuttle Program. The mean exposure time at altitude was 242.3 minutes (SD = 80.6), with a range from 120 to 360 minutes. Among our test subjects, 96 records of exposures are females. The mean age of all test subjects was 31.8 years (SD = 7.17), with a range from 20 to 54 years. Discussion: These data combined with other published databases and evaluated with metaanalysis techniques would extend our understanding about DCS. A better understanding about the cause and prevention of DCS would benefit astronauts, aviators, and divers.

  5. Design and development of a multimedia database for emergency telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Pavlopoulos, S; Berler, A; Kyriacou, E; Koutsouris, D

    1998-09-01

    Recent studies conclude that early and specialised pre-hospital patient management contributes to emergency cases survival. Recent developments in telecommunication and medical informatics by means of telemedicine can be extremely useful to accomplish such tasks in a cost-effective manner. Along that direction, we have designed a portable device for emergency telemedicine. This device is able to telematically "bring" the expert doctor at the emergency site, have him perform an accurate diagnosis, and subsequently direct the Emergency Medical Technicians on how to treat the patient until he arrives to the hospital. The need for storing and archiving all data being interchanged during the telemedicine sessions is very crucial for clinical, legal and administrative purposes. For this, we have developed a multimedia database able to store and manage the data collected by the AMBULANCE system. The database was equipped with a user-friendly graphical interface to enable use from computer naive users. Furthermore, the database has the possibility to display, in an standard way, ECG's, X-ray, CT and MRI images. The application is password protected with a three-level hierarchy access for users with different privileges. The scope of this application is to enhance the capabilities of the doctor on duty for a more precise and prompt diagnosis. The application has the ability to store audio files related to each emergency case and still images of the scene. Finally, this database can become a useful multimedia tool which will work together with the AMBULANCE portable device, the HIS and the PACS of the hospital. The system has been validated in selected non-critical cases and proved to be functional and successful in enhancing the ability of the doctor's on duty for prompt and accurate diagnosis and specialised pre-hospital treatment.

  6. The Kanzelhöhe Online Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötzi, W.; Hirtenfellner-Polanec, W.; Temmer, M.

    The Kanzelhöhe Observatory provides high-cadence full-disk observations of solar activity phenomena like sunspots, flares and prominence eruptions on a regular basis. The data are available for download from the KODA (Kanzelhöhe Observatory Data Archive) which is freely accessible. The archive offers sunspot drawings back to 1950 and high cadence H-α data back to 1973. Images from other instruments, like white-light and CaIIK, are available since 2007 and 2010, respectively. In the following we describe how to access the archive and the format of the data.

  7. Development of an Oceanographic Data Archiving and Service System for the Korean Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Dae; Park, Hyuk Min; Baek, Sang Ho

    2014-05-01

    Oceanographic Data and Information Center of Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) started to develop an oceanographic data archiving and service system in 2010 to support the Korean ocean researchers by providing quality controlled data continuously. Many physical oceanographic data available in the public domain and Korean domestic data were collected periodically, quality controlled, manipulated and provided to ocean modelers who need ocean data continuously and marine biologists who don't know well physical data but need it. The northern limit and the southern limit of the spatial coverage are 20°N and 55°N, and the western limit and the eastern limit are 110°E and 150°E, respectively. To archive TS (Temperature and Salinity) profile data, ARGO data were gathered from ARGO GDACs (France and USA) and many historical TS profile data observed by CTD, OSD and BT were retrieved from World Ocean Database 2009. The quality control software for TS profile data, which meets QC criteria suggested by the ARGO program and the GTSPP (Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program), was programmed and applied to the collected data. By the end of 2013, the total number of vertical profile data from the ARGO GDACs was 59,642 and total number of station data from WOD 2009 was 1,604,422. We also collected the global satellite SST data produced by NCDC and global SSH data from AVISO every day. An automatic program was coded to collect satellite data, extract sub data sets of the North West Pacific area and produce distribution maps. The total number of collected satellite data sets was 3,613 by the end of 2013. We use 3 different data services to provide archived data to the Korean experts. A FTP service was prepared to allow data users to download data in the original format. We developed TS database system using Oracle RDBMS to contain all collected temperature salinity data and support SQL data retrieval with various conditions. The KIOST ocean data portal

  8. 36 CFR 1253.2 - National Archives at College Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Archives at College Park. 1253.2 Section 1253.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS... College Park. (a) The National Archives at College Park is located at 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD...

  9. 36 CFR 1253.2 - National Archives at College Park.