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Sample records for arcuate nucleus neuropeptide

  1. Insulin suppresses ghrelin-induced calcium signaling in neuropeptide Y neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Yuko; Kohno, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Yada, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) play an important role in feeding regulation. Plasma levels of ghrelin and insulin show reciprocal dynamics before and after meals. We hypothesized that ghrelin and insulin also exert reciprocal effects on ARC NPY neurons. Cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured by fura-2 microfluorometry in single neurons isolated from ARC of adult rats, followed by immunocytochemical identification of NPY neurons. Ghrelin at 10−10 M increased [Ca2+]i in isolated ARC neurons, and co-administration of insulin concentration-dependently suppressed the ghrelin-induced [Ca2+]i increases. Insulin at 10−16 M, 10−14 M, 10−12 M and 10−10 M counteracted ghrelin action in 26%, 41%, 61% and 53% of ghrelin-responsive neurons, respectively, showing a maximal effect at 10−12 M, the estimated postprandial concentration of insulin in the brain. The majority (>70%) of the ghrelin-activated insulin-inhibited neurons were shown to contain NPY. Double-immunohistochemistry revealed that 85% of NPY neurons in ARC express insulin receptors. These data demonstrate that insulin directly interacts with ARC NPY neurons and counteracts ghrelin action. Our results suggest that postprandial increase in plasma insulin/ghrelin ratio and insulin inhibition of ghrelin action on ARC NPY neurons cooperate to effectively inhibit the neuron activity and terminate feeding. PMID:22081645

  2. Paradoxical effect of gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone to negatively regulate neuropeptide Y neurones in mouse arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, J S; Coleman, H A; Enriori, P J; Parkington, H C; Li, Q; Pereira, A; Cowley, M A; Clarke, I J

    2013-12-01

    Regulation of reproduction and energy homeostasis are linked, although our understanding of the central neural mechanisms subserving this connection is incomplete. Gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone (GnIH) is a neuropeptide that negatively regulates reproduction and stimulates food intake. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and products of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) precursor (β-endorphin melanocortins) are appetite regulating peptides produced in the neurones of the arcuate nucleus; these peptides also regulate reproduction. In the present study, we determined the effects of GnIH on NPY and POMC neurones. Using brain slices from mice with transgenes for fluorescent tags in the two types of neurone and patch clamp electrophysiology, a predominant inhibitory effect of GnIH was observed. GnIH (100 nM) inhibited the firing rate in POMC cells, confirming the results of previous studies and consistent with the stimulatory effect of GnIH on food intake. Paradoxically (i.e. because both GnIH and NPY stimulate food intake), GnIH also had a predominantly inhibitory effect on action potential activity in NPY cells. GnIH also inhibited the secretion of NPY and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone secretion in incubated hypothalamic blocks. GnIH (100 ng) injected into the cerebral ventricles of mice did not increase the number of NPY cells that were positively immunostained for c-Fos. Finally, dual label immunocytochemistry showed that 20% of NPY neurones had close contacts from GnIH fibres/varicosities. In conclusion, we confirm a negative effect of GnIH on POMC cells and demonstrate a paradoxical reduction of electrophysiological and functional activity in NPY cells.

  3. Young adult-specific hyperphagia in diabetic Goto-kakizaki rats is associated with leptin resistance and elevation of neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, F; Fujiwara, K; Kohno, D; Kuramochi, M; Kurita, H; Yada, T

    2006-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether hyperphagia, which is frequently observed in type 1 diabetic patients and model animals, also occurs in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats and, if so, to explore underlying abnormalities in the hypothalamus. GK rats at postnatal weeks 6-12, compared to control Wistar rats, exhibited hyperphagia, hyperglycaemia, hyperleptinemia and increased visceral fat accumulation, whereas body weight was unaltered. The ability of leptin to suppress feeding was reduced in GK rats compared to Wistar rats of these ages. In GK rats, leptin-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was significantly reduced in the cells of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), but not of the ventromedial hypothalamus, whereas the mRNA level of functional leptin receptor was unaltered. By real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridisation, mRNA levels of neuropeptide Y, but not pro-opiomelanocortin and galanin-like peptide, were significantly increased in the ARC of GK rats at 11 weeks, but not 26 weeks. Following i.c.v. injection of a NPY Y1 antagonist, 1229U91, the amount of food intake in GK rats was indistinguishable from that in Wistar rats, thus eliminating the hyperphagia of GK rats. These results demonstrate that young adult GK rats display hyperphagia in association with leptin resistance and increased NPY mRNA level in the ARC.

  4. Direct regulation of GnRH neuron excitability by arcuate nucleus POMC and NPY neuron neuropeptides in female mice.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-11-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons act to sense and coordinate the brain's responses to metabolic cues. One neuronal network that is very sensitive to metabolic status is that controlling fertility. In this study, we investigated the impact of neuropeptides released by NPY and POMC neurons on the cellular excitability of GnRH neurons, the final output cells of the brain controlling fertility. The majority (∼70%) of GnRH neurons were activated by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and this resulted from the direct postsynaptic activation of melanocortin receptor 3 and melanocortin receptor 4. A small population of GnRH neurons (∼15%) was excited by cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript or inhibited by β-endorphin. Agouti-related peptide, released by NPY neurons, was found to have variable inhibitory (∼10%) and stimulatory (∼25%) effects upon subpopulations of GnRH neurons. A variety of NPY and pancreatic polypeptide analogs was used to examine potential NPY interactions with GnRH neurons. Although porcine NPY (Y1/Y2/Y5 agonist) directly inhibited the firing of approximately 45% of GnRH neurons, [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-NPY (Y1/Y4/Y5 agonist) could excite (56%) or inhibit (19%). Experiments with further agonists indicated that Y1 receptors were responsible for suppressing GnRH neuron activity, whereas postsynaptic Y4 receptors were stimulatory. These results show that the activity of GnRH neurons is regulated in a complex manner by neuropeptides released by POMC and NPY neurons. This provides a direct route through which different metabolic cues can regulate fertility.

  5. Developmental changes in synaptic distribution in arcuate nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Arian F; Kirigiti, Melissa A; Baquero, Karalee C; Lee, Shin J; Smith, M Susan; Grove, Kevin L

    2015-06-01

    Neurons coexpressing neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, and GABA (NAG) play an important role in ingestive behavior and are located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. NAG neurons receive both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs, however, the developmental time course of synaptic input organization of NAG neurons in mice is unknown. In this study, we show that these neurons have low numbers of GABAergic synapses and that GABA is inhibitory to NAG neurons during early postnatal period. In contrast, glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons are relatively abundant by P13 and are comparatively similar to the levels observed in the adult. As mice reach adulthood (9-10 weeks), GABAergic tone onto NAG neurons increases. At this age, NAG neurons received similar numbers of inhibitory and EPSCs. To further differentiate age-associated changes in synaptic distribution, 17- to 18-week-old lean and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice were studied. Surprisingly, NAG neurons from lean adult mice exhibit a reduction in the GABAergic synapses compared with younger adults. Conversely, DIO mice display reductions in the number of GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons. Based on these experiments, we propose that synaptic distribution in NAG neurons is continuously restructuring throughout development to accommodate the animals' energy requirements.

  6. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-04-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  7. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus.

  8. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. PMID:26483343

  9. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Nadia; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Avendaño-Pradel, Rafael; Basualdo, Maria del Carmen; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Chávez-Macías, Laura; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase in human brain are localized in the same areas as in rodent brain. The similar distribution of NPY, α-MSH and VGF indicated that these neurons in the human brain may share similar functionality as in the rodent brain. The number of NPY and VGF immuno positive cells was increased in the infundibular nucleus of diabetic subjects in comparison to non-diabetic controls. In contrast, NPY and VGF were down regulated in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius of diabetic patients. These results suggest an activation of NPY producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which, according to animal experimental studies, is related to a catabolic state and might be the basis for increased hepatic glucose production in type-2 diabetes. PMID:22808091

  10. NPY and VGF immunoreactivity increased in the arcuate nucleus, but decreased in the nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of type-II diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Saderi, Nadia; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Avendaño-Pradel, Rafael; Basualdo, Maria del Carmen; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Chávez-Macías, Laura; Roblera, Juan E Olvera; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase in human brain are localized in the same areas as in rodent brain. The similar distribution of NPY, α-MSH and VGF indicated that these neurons in the human brain may share similar functionality as in the rodent brain. The number of NPY and VGF immuno positive cells was increased in the infundibular nucleus of diabetic subjects in comparison to non-diabetic controls. In contrast, NPY and VGF were down regulated in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius of diabetic patients. These results suggest an activation of NPY producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which, according to animal experimental studies, is related to a catabolic state and might be the basis for increased hepatic glucose production in type-2 diabetes.

  11. Arcuate nucleus destruction does not block food deprivation-induced increases in food foraging and hoarding.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Megan J; Bartness, Timothy J

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying the control of food intake are considerably better understood than those underlying the appetitive ingestive behaviors of foraging and hoarding of food, despite the prevalence of the latter across species including humans. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP), two orexigenic neuropeptides known to stimulate food intake in a variety of species, applied centrally to Siberian hamsters increases foraging and especially hoarding with lesser increases in food intake. Both are expressed in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and their synthesis increases with food deprivation, a naturally-occurring stimulus that markedly increases foraging and hoarding in Siberian hamsters. Therefore, we tested whether destruction of Arc neurons blocks these ingestive behaviors. This was accomplished either by microinjecting NPY conjugated to saporin (NPY-SAP) bilaterally into the Arc to kill NPY receptor-bearing neurons or via neonatal monosodium glutamate (MSG) treatment. For both methods, Arc cresyl violet staining (cell density) and NPY and Y1 receptor-immunoreactivity (ir) were significantly decreased. Although baseline foraging and food hoarding were not affected, food deprivation-induced increased food hoarding was surprisingly exaggerated approximately 100% with both types of Arc destruction. We found a substantial amount of remaining NPY-ir fibers, likely emanating from the brainstem, and a significant up-regulation of Y1 receptors in Arc NPY projections areas (hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and perifornical area) after Arc denervation and their activation may have accounted for the exaggerated increases. The converging evidence from both Arc destruction methods suggests an intact Arc is not necessary for food deprivation-induced increases in food foraging and hoarding.

  12. Modulation of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus on gastric motility in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-Yao; Ma, Rong; Cao, Qi; Su, Bao-Tian

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the arcuate nucleus (ARC) could modulate gastric motility, and if so, what are the mechanisms or pathways. METHODS: Wistar rats, anaesthetized with urethan, parameters of stimulation and electrolytic lesion sites were determined according to the Paxinos and Watson “ATLAS of rat brain in steriotaxic coordinate”. Intragastric pressure ( IGP ) and gastric motility were measured by Reybould¡äs method. RESULTS: Electrical stimulation of ARC could obviously decrease the IGP by 42.2% ± 5.4%, n = 15, P < 0.01, and the phasic gastric contractions disappeared. The analysis showed that the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe (DR) nuclei may be involved in central, but without the invovement of β-endorphinergic neurons rich in the ARC, while in periphery, the peripheral neural pathways are both vagus and sympathetic nerves. The fibers in vagus may be non-cholinergic. Humoral factors may also be involved. At the receptor level, Tonic action of adrenergic nerve in the stomach is mainly inhibitory; β-receptors, which may be present on the stomach wall and mediate inhibition; and α-receptors, which come into play through vagus, mediate inhibition, but those present on the smooth muscle mediate sympathetic excitation. Microinjection of TRH into ARC could significantly increase the IGP by 183.02% (0.53 kPa ± 0.08 kPa vs 1.5 kPa ± 0.6 kPa, n = 10, P < 0.001), the rate and amplitude of phasic gastric contraction were also increased (3 cpm vs 6 cpm-8 cpm). The peripheral pathway of such excitatory effects were transmitted with cholinergic vagus nerve mediated by M-receptor. CONCLUSION: ARC could modulate gastric motility biphasically, inhibitory and excitatory, depending on the nature of stimuli. PMID:11819337

  13. Site-specific effects of ghrelin on the neuronal activity in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Thomas; Traebert, Martin; Schmid, Herbert A; Scheel, Caroline; Lutz, Thomas A; Scharrer, Erwin

    2003-05-01

    The recently discovered hormone ghrelin, which is secreted from the stomach during fasting and hypoglycemia opposes the homeostatic functions of leptin by increasing food intake and decreasing energy expenditure. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) mediates the effects of leptin and contains a high density of ghrelin receptors. The leptin- and ghrelin-responsive network involves the hypothalamic neuropeptide Y/alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NPY/alpha-MSH) system. In the rat, neurons expressing the orexigenic peptide NPY are mainly located in the ventromedial Arc (ArcM), while pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, synthesizing the anorectic peptide alpha-MSH, predominate in the ventrolateral Arc (ArcL). In extracellular single unit recordings from in vitro slice preparations of the Arc, superfusion of ghrelin (10(-8) M) exerted predominantly excitatory effects on ArcM neurons (73%, n=93), while a high number ArcL neurons were inhibited in response to ghrelin (42%, n=43). The excitatory effect of ghrelin on neuronal activity was postsynaptic since it was unaffected by synaptic blockade (low Ca(2+)/high Mg(2+) solution). In contrast, the inhibitory response in the ArcL was abolished by the blockade of synaptic interactions indicating a presynaptic mechanism. These results indicate that circulating ghrelin may oppose the actions of leptin by directly activating NPY-neurons of the ArcM and by indirectly inhibiting POMC neurons of the ArcL.

  14. Direct modulation of GFAP-expressing glia in the arcuate nucleus bi-directionally regulates feeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Naiyan; Barak, Boaz; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Multiple hypothalamic neuronal populations that regulate energy balance have been identified. Although hypothalamic glia exist in abundance and form intimate structural connections with neurons, their roles in energy homeostasis are less known. Here we show that selective Ca2+ activation of glia in the mouse arcuate nucleus (ARC) reversibly induces increased food intake while disruption of Ca2+ signaling pathway in ARC glia reduces food intake. The specific activation of ARC glia enhances the activity of agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y (AgRP/NPY)-expressing neurons but induces no net response in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons. ARC glial activation non-specifically depolarizes both AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons but a strong inhibitory input to POMC neurons balances the excitation. When AgRP/NPY neurons are inactivated, ARC glial activation fails to evoke any significant changes in food intake. Collectively, these results reveal an important role of ARC glia in the regulation of energy homeostasis through its interaction with distinct neuronal subtype-specific pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18716.001 PMID:27751234

  15. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Streamson; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat. PMID:27611685

  16. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Woo, Young Jae; Chua, Streamson; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat. PMID:27611685

  17. MCT2 Expression and Lactate Influx in Anorexigenic and Orexigenic Neurons of the Arcuate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Campos, Christian; Elizondo, Roberto; Carril, Claudio; Martínez, Fernando; Boric, Katica; Nualart, Francisco; Garcia-Robles, Maria Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons of the arcuate nucleus control food intake, releasing orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to changes in glucose concentration. Several studies have suggested that the glucosensing mechanism is governed by a metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells via lactate flux through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Hypothalamic glial cells (tanycytes) release lactate through MCT1 and MCT4; however, similar analyses in neuroendocrine neurons have yet to be undertaken. Using primary rat hypothalamic cell cultures and fluorimetric assays, lactate incorporation was detected. Furthermore, the expression and function of MCT2 was demonstrated in the hypothalamic neuronal cell line, GT1-7, using kinetic and inhibition assays. Moreover, MCT2 expression and localization in the Sprague Dawley rat hypothalamus was analyzed using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analyses. Confocal immunohistochemistry analyses revealed MCT2 localization in neuronal but not glial cells. Moreover, MCT2 was localized to ∼90% of orexigenic and ∼60% of anorexigenic neurons as determined by immunolocalization analysis of AgRP and POMC with MCT2-positives neurons. Thus, MCT2 distribution coupled with lactate uptake by hypothalamic neurons suggests that hypothalamic neurons control food intake using lactate to reflect changes in glucose levels. PMID:23638108

  18. The arcuate nucleus of the C57BL/6J mouse hindbrain is a displaced part of the inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu Hong; Watson, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus is a prominent cell group in the human hindbrain, characterized by its position on the pial surface of the pyramid. It is considered to be a precerebellar nucleus and has been implicated in the pathology of several disorders of respiration. An arcuate nucleus has not been convincingly demonstrated in other mammals, but we have found a similarly positioned nucleus in the C57BL/6J mouse. The mouse arcuate nucleus consists of a variable group of neurons lying on the pial surface of the pyramid. The nucleus is continuous with the ventrolateral part of the principal nucleus of the inferior olive and both groups are calbindin positive. At first we thought that this mouse nucleus was homologous with the human arcuate nucleus, but we have discovered that the neurons of the human nucleus are calbindin negative, and are therefore not olivary in nature. We have compared the mouse arcuate neurons with those of the inferior olive in terms of molecular markers and cerebellar projection. The neurons of the arcuate nucleus and of the inferior olive share three major characteristics: they both contain neurons utilizing glutamate, serotonin or acetylcholine as neurotransmitters; they both project to the contralateral cerebellum, and they both express a number of genes not present in the major mossy fiber issuing precerebellar nuclei. Most importantly, both cell groups express calbindin in an area of the ventral hindbrain almost completely devoid of calbindin-positive cells. We conclude that the neurons of the hindbrain mouse arcuate nucleus are a displaced part of the inferior olive, possibly separated by the caudal growth of the pyramidal tract during development. The arcuate nucleus reported in the C57BL/6J mouse can therefore be regarded as a subgroup of the rostral inferior olive, closely allied with the ventral tier of the principal nucleus.

  19. The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Modulates the Sensitivity of Arcuate Nucleus to Hypoglycemia in the Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Moro Chao, D; León-Mercado, L; Foppen, E; Guzmán-Ruiz, M; Basualdo, M C; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2016-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) have reciprocal connections; catabolic metabolic information activates the ARC and inhibits SCN neuronal activity. Little is known about the influence of the SCN on the ARC. Here, we investigated whether the SCN modulated the sensitivity of the ARC to catabolic metabolic conditions. ARC neuronal activity, as determined by c-Fos immunoreactivity, was increased after a hypoglycemic stimulus by 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The highest ARC neuronal activity after 2DG was found at the end of the light period (zeitgeber 11, ZT11) with a lower activity in the beginning of the light period (zeitgeber 2, ZT2), suggesting the involvement of the SCN. The higher activation of ARC neurons after 2DG at ZT11 was associated with higher 2DG induced blood glucose levels as compared with ZT2. Unilateral SCN-lesioned animals, gave a mainly ipsilateral activation of ARC neurons at the lesioned side, suggesting an inhibitory role of the SCN on ARC neurons. The 2DG-induced counterregulatory glucose response correlated with increased ARC neuronal activity and was significantly higher in unilateral SCN-lesioned animals. Finally, the ARC as site where 2DG may, at least partly, induce a counterregulatory response was confirmed by local microdialysis of 2DG. 2DG administration in the ARC produced a higher increase in circulating glucose compared with 2DG administration in surrounding areas such as the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH). We conclude that the SCN uses neuronal pathways to the ARC to gate sensory metabolic information to the brain, regulating ARC glucose sensitivity and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemic conditions. PMID:27429160

  20. The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Modulates the Sensitivity of Arcuate Nucleus to Hypoglycemia in the Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Moro Chao, D; León-Mercado, L; Foppen, E; Guzmán-Ruiz, M; Basualdo, M C; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2016-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) have reciprocal connections; catabolic metabolic information activates the ARC and inhibits SCN neuronal activity. Little is known about the influence of the SCN on the ARC. Here, we investigated whether the SCN modulated the sensitivity of the ARC to catabolic metabolic conditions. ARC neuronal activity, as determined by c-Fos immunoreactivity, was increased after a hypoglycemic stimulus by 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The highest ARC neuronal activity after 2DG was found at the end of the light period (zeitgeber 11, ZT11) with a lower activity in the beginning of the light period (zeitgeber 2, ZT2), suggesting the involvement of the SCN. The higher activation of ARC neurons after 2DG at ZT11 was associated with higher 2DG induced blood glucose levels as compared with ZT2. Unilateral SCN-lesioned animals, gave a mainly ipsilateral activation of ARC neurons at the lesioned side, suggesting an inhibitory role of the SCN on ARC neurons. The 2DG-induced counterregulatory glucose response correlated with increased ARC neuronal activity and was significantly higher in unilateral SCN-lesioned animals. Finally, the ARC as site where 2DG may, at least partly, induce a counterregulatory response was confirmed by local microdialysis of 2DG. 2DG administration in the ARC produced a higher increase in circulating glucose compared with 2DG administration in surrounding areas such as the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH). We conclude that the SCN uses neuronal pathways to the ARC to gate sensory metabolic information to the brain, regulating ARC glucose sensitivity and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemic conditions.

  1. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuropeptide Expression in Patients with Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wamelen, Daniel J.; Aziz, N. Ahmad; Anink, Jasper J.; van Steenhoven, Robin; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Jockers, Ralf; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To study whether sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) arise from dysfunction of the body's master clock, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Design: Postmortem cohort study. Patients: Eight patients with HD and eight control subjects matched for sex, age, clock time and month of death, postmortem delay, and fixation time of paraffin-embedded hypothalamic tissue. Measurements and Results: Using postmortem paraffin-embedded tissue, we assessed the functional integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in patients with HD and control subjects by determining the expression of two major regulatory neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin. Additionally, we studied melatonin 1 and 2 receptor expression. Compared with control subjects, the suprachiasmatic nucleus contained 85% fewer neurons immunoreactive for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and 33% fewer neurons for arginine vasopressin in patients with HD (P = 0.002 and P = 0.027). The total amount of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin messenger RNA was unchanged. No change was observed in the number of melatonin 1 or 2 receptor immunoreactive neurons. Conclusions: These findings indicate posttranscriptional neuropeptide changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of patients with HD, and suggest that sleep and circadian rhythm disorders in these patients may at least partly arise from suprachiasmatic nucleus dysfunction. Citation: van Wamelen DJ; Aziz NA; Anink JJ; van Steenhoven R; Angeloni D; Fraschini F; Jockers R; Roos RAC; Swaab DF. Suprachiasmatic nucleus neuropeptide expression in patients with Huntington's disease. SLEEP 2013;36(1):117–125. PMID:23288978

  2. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  3. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  4. Retrograde study of CART- or NPY-neuronal projection from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus to the dorsal raphe and/or the locus coeruleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ye S; Lee, Ji S; Lee, Hyun S

    2013-06-26

    The present study was designed to reveal cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)- or neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neuronal projections from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) to the dorsal raphe (DR) and/or the locus coeruleus (LC) in the rat. Our results demonstrated that CART or NPY axon terminals formed close appositions to the neuronal profiles in the DR and the LC. Thus, arcuate sections were immunostained for the CART or NPY after the injections of green RetroBeads(™) into the DR and red tracer into the LC (or vice versa). First, retrogradely-labeled CART cells were mainly observed in the lateral Arc without colchicine. Of the total population of arcuate CART neurons, DR- and LC-projecting cells were 5.7% ± 0.9% and 6.6% ± 0.7%, respectively. In addition, a subset (3.3% ± 0.7%) of CART neurons provided divergent axon collaterals to the DR and the LC. Second, retrogradely-labeled NPY cells were observed in lateral or ventral borders of the medial Arc only after colchicine injection. Of the entire NPY cell population, DR- and LC-projecting neurons were 1.5% ± 0.3% and 1.3% ± 0.3%, respectively. Only a scanty proportion (0.1% ± 0.0%) sent axon collaterals to the DR and the LC. These observations suggested that arcuate CART or NPY system might have a potential influence on the brainstem monoaminergic nuclei, modulating their roles in feeding, nociception, emotional behaviors, arousal, and stress responses. Furthermore, a portion of arcuate CART neurons (along with only a few NPY cells) sending divergent axon collaterals to the DR/LC might have a simultaneous (and possibly more efficient) way to exert their specific influences on the monoaminergic nuclei.

  5. Estradiol-induced synaptic remodeling of tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive neurons in the rat arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Csakvari, Eszter; Kurunczi, Anita; Hoyk, Zsofia; Gyenes, Andrea; Naftolin, Frederick; Parducz, Arpad

    2008-08-01

    Gonadal steroids induce synaptic plasticity in several areas of the adult nervous system. In the arcuate nucleus of adult female rats, 17beta-estradiol triggers synaptic remodeling, resulting in a decrease in the number of inhibitory synaptic inputs, an increase in the number of excitatory synapses, and an enhancement of the frequency of neuronal firing. In the present paper, we studied the specificity of hormonal effects by determining the changes in synaptic connectivity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive (IR) neurons in the arcuate nucleus. We combined pre-embedding TH and post-embedding gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunostaining, and performed unbiased stereological measurements in gonadectomized and 17beta-estradiol-treated rats. We conclude that the synaptic connectivity of the TH-IR neurons is different from the other, nonlabeled population, and the response to estradiol is not uniform. TH-IR (dopaminergic) arcuate neurons of both male and female rats have more GABAergic (inhibitory) axosomatic inputs than the nondopaminergic population. Our study shows that the effect of 17beta-estradiol is sex and cell specific in the sense that not all arcuate neurons are affected by the structural synaptic remodeling. In ovariectomized females hormone treatment decreased the numerical density of GABAergic axosomatic synapses on TH-IR, but not on nondopaminergic, neurons, whereas in orchidectomized males, 17beta-estradiol treatment increased inhibitory synapses onto nondopaminergic neurons but did not affect the number of inhibitory terminals onto TH-IR neurons. The hormone-induced plastic changes in synaptic connectivity of TH-IR neurons may serve as the morphological basis for the cyclical regulation of the anterior pituitary.

  6. Research Resource: Gene Profiling of G Protein–Coupled Receptors in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Female

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Chunguang; Nestor, Casey C.; Mao, Peizhong; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus controls many critical homeostatic functions including energy homeostasis, reproduction, and motivated behavior. Although G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in the regulation of these functions, relatively few of the GPCRs have been identified specifically within the arcuate nucleus. Here, using TaqMan low-density arrays we quantified the mRNA expression of nonolfactory GPCRs in mouse arcuate nucleus. An unprecedented number of GPCRs (total of 292) were found to be expressed, of which 183 were known and 109 were orphan GPCRs. The known GPCR genes expressed were classified into several functional clusters including hormone/neurotransmitter, growth factor, angiogenesis and vasoactivity, inflammation and immune system, and lipid messenger receptors. The plethora of orphan genes expressed in the arcuate nucleus were classified into 5 structure-related classes including class A (rhodopsin-like), class B (adhesion), class C (other GPCRs), nonsignaling 7-transmembrane chemokine-binding proteins, and other 7-transmembrane proteins. Therefore, for the first time, we provide a quantitative estimate of the numerous GPCRs expressed in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Finally, as proof of principle, we documented the expression and function of one of these receptor genes, the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (Glp1r), which was highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that Glp1r mRNA was localized in proopiomelanocortin neurons, and using whole-cell recording we found that the glucagon-like peptide 1-selective agonist exendin-4 robustly excited proopiomelanocortin neurons. Thus, the quantitative GPCR data emphasize the complexity of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and furthermore provide a valuable resource for future neuroendocrine/endocrine-related experiments. PMID:24933249

  7. Leptin modulates the intrinsic excitability of AgRP/NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Baver, Scott B; Hope, Kevin; Guyot, Shannon; Bjørbaek, Christian; Kaczorowski, Catherine; O'Connell, Kristen M S

    2014-04-16

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) is a brain region critical for regulation of food intake and a primary area for the action of leptin in the CNS. In lean mice, the adipokine leptin inhibits neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neuronal activity, resulting in decreased food intake. Here we show that diet-induced obesity in mice is associated with persistent activation of NPY neurons and a failure of leptin to reduce the firing rate or hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanism whereby diet uncouples leptin's effect on neuronal excitability remains to be fully elucidated. In NPY neurons from lean mice, the Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine inhibited leptin-induced changes in input resistance and spike rate. Consistent with this, we found that ARH NPY neurons have a large, leptin-sensitive delayed rectifier K(+) current and that leptin sensitivity of this current is blunted in neurons from diet-induced obese mice. This current is primarily carried by Kv2-containing channels, as the Kv2 channel inhibitor stromatoxin-1 significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate in NPY neurons from lean mice. In HEK cells, leptin induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Kv2.1 but had no effect on the function of the closely related channel Kv2.2 when these channels were coexpressed with the long isoform of the leptin receptor LepRb. Our results suggest that dynamic modulation of somatic Kv2.1 channels regulates the intrinsic excitability of NPY neurons to modulate the spontaneous activity and the integration of synaptic input onto these neurons in the ARH.

  8. Leptin-sensitive neurons in the arcuate nucleus integrate activity and temperature circadian rhythms and anticipatory responses to food restriction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ai-Jun; Dinh, Thu T.; Jansen, Heiko T.; Ritter, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we investigated the role of neuropeptide Y and leptin-sensitive networks in the mediobasal hypothalamus in sleep and feeding and found profound homeostatic and circadian deficits with an intact suprachiasmatic nucleus. We propose that the arcuate nuclei (Arc) are required for the integration of homeostatic circadian systems, including temperature and activity. We tested this hypothesis using saporin toxin conjugated to leptin (Lep-SAP) injected into Arc in rats. Lep-SAP rats became obese and hyperphagic and progressed through a dynamic phase to a static phase of growth. Circadian rhythms were examined over 49 days during the static phase. Rats were maintained on a 12:12-h light-dark (LD) schedule for 13 days and, thereafter, maintained in continuous dark (DD). After the first 13 days of DD, food was restricted to 4 h/day for 10 days. We found that the activity of Lep-SAP rats was arrhythmic in DD, but that food anticipatory activity was, nevertheless, entrainable to the restricted feeding schedule, and the entrained rhythm persisted during the subsequent 3-day fast in DD. Thus, for activity, the circuitry for the light-entrainable oscillator, but not for the food-entrainable oscillator, was disabled by the Arc lesion. In contrast, temperature remained rhythmic in DD in the Lep-SAP rats and did not entrain to restricted feeding. We conclude that the leptin-sensitive network that includes the Arc is required for entrainment of activity by photic cues and entrainment of temperature by food, but is not required for entrainment of activity by food or temperature by photic cues. PMID:23986359

  9. HYPERPHAGIA INDUCED BY SUCROSE: RELATION TO CIRCULATING AND CSF GLUCOSE AND CORTICOSTERONE AND OREXIGENIC PEPTIDES IN THE ARCUATE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Gaysinskaya, V. A.; Karatayev, O.; Shuluk, J.; Leibowitz, S. F.

    2010-01-01

    Sucrose-rich diets compared to starch-rich diets are known to stimulate overeating under chronic conditions. The present study in normal-weight rats established an acute “preload-to-test meal” paradigm for demonstrating sucrose-induced hyperphagia and investigating possible mechanisms that mediate this behavioral phenomenon. In this acute paradigm, the rats were first given a small (15 kcals) sucrose preload (30% sucrose) for 30 min compared to an equicaloric, starch preload (25% starch with 5% sucrose) and then allowed to freely consume a subsequent test meal of lab chow. The sucrose preload, when compared to a starch preload equal in energy density and palatability, consistently increased food intake in the subsequent test meal occurring between 60–120 min after the end of the preload. Measurements of hormones, metabolites and hypothalamic peptides immediately preceding this hyperphagia revealed marked differences between the sucrose vs starch groups that could contribute to the increase in food intake. Whereas the sucrose group compared to starch group immediately after the preload (at 10 min) had elevated levels of glucose in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) along with reduced expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related protein (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the subsequent effects (at 30–60 min) just preceding the test meal hyperphagia were the reverse. Along with lower levels of glucose, they included markedly elevated serum and CSF levels of corticosterone and mRNA levels of NPY and AgRP in the ARC. In addition to establishing an animal model for sucrose-induced hyperphagia, these results demonstrate peripheral and central mechanisms that may mediate this behavioral phenomenon. PMID:21036188

  10. PYY(3-36) into the arcuate nucleus inhibits food deprivation-induced increases in food hoarding and intake.

    PubMed

    Teubner, Brett J W; Bartness, Timothy J

    2013-09-01

    Central administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) increases food intake in laboratory rats and mice, as well as food foraging and hoarding in Siberian hamsters. The NPY-Y1 and Y5 receptors (Rs) within the hypothalamus appear sufficient to account for these increases in ingestive behaviors. Stimulation of NPY-Y2Rs in the Arcuate nucleus (Arc) has an anorexigenic effect as shown by central or peripheral administration of its natural ligand peptide YY (3-36) and pharmacological NPY-Y2R antagonism by BIIE0246 increases food intake. Both effects on food intake by NPY-Y2R agonism and antagonism are relatively short-lived lasting ∼4h. The role of NPY-Y2Rs in appetitive ingestive behaviors (food foraging/hoarding) is untested, however. Therefore, Siberians hamsters, a natural food hoarder, were housed in a semi-natural burrow/foraging system that had (a) foraging requirement (10 revolutions/pellet), no free food (true foraging group), (b) no running wheel access, free food (general malaise control) or (c) running wheel access, free food (exercise control). We microinjected BIIE0246 (antagonist) and PYY(3-36) (agonist) into the Arc to test the role of NPY-Y2Rs there on ingestive behaviors. Food foraging, hoarding, and intake were not affected by Arc BIIE0246 microinjection in fed hamsters 1, 2, 4, and 24h post injection. Stimulation of NPY-Y2Rs by PYY(3-36) inhibited food intake at 0-1 and 1-2h and food hoarding at 1-2h without causing general malaise or affecting foraging. Collectively, these results implicate a sufficiency, but not necessity, of the Arc NPY-Y2R in the inhibition of food intake and food hoarding by Siberian hamsters.

  11. An Intact Dorsomedial Posterior Arcuate Nucleus is Not Necessary for Photoperiodic Responses in Siberian Hamsters1

    PubMed Central

    Teubner, Brett J.W.; Leitner, Claudia; Thomas, Michael A.; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal responses of many animal species are triggered by changes in daylength and its transduction into a neuroendocrine signal by the pineal gland through the nocturnal duration of melatonin (MEL) release. The precise central sites necessary to receive, transduce, and relay the short day (SD) fall-winter MEL signals into seasonal responses and changes in physiology and behavior are unclear. In Siberian hamsters, SDs trigger decreases in body and lipid mass, testicular regression and pelage color changes. Several candidate genes and their central sites of expression have been proposed as components of the MEL transduction system with considerable recent focus on the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and its component, the dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus (dmpARC). This site has been postulated as a critical relay of SD information through the modulation of a variety of neurochemicals/receptors important for the control of energy balance. Here the necessity of an intact dmpARC for SD responses was tested by making electrolytic lesions of the Siberian hamster dmpARC and then exposing them to either long days (LD) or SDs for 12 weeks. The SD typical decreases in body and fat mass, food intake, testicular volume, serum testosterone concentrations, pelage color change and increased UCP-1 protein expression (a proxy for brown adipose tissue thermogenesis) all occurred despite the lack of an intact dmpARC. Although the Siberian hamster dmpARC contains photoperiod-modulated constituents, these data demonstrate that an intact dmpARC is not necessary for SD responses and not integral to the seasonal energy- and reproductive-related responses measured here. PMID:25647158

  12. An intact dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus is not necessary for photoperiodic responses in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Teubner, Brett J W; Leitner, Claudia; Thomas, Michael A; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal responses of many animal species are triggered by changes in daylength and its transduction into a neuroendocrine signal by the pineal gland through the nocturnal duration of melatonin (MEL) release. The precise central sites necessary to receive, transduce, and relay the short day (SD) fall-winter MEL signals into seasonal responses and changes in physiology and behavior are unclear. In Siberian hamsters, SDs trigger decreases in body and lipid mass, testicular regression and pelage color changes. Several candidate genes and their central sites of expression have been proposed as components of the MEL transduction system with considerable recent focus on the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and its component, the dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus (dmpARC). This site has been postulated as a critical relay of SD information through the modulation of a variety of neurochemicals/receptors important for the control of energy balance. Here the necessity of an intact dmpARC for SD responses was tested by making electrolytic lesions of the Siberian hamster dmpARC and then exposing them to either long days (LD) or SDs for 12wks. The SD typical decreases in body and fat mass, food intake, testicular volume, serum testosterone concentrations, pelage color change and increased UCP-1 protein expression (a proxy for brown adipose tissue thermogenesis) all occurred despite the lack of an intact dmpARC. Although the Siberian hamster dmpARC contains photoperiod-modulated constituents, these data demonstrate that an intact dmpARC is not necessary for SD responses and not integral to the seasonal energy- and reproductive-related responses measured here.

  13. An intact dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus is not necessary for photoperiodic responses in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Teubner, Brett J W; Leitner, Claudia; Thomas, Michael A; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal responses of many animal species are triggered by changes in daylength and its transduction into a neuroendocrine signal by the pineal gland through the nocturnal duration of melatonin (MEL) release. The precise central sites necessary to receive, transduce, and relay the short day (SD) fall-winter MEL signals into seasonal responses and changes in physiology and behavior are unclear. In Siberian hamsters, SDs trigger decreases in body and lipid mass, testicular regression and pelage color changes. Several candidate genes and their central sites of expression have been proposed as components of the MEL transduction system with considerable recent focus on the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and its component, the dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus (dmpARC). This site has been postulated as a critical relay of SD information through the modulation of a variety of neurochemicals/receptors important for the control of energy balance. Here the necessity of an intact dmpARC for SD responses was tested by making electrolytic lesions of the Siberian hamster dmpARC and then exposing them to either long days (LD) or SDs for 12wks. The SD typical decreases in body and fat mass, food intake, testicular volume, serum testosterone concentrations, pelage color change and increased UCP-1 protein expression (a proxy for brown adipose tissue thermogenesis) all occurred despite the lack of an intact dmpARC. Although the Siberian hamster dmpARC contains photoperiod-modulated constituents, these data demonstrate that an intact dmpARC is not necessary for SD responses and not integral to the seasonal energy- and reproductive-related responses measured here. PMID:25647158

  14. Ovarian regulation of kisspeptin neurones in the arcuate nucleus of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Alçin, E.; Sahu, A.; Ramaswamy, S.; Hutz, E.D.; Keen, K.L.; Terasawa, E.; Bethea, C.L.; Plant, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tonic gonadotrophin secretion throughout the menstrual cycle is regulated by the negative feedback actions of ovarian oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P). While kisspeptin neurones in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus appear to play a major role in mediating these feedback actions of the steroids in non-primate species, this issue has been less well studied in the monkey. Here, we used immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) to examine kisspeptin and KISS1 expression, respectively, in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) of adult ovariectomised (OVX) rhesus monkeys. We also examined kisspeptin expression in the MBH of ovarian intact females, and the effect of E2, P and E2+P replacement on KISS1 expression in OVX animals. Kisspeptin or KISS1 expressing neurons and pronounced kisspeptin fibres were readily identified throughout the ARC of ovariectomised monkeys, but in intact animals on the other hand kisspeptin cell bodies were small in size and number and only fine fibers were observed. Replacement of OVX monkeys with physiologic levels of E2, either alone or with luteal phase levels of P, abolished KISS1 expression in the ARC. Interestingly, P replacement alone for 14 days also resulted in a significant downregulation of KISS1 expression. These findings support the view that, in primates, as in rodents and sheep, kisspeptin signaling in ARC neurones appears to play an important role in mediating the negative feedback action of E2 on gonadotrophin secretion, and indicate a need to further study their regulation by P. PMID:23331967

  15. Early regulation of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus CART gene expression by short photoperiod in the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Julian G; Ellis, Claire; Moar, Kim M; Logie, Tracy J; Morgan, Peter J; Adam, Clare L

    2003-03-28

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) mRNA is expressed in a number of hypothalamic nuclei including the arcuate nucleus (ARC). An increase in CART gene expression in the ARC of juvenile female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod at weaning and prior to major divergence of body weight trajectory in this seasonal mammal implicates CART in the induction of programmed weight change. In the current series of experiments, elevated CART mRNA in short photoperiod juvenile female animals relative to long photoperiod controls was apparent throughout the caudal-rostral extent of the ARC after 14 days, but was not observed when short photoperiod exposure was limited to 4-7 days. Elevated CART gene expression was also observed in juvenile males 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod at weaning, in adult female hamsters 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod and in adult male hamsters 21 days after transfer to short photoperiod. There were no consistent trends in expression levels of other energy balance-related genes with these relatively short duration photoperiod manipulations, suggesting that CART may be involved in short photoperiod-programmed body weight regulation.

  16. Depletion of cholinergic neurons of the medullary arcuate nucleus in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, E E; Schmeichel, A M; Parisi, J E

    2001-03-23

    The human arcuate nucleus (ArcN) has been considered akin to the pontine precerebellar nuclei. However, there is anatomical, functional, and clinical evidence that the ArcN may be the homologue of chemosensitive areas of the ventral medullary surface involved in ventilatory responses to hypercarbia and cerebrospinal fluid acidosis. Acetylcholine has been involved in mechanisms of central chemosensitivity. Loss of ArcN neurons has been reported in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), a disorder characterized by disturbed automatic ventilation, but the neurochemical identity of these neurons is undetermined. We sought to determine whether the ArcN contains cholinergic neurons and whether these neurons are depleted in patients with MSA. Medullae were obtained from six patients with MSA, five patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and six sex- and age-matched controls. Fifty-micron transverse sections obtained through the mid-olivary levels were processed for acetylcholinesterase (AchE), choline acetyltransferase (CAT), and alpha-synuclein immunoreactivity. We found that the ArcN contained CAT-positive neurons. There was a significant decrease in density of cholinergic ArcN neurons in MSA but not in PD patients. alpha-Synuclein-containing inclusions were present in the ArcN of MSA patients. Depletion of cholinergic neurons may provide a substrate for disturbances in automatic respiration in MSA patients.

  17. Functional expression of P2 purinoceptors in a primary neuroglial cell culture of the rat arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pollatzek, Eric; Hitzel, Norma; Ott, Daniela; Raisl, Katrin; Reuter, Bärbel; Gerstberger, Rüdiger

    2016-07-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) plays an important role in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis. Expression of various purinoceptor subtypes in the rat ARC and physiological studies suggest a modulatory function of P2 receptors within the neuroglial ARC circuitry. A differentiated mixed neuronal and glial microculture was therefore established from postnatal rat ARC, revealing neuronal expression of ARC-specific transmitters involved in food intake regulation (neuropeptide Y (NPY), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)). Some NPYergic neurons cosynthesized TH, while POMC and TH expression proved to be mutually exclusive. Stimulation with the general purinoceptor agonists 2-methylthioadenosine-5'triphosphate (2-MeSATP) and ATP but not the P2X1/P2X3 receptor subtype agonist α,β-methyleneadenosine-5'triphosphate (α,β-meATP) induced intracellular calcium signals in ARC neurons and astrocytes. Some 5-10% each of 2-MeSATP responsive neurons expressed POMC, NYP or TH. Supporting the calcium imaging data, radioligand binding studies to hypothalamic membranes showed high affinity for 2-MeSATP, ATP but not α,β-meATP to displace [α-(35)S]deoxyadenosine-5'thiotriphosphate ([(35)S]dATPαS) from P2 receptors. Repetitive superfusion with equimolar 2-MeSATP allowed categorization of ARC cells into groups with a high or low (LDD) degree of purinoceptor desensitization, the latter allowing further receptor characterization. Calcium imaging experiments performed at 37°C vs. room temperature showed further reduction of desensitization. Agonist-mediated intracellular calcium signals were suppressed in all LDD neurons but only 25% of astrocytes in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggestive of metabotropic P2Y receptor expression in the majority of ARC astrocytes. The highly P2Y1-selective receptor agonists MRS2365 and 2-methylthioadenosine-5'diphosphate (2-MeSADP) activated 75-85% of all 2-MeSATP-responsive ARC astrocytes. Taking into consideration the

  18. Transplantable rat glucagonomas cause acute onset of severe anorexia and adipsia despite highly elevated NPY mRNA levels in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P B; Blume, N; Mikkelsen, J D; Larsen, P J; Jensen, H I; Holst, J J; Madsen, O D

    1998-01-01

    We have isolated a stable, transplantable, and small glucagonoma (MSL-G-AN) associated with abrupt onset of severe anorexia occurring 2-3 wk after subcutaneous transplantation. Before onset of anorexia, food consumption is comparable to untreated controls. Anorexia is followed by adipsia and weight loss, and progresses rapidly in severity, eventually resulting in reduction of food and water intake of 100 and 80%, respectively. During the anorectic phase, the rats eventually become hypoglycemic and hypothermic. The tumor-associated anorexia shows no sex difference, and is not affected by bilateral abdominal vagotomy, indicating a direct central effect. The adipose satiety factor leptin, known to suppress food intake by reducing hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels, was not found to be expressed by the tumor, and circulating leptin levels were reduced twofold in the anorectic phase. A highly significant increase in hypothalamic (arcuate nucleus) NPY mRNA levels was found in anorectic rats compared with control animals. Since elevated hypothalamic NPY is among the most potent stimulators of feeding and a characteristic of most animal models of hyperphagia, we conclude that the MSL-G-AN glucagonoma releases circulating factor(s) that overrides the hypothalamic NPY-ergic system, thereby eliminating the orexigenic effect of NPY. We hypothesize a possible central role of proglucagon-derived peptides in the observed anorexia. PMID:9435324

  19. Novel insight in distribution of nesfatin-1 and phospho-mTOR in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Inhoff, Tobias; Stengel, Andreas; Peter, Lisa; Goebel, Miriam; Taché, Yvette; Bannert, Norbert; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Recently, two proteins have been localized in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and implicated in the regulation of food intake: the serine-threonine-kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as part of the TOR signaling complex 1 (TORC1), and nesfatin-1 derived from the precursor protein nucleobindin2. However, the exact cell types are not well described. Therefore, we performed double-labeling studies for NPY, CART, nesfatin-1 and pmTOR in the ARC. In this study, we showed that nesfatin-1 is not only intracellularly co-localized with cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide as reported before, but also with phospho-mTOR (pmTOR) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in ARC neurons. Quantification revealed that 59+/-5% of the pmTOR-immunoreactive (ir) neurons were immunoreactive for nesfatin-1. Moreover, double labeling for nesfatin-1 and NPY exhibited that 19+/-5% of the NPY positive cells were also immunoreactive for nesfatin-1. Furthermore, we could also confirm results from previous studies, showing that the majority of nesfatin-1 neurons are also positive for CART peptide, whereas most of the pmTOR is co-localized with NPY and only to a lesser extent with CART.

  20. Differential gene regulation of GHSR signaling pathway in the arcuate nucleus and NPY neurons by fasting, diet-induced obesity, and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Yasrebi, Ali; Hsieh, Anna; Mamounis, Kyle J; Krumm, Elizabeth A; Yang, Jennifer A; Magby, Jason; Hu, Pu; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-02-15

    Ghrelin's receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Fasting, diet-induced obesity (DIO), and 17β-estradiol (E2) influence ARC Ghsr expression. It is unknown if these effects occur in NPY neurons. Therefore, we examined the expression of Npy, Agrp, and GHSR signaling pathway genes after fasting, DIO, and E2 replacement in ARC and pools of NPY neurons. In males, fasting increased ARC Ghsr and NPY Foxo1 but decreased NPY Ucp2. In males, DIO decreased ARC and NPY Ghsr and Cpt1c. In fed females, E2 increased Agrp, Ghsr, Cpt1c, and Foxo1 in ARC. In NPY pools, E2 decreased Foxo1 in fed females but increased Foxo1 in fasted females. DIO in females suppressed Agrp and augmented Cpt1c in NPY neurons. In summary, genes involved in GHSR signaling are differentially regulated between the ARC and NPY neurons in a sex-dependent manner.

  1. Transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein exhibit early metabolic deficits and a pathologically low leptin state associated with hypothalamic dysfunction in arcuate neuropeptide Y neurons.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P; Iadecola, Costantino

    2014-07-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ.

  2. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein Exhibit Early Metabolic Deficits and a Pathologically Low Leptin State Associated with Hypothalamic Dysfunction in Arcuate Neuropeptide Y Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. PMID:24990930

  3. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  4. Neuropeptide Y and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone reciprocally regulate nesfatin-1 neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Sedbazar, Udval; Ayush, Enkh-Amar; Maejima, Yuko; Yada, Toshihiko

    2014-12-17

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acids peptide processed from its precursor nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). Accumulating evidences have shown that the nesfatin-1/NUCB2 localized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus regulates food intake and energy metabolism. However, the factors that regulate nesfatin-1/NUCB2 neurons in PVN are less defined. In the hypothalamic feeding center, the second-order neurons in PVN are extensively projected by the first-order neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the representatives of which are orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and anorexigenic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) neurons. The present study explored whether NPY and α-MSH regulate the PVN nesfatin-1/NUCB2 neurons. This was achieved by cytosolic Ca ([Ca]i) imaging, followed by nesfatin-1/NUCB2 immunostaining in single neurons isolated from PVN. The moderate increase in [Ca]i with 5 mM glucose was suppressed by NPY, but further increased by α-MSH in the PVN neurons that were shown to be immunoreactive to nesfatin-1/NUCB2. The majority (60%) of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 neurons in PVN responded to NPY and/or α-MSH. Confocal immunohistochemical images showed that both NPY and α-MSH neuronal terminals contacted nesfatin-1/NUCB2 neurons in PVN. These data show that NPY inhibits and α-MSH activates PVN nesfatin-1/NUCB2 neurons, presenting dual and reciprocal neuro-circuits from ARC to PVN, possibly contributing toward the balanced regulation of feeding.

  5. Neuroplastic changes in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus: the estradiol effect is accompanied by increased exoendocytotic activity of neuronal membranes.

    PubMed

    Párducz, A; Szilágyi, T; Hoyk, S; Naftolin, F; Garcia-Segura, L M

    1996-04-01

    1. In the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, estradiol induces coordinated changes in the number of axosomatic synapses, the amount of glial ensheathing, and the ultrastructure of the membrane of neuronal somas. In the present study we used conventional electron microscopy and freeze-fracture to examine cellular mechanisms responsible for the estradiol-induced changes at the membrane level. 2. In freeze-fracture replicas taken 10-60 min and 24 hr after injection of 17 beta-estradiol to adult ovariectomized females, it was found that there was a rapid increase in the number of exoendocytotic images that reached a plateau by 30 min. 3. In thin sections from animals injected 24 hr earlier we demonstrated a significant increase in coated vesicles in the periphery of the neurons and coated pits in the perikaryal membranes and decreased axosomatic synapses. 4. We conclude that these morphological alterations are signaling estrogen-induced transport and/or turnover of perikaryal membrane constituents and extracellular components which may affect interneuronal and neuroglial interactions. PMID:8743973

  6. Photoperiodic regulation of histamine H3 receptor and VGF messenger ribonucleic acid in the arcuate nucleus of the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Perry; Ross, Alexander W; Balik, Ales; Littlewood, Pauline A; Mercer, Julian G; Moar, Kim M; Sallmen, Tina; Kaslin, Jan; Panula, Pertti; Schuhler, Sandrine; Ebling, Francis J; Ubeaud, Caroline; Morgan, Peter J

    2005-04-01

    To survive winter the Siberian hamster has evolved profound physiological and behavioral adaptations, including a moult to winter pelage, regression of the reproductive axis, onset of daily torpor and increased capacity for thermogenesis. However, one of the most striking adaptations is the catabolism of intraabdominal and sc fat reserves contributing to the loss of up to 40% of body weight. These physiological and behavioral adaptations are photoperiodically driven, yet neither the site(s) in the brain nor the molecular mechanism(s) involved in the regulation of these profound adaptations is known. Here we report a dynamic regulation of gene expression in a dorsal region of the medial posterior area of the arcuate nucleus (dmpARC) of the Siberian and Syrian hamster brain in response to altered photoperiod. We show mRNA for the histamine H3 receptor is down-regulated and VGF is up-regulated in the dmpARC in hamsters switched from long- to short-day photoperiod. These data provide further evidence to support the view that the dmpARC is a major site to relay photoperiodic changes and as a site for the long-term regulation of seasonal physiology and behavior.

  7. Phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunits by protein kinase C in arcuate nucleus contributes to inflammatory pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Fan; Tian, Huiyu; Gong, Shan; Zhu, Qi; Xu, Guang-Yin; Tao, Jin; Jiang, Xinghong

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus plays a key role in pain processing. Although it is well known that inhibition of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) in ARC attenuates hyperalgesia induced by peripheral inflammation, the underlying mechanism of NMDAR activation in ARC remains unclear. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in several signalling cascades activated in physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, we hypothesised that upregulation of PKC activates NMDARs in the ARC, thus contributing to inflammatory hyperalgesia. Intra-ARC injection of chelerythrine (CC), a specific PKC inhibitor, attenuated complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo extracellular recordings showed that microelectrophoresis of CC or MK-801 (a NMDAR antagonist) significantly reduced the enhancement of spontaneous discharges and pain-evoked discharges of ARC neurons. In addition, CFA injection greatly enhanced the expression of total and phosphorylated PKCγ in the ARC. Interestingly, CFA injection also remarkably elevated the level of phosphorylated NR2B (Tyr1472) without affecting the expression of total NR2B. Importantly, intra-ARC injection of CC reversed the upregulation of phosphorylated NR2B subunits in the ARC. Taken together, peripheral inflammation leads to an activation of NMDARs mediated by PKC activation in the ARC, thus producing thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. PMID:26515544

  8. Silencing of OB-RGRP in mouse hypothalamic arcuate nucleus increases leptin receptor signaling and prevents diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Cyril; Sarkis, Chamsy; Séron, Karin; Belouzard, Sandrine; Chen, Patty; Lenain, Aude; Corset, Laetitia; Dam, Julie; Vauthier, Virginie; Dubart, Anne; Mallet, Jacques; Froguel, Philippe; Rouillé, Yves; Jockers, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem and is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Leptin is the crucial adipostatic hormone that controls food intake and body weight through the activation of specific leptin receptors (OB-R) in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). However, in most obese patients, high circulating levels of leptin fail to bring about weight loss. The prevention of this “leptin resistance” is a major goal for obesity research. We report here a successful prevention of diet-induced obesity (DIO) by silencing a negative regulator of OB-R function, the OB-R gene-related protein (OB-RGRP), whose transcript is genetically linked to the OB-R transcript. We provide in vitro evidence that OB-RGRP controls OB-R function by negatively regulating its cell surface expression. In the DIO mouse model, obesity was prevented by silencing OB-RGRP through stereotactic injection of a lentiviral vector encoding a shRNA directed against OB-RGRP in the ARC. This work demonstrates that OB-RGRP is a potential target for obesity treatment. Indeed, regulators of the receptor could be more appropriate targets than the receptor itself. This finding could serve as the basis for an approach to identifying potential new therapeutic targets for a variety of diseases, including obesity. PMID:18042720

  9. Monosodium glutamate-induced arcuate nucleus damage affects both natural torpor and 2DG-induced torpor-like hypothermia in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Kimberly M; Routman, David; Driscoll, Joseph R; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Dark, John

    2008-01-01

    Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) have the ability to express daily torpor and decrease their body temperature to approximately 15 degrees C, providing a significant savings in energy expenditure. Daily torpor in hamsters is cued by winterlike photoperiods and occurs coincident with the annual nadirs in body fat reserves and chronic leptin concentrations. To better understand the neural mechanisms underlying torpor, Siberian hamster pups were postnatally treated with saline or MSG to ablate arcuate nucleus neurons that likely possess leptin receptors. Body temperature was studied telemetrically in cold-acclimated (10 degrees C) male and female hamsters moved to a winterlike photoperiod (10:14-h light-dark cycle) (experiments 1 and 2) or that remained in a summerlike photoperiod (14:10-h light-dark cycle) (experiment 3). In experiment 1, even though other photoperiodic responses persisted, MSG-induced arcuate nucleus ablations prevented the photoperiod-dependent torpor observed in saline-treated Siberian hamsters. MSG-treated hamsters tended to possess greater fat reserves. To determine whether reductions in body fat would increase frequency of photoperiod-induced torpor after MSG treatment, hamsters underwent 2 wk of food restriction (70% of ad libitum) in experiment 2. Although food restriction did increase the frequency of torpor in both MSG- and saline-treated hamsters, it failed to normalize the proportion of MSG-treated hamsters undergoing photoperiod-dependent torpor. In experiment 3, postnatal MSG treatments reduced the proportion of hamsters entering 2DG-induced torpor-like hypothermia by approximately 50% compared with saline-treated hamsters (38 vs. 72%). In those MSG-treated hamsters that did become hypothermic, their minimum temperature during hypothermia was significantly greater than comparable saline-treated hamsters. We conclude that 1) arcuate nucleus mechanisms mediate photoperiod-induced torpor, 2) food-restriction-induced torpor may also be

  10. Insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity in part by suppression of tonic inhibitory neuropeptide Y inputs into the paraventricular nucleus in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2016-07-01

    Following binding to receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ArcN), insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and baroreflex control of SNA via a pathway that includes the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Previous studies in males indicate that the sympathoexcitatory response is mediated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which binds to PVN melanocortin type 3/4 receptors (MC3/4R). The present study was conducted in α-chloralose-anesthetized female rats to test the hypothesis that suppression of inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) inputs to the PVN is also involved. In support of this, blockade of PVN NPY Y1 receptors with BIBO 3304 (NPY1x), ArcN insulin nanoinjections, and PVN NPY1x followed by ArcN insulin each increased lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation similarly. Moreover, prior PVN injections of NPY blocked the sympathoexcitatory effects of ArcN insulin. Finally, PVN nanoinjections of the MC3/4R inhibitor SHU9119 prevented both the acute (15 min) and longer, more slowly developing (60 min), increases in LSNA in response to ArcN insulin. In conclusion, in females, ArcN insulin increases LSNA, in part, by suppressing tonic PVN NPY inhibition, which unmasks excitatory α-MSH drive of LSNA. Moreover, the steadily increasing rise in LSNA induced by ArcN insulin is also dependent on PVN MC3/4R. PMID:27122366

  11. Identification of a Neuropeptide S Responsive Circuitry Shaping Amygdala Activity via the Endopiriform Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Meis, Susanne; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge Ricardo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Stork, Oliver; Munsch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor are thought to define a set of specific brain circuits involved in fear and anxiety. Here we provide evidence for a novel, NPS-responsive circuit that shapes neural activity in the mouse basolateral amygdala (BLA) via the endopiriform nucleus (EPN). Using slice preparations, we demonstrate that NPS directly activates an inward current in 20% of EPN neurons and evokes an increase of glutamatergic excitation in this nucleus. Excitation of the EPN is responsible for a modulation of BLA activity through NPS, characterized by a general increase of GABAergic inhibition and enhancement of spike activity in a subset of BLA projection neurons. Finally, local injection of NPS to the EPN interferes with the expression of contextual, but not auditory cued fear memory. Together, these data suggest the existence of a specific NPS-responsive circuitry between EPN and BLA, likely involved in contextual aspects of fear memory. PMID:18628994

  12. Nutritional Programming of Accelerated Puberty in Heifers: Involvement of Pro-Opiomelanocortin Neurones in the Arcuate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, R C; Alves, B R C; Sharpton, S M; Williams, G L; Amstalden, M

    2015-08-01

    The timing of puberty and subsequent fertility in female mammals are dependent on the integration of metabolic signals by the hypothalamus. Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) comprise a critical metabolic-sensing pathway controlling the reproductive neuroendocrine axis. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH), a product of the POMC gene, has excitatory effects on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones and fibres containing αMSH project to GnRH and kisspeptin neurones. Because kisspeptin is a potent stimulator of GnRH release, αMSH may also stimulate GnRH secretion indirectly via kisspeptin neurones. In the present work, we report studies conducted in young female cattle (heifers) aiming to determine whether increased nutrient intake during the juvenile period (4-8 months of age), a strategy previously shown to advance puberty, alters POMC and KISS1 mRNA expression, as well as αMSH close contacts on GnRH and kisspeptin neurones. In Experiment 1, POMC mRNA expression, detected by in situ hybridisation, was greater (P < 0.05) in the ARC in heifers that gained 1 kg/day of body weight (high-gain, HG; n = 6) compared to heifers that gained 0.5 kg/day (low-gain, LG; n = 5). The number of KISS1-expressing cells in the middle ARC was reduced (P < 0.05) in HG compared to LG heifers. In Experiment 2, double-immunofluorescence showed limited αMSH-positive close contacts on GnRH neurones, and the magnitude of these inputs was not influenced by nutritional status. Conversely, a large number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells in the ARC were observed in close proximity to αMSH-containing varicosities. Furthermore, HG heifers (n = 5) exhibited a greater (P < 0.05) percentage of kisspeptin neurones in direct apposition to αMSH fibres and an increased (P < 0.05) number of αMSH close contacts per kisspeptin cell compared to LG heifers (n = 6). These results indicate that the POMC-kisspeptin pathway may be important

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ controls ingestive behavior, agouti-related protein, and neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Garretson, John T; Teubner, Brett J W; Grove, Kevin L; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-03-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ controls ingestive behavior, agouti-related protein, and neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Garretson, John T; Teubner, Brett J W; Grove, Kevin L; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-03-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  15. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Controls Ingestive Behavior, Agouti-Related Protein, and Neuropeptide Y mRNA in the Arcuate Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Garretson, John T.; Teubner, Brett J.W.; Grove, Kevin L.; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  16. Central amygdalar nucleus treated with orexin neuropeptides evoke differing feeding and grooming responses in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Mele, Maria; Di Vito, Anna; Canonaco, Marcello

    2015-04-15

    Interaction of the orexinergic (ORXergic) neuronal system with the excitatory (glutamate, l-Glu) or the inhibitory (GABA) neurosignaling complexes evokes major homeostatic physiological events. In this study, effects of the two ORXergic neuropeptides (ORX-A/B) on their receptor (ORX-2R) expression changes were correlated to feeding and grooming actions of the hibernating hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Infusion of the central amygdala nucleus (CeA) with ORX-A caused hamsters to consume notable quantities of food, while ORX-B accounted for a moderate increase. Interestingly the latter neuropeptide was responsible for greater frequencies of grooming with respect to both controls and the hamsters treated with ORX-A. These distinct behavioral changes turned out to be even greater in the presence of l-Glu agonist (NMDA) while the α1 GABAA receptor agonist (zolpidem, Zol) greatly reduced ORX-A-dependent feeding bouts. Moreover, ORX-A+NMDA mainly promoted greater ORX-2R expression levels with respect to ORX-A-treated hamsters while ORX-B+Zol was instead largely responsible for a down-regulatory trend. Overall, these features point to CeA ORX-2R sites as key sensory limbic elements capable of regulating eating and grooming responses, which may provide useful insights regarding the type of molecular mechanism(s) operating during feeding bouts.

  17. A high level of male sexual activity is necessary for the activation of the medial preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus during the 'male effect' in anestrous goats.

    PubMed

    Bedos, Marie; Portillo, Wendy; Dubois, Jean-Philippe; Duarte, Gerardo; Flores, José A; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu; Paredes, Raúl G; Delgadillo, José A

    2016-10-15

    In small ungulates such as sheep or goats, the introduction of a male among a group of anovulatory females during the anestrus season leads to the reactivation of the gonadotrope axis and ovulation, a phenomenon known as the 'male effect'. In goats, our previous studies have demonstrated the importance of male sexual activity for an efficient reactivation of the gonadotrope axis assessed through ovulation and blood LH pulsatility. In the present experiment, we assessed whether the level of male sexual activity would also induce differential activation of two brain regions of key importance for the reactivation of GnRH activity, namely the medial preoptic area and the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. In both structures, we observed a differential activation of Fos in females, depending on the level of buck sexual activity. Indeed, goats unexposed to males showed low levels of expression of Fos while those exposed to sexually inactive bucks showed an intermediate level of Fos expression. Finally, the highest level of Fos expression was found in females exposed to sexually active males. However, and contrary to our initial hypothesis, we were not able to find any specific activation of kisspeptin cells in the arcuate nucleus following the introduction of highly sexually active males. As a whole, these results demonstrate that the level of male sexual activity is a key factor to stimulate brain regions involved in the control of the gonadotrope axis in the context of the male effect in goats.

  18. A high level of male sexual activity is necessary for the activation of the medial preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus during the 'male effect' in anestrous goats.

    PubMed

    Bedos, Marie; Portillo, Wendy; Dubois, Jean-Philippe; Duarte, Gerardo; Flores, José A; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu; Paredes, Raúl G; Delgadillo, José A

    2016-10-15

    In small ungulates such as sheep or goats, the introduction of a male among a group of anovulatory females during the anestrus season leads to the reactivation of the gonadotrope axis and ovulation, a phenomenon known as the 'male effect'. In goats, our previous studies have demonstrated the importance of male sexual activity for an efficient reactivation of the gonadotrope axis assessed through ovulation and blood LH pulsatility. In the present experiment, we assessed whether the level of male sexual activity would also induce differential activation of two brain regions of key importance for the reactivation of GnRH activity, namely the medial preoptic area and the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. In both structures, we observed a differential activation of Fos in females, depending on the level of buck sexual activity. Indeed, goats unexposed to males showed low levels of expression of Fos while those exposed to sexually inactive bucks showed an intermediate level of Fos expression. Finally, the highest level of Fos expression was found in females exposed to sexually active males. However, and contrary to our initial hypothesis, we were not able to find any specific activation of kisspeptin cells in the arcuate nucleus following the introduction of highly sexually active males. As a whole, these results demonstrate that the level of male sexual activity is a key factor to stimulate brain regions involved in the control of the gonadotrope axis in the context of the male effect in goats. PMID:27475456

  19. A role for VGF in the hypothalamic arcuate and paraventricular nuclei in the control of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Saderi, N; Buijs, F N; Salgado-Delgado, R; Merkenstein, M; Basualdo, M C; Ferri, G-L; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2014-04-18

    The arcuate nucleus is the main receptive area of the brain for peripheral and central metabolic cues and its integrity is essential for the maintenance of energy homeostasis. In the arcuate nucleus, different neuronal populations process metabolic signals and transmit this information to other nuclei of the hypothalamus by means of neurotransmitters and a combination of neuropeptides whose expression is modulated by the nutritional status. Here we investigated the changes in expression and synthesis of the polypeptide VGF in the arcuate nucleus of rats, in relation to the two main categories of neurons that show colocalization with VGF: the orexigenic NPY-expressing cells and the anorexigenic POMC-expressing cells. The results show that fasting is the most important stimulus for VGF expression, and that the up-regulation of VGF mRNA is restricted to the NPY area of the arcuate nucleus. POMC neurons express VGF under all feeding conditions, but especially in ad libitum-fed and fasted-refed animals. We also show that VGF arcuate neurons project to the pre-autonomic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, providing anatomical evidence suggesting VGF as a central modulator of the autonomic nervous system.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing factor-overexpressing mice exhibit reduced neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and food intake in response to fasting.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Million, Mulugeta; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulating ghrelin levels, and gastric emptying of a nonnutrient meal. CRF-OE mice injected ip with saline showed a 47 and 44% reduction of 30-min and 4-h cumulative food intake response to an overnight fast, respectively, compared with WT. However, the 30-min food intake decrease induced by ip cholecystokinin (3 microg/kg) and increase by ghrelin (300 microg/kg) were similar in CRF-OE and WT mice. Overnight fasting increased the plasma total ghrelin to similar levels in CRF-OE and WT mice, although CRF-OE mice had a 2-fold reduction of nonfasting ghrelin levels. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells induced by fasting in the arcuate nucleus was reduced by 5.9-fold in CRF-OE compared with WT mice whereas no significant changes were observed in other hypothalamic nuclei. In contrast, fasted CRF-OE mice displayed a 5.6-fold increase in Fos-immunoreactive cell number in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and a 34% increase in 20-min gastric emptying. These findings indicate that sustained overproduction of hypothalamic CRF in mice interferes with fasting-induced activation of arcuate nucleus neurons and the related hyperphagic response.

  1. Photoperiodic regulation of leptin sensitivity in the Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, is reflected in arcuate nucleus SOCS-3 (suppressor of cytokine signaling) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tups, Alexander; Ellis, Claire; Moar, Kim M; Logie, Tracy J; Adam, Clare L; Mercer, Julian G; Klingenspor, Martin

    2004-03-01

    We present the first evidence that suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), a protein inhibiting Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling distal of the leptin receptor, conveys seasonal changes in leptin sensitivity in the Siberian hamster. Food deprivation (48 h) reduced SOCS3 gene expression in hamsters acclimated to either long (LD) or short (SD) photoperiods, suggesting that leptin signals acute starvation regardless of photoperiod. However, SOCS3 mRNA levels were substantially lower in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of hamsters acclimated to SD than in those raised in LD. In juveniles raised in LD, a rapid increase in SOCS3 mRNA was observed within 4 d of weaning, which was completely prevented by transfer to SD on the day of weaning. The early increase in SOCS3 gene expression in juvenile hamsters in LD clearly preceded the establishment of different body weight trajectories in LD and SD. In adult LD hamsters, SOCS3 mRNA was maintained at an elevated level despite the chronic food restriction imposed to lower body weight and serum leptin to or even below SD levels. A single injection of leptin in SD hamsters elevated SOCS3 mRNA to LD levels, whereas leptin treatment had no effect on SOCS3 gene expression in LD hamsters. Our results suggest that the development of leptin resistance in LD-acclimated hamsters involves SOCS3-mediated suppression of leptin signaling in the arcuate nucleus. Increased SOCS3 expression in LD hamsters is independent of body fat and serum leptin levels, suggesting that the photoperiod is able to trigger the biannual reversible switch in leptin sensitivity.

  2. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN-RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  3. An Indirect Action Contributes to C-Fos Induction in Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus by Neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengjie; Dakshinamoorthy, Janani; Kim, Eun Ran; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively to examine the underlying NPY orexigenic neural pathways. However, PVH C-Fos induction is in discordance with the abundant expression of NPY receptors, a group of inhibitory Gi protein coupled receptors in the PVH, and with the overall role of PVH neurons in feeding inhibition, suggesting a mechanism of indirect action. Here we showed that the ability of NPY on C-Fos induction in the PVH was blunted in conditions of insulin deficiency and fasting, a condition associated with a high level of NPY and a low level of insulin. Moreover, insulin insufficiency blunted C-Fos induction in the PVH by fasting-induced re-feeding, and insulin and NPY induced c-Fos induction in the same group of PVH neurons. Finally, NPY produced normal C-Fos induction in the PVH with disruption of GABA-A receptors. Thus, our results revealed that PVH C-Fos induction by NPY is mediated by an indirect action, which is at least partially mediated by insulin action, but not GABA-A receptors. PMID:26813148

  4. Neuropeptide FF receptors exhibit direct and anti-opioid effects on mice dorsal raphe nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhong; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-01

    By using acutely dissociated dorsal raphe nucleus neurons (DRN) from young mice, direct and anti-opioid effects of Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors were measured. The NPFF analog 1 DMe (10 µM) had no effect on resting Ca2+ channels but reduced the magnitude of Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization in 83.3% neurons tested, of which the inhibition rate is 45.4±2.9%. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced to 18.9% the number of responding neurons and attenuated by 47% the response of 1 DMe. In contrast, cholera toxin treatment had no significant effect. Eighteen minute perfusion with 1 DMe at a very low 10 nM concentration, that did not directly inhibit Ca2+ transients triggered by depolarization in every neuron, attenuated by 78% the inhibitory effect of Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) on Ca2+ transients, but not that of by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time that NPFF receptors on mice DRN inhibit Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization via Gi/o protein and also exhibit a specific anti-opioid activity on nociceptin receptors, and that their specific anti-opioid activity is not a direct consequence of their activity on Ca2+ transients.

  5. [Concentration of monoamines and activity of several enzymes in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in young and aging rats during the estrous cycle].

    PubMed

    Grantyn', V A

    1976-07-01

    The arcuate nucleus (AN) and the median eminence (ME) of the hypothalamus were investigated in young and ageing female rats. During the estral cycle (EC) the monoamine (MA) content, the monoaminoxidase (MAO), NADP and NAD-diaphorase activities were determined in the AN, and the MA content and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) -- in the ME. In young rats in the proestrus-estrus there was an increase in the activity of the NADP and NAD-diaphorase and of the MA content, but a decrease of the MAO activity. This indicated an intensified function of the nucleus at these stages of the EC. Accumulation of the MA in the ME was noted in the diestrus, while in the proestrus their concentration sharply fell; on the other hand, the activity of the AP was considerably increased. In the ageing rats the dynamics of the indices under study during the EC were largely unchanged. However, the functional activity of the AN proved to increase, and in the ME and elevation of the MA concentration and disturbance of its release from the nerve terminals was seen.

  6. Neuropeptide Y signaling in the dorsal raphe nucleus inhibits male sexual behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A; Komori, Y; Muroi, Y; Kinoshita, K; Ishii, T

    2016-04-21

    Animals change their biological activities depending on their nutritional state. Reproductive functions, including sexual behavior, are suppressed under low-energy conditions; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism is poorly understood. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic molecule released in response to low-energy conditions and has an inhibitory effect on sexual behavior. We examined how NPY is involved in energy state-dependent regulation of male sexual behavior. Mounting, intromission, and ejaculation were evaluated as parameters of sexual behavior. Almost all parameters indicated that fasting for 24h suppressed male sexual behavior. Intracerebroventricular injection of NPY inhibited sexual behavior in males that free-fed for 8h following 24-h fasting (fed males). We next examined whether the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which serotonergic (5-HT) neurons are distributed, is involved in NPY-mediated inhibition of male sexual behavior. NPY-positive processes immunoreactive for a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin, were distributed in the DRN of both fed and fasted males. Expression of the NPY Y1 receptor in 5-HT neurons was also observed. Direct injection of NPY or 8-OH-DPAT (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist that inhibits the activity of 5-HT neurons) into the DRN inhibited male sexual behavior in fed males. In contrast, injection of BIBP-3226, a NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, or (+)-DOI hydrochloride (DOI), a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist that activates 5-HT neurons, into the DRN partially recovered male sexual behavior in 24-h fasted males. These results suggest that NPY inhibits serotonergic neuronal activity via the Y1 receptor in the DRN, resulting in suppression of male sexual behavior in low-energy conditions.

  7. Nitrous oxide-induced NO-dependent neuronal release of β-endorphin from the rat arcuate nucleus and periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Ohgami, Yusuke; Chung, Eunhee; Quock, Raymond M

    2010-12-17

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O)-induced antinociception is thought to result from nitric oxide (NO)-dependent neuronal release of endogenous opioid peptides in the central nervous system. The present study employed microdialysis to determine whether exposure to N(2)O stimulates proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons to release β-endorphin in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus and the periaqueductal gray (PAG) of the midbrain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotaxically implanted with microdialysis probes in the ARC or PAG. Exposure to 70% N(2)O significantly increased dialysate levels of oxidation products of NO as well as β-endorphin, compared to levels in fractions collected under room air. These increases in the ARC and PAG were abolished by systemic pretreatment with L-N(G)-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). These findings suggest an association between increased NO activity and the stimulated release of β-endorphin during exposure of rats to N(2)O. PMID:20937263

  8. Expression of melanocortin-4 receptor and agouti-related peptide mRNAs in arcuate nucleus during long term malnutrition of female ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Tamadon, Amin; Hematzadeh, Aida; Jahanara, Maliheh; Shirazi, Mohammad Reza Jafarzadeh; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali; Moghiminasr, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) are involved in energy homeostasis in the rat. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of MC4R and AgRP mRNAs in arcuate nucleus (ARC) during long term malnutrition of female ovariectomized rats. Materials and Methods: Ten female ovariectomized rats were divided into two equal groups (n=6) of normal and restricted diet groups. Using real-time PCR, the relative expressions (compared to controls) of MC4R and AgRP mRNAs were compared between both diet groups. Results: The relative expression of MC4R and AgRP mRNA in the ARC of female ovariectomized rats during long term malnutrition was higher than those with normal diet (P<0.05). Conclusion: Changes in the relative expression level of MC4R and AgRP mRNAs during long term malnutrition of rat indicated a stimulatory role of MC4R and AgRP in regulating energy balance in ARC of rat hypothalamus. PMID:25825637

  9. Neonatal handling reduces angiotensin II receptor density in the medial preoptic area and paraventricular nucleus but not in arcuate nucleus and locus coeruleus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cármen Marilei; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes; Franskoviaki, Inélia; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Franci, Celso Rodrigues; Lucion, Aldo Bolten; Sanvitto, Gilberto Luiz

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal handling alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonads axis (HPG) in adult animals, and angiotensin II (Ang II) modulates the functions in these axes. We tested whether neonatal handling could change the density of Ang II receptors in some central areas in female rats. Results showed decreased density of the Ang II receptors in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the neonatal handled group.

  10. Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and binding sites in the rat mediobasal hypothalamus: effects of monosodium glutamate (MSG) lesions.

    PubMed

    Meister, B; Ceccatelli, S; Hökfelt, T; Andén, N E; Andén, M; Theodorsson, E

    1989-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence histochemistry and receptor autoradiography were used to study the localization of transmitter-/peptide-containing neurons and peptide binding sites in the mediobasal hypothalamus in normal rats and in rats treated neonatally with repeated doses of the neurotoxin monosodium-glutamate (MSG). In the arcuate nucleus, the results showed a virtually complete loss of cell bodies containing immunoreactivity for growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), galanin (GAL), dynorphin (DYN), enkephalin (ENK), corticotropin-like intermediate peptide (CLIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and neuropeptide K (NPK). Tyrosine hydroxylase(TH)-glutamic acid decarboxylase(GAD)-, neurotensin(NT)- and somatostatin(SOM)-immunoreactive (IR) cells were, however, always detected in the ventrally dislocated, dorsomedial division of the arcuate nucleus. In the median eminence, marked decreases in numbers of GAD-, NT-, GAL-, GRF-, DYN-, and ENK-IR fibers were observed. The numbers of TH-, SOM- and NPY-IR fibers were in contrast not or only affected to a very small extent, as revealed with the immunofluorescence technique. Biochemical analysis showed a tendency for MSG to reduce dopamine levels in the median eminence of female rats, whereas no effect was observed in male rats. Autoradiographic studies showed high to moderate NT binding sites, including strong binding over presumably dorsomedial dopamine cells. In MSG-treated rats, there was a marked reduction in GAL binding in the ventromedial nucleus. The findings implicate that most neurons in the ventrolateral and ventromedial arcuate nucleus are sensitive to the toxic effects of MSG, whereas a subpopulation of cells in the dorsomedial division of the arcuate nucleus, including dopamine neurons, are not susceptible to MSG-neurotoxicity. The results indicate, moreover that the very dense TH-IR fiber network in the median eminence predominantly arises from the dorsomedial TH-IR arcuate cells, whereas the GAD-, NT-, GAL-, GRF- and

  11. Deprivation of anticipated food under scheduled feeding induces c-Fos expression in the caudal part of the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus through histamine H₁ receptors in rats: potential involvement of E3 subgroup of histaminergic neurons in tuberomammillary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Hayato; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Mizukawa, Nami; Matsumoto, Mai; Takeda, Noriaki; Senba, Emiko; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2011-04-28

    It is well established that histaminergic neurons densely innervate the anterior hypothalamus and regulate several functions through histamine H(1) receptor (H1R). However, functional innervations of histaminergic neurons in the caudal hypothalamus have been poorly investigated. Recently, we have demonstrated that c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was significantly induced by food deprivation under scheduled feeding in H1R-expressing cells in the caudal part of the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus (cARC) of rats and histaminergic neurons innervating this area. In this study, we have examined the functional involvement of histaminergic neurons in the food deprivation-induced c-Fos expression in the cARC under scheduled feeding. The c-Fos expression in the cARC by food deprivation was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with antihistamines. After food deprivation, the number of c-Fos-histidine decarboxylase (HDC) double-positive neurons was mostly increased in the E3 subdivision of the tuberomammillary nucleus (TM). Under the restricted feeding schedule, significant expressions of c-Fos were detected in the TM and cARC only when rats strongly anticipated feeding, compared with a slight c-Fos induction in both nuclei when they were satiated. These findings suggest that the histaminergic neurons in the E3 subdivision of the TM are selectively activated by deprivation of an anticipated food under scheduled feeding and functionally innervate the H1R-expressing neurons in the cARC.

  12. The ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 mimics the neuronal effects of ghrelin in the arcuate nucleus and attenuates anorexia-cachexia syndrome in tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Borner, Tito; Loi, Laura; Pietra, Claudio; Giuliano, Claudio; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The gastric hormone ghrelin positively affects energy balance by increasing food intake and reducing energy expenditure. Ghrelin mimetics are a possible treatment against cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS). This study aimed to characterize the action of the nonpeptidergic ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 on neuronal function, energy homeostasis and muscle mass in healthy rats and to evaluate its possible usefulness for the treatment of CACS in a rat tumor model. Using extracellular single-unit recordings, we tested whether HM01 mimics the effects of ghrelin on neuronal activity in the arcuate nucleus (Arc). Furthermore, we assessed the effect of chronic HM01 treatment on food intake (FI), body weight (BW), lean and fat volumes, and muscle mass in healthy rats. Using a hepatoma model, we investigated the possible beneficial effects of HM01 on tumor-induced anorexia, BW loss, muscle wasting, and metabolic rate. HM01 (10(-7)-10(-6) M) mimicked the effect of ghrelin (10(-8) M) by increasing the firing rate in 76% of Arc neurons. HM01 delivered chronically for 12 days via osmotic minipumps (50 μg/h) increased FI in healthy rats by 24%, paralleled by increased BW, higher fat and lean volumes, and higher muscle mass. Tumor-bearing rats treated with HM01 had 30% higher FI than tumor-bearing controls and were protected against BW loss. HM01 treatment resulted in higher muscle mass and fat mass. Moreover, tumor-bearing rats reduced their metabolic rate following HM01 treatment. Our studies substantiate the possible therapeutic usefulness of ghrelin receptor agonists like HM01 for the treatment of CACS and possibly other forms of disease-related anorexia and cachexia. PMID:27147616

  13. Effects of insulin and leptin in the ventral tegmental area and arcuate hypothalamic nucleus on food intake and brain reward function in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.; Corrie, Lu W.; Rogers, Jessica A.; Yamada, Hidetaka

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence for a role of insulin and leptin in food intake, but the effects of these adiposity signals on the brain reward system are not well understood. Furthermore, the effects of insulin and leptin on food intake in females are underinvestigated. These studies investigated the role of insulin and leptin in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc) on food intake and brain reward function in female rats. The intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the effects of insulin and leptin on the reward system. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a decrease in brain reward function. The bilateral administration of leptin into the VTA (15–500 ng/side) or Arc (15–150 ng/side) decreased food intake for 72 h. The infusion of leptin into the VTA or Arc resulted in weight loss during the first 48 (VTA) or 24 h (Arc) after the infusions. The administration of insulin (0.005–5 mU/side) into the VTA or Arc decreased food intake for 24 h but did not affect body weights. The bilateral administration of low, but not high, doses of leptin (15 ng/side) or insulin (0.005 mU/side) into the VTA elevated brain reward thresholds. Neither insulin nor leptin in the Arc affected brain reward thresholds. These studies suggest that a small increase in leptin or insulin levels in the VTA leads to a decrease in brain reward function. A relatively large increase in insulin or leptin levels in the VTA or Arc decreases food intake. PMID:21255613

  14. Estrogen-negative feedback and estrous cyclicity are critically dependent upon estrogen receptor-α expression in the arcuate nucleus of adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Shel-Hwa; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-08-01

    The location and characteristics of cells within the brain that suppress GnRH neuron activity to contribute to the estrogen-negative feedback mechanism are poorly understood. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Cre-LoxP recombination in estrogen receptor-α (ERα) floxed mice (ERα(flox/flox)), we aimed to examine the role of ERα-expressing neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) in the estrogen-negative feedback mechanism. Bilateral injection of AAV-Cre into the ARN of ERα(flox/flox) mice (n = 14) resulted in the time-dependent ablation of up to 99% of ERα-immunoreactive cell numbers throughout the rostrocaudal length of the ARN. These mice were all acyclic by 5 weeks after AAV-Cre injections with most mice in constant estrous. Control wild-type mice injected with AAV-Cre (n = 13) were normal. Body weight was not altered in ERα(flox/flox) mice. After ovariectomy, a significant increment in LH secretion was observed in all genotypes, although its magnitude was reduced in ERα(flox/flox) mice. Acute and chronic estrogen-negative feedback were assessed by administering 17β-estradiol to mice as a bolus (LH measured 3 h later) or SILASTIC brand capsule implant (LH measured 5 d later). This demonstrated that chronic estrogen feedback was absent in ERα(flox/flox) mice, whereas the acute feedback was normal. These results reveal a critical role for ERα-expressing cells within the ARN in both estrous cyclicity and the chronic estrogen negative feedback mechanism in female mice. This suggests that ARN cells provide a key indirect, transsynpatic route through which estradiol suppresses the activity of GnRH neurons.

  15. The ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 mimics the neuronal effects of ghrelin in the arcuate nucleus and attenuates anorexia-cachexia syndrome in tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Borner, Tito; Loi, Laura; Pietra, Claudio; Giuliano, Claudio; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The gastric hormone ghrelin positively affects energy balance by increasing food intake and reducing energy expenditure. Ghrelin mimetics are a possible treatment against cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS). This study aimed to characterize the action of the nonpeptidergic ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 on neuronal function, energy homeostasis and muscle mass in healthy rats and to evaluate its possible usefulness for the treatment of CACS in a rat tumor model. Using extracellular single-unit recordings, we tested whether HM01 mimics the effects of ghrelin on neuronal activity in the arcuate nucleus (Arc). Furthermore, we assessed the effect of chronic HM01 treatment on food intake (FI), body weight (BW), lean and fat volumes, and muscle mass in healthy rats. Using a hepatoma model, we investigated the possible beneficial effects of HM01 on tumor-induced anorexia, BW loss, muscle wasting, and metabolic rate. HM01 (10(-7)-10(-6) M) mimicked the effect of ghrelin (10(-8) M) by increasing the firing rate in 76% of Arc neurons. HM01 delivered chronically for 12 days via osmotic minipumps (50 μg/h) increased FI in healthy rats by 24%, paralleled by increased BW, higher fat and lean volumes, and higher muscle mass. Tumor-bearing rats treated with HM01 had 30% higher FI than tumor-bearing controls and were protected against BW loss. HM01 treatment resulted in higher muscle mass and fat mass. Moreover, tumor-bearing rats reduced their metabolic rate following HM01 treatment. Our studies substantiate the possible therapeutic usefulness of ghrelin receptor agonists like HM01 for the treatment of CACS and possibly other forms of disease-related anorexia and cachexia.

  16. Estradiol upregulates progesterone receptor and orphanin FQ colocalization in arcuate nucleus neurons and opioid receptor-like receptor-1 expression in proopiomelanocortin neurons that project to the medial preoptic nucleus in the female rat

    PubMed Central

    Sanathara, Nayna M.; Moreas, Justine; Mahavongtrakul, Matthew; Sinchak, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian steroids regulate sexual receptivity in the female rat by acting on neurons that converge on proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) that project to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN). Estradiol rapidly activates these neurons to release β-endorphin that activates MPN μ-opioid receptors (MOP) to inhibit lordosis. Lordosis is facilitated by the subsequent action of progesterone that deactivates the estradiol-induced MPN MOP activation. Orphanin FQ (OFQ/N; aka nociceptin) infusions into the ARH, like progesterone, deactivate MPN MOP and facilitate lordosis in estradiol-primed rats. OFQ/N reduces the activity of ARH β-endorphin neurons through post- and presynaptic mechanisms via its cognate receptor, ORL-1. Methods We tested the hypotheses that progesterone receptors (PR) are expressed in ARH OFQ/N neurons by immunohistochemistry and ORL-1 is expressed in POMC neurons that project to the MPN by combining Fluoro-Gold injection into the MPN and double-label fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We also hypothesized that estradiol increases coexpression of PR-OFQ/N and ORL-1-POMC in ARH neurons of ovariectomized rats. Results The number of PR and OFQ/N immunopositive ARH neurons was increased as was their colocalization by estradiol treatment. FISH for ORL-1 and POMC mRNA revealed a subpopulation of ARH neurons that was triple-labeled indicating these neurons project to the MPN and coexpress ORL-1 and POMC mRNA. Estradiol was shown to upregulate ORL-1 and POMC expression in MPN-projecting ARH neurons. Conclusion Estradiol upregulates the ARH OFQ/N-ORL-1 system projecting to the MPN that regulates lordosis. PMID:24821192

  17. Expression of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 (RFRP-3) mRNA in Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus and KiSS-1 mRNA in Arcuate Nucleus of Rat during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Tamadon, Amin; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Mohammadi Nezhad, Saeed; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tanideh, Nader; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) and kisspeptin (KiSS-1) are known to respectively inhibit and stimulate gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and lute- inizing hormone (LH) secretion in rat. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relative mRNA expression of RFRP-3 and KiSS-1 in the hypothalamus of pregnant rats. Materials and Methods In a randomized controlled experimental study, the exact preg- nancy day of 18 Sprague-Dawley rats were confirmed using the vaginal smear method and were equally assigned to three groups of days 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy. Four non- pregnant female rats were ovariectomized and assigned as the control group. All rats were decapitated, and the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and the arcuate nucleus (ARC) for detection of KiSS-1 mRNA were separated from their hypothalamus to detect RFRP-3 and KiSS-1 mRNA respectively. Then, their relative expressions were compared between control and pregnant groups using real-time polymerase chain reac- tion (PCR). Results The relative expression of RFRP-3 mRNA in DMH did not change significantly during pregnancy (p>0.01). However, the relative expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in ARC was at its highest in day 7 of pregnancy and decreased until day 21 of pregnancy (p<0.01). Conclusion Decrease in GnRH and LH secretion during the pregnancy of rat may be controlled by constant expression of RFRP-3 mRNA and reduced expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in hypothalamus. PMID:25379163

  18. Direct inhibition of arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons: a potential mechanism for the orexigenic actions of dynorphin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2013-01-01

    Dynorphin, an endogenous ligand of kappa (κ) opioid receptors, has multiple roles in the brain, and plays a positive role in energy balance and food intake. However, the mechanism for this is unclear. With immunocytochemistry, we find that axonal dynorphin immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus is strong, and that a large number of dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons terminate on or near anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cells. Here we provide evidence from whole-cell patch-clamp recording that dynorphin-A (Dyn-A) directly and dose-dependently inhibits arcuate nucleus POMC neurons. Dyn-A inhibition was eliminated by the κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-BNI, but not by the μ receptor antagonist CTAP. The inhibitory effect was mimicked by the κ2 receptor agonist GR89696, but not by the κ1 receptor agonist U69593. No presynaptic effect of κ2 agonists was found. These results suggest that Dyn-A inhibits POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor. In whole-cell voltage clamp, Dyn-A opened G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK)-like channels on POMC neurons. Dynorphin attenuated glutamate and GABA neurotransmission to POMC neurons. In contrast to the strong inhibition of POMC neurons by Dyn-A, we found a weaker direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons mediated by both κ1 and κ2 receptors. Taken together, these results indicate a direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor and GIRK channels. A number of orexigenic hypothalamic neurons release dynorphin along with other neuropeptides. The inhibition of anorexigenic POMC neurons may be one mechanism underlying the orexigenic actions of dynorphin. PMID:23318874

  19. Androgen inhibits, while oestrogen enhances, restraint-induced activation of neuropeptide neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Lund, T D; Munson, D J; Haldy, M E; Handa, R J

    2004-03-01

    The hormonal response to stress is enhanced by oestrogen but inhibited by androgens. To determine underlying changes in activity of neuropeptide neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), we examined the effect of oestrogen and androgen treatment on restraint-induced c-fos mRNA, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) heteronuclear RNA, and arginine vasopressin hnRNA expression in the PVN. Male rats were gonadectomized and injected with oestradiol benzoate (EB) or dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHTP; s.c., daily for 4 days). Rats were stressed by restraint for 10 min or 30 min before killing. Other rats were stressed for 30 min and then returned to their home cage for 20 min before killing. Corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone responses to restraint stress were significantly greater in EB-treated rats and lower in DHTP-treated rats at the 30-min timepoint compared to controls. c-fos mRNA increases following stress were augmented by EB but inhibited by DHTP. CRH hnRNA expression increased significantly in the PVN in response to restraint stress, and this increase was augmented by EB treatment, but decreased by DHTP treatment. Vasopressin hnRNA expression was also increased in response to stress, and this increase was attenuated by DHTP. These findings indicate that gonadal hormones influence the reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis to stress.

  20. Neuropeptide Y response to alcohol is altered in nucleus accumbens of mice selectively bred for drinking to intoxication.

    PubMed

    Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M; Ryabinin, Andrey E; Crabbe, John C

    2016-04-01

    The High Drinking in the Dark (HDID) mice have been selectively bred for drinking to intoxicating blood alcohol levels and represent a genetic model of risk for binge-like drinking. Presently, little is known about the specific genetic factors that promote excessive intake in these mice. Previous studies have identified neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a potential target for modulating alcohol intake. NPY expression differs in some rodent lines that have been selected for high and low alcohol drinking phenotypes, as well as inbred mouse strains that differ in alcohol preference. Alcohol drinking and alcohol withdrawal also produce differential effects on NPY expression in the brain. Here, we assessed brain NPY protein levels in HDID mice of two replicates of selection and control heterogeneous stock (HS) mice at baseline (water drinking) and after binge-like alcohol drinking to determine whether selection is associated with differences in NPY expression and its sensitivity to alcohol. NPY levels did not differ between HDID and HS mice in any brain region in the water-drinking animals. HS mice showed a reduction in NPY levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) - especially in the shell - in ethanol-drinking animals vs. water-drinking controls. However, HDID mice showed a blunted NPY response to alcohol in the NAc core and shell compared to HS mice. These findings suggest that the NPY response to alcohol has been altered by selection for drinking to intoxication in a region-specific manner. Thus, the NPY system may represent a potential target for altering binge-like alcohol drinking in these mice. PMID:26779672

  1. Neuropeptides and central control of sexual behaviour from the past to the present: a review.

    PubMed

    Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Of the numerous neuropeptides identified in the central nervous system, only a few are involved in the control of sexual behaviour. Among these, the most studied are oxytocin, adrenocorticotropin, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone and opioid peptides. While opioid peptides inhibit sexual performance, the others facilitate sexual behaviour in most of the species studied so far (rats, mice, monkeys and humans). However, evidence for a sexual role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, galanin and galanin-like peptide, cholecystokinin, substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, vasopressin, angiotensin II, hypocretins/orexins and VGF-derived peptides are also available. Corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, vasopressin and angiotensin II inhibit, while substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, hypocretins/orexins and some VGF-derived peptide facilitate sexual behaviour. Neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour by acting mainly in the hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., lateral hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial nucleus, arcuate nucleus), in the medial preoptic area and in the spinal cord. However, it is often unclear whether neuropeptides influence the anticipatory phase (sexual arousal and/or motivation) or the consummatory phase (performance) of sexual behaviour, except in a few cases (e.g., opioid peptides and oxytocin). Unfortunately, scarce information has been added in the last 15 years on the neural mechanisms by which neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour, most studied neuropeptides apart. This may be due to a decreased interest of researchers on neuropeptides and sexual behaviour or on sexual behaviour in general. Such a decrease may be related to the discovery of orally effective, locally acting type V phosphodiesterase inhibitors for the therapy of erectile dysfunction.

  2. Neuropeptides and central control of sexual behaviour from the past to the present: a review.

    PubMed

    Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Of the numerous neuropeptides identified in the central nervous system, only a few are involved in the control of sexual behaviour. Among these, the most studied are oxytocin, adrenocorticotropin, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone and opioid peptides. While opioid peptides inhibit sexual performance, the others facilitate sexual behaviour in most of the species studied so far (rats, mice, monkeys and humans). However, evidence for a sexual role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, galanin and galanin-like peptide, cholecystokinin, substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, vasopressin, angiotensin II, hypocretins/orexins and VGF-derived peptides are also available. Corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, vasopressin and angiotensin II inhibit, while substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, hypocretins/orexins and some VGF-derived peptide facilitate sexual behaviour. Neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour by acting mainly in the hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., lateral hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial nucleus, arcuate nucleus), in the medial preoptic area and in the spinal cord. However, it is often unclear whether neuropeptides influence the anticipatory phase (sexual arousal and/or motivation) or the consummatory phase (performance) of sexual behaviour, except in a few cases (e.g., opioid peptides and oxytocin). Unfortunately, scarce information has been added in the last 15 years on the neural mechanisms by which neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour, most studied neuropeptides apart. This may be due to a decreased interest of researchers on neuropeptides and sexual behaviour or on sexual behaviour in general. Such a decrease may be related to the discovery of orally effective, locally acting type V phosphodiesterase inhibitors for the therapy of erectile dysfunction. PMID:23851261

  3. 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan Suppressed Food Intake in Rats Despite an Increase in the Arcuate NPY Expression.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Wha; Choi, Si Ho; Yoo, Sang Bae; Lee, Jong-Ho; Jahng, Jeong Won

    2010-12-01

    This study was conducted to define the underlying mechanism of hypophagia induced by increased central serotonergic action. Rats received 3 daily injections of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), a serotonin precursor, at a dose of 100 mg/kg/10 ml saline at 1 h before lights off. A significant suppression in food intake was observed shortly after the 5-HTP injection and persisted during 3 daily 5-HTP injections. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression in the arcuate nucleus increased after 3 days of 5-HTP treatment, as high as in the pair-fed group. Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (pERK1/2) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was increased markedly by 3 days of 5-HTP treatment, but not by 3 days of pair-fed. mRNA expression levels of serotonin reuptake transporter (5-HTT) was increased in the dorsal raphe nucleus of the 5-HTP treated rats, but not in the pair-fed group. Results suggest that increased pERK1/2 in the PVN of 5-HTP injected rats may be a part of serotonergic anorectic signaling, perhaps blunting the orectic action of NPY; i.e., 5-HTP injected rats showed hypophagia despite of increased NPY expression in the arcuate nucleus.

  4. Hypothalamic neuropeptide expression following chronic food restriction in sedentary and wheel-running rats.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, C E; Hillebrand, J J G; Verhagen, L A W; Roeling, T A P; Adan, R A H

    2005-10-01

    When rats are given access to a running-wheel in combination with food restriction, they will become hyperactive and decrease their food intake, a paradoxical phenomenon known as activity-based anorexia (ABA). Little is known about the regulation of the hypothalamic neuropeptides that are involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance during the development of ABA. Therefore, rats were killed during the development of ABA, before they entered a state of severe starvation. Neuropeptide mRNA expression levels were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR on punches of separate hypothalamic nuclei. As is expected in a state of negative energy balance, expression levels of agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were increased 5-fold in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of food-restricted running ABA rats vs 2-fold in sedentary food-restricted controls. The co-regulated expression of AgRP and NPY strongly correlated with relative body weight and white adipose tissue mass. Arcuate expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) was reduced 2-fold in the ABA group. In second-order neurons of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) mRNA expression was upregulated 2-fold in food-restricted running rats, but not in food-restricted sedentary controls. Prepro-orexin, CART and corticotropin-releasing hormone expression levels in the LHA and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were unchanged in both food-restricted groups. From this study it was concluded that during the development of ABA, neuropeptides in first-order neurons in the ARC and MCH in the LHA are regulated in an adequate response to negative energy balance, whereas expression levels of the other studied neuropeptides in secondary neurons of the LHA and PVN are unchanged and are probably regulated by factors other than energy status alone.

  5. ProSAAS-derived peptides are colocalized with neuropeptide Y and function as neuropeptides in the regulation of food intake.

    PubMed

    Wardman, Jonathan H; Berezniuk, Iryna; Di, Shi; Tasker, Jeffrey G; Fricker, Lloyd D

    2011-01-01

    ProSAAS is the precursor of a number of peptides that have been proposed to function as neuropeptides. Because proSAAS mRNA is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, we examined the cellular localization of several proSAAS-derived peptides in the mouse hypothalamus and found that they generally colocalized with neuropeptide Y (NPY), but not α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. However, unlike proNPY mRNA, which is upregulated by food deprivation in the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither proSAAS mRNA nor proSAAS-derived peptides were significantly altered by 1-2 days of food deprivation in wild-type mice. Furthermore, while proSAAS mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus were significantly lower in Cpe(fat/fat) mice as compared to wild-type littermates, proNPY mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus and in other subregions of the hypothalamus were not significantly different between wild-type and Cpe(fat/fat) mice. Intracerebroventricular injections of antibodies to two proSAAS-derived peptides (big LEN and PEN) significantly reduced food intake in fasted mice, while injections of antibodies to two other proSAAS-derived peptides (little LEN and little SAAS) did not. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of parvocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, a target of arcuate NPY projections, showed that big LEN produced a rapid and reversible inhibition of synaptic glutamate release that was spike independent and abolished by blocking postsynaptic G protein activity, suggesting the involvement of a postsynaptic G protein-coupled receptor and the release of a retrograde synaptic messenger. Taken together with previous studies, these findings support a role for proSAAS-derived peptides such as big LEN as neuropeptides regulating food intake.

  6. Impact of glucose infusion on the structural and functional characteristics of adipose tissue and on hypothalamic gene expression for appetite regulatory neuropeptides in the sheep fetus during late gestation

    PubMed Central

    Mühlhäusler, BS; Adam, CL; Marrocco, EM; Findlay, PA; Roberts, CT; McFarlane, JR; Kauter, KG; McMillen, IC

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, our aim was to determine whether intrafetal glucose infusion increases fetal adiposity, synthesis and secretion of leptin and regulates gene expression of the ‘appetite regulatory’ neuropeptides neuropepetide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AGRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and receptors (leptin receptor (OB-Rb) and melancortin 3 receptor (MC3R)) within the fetal hypothalamus. Glucose (50% dextrose in saline) or saline was infused (7.5 ml h−1) into fetal sheep between 130 and 140 days gestation (term = 150 ± 3 days gestation). Glucose infusion increased circulating glucose and insulin concentrations, mean lipid locule size (532.8 ± 3.3 μm2 versus 456.7 ± 14.8 μm2) and total unilocular fat mass (11.7 ± 0.6 g versus 8.9 ± 0.6 g) of the perirenal fat depot. The expression of OB-Rb mRNA was higher in the ventromedial nucleus compared to the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in both glucose and saline infused fetuses (F= 8.04; P < 0.01) and there was a positive correlation between expression of OB-Rb and MC3R mRNA in the arcuate nucleus (r= 0.81; P < 0.005). Glucose infusion increased mRNA expression for POMC, but not for the anorectic neuropeptide CART, or the orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AGRP, in the arcuate nucleus of the fetal hypothalamus. These findings demonstrate that increased circulating glucose and insulin regulate gene expression of the neuropeptides within the fetal hypothalamus that are part of the neural network regulating energy balance in adult life. PMID:15661821

  7. Arcuate NPY neurons sense and integrate peripheral metabolic signals to control feeding.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Daisuke; Yada, Toshihiko

    2012-12-01

    NPY neuron in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is a key feeding center. Studies have shown that NPY neuron in the arcuate nucleus has a role to induce food intake. The arcuate nucleus is structurally unique with lacking blood brain barrier. Peripheral energy signals including hormones and nutrition can reach the arcuate nucleus. In this review, we discuss sensing and integrating peripheral signals in NPY neurons. In the arcuate nucleus, ghrelin mainly activates NPY neurons. Leptin and insulin suppress the ghrelin-induced activation in 30-40% of the ghrelin-activated NPY neurons. Lowering glucose concentration activates 40% of NPY neurons. These results indicate that NPY neuron in the arcuate nucleus is a feeding center in which major peripheral energy signals are directly sensed and integrated. Furthermore, there are subpopulations of NPY neurons in regard to their responsiveness to peripheral signals. These findings suggest that NPY neuron in the arcuate nucleus is an essential feeding center to induce food intake in response to peripheral metabolic state.

  8. Early weaning is associated with higher neuropeptide Y (NPY) and lower cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) expressions in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; da Silva Lima, Natália; Barradas, Penha Cristina; Manhães, Alex C; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia Cristina

    2012-12-28

    The interruption of lactation for a short period, without the use of pharmacological substances or maternal separation, causes offspring malnutrition and hypoleptinaemia and programmes for metabolic disorders such as higher body weight and adiposity, hyperphagia, hyperleptinaemia and central leptin resistance in adulthood. Here, in order to clarify the mechanisms underlying the phenotype observed in adult early-weaned (EW) rats, we studied the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in different hypothalamic nuclei by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In the EW group, the teats of lactating rats were blocked with a bandage to interrupt lactation during the last 3 d, while control pups had free access to milk throughout the entire lactation period. At age 180 d, EW offspring showed higher NPY staining in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), as well as NPY protein content (+68 %) in total hypothalamus than control ones. AgRP showed no changes in staining or Western blot. POMC content was not affected; however, its distribution pattern was altered. CART-positive cells of EW offspring had lower immunoreactivity associated with reduced cell number in the PVN and lower protein content ( - 38 %) in total hypothalamus. The present data indicate that precocious weaning can imprint the neuronal circuitry, especially in the PVN, and cause a long-term effect on the expression of specific orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as NPY and CART, that can be caused by leptin resistance and are coherent with the hyperphagia observed in these animals.

  9. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  10. Opposing roles of corticotropin-releasing factor and neuropeptide Y within the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the negative affective component of pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Hara, Taiki; Ohno, Atsushi; Tamano, Ryuta; Koseki, Kana; Naka, Tomonori; Maruyama, Chikashi; Kaneda, Katsuyuki; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Minami, Masabumi

    2013-04-01

    Pain is a complex experience composed of sensory and affective components. Although the neural systems of the sensory component of pain have been studied extensively, those of its affective component remain to be determined. In the present study, we examined the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) injected into the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dlBNST) on pain-induced aversion and nociceptive behaviors in rats to examine the roles of these peptides in affective and sensory components of pain, respectively. In vivo microdialysis showed that formalin-evoked pain enhanced the release of CRF in this brain region. Using a conditioned place aversion (CPA) test, we found that intra-dlBNST injection of a CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonist suppressed pain-induced aversion. Intra-dlBNST CRF injection induced CPA even in the absence of pain stimulation. On the other hand, intra-dlBNST NPY injection suppressed pain-induced aversion. Coadministration of NPY inhibited CRF-induced CPA. This inhibitory effect of NPY was blocked by coadministration of a Y1 or Y5 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in dlBNST slices revealed that CRF increased neuronal excitability specifically in type II dlBNST neurons, whereas NPY decreased it in these neurons. Excitatory effects of CRF on type II dlBNST neurons were suppressed by NPY. These results have uncovered some of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the affective component of pain by showing opposing roles of intra-dlBNST CRF and NPY in pain-induced aversion and opposing actions of these peptides on neuronal excitability converging on the same target, type II neurons, within the dlBNST.

  11. Opposing roles of corticotropin-releasing factor and neuropeptide Y within the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the negative affective component of pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Hara, Taiki; Ohno, Atsushi; Tamano, Ryuta; Koseki, Kana; Naka, Tomonori; Maruyama, Chikashi; Kaneda, Katsuyuki; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Minami, Masabumi

    2013-04-01

    Pain is a complex experience composed of sensory and affective components. Although the neural systems of the sensory component of pain have been studied extensively, those of its affective component remain to be determined. In the present study, we examined the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) injected into the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dlBNST) on pain-induced aversion and nociceptive behaviors in rats to examine the roles of these peptides in affective and sensory components of pain, respectively. In vivo microdialysis showed that formalin-evoked pain enhanced the release of CRF in this brain region. Using a conditioned place aversion (CPA) test, we found that intra-dlBNST injection of a CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonist suppressed pain-induced aversion. Intra-dlBNST CRF injection induced CPA even in the absence of pain stimulation. On the other hand, intra-dlBNST NPY injection suppressed pain-induced aversion. Coadministration of NPY inhibited CRF-induced CPA. This inhibitory effect of NPY was blocked by coadministration of a Y1 or Y5 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in dlBNST slices revealed that CRF increased neuronal excitability specifically in type II dlBNST neurons, whereas NPY decreased it in these neurons. Excitatory effects of CRF on type II dlBNST neurons were suppressed by NPY. These results have uncovered some of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the affective component of pain by showing opposing roles of intra-dlBNST CRF and NPY in pain-induced aversion and opposing actions of these peptides on neuronal excitability converging on the same target, type II neurons, within the dlBNST. PMID:23554470

  12. The effects of aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment on circadian rhythms and suprachiasmatic nucleus expression of neuropeptide genes and 5-HT1B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Marilyn J.; Hester, James M.; Hopper, Jason A.; Franklin, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related changes in circadian rhythms, including attenuation of photic phase shifts, are associated with changes in the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Aging decreases expression of mRNA for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a key neuropeptide for rhythm generation and photic phase shifts, and increases expression of serotonin transporters and 5-HT1B receptors, whose activation inhibits these phase shifts. Here we describe studies in hamsters showing that aging decreases SCN expression of mRNA for gastrin-releasing peptide, which also modulates photic phase resetting. Because serotonin innervation trophically supports SCN VIP mRNA expression, and serotonin transporters decrease extracellular serotonin, we predicted that chronic administration of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, would attenuate the age-related changes in SCN VIP mRNA expression and 5-HT1B receptors. In situ hybridization studies showed that fluoxetine treatment does not alter SCN VIP mRNA expression, in either age group, at zeitgeber time (ZT)6 or 13 (ZT12 corresponds to lights off). However, receptor autoradiographic studies showed that fluoxetine prevents the age-related increase in SCN 5-HT1B receptors at ZT6, and decreases SCN 5-HT1B receptors in both ages at ZT13. Therefore, aging effects on SCN VIP mRNA and SCN 5-HT1B receptors are differentially regulated; the age-related increase in serotonin transporter sites mediates the latter but not the former. The studies also showed that aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment decrease total daily wheel running without altering the phase of the circadian wheel running rhythm, in contrast to previous reports of phase resetting by acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:20525077

  13. The effect of acute and chronic restraint on the central expression of prepro-neuropeptide Y mRNA in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sweerts, B W; Jarrott, B; Lawrence, A J

    2001-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), one of the most abundant neuropeptides found in the central nervous system (CNS), has been implicated in the regulation of many autonomic functions, including cardiovascular control and the central stress response. The present study represents a detailed investigation of the effects of acute and chronic restraint stress on the expression of the mRNA encoding the NPY precursor, prepro-NPY, in the CNS of normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Basal (unstressed) levels of prepro-NPY mRNA expression were found to be significantly increased in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SHR compared to WKY rats, with similar levels of prepro-NPY mRNA expression found in the remaining central nuclei. Following exposure to both acute and chronic restraint, significant changes in prepro-NPY mRNA expression were found in a variety of central regions in both strains, including the arcuate nucleus and hippocampus (both strains), medial amygdala and cortex (WKY only), and dentate gyrus, nucleus of the solitary tract and ventrolateral medulla (SHR only). A comparison of the temporal response to restraint revealed that significant differences between strains existed in regions such as the arcuate nucleus, hippocampus and dentate gyrus, providing further evidence that hypertensive rats apparently have an impaired neural stress response. The present study demonstrates that exposure to restraint results in significant changes in prepro-NPY mRNA expression in specific nuclei of both WKY and SHR that are components of not only the central circuitry regulating the stress response, but also the neural network modulating autonomic function.

  14. Olanzapine-induced hyperphagia and weight gain associate with orexigenic hypothalamic neuropeptide signaling without concomitant AMPK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fernø, Johan; Varela, Luis; Skrede, Silje; Vázquez, María Jesús; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Steen, Vidar M; López, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The success of antipsychotic drug treatment in patients with schizophrenia is limited by the propensity of these drugs to induce hyperphagia, weight gain and other metabolic disturbances, particularly evident for olanzapine and clozapine. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in antipsychotic-induced hyperphagia remain unclear. Here, we investigate the effect of olanzapine administration on the regulation of hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake, namely neuropeptide expression and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in rats. Our results show that subchronic exposure to olanzapine upregulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related protein (AgRP) and downregulates proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC). This effect was evident both in rats fed ad libitum and in pair-fed rats. Of note, despite weight gain and increased expression of orexigenic neuropeptides, subchronic administration of olanzapine decreased AMPK phosphorylation levels. This reduction in AMPK was not observed after acute administration of either olanzapine or clozapine. Overall, our data suggest that olanzapine-induced hyperphagia is mediated through appropriate changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides, and that this effect does not require concomitant AMPK activation. Our data shed new light on the hypothalamic mechanism underlying antipsychotic-induced hyperphagia and weight gain, and provide the basis for alternative targets to control energy balance.

  15. Kisspeptin regulation of arcuate neuron excitability in kisspeptin receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhuai; Herbison, Allan

    2015-05-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) is critical for kisspeptin to activate GnRH neurons to modulate fertility. However, the often mismatching distribution of kisspeptin and GPR54 in the brain suggests that kisspeptin may also act on other receptors. The arcuate nucleus (ARN) is one brain region with a very high density of kisspeptin fibers but only limited evidence for the expression of GPR54. Using acute brain slice electrophysiology in combination with Gpr54 knockout (GPR54KO) mouse models, we examined whether actions of kisspeptin in the ARN were dependent upon GPR54. Cell-attached recordings from unidentified ARN neurons in wild-type mice revealed that approximately one third of neurons were either excited or inhibited by kisspeptin in a dose-dependent manner. The responses of ARN neurons to kisspeptin were exactly the same in GPR54KO mice despite effects of kisspeptin on GnRH neurons being abolished. To evaluate whether kisspeptin may be acting through neuropeptide FF receptors, the effects of an agonist RFamide-related peptide 3 (RFRP-3) and antagonists RF9 and BIBP-3226 were evaluated. Both the excitatory and inhibitory effects of kisspeptin were mimicked by the agonist RFRP-3. RF9 itself activated ARN neurons and suppressed only the inhibitory actions of kisspeptin. BIBP-3226 suppressed kisspeptin actions in 50% of neurons. Whole-cell recordings in GPR54KO mice demonstrated that both kisspeptin and RFRP-3 acted directly on the same ARN neurons and activated the same ion channels. Together, these studies demonstrate that kisspeptin can act partly through neuropeptide FF receptors to modulate neuronal activity independent of GPR54 in the mouse brain.

  16. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) does not affect ethanol-reinforced responding in binge-drinking, nondependent rats.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Angela N; Czachowski, Cristine L

    2012-03-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) has been implicated as having a significant role in mediating alcohol-drinking behavior. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been investigated as a potential pharmacotherapeutic due to its ability to attenuate ethanol intake, particularly when administered into the CeA. Previous research suggests, though the evidence is somewhat conflicting, that the efficacy of NPY is contingent upon genetic background and/or prior history of ethanol dependence in rats. However, studies looking at the effects of NPY in nonselected animals lacking a history of ethanol dependence have two factors that could impact the interpretation of the results: ethanol history/selection AND relatively low baseline ethanol intakes as compared to ethanol-dependent and/or genetically selected controls. The purpose of the present study was to generate higher baseline ethanol intakes upon which to examine the effects of NPY on ethanol and sucrose drinking in nonselected rats using a binge drinking model. Long Evans rats were trained to complete a single response requirement resulting in access to either 2% sucrose (Sucrose Group) or 2% sucrose/10% ethanol (Ethanol Group) for a 20-min drinking session. On treatment days, rats were bilaterally microinjected into the CeA with aCSF or one of three doses of NPY (0.25μg, 0.50μg, or 1.00μg/.5μL). Subjects in the Ethanol Group were consuming an average of 1.2g/kg of ethanol (yielding BELs of ~90mg%) during the 20min access period following aCSF treatments. The results revealed that NPY had no effect on either sucrose or ethanol consumption or on appetitive responding (latency to respond). Overall, the findings indicate that even a history of binge-like ethanol consumption is not sufficient to recruit CeA NPY activity, and are consistent with previous studies showing that the role of NPY in regulating ethanol reinforcement in the CeA may be contingent upon a prior history of ethanol dependence.

  17. The Decline in Pulsatile GnRH Release, as Reflected by Circulating LH Concentrations, During the Infant-Juvenile Transition in the Agonadal Male Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta) Is Associated With a Reduction in Kisspeptin Content of KNDy Neurons of the Arcuate Nucleus in the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suresh; Dwarki, Karthik; Ali, Barkat; Gibbs, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Puberty in primates is timed by 2 hypothalamic events: during late infancy a decline in pulsatile GnRH release occurs, leading to a hypogonadotropic state that maintains quiescence of the prepubertal gonad; and in late juvenile development, pulsatile GnRH release is reactivated and puberty initiated, a phase of development that is dependent on kisspeptin signaling. In the present study, we determined whether the arrest of GnRH pulsatility in infancy was associated with a change in kisspeptin expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Kisspeptin was determined using immunohistochemistry in coronal hypothalamic sections from agonadal male rhesus monkeys during early infancy when GnRH release as reflected by circulating LH concentrations was robust and compared with that in juveniles in which GnRH pulsatility was arrested. The distribution of immunopositive kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the MBH of infants was similar to that previously reported for adults. Kisspeptin cell body number was greater in infants compared with juveniles, and at the middle to posterior level of the arcuate nucleus, this developmental difference was statistically significant. Neurokinin B in the MBH exhibited a similar distribution to that of kisspeptin and was colocalized with kisspeptin in approximately 60% of kisspeptin perikarya at both developmental stages. Intensity of GnRH fiber staining in the median eminence was robust at both stages. These findings indicate that the switch that shuts off pulsatile GnRH release during infancy and that guarantees the subsequent quiescence of the prepubertal gonad involves a reduction in a stimulatory kisspeptin tone to the GnRH neuronal network. PMID:23525220

  18. Maternal nicotine exposure during lactation alters hypothalamic neuropeptides expression in the adult rat progeny.

    PubMed

    Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; Moura, Egberto G; Manhães, Alex C; Pinheiro, Cintia R; Santos-Silva, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia C

    2013-08-01

    Maternal exposure to nicotine during lactation causes hyperleptinemia in the pups and, at adulthood, these animals are overweight and hyperleptinemic, while, in their hypothalamus, the leptin signaling pathway is reduced, evidencing a central leptin resistance. Then, we evaluated the expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and others in different hypothalamic nuclei in order to better understand the mechanisms underlying the obese phenotype observed in these animals at adulthood. On the 2nd postnatal day (P2), dams were subcutaneously implanted with osmotic minipumps releasing nicotine (NIC-6 mg/kg/day) or saline for 14 days. Offspring were killed in P180 and immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were carried out. Significance data had p<0.05. Adult NIC offspring showed more intense NPY staining in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) (+21%) and increased number of POMC-positive cells in the: arcuate nucleus (+33%), as an increase in fiber density of α-MSH in PVN (+85%). However, the number of CART-positive cells was reduced in the PVN (-25%). CRH staining was more intense in NIC offspring (+136%). Orexins and AgRP were not altered. Thus, maternal nicotine exposure changes hypothalamic neuropeptides in the adult progeny that is partially compatible with leptin resistance.

  19. Altered levels of synapsin I, dopamine transporter, dynorphin A, and neuropeptide Y in the nucleus accumbens and striatum at post-puberty in rats treated neonatally with pregnenolone or DHEA.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Iwata, Masaaki; Shirayama, Yukihiko

    2009-10-01

    It is well documented that neonatal neurosteroid administration influences brain development. In our previous studies, administration of pregnenolone, the precursor of neurosteroids, during the neonatal period altered the activity of dopamine (DA) in the striatum. Furthermore, neonatal treatment with pregnenolone or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) increased synapse-related protein synapsin I as well as neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hippocampus. The present study examined the effects of neonatal treatment with pregnenolone or DHEA on synapsin I, DA transporter (DAT), dynorphin A, and NPY in the striatum and the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens at post-puberty. Administration of pregnenolone or DHEA during the neonatal period increased immunodensity of synapsin I in the dorsomedial or ventrolateral striatum. DAT immunodensity in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens core as well as dynorphin A immunodensity in the nucleus accumbens core were increased in DHEA-treated but not in pregnenolone-treated rats. In addition, the size, but not numbers, of NPY-positive cells in the nucleus accumbens core was increased in pregnenolone- and DHEA-treated rats. The results suggest that neurosteroid levels during the neonatal period have larger impact on synaptic formation, development of DA and NPY systems in the nigrostriatal rather than the mesolimbic pathway.

  20. Forebrain Projections of Arcuate Neurokinin B Neurons Demonstrated by Anterograde Tract-Tracing and Monosodium Glutamate Lesions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Sally J.; Burke, Michelle C.; Anderson, Miranda J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin receptor signaling are essential components of the reproductive axis. A population of neurons resides within the arcuate nucleus of the rat that expresses NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and estrogen receptor α. Here we investigate the projections of these neurons using NKB-immunocytochemistry as a marker. First, the loss of NKB-immunoreactive (ir) somata and fibers was characterized after ablation of the arcuate nucleus by neonatal injections of monosodium glutamate. Second, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the arcuate nucleus and anterogradely labeled NKB-ir fibers were identified using dual-labeled immunofluorescence. Four major projection pathways are described: 1) Local projections within the arcuate nucleus bilaterally, 2) Projections to the median eminence including the lateral palisade zone, 3) Projections to a periventricular pathway extending rostrally to multiple hypothalamic nuclei, the septal region and BNST and dorsally to the dorsomedial nucleus and 4) Projections to a ventral hypothalamic tract to the lateral hypothalamus and medial forebrain bundle. The diverse projections provide evidence that NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons could integrate the reproductive axis with multiple homeostatic, behavioral and neuroendocrine processes. Interestingly, anterograde tract-tracing revealed NKB-ir axons originating from arcuate neurons terminating on other NKB-ir somata within the arcuate nucleus. Combined with previous studies, these experiments reveal a bilateral interconnected network of sex-steroid responsive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat that express NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and ERα and project to GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This circuitry provides a mechanism for bilateral synchronization of arcuate NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons to modulate the pulsatile secretion of GnRH. PMID:20038444

  1. Crustacean neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Stemmler, Elizabeth A; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2010-12-01

    Crustaceans have long been used for peptide research. For example, the process of neurosecretion was first formally demonstrated in the crustacean X-organ-sinus gland system, and the first fully characterized invertebrate neuropeptide was from a shrimp. Moreover, the crustacean stomatogastric and cardiac nervous systems have long served as models for understanding the general principles governing neural circuit functioning, including modulation by peptides. Here, we review the basic biology of crustacean neuropeptides, discuss methodologies currently driving their discovery, provide an overview of the known families, and summarize recent data on their control of physiology and behavior.

  2. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities in the arcuate-median eminence complex and their link to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Romero-Fernandez, W; Borroto-Escuela, D O; Vargas-Barroso, V; Narváez, M; Di Palma, M; Agnati, L F; Larriva Sahd, J; Fuxe, K

    2014-07-18

    Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region.  Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially

  3. Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Immunoreactivities in the Arcuate-Median Eminence Complex and their Link to the Tubero-Infundibular Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Fernandez, W.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Vargas-Barroso, V.; Narváez, M.; Di Palma, M.; Agnati, L.F.; Sahd, J. Larriva

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially

  4. Glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Silva, Lilian Eslaine C M; de Castro, Margaret; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L K

    2012-06-01

    Glucocorticoid deficiency is associated with a decrease of food intake. Orexigenic peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related protein (AgRP), and the anorexigenic peptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC), expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), are regulated by meal-induced signals. Orexigenic neuropeptides, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin, expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), also control food intake. Thus, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glucocorticoids are required for changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides induced by feeding. Male Wistar rats (230-280 g) were subjected to ADX or sham surgery. ADX animals received 0.9% NaCl in the drinking water, and half of them received corticosterone in the drinking water (B: 25 mg/L, ADX+B). Six days after surgery, animals were fasted for 16 h and they were decapitated before or 2 h after refeeding for brain tissue and blood collections. Adrenalectomy decreased NPY/AgRP and POMC expression in the ARC in fasted and refed animals, respectively. Refeeding decreased NPY/AgRP and increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC of sham and ADX+B groups, with no effects in ADX animals. The expression of MCH and orexin mRNA expression in the LHA was increased in ADX and ADX+B groups in fasted condition, however there was no effect of refeeding on the expression of MCH and orexin in the LHA in the three experimental groups. Refeeding increased plasma leptin and insulin levels in sham and ADX+B animals, with no changes in leptin concentrations in ADX group, and insulin response to feeding was lower in this group. Taken together, these data demonstrated that circulating glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The lower leptin and insulin responses to feeding may contribute to the altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression after adrenalectomy.

  5. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    McClintick, Jeanette N; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5-3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system.

  6. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking

    PubMed Central

    McClintick, Jeanette N.; McBride, William J.; Bell, Richard L.; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5 – 3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system. PMID:25542586

  7. Estradiol-induced hypophagia is associated with the differential mRNA expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Silva, L E C M; Castro, M; Amaral, F C; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Elias, L L K

    2010-08-01

    Estradiol participates in the control of energy homeostasis, as demonstrated by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain after ovariectomy in rats. In the present study, female Wistar rats (200-230 g, N = 5-15 per group), with free access to chow, were individually housed in metabolic cages. We investigated food intake, body weight, plasma leptin levels, measured by specific radioimmunoassay, and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides, determined by real-time PCR, in ovariectomized rats with (OVX+E) and without (OVX) estradiol cypionate treatment (10 microg/kg body weight, sc, for 8 days). Hormonal and mRNA expression were determined at pre-feeding and 4 h after food intake. OVX+E rats showed lower food intake, less body weight gain and lower plasma leptin levels. In the OVX+E group, we also observed a reduction of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus and a decrease in orexin A in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). There was an increase in leptin receptor (LepRb), melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R), CART, and mainly corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus and LepRb and CART mRNA in the LHA. These data show that hypophagia induced by estradiol treatment is associated with reduced hypothalamic expression of orexigenic peptides such as NPY, AgRP and orexin A, and increased expression of the anorexigenic mediators MC4-R, LepRb and CRH. In conclusion, estradiol decreases food intake, and this effect seems to be mediated by peripheral factors such as leptin and the differential mRNA expression of neuropeptides in the hypothalamus.

  8. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  9. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D; Kelly, Martin J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1(ARH)) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1(ARH) neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1(ARH) neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1(ARH) neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1(ARH) neurons. We propose that Kiss1(ARH) neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. PMID:27549338

  10. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-10-20

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH. PMID:26443858

  11. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-10-20

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH.

  12. Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates progenitor maintenance and differentiation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Paven K.; Naratadam, George T.; Xu, Liwen; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc), containing pro-opoiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons, regulates feeding, energy balance and body size. Dysregulation of this homeostatic mediator underlies diseases ranging from growth failure to obesity. Despite considerable investigation regarding the function of Arc neurons, mechanisms governing their development remain unclear. Notch signaling factors such as Hes1 and Mash1 are present in hypothalamic progenitors that give rise to Arc neurons. However, how Notch signaling controls these progenitor populations is unknown. To elucidate the role of Notch signaling in Arc development, we analyzed conditional loss-of-function mice lacking a necessary Notch co-factor, Rbpjκ, in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (Rbpjκ cKO), as well as mice with expression of the constitutively active Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (NICD Tg). We found that loss of Rbpjκ results in absence of Hes1 but not of Hes5 within the primordial Arc at E13.5. Additionally, Mash1 expression is increased, coincident with increased proliferation and accumulation of Arc neurons at E13.5. At E18.5, Rbpjκ cKO mice have few progenitors and show increased numbers of differentiated Pomc, NPY and Ghrh neurons. By contrast, NICD Tg mice have increased hypothalamic progenitors, show an absence of differentiated Arc neurons and aberrant glial differentiation at E18.5. Subsequently, both Rbpjκ cKO and NICD Tg mice have changes in growth and body size during postnatal development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates the generation and differentiation of Arc neurons, which contribute to homeostatic regulation of body size. PMID:23884446

  13. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  14. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  15. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  16. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  17. Neuropeptide Y attenuates anxiety- and depression-like effects of cholecystokinin-4 in mice.

    PubMed

    Desai, S J; Borkar, C D; Nakhate, K T; Subhedar, N K; Kokare, D M

    2014-09-26

    We investigated the involvement of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the modulation of cholecystokinin-4 (CCK-4)-evoked anxiety and depression. Adult male mice were injected with vehicle, CCK-4, NPY, NPY Y1 receptor agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY or antagonist BIBP3226, via intracerebroventricular route, and subjected to social interaction or forced swim test (FST) for the evaluation of anxiety- and depression-like phenotypes, respectively. To assess the interactions between the two systems, if any, NPYergic agents were administered prior to CCK-4 and the animals were subjected to these behavioral tests. Treatment with CCK-4 or BIBP3226 dose-dependently reduced social interaction time, while NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY produced opposite effect. CCK-4 treatment increased immobility time in FST. This effect was reversed by NPY and [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY, although BIBP3226 per se did not alter the immobility time. In a combination study, the anxiogenic or depressive effects of CCK-4 were attenuated by NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY and potentiated by BIBP3226. The brains of CCK-4 treated rats were processed for NPY immunohistochemistry. Following CCK-4 treatment, the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), ventral part of lateral division of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BSTLV), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and locus coeruleus showed a reduction in NPY-immunoreactive fibers. Population of NPY-immunopositive cells was also decreased in the AcbSh, BSTLV, prefrontal cortex and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). However, NPY-immunoreaction in the fibers of the ARC and cells of the central nucleus of amygdala was unchanged. We conclude that, inhibition of NPY signaling in the brain by CCK-4 might be causal to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

  18. Neuropeptide Y conjugated to saporin alters anxiety-like behavior when injected into the central nucleus of the amygdala or basomedial hypothalamus in BALB/cJ mice.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Angela M; Thiele, Todd E

    2010-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid neuromodulator that is distributed throughout the central nervous system and has been implicated in a wide range of neurobiological responses including the integration of emotional behavior. The anxiolytic properties of NPY are modulated by NPY signaling in the hippocampus and in the central (CeA) and basolateral (BLA) nuclei of the amygdala. Recently, the neurotoxin saporin, when conjugated to NPY (NPY-SAP), was shown to selectively kill NPY receptor-expressing neurons and has been used as a tool to study the central NPY neurocircuitry involved with feeding behaviors. Here we determined if NPY-SAP can be used as a tool to study the central NPY neurocircuitry that modulates anxiety-like behaviors. BALB/cJ mice were given injection of either NPY-SAP or a control blank saporin (B-SAP) into the CeA or the basomedial hypothalamus (BMH) as a control injection site. The elevated zero maze test was used to assess anxiety-like behavior and NPY-SAP-induced lesions were verified using NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) immunoreactivity (IR). Results showed that injection of NPY-SAP into the CeA site-specifically blunted Y1R IR in the CeA which was associated with a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior. Injection of NPY-SAP into the BMH, while locally blunting Y1R IR, promoted a compensatory increase of Y1R IR in the BLA and the CA3 region of the hippocampus which was associated with a significant reduction of anxiety-like behavior. The present set of experiments suggest that the NPY-SAP neurotoxin may be a useful tool for studying the NPY neurocircuitry that modulates anxiety-like behaviors.

  19. Distribution, parabrachial region projection, and coexistence of neuropeptide and catecholamine cells of the nucleus of the solitary tract in the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Berk, M L; Smith, S E; Mullins, L A

    1993-01-15

    The chemical nature of the cells of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) that project to the parabrachial nucleus (PB) was investigated in the pigeon by the use of fluorescent bead retrograde tracer and immunofluorescence for the detection of substance P (SP), leucine-enkephalin (LENK), cholecystokinin (CCK), neurotensin (NT), somatostatin (SS), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Cells immunoreactive for CCK were located in subnuclei lateralis dorsalis pars anterior (LDa) and medialis superficialis pars posterior, and caudal NTS (cNTS); 22-26.5% of these cells were double-labeled bilaterally. Immunoreactive SP cells were found in ventral NTS subnuclei; 24-25% of these cells were double-labeled bilaterally. Cells immunoreactive for LENK and NT were concentrated in the anterior NTS; 5.5-7.5% of the LENK cells were double-labeled bilaterally, while 11% (ipsilateral) and 21% (contralateral) of the NT immunoreactive cells were double-labeled. Many SS immunoreactive cells were found in peripherally located subnuclei; 5.5-6.5% of these cells were double-labeled bilaterally. Catecholamine cells were distributed in LDa, peripheral subnuclei, and cNTS; 23% of these cells were double-labeled ipsilaterally and 8.5% contralaterally. A two-color double-labeling immunofluorescence technique revealed many cells immunoreactive for both NT and LENK, only a rare cell immunoreactive for both SS and SP, and no cells immunoreactive for both TH and SP. Cells immunoreactive for SP, CCK, NT, and TH are major contributors to NTS projections to PB. The confinement of these substances to specific NTS subnuclei, which receive visceral sensory information from specific organs, may contribute to the chemical encoding of ascending visceral information. PMID:7680049

  20. Hypothalamic neuropeptide systems and anticipatory weight change in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Adam, C L; Mercer, J G

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal animals are able both to programme changes in body weight in response to annual changes in photoperiod (anticipatory regulation) and to correct changes in body weight caused by imposed energetic demand (compensatory regulation). Experimental evidence from the Siberian hamster suggests that seasonally appropriate body weight is continually reset according to photoperiodic history, even when actual body weight is driven away from this target weight by manipulation of energy intake. These characteristics constitute the "sliding set point" of seasonal body weight regulation. To define the mechanisms and molecules underlying anticipatory body weight regulation, we are investigating the involvement of hypothalamic systems with an established role in the compensatory defence of body weight. Weight loss or restricted growth induced by short days (SD) results in low circulating leptin compared with long day (LD) controls. However, this chronic low leptin signal is read differently from acute low leptin resulting from food deprivation; leptin receptor gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is lower in SD, whereas food deprivation increases expression levels, suggesting changes in sensitivity to leptin feedback. SD alterations in mRNA levels for a number of hypothalamic neuropeptide and receptor genes appear counter-intuitive for a SD body weight trajectory. However, early increases in ARC cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression in SDs could be involved in driving body weight loss or growth restriction. The sites of photoperiod interaction with energy balance neuronal circuitry and the neurochemical encoding of body weight set point require full characterisation. Study of anticipatory regulation in seasonal animals offers new insight into body weight regulation across mammalian species, including man.

  1. Reproductive neuropeptides: prevalence of GnRH and KNDy neural signalling components in a model avian, gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Nerine T; Tello, Javier A; Bedecarrats, Gregoy Y; Millar, Robert P

    2013-09-01

    Diverse external and internal environmental factors are integrated in the hypothalamus to regulate the reproductive system. This is mediated through the pulsatile secretion of GnRH into the portal system to stimulate pituitary gonadotrophin secretion, which in turn regulates gonadal function. A single subpopulation of neurones termed 'KNDy neurones' located in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus co-localise kisspeptin (Kiss), neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn) and are responsive to negative feedback effects of sex steroids. The co-ordinated secretion from KNDy neurones appears to modulate the pulsatile release of GnRH, acting as a proximate pacemaker. This review briefly describes the neuropeptidergic control of reproduction in the avian class, highlighting the status of reproductive neuropeptide signalling systems homologous to those found in mammalian genomes. Genes encoding the GnRH system are complete in the chicken with similar roles to the mammalian counterparts, whereas genes encoding Kiss signalling components appear missing in the avian lineage, indicating a differing set of hypothalamic signals controlling avian reproduction. Gene sequences encoding both NKB and Dyn signalling components are present in the chicken genome, but expression analysis and functional studies remain to be completed. The focus of this article is to describe the avian complement of neuropeptidergic reproductive hormones and provide insights into the putative mechanisms that regulate reproduction in birds. These postulations highlight differences in reproductive strategies of birds in terms of gonadal steroid feedback systems, integration of metabolic signals and seasonality. Also included are propositions of KNDy neuropeptide gene silencing and plasticity in utilisation of these neuropeptides during avian evolution.

  2. Reducing adsorption to improve recovery and in vivo detection of neuropeptides by microdialysis with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; Mabrouk, Omar S; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of neurochemicals; however, measuring their concentration in vivo by using microdialysis sampling is challenging due to their low concentration and the small samples generated. Capillary liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (cLC-MS) can yield attomole limits of detection (LOD); however, low recovery and loss of sample to adsorptive surfaces can still hinder detection of neuropeptides. We have evaluated recovery during sampling and transfer to the cLC column for a selection of 10 neuropeptides. Adding acetonitrile to sample eliminated carryover and improved LOD by 1.4- to 60-fold. The amount of acetonitrile required was found to have an optimal value that correlated with peptide molecular weight and retention time on a reversed phase LC column. Treating AN69 dialysis membrane, which bears negative charge due to incorporated sulfonate groups, with polyethylenimine (PEI) improved recovery by 1.2- to 80-fold. The effect appeared to be due to reducing electrostatic interaction between peptides and the microdialysis probe because modification increased recovery only for peptides that carried net positive charge. The combined effects improved LOD of the entire method by 1.3- to 800-fold for the different peptides. We conclude that peptides with both charged and hydrophobic regions require combined strategies to prevent adsorption and yield the best possible detection. The method was demonstrated by determining orexin A, orexin B, and a novel isoform of rat β-endorphin in the arcuate nucleus. Dialysate concentrations were below 10 pM for these peptides. A standard addition study on dialysates revealed that while some peptides can be accurately quantified, some are affected by the matrix.

  3. Reducing adsorption to improve recovery and in vivo detection of neuropeptides by microdialysis with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; Mabrouk, Omar S; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of neurochemicals; however, measuring their concentration in vivo by using microdialysis sampling is challenging due to their low concentration and the small samples generated. Capillary liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (cLC-MS) can yield attomole limits of detection (LOD); however, low recovery and loss of sample to adsorptive surfaces can still hinder detection of neuropeptides. We have evaluated recovery during sampling and transfer to the cLC column for a selection of 10 neuropeptides. Adding acetonitrile to sample eliminated carryover and improved LOD by 1.4- to 60-fold. The amount of acetonitrile required was found to have an optimal value that correlated with peptide molecular weight and retention time on a reversed phase LC column. Treating AN69 dialysis membrane, which bears negative charge due to incorporated sulfonate groups, with polyethylenimine (PEI) improved recovery by 1.2- to 80-fold. The effect appeared to be due to reducing electrostatic interaction between peptides and the microdialysis probe because modification increased recovery only for peptides that carried net positive charge. The combined effects improved LOD of the entire method by 1.3- to 800-fold for the different peptides. We conclude that peptides with both charged and hydrophobic regions require combined strategies to prevent adsorption and yield the best possible detection. The method was demonstrated by determining orexin A, orexin B, and a novel isoform of rat β-endorphin in the arcuate nucleus. Dialysate concentrations were below 10 pM for these peptides. A standard addition study on dialysates revealed that while some peptides can be accurately quantified, some are affected by the matrix. PMID:26351736

  4. Impact of aflatoxin B1 on hypothalamic neuropeptides regulating feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Trebak, Fatima; Alaoui, Abdelilah; Alexandre, David; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Anouar, Youssef; Chartrel, Nicolas; Magoul, Rabia

    2015-07-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in food is a major problem of public health as they produce immunosuppressive, hepatotoxic and neurotoxic effects. Mycotoxins also induce mutagenic and carcinogenic effects after long exposure. Among mycotoxins that contaminate food are aflatoxins (AF) such as AFB1, which is the most powerful natural carcinogen. The AF poisoning results in symptoms of depression, anorexia, diarrhea, jaundice or anemia that can lead to death, but very few studies have explored the impact of AF on neuroendocrine regulations. To better understand the neurotoxic effects of AF related to anorexia, we explored in rat the impact of AFB1 on the major hypothalamic neuropeptides regulating feeding behavior, either orexigenic (NPY, Orexin, AgRP, MCH) or anorexigenic (α-MSH, CART, TRH). We also studied the effect of AFB1 on a novel neuropeptide, the secretogranin II (SgII)-derived peptide EM66, which has recently been linked to the control of food intake. For this, adult male rats were orally treated twice a week for 5 weeks with a low dose (150 μg/kg) or a high dose (300 μg/kg) of AFB1 dissolved in corn oil. Repeated exposure to AFB1 resulted in reduced body weight gain, which was highly significant for the high dose of AF. Immunocytochemical and quantitative PCR experiments revealed a dose-related decrease in the expression of all the hypothalamic neuropeptides studied in response to AFB1. Such orexigenic and anorexigenic alterations may underlie appetite disorders as they are correlated to a dose-dependent decrease in body weight gain of treated rats as compared to controls. We also found a decrease in the number of EM66-containing neurons in the arcuate nucleus of AFB1-treated animals, which was associated with a lower expression of its precursor SgII. These findings show for the first time that repeated consumption of AFB1 disrupts the hypothalamic regulation of neuropeptides involved in feeding behavior, which may contribute to the lower body weight gain

  5. [Physiology of the neuropeptides].

    PubMed

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez- Expósito, M J

    In the present review, the characteristics of mammalian neuropeptides have been studied. Neuropeptides are widely distributed not only in the nervous system but also in the periphery. They are synthesised by neurons as large precursor molecules (pre propeptides) which have to be cleaved and modified in order to form the mature neuropeptides. Neuropeptides may exert actions as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and/or neurohormones. In the neurons, they coexist with classic transmitters and often with other peptides. After their releasing, they bind to especific receptors to exert their action in the target cell. Most of these receptors belongs to a family of G protein coupled receptors. Finally, peptidases are the enzymes involved in the degradation of neuropeptides. Conclusions. In the last years, the number of known neuropeptides and the understanding of their functions have been increased. With these data, present investigations are looking for the treatment of different pathologies associated with alterations in the physiology of neuropeptides.

  6. Serotonin 2C receptor activates a distinct population of arcuate pro-opiomelanocortin neurons via TRPC channels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2CRs) expressed by pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus regulate food intake, energy homeostasis ,and glucose metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of 5-HT to regulate POMC neuronal activity via 5-HT2CRs have no...

  7. The novel neuropeptide phoenixin is highly co-expressed with nesfatin-1 in the rat hypothalamus, an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa; Bogus, Katarzyna; Worthington, John J; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-04-10

    The hypothalamus regulates a number of autonomic functions essential for homeostasis; therefore, investigations concerning hypothalamic neuropeptides and their functions and distribution are of great importance in contemporary neuroscience. Recently, novel regulatory factors expressed in the hypothalamus have been discovered, of which nesfatin-1 and phoenixin (PNX), show intriguing similarities in their brain distributions. There are currently few studies characterizing PNX expression, so it is imperative to accurately trace its localization, with particular attention to the hypothalamic nuclei and nesfatin-1 co-expression. Using fluorescence and classical immunohistochemical stainings on adult rat brain, we visualized the potential co-expression of nesfatin-1 and PNX immunoreactive cells. We have demonstrated a distinct PNX-immunoreactivity in 21-32% of cells in the arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial and lateral hypothalamus. Nesfatin-1 expression reached 45-68% of all neurons in the same sites, while co-expression was strikingly seen in the vast majority (70-86%) of PNX-immunoreactive neurons in the rat hypothalamic nuclei. Our results demonstrate for the first time, a wide distribution of PNX in the hypothalamus which could implicate a potential functional relationship with nesfatin-1, possibly in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or other autonomic functions, which require further study.

  8. Molecular analysis of central feeding regulation by neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons with NPY receptor small interfering RNAs (siRNAs).

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play important roles in central feeding behavior. Among them, neuropeptide Y (NPY) has the strongest orexigenic action. It is synthesized in NPY-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), which projects to other nuclei, mainly to the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). PVN, which possesses NPY-Y1, -Y2 and -Y4, -Y5 receptors, is considered as feeding center for central feeding behavior. Herein I review recent results on feeding behavior obtained by gene knockdown technologies. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) plasmid-based vectors, which drive transcription of siRNA by U6 RNA polymerase III promoter to produce knockdown of the NPY and its receptor (Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5) genes, were stereotaxically injected into mouse ARC and PVN. Feeding behaviors were measured for 6days after siRNA vector injection. NPY and its receptor mRNA levels were decreased, which were measured by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, and simultaneous decrease in their proteins was also detected in separate nuclei by immunohistochemistry. In the NPY system, decrease in NPY, Y1 and Y5 expressions in specialized nuclei diminished central feeding behavior, whereas decrease in Y2 or Y4 expression in both ARC or PVN did not affect feeding behavior. Thus, specialized change in expressions of NPY and its receptors (especially Y1 and Y5) are important for regulation of endogenous feeding behavior in central regulation. Further analysis of NPY receptors may provide better understanding of feeding behavior and of potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Gonadal steroids and hypothalamic galanin and neuropeptide Y: role in eating behavior and body weight control in female rats.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, S F; Akabayashi, A; Alexander, J T; Wang, J

    1998-04-01

    The neuropeptides, galanin (GAL) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on studies in male rodents, are believed to have a role in controlling energy balance, both nutrient ingestion and metabolism. Whereas these peptides are also involved in reproduction, little is known about their specific function in energy balance in females. In rats consuming lab chow or macronutrient diets, measurements across the estrous cycle were taken of hypothalamic GAL and NPY, using RIA and immunohistochemistry; of the circulating hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and LH; and also of food intake and body weight. Levels of GAL and NPY peak during the proestrous phase of the female cycle when circulating estradiol and progesterone also rise. As previously reported for GAL, this peak is detected in two areas, the medial preoptic area (MPOA; +110%; P < 0.05) and the external zone of the median eminence (+57%; P < 0.05). In addition, this proestrous peak is seen in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), specifically the anterior parvocellular portion (+35%; P < 0.05). Similarly, NPY rises during proestrous in the medial region of the PVN (+21%; P < 0.05) in addition to the MPOA (+78%; P < 0.05) and arcuate nucleus (+35%; P < 0.05). This peak in peptide levels is accompanied by an increase in caloric intake in rats receiving the lab chow diet and a specific increase in preference for fat in rats receiving macronutrient diets. Animals showing a preference for a fat-rich diet exhibit higher levels of GAL in the MPOA as well as the PVN and median eminence and also of NPY specifically in the MPOA. These peptides in the MPOA are similarly enhanced in animals with greater body fat, independent of diet. This evidence suggests that in the female rat, both GAL and NPY in the MPOA may contribute to the overeating and increased weight gain that occur during a fat-rich diet.

  10. Amygdalar neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors mediate the anxiolytic-like actions of neuropeptide Y in the social interaction test.

    PubMed

    Sajdyk, T J; Vandergriff, M G; Gehlert, D R

    1999-03-01

    The effects of intra-amygdalar neuropeptide Y infusions were assessed in rats using the social interaction test. Neuropeptide Y administered into the central nucleus of the amygdala did not alter behavior, while injections into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala produced an increased social interaction time. Furthermore, the anxiolytic-like effect was antagonized by co-administration of the potent neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist ((R)-N-[[4-(aminocarbonylaminomethyl)-phenyl]methyl]-N2-(diphen ylacetyl)-argininamide trifluoroacetate) 3304, but not with the inactive enantiomer ((R)-N-[[4-(aminocarbonylaminomethyl)-phenyl]methyl]-N2-(diphen ylacetyl)-argininamide trifluoroacetate) 3457. Therefore, neuropeptide Y produces an anxiolytic-like effect in the social interaction test through neuropetide Y Y1 receptors located in the basolateral amygdala.

  11. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding. PMID:27503800

  12. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding. PMID:27503800

  13. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Sar, M.; Sahu, A.; Crowley, W.R.; Kalra, S.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of (3H)estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-(2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H)estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of (3H)estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of (3H)estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear (3H)estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC.

  14. Neuropeptides in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Stjepana; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-12-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in modulating seizures and epilepsy. Unlike neurotransmitters which operate on a millisecond time-scale, neuropeptides have longer half lives; this leads to modulation of neuronal and network activity over prolonged periods, so contributing to setting the seizure threshold. Most neuropeptides are stored in large dense vesicles and co-localize with inhibitory interneurons. They are released upon high frequency stimulation making them attractive targets for modulation of seizures, during which high frequency discharges occur. Numerous neuropeptides have been implicated in epilepsy; one, ACTH, is already used in clinical practice to suppress seizures. Here, we concentrate on neuropeptides that have a direct effect on seizures, and for which therapeutic interventions are being developed. We have thus reviewed the abundant reports that support a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY), galanin, ghrelin, somatostatin and dynorphin in suppressing seizures and epileptogenesis, and for tachykinins having pro-epileptic effects. Most in vitro and in vivo studies are performed in hippocampal tissue in which receptor expression is usually high, making translation to other brain areas less clear. We highlight recent therapeutic strategies to treat epilepsy with neuropeptides, which are based on viral vector technology, and outline how such interventions need to be refined in order to address human disease.

  15. Intron-Specific Neuropeptide Probes

    PubMed Central

    Gainer, Harold; Ponzio, Todd A.; Yue, Chunmei; Kawasaki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of changes in pre-mRNA levels by intron-specific probes are generally accepted as more closely reflecting changes in gene transcription rates than are measurements of mRNA levels by exonic probes. This is, in part, because the pre-mRNAs, which include the primary transcript and various splicing intermediates located in the nucleus (also referred to as heteronuclear RNAs, or hnRNAs), are processed rapidly (with half-lives <60 min) as compared to neuropeptide mRNAs, which are then transferred to the cytoplasm and which have much longer half-lives (often over days). In this chapter, we describe the use of exon-and intron-specific probes to evaluate oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) neuropeptide gene expression by analyses of their mRNAs and hnRNAs by quantitative in situ hybridization (qISH) and also by using specific PCR primers in quantitative, real-time PCR (qPCR) procedures. PMID:21922402

  16. PACAP neurons in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus are targets of central leptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Zoe; Ivanov, Tina R; Bechtold, David A; Dhillon, Harveen; Lowell, Brad B; Luckman, Simon M

    2009-11-25

    The adipose-derived hormone, leptin, was discovered over 10 years ago, but only now are we unmasking its downstream pathways which lead to reduced energy intake (feeding) and increased energy expenditure (thermogenesis). Recent transgenic models have challenged the long-standing supposition that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) is omnipotent in the central response to leptin, and research focus is beginning to shift to examine roles of extra-arcuate sites. Dhillon et al. (2006) demonstrated that targeted knock out of the signaling form of the leptin receptor (lepr-B) in steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) cells of the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMN) produces obesity of a similar magnitude to the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-driven lepr-B deleted mouse, via a functionally distinct mechanism. These findings reveal that SF-1 cells of the VMN could be equally as important as POMC cells in mediating leptin's anti-obesity effects. However, the identification of molecular and cellular correlates of this relationship remains tantalizingly unknown. Here, we have shown that mRNA expression of the VMN-expressed neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is regulated according to energy status and that it exerts catabolic effects when administered centrally to mice. Furthermore, we have shown that SF-1 and PACAP mRNAs are colocalized in the VMN, and that leptin signaling via lepr-B is required for normal PACAP expression in these cells. Finally, blocking endogenous central PACAP signaling with the antagonist PACAP(6-38) markedly attenuates leptin-induced hypophagia and hyperthermia in vivo. Thus, it appears that PACAP is an important mediator of central leptin effects on energy balance.

  17. Expression of regulatory neuropeptides in the hypothalamus of red deer (Cervus elaphus) reveals anomalous relationships in the seasonal control of appetite and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Barrell, G K; Ridgway, M J; Wellby, M; Pereira, A; Henry, B A; Clarke, I J

    2016-04-01

    Red deer are seasonal with respect to reproduction and food intake, so we tested the hypothesis that their brains would show seasonal changes in numbers of cells containing hypothalamic neuropeptides that regulate these functions. We examined the brains of male and female deer in non-breeding and breeding seasons to quantify the production of kisspeptin, gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (γ-MSH - an index of pro-opiomelanocortin production), using immunohistochemistry. These neuropeptides are likely to be involved in the regulation of reproductive function and appetite. During the annual breeding season there were more cells producing kisspeptin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus than during the non-breeding season in males and females whereas there was no seasonal difference in the expression of GnIH. There were more cells producing the appetite stimulating peptide, NPY, in the arcuate/median eminence regions of the hypothalamus of females during the non-breeding season whereas the levels of an appetite suppressing peptide, γ-MSH, were highest in the breeding season. Male deer brains exhibited the converse, with NPY cell numbers highest in the breeding season and γ-MSH levels highest in the non-breeding season. These results support a role for kisspeptin as an important stimulatory regulator of seasonal breeding in deer, as in other species, but suggest a lack of involvement of GnIH in the seasonality of reproduction in deer. In the case of appetite regulation, the pattern exhibited by females for NPY and γ-MSH was as expected for the breeding and non-breeding seasons, based on previous studies of these peptides in sheep and the seasonal cycle of appetite reported for various species of deer. An inverse result in male deer most probably reflects the response of appetite regulating cells to negative energy balance during the mating season. Differences between the sexes in the seasonal

  18. Adult exposure to tributyltin affects hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, Y1 receptor distribution, and circulating leptin in mice.

    PubMed

    Bo, E; Farinetti, A; Marraudino, M; Sterchele, D; Eva, C; Gotti, S; Panzica, G

    2016-07-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a pesticide used in antifouling paints, is toxic for aquatic invertebrates. In vertebrates, TBT may act in obesogen- inducing adipogenetic gene transcription for adipocyte differentiation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that acute administration of TBT induces c-fos expression in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that adult exposure to TBT may alter a part of the nervous pathways controlling animal food intake. In particular, we investigated the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactivity. This neuropeptide forms neural circuits dedicated to food assumption and its action is mediated by Y1 receptors that are widely expressed in the hypothalamic nuclei responsible for the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. To this purpose, TBT was orally administered at a dose of 0.025 mg/kg/day/body weight to adult animals [male and female C57BL/6 (Y1-LacZ transgenic mice] for 4 weeks. No differences were found in body weight and fat deposition, but we observed a significant increase in feed efficiency in TBT-treated male mice and a significant decrease in circulating leptin in both sexes. Computerized quantitative analysis of NPY immunoreactivity and Y1-related β-galactosidase activity demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in NPY and Y1 transgene expression in the hypothalamic circuit controlling food intake of treated male mice in comparison with controls. In conclusion, the present results indicate that adult exposure to TBT is profoundly interfering with the nervous circuits involved in the stimulation of food intake. PMID:27310180

  19. Study of the influence of stress and adrenalectomy on central and peripheral neuropeptide Y levels. Comparison with catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Rivet, J M; Castagné, V; Corder, R; Gaillard, R; Mormède, P

    1989-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is colocalized with catecholamines in brainstem-hypothalamus neuronal pathways implicated in the regulation of the hypothalamo-hypophyso-adrenocortical system (HHAS) and may interact with catecholamines in the regulation of neuroendocrine stress responses. On the other hand, the presence of corticosteroid receptors in these neurons suggests that adrenocortical hormones may regulate central NPY levels. NPY and biogenic amine levels were therefore measured in punched brain regions (ventrolateral and dorsomedial medulla, paraventricular and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, frontal cortex) in basal conditions and up to 4 h after a 30-min period of restraint stress. Despite a massive activation of the HHAS (measured by plasma levels of ACTH and glucocorticoids), and a large increase of prolactin levels, no change of NPY levels could be found in any of the above-mentioned structures. The same parameters, as well as plasma levels of NPY and catecholamines and NPY levels in cardiac tissue were also measured 2, 20 and 96 h after adrenalectomy. Again, despite the large changes of brain and peripheral catecholamine levels, and the intense activation of the HHAS, no change of NPY levels was observed in any of the structures studied. These data question the nature of the relationships between NPY and neuroendocrine stress responses. PMID:2812275

  20. Effects of long-term ingestion of aspartame on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, plasma leptin and body weight gain and composition.

    PubMed

    Beck, Bernard; Burlet, Arlette; Max, Jean Pierre; Stricker-Krongrad, Alain

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the chronic ingestion of aspartame (ASP) on brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) concentrations, plasma hormones, food intake and body fat. Two groups of male Long-Evans rats, fed on a control (C) well-balanced diet, had to drink either a 0.1% ASP solution or water for a period of 14 weeks starting at weaning. Food intake and body weight were weekly recorded. At the end of the experiment, fat pads were sampled, leptin and insulin were measured in the plasma and NPY in several microdissected brain areas. Substituting ASP for water led to lower body weight (-8%; P<.004) and lower fat depot weight (-20%; P<.01) with no differences in energy intake or plasma insulin concentrations. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced by 34% (P<.05). Leptin concentrations were well-correlated with final body weight (r=.47; P<.025) and fat pad mass (r=.53; P<.01). NPY concentrations were 23% lower (P<.03) in the arcuate nucleus of ASP rats with no differences in other brain areas. The beneficial effects on body composition could be related to the decreased effects of NPY on lipid and energy metabolism, independently of insulin. The reasons for the NPY decrease (regulatory or toxicological) are not obvious. The constitutive amino acids of the ASP molecule might participate in the NPY regulation.

  1. Hypothalamic neuropeptide gene expression during recovery from food restriction superimposed on short-day photoperiod-induced weight loss in the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Archer, Zoë A; Moar, Kim M; Logie, Tracy J; Reilly, Laura; Stevens, Valerie; Morgan, Peter J; Mercer, Julian G

    2007-09-01

    Previously, 40% food restriction of male Siberian hamsters over 21 days in short-day (SD) photoperiod induced characteristic changes in expression of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus energy balance genes; mRNAs for neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, and leptin receptor were upregulated, and those of proopiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript were depressed. The present study examined the effect of refeeding hamsters for 6 days (approximately 50% recovery of weight differential) or 19 days (resumption of appropriate weight trajectory). Hyperphagia continued throughout refeeding, but differences in fat pad weights and leptin levels had disappeared after 19 days. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene expression was depressed by prior restriction in both refed groups. The depressive effect of prior restriction on proopiomelanocortin gene expression had disappeared after 19 days of refeeding. There was no effect of prior food restriction on neuropeptide Y or agouti-related peptide gene expression. Expression of the anorexigenic brain-derived neurotrophic factor was downregulated in the ventromedial nucleus after SD exposure for 12 wk. In the SD food restriction study, there were effects of photoperiod on brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression but not of prior food restriction. Hypothalamic energy balance genes in the hamster respond asynchronously to return to a seasonally appropriate body weight. The achievement of this weight rather than the weight at which caloric restriction was imposed is the critical factor. The differential responses of hypothalamic energy balance genes to food restriction and refeeding are poorly characterized in any species, a critical issue given their potential relevance to human weight loss strategies that involve caloric restriction.

  2. Early weaning by maternal prolactin inhibition leads to higher neuropeptide Y and astrogliosis in the hypothalamus of the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; Moura, Egberto G; Manhães, Alex C; Peixoto-Silva, Nayara; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia C

    2015-02-14

    The suppression of prolactin production with bromocriptine (BRO) in the last 3 d of lactation reduces milk yield (early weaning) and increases the transfer of leptin through the milk, causing hyperleptinaemia in pups. In adulthood, several changes occur in the offspring as a result of metabolic programming, including overweight, higher visceral fat mass, hypothyroidism, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperleptinaemia and central leptin resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether overweight rats programmed by early weaning with maternal BRO treatment have hypothalamic alterations in adulthood. We analysed the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) by immunohistochemistry in the following hypothalamic nuclei: medial and lateral arcuate nucleus (ARC); paraventricular nucleus (PVN); lateral hypothalamus (LH). Additionally, we sought to determine whether these programmed rats exhibited hypothalamic inflammation as indicated by astrogliosis. NPY immunostaining showed a denser NPY-positive fibre network in the ARC and PVN (+82% in both nuclei) of BRO offspring. Regarding the anorexigenic neuropeptides, no difference was found for CART, POMC and α-MSH. The number of astrocytes was higher in all the nuclei of BRO rats. The fibre density of glial fibrillary acidic protein was also increased in both medial and lateral ARC (6·06-fold increase and 9·13-fold increase, respectively), PVN (5·75-fold increase) and LH (2·68-fold increase) of BRO rats. We suggest that early weaning has a long-term effect on the expression of NPY as a consequence of developmental plasticity, and the presence of astrogliosis indicates hypothalamic inflammation that is closely related to overweight and hyperleptinaemia observed in our model.

  3. Neuropeptides and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zaben, M J; Gray, W P

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is important for modulating the behavioural responses to stress and for certain forms of learning and memory. The mechanisms underlying the necessary coupling of neuronal activity to neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) function remain poorly understood. Within the dentate subgranular stem cell niche, local interneurons appear to play an important part in this excitation-neurogenesis coupling via GABAergic transmission, which promotes neuronal differentiation and integration. Neuropeptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and galanin have emerged as important mediators for signalling local and extrinsic interneuronal activity to subgranular zone precursors. Here we review the distribution of these neuropeptides and their receptors in the neurogenic area of the hippocampus and their precise effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. We also discuss neuropeptides' potential involvement in functional aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis particularly their involvement in the modulation of learning and memory and behavior responses.

  4. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    PubMed

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  5. Penultimate proline in neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Glover, Matthew S; Bellinger, Earl P; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E

    2015-08-18

    A recent ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) study revealed that tryptic peptide ions containing a proline residue at the second position from the N-terminus (i.e., penultimate proline) frequently adopt multiple conformations, owing to the cis-trans isomerization of Xaa(1)-Pro(2) peptide bonds [J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 26, 444]. Here, we present a statistical analysis of a neuropeptide database that illustrates penultimate proline residues are frequently found in neuropeptides. In order to probe the effect of penultimate proline on neuropeptide conformations, IMS-MS experiments were performed on two model peptides in which penultimate proline residues were known to be important for biological activity: the N-terminal region of human neuropeptide Y (NPY1-9, Tyr(1)-Pro(2)-Ser(3)-Lys(4)-Pro(5)-Asp(6)-Asn(7)-Pro(8)-Gly(9)-NH2) and a tachykinin-related peptide (CabTRP Ia, Ala(1)-Pro(2)-Ser(3)-Gly(4)-Phe(5)-Leu(6)-Gly(7)-Met(8)-Arg(9)-NH2). From these studies, it appears that penultimate prolines allow neuropeptides to populate multiple conformations arising from the cis-trans isomerization of Xaa(1)-Pro(2) peptide bonds. Although it is commonly proposed that the role of penultimate proline residues is to protect peptides from enzymatic degradation, the present results indicate that penultimate proline residues also are an important means of increasing the conformational heterogeneity of neuropeptides.

  6. Migraine and neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Tajti, János; Szok, Délia; Majláth, Zsófia; Tuka, Bernadett; Csáti, Anett; Vécsei, László

    2015-08-01

    Migraine is a common disabling neurovascular primary headache disorder. The pathomechanism is not clear, but extensive preclinical and clinical studies are ongoing. The structural basis of the leading hypothesis is the trigeminovascular system, which includes the trigeminal ganglion, the meningeal vasculature, and the distinct nuclei of the brainstem, the thalamus and the somatosensory cortex. This review covers the effects of sensory (calcitonin gene-related peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and substance P), sympathetic (neuropeptide Y) and parasympathetic (vasoactive intestinal peptide) migraine-related neuropeptides and the functions of somatostatin, nociceptin and the orexins in the trigeminovascular system. These neuropeptides may take part in neurogenic inflammation (plasma protein extravasation and vasodilatation) of the intracranial vasculature and peripheral and central sensitization of the trigeminal system. The results of human clinical studies are discussed with regard to the alterations in these neuropeptides in the plasma, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid during or between migraine attacks, and the therapeutic possibilities involving migraine-related neuropeptides in the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine headache are surveyed.

  7. Comparative immunohistochemical study of the distribution of neuropeptide Y, growth hormone-releasing factor and the carboxyterminus of precursor protein GHRF in the human hypothalamic infundibular area.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, P; Tramu, G; Bloch, B

    1990-04-01

    It is now well documented that various polyclonal antisera to the human growth hormone-releasing factor (hGHRF, somatocrinin) visualize in the brain by immunohistochemistry the classical hypothalamic hypophysiotropic neurons and also antigens present in otherwise characterized peptidergic neuronal systems. The nature of these antigens is still an open question. One of these hGHRF antisera, raised against an immunogen of hGHRF1-44NH2, labels in the arcuate nucleus of the human mediobasal hypothalamus the neuropeptide Y (NPY) containing neurons which for the most part constitute a tuberoextrainfundibular system. The identity of the hGHRF-like substance present in these neurons with true somatocrinin has been assessed by performing a comparative immunohistochemical study including sequential double and triple labeling using the antiserum to hGHRF1-44NH2 in conjunction with antisera to the carboxyterminus of preprosomatocrinin (CTPG) and to NPY. This made it feasible to dissociate the hGHRF1-44NH2-immunoreactive neurons into two major subpopulations costaining either for CTPG of NPY, and a minor neuronal group displaying simultaneously the three labelings. A subset of arcuate neurons also showed NPY staining only. These results suggest that (1) the hGHRF-like antigen present in the majority of the NPY neurons is not true somatocrinin, or alternatively that preprosomatocrinin undergoes a unique maturational processing in these neurons, and (2) a subset of tuberoinfundibular somatocrininergic neurons produces and releases NPY which may be involved in the multifactorial control of the pituitary function.

  8. Effects of early and late neonatal bromocriptine treatment on hypothalamic neuropeptides, dopaminergic reward system and behavior of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Janaine C; Lisboa, Patricia C; de Oliveira, Elaine; Peixoto-Silva, Nayara; Pinheiro, Cintia R; Fraga, Mabel C; Claudio-Neto, Sylvio; Franci, Celso R; Manhães, Alex C; Moura, Egberto G

    2016-06-14

    In humans, bromocriptine (BRO) is used as a treatment for many disorders, such as prolactinomas, even during pregnancy and lactation. Previously we demonstrated that maternal BRO treatment at the end of lactation programs offspring for obesity and several endocrine dysfunctions. Here, we studied the long-term effects of direct BRO injection in neonatal Wistar rats on their dopaminergic pathway, anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity at adulthood. Male pups were either s.c. injected with BRO (0.1μg/once daily) from postnatal day (PN) 1 to 10 or from PN11 to 20. Controls were injected with methanol-saline. Body mass, food intake, neuropeptides, dopamine pathway parameters, anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity were analyzed. The dopamine pathway was analyzed in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS) at PN180. PN1-10 BRO-treated animals had normal body mass and adiposity but lower food intake and plasma prolactin (PRL). This group had higher POMC in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), higher tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the VTA, higher dopa decarboxylase (DDc), higher D2R and μu-opioid receptor in the NAc. Concerning behavior in elevated plus maze (EPM), BRO-treated animals displayed more anxiety-like behaviors. PN11-20 BRO-treated showed normal body mass and adiposity but higher food intake and plasma PRL. This group had lower POMC in the ARC, lower TH in the VTA and lower DAT in the NAc. BRO-treated animals showed less anxiety-like behaviors in the EPM. Thus, neonatal BRO injection, depending on the time of treatment, leads to different long-term dysfunctions in the dopaminergic reward system, food intake behavior and anxiety levels, findings that could be partially due to PRL and POMC changes. PMID:27038750

  9. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Differential effects of methamphetamine on expression of neuropeptide Y mRNA in hypothalamus and on serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations in ad libitum-fed and schedule-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Crowley, W R; Ramoz, G; Keefe, K A; Torto, R; Kalra, S P; Hanson, G R

    2005-01-01

    Relatively little is known concerning the interaction of psychostimulants with hypothalamic neuropeptide systems or metabolic hormones implicated in regulation of energy balance. The present studies tested whether methamphetamine alters the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), two important orexigenic neuropeptides, or proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor for the anorexigenic peptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, or the secretion of leptin, insulin and ghrelin, concomitant with inhibition of food intake. Female rats were either fed ad libitum (AL) or placed on a scheduled feeding (SF) regimen, with access to food limited to 4 h/day. Administration of (+/-)-methamphetamine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 2 h prior to food presentation significantly inhibited food intake in SF animals, but did not affect intake in AL animals. In a separate study, AL and SF animals were killed just prior to expected food presentation, and expression of NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNAs in hypothalamus was determined using in situ hybridisation; concentrations of leptin, insulin and ghrelin in serum were determined with radioimmunoassays. In saline-treated, SF controls, NPY and AgRP mRNA expression in arcuate nucleus and serum ghrelin were significantly elevated, and serum leptin and insulin were significantly reduced. Methamphetamine reversed the up-regulation of NPY mRNA expression observed in the SF condition, without affecting AgRP mRNA or the serum concentrations of metabolic hormones. However, in AL animals, NPY mRNA expression in arcuate and dorsomedial nuclei was significantly increased by methamphetamine, which also reduced serum leptin and insulin and increased serum ghrelin concentrations. These findings suggest that the inhibition of NPY expression in SF animals may be a mechanism underlying the anorexigenic effect of methamphetamine seen in this condition. The increase in NPY expression produced by methamphetamine in AL animals may be mediated by the

  11. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus.

  12. Various dietary fats differentially change the gene expression of neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, B; Szemraj, J; Bartkowiak, J; Walczewska, A

    2007-05-01

    Various high-fat diets are obesogenic but not to the same extent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of saturated fat n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the central neuropeptidergic system in adult rats. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridisation, we evaluated the net effect of feeding in these fats, comparing the effects of a high- to low-fat diet, and the diversity of the effects of these fats in the same amount within the diet. We also determined plasma lipids, glucose, insulin and leptin concentrations. Six-week feeding with high-saturated fat evoked hyperpahagia and the largest weight gain compared to both high-PUFA diets. Rats fed high-saturated fat were found to have decreased neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the compact zone of the dorsomedial nucleus (DMHc), unchanged pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), galanin-like peptide (GALP) mRNA expression in the ARC, as well as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and prepro-orexin (preORX) mRNA expression in the lateral hypothalamus, compared to low-saturated fed rats. By contrast, feeding with both high-PUFA diets increased POMC and GALP mRNA expression in the ARC compared to the corresponding low-fat diet and the high-saturated fat diet. Furthermore, feeding with both low-PUFA diets reduced NPY mRNA expression compared to the low-saturated fat diet exclusively in the DMHc. Uniquely, the high n-3 PUFA feeding halved MCH and preORX mRNA expression in the lateral hypothalamus compared to the other high-fat and low n-3 PUFA diets. In rats fed three high-fat diets, plasma insulin and leptin concentrations were significantly increased and the type of fat had no effect on these hormone levels. Rats fed high-saturated fat had both hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolemia and rats fed high n-3 PUFA only had hyperglycaemia. The present study demonstrates that various forms of dietary fat differentially change the

  13. Orphan neuropeptides. Novel neuropeptides modulating sleep or feeding.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shinjae; Civelli, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Neuropeptides form the largest family of modulators of synaptic transmission. Until 1995 some 60 different neuropeptides had been found. With the recognition that all neuropeptides act by binding to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a new approach relying on the use of orphan GPCRs as targets was designed to identify novel neuropeptides. Thirteen new neuropeptide families have since been discovered. In this review we will describe the orphan GPCR-based approach that led to these discoveries and present its impact on two specific physiological responses, feeding and sleep. In particular, we will discuss the modulatory roles of the hypocretins/orexins and of neuropeptide S in sleep and awakening and those of ghrelin and melanin concentrating hormone in food intake.

  14. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  15. Role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova; Kruzliak, Peter; Rabkin, Simon W

    2014-11-01

    The role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathy-associated heart failure has been garnering more attention. Several neuropeptides--Neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and their receptors have been studied in the various types of cardiomyopathies. The data indicate associations with the strength of the association varying depending on the kind of neuropeptide and the nature of the cardiomyopathy--diabetic, ischemic, inflammatory, stress-induced or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Several neuropeptides appear to alter regulation of genes involved in heart failure. Demonstration of an association is an essential first step in proving causality or establishing a role for a factor in a disease. Understanding the complexity of neuropeptide function should be helpful in establishing new or optimal therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure in cardiomyopathies.

  16. NPY mediates reward activity of morphine, via NPY Y1 receptors, in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sagar J; Upadhya, Manoj A; Subhedar, Nishikant K; Kokare, Dadasaheb M

    2013-06-15

    Although the interaction between endogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY) and opioidergic systems in processing of reward has been speculated, experimental evidence is lacking. We investigated the role of NPY, and its Y1 receptors, in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) in morphine induced reward and reinforcement behavior. Rats were implanted with cannulae targeted at AcbSh for drug administration, and with stimulating electrode in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). The rats were then conditioned in an operant conditioning chamber for electrical self-stimulation of the MFB. Increased rate of lever pressings was evaluated against the frequency of the stimulating current. Increase in rate of lever presses was considered as a measure of reward and reinforcement. About 30-70% increase in self-stimulation was observed following bilateral intra-AcbSh treatment with morphine, NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY (NPY Y1/Y5 receptors agonist), however, BIBP3226 (selective NPY Y1 receptors antagonist) produced opposite effect. The reward effect of morphine was significantly potentiated by NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY, but antagonized by BIBP3226. NPY-immunoreactivity in the AcbSh, arcuate nucleus (ARC) and lateral part of bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNSTl) was significantly more in the operant conditioned rats than in naïve control. However, morphine administration to the conditioned rats resulted in significant decrease in the NPY-immunoreactivity in all these anatomical regions. Since the role of morphine in modulation of mesolimbic-dopaminergic pathway is well established, we suggest that NPY system in AcbSh, ARC and BNSTl, perhaps acting via Y1-receptor system, may be an important component of the mesolimbic-AcbSh reward circuitry triggered by endogenous opioids.

  17. Neuropeptides and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gábriel, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, develops in 75% of patients with type 1 and 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes, progressing to legal blindness in about 5%. In the recent years, considerable efforts have been put into finding treatments for this condition. It has been discovered that peptidergic mechanisms (neuropeptides and their analogues, activating a diverse array of signal transduction pathways through their multiple receptors) are potentially important for consideration in drug development strategies. A considerable amount of knowledge has been accumulated over the last three decades on human retinal neuropeptides and those elements in the pathomechanisms of diabetic retinopathy which might be related to peptidergic signal transduction. Here, human retinal neuropeptides and their receptors are reviewed, along with the theories relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy both in humans and in experimental models. By collating this information, the curative potential of certain neupeptides and their analogues/antagonists can also be discussed, along with the existing clinical treatments of diabetic retinopathy. The most promising peptidergic pathways for which treatment strategies may be developed at present are stimulation of the somatostatin-related pathway and the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide-related pathway or inhibition of angiotensinergic mechanisms. These approaches may result in the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production and neuronal apoptosis; therefore, both the optical quality of the image and the processing capability of the neural circuit in the retina may be saved. PMID:23043302

  18. The Physiological Role of Arcuate Kisspeptin Neurons in the Control of Reproductive Function in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beale, K.E.; Kinsey-Jones, J.S.; Gardiner, J.V.; Harrison, E.K.; Thompson, E.L.; Hu, M.H.; Sleeth, M.L.; Sam, A.H.; Greenwood, H.C.; McGavigan, A.K.; Dhillo, W.S.; Mora, J.M.; Li, X.F.; Franks, S.; Bloom, S.R.; O'Byrne, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin plays a pivotal role in pubertal onset and reproductive function. In rodents, kisspeptin perikarya are located in 2 major populations: the anteroventral periventricular nucleus and the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). These nuclei are believed to play functionally distinct roles in the control of reproduction. The anteroventral periventricular nucleus population is thought to be critical in the generation of the LH surge. However, the physiological role played by the ARC kisspeptin neurons remains to be fully elucidated. We used bilateral stereotactic injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding kisspeptin antisense into the ARC of adult female rats to investigate the physiological role of kisspeptin neurons in this nucleus. Female rats with kisspeptin knockdown in the ARC displayed a significantly reduced number of both regular and complete oestrous cycles and significantly longer cycles over the 100-day period of the study. Further, kisspeptin knockdown in the ARC resulted in a decrease in LH pulse frequency. These data suggest that maintenance of ARC-kisspeptin levels is essential for normal pulsatile LH release and oestrous cyclicity. PMID:24424033

  19. NEUROENDOCRINE ACTIONS AND REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROPEPTIDE Y DURING LACTATION

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, W,R.; Ramoz, G.; Torto, R.; Keefe, K.A.; Wang, J. J.; Kalra, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    The expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its co-messenger, agouti-related peptide (AgRP), in arcuate neurons of the hypothalamus is increased during lactation in rats. Our research has been addressing the questions of the physiological actions of these peptides during lactation and the physiological signals associated with lactation that result in increased expression of their genes. Our studies indicate that NPY and AgRP exert pleiotropic actions during lactation that help integrate neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance with controls over anterior and posterior pituitary hormone secretion. Further, reciprocal signaling to the NPY/AgRP system by leptin and ghrelin is responsible for the changes in expression of these hypothalamic peptides in lactating animals, and thus, may contribute to regulation of food intake and the various neuroendocrine adaptations of lactation. PMID:17241697

  20. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  1. Neuropeptide Y in normal eating and in genetic and dietary-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Beck, B

    2006-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one the most potent orexigenic peptides found in the brain. It stimulates food intake with a preferential effect on carbohydrate intake. It decreases latency to eat, increases motivation to eat and delays satiety by augmenting meal size. The effects on feeding are mediated through at least two receptors, the Y1 and Y5 receptors. The NPY system for feeding regulation is mostly located in the hypothalamus. It is formed of the arcuate nucleus (ARC), where the peptide is synthesized, and the paraventricular (PVN), dorsomedial (DMN) and ventromedial (VMN) nuclei and perifornical area where it is active. This activity is modulated by the hindbrain and limbic structures. It is dependent on energy availability, e.g. upregulation with food deprivation or restriction, and return to baseline with refeeding. It is also sensitive to diet composition with variable effects of carbohydrates and fats. Leptin signalling and glucose sensing which are directly linked to diet type are the most important factors involved in its regulation. Absence of leptin signalling in obesity models due to gene mutation either at the receptor level, as in the Zucker rat, the Koletsky rat or the db/db mouse, or at the peptide level, as in ob/ob mouse, is associated with increased mRNA abundance, peptide content and/or release in the ARC or PVN. Other genetic obesity models, such as the Otsuka–Long–Evans–Tokushima Fatty rat, the agouti mouse or the tubby mouse, are characterized by a diminution in NPY expression in the ARC nucleus and by a significant increase in the DMN. Further studies are necessary to determine the exact role of NPY in these latter models. Long-term exposure to high-fat or high-energy palatable diets leads to the development of adiposity and is associated with a decrease in hypothalamic NPY content or expression, consistent with the existence of a counter-regulatory mechanism to diminish energy intake and limit obesity development. On the other hand, an

  2. Neuropeptides and nasal secretion.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, J N; Kaliner, M

    1991-10-01

    The nasal mucosa is innervated by the sensory, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nervous systems. Nociceptive sensory nerves are stimulated by mucosal injury, inhalation of irritants, or mast cell degranulation and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide, the tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A, and other peptides by the axon response mechanism. Sensory nerve stimulation initiates systemic reflexes, such as the sneeze, and central parasympathetic reflexes which release acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and other peptides and lead to glandular secretion. In concert, these proinflammatory neural responses lead to vasodilation, vascular permeability, and glandular secretion. Sympathetic nerves release neuropeptide Y and norepinephrine, potent vasoconstrictors which act to decompress the nasal mucosa and produce nasal patency. The balance between the effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic neurotransmitters may regulate nasal homeostasis, whereas the nociceptive sensory system may be held in reserve as a defense mechanism. Dysfunction of these systems may lead to pathological nasal syndromes. In the future, specific neuropeptide agonists and antagonists may be useful for the treatment of human rhinitic diseases. PMID:1928355

  3. Method of installing a reinforced thermosetting resin sucker rod assembly composed of pultruded arcuate sections

    SciTech Connect

    Zion, E.M.

    1984-06-05

    Pultruded reinforced thermosetting resin arcuate sections are wound respectively on spools, the spools are transported to a well site, and the arcuate sections are unwound from the spools and assembled into a sucker rod.

  4. Posterior Cortical Atrophy Presenting with Superior Arcuate Field Defect

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Sue Ling; Bukowska, Danuta M.; Ford, Stephen; Chen, Fred K.

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old female with reading difficulty presented with progressive arcuate field defect despite low intraocular pressure. Over a 5-year period, the field defect evolved into an incongruous homonymous hemianopia and the repeated neuroimaging revealed progressive posterior cortical atrophy. Further neuropsychiatric assessment demonstrated symptoms and signs consistent with Benson's syndrome. PMID:26417467

  5. The Role of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Byron; Ardila, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    In aphasia literature, it has been considered that a speech repetition defect represents the main constituent of conduction aphasia. Conduction aphasia has frequently been interpreted as a language impairment due to lesions of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) that disconnect receptive language areas from expressive ones. Modern neuroradiological…

  6. Posterior Cortical Atrophy Presenting with Superior Arcuate Field Defect.

    PubMed

    Wan, Sue Ling; Bukowska, Danuta M; Ford, Stephen; Chen, Fred K

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old female with reading difficulty presented with progressive arcuate field defect despite low intraocular pressure. Over a 5-year period, the field defect evolved into an incongruous homonymous hemianopia and the repeated neuroimaging revealed progressive posterior cortical atrophy. Further neuropsychiatric assessment demonstrated symptoms and signs consistent with Benson's syndrome. PMID:26417467

  7. Mapping of Kisspeptin Receptor mRNA in the Whole Rat Brain and its Co-Localisation with Oxytocin in the Paraventricular Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Higo, S; Honda, S; Iijima, N; Ozawa, H

    2016-04-01

    The neuropeptide kisspeptin and its receptor play an essential role in reproduction as a potent modulator of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurone. In addition to its reproductive function, kisspeptin signalling is also involved in extra-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis systems, including oxytocin and arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion. By contrast to the accumulating information for kisspeptin neurones and kisspeptin fibres, the histological distribution and function of the kisspeptin receptor in the rat brain remain poorly characterised. Using in situ hybridisation combined with immunofluorescence, the present study aimed to determine the whole brain map of Kiss1r mRNA (encoding the kisspeptin receptor), and to examine whether oxytocin or AVP neurones express Kiss1r. Neurones with strong Kiss1r expression were observed in several rostral brain areas, including the olfactory bulb, medial septum, diagonal band of Broca and throughout the preoptic area, with the most concentrated population being around 0.5 mm rostral to the bregma. Co-immunofluorescence staining revealed that, in these rostral brain areas, the vast majority of the Kiss1r-expressing neurones co-expressed GnRH. Moderate levels of Kiss1r mRNA were also noted in the rostral periventricular area, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and throughout the arcuate nucleus. Relatively weak Kiss1r expression was observed in the supraoptic nucleus and supramammillary nuclei. Moderate to weak expression of Kiss1r was also observed in several regions in the midbrain, including the periaqueductal gray and dorsal raphe nucleus. We also examined whether oxytocin and AVP neurones in the PVN co-express Kiss1r. Immunofluorescence revealed the co-expression of Kiss1r in a subset of the oxytocin neurones but not in the AVP neurones in the PVN. The present study provides a fundamental anatomical basis for further examination of the kisspeptin signalling system in the extra-HPG axis, as well as in

  8. Anatomical properties of the arcuate fasciculus predict phonological and reading skills in children.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Sherbondy, Anthony J; Deutsch, Gayle K; Wandell, Brian A; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2011-11-01

    For more than a century, neurologists have hypothesized that the arcuate fasciculus carries signals that are essential for language function; however, the relevance of the pathway for particular behaviors is highly controversial. The primary objective of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to examine the relationship between individual variation in the microstructural properties of arcuate fibers and behavioral measures of language and reading skills. A second objective was to use novel fiber-tracking methods to reassess estimates of arcuate lateralization. In a sample of 55 children, we found that measurements of diffusivity in the left arcuate correlate with phonological awareness skills and arcuate volume lateralization correlates with phonological memory and reading skills. Contrary to previous investigations that report the absence of the right arcuate in some subjects, we demonstrate that new techniques can identify the pathway in every individual. Our results provide empirical support for the role of the arcuate fasciculus in the development of reading skills.

  9. The median arcuate ligament syndrome: a mimicker of mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kay, Johnson C; Arroyo, Ramon A

    2013-08-01

    The median arcuate ligament syndrome is an uncommon condition characterized by the triad of postprandial abdominal pain, unintentional weight loss, and an epigastric bruit. This condition is diagnostically challenging and patients often undergo extensive laboratory, radiographic, and invasive evaluations before it is identified. Physicians should consider this syndrome in the differential diagnoses of chronic abdominal pain and mesenteric vasculitis. Once diagnosed, treatment is generally surgical with known predictors of favorable and unfavorable outcomes. Surgical candidates should be selected carefully. We describe the cases of two young active duty patients diagnosed with median arcuate ligament syndrome after suffering from chronic abdominal pain. Both were referred to our rheumatology department to evaluate for mesenteric vasculitis. Each had a different therapeutic outcome.

  10. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  11. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers.

    PubMed

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  12. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers.

    PubMed

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles. PMID:25314471

  13. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Lin, En-Ju D

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the classical neurotransmitters, neuropeptides represent an important class of modulators for affective behaviors and associated disorders, such as anxiety disorders. Many neuropeptides are abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in emotional processing and anxiety behaviors. Moreover, risk factors for anxiety disorders such as stress modulate the expression of various neuropeptides in the brain. Due to the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and yet limited treatment options, there is a clear need for more effective therapeutics. In this regard, the various neuropeptides represent exciting candidates for new therapeutic designs. In this review, I will provide an up-to-date summary on the evidences for the involvement of seven neuropeptides in anxiety: corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortins, vasopressin, oxytocin, substance P, neuropeptide Y and galanin. This review will cover the behavioral effects of these neuropeptides in animal models of anxiety by both genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Human studies indicating a role for these neuropeptides in anxiety disorders will also be discussed.

  14. Photoperiod regulates genes encoding melanocortin 3 and serotonin receptors and secretogranins in the dorsomedial posterior arcuate of the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Nilaweera, K N; Archer, Z A; Campbell, G; Mayer, C-D; Balik, A; Ross, A W; Mercer, J G; Ebling, F J P; Morgan, P J; Barrett, P

    2009-02-01

    The mechanism(s) involved in the regulation of the seasonal-appropriate body weight of the Siberian hamster are currently unknown. We have identified photoperiodically regulated genes including VGF in a sub-region of the arcuate nucleus termed the dorsomedial posterior arcuate (dmpARC). Gene expression changes in this nucleus so far account for a significant number of those reported as photoperiodically regulated and are therefore likely to contribute to seasonal physiological responses of the hamsters. The present study aimed to identify additional genes expressed in the dmpARC regulated by photoperiod that could be involved in regulating the activity of this nucleus with respect to seasonal physiology of the Siberian hamster. Using laser capture microdissection coupled with a microarray analysis and a candidate gene approach, we have identified several photoperiodically regulated genes in the dmpARC that are known to have roles in secretory and intracellular signalling pathways. These include secretogranin (sg) III and SgVI (secretory pathway), melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3-R) and serotonin (5-HT) receptors 2A and 7 (signalling pathway), all of which increase in expression under a short photoperiod. The spatial relationship between receptor signalling and potential secretory pathways was investigated by dual in situ hybridisation, which revealed that 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in neurones expressing VGF mRNA and that a sub-population (approximately 40%) of these neurones express MC3-R. These gene expression changes in dmpARC neurones may reflect the functional requirement of these neurones for seasonal physiological responses of the hamster.

  15. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy. PMID:26653760

  16. Naloxone-induced anorexia increases neuropeptide Y concentrations in the dorsomedial hypothalamus: evidence for neuropeptide Y-opioid interactions in the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P D; Wilding, J P; al-Dokhayel, A A; Gilbey, S G; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    1994-01-01

    We measured neuropeptide Y (NPY) concentration in microdissected hypothalamic nuclei, by radioimmunoassay, and NPY mRNA in the hypothalamus in rats treated systemically with the nonspecific opioid antagonist, naloxone, to produce mild anorexia. Twenty rats were treated with daily SC injections of naloxone (7.5 mg/kg); 20 were treated with vehicle alone. Naloxone produced a 7% reduction in food intake (p < 0.01) and a reduction in weight gain (p < 0.002). Neuropeptide Y concentrations were increased specifically in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMN) in rats treated with naloxone (6.8 +/- 0.7 fmol/micrograms protein vs. 3.1 +/- 1.0 fmol/micrograms protein, p < 0.05, n = 10 per group). Total hypothalamic NPY mRNA was unchanged. Neuropeptide Y-opioid interactions may be important in the control of food intake.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:27473896

  18. Anorexia in human and experimental animal models: physiological aspects related to neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia, a loss of appetite for food, can be caused by various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, firstly, clinical aspects of anorexia nervosa are summarized in brief. Secondly, hypothalamic neuropeptides responsible for feeding regulation in each hypothalamic nucleus are discussed. Finally, three different types of anorexigenic animal models; dehydration-induced anorexia, cisplatin-induced anorexia and cancer anorexia-cachexia, are introduced. In conclusion, hypothalamic neuropeptides may give us novel insight to understand and find effective therapeutics strategy essential for various kinds of anorexia.

  19. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ suppresses the excitability of neurons in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Chee, Melissa J; Price, Christopher J; Statnick, Michael A; Colmers, William F

    2011-07-01

    Nociceptin or orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) stimulates food intake when injected into the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN). The VMN negatively regulates energy balance in part by tonically activating proopiomelanocortin arcuate neurons, thereby suppressing food intake. However, it is not clear how orexigenic neurotransmission within the VMN can stimulate food intake. We tested the hypothesis that the orexigenic action of N/OFQ results from its inhibition of anorexigenic VMN neurons. We studied the effects of N/OFQ on the electrical properties of anorexigenic VMN neurons in acute brain slices. Ionic mechanisms underlying the actions of N/OFQ were studied using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from VMN neurons expressing the anorexigenic leptin receptor (LepRb). Bath application of N/OFQ to LepRb-expressing VMN neurons elicited a robust, reversible membrane hyperpolarization that suppressed neuronal excitability by raising the action potential firing threshold and cell rheobase. N/OFQ activated a postsynaptic, G-protein coupled, inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) current that was sensitive to G-protein inactivation, blocked by the GIRK blocker SCH23390, and occluded by the GABAB agonist and potent GIRK activator, baclofen. Application of the selective N/OFQ receptor antagonist SB-612111 blocked the inhibitory effects of N/OFQ. We concluded that N/OFQ directly inhibited VMN neurons by activating a GIRK. These results implicate the site-specific contributions of orexigenic neuropeptides at VMN neurons to suppress anorexigenic output. This study thus advances our understanding regarding the contributions of the VMN to hypothalamic regulation of energy balance.

  20. Neuropeptide S- and Neuropeptide S receptor-expressing neuron populations in the human pons

    PubMed Central

    Adori, Csaba; Barde, Swapnali; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Uhlén, Mathias; Reinscheid, Rainer R.; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide with potent pharmacological effects. In rodents, NPS is expressed in a few pontine cell clusters. Its receptor (NPSR1) is, however, widely distributed in the brain. The anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effects of NPS make the NPS–NPSR1 system an interesting potential drug target in mood-related disorders. However, so far possible disease-related mechanisms involving NPS have only been studied in rodents. To validate the relevance of these animal studies for i.a. drug development, we have explored the distribution of NPS-expressing neurons in the human pons using in situ hybridization and stereological methods and we compared the distribution of NPS mRNA expressing neurons in the human and rat brain. The calculation revealed a total number of 22,317 ± 2411 NPS mRNA-positive neurons in human, bilaterally. The majority of cells (84%) were located in the parabrachial area in human: in the extension of the medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei, in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus and around the adjacent lateral lemniscus. In human, in sharp contrast to the rodents, only very few NPS-positive cells (5%) were found close to the locus coeruleus. In addition, we identified a smaller cell cluster (11% of all NPS cells) in the pontine central gray matter both in human and rat, which has not been described previously even in rodents. We also examined the distribution of NPSR1 mRNA-expressing neurons in the human pons. These cells were mainly located in the rostral laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the cuneiform nucleus, the microcellular tegmental nucleus region and in the periaqueductal gray. Our results show that both NPS and NPSR1 in the human pons are preferentially localized in regions of importance for integration of visceral autonomic information and emotional behavior. The reported interspecies differences must, however, be considered when looking for targets for new pharmacotherapeutical interventions. PMID:26441556

  1. Median arcuate ligament syndrome: a nonvascular, vascular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Cooper, Leslie T; Duncan, Audra A; Jabr, Fadi I

    2011-07-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is often diagnosed when idiopathic, episodic abdominal pain is associated with dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by fibers of the median arcuate ligament. The character of the abdominal pain is often postprandial and associated with gradual weight loss from poor food intake, suggestive of chronic mesenteric ischemia. However, the pathognomonic imaging feature of dynamic, ostial celiac artery compression with expiration does not consistently predict clinical improvement from revascularization. Proposed but unproven pathophysiological mechanisms include neurogenic pain from compression of the splanchnic nerve plexus and intermittent ischemia from compression of the celiac artery. Alterations in blood flow and ganglion compression are both associated with delayed gastric emptying, another physiological correlate of the clinical syndrome. Published reports describe a variable response to revascularization and nerve plexus resection suggest a need for translational research to better characterize this poorly understood clinical entity. We illustrate the current gaps in our knowledge of MALS with the case of a 51-year-old woman with a 4-year history of chronic abdominal pain who responded to a combination of ganglion resection and celiac artery reconstruction. PMID:21536596

  2. Interactions between leptin and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y neurons in the control of food intake and energy homeostasis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Bing, C; Al-Barazanji, K; Mossakowaska, D E; Wang, X M; McBay, D L; Neville, W A; Taddayon, M; Pickavance, L; Dryden, S; Thomas, M E; McHale, M T; Gloyer, I S; Wilson, S; Buckingham, R; Arch, J R; Trayhurn, P; Williams, G

    1997-03-01

    Leptin acts on the brain to inhibit feeding, increase thermogenesis, and decrease body weight. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) that project to the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH) are postulated to control energy balance by stimulating feeding and inhibiting thermogenesis, especially under conditions of energy deficit. We investigated whether leptin's short-term effects on energy balance are mediated by inhibition of the NPY neurons. Recombinant murine leptin (11 microg) injected into the lateral ventricle of fasted adult Wistar rats inhibited food intake by 20-25% between 2 and 6 h after administration, compared with saline-treated controls (P < 0.05). Uncoupling protein mRNA levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT) rose by 70% (P < 0.01). Leptin treatment significantly reduced NPY concentrations by 20-50% (P < 0.05) in the ARC, PVN, and DMH and significantly decreased hypothalamic NPY mRNA levels (0.61 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.03 arbitrary units; P < 0.01). A second study examined changes in leptin during 5 days' intracerebroventricular NPY administration (10 microg/day), which induced sustained hyperphagia and excessive weight gain. In NPY-treated rats, leptin mRNA levels in epididymal fat were comparable to those in saline-treated controls (0.94 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.28 arbitrary units; P > 0.1), but plasma leptin levels were significantly higher (4.88 +/- 0.66 vs. 2.85 +/- 0.20 ng/ml; P < 0.01). Leptin therefore acts centrally to decrease NPY synthesis and NPY levels in the ARC-PVN projection; reduced NPY release in the PVN may mediate leptin's hypophagic and thermogenic actions. Conversely, NPY-induced obesity results in raised circulating leptin concentrations. Leptin and the NPY-ergic ARC-PVN neurons may interact in a homeostatic loop to regulate body fat mass and energy balance.

  3. THALAMIC NEUROPEPTIDE MEDIATING THE EFFECTS OF NURSING ON LACTATION AND MATERNAL MOTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Cservenák, Melinda; Szabó, Éva R.; Bodnár, Ibolya; Lékó, András; Palkovits, Miklós; Nagy, György M.; Usdin, Ted B.; Dobolyi, Arpád

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Nursing has important physiological and psychological consequences on mothers during the postpartum period. Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) may contribute to its effects on prolactin release and maternal motivation. Since TIP39-containing fibers and the receptor for TIP39, the parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2 receptor) are abundant in the arcuate nucleus and the medial preoptic area, we antagonized TIP39 action locally to reveal its actions. Mediobasal hypothalamic injection of a virus encoding an antagonist of the PTH2 receptor markedly decreased basal serum prolactin levels and the suckling-induced prolactin release. In contrast, injecting this virus into the preoptic area had no effect on prolactin levels, but did dampen maternal motivation judged by reduced time in a pup-associated cage during a place-preference test. In support of an effect of TIP39 on maternal motivation, we observed that TIP39 containing fibers and terminals had the same distribution within the preoptic area as neurons expressing Fos in response to suckling. Furthermore, TIP39 terminals closely apposed the plasma membrane of 82% of Fos-ir neurons. Retrograde tracer injected into the arcuate nucleus and the medial preoptic area labeled TIP39 neurons in the posterior intralaminar complex of the thalamus (PIL), indicating that these cells but not other groups of TIP39 neurons project to these hypothalamic regions. We also found that TIP39 mRNA levels in the PIL markedly increased around parturition and remained elevated throughout the lactation period, demonstrating the availability of the peptide in postpartum mothers. Furthermore, suckling, but not pup exposure without physical contact, increased Fos expression by PIL TIP39 neurons. These results indicate that suckling activates TIP39 neurons in the PIL that affect prolactin release and maternal motivation via projections to the arcuate nucleus and the preoptic area, respectively. PMID:24094875

  4. The hypothalamic neuropeptide FF network is impaired in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Goncharuk, Valeri D; Buijs, Ruud M; Jhamandas, Jack H; Swaab, Dick F

    2014-01-01

    Background The human hypothalamus contains the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) neurochemical network. Animal experiments demonstrated that NPFF is implicated in the central cardiovascular regulation. We therefore studied expression of this peptide in the hypothalamus of individuals who suffered from essential hypertension (n = 8) and died suddenly due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and compared to that of healthy individuals (controls) (n = 6) who died abruptly due to mechanical trauma of the chest. Methods The frozen right part of the hypothalamus was cut coronally into serial sections of 20 μm thickness, and each tenth section was stained immunohistochemically using antibody against NPFF. The central section through each hypothalamic nucleus was characterized by the highest intensity of NPFF immunostaining and thus was chosen for quantitative densitometry. Results In hypertensive patients, the area occupied by NPFF immunostained neuronal elements in the central sections through the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pa), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), perinuclear zone (PNZ) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), dorso- (DMH), ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, and perifornical nucleus (PeF) was dramatically decreased compared to controls, ranging about six times less in the VMH to 15 times less in the central part of the BST (BSTC). The NPFF innervation of both nonstained neuronal profiles and microvasculature was extremely poor in hypertensive patients compared to control. Conclusions The decreased NPFF expression in the hypothalamus of hypertensive patients might be a cause of impairment of its interaction with other neurochemical systems, and thereby might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25161813

  5. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  6. Curvature range measurements of the arcuate fasciculus using diffusion tensor tractography☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Hong, Cheol Pyo; Kwon, Yong Hyun; Hwang, Yoon Tae; Kim, Joong Hwi; Park, Ji Won

    2013-01-01

    Because Broca's area and Wernicke's area in the brain are connected by the arcuate fasciculus, understanding the anatomical location and morphometry of the arcuate fasciculus can help in the treatment of patients with aphasia. We measured the horizontal and vertical curvature ranges of the arcuate fasciculus in both hemispheres in 12 healthy subjects using diffusion tensor tractography. In the right hemisphere, the direct curvature range and indirect curvature range values of the arcuate fasciculus horizontal part were 121.13 ± 5.89 and 25.99 ± 3.01 degrees, respectively, and in the left hemisphere, the values were 121.83 ± 5.33 and 27.40 ± 2.96 degrees, respectively. In the right hemisphere, the direct curvature range and indirect curvature range values of the arcuate fasciculus vertical part were 43.97 ± 7.98 and 30.15 ± 3.82 degrees, respectively, and in the left hemisphere, the values were 39.39 ± 4.42 and 24.08 ± 4.34 degrees, respectively. We believe that the measured curvature ranges are important data for localization and quantitative assessment of specific neuronal pathways in patients presenting with arcuate fasciculus abnormalities. PMID:25206594

  7. Curvature range measurements of the arcuate fasciculus using diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Hong, Cheol Pyo; Kwon, Yong Hyun; Hwang, Yoon Tae; Kim, Joong Hwi; Park, Ji Won

    2013-01-25

    Because Broca's area and Wernicke's area in the brain are connected by the arcuate fasciculus, understanding the anatomical location and morphometry of the arcuate fasciculus can help in the treatment of patients with aphasia. We measured the horizontal and vertical curvature ranges of the arcuate fasciculus in both hemispheres in 12 healthy subjects using diffusion tensor tractography. In the right hemisphere, the direct curvature range and indirect curvature range values of the arcuate fasciculus horizontal part were 121.13 ± 5.89 and 25.99 ± 3.01 degrees, respectively, and in the left hemisphere, the values were 121.83 ± 5.33 and 27.40 ± 2.96 degrees, respectively. In the right hemisphere, the direct curvature range and indirect curvature range values of the arcuate fasciculus vertical part were 43.97 ± 7.98 and 30.15 ± 3.82 degrees, respectively, and in the left hemisphere, the values were 39.39 ± 4.42 and 24.08 ± 4.34 degrees, respectively. We believe that the measured curvature ranges are important data for localization and quantitative assessment of specific neuronal pathways in patients presenting with arcuate fasciculus abnormalities. PMID:25206594

  8. The direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus is predictive of longitudinal reading change.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Booth, James R

    2015-06-01

    Structural coherence across the arcuate fasciculus has previously been related to reading skill, but the arcuate may be divisible into distinct subtracts which support different functions. Here, we examine longitudinal data from 30 children between the ages of 8 and 14 to determine whether initial coherence in any of the arcuate's subsections is predictive of changes in reading across a longitudinal interval of approximately three years. The arcuate was divided using probabilistic tractography; mean fractional anisotropy across each subtract was extracted for each participant. Time 1 to Time 2 change in reading skill (identification, fluency score average) was significantly and uniquely predicted by only direct fronto-temporal arcuate segment coherence. Participants with lower direct segment FA demonstrated decreases in reading scores, potentially reflecting lessened improvements due to continued inefficient processing. These results were consistent in the older and younger halves of the sample. As such, we demonstrate that it is specifically the direct segment of the arcuate that may support and be predictive of reading skill both initially and longitudinally across development. PMID:26011750

  9. The direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus is predictive of longitudinal reading change.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Booth, James R

    2015-06-01

    Structural coherence across the arcuate fasciculus has previously been related to reading skill, but the arcuate may be divisible into distinct subtracts which support different functions. Here, we examine longitudinal data from 30 children between the ages of 8 and 14 to determine whether initial coherence in any of the arcuate's subsections is predictive of changes in reading across a longitudinal interval of approximately three years. The arcuate was divided using probabilistic tractography; mean fractional anisotropy across each subtract was extracted for each participant. Time 1 to Time 2 change in reading skill (identification, fluency score average) was significantly and uniquely predicted by only direct fronto-temporal arcuate segment coherence. Participants with lower direct segment FA demonstrated decreases in reading scores, potentially reflecting lessened improvements due to continued inefficient processing. These results were consistent in the older and younger halves of the sample. As such, we demonstrate that it is specifically the direct segment of the arcuate that may support and be predictive of reading skill both initially and longitudinally across development.

  10. Brain neuropeptides in gastric mucosal protection.

    PubMed

    Gyires, Klára; Zádori, Zoltán S

    2014-12-01

    The centrally induced gastroprotective effect of neuropeptides has been intensively studied. Besides many similarities, however, differences can also be observed in their gastroprotective actions. The gastroprotective dose-response curve proved to be either sigmoid, or bell-shaped. Additional gastrointestinal effects of neuropeptides can contribute to their mucosal protective effect. Part of the neuropeptides induces gastroprotection by peripheral administration as well. Besides vagal nerve the sympathetic nervous system may also be involved in conveying the central effect to the periphery. Better understanding of the complex mechanism of the maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity may result in the development of new strategy to enhance gastric mucosal resistance against injury.

  11. Role of neuropeptide FF in central cardiovascular and neuroendocrine regulation.

    PubMed

    Jhamandas, Jack H; Goncharuk, Valeri

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) is an octapeptide belonging to the RFamide family of peptides that have been implicated in a wide variety of physiological functions in the brain including central cardiovascular and neuroendocrine regulation. The effects of these peptides are mediated via NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors that are abundantly expressed in the rat and human brain. Herein, we review evidence for the role of NPFF in central regulation of blood pressure particularly within the brainstem and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). At a cellular level, NPFF demonstrates distinct responses in magnocellular and parvocellular neurons of the PVN, which regulate the secretion of neurohypophyseal hormones and sympathetic outflow, respectively. Finally, the presence of NPFF system in the human brain and its alterations within the hypertensive brain are discussed.

  12. Neuropeptides in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Borbély, Eva; Scheich, Bálint; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-12-01

    Dementia conditions and memory deficits of different origins (vascular, metabolic and primary neurodegenerative such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) are getting more common and greater clinical problems recently in the aging population. Since the presently available cognitive enhancers have very limited therapeutical applications, there is an emerging need to elucidate the complex pathophysiological mechanisms, identify key mediators and novel targets for future drug development. Neuropeptides are widely distributed in brain regions responsible for learning and memory processes with special emphasis on the hippocampus, amygdala and the basal forebrain. They form networks with each other, and also have complex interactions with the cholinergic, glutamatergic, dopaminergic and GABA-ergic pathways. This review summarizes the extensive experimental data in the well-established rat and mouse models, as well as the few clinical results regarding the expression and the roles of the tachykinin system, somatostatin and the closely related cortistatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate-cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), opioid peptides and galanin. Furthermore, the main receptorial targets, mechanisms and interactions are described in order to highlight the possible therapeutical potentials. Agents not only symptomatically improving the functional impairments, but also inhibiting the progression of the neurodegenerative processes would be breakthroughs in this area. The most promising mechanisms determined at the level of exploratory investigations in animal models of cognitive disfunctions are somatostatin sst4, NPY Y2, PACAP-VIP VPAC1, tachykinin NK3 and galanin GALR2 receptor agonisms, as well as delta opioid receptor antagonism. Potent and selective non-peptide ligands with good CNS penetration are needed for further characterization of these molecular pathways to

  13. Mapping of Kisspeptin Receptor mRNA in the Whole Rat Brain and its Co-Localisation with Oxytocin in the Paraventricular Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Higo, S; Honda, S; Iijima, N; Ozawa, H

    2016-04-01

    The neuropeptide kisspeptin and its receptor play an essential role in reproduction as a potent modulator of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurone. In addition to its reproductive function, kisspeptin signalling is also involved in extra-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis systems, including oxytocin and arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion. By contrast to the accumulating information for kisspeptin neurones and kisspeptin fibres, the histological distribution and function of the kisspeptin receptor in the rat brain remain poorly characterised. Using in situ hybridisation combined with immunofluorescence, the present study aimed to determine the whole brain map of Kiss1r mRNA (encoding the kisspeptin receptor), and to examine whether oxytocin or AVP neurones express Kiss1r. Neurones with strong Kiss1r expression were observed in several rostral brain areas, including the olfactory bulb, medial septum, diagonal band of Broca and throughout the preoptic area, with the most concentrated population being around 0.5 mm rostral to the bregma. Co-immunofluorescence staining revealed that, in these rostral brain areas, the vast majority of the Kiss1r-expressing neurones co-expressed GnRH. Moderate levels of Kiss1r mRNA were also noted in the rostral periventricular area, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and throughout the arcuate nucleus. Relatively weak Kiss1r expression was observed in the supraoptic nucleus and supramammillary nuclei. Moderate to weak expression of Kiss1r was also observed in several regions in the midbrain, including the periaqueductal gray and dorsal raphe nucleus. We also examined whether oxytocin and AVP neurones in the PVN co-express Kiss1r. Immunofluorescence revealed the co-expression of Kiss1r in a subset of the oxytocin neurones but not in the AVP neurones in the PVN. The present study provides a fundamental anatomical basis for further examination of the kisspeptin signalling system in the extra-HPG axis, as well as in

  14. Reading impairment in a patient with missing arcuate fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Rauschecker, Andreas M.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Schwartzman, Armin; Perry, Lee M.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the case of a child (“S”) who was treated with radiation therapy at age 5 for a recurrent malignant brain tumor. Radiation successfully abolished the tumor but caused radiation-induced tissue necrosis, primarily affecting cerebral white matter. S was introduced to us at age 15 because of her profound dyslexia. We assessed cognitive abilities and performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure cerebral white matter pathways. Diffuse white matter differences were evident in T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion anisotropy, and mean diffusivity measures in S compared to a group of 28 normal female controls. In addition, we found specific white matter pathway deficits by comparing tensor orientation directions in S’s brain with those of the control brains. While her principal diffusion direction maps appeared consistent with those of controls over most of the brain, there were tensor orientation abnormalities in the fiber tracts that form the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) in both hemispheres. Tractography analysis indicated that the left and right arcuate fasciculus (AF), as well as other tracts within the SLF, were missing in S. Other major white matter tracts, such as the corticospinal and inferior occipitofrontal pathways, were intact. Functional MRI measurements indicated left-hemisphere dominanance for language with a normal activation pattern. Despite the left AF abnormality, S had preserved oral language with average sentence repetition skills. In addition to profound dyslexia, S exhibited visuospatial, calculation, and rapid naming deficits and was impaired in both auditory and spatial working memory. We propose that the reading and visuospatial deficits were due to the abnormal left and right SLF pathways, respectively. These results advance our understanding of the functional significance of the SLF and are the first to link radiation necrosis with selective damage to a specific set of fiber tracts. PMID:18775735

  15. Reduced Volume of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Correia, Marta M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Mohr, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Atypical language is a fundamental feature of autism spectrum conditions (ASC), but few studies have examined the structural integrity of the arcuate fasciculus, the major white matter tract connecting frontal and temporal language regions, which is usually implicated as the main transfer route used in processing linguistic information by the brain. Abnormalities in the arcuate have been reported in young children with ASC, mostly in low-functioning or non-verbal individuals, but little is known regarding the structural properties of the arcuate in adults with ASC or, in particular, in individuals with ASC who have intact language, such as those with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. We used probabilistic tractography of diffusion-weighted imaging to isolate and scrutinize the arcuate in a mixed-gender sample of 18 high-functioning adults with ASC (17 Asperger syndrome) and 14 age- and IQ-matched typically developing controls. Arcuate volume was significantly reduced bilaterally with clearest differences in the right hemisphere. This finding remained significant in an analysis of all male participants alone. Volumetric reduction in the arcuate was significantly correlated with the severity of autistic symptoms as measured by the Autism-Spectrum Quotient. These data reveal that structural differences are present even in high-functioning adults with ASC, who presented with no clinically manifest language deficits and had no reported developmental language delay. Arcuate structural integrity may be useful as an index of ASC severity and thus as a predictor and biomarker for ASC. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27242478

  16. Reduced Volume of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Rachel L; Correia, Marta M; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Mohr, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Atypical language is a fundamental feature of autism spectrum conditions (ASC), but few studies have examined the structural integrity of the arcuate fasciculus, the major white matter tract connecting frontal and temporal language regions, which is usually implicated as the main transfer route used in processing linguistic information by the brain. Abnormalities in the arcuate have been reported in young children with ASC, mostly in low-functioning or non-verbal individuals, but little is known regarding the structural properties of the arcuate in adults with ASC or, in particular, in individuals with ASC who have intact language, such as those with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. We used probabilistic tractography of diffusion-weighted imaging to isolate and scrutinize the arcuate in a mixed-gender sample of 18 high-functioning adults with ASC (17 Asperger syndrome) and 14 age- and IQ-matched typically developing controls. Arcuate volume was significantly reduced bilaterally with clearest differences in the right hemisphere. This finding remained significant in an analysis of all male participants alone. Volumetric reduction in the arcuate was significantly correlated with the severity of autistic symptoms as measured by the Autism-Spectrum Quotient. These data reveal that structural differences are present even in high-functioning adults with ASC, who presented with no clinically manifest language deficits and had no reported developmental language delay. Arcuate structural integrity may be useful as an index of ASC severity and thus as a predictor and biomarker for ASC. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27242478

  17. Anatomical Variant of Atlas : Arcuate Foramen, Occpitalization of Atlas, and Defect of Posterior Arch of Atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine anatomic variations of the atlas and the clinical significance of these variations. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 1029 cervical 3-dimensional (3D) CT images. Cervical 3D CT was performed between November 2011 and August 2014. Arcuate foramina were classified as partial or complete and left and/or right. Occipitalization of the atlas was classified in accordance with criteria specified by Mudaliar et al. Posterior arch defects of the atlas were classified in accordance with criteria specified by Currarino et al. Results One hundred and eight vertebrae (108/1029, 10.5%) showed an arcuate foramen. Bilateral arcuate foramina were present in 41 of these vertebrae and the remaining 67 arcuate foramina were unilateral (right 31, left 36). Right-side arcuate foramina were partial on 18 sides and complete on 54 sides. Left-side arcuate foramina were partial on 24 sides and complete on 53 sides. One case of atlas assimilation was found. Twelve patients (12/1029, 1.17%) had a defect of the atlantal posterior arch. Nine of these patients (9/1029, 0.87%) had a type A posterior arch defect. We also identified one type B, one type D, and one type E defect. Conclusion Preoperative diagnosis of occipitalization of the atlas and arcuate foramina using 3D CT is of paramount importance in avoiding neurovascular injury during surgery. It is important to be aware of posterior arch defects of the atlas because they may be misdiagnosed as a fracture. PMID:26819687

  18. Identification of a platyhelminth neuropeptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hanan H; Humphries, Judith E; Larsen, Martha J; Kubiak, Teresa M; Geary, Timothy G; Maule, Aaron G; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2007-06-01

    We report the characterisation of the first neuropeptide receptor from the phylum Platyhelminthes, an early-diverging phylum which includes a number of important human and veterinary parasites. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was identified from the model flatworm Girardia tigrina (Tricladida: Dugesiidae) based on the presence of motifs widely conserved amongst GPCRs. In two different assays utilising heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the Girardia GPCR was most potently activated by neuropeptides from the FMRFamide-like peptide class. The most potent platyhelminth neuropeptide in both assays was GYIRFamide, a FMRFamide-like peptide known to be present in G. tigrina. There was no activation by neuropeptide Fs, another class of flatworm neuropeptides. Also active were FMRFamide-like peptides derived from other phyla but not known to be present in any platyhelminth. Most potent among these were nematode neuropeptides encoded by the Caenorhabditis elegans flp-1 gene which share a PNFLRFamide carboxy terminal motif. The ability of nematode peptides to stimulate a platyhelminth receptor demonstrates a degree of structural conservation between FMRFamide-like peptide receptors from these two distinct, distant phyla which contain parasitic worms.

  19. Elucidation of the anatomy of a satiety network: Focus on connectivity of the parabrachial nucleus in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Zséli, Györgyi; Vida, Barbara; Martinez, Anais; Lechan, Ronald M; Khan, Arshad M; Fekete, Csaba

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that brain regions showing neuronal activation after refeeding comprise major nodes in a satiety network, and tested this hypothesis with two sets of experiments. Detailed c-Fos mapping comparing fasted and refed rats was performed to identify candidate nodes of the satiety network. In addition to well-known feeding-related brain regions such as the arcuate, dorsomedial, and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, lateral hypothalamic area, parabrachial nucleus (PB), nucleus of the solitary tract and central amygdalar nucleus, other refeeding activated regions were also identified, such as the parastrial and parasubthalamic nuclei. To begin to understand the connectivity of the satiety network, the interconnectivity of PB with other refeeding-activated neuronal groups was studied following administration of anterograde or retrograde tracers into the PB. After allowing for tracer transport time, the animals were fasted and then refed before sacrifice. Refeeding-activated neurons that project to the PB were found in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamic area; arcuate, paraventricular, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; parasubthalamic nucleus; central amygdalar nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. Axons originating from the PB were observed to closely associate with refeeding-activated neurons in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamus; paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; central amygdalar nucleus; parasubthalamic nucleus; ventral posterior thalamic nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. These data indicate that the PB has bidirectional connections with most refeeding-activated neuronal groups, suggesting that short-loop feedback circuits exist in this satiety network. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2803-2827, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918800

  20. Lhx1 Controls Terminal Differentiation and Circadian Function of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bedont, Joseph L.; LeGates, Tara A.; Slat, Emily A.; Byerly, Mardi S.; Wang, Hong; Hu, Jianfei; Rupp, Alan C.; Qian, Jiang; Wong, G. William; Herzog, Erik D.; Hattar, Samer; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate circadian rhythms are organized by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Despite its physiological importance, SCN development is poorly understood. Here, we show that Lim homeodomain transcription factor 1 (Lhx1) is essential for terminal differentiation and function of the SCN. Deletion of Lhx1 in the developing SCN results in loss of SCN-enriched neuropeptides involved in synchronization and coupling to downstream oscillators, among other aspects of circadian function. Intact, albeit damped, clock gene expression rhythms persist in Lhx1-deficient SCN; however, circadian activity rhythms are highly disorganized and susceptible to surprising changes in period, phase, and consolidation following neuropeptide infusion. Our results identify a factor required for SCN terminal differentiation. In addition, our in vivo study of combinatorial SCN neuropeptide disruption uncovered synergies among SCN-enriched neuropeptides in regulating normal circadian function. These animals provide a platform for studying the central oscillator's role in physiology and cognition. PMID:24767996

  1. Pediatric traumatic brain injury: language outcomes and their relationship to the arcuate fasciculus.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Frédérique J; Mahony, Kate; Connelly, Alan; Pigdon, Lauren; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Morgan, Angela T

    2013-12-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in long-lasting language impairments alongside dysarthria, a motor-speech disorder. Whether this co-morbidity is due to the functional links between speech and language networks, or to widespread damage affecting both motor and language tracts, remains unknown. Here we investigated language function and diffusion metrics (using diffusion-weighted tractography) within the arcuate fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the corpus callosum in 32 young people after TBI (approximately half with dysarthria) and age-matched healthy controls (n=17). Only participants with dysarthria showed impairments in language, affecting sentence formulation and semantic association. In the whole TBI group, sentence formulation was best predicted by combined corpus callosum and left arcuate volumes, suggesting this "dual blow" seriously reduces the potential for functional reorganisation. Word comprehension was predicted by fractional anisotropy in the right arcuate. The co-morbidity between dysarthria and language deficits therefore seems to be the consequence of multiple tract damage.

  2. Arcuate hypothalamic AgRP and putative POMC neurons show opposite changes in spiking across multiple timescales

    PubMed Central

    Mandelblat-Cerf, Yael; Ramesh, Rohan N; Burgess, Christian R; Patella, Paola; Yang, Zongfang; Lowell, Bradford B; Andermann, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Agouti-related-peptide (AgRP) neurons—interoceptive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC)—are both necessary and sufficient for driving feeding behavior. To better understand the functional roles of AgRP neurons, we performed optetrode electrophysiological recordings from AgRP neurons in awake, behaving AgRP-IRES-Cre mice. In free-feeding mice, we observed a fivefold increase in AgRP neuron firing with mounting caloric deficit in afternoon vs morning recordings. In food-restricted mice, as food became available, AgRP neuron firing dropped, yet remained elevated as compared to firing in sated mice. The rapid drop in spiking activity of AgRP neurons at meal onset may reflect a termination of the drive to find food, while residual, persistent spiking may reflect a sustained drive to consume food. Moreover, nearby neurons inhibited by AgRP neuron photostimulation, likely including satiety-promoting pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, demonstrated opposite changes in spiking. Finally, firing of ARC neurons was also rapidly modulated within seconds of individual licks for liquid food. These findings suggest novel roles for antagonistic AgRP and POMC neurons in the regulation of feeding behaviors across multiple timescales. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07122.001 PMID:26159614

  3. Renovascular effects of neuropeptide-Y in the split hydronephrotic rat kidney: non-uniform pattern of vascular reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, M S; Fretschner, M; Nobiling, R; Persson, P B; Steinhausen, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The renovascular effects of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) were examined in the split hydronephrotic rat kidney. 2. Systemic infusion of low non-pressor doses of NPY (0.2 micrograms kg-1 up to 5.0 micrograms kg-1) produced a non-uniform pattern of vascular reactivity. In general, a significant constriction of the proximal and distal arcuate artery was seen at all doses. No constriction was seen at the interlobular artery or the larger part of the afferent arteriole. These segments initially dilated during the lower dose infusions. The very distal part of the afferent arteriole adjacent to the glomerulus and the proximal efferent arteriole responded in a similar way to the arcuate arteries. 3. NPY, locally applied into the tissue bath at concentrations of 1 nmol l-1 up to 25 nmol l-1, produced non-uniform vascular reactions similar to those of intravenously infused NPY. At the considerably higher local dosage of 1.14 mumol l-1, all vascular segments revealed vasoconstriction. 4. NPY application did not attenuate effects of acetylcholine. This observation suggests that the mechanism of NPY-induced vasoconstriction does not rely upon antagonism of endothelium-derived vasodilatation. 5. The pattern of vascular reactivity to NPY was substantially different from that known for the vasoconstrictors noradrenaline and angiotensin II in our preparation. PMID:1822552

  4. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  5. Neuropeptide Y: A stressful review

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Florian; Holzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stress is defined as an adverse condition that disturbs the homeostasis of the body and activates adaptation responses. Among the many pathways and mediators involved, neuropeptide Y (NPY) stands out due to its unique stress-relieving, anxiolytic and neuroprotective properties. Stress exposure alters the biosynthesis of NPY in distinct brain regions, the magnitude and direction of this effect varying with the duration and type of stress. NPY is expressed in particular neurons of the brainstem, hypothalamus and limbic system, which explains why NPY has an impact on stress-related changes in emotional-affective behaviour and feeding as well as on stress coping. The biological actions of NPY in mammals are mediated by the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptor, Y1 receptor stimulation being anxiolytic whereas Y2 receptor activation is anxiogenic. Emerging evidence attributes NPY a role in stress resilience, the ability to cope with stress. Thus there is a negative correlation between stress-induced behavioural disruption and cerebral NPY expression in animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder. Exogenous NPY prevents the negative consequences of stress, and polymorphisms of the NPY gene are predictive of impaired stress processing and increased risk of neuropsychiatric diseases. Stress is also a factor contributing to, and resulting from, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, in which NPY appears to play an important neuroprotective role. This review summarizes the evidence for an implication of NPY in stress-related and neurodegenerative pathologies and addresses the cerebral NPY system as a therapeutic target. PMID:26441327

  6. Anatomical Properties of the Arcuate Fasciculus Predict Phonological and Reading Skills in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Wandell, Brian A.; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, neurologists have hypothesized that the arcuate fasciculus carries signals that are essential for language function; however, the relevance of the pathway for particular behaviors is highly controversial. The primary objective of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to examine the relationship between individual…

  7. The immune effects of neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Berczi, I; Chalmers, I M; Nagy, E; Warrington, R J

    1996-05-01

    Current evidence indicates that the neuroendocrine system is the highest regulator of immune/inflammatory reactions. Prolactin and growth hormone stimulate the production of leukocytes, including lymphocytes, and maintain immunocompetence. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis constitutes the most powerful circuit regulating the immune system. The neuropeptides constituting this axis, namely corticotrophin releasing factor, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, and beta-endorphin are powerful immunoregulators, which have a direct regulatory effect on lymphoid cells, regulating immune reactions by the stimulation of immunoregulatory hormones (glucocorticoids) and also by acting on the central nervous system which in turn generates immunoregulatory nerve impulses. Peptidergic nerves are major regulators of the inflammatory response. Substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide are pro-inflammatory mediators and somatostatin is anti-inflammatory. The neuroendocrine regulation of the inflammatory response is of major significance from the point of view of immune homeostasis. Malfunction of this circuit leads to disease and often is life-threatening. The immune system emits signals towards the neuroendocrine system by cytokine mediators which reach significant blood levels (cytokine-hormones) during systemic immune/inflammatory reactions. Interleukin-1, -6, and TNF-alpha are the major cytokine hormones mediating the acute phase response. These cytokines induce profound neuroendocrine and metabolic changes by interacting with the central nervous system and with many other organs and tissues in the body. Corticotrophin releasing factor functions under these conditions as a major co-ordinator of the response and is responsible for activating the ACTH-adrenal axis for regulating fever and for other CNS effects leading to a sympathetic outflow. Increased ACTH secretion leads to glucocorticoid production. alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone

  8. Zinc regulation of food intake: new insights on the role of neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Cathy W

    2003-07-01

    The role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in feeding behavior and zinc deficiency-induced anorexia has been controversial because hypothalamic NPY levels are elevated in both zinc deficiency and food restriction. A recent report shows that while NPY is released from terminals in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of food-restricted animals, this release is significantly impaired in zinc-deficient animals. Zinc deficiency may therefore cause anorexia by inhibiting the release of NPY that is required for receptor activation. PMID:12918877

  9. Neuropeptides: Keeping The Balance Between Pathogen Immunity and Immune Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Ganea, Doina; Delgado, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Various neuropeptides have emerged recently as potent immunomodulatory factors with potential for their therapeutic use on immune disorders. Here we highlight the most recent data relevant in the field and we offer our opinion how neuropeptide therapy might impact clinical immune diseases, and the challenges in this field that must be overcome before achieving medical progress. We also review recent reports describing the antimicrobial effects showed by some neuropeptides and the therapeutic, physiological and evolutionary consequences of this new finding. Finally, we discuss how a physiologically functional neuropeptide system contributes to general health and how neuropeptides educate our immune system to be tolerant. PMID:20399708

  10. Neuropeptides: conductors of the immune orchestra.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Kay, N E; Solomon, G F; Plotnikoff, N P

    1987-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for a bidirectional communications system between the immune system and the brain. Many of the substances involved in this communication appear to be neuropeptides. These findings have given biochemical validity to the clinical and epidemiological studies that have suggested that psychosocial factors can modulate the response to infections and neoplasms. PMID:3298913

  11. The neuropeptide bursicon acts in cuticle metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bursicon is a heterodimeric neuropeptide formed of bursicon a (burs a) and bursicon B (burs B) that controls cuticle tanning and wing expansion in insects. Burs a-a and burs B-B homodimers are also formed; they act via an unknown receptor to induce expression of prophylactic immune and stress genes ...

  12. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  13. Effect of progesterone on kisspeptin and neurokinin B cell numbers in the arcuate nucleus of the female pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Progesterone acts at the hypothalamus to inhibit LH secretion in the pig, but the mechanism for this is unknown. Kisspeptin and neurokinin B (NKB) have both been shown to influence GnRH/LH secretion and mediate steroid negative feedback in several species and to be critical for normal reproductive f...

  14. Apolipoprotein A-IV inhibits AgRP/NPY neurons and activates POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) in the brain potently suppresses food intake. However the mechanisms underlying its anorexigenic effects remain to be identified. We first examined the effects of apoA-IV on cellular activities in hypothalamic neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and ne...

  15. The evolution and diversity of SALMFamide neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Maurice R; Achhala, Sufyan; Martynyuk, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Two types of SALMFamides have been identified: L-type (e.g. the starfish neuropeptides S1 and S2) with the C-terminal motif LxFamide (x is variable) and F-type with the C-terminal motif FxFamide. In the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (class Echinoidea) there are two SALMFamide genes, one encoding L-type SALMFamides and a second encoding F-type SALMFamides, but hitherto it was not known if this applies to other echinoderms. Here we report the identification of SALMFamide genes in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (class Holothuroidea) and the starfish Patiria miniata (class Asteroidea). In both species there are two SALMFamide genes: one gene encoding L-type SALMFamides (e.g. S1 in P. miniata) and a second gene encoding F-type SALMFamides plus one or more L-type SALMFamides (e.g. S2-like peptide in P. miniata). Thus, the ancestry of the two SALMFamide gene types traces back to the common ancestor of echinoids, holothurians and asteroids, although it is not clear if the occurrence of L-type peptides in F-type SALMFamide precursors is an ancestral or derived character. The gene sequences also reveal a remarkable diversity of SALMFamide neuropeptides. Originally just two peptides (S1 and S2) were isolated from starfish but now we find that in P. miniata, for example, there are sixteen putative SALMFamide neuropeptides. Thus, the SALMFamides would be a good model system for experimental analysis of the physiological significance of neuropeptide "cocktails" derived from the same precursor protein.

  16. Enhancement of a robust arcuate GABAergic input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in a model of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, Aleisha M; Prescott, Mel; Marshall, Christopher J; Yip, Siew Hoong; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2015-01-13

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), the leading cause of female infertility, is associated with an increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency, implicating abnormal steroid hormone feedback to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. This study investigated whether modifications in the synaptically connected neuronal network of GnRH neurons could account for this pathology. The PCOS phenotype was induced in mice following prenatal androgen (PNA) exposure. Serial blood sampling confirmed that PNA elicits increased LH pulse frequency and impaired progesterone negative feedback in adult females, mimicking the neuroendocrine abnormalities of the clinical syndrome. Imaging of GnRH neurons revealed greater dendritic spine density that correlated with increased putative GABAergic but not glutamatergic inputs in PNA mice. Mapping of steroid hormone receptor expression revealed that PNA mice had 59% fewer progesterone receptor-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARN). To address whether increased GABA innervation to GnRH neurons originates in the ARN, a viral-mediated Cre-lox approach was taken to trace the projections of ARN GABA neurons in vivo. Remarkably, projections from ARN GABAergic neurons heavily contacted and even bundled with GnRH neuron dendrites, and the density of fibers apposing GnRH neurons was even greater in PNA mice (56%). Additionally, this ARN GABA population showed significantly less colocalization with progesterone receptor in PNA animals compared with controls. Together, these data describe a robust GABAergic circuit originating in the ARN that is enhanced in a model of PCOS and may underpin the neuroendocrine pathophysiology of the syndrome.

  17. Neuropeptides and steroid hormones in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cerinic, M M; Konttinen, Y; Generini, S; Cutolo, M

    1998-05-01

    Primary afferent nociceptive and peptidergic efferent nerves are sensitized in arthritis and thus easily stimulated by mechanical and chemical stimuli. This leads to increased or disturbed release of neuropeptides from nerve terminals. This local (at the site of stimulation), expanded (expanded and additional receptive fields), and remote (cross-spinal reflexes) neuropeptide release leads to disturbed tissue homeostasis and neurogenic inflammation. In arthritis, raised levels of neuropeptides were detected in the synovial fluid, whereas nerve fibers were lacking in the synovial tissue. It has been hypothesized that cycles of nerve fiber destruction and degeneration follow the cycles of joint inflammation. This evidence suggests that the peripheral nervous system, through its neuropeptides, may contribute to the generation of inflammation, i.e., "neurogenic inflammation." Altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis function and sex hormone status have been suggested to contribute to the development and persistence of arthritis. In particular, current evidence indicates that glucocorticoid secretion is closely and reciprocally interrelated with inflammation, and that an adrenal insufficiency is present in many forms of immune-mediated arthritis. Conversely, gonadal steroids seem to play a central role as predisposing factors in many forms of arthritis, with estrogens involved as immuno-enhancing hormones and androgens as natural immunosuppressors. Functional receptors for sex hormones have been described in cells involved in the immune response and, after activation, the hormone-receptor complex might modulate the expression of selected cytokines. The possibility of targeting the efferent nerves with specific peptides and replacement therapies with selected steroid hormones may represent a new and potentially efficient and natural system of modulation of the arthritis.

  18. The Role of Neuropeptides in Suicidal Behavior: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, Maurizio; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing evidence that neuropeptides may be involved in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior. A critical review of the literature was conducted to investigate the association between neuropeptides and suicidal behavior. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals were selected for the inclusion in the present review. Twenty-six articles were assessed for eligibility but only 22 studies were included. Most studies have documented an association between suicidality and some neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), VGF, cholecystokinin, substance P, and neuropeptide Y (NPY), which have been demonstrated to act as key neuromodulators of emotional processing. Significant differences in neuropeptides levels have been found in those who have attempted or completed suicide compared with healthy controls or those dying from other causes. Despite cross-sectional associations between neuropeptides levels and suicidal behavior, causality may not be inferred. The implications of the mentioned studies were discussed in this review paper. PMID:23986909

  19. The role of neuropeptides in suicidal behavior: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Gianluca; Pompili, Maurizio; Lindqvist, Daniel; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing evidence that neuropeptides may be involved in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior. A critical review of the literature was conducted to investigate the association between neuropeptides and suicidal behavior. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals were selected for the inclusion in the present review. Twenty-six articles were assessed for eligibility but only 22 studies were included. Most studies have documented an association between suicidality and some neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), VGF, cholecystokinin, substance P, and neuropeptide Y (NPY), which have been demonstrated to act as key neuromodulators of emotional processing. Significant differences in neuropeptides levels have been found in those who have attempted or completed suicide compared with healthy controls or those dying from other causes. Despite cross-sectional associations between neuropeptides levels and suicidal behavior, causality may not be inferred. The implications of the mentioned studies were discussed in this review paper.

  20. Evaluating the Arcuate Fasciculus With Combined Diffusion-Weighted MRI Tractography and Electrocorticography

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Erik C.; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Muzik, Otto; Rothermel, Robert; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhász, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2014-01-01

    The conventional model of language-related brain structure describing the arcuate fasciculus as a key white matter tract providing a direct connection between Wernicke’s region and Broca’s area has been called into question. Specifically, the inferior precentral gyrus, possessing both primary motor (Brodmann Area [BA] 4) and premotor cortex (BA 6), has been identified as a potential alternative termination. The authors initially localized cortical sites involved in language using measurement of event-related gamma-activity on electrocorticography (ECoG). The authors then determined whether language-related sites of the temporal lobe were connected, via white matter structures, to the inferior frontal gyrus more tightly than to the precentral gyrus. The authors found that language-related sites of the temporal lobe were far more likely to be directly connected to the inferior precentral gyrus through the arcuate fasciculus. Furthermore, tractography was a significant predictor of frontal language-related ECoG findings. Analysis of an interaction between anatomy and tractography in this model revealed tractrography to have the highest predictive value for language-related ECoG findings of the precentral gyrus. This study failed to support the conventional model of language-related brain structure. More feasible models should include the inferior precentral gyrus as a termination of the arcuate fasciculus. The exact functional significance of direct connectivity between temporal language-related sites and the precentral gyrus requires further study. PMID:23982893

  1. Neural Plasticity After Pre-Linguistic Injury to the Arcuate and Superior Longitudinal Fasciculi

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, Jason D; Feldman, Heidi M

    2011-01-01

    We describe the case of girl who was born prematurely and diagnosed periventricular leukomalacia, a condition characterized by severe injury to the white matter tracts primarily surrounding the ventricles. At 12 years of age, we obtained diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data on this child as part of a research protocol. Multiple analyses of DTI data, including tractography, showed that the left and right arcuate and superior longitudinal fasciculi were missing in the child though all other major white matter tracts were present. Standardized psychometric tests at age 12 years revealed that despite early language delays, she had average scores on expressive language, sentence repetition, and reading, functions that have been hypothesized to depend on signals carried by the arcuate fasciculus. We identified intact ventral connections between the temporal and frontal lobes through the extreme capsule fiber system and uncinate fasciculus. Preserved language and reading function after serious injury to the arcuate fasciculus highlights the plasticity of the developing brain after severe white matter injury early in life. PMID:21937035

  2. The role of neuropeptides in sleep modulation.

    PubMed

    Prospéro-García, Oscar; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica

    2004-10-01

    Several neuropeptides affect the sleep-wake cycle, for example, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, cholecystokinin octapeptide, orexin, somatostatin, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y and cortistatin, which regulate food ingestion. There are also proteins from the immunological system: tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, as well as trophic molecules, such as growth hormone-releasing hormone, growth hormone, prolactin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin-4. Based on this information, we believe that some functions of sleep can be suggested. One of these functions could be the regulation of energy, since many, if not all, of the neuropeptides that regulate feeding affect the level of alertness. Likewise, the immunological system and the trophic molecules establish a dialog with the brain during sleep in order to reestablish neuronal structure. These proteins are the expression of genes that accomplish the function of regulating our waking and our sleep, suggesting the important control the genome is exerting on this activity.

  3. A proteomic approach to neuropeptide function elucidation.

    PubMed

    Temmerman, L; Bogaerts, A; Meelkop, E; Cardoen, D; Boerjan, B; Janssen, T; Schoofs, L

    2012-03-01

    Many of the diverse functions of neuropeptides are still elusive. As they are ideally suited to modulate traditional signaling, their added actions are not always detectable under standard laboratory conditions. The search for function assignment to peptide encoding genes can therefore greatly benefit from molecular information. Specific molecular changes resulting from neuropeptide signaling may direct researchers to yet unknown processes or conditions, for which studying these signaling systems may eventually lead to phenotypic confirmation. Here, we applied gel-based proteomics after pdf-1 neuropeptide gene knockout in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. It has previously been described that pdf-1 null mutants display a locomotion defect, being slower and making more turns and reversals than wild type worms. The vertebrate functional homolog of PDF-1, vasocative intestinal peptide (VIP), is known to influence a plethora of processes, which have so far not been investigated for pdf-1. Because proteins represent the actual effectors inside an organism, proteomic analysis can guide our view to novel pdf-1 actions in the nematode worm. Our data show that knocking out pdf-1 results in alteration of levels of proteins involved in fat metabolism, stress resistance and development. This indicates a possible conservation of VIP-like actions for pdf-1 in C. elegans.

  4. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  5. Identification of a new member of PBAN family of neuropeptides from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide hormones produced by neurosecretory cells in the central or peripheral nervous systems regulate various physiological and behavioral events during insect development and reproduction. Pyrokinin/Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) is a major neuropeptide family, chara...

  6. Neuropeptide regulation of fear and anxiety: Implications of cholecystokinin, endogenous opioids, and neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mallory E; Choi, Dennis C; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-12-01

    The neural circuitry of fear likely underlies anxiety and fear-related disorders such as specific and social phobia, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The primary pharmacological treatments currently utilized for these disorders include benzodiazepines, which act on the GABAergic receptor system, and antidepressants, which modulate the monamine systems. However, recent work on the regulation of fear neural circuitry suggests that specific neuropeptide modulation of this system is of critical importance. Recent reviews have examined the roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis neuropeptides as well as the roles of neurotrophic factors in regulating fear. The present review, instead, will focus on three neuropeptide systems which have received less attention in recent years but which are clearly involved in regulating fear and its extinction. The endogenous opioid system, particularly activating the μ opioid receptors, has been demonstrated to regulate fear expression and extinction, possibly through functioning as an error signal within the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray to mark unreinforced conditioned stimuli. The cholecystokinin (CCK) system initially led to much excitement through its potential role in panic disorder. More recent work in the CCK neuropeptide pathway suggests that it may act in concordance with the endogenous cannabinoid system in the modulation of fear inhibition and extinction. Finally, older as well as very recent data suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a very interesting role in counteracting stress effects, enhancing extinction, and enhancing resilience in fear and stress preclinical models. Future work in understanding the mechanisms of neuropeptide functioning, particularly within well-known behavioral circuits, are likely to provide fascinating new clues into the understanding of fear behavior as well as suggesting novel therapeutics for treating disorders of anxiety and fear dysregulation.

  7. Comparison of Caenorhabditis elegans NLP peptides with arthropod neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Husson, Steven J; Lindemans, Marleen; Janssen, Tom; Schoofs, Liliane

    2009-04-01

    Neuropeptides are small messenger molecules that can be found in all metazoans, where they govern a diverse array of physiological processes. Because neuropeptides seem to be conserved among pest species, selected peptides can be considered as attractive targets for drug discovery. Much can be learned from the model system Caenorhabditis elegans because of the availability of a sequenced genome and state-of-the-art postgenomic technologies that enable characterization of endogenous peptides derived from neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) precursors. Here, we provide an overview of the NLP peptide family in C. elegans and discuss their resemblance with arthropod neuropeptides and their relevance for anthelmintic discovery.

  8. Neuropeptides in the Gonads: From Evolution to Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Nicolette L.; Bentley, George E.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate gonads are the sites of synthesis and binding of many peptides that were initially classified as neuropeptides. These gonadal neuropeptide systems are neither well understood in isolation, nor in their interactions with other neuropeptide systems. Further, our knowledge of the control of these gonadal neuropeptides by peripheral hormones that bind to the gonads, and which themselves are under regulation by true neuropeptide systems from the hypothalamus, is relatively meager. This review discusses the existence of a variety of neuropeptides and their receptors which have been discovered in vertebrate gonads, and the possible way in which such systems could have evolved. We then focus on two key neuropeptides for regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis: gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). Comparative studies have provided us with a degree of understanding as to how a gonadal GnRH system might have evolved, and they have been responsible for the discovery of GnIH and its gonadal counterpart. We attempt to highlight what is known about these two key gonadal neuropeptides, how their actions differ from their hypothalamic counterparts, and how we might learn from comparative studies of them and other gonadal neuropeptides in terms of pharmacology, reproductive physiology and evolutionary biology. PMID:21607065

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  10. Mimetic analogs of three insect neuropeptide classes for pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptides are potent regulators of critical life processes in insects, but are subjected to rapid degradation by peptidases in the hemolymph (blood), tissues and gut. This limitation can be overcome via replacement of peptidase susceptible portions of the insect neuropeptides to create analogs w...

  11. Mimetic analogs of pyrokinin neuropeptides for pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptides are potent regulators of critical life processes in insects, but are subjected to rapid degradation by peptidases in the hemolymph (blood), tissues and gut. This limitation can be overcome via replacement of peptidase susceptible portions of the insect neuropeptides to create analogs ...

  12. Transcriptomic identification of starfish neuropeptide precursors yields new insights into neuropeptide evolution

    PubMed Central

    Semmens, Dean C.; Mirabeau, Olivier; Moghul, Ismail; Pancholi, Mahesh R.; Wurm, Yannick; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are evolutionarily ancient mediators of neuronal signalling in nervous systems. With recent advances in genomics/transcriptomics, an increasingly wide range of species has become accessible for molecular analysis. The deuterostomian invertebrates are of particular interest in this regard because they occupy an ‘intermediate' position in animal phylogeny, bridging the gap between the well-studied model protostomian invertebrates (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans) and the vertebrates. Here we have identified 40 neuropeptide precursors in the starfish Asterias rubens, a deuterostomian invertebrate from the phylum Echinodermata. Importantly, these include kisspeptin-type and melanin-concentrating hormone-type precursors, which are the first to be discovered in a non-chordate species. Starfish tachykinin-type, somatostatin-type, pigment-dispersing factor-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type precursors are the first to be discovered in the echinoderm/ambulacrarian clade of the animal kingdom. Other precursors identified include vasopressin/oxytocin-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type, cholecystokinin/gastrin-type, orexin-type, luqin-type, pedal peptide/orcokinin-type, glycoprotein hormone-type, bursicon-type, relaxin-type and insulin-like growth factor-type precursors. This is the most comprehensive identification of neuropeptide precursor proteins in an echinoderm to date, yielding new insights into the evolution of neuropeptide signalling systems. Furthermore, these data provide a basis for experimental analysis of neuropeptide function in the unique context of the decentralized, pentaradial echinoderm bauplan. PMID:26865025

  13. Transcriptomic identification of starfish neuropeptide precursors yields new insights into neuropeptide evolution.

    PubMed

    Semmens, Dean C; Mirabeau, Olivier; Moghul, Ismail; Pancholi, Mahesh R; Wurm, Yannick; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptides are evolutionarily ancient mediators of neuronal signalling in nervous systems. With recent advances in genomics/transcriptomics, an increasingly wide range of species has become accessible for molecular analysis. The deuterostomian invertebrates are of particular interest in this regard because they occupy an 'intermediate' position in animal phylogeny, bridging the gap between the well-studied model protostomian invertebrates (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans) and the vertebrates. Here we have identified 40 neuropeptide precursors in the starfish Asterias rubens, a deuterostomian invertebrate from the phylum Echinodermata. Importantly, these include kisspeptin-type and melanin-concentrating hormone-type precursors, which are the first to be discovered in a non-chordate species. Starfish tachykinin-type, somatostatin-type, pigment-dispersing factor-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type precursors are the first to be discovered in the echinoderm/ambulacrarian clade of the animal kingdom. Other precursors identified include vasopressin/oxytocin-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type, cholecystokinin/gastrin-type, orexin-type, luqin-type, pedal peptide/orcokinin-type, glycoprotein hormone-type, bursicon-type, relaxin-type and insulin-like growth factor-type precursors. This is the most comprehensive identification of neuropeptide precursor proteins in an echinoderm to date, yielding new insights into the evolution of neuropeptide signalling systems. Furthermore, these data provide a basis for experimental analysis of neuropeptide function in the unique context of the decentralized, pentaradial echinoderm bauplan.

  14. Transcriptomic identification of starfish neuropeptide precursors yields new insights into neuropeptide evolution.

    PubMed

    Semmens, Dean C; Mirabeau, Olivier; Moghul, Ismail; Pancholi, Mahesh R; Wurm, Yannick; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptides are evolutionarily ancient mediators of neuronal signalling in nervous systems. With recent advances in genomics/transcriptomics, an increasingly wide range of species has become accessible for molecular analysis. The deuterostomian invertebrates are of particular interest in this regard because they occupy an 'intermediate' position in animal phylogeny, bridging the gap between the well-studied model protostomian invertebrates (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans) and the vertebrates. Here we have identified 40 neuropeptide precursors in the starfish Asterias rubens, a deuterostomian invertebrate from the phylum Echinodermata. Importantly, these include kisspeptin-type and melanin-concentrating hormone-type precursors, which are the first to be discovered in a non-chordate species. Starfish tachykinin-type, somatostatin-type, pigment-dispersing factor-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type precursors are the first to be discovered in the echinoderm/ambulacrarian clade of the animal kingdom. Other precursors identified include vasopressin/oxytocin-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type, cholecystokinin/gastrin-type, orexin-type, luqin-type, pedal peptide/orcokinin-type, glycoprotein hormone-type, bursicon-type, relaxin-type and insulin-like growth factor-type precursors. This is the most comprehensive identification of neuropeptide precursor proteins in an echinoderm to date, yielding new insights into the evolution of neuropeptide signalling systems. Furthermore, these data provide a basis for experimental analysis of neuropeptide function in the unique context of the decentralized, pentaradial echinoderm bauplan. PMID:26865025

  15. Mini-review: the evolution of neuropeptide signaling.

    PubMed

    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Hauser, Frank

    2012-08-10

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in basal animals with primitive nervous systems such as cnidarians (Hydra, jellyfishes, corals, and sea anemones). Most animals emerging after the Cnidaria belong to two evolutionary lineages, the Protostomia (to which the majority of invertebrates belong) and Deuterostomia (to which some minor groups of invertebrates, and all vertebrates belong). These two lineages split about 700 million years (Myr) ago. Many mammalian neuropeptide GPCRs have orthologues in the Protostomia and this is also true for some of the mammalian neuropeptides. Examples are oxytocin/vasopressin, GnRH, gastrin/CCK, and neuropeptide Y and their GPCRs. These results implicate that protostomes (for example insects and nematodes) can be used as models to study the biology of neuropeptide signaling.

  16. Neuropeptides in Alzheimer's disease: from pathophysiological mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, Debby; Van Dijck, Annemie; Janssen, Leen; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2013-06-01

    Neuropeptides are found throughout the entire nervous system where they can act as neurotransmitter, neuromodulator or neurohormone. In those functions, they play important roles in the regulation of cognition and behavior. In brain disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD), where abnormal cognition and behavior are observed, the study of neuropeptides is particularly interesting since altered neuropeptides can function as biomarkers or as targets for new medication. In this article neuropeptides with relevance to AD are listed and their influence on cognitive and behavioral disturbances is discussed. Findings from human cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue, and AD mouse models are described and related to the pathophysiology and symptomatology of the disease. In the past, clinical trials with neuropeptides have often failed due to insufficient delivery to the brain. Therefore, new strategies to target the brain with peptide drugs are also covered.

  17. Mini-review: the evolution of neuropeptide signaling.

    PubMed

    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Hauser, Frank

    2012-08-10

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in basal animals with primitive nervous systems such as cnidarians (Hydra, jellyfishes, corals, and sea anemones). Most animals emerging after the Cnidaria belong to two evolutionary lineages, the Protostomia (to which the majority of invertebrates belong) and Deuterostomia (to which some minor groups of invertebrates, and all vertebrates belong). These two lineages split about 700 million years (Myr) ago. Many mammalian neuropeptide GPCRs have orthologues in the Protostomia and this is also true for some of the mammalian neuropeptides. Examples are oxytocin/vasopressin, GnRH, gastrin/CCK, and neuropeptide Y and their GPCRs. These results implicate that protostomes (for example insects and nematodes) can be used as models to study the biology of neuropeptide signaling. PMID:22726357

  18. Investigating Late Amazonian Volcanotectonic Activity on Olympus Mons, Mars using Flank Vents and Arcuate Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanism, a fundamental process in shaping the Martian surface, is crucial to understanding its evolution. Olympus Mons, the largest volcano on Mars, is one of several large shield volcanoes. Previous studies were technologically limited to large features associated with these constructs. With the advent of high resolution datasets, we are now able to investigate smaller features, such as flank vents and arcuate graben. Flank vents, common on polygenetic volcanoes, indicate that magma has propagated away from the main conduit and/or magma chamber. Vent morphology allows for the characterization of magma properties and eruption rates. Graben indicate extensional deformation. The distribution of graben provides information on stresses that acted on the volcano. In lieu of geophysical, spectral and in-situ data, morphology, morphometry and spatial relationships are powerful tools. We utilized high resolution image data (CTX, HiRISE and THEMIS IR) and topographic data (HRSC DTM, MOLA) to identify and characterize flank vents and graben. We observed 60 flank vents and 84 arcuate graben on Olympus Mons. Flank vents display varying morphologies and morphometries, suggesting different eruption styles and variable magma volatility. Vents occur primarily on the lower flank. This suggests magma has propagated substantial distances from the magma chamber. Observed clustering of vents may also indicate shallow magma sources. Similarly, graben are observed on the lower flank crosscutting young lava flows that have mantled portions of the escarpment. This indicates either gravitational spreading of Olympus Mons or flexure of the lithosphere in response to the load of the edifice. Collectively, the distribution of flank vents and arcuate graben suggests a similar development to that proposed for Ascraeus Mons. Based on superposition relationships and dates from previous studies, the flank vents and graben formed in the Late Amazonian (≤500 Ma).

  19. Treatment of median arcuate ligament syndrome via traditional and robotic techniques.

    PubMed

    You, Jae S; Cooper, Matthew; Nishida, Steven; Matsuda, Elna; Murariu, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is a rare entity characterized by extrinsic compression of the celiac artery and symptoms of postprandial epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss mimicking mesenteric ischemia. We present two patients diagnosed with MALS, the first treated with an open laparotomy by a vascular surgeon and the second using a robot assisted laparoscopic approach by a general surgeon with a vascular surgeon on standby. This is the second ever report of this approach. Both patients recovered without complications and experienced resolution of their symptoms. A discussion of the pathophysiology, literature review, and multispecialty treatment approach are presented. PMID:24349891

  20. Large arcuate scars: A geological legacy of the Earth's accretionary past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saul, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Immediately following accretion, the surface of the Earth was densely patterned with circular scars which were the surface expressions of 3-D craterform structures. In the course of geological time these structures would have become less and less visible due to the workings of the Earth's atmosphere, surface waters, and plate tectonics regime but there is no compelling reason to assume that they have been entirely eradicated. Furthermore, a very imperfect analogy with the other inner planets suggests that geological processes may not in fact be capable of totally erasing such deep features. Some illustrative examples of arcuate scars are discussed.

  1. Arcuate Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In the upper left corner of this VIS image are a series of fractures. Where the fractures are exposed on the surface it is impossible to tell the plane of the fracture; however where the fractures are visible in the cliff wall it is possible to see that the fractures dip to the north. This image shows part of the caldera of Tharsis Tholus.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.7, Longitude 176.5 East (183.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. A neuropeptide speeds circadian entrainment by reducing intercellular synchrony

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Harang, Rich; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Tsai, Connie A.; Mazuski, Cristina; Kim, Jihee; Doyle, Francis J.; Petzold, Linda R.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Shift work or transmeridian travel can desynchronize the body's circadian rhythms from local light–dark cycles. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates and entrains daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Paradoxically, we found that vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide implicated in synchrony among SCN cells, can also desynchronize them. The degree and duration of desynchronization among SCN neurons depended on both the phase and the dose of VIP. A model of the SCN consisting of coupled stochastic cells predicted both the phase- and the dose-dependent response to VIP and that the transient phase desynchronization, or “phase tumbling”, could arise from intrinsic, stochastic noise in small populations of key molecules (notably, Period mRNA near its daily minimum). The model also predicted that phase tumbling following brief VIP treatment would accelerate entrainment to shifted environmental cycles. We tested this using a prepulse of VIP during the day before a shift in either a light cycle in vivo or a temperature cycle in vitro. Although VIP during the day does not shift circadian rhythms, the VIP pretreatment approximately halved the time required for mice to reentrain to an 8-h shifted light schedule and for SCN cultures to reentrain to a 10-h shifted temperature cycle. We conclude that VIP below 100 nM synchronizes SCN cells and above 100 nM reduces synchrony in the SCN. We show that exploiting these mechanisms that transiently reduce cellular synchrony before a large shift in the schedule of daily environmental cues has the potential to reduce jet lag. PMID:24167276

  3. Neuropeptide Y stimulates autophagy in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Aveleira, Célia A; Botelho, Mariana; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Pascoal, Jorge F; Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Nóbrega, Clévio; Cortes, Luísa; Valero, Jorge; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Álvaro, Ana R; Santana, Magda; Kügler, Sebastian; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-03-31

    Aging is characterized by autophagy impairment that contributes to age-related disease aggravation. Moreover, it was described that the hypothalamus is a critical brain area for whole-body aging development and has impact on lifespan. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the major neuropeptides present in the hypothalamus, and it has been shown that, in aged animals, the hypothalamic NPY levels decrease. Because caloric restriction (CR) delays aging, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy, and also increases hypothalamic NPY levels, we hypothesized that NPY could have a relevant role on autophagy modulation in the hypothalamus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of NPY on autophagy in the hypothalamus. Using both hypothalamic neuronal in vitro models and mice overexpressing NPY in the hypothalamus, we observed that NPY stimulates autophagy in the hypothalamus. Mechanistically, in rodent hypothalamic neurons, NPY increases autophagy through the activation of NPY Y1 and Y5 receptors, and this effect is tightly associated with the concerted activation of PI3K, MEK/ERK, and PKA signaling pathways. Modulation of hypothalamic NPY levels may be considered a potential strategy to produce protective effects against hypothalamic impairments associated with age and to delay aging. PMID:25775546

  4. Neuropeptide Y and posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sah, R; Geracioti, TD

    2016-01-01

    Resiliency to the adverse effects of extraordinary emotional trauma on the brain varies within the human population. Accordingly, some people cope better than others with traumatic stress. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid peptide transmitter abundantly expressed in forebrain limbic and brain stem areas that regulate stress and emotional behaviors. Studies largely in rodents demonstrate a role for NPY in promoting coping with stress. Moreover, accruing data from the genetic to the physiological implicate NPY as a potential ‘resilience-to-stress’ factor in humans. Here, we consolidate findings from preclinical and clinical studies of NPY that are of relevance to stress-associated syndromes, most prototypically posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Collectively, these data suggest that reduced central nervous system (CNS) NPY concentrations or function may be associated with PTSD. We also link specific symptoms of human PTSD with extant findings in the NPY field to reveal potential physiological contributions of the neuropeptide to the disorder. In pursuit of understanding the physiological basis and treatment of PTSD, the NPY system is an attractive target. PMID:22801411

  5. Neuropeptide Signaling in Crustaceans Probed by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhidan

    Neuropeptides are one of the most diverse classes of signaling molecules whose identities and functions are not yet fully understood. They have been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes, including feeding-related and motivated behaviors, and also environmental adaptations. In this work, improved mass spectrometry-based analytical platforms were developed and applied to the crustacean systems to characterize signaling molecules. This dissertation begins with a review of mass spectrometry-based neuropeptide studies from both temporal- and spatial-domains. This review is then followed by several chapters detailing a few research projects related to the crustacean neuropeptidomic characterization and comparative analysis. The neuropeptidome of crayfish, Orconectes rusticus is characterized for the first time using mass spectrometry-based tools. In vivo microdialysis sampling technique offers the capability of direct sampling from extracellular space in a time-resolved manner. It is used to investigate the secreted neuropeptide and neurotransmitter content in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, in this work. A new quantitation strategy using alternative mass spectrometry data acquisition approach is developed and applied for the first time to quantify neuropeptides. Coupling of this method with microdialysis enables the study of neuropeptide dynamics concurrent with different behaviors. Proof-of-principle experiments validating this approach have been carried out in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis to study feeding- and circadian rhythm-related neuropeptide changes using micoridialysis in a time-resolved manner. This permits a close correlation between behavioral and neurochemical changes, providing potential candidates for future validation of regulatory roles. In addition to providing spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) technique enables the characterization of signaling molecules while preserving the temporal resolution. A

  6. [Role of estrogen-sensitive neurons in the arcuate region of the hypothalamus in the mechanism of luteinizing hormone release].

    PubMed

    Babichev, V N; Ignatkov, V Ia

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on rats; estradiol brought to the arcuate region of the hypothalamus by means of microionophoresis led to the increase of the region of the hypothalamus by means of microionophoresis led to the increase of the blood luteinizing hormone (LH) level during the following stages of the estral cycle-diestrus 1, diestrus 2, and the first half day of the proestrus; as to the second half of the proestrus day--estradiol decreased its level. Changes in the LH level in the hypophysis under the influence of the microionophoretic introduction of estradiol into the arcuate region occurred during the second half of the day of diestrus 2 (reduction), and during the estrus (elevation). In the majority of cases a rise of the blood level was combined with the neuron activation in the arcuate region under the influence of estradiol.

  7. Neuropeptides as targets for the development of anticonvulsant drugs.

    PubMed

    Clynen, Elke; Swijsen, Ann; Raijmakers, Marjolein; Hoogland, Govert; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. These seizures are due to abnormal excessive and synchronous neuronal activity in the brain caused by a disruption of the delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Neuropeptides can contribute to such misbalance by modulating the effect of classical excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. In this review, we discuss 21 different neuropeptides that have been linked to seizure disorders. These neuropeptides show an aberrant expression and/or release in animal seizure models and/or epilepsy patients. Many of these endogenous peptides, like adrenocorticotropic hormone, angiotensin, cholecystokinin, cortistatin, dynorphin, galanin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin, somatostatin, and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, are able to suppress seizures in the brain. Other neuropeptides, such as arginine-vasopressine peptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone, enkephalin, β-endorphin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and tachykinins have proconvulsive properties. For oxytocin and melanin-concentrating hormone both pro- and anticonvulsive effects have been reported, and this seems to be dose or time dependent. All these neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs. Other neuropeptides such as nesfatin-1 and vasoactive intestinal peptide have been less studied in this field; however, as nesfatin-1 levels change over the course of epilepsy, this can be considered as an interesting marker to diagnose patients who have suffered a recent epileptic seizure.

  8. Neuropeptide Y administration into the amygdala alters high fat food intake.

    PubMed

    Primeaux, Stefany D; York, David A; Bray, George A

    2006-07-01

    The orexigenic effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) are mediated through the hypothalamus, while the anxiolytic effects of NPY appear to be mediated through the amygdala. We hypothesized that intra-amygdalar administration of NPY might alter food preference without changing total food intake. Neuropeptide Y was administered into the central nucleus of the amygdala in both satiated and overnight-fasted rats, and intake and preference for a high fat diet (56%)/low carbohydrate (20%) diet or a low fat (10%)/high carbohydrate (66%) diet were measured. Intra-amygdalar NPY administration in satiated rats did not change total caloric intake, but it did produce a dose-dependent decrease in intake of and preference for high fat diet relative to low fat diet over 24 h. In overnight-fasted rats, intra-amygdalar NPY also decreased the intake and preference for a high fat diet relative to low fat diet over 24 h, without altering total caloric intake. Intra-amygdalar NPY administration did not produce conditioned taste aversions to a novel saccharin solution. These results suggest that amygdalar NPY may have a role in macronutrient selection, without altering total caloric intake.

  9. Neuromodulatory function of neuropeptides in the normal CNS.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Adalberto; Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Lossi, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Neuropeptides are small protein molecules produced and released by discrete cell populations of the central and peripheral nervous systems through the regulated secretory pathway and acting on neural substrates. Inside the nerve cells, neuropeptides are selectively stored within large granular vesicles (LGVs), and commonly coexist in neurons with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, amino acids, and catecholamines). Storage in LGVs is responsible for a relatively slow response to secretion that requires enhanced or repeated stimulation. Coexistence (i.e. the concurrent presence of a neuropeptide with other messenger molecules in individual neurons), and co-storage (i.e. the localization of two or more neuropeptides within individual LGVs in neurons) give rise to a complicated series of pre- and post-synaptic functional interactions with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters. The typically slow response and action of neuropeptides as compared to fast-neurotransmitters such as excitatory/inhibitory amino acids and catecholamines is also due to the type of receptors that trigger neuropeptide actions onto target cells. Almost all neuropeptides act on G-protein coupled receptors that, upon ligand binding, activate an intracellular cascade of molecular enzymatic events, eventually leading to cellular responses. The latter occur in a time span (seconds or more) considerably longer (milliseconds) than that of low-molecular-weight fast-neurotransmitters, directly operating through ion channel receptors. As reviewed here, combined immunocytochemical visualization of neuropeptides and their receptors at the ultrastructural level and electrophysiological studies, have been fundamental to better unravel the role of neuropeptides in neuron-to-neuron communication.

  10. NeuroPep: a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mingxia; Yin, Sanwen; Jang, Richard; Wang, Jian; Xue, Zhidong; Xu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides play a variety of roles in many physiological processes and serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of some nervous-system disorders. In recent years, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified neuropeptides. Therefore, we have developed NeuroPep, a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides, which holds 5949 non-redundant neuropeptide entries originating from 493 organisms belonging to 65 neuropeptide families. In NeuroPep, the number of neuropeptides in invertebrates and vertebrates is 3455 and 2406, respectively. It is currently the most complete neuropeptide database. We extracted entries deposited in UniProt, the database (www.neuropeptides.nl) and NeuroPedia, and used text mining methods to retrieve entries from the MEDLINE abstracts and full text articles. All the entries in NeuroPep have been manually checked. 2069 of the 5949 (35%) neuropeptide sequences were collected from the scientific literature. Moreover, NeuroPep contains detailed annotations for each entry, including source organisms, tissue specificity, families, names, post-translational modifications, 3D structures (if available) and literature references. Information derived from these peptide sequences such as amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, molecular weight and other physicochemical properties of peptides are also provided. A quick search feature allows users to search the database with keywords such as sequence, name, family, etc., and an advanced search page helps users to combine queries with logical operators like AND/OR. In addition, user-friendly web tools like browsing, sequence alignment and mapping are also integrated into the NeuroPep database. Database URL: http://isyslab.info/NeuroPep

  11. NeuroPep: a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mingxia; Yin, Sanwen; Jang, Richard; Wang, Jian; Xue, Zhidong; Xu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides play a variety of roles in many physiological processes and serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of some nervous-system disorders. In recent years, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified neuropeptides. Therefore, we have developed NeuroPep, a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides, which holds 5949 non-redundant neuropeptide entries originating from 493 organisms belonging to 65 neuropeptide families. In NeuroPep, the number of neuropeptides in invertebrates and vertebrates is 3455 and 2406, respectively. It is currently the most complete neuropeptide database. We extracted entries deposited in UniProt, the database (www.neuropeptides.nl) and NeuroPedia, and used text mining methods to retrieve entries from the MEDLINE abstracts and full text articles. All the entries in NeuroPep have been manually checked. 2069 of the 5949 (35%) neuropeptide sequences were collected from the scientific literature. Moreover, NeuroPep contains detailed annotations for each entry, including source organisms, tissue specificity, families, names, post-translational modifications, 3D structures (if available) and literature references. Information derived from these peptide sequences such as amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, molecular weight and other physicochemical properties of peptides are also provided. A quick search feature allows users to search the database with keywords such as sequence, name, family, etc., and an advanced search page helps users to combine queries with logical operators like AND/OR. In addition, user-friendly web tools like browsing, sequence alignment and mapping are also integrated into the NeuroPep database. Database URL: http://isyslab.info/NeuroPep PMID:25931458

  12. Characterization and distribution of neuropeptide Y in the brain of a caecilian amphibian.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, T J; Conlon, J M; Goetz, F W; Boyd, S K

    2001-03-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) from the brain of an amphibian from the order Gymnophiona (the caecilian, Typhlonectes natans) was characterized. We cloned a 790 base pair cDNA encoding the caecilian NPY precursor. The open reading frame consisted of 291 bases, indicating an NPY precursor of 97 amino acids. Both deduced and isolated NPY primary structures were Tyr-Pro-Ser-Lys-Pro-Asp-Asn-Pro-Gly-Glu(10)-Asp-Ala-Pro-Ala-Glu-Asp-Met-Ala-Lys-Tyr(20)-Tyr-Ser-Ala-Leu-Arg-His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu(30)-Ile-Thr-Arg-Gln-Arg-Tyr. NH2. In caecilian brain, we observed NPY immunoreactive cells within the medial pallium, basal forebrain, preoptic area, midbrain tegmentum and trigeminal nucleus. The prevalence of preoptic and hypothalamic terminal field staining supports the hypothesis that NPY controls pituitary function in this caecilian.

  13. Anti-opioid effects of neuropeptide FF receptors in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Kersanté, Flavie; Wang, Jin-Ya; Chen, Jin-Chung; Mollereau, Catherine; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-25

    The present study investigates the modulatory effects of neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors on the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway controlled by opioid receptors. A stable NPFF(2) receptor agonist, dNPA, was injected into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the release of dopamine and serotonin within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), induced by intraperitoneal injection of morphine, was monitored using the brain microdialysis, in non-constrained rat. dNPA decreased systemic morphine-induced elevation of dopamine and serotonin metabolites within the NAc. Furthermore, co-injected with morphine into the VTA, NPFF inhibited morphine-induced stereotypy 60-120min after the injection. This neurochemical and behavioural anti-opioid effect mediated by NPFF(2) receptors at the level of VTA suggests the involvement of NPFF in the rewarding effects of opiates on the mesolimbic dopamine system.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of neuropeptides and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) for neuropeptides in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-01

    The genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors were identified in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) by transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Forty-eight candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or peptide hormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of neuropeptide-like precursor 2 (NPLP2) and trissin. The gene coding for prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) was first identified from hemimetabolous insect. A total of 57 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were identified and phylogenetic analysis showed most of them to be closely related to insect GPCRs. A notable finding was the occurrence of vertebrate hormone receptors, thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR)-like GPCR and parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR)-like GPCRs. These results suggest that N. lugens possesses the most comprehensive neuropeptide system yet found in insects. Moreover, our findings demonstrate the power of RNA-seq as a tool for analyzing the neuropeptide-related genes in the absence of whole genome sequence information.

  15. [Galanin: a new biologically active gastrointestinal neuropeptide].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F E

    1990-03-01

    The 29 amino acid containing neuropeptide galanin is localized in the intrinsic nervous system of the entire gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas. It was found in man and several animal species. Molecular biology studies revealed different molecular forms of galanin in several mammalian species including man. The galanin precursor was also found. Galanin shows several potent pharmacological actions: it inhibits gastrointestinal motility in man. It also has an inhibitory effect on intestinal smooth muscle contractility of several animal species. These actions are mediated directly by opening of potassium channels and indirectly by inhibition of acetylcholine release. In addition galanin inhibits pancreatic hormone secretion (i.e. hypoinsulinemia, hyperglycemia) and partly the release of hormones localized in the gastrointestinal tract. On exocrine glands in man (salivary glands) galanin has hydrokinetic actions. The physiological role of galanin might be regulation of gastrointestinal motility, control of secretory function of intestine and a regulatory role in endocrine and exocrine gland secretion.

  16. Neuropeptide Y functions as a neuroproliferative factor.

    PubMed

    Hansel, D E; Eipper, B A; Ronnett, G V

    2001-04-19

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has a number of functions in mammalian physiology. Here we identify a role for NPY in promoting proliferation of postnatal neuronal precursor cells. NPY is synthesized in the postnatal olfactory epithelium by sustentacular cells, previously proposed to function only in structural support. Mice with a targeted deletion of NPY contain half as many dividing olfactory neuronal precursor cells as do controls. Furthermore, NPY-deficient mice develop significantly fewer olfactory neurons by adulthood. NPY acts on multipotent neuronal precursor or basal cells to activate rapidly and transiently the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 subgroup of mitogen-activated protein kinases. The NPY Y1 receptor subtype appears to mediate this effect. The ability of NPY to induce neuronal precursor proliferation is mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), indicating an upstream PKC-dependent activation of ERK1/2. These results indicate that NPY may regulate neuronal precursor proliferation in the adult mammal.

  17. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  18. [Galanin: a new biologically active gastrointestinal neuropeptide].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F E

    1990-03-01

    The 29 amino acid containing neuropeptide galanin is localized in the intrinsic nervous system of the entire gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas. It was found in man and several animal species. Molecular biology studies revealed different molecular forms of galanin in several mammalian species including man. The galanin precursor was also found. Galanin shows several potent pharmacological actions: it inhibits gastrointestinal motility in man. It also has an inhibitory effect on intestinal smooth muscle contractility of several animal species. These actions are mediated directly by opening of potassium channels and indirectly by inhibition of acetylcholine release. In addition galanin inhibits pancreatic hormone secretion (i.e. hypoinsulinemia, hyperglycemia) and partly the release of hormones localized in the gastrointestinal tract. On exocrine glands in man (salivary glands) galanin has hydrokinetic actions. The physiological role of galanin might be regulation of gastrointestinal motility, control of secretory function of intestine and a regulatory role in endocrine and exocrine gland secretion. PMID:1693024

  19. A Combined fMRI and DTI Examination of Functional Language Lateralization and Arcuate Fasciculus Structure: Effects of Degree versus Direction of Hand Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propper, Ruthe E.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.; Whalen, Stephen; Tie, Yanmei; Norton, Isaiah H.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Zollei, Lilla; Radmanesh, Alireza; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between hand preference degree and direction, functional language lateralization in Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and structural measures of the arcuate fasciculus. Results revealed an effect of degree of hand preference on arcuate fasciculus structure, such that consistently-handed individuals,…

  20. De novo discovery of neuropeptides in the genomes of parasitic flatworms using a novel comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Uriel; Koziol, Miguel; Preza, Matías; Costábile, Alicia; Brehm, Klaus; Castillo, Estela

    2016-10-01

    Neuropeptide mediated signalling is an ancient mechanism found in almost all animals and has been proposed as a promising target for the development of novel drugs against helminths. However, identification of neuropeptides from genomic data is challenging, and knowledge of the neuropeptide complement of parasitic flatworms is still fragmentary. In this work, we have developed an evolution-based strategy for the de novo discovery of neuropeptide precursors, based on the detection of localised sequence conservation between possible prohormone convertase cleavage sites. The method detected known neuropeptide precursors with good precision and specificity in the models Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, it identified novel putative neuropeptide precursors in nematodes, including the first description of allatotropin homologues in this phylum. Our search for neuropeptide precursors in the genomes of parasitic flatworms resulted in the description of 34 conserved neuropeptide precursor families, including 13 new ones, and of hundreds of new homologues of known neuropeptide precursor families. Most neuropeptide precursor families show a wide phylogenetic distribution among parasitic flatworms and show little similarity to neuropeptide precursors of other bilaterian animals. However, we could also find orthologs of some conserved bilaterian neuropeptides including pyrokinin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, myomodulin, neuropeptide-Y, neuropeptide KY and SIF-amide. Finally, we determined the expression patterns of seven putative neuropeptide precursor genes in the protoscolex of Echinococcus multilocularis. All genes were expressed in the nervous system with different patterns, indicating a hidden complexity of peptidergic signalling in cestodes.

  1. De novo discovery of neuropeptides in the genomes of parasitic flatworms using a novel comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Uriel; Koziol, Miguel; Preza, Matías; Costábile, Alicia; Brehm, Klaus; Castillo, Estela

    2016-10-01

    Neuropeptide mediated signalling is an ancient mechanism found in almost all animals and has been proposed as a promising target for the development of novel drugs against helminths. However, identification of neuropeptides from genomic data is challenging, and knowledge of the neuropeptide complement of parasitic flatworms is still fragmentary. In this work, we have developed an evolution-based strategy for the de novo discovery of neuropeptide precursors, based on the detection of localised sequence conservation between possible prohormone convertase cleavage sites. The method detected known neuropeptide precursors with good precision and specificity in the models Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, it identified novel putative neuropeptide precursors in nematodes, including the first description of allatotropin homologues in this phylum. Our search for neuropeptide precursors in the genomes of parasitic flatworms resulted in the description of 34 conserved neuropeptide precursor families, including 13 new ones, and of hundreds of new homologues of known neuropeptide precursor families. Most neuropeptide precursor families show a wide phylogenetic distribution among parasitic flatworms and show little similarity to neuropeptide precursors of other bilaterian animals. However, we could also find orthologs of some conserved bilaterian neuropeptides including pyrokinin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, myomodulin, neuropeptide-Y, neuropeptide KY and SIF-amide. Finally, we determined the expression patterns of seven putative neuropeptide precursor genes in the protoscolex of Echinococcus multilocularis. All genes were expressed in the nervous system with different patterns, indicating a hidden complexity of peptidergic signalling in cestodes. PMID:27388856

  2. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive neurons in the suprachiasmatic-subparaventricular region in the hedgehog-tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Unger, J W

    1992-04-01

    The distribution of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) was studied in geniculate and peri-chiasmatic regions in the lesser hedgehog-tenrec, Echinops telfairi (Insectivora). Only few neurons demonstrated NPY-like immunoreactivity in the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus. In contrast, NPY-immunoreactive perikarya were clearly present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and dorsal and caudal to it. The latter region might correspond to the subparaventricular zone (SPV), recently identified in the rat as an additional area involved in processing circadian rhythms. While the distribution of a distinct cell population across nuclear boundries in both SCh and SPV might conform to the present idea of processing circadian rhythms, the presence of NPY-like immunoreactive neurons in these areas is rather unusual. In mammals, such neurons have only been demonstrated so far in the mentioned insectivore as well as in man.

  3. Advances in Mass Spectrometric Tools for Probing Neuropeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchberger, Amanda; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators in the functionality of the brain and other neurological organs. Because neuropeptides exist in a wide range of concentrations, appropriate characterization methods are needed to provide dynamic, chemical, and spatial information. Mass spectrometry and compatible tools have been a popular choice in analyzing neuropeptides. There have been several advances and challenges, both of which are the focus of this review. Discussions range from sample collection to bioinformatic tools, although avenues such as quantitation and imaging are included. Further development of the presented methods for neuropeptidomic mass spectrometric analysis is inevitable, which will lead to a further understanding of the complex interplay of neuropeptides and other signaling molecules in the nervous system.

  4. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bakos, Jan; Zatkova, Martina; Bacova, Zuzana; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits. PMID:26881105

  5. Locus coeruleus response to single-prolonged stress and early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Sabban, Esther L; Laukova, Marcela; Alaluf, Lishay G; Olsson, Emelie; Serova, Lidia I

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulation of the central noradrenergic system is a core feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we examined molecular changes in locus coeruleus (LC) triggered by single-prolonged stress (SPS) PTSD model at a time when behavioral symptoms are manifested, and the effect of early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). Immediately following SPS stressors, male SD rats were administered intranasal NPY (SPS/NPY) or vehicle (SPS/V). Seven days later, TH protein, but not mRNA, was elevated in LC only of the SPS/V group. Although 90% of TH positive cells expressed GR, its levels were unaltered. Compared to unstressed controls, LC of SPS/V, but not SPS/NPY, expressed less Y2 receptor mRNA with more CRHR1 mRNA in subset of animals, and elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in central nucleus of amygdala. Following testing for anxiety on elevated plus maze (EPM), there were significantly increased TH, DBH and NPY mRNAs in LC of SPS-treated, but not previously unstressed animals. Their levels highly correlated with each other but not with behavioral features on EPM. Thus, SPS triggers long-term noradrenergic activation and higher sensitivity to mild stressors, perhaps mediated by the up-regulation influence of amygdalar CRH input and down-regulation of Y2R presynaptic inhibition in LC. Results also demonstrate the therapeutic potential of early intervention with intranasal NPY for traumatic stress-elicited noradrenergic impairments. Single-prolonged stress (SPS)-triggered long-term changes in the locus coeruleus/norepinephrine (LC/NE) system with increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and CRH receptor 1(CRHR1) mRNA and lower neuropeptide Y receptor 2 (Y2R) mRNA levels as well as elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) that were prevented by early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). SPS treatment led to increased sensitivity of LC to mild stress of elevated plus maze

  6. Locus coeruleus response to single-prolonged stress and early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Sabban, Esther L; Laukova, Marcela; Alaluf, Lishay G; Olsson, Emelie; Serova, Lidia I

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulation of the central noradrenergic system is a core feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we examined molecular changes in locus coeruleus (LC) triggered by single-prolonged stress (SPS) PTSD model at a time when behavioral symptoms are manifested, and the effect of early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). Immediately following SPS stressors, male SD rats were administered intranasal NPY (SPS/NPY) or vehicle (SPS/V). Seven days later, TH protein, but not mRNA, was elevated in LC only of the SPS/V group. Although 90% of TH positive cells expressed GR, its levels were unaltered. Compared to unstressed controls, LC of SPS/V, but not SPS/NPY, expressed less Y2 receptor mRNA with more CRHR1 mRNA in subset of animals, and elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in central nucleus of amygdala. Following testing for anxiety on elevated plus maze (EPM), there were significantly increased TH, DBH and NPY mRNAs in LC of SPS-treated, but not previously unstressed animals. Their levels highly correlated with each other but not with behavioral features on EPM. Thus, SPS triggers long-term noradrenergic activation and higher sensitivity to mild stressors, perhaps mediated by the up-regulation influence of amygdalar CRH input and down-regulation of Y2R presynaptic inhibition in LC. Results also demonstrate the therapeutic potential of early intervention with intranasal NPY for traumatic stress-elicited noradrenergic impairments. Single-prolonged stress (SPS)-triggered long-term changes in the locus coeruleus/norepinephrine (LC/NE) system with increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and CRH receptor 1(CRHR1) mRNA and lower neuropeptide Y receptor 2 (Y2R) mRNA levels as well as elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) that were prevented by early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). SPS treatment led to increased sensitivity of LC to mild stress of elevated plus maze

  7. [Effects of neuropeptides on interferon production in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    The study of an interferon-inducing action of neuropeptides (a cerebrolysin model) on production of interferons by human blood leukocytes has shown that neuropeptides induce gamma-interferon production in the titer 267 IU/ml that determines one of the mechanisms of a neuroimmunocorrecting effect of cerebrolysin (Ebewe, Austria) in many neurological diseases (acute stroke, brain traumas and different neuroinfectious diseases). PMID:18720720

  8. Neuropeptides control the dynamic behavior of airway mucosal dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Voedisch, Sabrina; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Veres, Tibor Z; Spies, Emma; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The airway mucosal epithelium is permanently exposed to airborne particles. A network of immune cells patrols at this interface to the environment. The interplay of immune cells is orchestrated by different mediators. In the current study we investigated the impact of neuronal signals on key functions of dendritic cells (DC). Using two-photon microscopic time-lapse analysis of living lung sections from CD11c-EYFP transgenic mice we studied the influence of neuropeptides on airway DC motility. Additionally, using a confocal microscopic approach, the phagocytotic capacity of CD11c(+) cells after neuropeptide stimulation was determined. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) leads to an unspecific release of neuropeptides from nerves. After EFS and treatment with the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), airway DC in living lung slices showed an altered motility. Furthermore, the EFS-mediated effect could partially be blocked by pre-treatment with the receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37). Additionally, the phagocytotic capacity of bone marrow-derived and whole lung CD11c(+) cells could be inhibited by neuropeptides CGRP, VIP, and Substance P. We then cross-linked these data with the in vivo situation by analyzing DC motility in two different OVA asthma models. Both in the acute and prolonged OVA asthma model altered neuropeptide amounts and DC motility in the airways could be measured. In summary, our data suggest that neuropeptides modulate key features motility and phagocytosis of mouse airway DC. Therefore altered neuropeptide levels in airways during allergic inflammation have impact on regulation of airway immune mechanisms and therefore might contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma.

  9. Relatively normal repetition performance despite severe disruption of the left arcuate fasciculus.

    PubMed

    Epstein-Peterson, Zachary; Vasconcellos Faria, Andreia; Mori, Susumu; Hillis, Argye E; Tsapkini, Kyrana

    2012-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) is believed to be fundamental to the neural circuitry behind many important cognitive processes. Connecting Wernicke's and Broca's area, these fibers are thought to be especially important for repetition. In this case study we present evidence from a patient that set doubt on these assumptions. We present structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and language data on a patient with a large left-sided stroke and severely damaged left AF who showed intact word repetition and relatively intact sentence repetition performance. Specifically, his sentence repetition is more fluent and grammatical, with less hesitation than spontaneous speech, and with rare omissions only during the longest sentences. These results challenge classical theories that maintain the left AF is the dominant language processing pathway or mechanism for repetition. PMID:22229646

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging studies on arcuate fasciculus in stroke patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the most common and devastating sequelae of stroke. The arcuate fasciculus (AF), an important neural tract for language function, connects Broca's and Wernicke's areas. In this review article, previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies on the AF in stroke patients were reviewed with regard to the usefulness for diagnosis (seven studies), prediction of prognosis (two studies), and recovery of aphasia (three studies). Although scant studies on this topic have been conducted in stroke patients, DTI for the AF appears to provide useful information on the presence or severity of injury of the AF, prognosis prediction of aphasia, and recovery mechanisms of aphasia in stroke patients. Therefore, further DTI studies on these topics should be encouraged, especially studies on prognosis prediction and recovery mechanisms of aphasia. In addition, research on other neural tracts known to be involved in aphasia as well as the AF in both hemispheres should be encouraged. PMID:24198780

  11. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J; Day, Tim A; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-09-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era. PMID:19361512

  12. Neuropeptides of the cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter).

    PubMed

    Predel, Reinhard; Russell, William K; Russell, David H; Suh, Charles P-C; Nachman, Ronald J

    2012-03-01

    The cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter), is an economically important pest of cotton, and increasing concerns over resistance, detrimental effects on beneficial insects and safety issues associated with traditional insecticide applications have led to an interest in research on novel, alternative strategies for control. One such approach requires a more basic understanding of the neurohormonal system that regulates important physiological properties of the fleahopper; e.g. the expression of specific messenger molecules such as neuropeptides. Therefore we performed a peptidomic study of neural tissues from the fleahopper which led to the first identification of the sequences of native peptide hormones. These peptide hormones include the following neuropeptides: corazonin, short neuropeptide F (sNPF), myosuppressin, CAPA-pyrokinin and CAPA-PVK peptides. The CAPA-pyrokinin, sNPF, and CAPA-PVK peptides represent novel sequences. A comparison of fleahopper neuropeptides with those of related heteropteran species indicates that they are quite different. The sNPF of P. seriatus shows, among others, a novel substitution of Leu with Phe within the C-terminal region; a modification that sets it apart from the known sNPFs of not only other Heteroptera but of other arthropod species as well. The identity of the neuropeptides native to the fleahopper can aid in the potential development of biostable, bioavailable mimetic agonists and antagonists capable of disrupting the physiological functions that these neuropeptides regulate.

  13. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J; Day, Tim A; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-09-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era.

  14. A review of the arcuate structures in the Iberian Variscides; constraints and genetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, R.; Ribeiro, A.; Romão, J.; Coke, C.; Moreira, N.

    2016-06-01

    The main Ibero-Armorican Arc (IAA) is essentially defined by a predominant NW-SE trend in the Iberian branch and an E-W trend in the Brittany one. However, in northern Spain it presents a 180° rotation, sometimes known as the Cantabrian Arc (CA). The relation between both arcs is controversial, being considered either as a single arc due to one tectonic event, or as the result of a polyphasic process. According to the last assumption, there is a later arcuate structure (CA), overlapping a previous major one (IAA). Whatever the models, they must be able to explain the presence of a Variscan sinistral transpression in Iberia and a dextral one in Armorica, and a deformation spanning from the Devonian to the Upper Carboniferous. Another arcuate structure, in continuity with the CA, the Central-Iberian Arc (CIA) was recently proposed mainly based upon on magnetic anomalies, geometry of major folds and Ordovician paleocurrents. The critical review of the structural, stratigraphic and geophysical data supports both the IAA and the CA, but as independent structures. However, the presence of a CIA is highly questionable and could not be supported. The complex strain pattern of the IAA and the CA could be explained by a Devonian - Carboniferous polyphasic indentation of a Gondwana promontory. In this model the CA is essentially a thin-skinned arc, while the IAA has a more complex and longer evolution that has led to a thick-skinned first order structure. Nevertheless, both arcs are essentially the result of a lithospheric bending process during the Iberian Variscides.

  15. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  16. Sensory neuropeptide effects in human skin.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R W; Conradson, T B; Dixon, C M; Crossman, D C; Barnes, P J

    1987-12-01

    1 Neuropeptides released from sensory nerves may account for cutaneous flare and wheal following local trauma. In 28 normal subjects we have studied the effects of four sensory neuropeptides given by intradermal injection on the forearm or back. 2 All peptides caused a flare distant from the site of injection, presumably due to an axon reflex. Substance P (SP) was the most potent (geometric mean dose causing 50% of maximum flare, 4.2 pmol). Neurokinin A (NKA) was the next most potent with neurokinin B (NKB) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the least. The distant flare response to SP, NKA and NKB was maximal at 5 min and disappeared within 2 h. 3 CGRP caused a local erythema over the site of injection at doses above 0.5 pmol which at higher doses lasted for up to 12 h. 4 SP, NKA and NKB caused wheals at doses above 5 pmol with SP and NKB being the most potent. CGRP (up to 250 pmol) did not consistently cause wheal formation. There was no significant effect of coinjection of CGRP upon the response to SP although there was a tendency for an enhancement of the wheal response. 5 The H1-histamine antagonist terfenadine (60 mg orally) significantly inhibited the wheal and distant flare response to histamine (5 nmol) and NKA, but not that caused by NKB. The distant flare of CGRP was also reduced but the local erythema was unaltered. 6. Aspirin (600 mg orally) significantly inhibited the distant flare response to SP, NKA and CGRP, but not that caused by NKB or histamine; the local erythema induced by CGRP was unaffected by aspirin. Aspirin also inhibited the wheal formed by NKA but not the wheal induced by the other substances. 7. These results suggest that tachykinins cause a distant flare response partially via the release of histamine and cyclo-oxygenase products, but cause a wheal by a direct effect on the skin microvasculature. The order of potency SP > NKB > NKA suggests that an SPp or NK, receptor is involved in the wheal response. CGRP by contrast has a

  17. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-01-01

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers' attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one's favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands. PMID:26449882

  18. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters in human placental villi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C L; Cheng, L R; Wang, H; Zhuang, L Z; Huang, W Q

    1991-01-01

    The human placenta contains many kinds of bioactive substances which are more or less similar to those from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Most of the studies were carried out mainly with term placenta. The present study, therefore, was attempted to identify, quantify and characterize these substances in the human placenta at the early pregnancy. Using the RIA, immunohistochemistry, HPLC, tissue culture and intrauterine injection methods, we have found that: (1) many kinds of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are present in the placental villi; (2) LH-RH, NT and SRIF positive immunoreactive granules are localized in the cytotrophoblast and those of beta-EP, 5-HT positive granules in the syncytiotrophoblast; (3) synthetic LH-RH and dynorphin (Dyn) stimulate the hCG secretion of the early placental villi in vitro, and (4) the antisera of LH-RH, NT, Dyn and NE antagonist-alpha-MPT significantly reduced the number of blastocyst implantations in the early pregnant rat. These results indicate that in the human placenta there possibly exists a self-regulation mechanism for the synthesis and secretion of placental hormones and neurotransmitters. Therefore, the human placenta can be regarded as a neuroendocrine organ.

  19. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-01-01

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers’ attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one’s favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands. PMID:26449882

  20. Regional distribution of neuropeptide Y and its receptor in the porcine central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Busch-Sørensen, M; Sheikh, S P; O'Hare, M; Tortora, O; Schwartz, T W; Gammeltoft, S

    1989-05-01

    The regional distribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactivity and receptor binding was studied in the porcine CNS. The highest amounts of immunoreactive NPY were found in the hypothalamus, septum pellucidum, gyrus cinguli, cortex frontalis, parietalis, and piriformis, corpus amygdaloideum, and bulbus olfactorius (200-1,000 pmol/g wet weight). In the cortex temporalis and occipitalis, striatum, hippocampus, tractus olfactorius, corpus mamillare, thalamus, and globus pallidus, the NPY content was 50-200 pmol/g wet weight, whereas the striatum, colliculi, substantia nigra, cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata, and medulla spinalis contained less than 50 pmol/g wet weight. The receptor binding of NPY was highest in the hippocampus, corpus fornicis, corpus amygdaloideum, nucleus accumbens, and neurohypophysis, with a range of 1.0-5.87 pmol/mg of protein. Intermediate binding (0.5-1.0 pmol/mg of protein) was found in the septum pellucidum, columna fornicis, corpus mamillare, cortex piriformis, gyrus cinguli, striatum, substantia grisea centralis, substantia nigra, and cerebellum. In the corpus callosum, basal ganglia, corpus pineale, colliculi, corpus geniculatum mediale, nucleus ruber, pons, medulla oblongata, and medulla spinalis, receptor binding of NPY was detectable but less than 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. No binding was observed in the bulbus and tractus olfactorius and adenohypophysis. In conclusion, immunoreactive NPY and its receptors are widespread in the porcine CNS, with predominant location in the limbic system, olfactory system, hypothalamoneurohypophysial tract, corpus striatum, and cerebral cortex.

  1. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents.

  2. Multiple Neuropeptide-Coding Genes Involved in Planarian Pharynx Extension.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Seira; Inoue, Takeshi; Kashima, Makoto; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Planarian feeding behavior involves three steps: moving toward food, extending the pharynx from their planarian's ventral side after arriving at the food, and ingesting the food through the pharynx. Although pharynx extension is a remarkable behavior, it remains unknown what neuronal cell types are involved in its regulation. To identify neurons involved in regulating pharynx extension, we quantitatively analyzed pharynx extension and sought to identify these neurons by RNA interference (RNAi) and in situ hybridization. This assay, when performed using planarians with amputation of various body parts, clearly showed that the head portion is indispensable for inducing pharynx extension. We thus tested the effects of knockdown of brain neurons such as serotonergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic neurons by RNAi, but did not observe any effects on pharynx extension behavior. However, animals with RNAi of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2, a neuropeptide processing enzyme) gene did not perform the pharynx extension behavior, suggesting the possible involvement of neuropeptide(s in the regulation of pharynx extension. We screened 24 neuropeptide-coding genes, analyzed their functions by RNAi using the pharynx extension assay system, and identified at least five neuropeptide genes involved in pharynx extension. These was expressed in different cells or neurons, and some of them were expressed in the brain, suggesting complex regulation of planarian feeding behavior by the nervous system.

  3. Neuropeptides, via specific receptors, regulate T cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Levite, M; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Steinman, L; Lider, O

    1998-01-15

    The ability of T cells to adhere to and interact with components of the blood vessel walls and the extracellular matrix is essential for their extravasation and migration into inflamed sites. We have found that the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of resting human T cells to fibronectin, a major glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix, is induced by physiologic concentrations of three neuropeptides: calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin; each acts via its own specific receptor on the T cell membrane. In contrast, substance P (SP), which coexists with CGRP in the majority of peripheral endings of sensory nerves, including those innervating the lymphoid organs, blocks T cell adhesion to fibronectin when induced by CGRP, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, and PMA. Inhibition of T cell adhesion was obtained both by the intact SP peptide and by its 1-4 N-terminal and its 4-11, 5-11, and 6-11 C-terminal fragments, used at similar nanomolar concentrations. The inhibitory effects of the parent SP peptide and its fragments were abrogated by an SP NK-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting they all act through the same SP NK-1 receptor. These findings suggest that neuropeptides, by activating their specific T cell-expressed receptors, can provide the T cells with both positive (proadhesive) and negative (antiadhesive) signals and thereby regulate their function. Thus, neuropeptides may influence diverse physiologic processes involving integrins, including leukocyte-mediated migration and inflammation. PMID:9551939

  4. Multiple Neuropeptide-Coding Genes Involved in Planarian Pharynx Extension.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Seira; Inoue, Takeshi; Kashima, Makoto; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Planarian feeding behavior involves three steps: moving toward food, extending the pharynx from their planarian's ventral side after arriving at the food, and ingesting the food through the pharynx. Although pharynx extension is a remarkable behavior, it remains unknown what neuronal cell types are involved in its regulation. To identify neurons involved in regulating pharynx extension, we quantitatively analyzed pharynx extension and sought to identify these neurons by RNA interference (RNAi) and in situ hybridization. This assay, when performed using planarians with amputation of various body parts, clearly showed that the head portion is indispensable for inducing pharynx extension. We thus tested the effects of knockdown of brain neurons such as serotonergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic neurons by RNAi, but did not observe any effects on pharynx extension behavior. However, animals with RNAi of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2, a neuropeptide processing enzyme) gene did not perform the pharynx extension behavior, suggesting the possible involvement of neuropeptide(s in the regulation of pharynx extension. We screened 24 neuropeptide-coding genes, analyzed their functions by RNAi using the pharynx extension assay system, and identified at least five neuropeptide genes involved in pharynx extension. These was expressed in different cells or neurons, and some of them were expressed in the brain, suggesting complex regulation of planarian feeding behavior by the nervous system. PMID:27268986

  5. Damage to the anterior arcuate fasciculus predicts non-fluent speech production in aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dazhou; Fillmore, Paul; Holland, Audrey; Rorden, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Non-fluent aphasia implies a relatively straightforward neurological condition characterized by limited speech output. However, it is an umbrella term for different underlying impairments affecting speech production. Several studies have sought the critical lesion location that gives rise to non-fluent aphasia. The results have been mixed but typically implicate anterior cortical regions such as Broca’s area, the left anterior insula, and deep white matter regions. To provide a clearer picture of cortical damage in non-fluent aphasia, the current study examined brain damage that negatively influences speech fluency in patients with aphasia. It controlled for some basic speech and language comprehension factors in order to better isolate the contribution of different mechanisms to fluency, or its lack. Cortical damage was related to overall speech fluency, as estimated by clinical judgements using the Western Aphasia Battery speech fluency scale, diadochokinetic rate, rudimentary auditory language comprehension, and executive functioning (scores on a matrix reasoning test) in 64 patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke. A region of interest analysis that included brain regions typically implicated in speech and language processing revealed that non-fluency in aphasia is primarily predicted by damage to the anterior segment of the left arcuate fasciculus. An improved prediction model also included the left uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract connecting the middle and anterior temporal lobe with frontal lobe regions, including the pars triangularis. Models that controlled for diadochokinetic rate, picture-word recognition, or executive functioning also revealed a strong relationship between anterior segment involvement and speech fluency. Whole brain analyses corroborated the findings from the region of interest analyses. An additional exploratory analysis revealed that involvement of the uncinate fasciculus adjudicated between Broca’s and global aphasia

  6. Damage to the anterior arcuate fasciculus predicts non-fluent speech production in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Fridriksson, Julius; Guo, Dazhou; Fillmore, Paul; Holland, Audrey; Rorden, Chris

    2013-11-01

    Non-fluent aphasia implies a relatively straightforward neurological condition characterized by limited speech output. However, it is an umbrella term for different underlying impairments affecting speech production. Several studies have sought the critical lesion location that gives rise to non-fluent aphasia. The results have been mixed but typically implicate anterior cortical regions such as Broca's area, the left anterior insula, and deep white matter regions. To provide a clearer picture of cortical damage in non-fluent aphasia, the current study examined brain damage that negatively influences speech fluency in patients with aphasia. It controlled for some basic speech and language comprehension factors in order to better isolate the contribution of different mechanisms to fluency, or its lack. Cortical damage was related to overall speech fluency, as estimated by clinical judgements using the Western Aphasia Battery speech fluency scale, diadochokinetic rate, rudimentary auditory language comprehension, and executive functioning (scores on a matrix reasoning test) in 64 patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke. A region of interest analysis that included brain regions typically implicated in speech and language processing revealed that non-fluency in aphasia is primarily predicted by damage to the anterior segment of the left arcuate fasciculus. An improved prediction model also included the left uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract connecting the middle and anterior temporal lobe with frontal lobe regions, including the pars triangularis. Models that controlled for diadochokinetic rate, picture-word recognition, or executive functioning also revealed a strong relationship between anterior segment involvement and speech fluency. Whole brain analyses corroborated the findings from the region of interest analyses. An additional exploratory analysis revealed that involvement of the uncinate fasciculus adjudicated between Broca's and global aphasia

  7. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of number density distributions of the nucleus, harmonic well and Woods-Saxon models, are used with the t-matrix that is taken from the scattering experiments to find a simple optical potential. The parameterized two body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are shown. The eikonal approximation was chosen as the solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  8. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  9. Convergence of the nucleus-nucleus Glauber multiple scattering series

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I. )

    1991-05-01

    The Glauber {ital S}-matrix operator for nucleus-nucleus scattering is expressed as a finite series of matrix elements involving Bell's polynomials. Analyzing {alpha}{sup 4}He elastic-scattering data at the incident momentum of 4.32 GeV/{ital c}, we infer that our expansion is appreciably converging. Further, by applying closure over target and projectile states and neglecting a certain class of terms involving intermediate excitations, we arrive at a recurrence relation for nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series terms, which invites further study as it seems to provide a simple method for calculating the nucleus-nucleus elastic-scattering cross section.

  10. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  11. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  12. Laparoscopic Division of Median Arcuate Ligament for the Celiac Axis Compression Syndrome-Two Case Reports with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathy; Deuri, Biswajit; Keerthi, M S S; Naidu, Subrahmaneswara Babu; Subbaiah, Rajapandian; Raj, Praveen; Palanisamy, Senthilnathan; Chinnusamy, Palanivelu

    2016-04-01

    Median arcuate ligament (MAL) syndrome is an uncommon condition caused by the external compression of the celiac trunk by the median arcuate ligament. In the current era of technological advancement, this syndrome may be corrected through the laparoscopic approach. We report two patients who were diagnosed as MAL syndrome and underwent laparoscopic division of MAL fibers at our institute. Both the patients improved symptomatically following the procedure and were discharged on the fourth post-operative day. Also, they remained symptom free during subsequent follow-up period of 1 year and 8 months, respectively. Laparoscopic approach to correct the MAL syndrome is feasible and safe. It may be the preferred modality of treatment in view of its superior visualization and lack of morbidity. However, adequate experience in advanced laparoscopic surgery is required before attempting this procedure.

  13. Peptidomics for the discovery and characterization of neuropeptides and hormones.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Elena V; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of neuropeptides as signaling molecules with paracrine or hormonal regulatory functions has led to trailblazing advances in physiology and fostered the characterization of numerous neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as potential drug targets. The impact on human health has been tremendous: approximately 30% of commercial drugs act via the GPCR pathway. However, about 25% of the GPCRs encoded by the mammalian genome still lack their pharmacological identity. Searching for the orphan GPCR endogenous ligands that are likely to be neuropeptides has proved to be a formidable task. Here we describe the mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies and experimental strategies that have been successful in achieving high-throughput characterization of endogenous peptides in nervous and endocrine systems.

  14. Peptidomics for the discovery and characterization of neuropeptides and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Romanova, Elena V.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of neuropeptides as signaling molecules with paracrine or hormonal regulatory functions has led to trailblazing advances in physiology and fostered the characterization of numerous neuropeptide-binding G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as potential drug targets. The impact on human health has been tremendous: approximately 30% of commercial drugs act via the GPCR pathway. However, about 25% of the GPCRs encoded by the mammalian genome still lack their pharmacological identity. Searching for the orphan GPCR endogenous ligands that likely are neuropeptides has proved to be a formidable task. Here we describe the mass spectrometry-based technologies and experimental strategies that have been successful in achieving high throughput characterization of endogenous peptides in nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:26143240

  15. Effect of fasting on cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript, neuropeptide Y, and leptin receptor expression in the non-human primate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Van Vugt, Dean A; Lujan, Marla E; Froats, Mark; Krzemien, Alicja; Couceyro, Pastor R; Reid, Robert L

    2006-01-01

    Leptin is a cytokine produced by white adipose tissue that circulates in direct proportion to adiposity and is an important signal of energy balance. Leptin inhibits food intake in rodents by inhibiting the orexigenic neuropetides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti regulated peptide (AgRP) and stimulating the anorexigenic neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). In order to extend our understanding of neuroendocrine regulation of appetite in the primate, we determined the effect of a metabolic challenge on CART, NPY, and leptin receptor (Ob-R) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in the nonhuman primate (NHP) hypothalamus. Ten adult female rhesus monkeys were either maintained on a regular diet or fasted for two days before euthanasia. CART, NPY, and Ob-R mRNA were measured by in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH). A 2-day fast decreased CART expression in the ARC, increased NPY gene expression in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and increased Ob-R expression in the ventromedial nucleus (VMN). This is the first report that fasting inhibits CART expression and stimulates Ob-R expression in monkeys. Increased NPY expression in the SON and PVN, but not the ARC of fasted monkeys also is novel. With some exceptions, our observations are confirmatory of findings in rodent studies. Similarities in the neuroendocrine responses to a metabolic challenge in monkeys and rodents support extending existing hypotheses of neuroendocrine control of energy homeostasis to primates. PMID:17124379

  16. Transient expression of neuropeptide W in postnatal mouse hypothalamus--a putative regulator of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Motoike, T; Skach, A G; Godwin, J K; Sinton, C M; Yamazaki, M; Abe, M; Natsume, R; Sakimura, K; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-08-20

    Neuropeptide B and W (NPB and NPW) are cognate peptide ligands for NPBWR1 (GPR7), a G protein-coupled receptor. In rodents, they have been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine/autonomic responses, and social interactions. Although localization of these peptides and their receptors in adult rodent brain has been well documented, their expression in mouse brain during development is unknown. Here we demonstrate the transient expression of NPW mRNA in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of postnatal mouse brain and its co-localization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA. Neurons expressing both NPW and NPY mRNAs begin to emerge in the DMH at about postnatal day 0 (P-0) through P-3. Their expression is highest around P-14, declines after P-21, and by P-28 only a faint expression of NPW and NPY mRNA remains. In P-18 brains, we detected NPW neurons in the region spanning the subincertal nucleus (SubI), the lateral hypothalamic (LH) perifornical (PF) areas, and the DMH, where the highest expression of NPW mRNA was observed. The majority of these postnatal hypothalamic NPW neurons co-express NPY mRNA. A cross of NPW-iCre knock-in mice with a Cre-dependent tdTomato reporter line revealed that more than half of the reporter-positive neurons in the adult DMH, which mature from the transiently NPW-expressing neurons, are sensitive to peripherally administrated leptin. These data suggest that the DMH neurons that transiently co-express NPW and NPY in the peri-weaning period might play a role in regulating energy homeostasis during postnatal development.

  17. The Role of Neuropeptide Y in the Expression and Extinction of Fear-Potentiated Startle

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Alisa R.; Yang, Yong; Ressler, Kerry J.; Davis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are a promising target for novel treatments for anxiety and other psychiatric disorders and neuropeptide Y (NPY) has emerged as a key component of anxiolytic circuits in the brain. For this reason, we have evaluated the role of NPY in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of NPY inhibits both baseline acoustic startle and the expression of fear-potentiated startle. Infusion of NPY (10 pmol/side) into the basolateral, but not the medial, nucleus of the amygdala reproduced the i.c.v. effect. Central administration of NPY (10 μg) also enhanced within-session extinction of fear-potentiated startle. This finding, coupled with the growing body of literature correlating NPY with resilience in humans, led us to the hypothesis that NPY may enhance the extinction of conditioned fear. When NPY (10 μg) is administered i.c.v. prior to extinction training, extinction retention for both the contextual and cued components of conditioned fear is enhanced when tested 48 hours later off drug. Additionally, we found that intra-basolateral amygdala administration of the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO 3304 (200 pmol/side) prior to extinction training led to a profound deficit in extinction retention. This is the first evidence that NPY facilitates and an NPY antagonist blocks the extinction of conditioned fear. We believe that the role of NPY in the extinction of conditioned fear may, at least in part, explain the mechanism underlying the association between NPY and psychobiological resilience in humans. PMID:19036961

  18. Involvement of neuropeptide Y in neuroendocrine stress responses. Central and peripheral studies.

    PubMed

    Mormède, P; Castagné, V; Rivet, J M; Gaillard, R; Corder, R

    1990-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is closely associated to stress-reactive structures in the central and peripheral nervous system. In the periphery, the peptide is colocalized with catecholamines in postganglionic sympathetic fibres and the adrenal medulla. In the brain, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus receives a dense innervation of NPYergic neurons, some of which also contain monoamines. With the use of a specific immunoradiometric assay, we have demonstrated that NPY is released into the peripheral circulation during psychological stress together with catecholamines. The postganglionic origin of the peptide was demonstrated by the activity of the nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium to attenuate the response. Adrenalectomy or insulin-induced hypoglycemia did not alter basal or stimulated NPY plasma levels, showing that the adrenal is not a major source of circulating NPY in the rat. Although NPY and noradrenaline are frequently released in parallel in various experimental conditions, a clear dissociation can be found in several cases, such as cold stress or the response to phentolamine, where no change can be seen in plasma NPY despite a large activation of noradrenergic terminals. Furthermore, the neuropeptide may play a role in stress-induced pathological states such as hypertension, since its release is greater in animals previously submitted to chronic stress and high-sodium diet. On the other hand, its role in the central nervous system control mechanisms of the stress response is far from being clear, but to understand the interaction of NPY we need a better knowledge of the role of noradrenergic neurons in the central control of the adrenocortical axis or sympathetic nervous system activity. PMID:2193112

  19. Neuropeptides and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter; Farzi, Aitak

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators both within the nervous system and between neurons and other cell types. Neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing factor are also likely to play a role in the bidirectional gut-brain communication. In this capacity they may influence the activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota and its interaction with the gut-brain axis. Current efforts in elucidating the implication of neuropeptides in the microbiota-gut-brain axis address four information carriers from the gut to the brain (vagal and spinal afferent neurons; immune mediators such as cytokines; gut hormones; gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) and four information carriers from the central nervous system to the gut (sympathetic efferent neurons; parasympathetic efferent neurons; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal medulla; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal cortex). Apart from operating as neurotransmitters, many biologically active peptides also function as gut hormones. Given that neuropeptides and gut hormones target the same cell membrane receptors (typically G protein-coupled receptors), the two messenger roles often converge in the same or similar biological implications. This is exemplified by NPY and peptide YY (PYY), two members of the PP-fold peptide family. While PYY is almost exclusively expressed by enteroendocrine cells, NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The function of PYY-releasing enteroendocrine cells is directly influenced by short chain fatty acids generated by the intestinal microbiota from indigestible fibre, while NPY may control the impact of the gut microbiota on inflammatory processes, pain, brain function and behaviour. Although the impact of neuropeptides on the interaction between the gut microbiota and brain awaits to be analysed, biologically active peptides

  20. Individual Differences in Crossmodal Brain Activity Predict Arcuate Fasciculus Connectivity in Developing Readers

    PubMed Central

    Gullick, Margaret M.; Booth, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Crossmodal integration of auditory and visual information, such as phonemes and graphemes, is a critical skill for fluent reading. Previous work has demonstrated that white matter connectivity along the arcuate fasciculus (AF) is predicted by reading skill and that crossmodal processing particularly activates the posterior STS (pSTS). However, the relationship between this crossmodal activation and white matter integrity has not been previously reported. We investigated the interrelationship of crossmodal integration, both in terms of behavioral performance and pSTS activity, with AF tract coherence using a rhyme judgment task in a group of 47 children with a range of reading abilities. We demonstrate that both response accuracy and pSTS activity for crossmodal (auditory–visual) rhyme judgments was predictive of fractional anisotropy along the left AF. Unimodal (auditory-only or visual-only) pSTS activity was not significantly related to AF connectivity. Furthermore, activity in other reading-related ROIs did not show the same AV-only AF coherence relationship, and AV pSTS activity was not related to connectivity along other language-related tracts. This study is the first to directly show that crossmodal brain activity is specifically related to connectivity in the AF, supporting its role in phoneme–grapheme integration ability. More generally, this study helps to define an interdependent neural network for reading-related integration. PMID:24456399

  1. Developmental process of the arcuate fasciculus from infancy to adolescence: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the radiologic developmental process of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) using subcomponent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis in typically developing volunteers. DTI data were acquired from 96 consecutive typically developing children, aged 0–14 years. AF subcomponents, including the posterior, anterior, and direct AF tracts were analyzed. Success rates of analysis (AR) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of each subcomponent tract were measured and compared. AR of all subcomponent tracts, except the posterior, showed a significant increase with aging (P < 0.05). Subcomponent tracts had a specific developmental sequence: First, the posterior AF tract, second, the anterior AF tract, and last, the direct AF tract in identical hemispheres. FA values of all subcomponent tracts, except right direct AF tract, showed correlation with subject's age (P < 0.05). Increased AR and FA values were observed in female subjects in young age (0–2 years) group compared with males (P < 0.05). The direct AF tract showed leftward hemispheric asymmetry and this tendency showed greater consolidation in older age (3–14 years) groups (P < 0.05). These findings demonstrated the radiologic developmental patterns of the AF from infancy to adolescence using subcomponent DTI analysis. The AF showed a specific developmental sequence, sex difference in younger age, and hemispheric asymmetry in older age. PMID:27482222

  2. Distinguishing the effect of lesion load from tract disconnection in the arcuate and uncinate fasciculi

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Thomas M.H.; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Prejawa, Susan; Leff, Alex P.; Price, Cathy J.

    2016-01-01

    Brain imaging studies of functional outcomes after white matter damage have quantified the severity of white matter damage in different ways. Here we compared how the outcome of such studies depends on two different types of measurements: the proportion of the target tract that has been destroyed (‘lesion load’) and tract disconnection. We demonstrate that conclusions from analyses based on two examples of these measures diverge and that conclusions based solely on lesion load may be misleading. First, we reproduce a recent lesion-load-only analysis which suggests that damage to the arcuate fasciculus, and not to the uncinate fasciculus, is significantly associated with deficits in fluency and naming skills. Next, we repeat the analysis after replacing the measures of lesion load with measures of tract disconnection for both tracts, and observe significant associations between both tracts and both language skills: i.e. the change increases the apparent relevance of the uncinate fasciculus to fluency and naming skills. Finally we show that, in this dataset, disconnection data explains significant variance in both language skills that is not accounted for by lesion load or volume, but lesion load data explains no unique variance in those skills, once disconnection and lesion volume are taken into account. PMID:26388553

  3. Neuropeptide S promotes wakefulness through activation of the posterior hypothalamic histaminergic and orexinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, P; Shao, Y F; Zhang, M; Fan, K; Kong, X P; Wang, R; Hou, Y P

    2012-04-01

    In spite of the initial and pivotal findings that the newly identified neuropeptide S (NPS) promotes arousal associated with locomotor and anxiolytic-like effects, the mechanisms through which NPS acts to modulate sleep-waking states remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate in the rat the effects of i.c.v. injection of NPS on the EEG, sleep-wake cycle, and brain c-Fos expression. NPS at 0.1 and 1 nmol increased significantly wakefulness (W) during the first 2 h (54.7 ± 3.2 and 64.9 ± 2.1 min, respectively, vs. 41.4 ± 2.5 min seen with saline injections, P<0.01 and P<0.001), accompanied by an increase in EEG high frequency activities (14.5-60 Hz). In the meanwhile, slow wave sleep (SWS) and paradoxical sleep (PS) decreased significantly. Ex-vivo Fos immunohistochemistry in the posterior hypothalamus revealed that, as compared with saline-treated rats, NPS enhanced c-Fos expression in histaminergic neurons by 76.0% in the ventral tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) and 57.8% in the dorsal TMN, and in orexinergic neurons by 28.2% in the perifornical nucleus (PeF), 24.3% in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), and 13.7% in the lateral hypothalamic area (LH) of the posterior hypothalamus. The NPS-induced c-Fos expression in histaminergic neurons and orexinergic neurons where NPS receptor (NPSR) mRNA is highly expressed, suggests that NPS activates histaminergic and orexinergic neurons to promote W.

  4. Bidirectional iterative parcellation of diffusion weighted imaging data: Separating cortical regions connected by the arcuate fasciculus and extreme capsule

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Dianne K.; Van Petten, Cyma; Beeson, Pélagie M.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Plante, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a Bidirectional Iterative Parcellation (BIP) procedure designed to identify the location and size of connected cortical regions (parcellations) at both ends of a white matter tract in diffusion weighted images. The procedure applies the FSL option “probabilistic tracking with classification targets” in a bidirectional and iterative manner. To assess the utility of BIP, we applied the procedure to the problem of parcellating a limited set of well-established gray matter seed regions associated with the dorsal (arcuate fasciculus/superior longitudinal fasciculus) and ventral (extreme capsule fiber system) white matter tracts in the language networks of 97 participants. These left hemisphere seed regions and the two white matter tracts, along with their right hemisphere homologues, provided an excellent test case for BIP because the resulting parcellations overlap and their connectivity via the arcuate fasciculi and extreme capsule fiber systems are well studied. The procedure yielded both confirmatory and novel findings. Specifically, BIP confirmed that each tract connects within the seed regions in unique, but expected ways. Novel findings included increasingly left-lateralized parcellations associated with the arcuate fasciculus/superior longitudinal fasciculus as a function of age and education. These results demonstrate that BIP is an easily implemented technique that successfully confirmed cortical connectivity patterns predicted in the literature, and has the potential to provide new insights regarding the architecture of the brain. PMID:25173414

  5. Paleomagnetic data bearing on the origin of arcuate structures in the French Peak-Massachusetts Mountain area of southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The eastern margin of the Yucca Flat basin, in southern Nevada, is bounded by NNW-striking tilted fault blocks of the Halfpint Range whose strikes curve as much as 90?? clockwise into ENE strikes in the French Peak-Massachusetts Mountain (FPMM) area. This pattern of arcuate structures has been attributed to clockwise drag along a postulated NW-trending, right-lateral shear zone. The flexure model implies that rocks within the FPMM area were rotated strongly clockwise about a vertical axis. Directions of remanent magnetization of the middle Miocene Ammonia Tanks and Rainier Mesa Members of the Timber Mountain Tuff and of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff indicate no systematic vertical-axis rotation in the FPMM area and disprove the flexure model. The paleomagnetic data indicate that structures in the FPMM area initiated with arcuate trends and were not originally straight elements that were rotated by right-lateral drag. The structures probably formed under the influence of spatially variable stress fields. The FPMM area lies in an accommodation zone between domains of oppositely tilted extensional fault blocks. Interaction between stress fields associated with propagating normal-fault zones may have been responsible for the arcuate structures in the FPMM area. -from Author

  6. Pathogenic involvement of neuropeptides in anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Alldredge, Brett

    2010-06-01

    Anxiety and depression are highly prevalent disorders of mood posing significant challenges to individuals and society. Current evidence indicates no single neurobiological determinant underpins these conditions and an integrated approach in both research and treatment is expedient. Basic, behavioral, and clinical science indicates various stress-responsive neuropeptides in the neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral pathophysiology of stress-related disorders including anxiety and depression. This review draws on recent research to capture the consensus and implications of neuropeptide research concerning the pathogenesis of anxiety and depression.

  7. SALMFamide salmagundi: the biology of a neuropeptide family in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Maurice R

    2014-09-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that occur in species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata. The prototypes for this neuropeptide family (S1 and S2) were discovered in starfish but subsequently SALMFamides were identified in other echinoderms. There are two types of SALMFamides: L-type, which have the C-terminal motif SxLxFamide, and F-type, which have the C-terminal motif SxFxFamide. They are derived from two types of precursor proteins: an L-type SALMFamide precursor, which comprises only L-type or L-type-like SALMFamides and an F-type SALMFamide precursor, which contains several F-type or F-type-like SALMFamides and, typically, one or more L-type SALMFamides. Thus, SALMFamides occur as heterogeneous mixtures of neuropeptides - a SALMFamide salmagundi. SALMFamides are produced by distinct populations of neurons in echinoderm larval and adult nervous systems and are present in the innervation of neuromuscular organs. Both L-type and F-type SALMFamides cause muscle relaxation in echinoderms and, for example, in starfish this effect of SALMFamides may mediate neural control of cardiac stomach eversion in species that feed extra-orally (e.g., Asterias rubens). The SALMFamide S1 also causes inhibition of neural release of a relaxin-like gonadotropin in the starfish Asterina pectinifera. An important issue that remains to be resolved are the relationships of SALMFamides with neuropeptides that have been identified in other phyla. However, it has been noted that the C-terminal SxLxFamide motif of L-type SALMFamides is a feature of some members of a bilaterian neuropeptide family that includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in vertebrates and SIFamide-type neuropeptides in protostomes. Similarly, the C-terminal FxFamide motif of F-type SALMFamides is a feature of vertebrate QRFP (26RFa)-type neuropeptides. These sequence similarities may provide a basis for molecular identification of receptors that mediate effects of SALMFamides. Furthermore

  8. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  9. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  10. SUMOrganization of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Heun, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    In the eukaryotic nucleus, gene expression and maintenance of genome integrity are tightly controlled at multiple levels, from the molecular details to the higher-order structure of the genome. The nucleus contains spatially and functionally distinct compartments in which these fundamental processes are carried out. While the dynamics and functions of some nuclear subdomains, like the nucleolus, have been well studied, other domains, like the PML-nuclear bodies, remain enigmatic. Recent evidence has now implicated the SUMOylation pathway as an important player in subnuclear architecture, particularly in the assembly of PML-nuclear bodies. Related functions include the organization of chromatin loops and maintenance of rDNA repeat stability. Consequently, complete loss of SUMO modification profoundly affects nuclear organization and cell viability.

  11. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  12. Insight into the molecular and functional diversity of cnidarian neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshio; Takeda, Noriyo

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians are the most primitive animals to possess a nervous system. This phylum is composed of the classes Scyphozoa (jellyfish), Cubozoa (box jellyfish), and Hydrozoa (e.g., Hydra, Hydractinia), which make up the subphylum Medusozoa, as well as the class Anthozoa (sea anemones and corals). Neuropeptides have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in cnidarians. For example, from the cnidarian Hydra, a key model system for studying the peptides involved in developmental and physiological processes, we identified a wide variety of novel neuropeptides from Hydra magnipapillata (the Hydra Peptide Project). Most of these peptides act directly on muscle cells and induce contraction and relaxation. Some peptides are involved in cell differentiation and morphogenesis. In this review, we describe FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), GLWamide-family peptides, and the neuropeptide Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide. Several hundred FLPs have been isolated from invertebrate animals such as cnidarians. GLWamide-family peptides function as signaling molecules in muscle contraction, metamorphosis, and settlement in cnidarians. Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide enhances neuronal differentiation in Hydra. Recently, GLWamide-family peptides and Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide were shown to trigger oocyte maturation and subsequent spawning in the hydrozoan jellyfish Cytaeis uchidae. These findings suggest the importance of these neuropeptides in both developmental and physiological processes. PMID:25625515

  13. Functional roles of neuropeptides in the insect central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nässel, D. R.

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequencing project we can begin to appreciate the extent of the complexity in the components involved in signal transfer and modulation in the nervous system of an animal with reasonably complex behavior. Of all the different classes of signaling substances utilized by the nervous system, the neuropeptides are the most diverse structurally and functionally. Thus peptidergic mechanisms of action in the central nervous system need to be analyzed in the context of the neuronal circuits in which they act and generalized traits cannot be established. By taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetics and the presence of identifiable neurons, it has been possible to interfere with peptidergic signaling in small populations of central neurons and monitor the consequences on behavior. These studies and experiments on other insects with large identifiable neurons, permitting cellular analysis of signaling mechanisms, have outlined important principles for temporal and spatial action of neuropeptides in outputs of the circadian clock and in orchestrating molting behavior. Considering the large number of neuropeptides available in each insect species and their diverse distribution patterns, it is to be expected that different neuropeptides play roles in most aspects of insect physiology and behavior.

  14. Insight into the molecular and functional diversity of cnidarian neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshio; Takeda, Noriyo

    2015-01-23

    Cnidarians are the most primitive animals to possess a nervous system. This phylum is composed of the classes Scyphozoa (jellyfish), Cubozoa (box jellyfish), and Hydrozoa (e.g., Hydra, Hydractinia), which make up the subphylum Medusozoa, as well as the class Anthozoa (sea anemones and corals). Neuropeptides have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in cnidarians. For example, from the cnidarian Hydra, a key model system for studying the peptides involved in developmental and physiological processes, we identified a wide variety of novel neuropeptides from Hydra magnipapillata (the Hydra Peptide Project). Most of these peptides act directly on muscle cells and induce contraction and relaxation. Some peptides are involved in cell differentiation and morphogenesis. In this review, we describe FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), GLWamide-family peptides, and the neuropeptide Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide. Several hundred FLPs have been isolated from invertebrate animals such as cnidarians. GLWamide-family peptides function as signaling molecules in muscle contraction, metamorphosis, and settlement in cnidarians. Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide enhances neuronal differentiation in Hydra. Recently, GLWamide-family peptides and Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide were shown to trigger oocyte maturation and subsequent spawning in the hydrozoan jellyfish Cytaeis uchidae. These findings suggest the importance of these neuropeptides in both developmental and physiological processes.

  15. The insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Insects are so successful because of great resistance to environmental stress, yet little is known about how such responses may be mediated by the neuroendocrine system. Results: We provide evidence that the capability (capa) neuropeptide gene and peptide are critical mediators of desic...

  16. Insight into the Molecular and Functional Diversity of Cnidarian Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshio; Takeda, Noriyo

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians are the most primitive animals to possess a nervous system. This phylum is composed of the classes Scyphozoa (jellyfish), Cubozoa (box jellyfish), and Hydrozoa (e.g., Hydra, Hydractinia), which make up the subphylum Medusozoa, as well as the class Anthozoa (sea anemones and corals). Neuropeptides have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in cnidarians. For example, from the cnidarian Hydra, a key model system for studying the peptides involved in developmental and physiological processes, we identified a wide variety of novel neuropeptides from Hydra magnipapillata (the Hydra Peptide Project). Most of these peptides act directly on muscle cells and induce contraction and relaxation. Some peptides are involved in cell differentiation and morphogenesis. In this review, we describe FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), GLWamide-family peptides, and the neuropeptide Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide. Several hundred FLPs have been isolated from invertebrate animals such as cnidarians. GLWamide-family peptides function as signaling molecules in muscle contraction, metamorphosis, and settlement in cnidarians. Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide enhances neuronal differentiation in Hydra. Recently, GLWamide-family peptides and Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide were shown to trigger oocyte maturation and subsequent spawning in the hydrozoan jellyfish Cytaeis uchidae. These findings suggest the importance of these neuropeptides in both developmental and physiological processes. PMID:25625515

  17. Neuropeptide alterations in the tree shrew hypothalamus during volatile anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fouillen, Laetitia; Petruzziello, Filomena; Veit, Julia; Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor; Zhang, Xiaozhe

    2013-03-27

    Neuropeptides are critical signaling molecules, involved in the regulation of diverse physiological processes including energy metabolism, pain perception and brain cognitive state. Prolonged general anesthesia has an impact on many of these processes, but the regulation of peptides by general anesthetics is poorly understood. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of the hypothalamic neuropeptides of the tree shrew during volatile isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia administered accompanying a neurosurgical procedure. Using a predicted-peptide database and hybrid spectral analysis, we first identified 85 peptides from the tree shrew hypothalamus. Differential analysis was then performed between control and experimental group animals. The levels of 12 hypothalamic peptides were up-regulated following prolonged general anesthesia. Our study revealed for the first time that several neuropeptides, including alpha-neoendorphin and somatostatin-14, were altered during general anesthesia. Our study broadens the scope for the involvement of neuropeptides in volatile anesthesia regulation, opening the possibility for investigating the associated regulatory mechanisms. PMID:23228960

  18. Antinucleon-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical results on anti p-nucleus interactions are reviewed. We focus on determinations of the anti p optical potential from elastic scattering, the use of (anti p, anti p') inelastic scattering to reveal aspects of the spin-isospin dependence of N anti N amplitudes, and some puzzling features of (anti p, anti n) charge exchange reactions on nuclei. 47 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Crustacean Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Liang, Zhidan; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides represent one of the largest classes of signaling molecules used by nervous systems to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Over the past several years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have revolutionized the discovery of neuropeptides in numerous model organisms, especially in decapod crustaceans. Here, we focus our discussion on recent advances in the use of MS-based techniques to map neuropeptides in spatial domain and monitoring their dynamic changes in temporal domain. These MS-enabled investigations provide valuable information about the distribution, secretion and potential function of neuropeptides with high molecular specificity and sensitivity. In situ MS imaging and in vivo microdialysis are highlighted as key technologies for probing spatio-temporal dynamics of neuropeptides in the crustacean nervous system. This review summarizes the latest advancement in MS-based methodologies for neuropeptide analysis including typical workflow and sample preparation strategies as well as major neuropeptide families discovered in decapod crustaceans. PMID:25448012

  20. Injury of the Arcuate Fasciculus in the Dominant Hemisphere in Patients With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Young; Shin, So Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about injury of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere in patients with mild TBI, using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). We recruited 25 patients with injury of the left AF among 64 right-handed consecutive patients with mild TBI and 20 normal control subjects. DTTs of the left AF were reconstructed, and fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fiber number of the AF were measured. Among 64 consecutive patients, 25 (39%) patients showed injury of the left AF. The patient group showed lower FA value and fiber number with higher ADC value than the control group (P < 0.05). On K-WAB evaluation, aphasia quotient and language quotient were 95.9 ± 4.1 (range 85–100) and 95.0 ± 5.4 (range 80–100), respectively. However, 23 (92.0%) of 25 patients complained of language-related symptoms after TBI; paraphasia in 12 (48.0%) patients, deficits of comprehension in 4 (16.0%) patients, deficits of speech production in 1 (4.0%) patient, and >2 language symptoms in 6 (24.0%) patients. We found that a significant number (39%) of patients with mild TBI had injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere and these patients had mild language deficit. These results suggest that DTT could provide useful information in detecting injury of the AF and evaluation of the AF using DTT would be necessary even in the case of a patient with mild TBI who complains of mild language deficit. PMID:26945425

  1. Arcuate fasciculus asymmetry has a hand in language function but not handedness.

    PubMed

    Allendorfer, Jane B; Hernando, Kathleen A; Hossain, Shyla; Nenert, Rodolphe; Holland, Scott K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2016-09-01

    The importance of relationships between handedness, language lateralization and localization, and white matter tracts for language performance is unclear. The goal of the study was to investigate these relationships by examining arcuate fasciculus (AF) structural asymmetry (DTI) and functional asymmetry (fMRI) in language circuits, handedness, and linguistic performance. A large sample of right-handed (n = 158) and atypical-handed (n = 82) healthy adults underwent DTI at 3 T to assess number of streamlines and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the AF, and language fMRI. Language functions were assessed using standard tests of vocabulary, naming, verbal fluency, and complex ideation. Laterality indices (LIs) illustrated degree of asymmetry and lateralization patterns for the AF (streamlines and FA) and verb generation fMRI. Both handedness groups showed leftward lateralization bias for streamline and fMRI LIs and symmetry for FA LI. The proportion of subjects with left, right, or symmetric lateralization were similar between groups if based on AF LIs, but differed if based on fMRI LIs (p = 0.0016). Degree of right-handedness was not associated with AF lateralization, but was associated with fMRI language lateralization (p = 0.0014). FA LI was not associated with performance on language assessments, but streamline LI was associated with better vocabulary and complex ideation performance in atypical-handed subjects (p = 0.022 and p = 0.0098, respectively), and better semantic fluency in right-handed subjects (p = 0.047); however, these did not survive multiple comparisons correction. We provide evidence that AF asymmetry is independent of hand preference, and while degree of right-handedness is associated with hemispheric language lateralization, the majority of atypical-handed individuals are left-lateralized for language. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3297-3309, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Seasonal shoreline behaviours along the arcuate Niger Delta coast: Complex interaction between fluvial and marine processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dada, Olusegun A.; Li, Guangxue; Qiao, Lulu; Ding, Dong; Ma, Yanyan; Xu, Jishang

    2016-07-01

    Deltaic coasts are dynamic geomorphic systems where continuous changes occur on diverse spatial and temporal scales, and these changes constitute an important aspect of their evolution. Based on three-year satellite-derived shoreline data coupled with re-analyzed wave data and hydro-meteorological data, a comprehensive analysis of the dominant processes governing the seasonal shoreline changes along the oil-rich arcuate section of the Niger Delta, in the Nigerian Shelf of the North Atlantic Ocean has been undertaken. Shoreline analysis results show that the delta coast is characterized by predominant summer erosion and maximum winter accretion. Between 2010 and 2012, erosion dominated over accretion and a total of 9.1 km2 deltaic land was lost to coastline erosion at an annual average erosion rate of 4.55±1.21 km2/yr. A greater understanding of the dominant factors responsible for the change is presented. Shoreline change interactions with cross-shore sediment exchange processes are prominent at seasonal timescale (Summer R2=-0.85 and Winter R2=0.7), and interannual timescale (R2=-0.93) with longshore sediment transport processes. Correlation analysis reveals a gradual degeneration of relationship between the suspended sediment flux and coastal hydrodynamics beginning from 2010 to 2012 (cross-shore transport, R=0.68, 0.36 and 0.2 for 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively; longshore transport R=0.63, 0.44 and 0.2 for 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively). The study concludes that the effect of fluvial sediment reduction to the delta coast due to capital dredging of the Lower Niger River channels between 2009 and 2012, and periodic fluctuations in the nearshore hydrodynamics processes caused the observed annual shoreline erosion that eventually forced the deltaic coastline toward a state of landward migration during the study period.

  3. The neuropeptide catestatin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Chunyan; Sun, Ningling

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Catestatin stimulates proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} Catestatin provokes sustained increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. {yields} Catestatin produces increased activation of calcineurin and promotes NFATc1 translocation into the nucleus. -- Abstract: The Chromogranin A-derived neuropeptide catestatin is an endogenous nicotinic cholinergic antagonist that acts as a pleiotropic hormone. Since catestatin shares several functions with other members derived from the chromogranin/secretogranin protein family and other neuropeptides which exert proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we therefore hypothesized that catestatin would regulate VSMC proliferation. The present study demonstrates that catestatin caused a dose-dependent induction of proliferation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and furthermore evoked a sustained increase in intracellular calcium. This subsequently leaded to enhanced activation of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin and resulted in an activation of the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), initiating transcription of proliferative genes. In addition, cyclosporin A (CsA), a potent inhibitor of calcineurin, abrogated catestatin-mediated effect on VSMCs, indicating that the calcineurin-NFAT signaling is strongly required for catestatin-induced growth of VSMCs. The present study establishes catestatin as a novel proliferative cytokine on vascular smooth muscle cells and this effect is mediated by the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway.

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel neuropeptide (neuropeptide Y-HS) from leech salivary gland of Haemadipsa sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Hui; Chen, Yan; Bai, Xue-Wei; Yao, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xu-Guang; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren

    2016-09-01

    The present study was designed to identify immunomodulatory components from the leech salivary gland of Haemadipsa sylvestris. The Sephadex G-50, Resource(TM) S column chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) were used to isolate and purify the salivary gland extracts (SGE). Structural analysis of isolated compounds was based on Edman degradation and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS). The cDNA encoding the precursor of the compound was cloned from the cDNA library of the salivary gland of H. sylvestris. The levels of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The effects on cell proliferation and cell viability were observed using MTT assay. A novel neuropeptide Y (Neuropeptide Y-HS) from the leech salivary gland of H. sylvestris was purified and characterized. It was composed of 36 amino acid residues and the amino acid sequence was determined to be FLEPPERPAVFTSVEQMKSYIKALNDYYLLLGRPRF-NH2, containing an amidated C-terminus. It showed significant inhibitory effects on the production of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and MCP-1. Neuropeptide Y was identified from leeches for the first time. The presence of neuropeptide Y-HS in leech salivary gland may help get blood meal from hosts and inhibit inflammation.

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel neuropeptide (neuropeptide Y-HS) from leech salivary gland of Haemadipsa sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Hui; Chen, Yan; Bai, Xue-Wei; Yao, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xu-Guang; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren

    2016-09-01

    The present study was designed to identify immunomodulatory components from the leech salivary gland of Haemadipsa sylvestris. The Sephadex G-50, Resource(TM) S column chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) were used to isolate and purify the salivary gland extracts (SGE). Structural analysis of isolated compounds was based on Edman degradation and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS). The cDNA encoding the precursor of the compound was cloned from the cDNA library of the salivary gland of H. sylvestris. The levels of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The effects on cell proliferation and cell viability were observed using MTT assay. A novel neuropeptide Y (Neuropeptide Y-HS) from the leech salivary gland of H. sylvestris was purified and characterized. It was composed of 36 amino acid residues and the amino acid sequence was determined to be FLEPPERPAVFTSVEQMKSYIKALNDYYLLLGRPRF-NH2, containing an amidated C-terminus. It showed significant inhibitory effects on the production of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and MCP-1. Neuropeptide Y was identified from leeches for the first time. The presence of neuropeptide Y-HS in leech salivary gland may help get blood meal from hosts and inhibit inflammation. PMID:27667513

  6. Distribution pattern of neuropeptide Y in the brain, pituitary and olfactory system during the larval development of the toad Rhinella arenarum (Amphibia: Anura).

    PubMed

    Heer, T; Pozzi, A G; Yovanovich, C A; Paz, D A

    2009-04-01

    The first NPY-immunoreactivity (ir) in the central nervous system of Rhinella arenarum was obtained just after hatching in the pre-optic area, ventral thalamus and rostral rhombencephalon. During pre-metamorphosis, new NPY-ir cells were observed in other brain areas such as pallium, septum and striatum, infundibulum and pars intermedia of the pituitary. Further maturation continued through pro-metamorphosis with the appearance of cell groups in the diagonal band, amygdala, pre-optic nucleus, dorsal nucleus of the habenula, anterior ventral and dorsal thalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, tuberculum posterior, tectum, torus semicircularis, inter-peduncular nucleus and median eminence. During the metamorphic climax and soon after, the relative abundance of NPY-ir fibres decreased in all hypothalamic areas and the staining intensity and number of NPY-ir cells in the pallium also decreased, whereas no cells were found in the striatum, dorsal nucleus of the habenula and tectum. In the olfactory epithelium, nerve or bulb, neither cells nor NPY-ir fibres were found during the stages of development analysed. The ontogeny pattern of the NPY-ir neuronal system in the brain of Rh. arenarum is more similar to the spatiotemporal appearance reported for Rana esculenta than to that reported for Xenopus laevis. Many NPY-ir fibres were found in the median eminence and in the pars intermedia of the pituitary, supporting the idea that this neuropeptide may play a role in the modulation of hypophyseal secretion during development.

  7. Analytic optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus nucleus-nucleus collisions involving light and medium nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing an optical model potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are analytically derived. These expressions are applicable to light and medium cosmic ray nuclei as their single-particle density distributions are analytically determined, without approximation, from their actual harmonic well charge density distributions. Pauli correlation effects are included through the use of a simple Gaussian function to replace the usual expression obtained in the infinite nuclear matter approximation.

  8. Photoperiodic regulation of insulin receptor mRNA and intracellular insulin signaling in the arcuate nucleus of the Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus.

    PubMed

    Tups, Alexander; Helwig, Michael; Stöhr, Sigrid; Barrett, Perry; Mercer, Julian G; Klingenspor, Martin

    2006-09-01

    During the last 5 years it has been well established that photoperiod-induced changes in body weight in the seasonal hamster, Phodopus sungorus, are accompanied by a marked seasonal cycle in leptin sensitivity. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of insulin signaling in seasonal body weight regulation. We analyzed the expression pattern and relative intensity of insulin receptor (IR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) mRNAs by in situ hybridization in the brains of juvenile female hamsters acclimated to either long- (LD) or short-day length (SD) for 8 wk, with or without superimposed food deprivation for 48 h. Furthermore, the hypothalamic concentration and distribution of phospho-AKT, a marker of PI3-kinase activity was determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Eight weeks of acclimation to SD led to a substantial downregulation of IR, PTP1B gene expression, and phospho-AKT concentration in this brain region, whereas PI3-kinase mRNA was unchanged. Food deprivation induced a decrease in PTP1B and a trend toward lowered IR gene expression in LD but not in SD. Additionally, a striking increase in PTP1B gene expression in the thalamus was observed after food deprivation in both photoperiods. The direction of change in neuronal insulin signaling contrasts to the central catabolic nature of this pathway described in other species. SD-induced reduction in insulin signaling may be due to decline in body fat stores mediated by enhanced central leptin sensitivity. Increased anorexigenic tone of leptin may overwrite central insulin signaling to prevent catabolic overdrive.

  9. Modulation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase, Neuropeptide Y, Glutamate, and Substance P in Ganglia and Brain Areas Involved in Cardiovascular Control after Chronic Exposure to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Merari F. R.; Coelho, Emerson F.; Farizatto, Karen L. G.; Chadi, Gerson; Fior-Chadi, Debora R.

    2011-01-01

    Considering that nicotine instantly interacts with central and peripheral nervous systems promoting cardiovascular effects after tobacco smoking, we evaluated the modulation of glutamate, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and substance P (SP) in nodose/petrosal and superior cervical ganglia, as well as TH and NPY in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) after 8 weeks of nicotine exposure. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization data demonstrated increased expression of TH in brain and ganglia related to blood pressure control, preferentially in SHR, after nicotine exposure. The alkaloid also increased NPY immunoreactivity in ganglia, NTS, and PVN of SHR, in spite of decreasing its receptor (NPY1R) binding in NTS of both strains. Nicotine increased SP and glutamate in ganglia. In summary, nicotine positively modulated the studied variables in ganglia while its central effects were mainly constrained to SHR. PMID:21822476

  10. Crustal electric structure of Haiyuan arcuate tectonic region in the northeastern margin of Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yan; Zhao, Guo-Ze; Wang, Ji-Jun; Tang, Ji; Chen, Xiao-Bin; Deng, Qian-Hui; Xuan, Fei; Zhao, Jun-Meng

    2005-07-01

    Through the analysis and 2-D inversion for the 5 profiles in Haiyuan arcuate tectonic region (105° 107°E, 36° 37.5°N) in the northeastern margin of Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, we have obtained the electric structure within a range of 160 km in width (east-west) and 60 km in depth in the studied area. The results show that the crustal electric structure can be divided into 6 sections, corresponding respectively to Xiji basin (I), Xihuashan-Nanhuashan uplift (II), Xingrenbu-Haiyuan basin (III), Zhongwei-Qingshuihe basin (IV), Zhongning-Hongsibu basin (V) and west-margin zone of Ordos (VI) from the southwest to the northeast. The crustal electric structure is characterized by a broom-shaped pattern, which scatters to the northwest and shrinks to the southeast. The structures in the top part of Haiyuan arcuate tectonic region are complete and large, however, they diminish from the arc top to the northwest and southeast ends. In the depth from 0 km to 10 km, the resistivity is high in the sections II and VI, but relatively low in the other four sections, showing a similar pattern of basin depression. The electrical basement in the section III is the deepest, displaying a “dustpan” shape that is deep in the southwest and shallow in the northeast. A series of discontinuous zones with high conductivity exist in the middle-lower crust in Haiyuan arcuate tectonic region, which is possibly related to the moderate and strong earthquakes in the region. The resistivity distribution in the focal area of the 1920 Haiyuan earthquake is significantly heterogeneous with an obviously high conductivity zone near the hypocenter regime.

  11. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  12. Nucleus from string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Morita, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass-number (A) dependence r∝A1/3 for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multibaryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1)×A1/3[fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  13. Discovery of sea urchin NGFFFamide receptor unites a bilaterian neuropeptide family

    PubMed Central

    Semmens, Dean C.; Beets, Isabel; Rowe, Matthew L.; Blowes, Liisa M.; Oliveri, Paola; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides are ancient regulators of physiology and behaviour, but reconstruction of neuropeptide evolution is often difficult owing to lack of sequence conservation. Here, we report that the receptor for the neuropeptide NGFFFamide in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (phylum Echinodermata) is an orthologue of vertebrate neuropeptide-S (NPS) receptors and crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) receptors. Importantly, this has facilitated reconstruction of the evolution of two bilaterian neuropeptide signalling systems. Genes encoding the precursor of a vasopressin/oxytocin-type neuropeptide and its receptor duplicated in a common ancestor of the Bilateria. One copy of the precursor retained ancestral features, as seen in highly conserved vasopressin/oxytocin–neurophysin-type precursors. The other copy diverged, but this took different courses in protostomes and deuterostomes. In protostomes, the occurrence of a disulfide bridge in neuropeptide product(s) of the precursor was retained, as in CCAP, but with loss of the neurophysin domain. In deuterostomes, we see the opposite scenario—the neuropeptides lost the disulfide bridge, and neurophysin was retained (as in the NGFFFamide precursor) but was subsequently lost in vertebrate NPS precursors. Thus, the sea urchin NGFFFamide precursor and receptor are ‘missing links’ in the evolutionary history of neuropeptides that control ecdysis in arthropods (CCAP) and regulate anxiety in humans (NPS). PMID:25904544

  14. Modulation of Locomotion and Reproduction by FLP Neuropeptides in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan-Jung; Burton, Tina; Ha, Lawrence; Huang, Zi; Olajubelo, Adewale; Li, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides function in animals to modulate most, if not all, complex behaviors. In invertebrates, neuropeptides can function as the primary neurotransmitter of a neuron, but more generally they co-localize with a small molecule neurotransmitter, as is commonly seen in vertebrates. Because a single neuron can express multiple neuropeptides and because neuropeptides can bind to multiple G protein-coupled receptors, neuropeptide actions increase the complexity by which the neural connectome can be activated or inhibited. Humans are estimated to have 90 plus neuropeptide genes; by contrast, nematodes, a relatively simple organism, have a slightly larger complement of neuropeptide genes. For instance, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has over 100 neuropeptide-encoding genes, of which at least 31 genes encode peptides of the FMRFamide family. To understand the function of this large FMRFamide peptide family, we isolated knockouts of different FMRFamide-encoding genes and generated transgenic animals in which the peptides are overexpressed. We assayed these animals on two basic behaviors: locomotion and reproduction. Modulating levels of different neuropeptides have strong as well as subtle effects on these behaviors. These data suggest that neuropeptides play critical roles in C. elegans to fine tune neural circuits controlling locomotion and reproduction.

  15. Modulation of Locomotion and Reproduction by FLP Neuropeptides in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan-Jung; Burton, Tina; Ha, Lawrence; Huang, Zi; Olajubelo, Adewale; Li, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides function in animals to modulate most, if not all, complex behaviors. In invertebrates, neuropeptides can function as the primary neurotransmitter of a neuron, but more generally they co-localize with a small molecule neurotransmitter, as is commonly seen in vertebrates. Because a single neuron can express multiple neuropeptides and because neuropeptides can bind to multiple G protein-coupled receptors, neuropeptide actions increase the complexity by which the neural connectome can be activated or inhibited. Humans are estimated to have 90 plus neuropeptide genes; by contrast, nematodes, a relatively simple organism, have a slightly larger complement of neuropeptide genes. For instance, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has over 100 neuropeptide-encoding genes, of which at least 31 genes encode peptides of the FMRFamide family. To understand the function of this large FMRFamide peptide family, we isolated knockouts of different FMRFamide-encoding genes and generated transgenic animals in which the peptides are overexpressed. We assayed these animals on two basic behaviors: locomotion and reproduction. Modulating levels of different neuropeptides have strong as well as subtle effects on these behaviors. These data suggest that neuropeptides play critical roles in C. elegans to fine tune neural circuits controlling locomotion and reproduction. PMID:26406995

  16. Molecular characterization and expression profiles of neuropeptide precursors in the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Pengcheng; Wang, Xianhui; Kang, Le

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptides serve as the most important regulatory signals in insects. Many neuropeptides and their precursors have been identified in terms of the contig sequences of whole genome information of the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria), which exhibits a typical phenotypic plasticity in morphology, behavior and physiology. However, functions of these locust neuropeptides are largely unknown. In this study, we first revised the 23 reported neuropeptide precursor genes and identified almost all the neuropeptide precursors and corresponding products in L. migratoria. We further revealed the significant expansion profiles (such as AKH) and alternative splicing of neuropeptide genes (Lom-ITP, Lom-OK and Lom-NPF1). Transcriptomic analysis indicated that several neuropeptides, such as Lom-ACP and Lom-OK, displayed development-specific expression patterns. qRT-PCR data confirmed that most neuropeptide precursors were strongly expressed in the central nervous system. Fifteen neuropeptide genes displayed different expression levels between solitarious and gregarious locusts. These findings provide valuable clues to understand neuropeptide evolution and their functional roles in basic biology and phase transition in locusts.

  17. Unique biological function of cathepsin L in secretory vesicles for biosynthesis of neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Funkelstein, Lydiane; Beinfeld, Margery; Minokadeh, Ardalan; Zadina, James; Hook, Vivian

    2010-12-01

    Neuropeptides are essential for cell-cell communication in the nervous and neuroendocrine systems. Production of active neuropeptides requires proteolytic processing of proneuropeptide precursors in secretory vesicles that produce, store, and release neuropeptides that regulate physiological functions. This review describes recent findings indicating the prominent role of cathepsin L in secretory vesicles for production of neuropeptides from their protein precursors. The role of cathepsin L in neuropeptide production was discovered using the strategy of activity-based probes for proenkephalin-cleaving activity for identification of the enzyme protein by mass spectrometry. The novel role of cathepsin L in secretory vesicles for neuropeptide production has been demonstrated in vivo by cathepsin L gene knockout studies, cathepsin L gene expression in neuroendocrine cells, and notably, cathepsin L localization in neuropeptide-containing secretory vesicles. Cathepsin L is involved in producing opioid neuropeptides consisting of enkephalin, β-endorphin, and dynorphin, as well as in generating the POMC-derived peptide hormones ACTH and α-MSH. In addition, NPY, CCK, and catestatin neuropeptides utilize cathepsin L for their biosynthesis. The neuropeptide-synthesizing functions of cathepsin L represent its unique activity in secretory vesicles, which contrasts with its role in lysosomes. Interesting evaluations of protease gene knockout studies in mice that lack cathepsin L compared to those lacking PC1/3 and PC2 (PC, prohormone convertase) indicate the key role of cathepsin L in neuropeptide production. Therefore, dual cathepsin L and prohormone convertase protease pathways participate in neuropeptide production. Significantly, the recent new findings indicate cathepsin L as a novel 'proprotein convertase' for production of neuropeptides that mediate cell-cell communication in health and disease.

  18. Ultrastructural Correlates of Enhanced Norepinephrine and Neuropeptide Y Cotransmission in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Kourtesis, Ioannis; Kasparov, Sergey; Verkade, Paul; Teschemacher, Anja G

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) replicates many clinically relevant features of human essential hypertension and also exhibits behavioral symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and dementia. The SHR phenotype is highly complex and cannot be explained by a single genetic or physiological mechanism. Nevertheless, numerous studies including our own work have revealed striking differences in central catecholaminergic transmission in SHR such as increased vesicular catecholamine content in the ventral brainstem. Here, we used immunolabeling followed by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy to quantify vesicle sizes and populations across three catecholaminergic brain areas-nucleus tractus solitarius and rostral ventrolateral medulla, both key regions for cardiovascular control, and the locus coeruleus. We also studied colocalization of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in norepinephrine and epinephrine-containing neurons as NPY is a common cotransmitter with central and peripheral catecholamines. We found significantly increased expression and coexpression of NPY in norepinephrine and epinephrine-positive neurons of locus coeruleus in SHR compared with Wistar rats. Ultrastructural analysis revealed immunolabeled vesicles of 150 to 650 nm in diameter (means ranging from 250 to 300 nm), which is much larger than previously reported. In locus coeruleus and rostral ventrolateral medulla, but not in nucleus tractus solitarius, of SHR, noradrenergic and adrenergic vesicles were significantly larger and showed increased NPY colocalization when compared with Wistar rats. Our morphological evidence underpins the hypothesis of hyperactivity of the noradrenergic and adrenergic system and increased norepinephrine and epinephrine and NPY cotransmission in specific brain areas in SHR. It further strengthens the argument for a prohypertensive role of C1 neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla as a potential causative factor for essential hypertension.

  19. Ultrastructural Correlates of Enhanced Norepinephrine and Neuropeptide Y Cotransmission in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Kourtesis, Ioannis; Kasparov, Sergey; Verkade, Paul; Teschemacher, Anja G

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) replicates many clinically relevant features of human essential hypertension and also exhibits behavioral symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and dementia. The SHR phenotype is highly complex and cannot be explained by a single genetic or physiological mechanism. Nevertheless, numerous studies including our own work have revealed striking differences in central catecholaminergic transmission in SHR such as increased vesicular catecholamine content in the ventral brainstem. Here, we used immunolabeling followed by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy to quantify vesicle sizes and populations across three catecholaminergic brain areas-nucleus tractus solitarius and rostral ventrolateral medulla, both key regions for cardiovascular control, and the locus coeruleus. We also studied colocalization of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in norepinephrine and epinephrine-containing neurons as NPY is a common cotransmitter with central and peripheral catecholamines. We found significantly increased expression and coexpression of NPY in norepinephrine and epinephrine-positive neurons of locus coeruleus in SHR compared with Wistar rats. Ultrastructural analysis revealed immunolabeled vesicles of 150 to 650 nm in diameter (means ranging from 250 to 300 nm), which is much larger than previously reported. In locus coeruleus and rostral ventrolateral medulla, but not in nucleus tractus solitarius, of SHR, noradrenergic and adrenergic vesicles were significantly larger and showed increased NPY colocalization when compared with Wistar rats. Our morphological evidence underpins the hypothesis of hyperactivity of the noradrenergic and adrenergic system and increased norepinephrine and epinephrine and NPY cotransmission in specific brain areas in SHR. It further strengthens the argument for a prohypertensive role of C1 neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla as a potential causative factor for essential hypertension. PMID

  20. Photoperiodic regulation of satiety mediating neuropeptides in the brainstem of the seasonal Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Helwig, Michael; Archer, Zoë A; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Tups, Alexander; Mercer, Julian G; Klingenspor, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Central regulation of energy balance in seasonal mammals such as the Siberian hamster is dependent on the precise integration of short-term satiety information arising from the gastrointestinal tract with long-term signals on the status of available energy reserves (e.g. leptin) and prevailing photoperiod. Within the central nervous system, the brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) are major relay nuclei that transmit information from the gastrointestinal tract to higher forebrain centres. We extended studies on the seasonal programming of the hypothalamus to examine the effect of the photoperiod on neuropeptidergic circuitries of this gut-brain axis. In the NTS and PBN we performed gene expression and immunoreactivity (-ir) studies on selected satiety-related neuropeptides and receptors: alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R), growth hormone secretagogue-receptor, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, preproglucagon (PPG), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY, galanin, neurotensin, and corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH). Gene expression of PPG and MC4-R, and -ir of CCK and GLP-1, in the NTS were up-regulated after 14 weeks in long-day photoperiod (16 h light:8 h dark) compared to short-days (8 h light:16 h dark), whereas CRH-ir and NT-ir were increased in short-days within the PBN. We suggest that brainstem neuroendocrine mechanisms contribute to the long-term regulation of body mass in the Siberian hamster by a photoperiod-related modulation of satiety signalling.

  1. Ultrastructural Correlates of Enhanced Norepinephrine and Neuropeptide Y Cotransmission in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kourtesis, Ioannis; Kasparov, Sergey; Verkade, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) replicates many clinically relevant features of human essential hypertension and also exhibits behavioral symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and dementia. The SHR phenotype is highly complex and cannot be explained by a single genetic or physiological mechanism. Nevertheless, numerous studies including our own work have revealed striking differences in central catecholaminergic transmission in SHR such as increased vesicular catecholamine content in the ventral brainstem. Here, we used immunolabeling followed by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy to quantify vesicle sizes and populations across three catecholaminergic brain areas—nucleus tractus solitarius and rostral ventrolateral medulla, both key regions for cardiovascular control, and the locus coeruleus. We also studied colocalization of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in norepinephrine and epinephrine-containing neurons as NPY is a common cotransmitter with central and peripheral catecholamines. We found significantly increased expression and coexpression of NPY in norepinephrine and epinephrine-positive neurons of locus coeruleus in SHR compared with Wistar rats. Ultrastructural analysis revealed immunolabeled vesicles of 150 to 650 nm in diameter (means ranging from 250 to 300 nm), which is much larger than previously reported. In locus coeruleus and rostral ventrolateral medulla, but not in nucleus tractus solitarius, of SHR, noradrenergic and adrenergic vesicles were significantly larger and showed increased NPY colocalization when compared with Wistar rats. Our morphological evidence underpins the hypothesis of hyperactivity of the noradrenergic and adrenergic system and increased norepinephrine and epinephrine and NPY cotransmission in specific brain areas in SHR. It further strengthens the argument for a prohypertensive role of C1 neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla as a potential causative factor for essential hypertension. PMID

  2. Involvement of the neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ in kainate seizures.

    PubMed

    Bregola, Gianni; Zucchini, Silvia; Rodi, Donata; Binaschi, Anna; D'Addario, Claudio; Landuzzi, Daniela; Reinscheid, Rainer; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia; Simonato, Michele

    2002-11-15

    The neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) has been shown to modulate neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. Previous studies indicate that the mRNA levels for the N/OFQ precursor (proN/OFQ) are increased after seizures. However, it is unclear whether N/OFQ plays a role in seizure expression. Therefore, (1) we analyzed proN/OFQ mRNA levels and NOP (the N/OFQ receptor) mRNA levels and receptor density in the kainate model of epilepsy, using Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and receptor binding assay, and (2) we examined susceptibility to kainate seizure in mice treated with 1-[(3R, 4R)-1-cyclooctylmethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-4-piperidyl]-3-ethyl-1, 3-dihydro-benzimidazol-2-one (J-113397), a selective NOP receptor antagonist, and in proN/OFQ knock-out mice. After kainate administration, increased proN/OFQ gene expression was observed in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus and in the medial nucleus of the amygdala. In contrast, NOP mRNA levels and receptor density decreased in the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, and cortex. Mice treated with the NOP receptor antagonist J-113397 displayed reduced susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures (i.e., significant reduction of behavioral seizure scores). N/OFQ knock-out mice were less susceptible to kainate seizures compared with their wild-type littermates, in that lethality was reduced, latency to generalized seizure onset was prolonged, and behavioral seizure scores decreased. Intracerebroventricular administration of N/OFQ prevented reduced susceptibility to kainate seizures in N/OFQ knock-out mice. These data indicate that acute limbic seizures are associated with increased N/OFQ release in selected areas, causing downregulation of NOP receptors and activation of N/OFQ biosynthesis, and support the notion that the N/OFQ-NOP system plays a facilitatory role in kainate seizure expression.

  3. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Central ghrelin increases food foraging/hoarding that is blocked by GHSR antagonism and attenuates hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael A; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    The stomach-derived "hunger hormone" ghrelin increases in the circulation in direct response to time since the last meal, increasing preprandially and falling immediately following food consumption. We found previously that peripheral injection of ghrelin potently stimulates food foraging (FF), food hoarding (FH), and food intake (FI) in Siberian hamsters. It remains, however, largely unknown if central ghrelin stimulation is necessary/sufficient to increase these behaviors regardless of peripheral stimulation of the ghrelin receptor [growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)]. We injected three doses (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 μg) of ghrelin into the third ventricle (3V) of Siberian hamsters and measured changes in FF, FH, and FI. To test the effects of 3V ghrelin receptor blockade, we used the potent GHSR antagonist JMV2959 to block these behaviors in response to food deprivation or a peripheral ghrelin challenge. Finally, we examined neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in response to peripheral ghrelin administration and 3V GHSR antagonism. Third ventricular ghrelin injection significantly increased FI through 24 h and FH through day 4. Pretreatment with 3V JMV2959 successfully blocked peripheral ghrelin-induced increases in FF, FH, and FI at all time points and food deprivation-induced increases in FF, FH, and FI up to 4 h. c-Fos immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, but not in the arcuate nucleus, following pretreatment with intraperitoneal JMV2959 and ghrelin. Collectively, these data suggest that central GHSR activation is both necessary and sufficient to increase appetitive and consummatory behaviors in Siberian hamsters.

  6. Neuropeptide signaling remodels chemosensory circuit composition in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leinwand, Sarah G.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.

    2013-01-01

    Neural circuits detect environmental changes and drive behavior. The routes of information flow through dense neural networks are dynamic; however, the mechanisms underlying this circuit flexibility are poorly understood. Here, we define a novel, sensory context-dependent and neuropeptide-regulated switch in the composition of a C. elegans salt sensory circuit. The primary salt detectors, ASE sensory neurons, use BLI-4 endoprotease-dependent cleavage to release the insulin-like peptide INS-6 in response to large but not small changes in external salt stimuli. Insulins, signaling through the insulin receptor DAF-2, functionally switch the AWC olfactory sensory neuron into an interneuron in the salt circuit. Animals with disrupted insulin signaling have deficits in salt attraction, suggesting that peptidergic signaling potentiates responses to high salt stimuli, which may promote ion homeostasis. Our results show that sensory context and neuropeptide signaling modify neural networks and suggest general mechanisms for generating flexible behavioral outputs by modulating neural circuit composition. PMID:24013594

  7. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  8. Identification of the first neuropeptides from the Amphipoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E

    2014-09-15

    Despite being used as models in the field of ecotoxicology, including use in studies of endocrine disruption, little is known about the hormonal systems of amphipods, particularly their peptidergic signaling systems. Here, transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences were used to predict the structures of the first neuropeptides from members of this crustacean order. Using a well-established workflow, BLAST searches of the extant amphipod TSA data were conducted for putative peptide-encoding transcripts. The pre/preprohormones deduced from the identified TSA sequences were then used to predict the mature structures of amphipod neuropeptides. In total, 43 putative peptide-encoding transcripts were identified from three amphipods, Echinogammarus veneris, Hyalella azteca and Melita plumulosa. Collectively, 139 distinct mature peptides (110 from E. veneris alone) were predicted from these TSA sequences. The identified peptides included members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment concentrating hormone, allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, bursicon α, bursicon β, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone, diuretic hormone 31, FLRFamide, molt-inhibiting hormone, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone (PDH), proctolin, RYamide, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide families. Of particular note were the identifications of orcokinins possessing SFDEIDR- rather than the typical NFDEIDR- amino-termini, e.g. SFDEINRSNFGFN, a carboxyl-terminally amidated orcokinin, i.e. SFDEINRSNFGFSamide, PDHs longer than the stereotypical 18 amino acids, e.g. NSELLNTLLGSKSLAALRAAamide, and a 13 rather than 12 amino acid long SIFamide, i.e. GPYRKPPFNGSIFamide. These data not only provide the first descriptions of native amphipod neuropeptides, but also represent a new resource for initiating investigations of peptidergic signaling in the Amphipoda.

  9. Neuropeptide feedback modifies odor-evoked dynamics in C. elegans olfactory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chalasani, Sreekanth H.; Kato, Saul; Albrecht, Dirk R.; Nakagawa, Takao; Abbott, L. F.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2010-01-01

    Many neurons release classical transmitters together with neuropeptide cotransmitters whose functions are incompletely understood. Here we define the relationship between two transmitters in the olfactory system of Caenorhabditis elegans, showing that a neuropeptide-to-neuropeptide feedback loop alters sensory dynamics in primary olfactory neurons. The AWC olfactory neuron is glutamatergic and also expresses the peptide NLP-1. nlp-1 mutants have increased AWC-dependent behaviors, suggesting that NLP-1 limits the normal response. The receptor for NLP-1 is the G protein-coupled receptor NPR-11, which acts in postsynaptic AIA interneurons. Feedback from AIA interneurons modulates odor-evoked calcium dynamics in AWC olfactory neurons and requires INS-1, a neuropeptide released from AIA. The neuropeptide feedback loop dampens behavioral responses to odors on short and long timescales. Our results point to neuronal dynamics as a site of behavioral regulation and reveal the ability of neuropeptide feedback to remodel sensory networks on multiple timescales. PMID:20364145

  10. [Changes in neuropeptide Y and substance P immunoreactive nerve fibres and immunocompetent cells in hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Fehér, Erzsébet

    2015-11-22

    Neuropeptide Y and substance P were thought to play a role in the function of immune cells and in amplification or elimination of the inflammatory processes. In hepatitis the number of both neuropeptide Y and substance P immunoreactive nerve fibres are increased, where the increase of neoropeptide Y is significant. A large number of lymphocytes and mast cells are also stained for neuropeptide Y and substance P. Very close associations (less than 1 µm) were observed between neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve fibres and immune cells stained also with neuropeptide Y. Some immune cells were also found to be immunoreactive for tumor necrosis factor-α and NF-κB. Some of the SP IR immunocells were also stained for TNF-α and nuclear factor kappaB. Based on these data it is hypothesized that neuropeptid Y and substance P released from nerve fibres and immune cells play a role in inflammation and elimination of inflammation in hepatitis.

  11. Mechanisms involved in the regulation of neuropeptide-mediated neurite outgrowth: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Bakos, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The present knowledge, regarding the neuronal growth and neurite extension, includes neuropeptide action in the central nervous system. Research reports have brought much information about the multiple intracellular signaling pathways of neuropeptides. However, regardless of the differences in the local responses elicited by neuropeptides, there exist certain functional similarities in the effects of neuropeptides, mediated by their receptors. In the present review, data of the relevant studies, focused on G protein-coupled receptors activated by neuropeptides, are summarized. Particularly, receptors that activate phosphatidylinositol-calcium system and protein kinase C pathways, resulting in the reorganization of the neuronal cytoskeleton and changes in the neuronal morphology, are discussed. Based on our data received, we are showing that oxytocin increases the gene expression of GTPase cell division cycle protein 42 (Cdc42), implicated in many aspects of the neuronal growth and morphology. We are also paying a special attention to neurite extension and retraction in the context of neuropeptide regulation. PMID:27560639

  12. The intriguing mission of neuropeptide Y in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Stanojević, Stanislava

    2013-07-01

    For many years, the central nervous system and the immune system were considered two autonomous entities. However, extensive research in the field of neuroimmunomodulation during the past decades has demonstrated the presence of different neuropeptides and their respective receptors in the immune cells. More importantly, it has provided evidence for the direct effects of neuropeptides on the immune cell functions. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is generally considered the most abundant peptide in the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it is also distinguished by exhibiting pleiotropic functions in many other physiological systems, including the immune system. NPY affects the functions of the cells of the adaptive and innate immunity. In this respect, NPY is known to modulate immune cell trafficking, T helper cell differentiation, cytokine secretion, natural killer cell activity, phagocytosis and the production of reactive oxygen species. The specific Y receptors have been found in immune cells, and their expression is amplified upon immune stimulation. Different Y receptor subtypes may mediate an opposite effect of NPY on the particular function, thus underlining its regulatory role. Since the immune cells are capable of producing NPY upon appropriate stimulation, this peptide can regulate immune cell functions in an autocrine/paracrine manner. NPY also has important implications in several immune-mediated disorders, which affirms the clear need for further investigation of its role in either the mechanisms of the disease development or its possible therapeutic capacity. This review summarises the key points of NPY's mission throughout the immune system.

  13. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  14. Insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Terhzaz, Selim; Teets, Nicholas M.; Cabrero, Pablo; Henderson, Louise; Ritchie, Michael G.; Nachman, Ronald J.; Dow, Julian A. T.; Denlinger, David L.; Davies, Shireen-A.

    2015-01-01

    The success of insects is linked to their impressive tolerance to environmental stress, but little is known about how such responses are mediated by the neuroendocrine system. Here we show that the capability (capa) neuropeptide gene is a desiccation- and cold stress-responsive gene in diverse dipteran species. Using targeted in vivo gene silencing, physiological manipulations, stress-tolerance assays, and rationally designed neuropeptide analogs, we demonstrate that the Drosophila melanogaster capa neuropeptide gene and its encoded peptides alter desiccation and cold tolerance. Knockdown of the capa gene increases desiccation tolerance but lengthens chill coma recovery time, and injection of capa peptide analogs can reverse both phenotypes. Immunohistochemical staining suggests that capa accumulates in the capa-expressing Va neurons during desiccation and nonlethal cold stress but is not released until recovery from each stress. Our results also suggest that regulation of cellular ion and water homeostasis mediated by capa peptide signaling in the insect Malpighian (renal) tubules is a key physiological mechanism during recovery from desiccation and cold stress. This work augments our understanding of how stress tolerance is mediated by neuroendocrine signaling and illustrates the use of rationally designed peptide analogs as agents for disrupting protective stress tolerance. PMID:25730885

  15. Insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Terhzaz, Selim; Teets, Nicholas M; Cabrero, Pablo; Henderson, Louise; Ritchie, Michael G; Nachman, Ronald J; Dow, Julian A T; Denlinger, David L; Davies, Shireen-A

    2015-03-01

    The success of insects is linked to their impressive tolerance to environmental stress, but little is known about how such responses are mediated by the neuroendocrine system. Here we show that the capability (capa) neuropeptide gene is a desiccation- and cold stress-responsive gene in diverse dipteran species. Using targeted in vivo gene silencing, physiological manipulations, stress-tolerance assays, and rationally designed neuropeptide analogs, we demonstrate that the Drosophila melanogaster capa neuropeptide gene and its encoded peptides alter desiccation and cold tolerance. Knockdown of the capa gene increases desiccation tolerance but lengthens chill coma recovery time, and injection of capa peptide analogs can reverse both phenotypes. Immunohistochemical staining suggests that capa accumulates in the capa-expressing Va neurons during desiccation and nonlethal cold stress but is not released until recovery from each stress. Our results also suggest that regulation of cellular ion and water homeostasis mediated by capa peptide signaling in the insect Malpighian (renal) tubules is a key physiological mechanism during recovery from desiccation and cold stress. This work augments our understanding of how stress tolerance is mediated by neuroendocrine signaling and illustrates the use of rationally designed peptide analogs as agents for disrupting protective stress tolerance.

  16. "Neuropeptides in the brain defense against distant organ damage".

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Mike Yoshio; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Cunha, Débora Maria Gomes; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2016-01-15

    Delirium, or acute confusional state, is a common manifestation in diseases that originate outside the central nervous system, affecting 30-40% of elderly hospitalized patients and up to 80% of the critically ill, even though it remains unclear if severe systemic inflammation is able or not to induce cellular disturbances and immune activation in the brain. Neuropeptides are pleotropic molecules heterogeneously distributed throughout the brain and possess a wide spectrum of functions, including regulation of the inflammatory response, so we hypothesized that they would be the major alarm system in the brain before overt microglia activation. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we induced acute pancreatitis in 8-10week old rats and collected brain tissue, 12 and 24h following pancreatic injury, to measure neuropeptide and cytokine tissue levels. We found significantly higher levels of β-endorphin, orexin and oxytocin in the brain of rats submitted to pancreatic injury, when compared to healthy controls. Interestingly, these differences were not associated with increased local cytokine levels, putting in evidence that neuropeptide release occurred independently of microglia activation and may be a pivotal alarm system to initiate neurologic reactions to distant inflammatory non-infectious aggression.

  17. Toward a consensus nomenclature for insect neuropeptides and peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Coast, Geoffrey M; Schooley, David A

    2011-03-01

    The nomenclature currently in use for insect neuropeptide and peptide hormone families is reviewed and suggestions are made as to how it can be rationalized. Based upon this review, a number of conventions are advanced as a guide to a more rationale nomenclature. The scheme that is put forward builds upon the binomial nomenclature scheme proposed by Raina and Gäde in 1988, when just over 20 insect neuropeptides had been identified. Known neuropeptides and peptide hormones are assigned to 32 structurally distinct families, frequently with overlapping functions. The names given to these families are those that are currently in use, and describe a biological function, homology to known invertebrate/vertebrate peptides, or a conserved structural motif. Interspecific isoforms are identified using a five-letter code to indicate genus and species names, and intraspecific isoforms are identified by Roman or Arabic numerals, with the latter used to signify the order in which sequences are encoded on a prepropeptide. The proposed scheme is sufficiently flexible to allow the incorporation of novel peptides, and could be extended to other arthropods and non-arthropod invertebrates. PMID:21093513

  18. Sensory neurobiological analysis of neuropeptide modulation of meal size.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary J; Azzara, Anthony V

    2004-08-01

    Gerry Smith's emphasis on the meal as the functional unit of ingestion spurred experiments designed to (1) identify oral and postoral stimuli that affect meal size, and (2) identify peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in the processing of sensory signals generated by these stimuli. His observations that gut-brain peptides can limit meal size were important in formulating the idea that neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake modulate the peripheral and central neural processing of meal-stimulated sensory signals. This focus on meal size continues to foster the development of hypotheses and the design of experiments that characterize the sites and modes of action of feeding modulatory neuropeptides. These investigations have focused attention on the gut-brain neuraxis as a critical sensory pathway in the control of ingestive behavior, and have revealed important integrative properties of peripheral and central neurons along this axis. The neuromodulatory function of peptides that alter food intake is supported by their ability to recruit the activation of neurons at multiple central nodes of the gut-brain axis and to affect the neural processing and behavioral potency of meal-related gastrointestinal signals important in the negative feedback control of meal size. This sensory neurobiological perspective may also be applied to determine whether feeding modulatory neuropeptides affect the neural and behavioral potency of oral positive feedback signals that promote ingestion.

  19. [Modification of the FF neuropeptide enhances its hypertensive effect].

    PubMed

    Kapel'ko, V I; Bespalova, Zh D; Efremov, E E; Lakomkin, V L; Orlova, Ts R; Lakomkin, S V; Sidorova, M V; Az'muko, A A; Molokoedov, A S; Sharf, T V

    2009-05-01

    Neuropeptide FF (H-Phe-Leu-Phe-Gln-Pro-Gln-Arg-Phe-NH2) injected intravenously temporarily enhanced the arterial pressure (AP) and the heart rate (HR). However, its role in the regulation of blood circulation is obscure. To study the properties of the molecule, its analogue was synthesized, in which proline in position 7 was substituted with glycine, and leucine in the position 2 with norleucine. Modified neuropeptide FF (FFm) also temporarily and in a dose-dependent manner increased the AP and HR; however, the equal degree of increase was reached at doses of FFm being 5-7 times lesser as compared with the natural peptide. The application of the FFm at hemorrhagic shock excluded mortality of animals during the experiment, considerably increased the degree of AP and HR restoration in the remaining experiments, and improved the survival of animals in 24 hours. It has been found that the level of antibodies to the fragment of hFF1 receptor in the serum is lower in spontaneously hypertensive rats SHR as compared with Wistar rats, but it is increased in patients of cardiological profile as compared with donors. The findings suggest involvement of neuropeptide FF in the regulation of blood circulation; however, the precise mechanisms remain to be determined.

  20. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  1. Scaling phenomenon in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C. Y.; Blankenbecler, R.

    1980-01-01

    New scaling variables for proton and pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are introduced which are the generalizations of the Feynmann scaling variable. They allow a simple description of the cross sections at forward and backward angles. 2 figures.

  2. The Evolution and Variety of RFamide-Type Neuropeptides: Insights from Deuterostomian Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Elphick, Maurice R.; Mirabeau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Five families of neuropeptides that have a C-terminal RFamide motif have been identified in vertebrates: (1) gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), (2) neuropeptide FF (NPFF), (3) pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide (QRFP), (4) prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), and (5) Kisspeptin. Experimental demonstration of neuropeptide–receptor pairings combined with comprehensive analysis of genomic and/or transcriptomic sequence data indicate that, with the exception of the deuterostomian PrRP system, the evolutionary origins of these neuropeptides can be traced back to the common ancestor of bilaterians. Here, we review the occurrence of homologs of vertebrate RFamide-type neuropeptides and their receptors in deuterostomian invertebrates – urochordates, cephalochordates, hemichordates, and echinoderms. Extending analysis of the occurrence of the RFamide motif in other bilaterian neuropeptide families reveals RFamide-type peptides that have acquired modified C-terminal characteristics in the vertebrate lineage (e.g., NPY/NPF), neuropeptide families where the RFamide motif is unique to protostomian members (e.g., CCK/sulfakinins), and RFamide-type peptides that have been lost in the vertebrate lineage (e.g., luqins). Furthermore, the RFamide motif is also a feature of neuropeptide families with a more restricted phylogenetic distribution (e.g., the prototypical FMRFamide-related neuropeptides in protostomes). Thus, the RFamide motif is both an ancient and a convergent feature of neuropeptides, with conservation, acquisition, or loss of this motif occurring in different branches of the animal kingdom. PMID:24994999

  3. Can neuropeptides treat obesity? A review of neuropeptides and their potential role in the treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Boughton, C K; Murphy, K G

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide public health issue. The physiological systems that regulate body weight are thus of great interest as targets for anti-obesity agents. Peptidergic systems are critical to the regulation of energy homeostasis by key regions in the hypothalamus and brainstem. A number of neuropeptide systems have therefore been investigated as potential treatments for obesity. Blocking orexigenic peptide signals such as neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone, orexins, relaxin-3 and galanin-like peptide or stimulating anorectic signalling pathways used by peptides such as the melanocortins, ciliary neurotrophic factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, are approaches that have shown some promise, but which have also highlighted possible concerns. Manipulation of central peptidergic systems poses a number of therapeutic problems, including brain access and side effects. Given that the homeostatic defence of body weight may limit the effectiveness of any single-target therapy developed, a combination therapy approach may offer the best hope for the effective prevention and treatment of obesity. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:23121386

  4. Comparative distribution of central neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the prairie (Microtus ochrogaster) and meadow (M. pennsylvanicus) vole.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Caroline M; Hitchcock, Leah N; Anacker, Allison M J; Young, Larry J; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2013-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been implicated as a modulator of social behavior, often in a species-specific manner. Comparative studies of closely related vole species are particularly useful for identifying neural systems involved in social behaviors in both voles and humans. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was performed to compare NPY-like immunoreactivity (-ir) in brain tissue of the socially monogamous prairie vole and non-monogamous meadow vole. Species differences in NPY-ir were observed in a number of regions including the cortex, extended amygdala, septal area, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and intergeniculate leaf. Meadow voles had higher NPY-ir in all these regions as compared to prairie voles. No differences were observed in the striatum or hippocampus. The extended amygdala and lateral septum are regions that play a key role in regulation of monogamous behaviors such as pair bonding and paternal care. The present study suggests NPY in these regions may be an additional modulator of these species-specific social behaviors. Meadow voles had moderately higher NPY-ir in a number of hypothalamic regions, especially in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Meadow voles also had much higher levels of NPY-ir in the intergeniculate leaflet, another key region in the regulation of circadian rhythms. Overall, species differences in NPY-ir were observed in a number of brain regions implicated in emotion, stress, circadian, and social behaviors. These findings provide additional support for a role for the NPY system in species-typical social behaviors.

  5. Spatiotemporal profiles of arginine vasopressin transcription in cultured suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Yoshiko; Enoki, Ryosuke; Watanabe, Kazuto; Yamazaki, Maya; Sakimura, Kenji; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2015-11-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP), a major neuropeptide in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is postulated to mediate the output of the circadian oscillation. Mice carrying a reporter gene of AVP transcription (AVP(ELuc)) were produced by knocking-in a cDNA of Emerald-luciferase (ELuc) in the translational initiation site. Homozygous mice did not survive beyond postnatal day 7. Using the heterozygous (AVP(ELuc/+)) mice, a bioluminescence reporter system was developed that enabled to monitor AVP transcription through AVP-ELuc measurement in real time for more than 10 cycles in the cultured brain slice. AVP(ELuc/+) mice showed circadian behaviour rhythms and light responsiveness indistinguishable from those of the wild-type. Robust circadian rhythms in AVP-ELuc were detected in the cultured SCN slice at a single cell as well as tissue levels. The circadian rhythm of the whole SCN slice was stable, with the peak at the mid-light phase of a light-dark cycle, while that of a single cell was more variable. By comparison, rhythmicity in the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus in the hypothalamus was unstable and damped rapidly. Spatiotemporal profiles of AVP expression at the pixel level revealed significant circadian rhythms in the entire area of AVP-positive cells in the SCN, and at least two clusters that showed different circadian oscillations. Contour analysis of bioluminescence intensity in a cell-like region demonstrated the radiation area was almost identical to the cell size. This newly developed reporter system for AVP gene expression is a useful tool for the study of circadian rhythms. PMID:26342201

  6. Mechanics of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lammerding, Jan

    2011-04-01

    The nucleus is the distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was often considered simply as a unique compartment containing the genetic information of the cell and associated machinery, without much attention to its structure and mechanical properties. This article provides compelling examples that illustrate how specific nuclear structures are associated with important cellular functions, and how defects in nuclear mechanics can cause a multitude of human diseases. During differentiation, embryonic stem cells modify their nuclear envelope composition and chromatin structure, resulting in stiffer nuclei that reflect decreased transcriptional plasticity. In contrast, neutrophils have evolved characteristic lobulated nuclei that increase their physical plasticity, enabling passage through narrow tissue spaces in their response to inflammation. Research on diverse cell types further demonstrates how induced nuclear deformations during cellular compression or stretch can modulate cellular function. Pathological examples of disturbed nuclear mechanics include the many diseases caused by mutations in the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and associated proteins, as well as cancer cells that are often characterized by abnormal nuclear morphology. In this article, we will focus on determining the functional relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular (dys-)function, describing the molecular changes associated with physiological and pathological examples, the resulting defects in nuclear mechanics, and the effects on cellular function. New insights into the close relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular organization and function will yield a better understanding of normal biology and will offer new clues into therapeutic approaches to the various diseases associated with defective nuclear mechanics.

  7. A case of pancreatic cancer with concomitant median arcuate ligament syndrome treated successfully using an allograft arterial transposition

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sebahattin; Ringe, Kristina I.; Boru, Cristian E.; Constantinica, Victor; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    An association of pancreatic cancer and median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is a rare and challenging situation in terms of treatment. A 60-year-old man diagnosed with pancreatic cancer underwent laparotomy. A pancreaticoduodenectomy was planned, but during the resection part of the operation, a celiac artery stenosis was noticed. The patient was diagnosed with MALS causing almost total celiac artery occlusion, with no radiological solution. The patient was re-operated the next day, and an iliac artery allograft was used for aorta-proper hepatic artery reconstruction, concomitant with the total pancreaticoduodenectomy. Preoperative meticulous evaluation of vascular structures of the celiac trunk and its branches is important, especially in pancreatic surgery. A vascular allograft may be a lifesaving alternative when vascular reconstruction is necessary. PMID:26715412

  8. Orogen-parallel mass transport along the arcuate Himalayan front into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Along the length of the Himalayan arc, Quaternary rock exhumation rates are highest in the Himalayan syntaxes at the lateral ends of the arc. In the western Himalayan syntaxis, these rates may exceed 10 mm/a over the past 2 Ma, requiring an additional source of crustal mass into this region to maintain the high-elevation topography. We have previously demonstrated that strain partitioning of oblique convergence can produce a significant orogen-parallel mass flux into the syntaxis of a Himalaya-like orogen and balance the rapid rates of surface denudation. However, the magnitude of this orogen parallel mass flux and whether strain is partitioned across the Himalayan thrust front is affected by the strength of the material bounding and within the Himalayan orogenic wedge, the dip angle of the basal detachment and the convergence obliquity angle γ. Strain partitioning is expected for a finite-length Himalaya-like segmented linear orogen with an obliquity of γ = 30 - 40°, but the obliquity angle in the Himalayan arc varies from 0 at the center of the arc to ˜ 40° in the western Himalayan syntaxis region. Thus, the conditions in which strain partitioning will occur may not be met along much of the length of the arc. Though there is clear evidence of strain partitioning in the Himalaya, preliminary results from 3D numerical geodynamic models of an orogen with an arcuate geometry based on the Himalaya suggest strain partitioning does not occur for the same conditions observed in earlier models of segmented linear orogens or orogens with a smaller arc radius. In those models, the proportion of the orogen length with a high obliquity angle was greater, which favors strain partitioning. In numerical experiments of an arcuate Himalayan orogen with weak material (friction angle φ ≤ 5°) at the back of the orogenic wedge, strain partitioning is only observed in the toe of the orogenic wedge (10-15 km from the thrust front) at the western end of the arc, rather than for

  9. Role of the neuropeptide, bombesin, in bile secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    Since ancient times, bile secretion has been considered vital for maintaining health. One of the main functions of bile secretion is gastric acid neutralization with biliary bicarbonate during a meal or Pavlovian response. Although the liver has many extrinsic and intrinsic nerve innervations, the functional role of these nerves in biliary physiology is poorly understood. To understand the role of neural regulation in bile secretion, our recent studies on the effect of bombesin, a neuropeptide, on bile secretion and its underlying mechanisms will be reviewed. Using isolated perfused rat livers (IPRL) from both normal and 2 week bile duct ligated rats, as well as hepatocyte couplets and isolated bile duct units (IBDU) from normal rat livers, bombesin was shown to stimulate biliary bicarbonate and fluid secretion from bile ducts. Detailed pH studies indicated that bombesin stimulated the activity of Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, which was counterbalanced by a secondary activation of electrogenic Na+/HCO3- symport. Quantitative videomicroscopic studies showed that bombesin-stimulated fluid secretion in IBDU was dependent on Cl- and HCO3- in the media, anion exchanger(s), Cl- and K+ channels, and carbonic anhydrase, but not on the microtubular system. Furthermore, this bombesin response is inhibited by somatostatin but not substance P. Finally, studies of secondary messengers in isolated cholangiocytes and IBDU indicated that bombesin had no effect on intracellular cAMP, cGMP, or Ca++ levels in cholangiocytes. These results provide evidence that neuropeptides such as bombesin can directly stimulate fluid and bicarbonate secretion from cholangiocytes by activating luminal Cl-/HCO3- exchange, but by different mechanisms from those established for secretin. These findings, in turn, suggest that neuropeptides may play an important regulatory role in biliary transport and secretion. Thus, this neuropeptidergic regulation of bile secretion may provide a plausible mechanism for the

  10. Reproductive neuropeptides that stimulate spawning in the Sydney Rock Oyster (Saccostrea glomerata).

    PubMed

    In, Vu Van; Ntalamagka, Nikoleta; O'Connor, Wayne; Wang, Tianfang; Powell, Daniel; Cummins, Scott F; Elizur, Abigail

    2016-08-01

    The Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, is a socioeconomically important species in Australia, yet little is known about the molecular mechanism that regulates its reproduction. To address this gap, we have performed a combination of high throughput transcriptomic and peptidomic analysis, to identify genes and neuropeptides that are expressed in the key regulatory tissues of S. glomerata; the visceral ganglia and gonads. Neuropeptides are known to encompass a diverse class of peptide messengers that play functional roles in many aspects of an animal's life, including reproduction. Approximately 28 neuropeptide genes were identified, primarily within the visceral ganglia transcriptome, that encode precursor proteins containing numerous neuropeptides; some were confirmed through mass spectral peptidomics analysis of the visceral ganglia. Of those, 28 bioactive neuropeptides were synthesized, and then tested for their capacity to induce gonad development and spawning in S. glomerata. Egg laying hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, APGWamide, buccalin, CCAP and LFRFamide were neuropeptides found to trigger spawning in ripe animals. Additional testing of APGWa and buccalin demonstrated their capacity to advance conditioning and gonadal maturation. In summary, our analysis of S. glomerata has identified neuropeptides that can influence the reproductive cycle of this species, specifically by accelerating gonadal maturation and triggering spawning. Other molluscan neuropeptides identified in this study will enable further research into understanding the neuroendocrinology of oysters, which may benefit their cultivation. PMID:27328253

  11. Neuropeptides stimulate human osteoblast activity and promote gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenhui; Zhang, Xuemin; Shi, Shushan; Zhang, Yingze

    2013-06-01

    Neuropeptides released from the skeletal nerve fibers have neurotransmitter and immunoregulatory roles; they exert paracrine biological effects on bone cells present close to the nerve endings expressing these signaling molecules. The aims of this study were a systematic investigation of the effects of the neuropeptides substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) on the cell viability and function of the human osteoblasts, and comparing their difference in the role of regulating bone formation. Cultures of normal human osteoblasts were treated with SP, CGRP, VIP, NPY or TH at three concentrations. We found that each of the five neuropeptides induced increases in cell viability of human osteoblasts. The stimulatory action of NPY was the highest, followed by VIP, SP and TH, while CGRP had the lowest stimulatory effect. The viability index of osteoblasts was inversely associated with the concentration of neuropeptides, and positively with the time of exposure. Moreover, the five neuropeptides increased the ALP activity and osteocalcin to different extents in a dose-dependent manner. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly promoted by neuropeptides. The results demonstrated that neuropeptides released from skeletal nerve endings after a stimulus appeared to be able to induce the proliferation and activity of osteoblasts via enhancing GJIC between cells, and further influence the bone formation. These findings may contribute toward a better understanding of the neural influence on bone remodeling and improving treatments related to bone diseases.

  12. Reproductive neuropeptides that stimulate spawning in the Sydney Rock Oyster (Saccostrea glomerata).

    PubMed

    In, Vu Van; Ntalamagka, Nikoleta; O'Connor, Wayne; Wang, Tianfang; Powell, Daniel; Cummins, Scott F; Elizur, Abigail

    2016-08-01

    The Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, is a socioeconomically important species in Australia, yet little is known about the molecular mechanism that regulates its reproduction. To address this gap, we have performed a combination of high throughput transcriptomic and peptidomic analysis, to identify genes and neuropeptides that are expressed in the key regulatory tissues of S. glomerata; the visceral ganglia and gonads. Neuropeptides are known to encompass a diverse class of peptide messengers that play functional roles in many aspects of an animal's life, including reproduction. Approximately 28 neuropeptide genes were identified, primarily within the visceral ganglia transcriptome, that encode precursor proteins containing numerous neuropeptides; some were confirmed through mass spectral peptidomics analysis of the visceral ganglia. Of those, 28 bioactive neuropeptides were synthesized, and then tested for their capacity to induce gonad development and spawning in S. glomerata. Egg laying hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, APGWamide, buccalin, CCAP and LFRFamide were neuropeptides found to trigger spawning in ripe animals. Additional testing of APGWa and buccalin demonstrated their capacity to advance conditioning and gonadal maturation. In summary, our analysis of S. glomerata has identified neuropeptides that can influence the reproductive cycle of this species, specifically by accelerating gonadal maturation and triggering spawning. Other molluscan neuropeptides identified in this study will enable further research into understanding the neuroendocrinology of oysters, which may benefit their cultivation.

  13. Hyperon-nucleus potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, C. B.; Gal, A.

    We review models for the interaction of baryons ( N, Λ, Σ and Ξ) with nuclei, emphasizing the underlying meson exchange picture. Starting from a phenomenological one boson exchange model (the Nijmegen potential, as an example) which accounts for the available NN, ΛN and ΣN two-body scattering data, we show how to construct the effective baryon-nucleon interaction ( G-matrix). Employing the folding model, we then obtain the many-body potentials for bound states in terms of the nuclear density and the appropriate spin-isospin weighted G-matrices. The models we emphasize most impose SU(3) constraints on baryon-baryon coupling constants SU(3) is broken through the use of physical masses), although we also compare with rough estimates based on quark model relations between coupling constants. We stress the essential unity and economy of such models, in which nucleon and hyperon-nucleus potentials are intimately related via SU(3), and the connection between the two-body and many-body potentials is preserved. We decompose the nuclear potentials into central and spin-orbit parts, each of which is isospin dependent. For nucleons, the microscopic origin of the isospin dependent Lane potential V1 N is clarified. For Λ and Σ hyperons, the one boson exchange model with SU(3) constraints leads to one-body spin-orbit strengths VLSB which are relatively weak ( VLSΛ ≈ 1.5-2 MeV, VLSΣ ≈ 2.5-;3 MeV, compared to VLSN ≈ 7-9 MeV). We demonstrate the interplay between symmetric and antisymmetric two-body spin-orbit forces which give rise to these results, as well as the special role of K and K ∗ exchange for hyperons. We contrast these results with predictions based on the naive quark model. From S and P-wave two-body interactions, a Lane potential for the Σ of depth V1 Σ ≈ 50-60 MeV is predicted although this result is somewhat uncertain. For the Ξ, the nuclear potential is very different in various models for the two-body interaction based on SU(3) or the quark

  14. Decoding the superior parietal lobule connections of the superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kamali, A; Sair, H I; Radmanesh, A; Hasan, K M

    2014-09-26

    The temporo-parietal (TP) white matter connections between the inferior parietal lobule and superior temporal gyrus as part of the superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus (SLF/AF) or middle longitudinal fasciculus (MdLF) have been studied in prior diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) studies. However, few studies have been focusing on the higher TP connections of the superior parietal lobule with the temporal lobe. These higher TP connections have been shown to have a role in core processes such as attention, memory, emotions, and language. Our most recent study, for the first time, hinted to the possibility of a long white matter connection interconnecting the superior parietal lobule (SPL) with the posterior temporal lobe in human brain which we call the SLF/AF TP-SPL and for a shorter abbreviation, the TP-SPL. We decided to further investigate this white matter connection using fiber assignment by continuous tracking deterministic tractography and high spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging on 3T. Five healthy right-handed men (age range 24-37 years) were studied. We delineated the SPL connections of the SLF/AF TP bilaterally in five normal adult human brains. Using a high resolution DTT technique, we demonstrate for the first time, the trajectory of a long fiber bundle connectivity between the SPL and posterior temporal lobe, called the SLF/AF TP-SPL (or the TP-SPL), bilaterally in five healthy adult human brains. We also demonstrate the trajectory of the vertically oriented posterior TP connections, interconnecting the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) with the posterior temporal lobe (TP-IPL) in relation to the TP-SPL, arcuate fasciculus and other major language pathways. In the current study, for the first time, we categorized the TP connections into the anterior and posterior connectivity groups and subcategorized each one into the SPL or IPL connections. PMID:25086308

  15. CGRP as a neuropeptide in migraine: lessons from mice

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that is far more than just a bad headache. A hallmark of migraine is altered sensory perception. A likely contributor to this altered perception is the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Over the past decade, CGRP has become firmly established as a key player in migraine. Although the mechanisms and sites of action by which CGRP might trigger migraine remain speculative, recent advances with mouse models provide some hints. This brief review focuses on how CGRP might act as both a central and peripheral neuromodulator to contribute to the migraine-like symptom of light aversive behaviour in mice. PMID:26032833

  16. Olfactory Bulbectomy Increases Food Intake and Hypothalamic Neuropeptide Y in Obesity-Prone but not Obesity-Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Primeaux, Stefany D.; Barnes, Maria J.; Bray, George A.

    2007-01-01

    Obese individuals often suffer from depression. The olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) model is an animal model of depression that produces behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical alterations resembling clinical depression. The OBX model was employed to assess depression-related changes in food intake in obesity-prone, Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats and obesity-resistant, S5B/Pl rats. OBX increased food intake in OM rats beginning 7 days following surgery, however, OBX did not alter food intake in S5B/Pl rats at any time point. Fourteen days following surgery, OBX significantly increased locomotor activity (total lines crossed and rears) in the openfield test in OM and S5B/Pl rats. Fifteen days following surgery, prepro-neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA levels were significantly increased in the hypothalamus of bulbectomized OM rats and in the medial nucleus of the amygdala of bulbectomized OM and S5B/Pl rats. OBX decreased NPY Y2 receptor mRNA levels in the hypothalamus and medial nucleus of the amygdala in OM rats, while increasing NPY Y2 receptor mRNA levels in the medial nucleus of the amygdala of S5B/Pl rats. These data indicate that though both obesity-prone and obesity-resistant strains were susceptible to the locomotor effects of OBX, food intake and hypothalamic prepro-NPY mRNA were only increased in OM rats. Therefore, strain specific alterations in hypothalamic NPY may account for increased food intake in the obesity-prone rats following OBX, and suggests a potential mechanism to explain the comorbidity of obesity and depression. PMID:17420059

  17. Cytological approach to morphogenesis in the planarian blastema. II. The effect of neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Hori, I

    1997-01-01

    The regeneration blastema consists of three cell types, undifferentiated cells, regenerative cells, and differentiated cells all of which can be identified by their ultrastructural characteristics. Quantitative changes in the numbers of these cells within the blastema offer important clues about the detailed process of regeneration. When decapitated worms were allowed to regenerate in neuropeptide-containing tap water, the undifferentiated cells accumulated rapidly and initiated blastema formation. These cells were then replaced with regenerative cells, and subsequently with differentiated cells. In the non-treated regenerating worms, the proportion of undifferentiated cells was much lower than in the neuropeptide-treated ones. The results of this study indicate that neuropeptides have a remarkable effect on the early stage of regeneration in planarians. Immunoelectron microscopy using a gold-conjugated anti-neuropeptide antiserum revealed the presence of neuropeptides in some kinds of parenchymal cells in the post-blastemal area.

  18. Unexpected doubly-magic nucleus.

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R. V. F.; Physics

    2009-01-01

    Nuclei with a 'magic' number of both protons and neutrons, dubbed doubly magic, are particularly stable. The oxygen isotope {sup 24}O has been found to be one such nucleus - yet it lies just at the limit of stability.

  19. Neuropeptide Y inhibits the trigeminovascular pathway through NPY Y1 receptor: implications for migraine.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Margarida-Martins; Akerman, Simon; Tavares, Isaura; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a painful neurologic disorder with premonitory symptomatology that can include disturbed appetite. Migraine pathophysiology involves abnormal activation of trigeminocervical complex (TCC) neurons. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is synthesized in the brain and is involved in pain modulation. NPY receptors are present in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis suggesting a role in migraine pathophysiology. The present study aimed to determine the effect of systemic administration of NPY on TCC neuronal activity in response to dural nociceptive trigeminovascular activation. We performed in vivo electrophysiology in anesthetized rats, administered NPY (10, 30, and 100 µg·kg), and investigated the receptors involved by studying NPY Y1 (30 µg·kg), Y2 (30 µg·kg), and Y5 receptor agonists (100·µg·kg), and NPY Y1 receptor antagonist (30 µg·kg). NPY (30 and 100 µg·kg) significantly reduced TCC neuronal firing in response to dural-evoked trigeminovascular activation, but only NPY (30 µg·kg) significantly reduced spontaneous trigeminal firing. NPY Y1 receptor agonist also significantly reduced dural-evoked and spontaneous TCC neuronal firing. NPY (10 µg·kg), NPY Y2, and Y5 receptor agonists, and the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist had no significant effects on nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the TCC or spontaneous trigeminal firing. This study demonstrates that NPY dose dependently inhibits dural-evoked trigeminal activity, through NPY Y1 receptor activation, indicating antinociceptive actions of NPY in a migraine animal model. Based on the role of NPY in appetite regulation, it is possible that disruption of the NPY system might explain changes of appetite in migraineurs.

  20. Neuropeptide Y inhibits the trigeminovascular pathway through NPY Y1 receptor: implications for migraine.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Margarida-Martins; Akerman, Simon; Tavares, Isaura; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a painful neurologic disorder with premonitory symptomatology that can include disturbed appetite. Migraine pathophysiology involves abnormal activation of trigeminocervical complex (TCC) neurons. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is synthesized in the brain and is involved in pain modulation. NPY receptors are present in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis suggesting a role in migraine pathophysiology. The present study aimed to determine the effect of systemic administration of NPY on TCC neuronal activity in response to dural nociceptive trigeminovascular activation. We performed in vivo electrophysiology in anesthetized rats, administered NPY (10, 30, and 100 µg·kg), and investigated the receptors involved by studying NPY Y1 (30 µg·kg), Y2 (30 µg·kg), and Y5 receptor agonists (100·µg·kg), and NPY Y1 receptor antagonist (30 µg·kg). NPY (30 and 100 µg·kg) significantly reduced TCC neuronal firing in response to dural-evoked trigeminovascular activation, but only NPY (30 µg·kg) significantly reduced spontaneous trigeminal firing. NPY Y1 receptor agonist also significantly reduced dural-evoked and spontaneous TCC neuronal firing. NPY (10 µg·kg), NPY Y2, and Y5 receptor agonists, and the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist had no significant effects on nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the TCC or spontaneous trigeminal firing. This study demonstrates that NPY dose dependently inhibits dural-evoked trigeminal activity, through NPY Y1 receptor activation, indicating antinociceptive actions of NPY in a migraine animal model. Based on the role of NPY in appetite regulation, it is possible that disruption of the NPY system might explain changes of appetite in migraineurs. PMID:27023421

  1. Exploring the role of neuropeptide S in the regulation of arousal: a functional anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Adori, Csaba; Barde, Swapnali; Vas, Szilvia; Ebner, Karl; Su, Jie; Svensson, Camilla; Mathé, Aleksander A; Singewald, Nicolas; Reinscheid, Rainer R; Uhlén, Mathias; Kultima, Kim; Bagdy, György; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide expressed by limited number of neurons in the brainstem. The simultaneous anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effect of NPS suggests an involvement in mood control and vigilance, making the NPS-NPS receptor system an interesting potential drug target. Here we examined, in detail, the distribution of NPS-immunoreactive (IR) fiber arborizations in brain regions of rat known to be involved in the regulation of sleep and arousal. Such nerve terminals were frequently apposed to GABAergic/galaninergic neurons in the ventro-lateral preoptic area (VLPO) and to tyrosine hydroxylase-IR neurons in all hypothalamic/thalamic dopamine cell groups. Then we applied the single platform-on-water (mainly REM) sleep deprivation method to study the functional role of NPS in the regulation of arousal. Of the three pontine NPS cell clusters, the NPS transcript levels were increased only in the peri-coerulear group in sleep-deprived animals, but not in stress controls. The density of NPS-IR fibers was significantly decreased in the median preoptic nucleus-VLPO region after the sleep deprivation, while radioimmunoassay and mass spectrometry measurements showed a parallel increase of NPS in the anterior hypothalamus. The expression of the NPS receptor was, however, not altered in the VLPO-region. The present results suggest a selective activation of one of the three NPS-expressing neuron clusters as well as release of NPS in distinct forebrain regions after sleep deprivation. Taken together, our results emphasize a role of the peri-coerulear cluster in the modulation of arousal, and the importance of preoptic area for the action of NPS on arousal and sleep. PMID:26462664

  2. Neuropeptide Y inhibits the trigeminovascular pathway through NPY Y1 receptor: implications for migraine

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Margarida-Martins; Akerman, Simon; Tavares, Isaura; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine is a painful neurologic disorder with premonitory symptomatology that can include disturbed appetite. Migraine pathophysiology involves abnormal activation of trigeminocervical complex (TCC) neurons. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is synthesized in the brain and is involved in pain modulation. NPY receptors are present in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis suggesting a role in migraine pathophysiology. The present study aimed to determine the effect of systemic administration of NPY on TCC neuronal activity in response to dural nociceptive trigeminovascular activation. We performed in vivo electrophysiology in anesthetized rats, administered NPY (10, 30, and 100 µg·kg−1), and investigated the receptors involved by studying NPY Y1 (30 µg·kg−1), Y2 (30 µg·kg−1), and Y5 receptor agonists (100·µg·kg−1), and NPY Y1 receptor antagonist (30 µg·kg−1). NPY (30 and 100 µg·kg−1) significantly reduced TCC neuronal firing in response to dural-evoked trigeminovascular activation, but only NPY (30 µg·kg−1) significantly reduced spontaneous trigeminal firing. NPY Y1 receptor agonist also significantly reduced dural-evoked and spontaneous TCC neuronal firing. NPY (10 µg·kg−1), NPY Y2, and Y5 receptor agonists, and the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist had no significant effects on nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the TCC or spontaneous trigeminal firing. This study demonstrates that NPY dose dependently inhibits dural-evoked trigeminal activity, through NPY Y1 receptor activation, indicating antinociceptive actions of NPY in a migraine animal model. Based on the role of NPY in appetite regulation, it is possible that disruption of the NPY system might explain changes of appetite in migraineurs. PMID:27023421

  3. Short neuropeptide F is a sleep-promoting inhibitory modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yuhua; Donelson, Nathan C.; Vecsey, Christopher G.; Guo, Fang; Rosbash, Michael; Griffith, Leslie C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY To advance the understanding of sleep regulation, we screened for sleep-promoting cells and identified neurons expressing neuropeptide Y-like short neuropeptide F (sNPF). Sleep-induction by sNPF meets all relevant criteria. Rebound sleep following sleep deprivation is reduced by activation of sNPF neurons and flies even experience negative sleep rebound upon cessation of sNPF neuronal stimulation, indicating that sNPF provides an important signal to the sleep homeostat. Only a subset of sNPF-expressing neurons, which includes the small ventrolateral clock neurons, is sleep-promoting. Their release of sNPF increases sleep consolidation in part by suppressing the activity of wake-promoting large ventrolateral clock neurons, and suppression of neuronal firing may be the general response to sNPF receptor activation. sNPF acutely increases sleep without altering feeding behavior, which it affects only on a much longer time scale. The profound effect of sNPF on sleep indicates that it is an important sleep-promoting molecule. PMID:24094110

  4. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures. PMID:25963417

  5. Neuropeptides Modulate Female Chemosensory Processing upon Mating in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mo; Loschek, Laura F.; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C.

    2016-01-01

    A female’s reproductive state influences her perception of odors and tastes along with her changed behavioral state and physiological needs. The mechanism that modulates chemosensory processing, however, remains largely elusive. Using Drosophila, we have identified a behavioral, neuronal, and genetic mechanism that adapts the senses of smell and taste, the major modalities for food quality perception, to the physiological needs of a gravid female. Pungent smelling polyamines, such as putrescine and spermidine, are essential for cell proliferation, reproduction, and embryonic development in all animals. A polyamine-rich diet increases reproductive success in many species, including flies. Using a combination of behavioral analysis and in vivo physiology, we show that polyamine attraction is modulated in gravid females through a G-protein coupled receptor, the sex peptide receptor (SPR), and its neuropeptide ligands, MIPs (myoinhibitory peptides), which act directly in the polyamine-detecting olfactory and taste neurons. This modulation is triggered by an increase of SPR expression in chemosensory neurons, which is sufficient to convert virgin to mated female olfactory choice behavior. Together, our data show that neuropeptide-mediated modulation of peripheral chemosensory neurons increases a gravid female’s preference for important nutrients, thereby ensuring optimal conditions for her growing progeny. PMID:27145127

  6. Allatotropin: An Ancestral Myotropic Neuropeptide Involved in Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Adami, Mariana Laura; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Damborenea, Cristina; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. Methods A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. Conclusions AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. Significance Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion. PMID:24143240

  7. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor effects on pulpal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J L; Hargreaves, K M

    2008-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important modulatory neuropeptide that regulates several physiological systems, including the activity of sensory neurons. We evaluated whether activation of the NPY Y1 receptor could modulate the activity of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors in trigeminal ganglia and dental pulp. We tested this hypothesis by measuring capsaicin-stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide release (CGRP) as a measure of nociceptor activity. Capsaicin-evoked CGRP release was inhibited by 50% (p < 0.05) in trigeminal ganglia and by 26% (p < 0.05) in dental pulp when tissues were pre-treated with [Leu(31),Pro(34)]NPY. The Y1 receptor was found to co-localize with the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglia. These results demonstrate that activation of the Y1 receptor results in the inhibition of the activity of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors in the trigeminal ganglia and dental pulp. These findings are relevant to the physiological modulation of dental nociceptors by endogenous NPY and demonstrate an important novel analgesic target for the treatment of dental pain.

  8. NeuroPID: a classifier of neuropeptide precursors.

    PubMed

    Karsenty, Solange; Rappoport, Nadav; Ofer, Dan; Zair, Adva; Linial, Michal

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptides (NPs) are short secreted peptides produced in neurons. NPs act by activating signaling cascades governing broad functions such as metabolism, sensation and behavior throughout the animal kingdom. NPs are the products of multistep processing of longer proteins, the NP precursors (NPPs). We present NeuroPID (Neuropeptide Precursor Identifier), an online machine-learning tool that identifies metazoan NPPs. NeuroPID was trained on 1418 NPPs annotated as such by UniProtKB. A large number of sequence-based features were extracted for each sequence with the goal of capturing the biophysical and informational-statistical properties that distinguish NPPs from other proteins. Training several machine-learning models, including support vector machines and ensemble decision trees, led to high accuracy (89-94%) and precision (90-93%) in cross-validation tests. For inputs of thousands of unseen sequences, the tool provides a ranked list of high quality predictions based on the results of four machine-learning classifiers. The output reveals many uncharacterized NPPs and secreted cell modulators that are rich in potential cleavage sites. NeuroPID is a discovery and a prediction tool that can be used to identify NPPs from unannotated transcriptomes and mass spectrometry experiments. NeuroPID predicted sequences are attractive targets for investigating behavior, physiology and cell modulation. The NeuroPID web tool is available at http:// neuropid.cs.huji.ac.il.

  9. Regional distribution of neuropeptide processing endopeptidases in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Berman, Y L; Rattan, A K; Carr, K; Devi, L

    1994-01-01

    Many peptide hormone and neuropeptide precursors undergo post-translational processing at mono- and/or dibasic residues. An enzymatic activity capable of processing prodynorphin at a monobasic processing site designated 'dynorphin converting enzyme' has been previously reported in rat rain and bovine pituitary. In this study the distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity in ten regions of rat brain has been compared with the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzymes and with the immuno-reactive dynorphin peptides. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity generally matches the distribution of immuno-reactive dynorphin B-13 in most but not all brain regions. The regions that are known to have a relatively large number of immuno-reactive dynorphin-neurons also contain high levels of dynorphin converting enzyme activity. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity does not match the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzyme or carboxypeptidase E activities. Taken together the data support the possibility that the dynorphin converting enzyme is involved in the maturation of dynorphin, as well as other neuropeptides, and peptide hormones.

  10. Neuropeptides Modulate Female Chemosensory Processing upon Mating in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ashiq; Üçpunar, Habibe K; Zhang, Mo; Loschek, Laura F; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C

    2016-05-01

    A female's reproductive state influences her perception of odors and tastes along with her changed behavioral state and physiological needs. The mechanism that modulates chemosensory processing, however, remains largely elusive. Using Drosophila, we have identified a behavioral, neuronal, and genetic mechanism that adapts the senses of smell and taste, the major modalities for food quality perception, to the physiological needs of a gravid female. Pungent smelling polyamines, such as putrescine and spermidine, are essential for cell proliferation, reproduction, and embryonic development in all animals. A polyamine-rich diet increases reproductive success in many species, including flies. Using a combination of behavioral analysis and in vivo physiology, we show that polyamine attraction is modulated in gravid females through a G-protein coupled receptor, the sex peptide receptor (SPR), and its neuropeptide ligands, MIPs (myoinhibitory peptides), which act directly in the polyamine-detecting olfactory and taste neurons. This modulation is triggered by an increase of SPR expression in chemosensory neurons, which is sufficient to convert virgin to mated female olfactory choice behavior. Together, our data show that neuropeptide-mediated modulation of peripheral chemosensory neurons increases a gravid female's preference for important nutrients, thereby ensuring optimal conditions for her growing progeny. PMID:27145127

  11. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures.

  12. Immunopathological study of neuropeptide expression in human salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Y; Deguchi, H; Nakahata, A; Kurashima, C; Hirokawa, K

    1990-01-01

    The immunoreactivity of anti-neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and anti-Leu-7 on formalin-fixed sections of human salivary gland neoplasms was determined by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method. In addition, neuropeptides, such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin, and substance P, in human salivary gland neoplasms were expressed, whereas other polypeptides, including glucagon, cholecystokinin, leu-enkephalin and calcitonin, were absent. When 182 paraffin-embedded examples of human salivary gland tumors, including 112 benign and 70 malignant neoplasms, were examined immunohistochemically, positive immunoreactivity was observed in: 51 cases with NSE (59%) and 46 cases with Leu-7 (54%) of 86 pleomorphic adenomas; 11 cases with Leu-7 (61%) of 18 Warthin's tumors; 7 cases with Leu-7 (58%) of 12 acinic cell carcinomas; 5 cases with NSE (31%) of 16 adenoid cystic carcinomas; 5 cases with NSE (42%) and 4 cases with Leu-7 (33%) of 12 adenocarcinomas; 4 cases with NSE (25%) and 6 cases with Leu-7 (38%) of 16 undifferentiated carcinomas. The other tumors, such as oxyphilic adenomas, basal cell adenomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, were nonreactive. Neuropeptides were observed in the neoplastic epithelial cells of certain tumors such as Warthin's tumors, acinic cell carcinomas, adenocarcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. These findings suggest the possibility that cells of neuroendocrine origin, present in certain neoplastic salivary gland epithelia may play a significant role in the histogenesis of human salivary gland neoplasms.

  13. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  14. The roles of neuropeptides in Caenorhabditis elegans including their importance in the regulation of feeding and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2013-06-01

    C. elegans has 302 neurons (in the adult hermaphrodite) and this simple nervous system harbours over 250 neuropeptides. Neuropeptides are a class of signalling molecule implicated in key physiological roles and thus confer a surprising level of complexity to signalling in this nematode. Indeed, it is probable that most, if not all, sensory, motor and interneurons, in C. elegans synthesise and release at least one neuropeptide but that many neurons synthesise an array of neuropeptides. In this review neuropeptides and their receptors with specific roles in feeding, metabolism, reproduction and locomotion are discussed. It is noted that the majority of C. elegans neuropeptides do not yet have defined roles and their cognate receptors have not yet been identified. Future studies will serve to provide further fundamental insight into how neuropeptide signalling can underpin animal behaviour.

  15. Effect of beta-adrenoceptors on the behaviour induced by the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela E; Attademo, Andrés; Baiardi, Gustavo; Celis, María Ester

    2007-07-30

    Excessive grooming behaviour is induced by intracerebroventricular injections of the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide (neuropeptide-EI), via the activation of A-10 dopaminergic neurons and the noradrenergic system. Our object was to study the latter system involved in these behaviours, using male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g with i.c.v. implants. The results show that all the adrenoceptor antagonists "per se" do not affect excessive grooming behaviour or motor activity. Intracerebroventricular administration of propranolol, a general beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, before neuropeptide-EI, inhibited the induced excessive grooming behaviour in a dose dependent manner. Metoprolol, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, also blocked this behaviour. However, intracerebroventricular injections of phentolamine, an alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, and ((+/-)-1-[2,3-(Dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol), a beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, had no effect on the behaviour induced by neuropeptide-EI induced behaviour for any of the doses tested. On the other hand, isoproterenol, a general beta-adrenoceptor agonist and dobutamine, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist, both elicited similar behaviours as those induced by neuropeptide-EI. These results support the hypothesis that a relationship exists between neuropeptide-EI and beta-adrenoceptors, more specifically the beta(1)-adrenoceptor, as found with other similar endogenous peptides such as neurotensin, cholecystin, substance P and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. Hence, neuropeptide-EI could probably be exerting a neuromodulating effect on the central nervous system.

  16. Neuropeptides amplify and focus the monoaminergic inhibition of nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hapiak, Vera; Summers, Philip; Ortega, Amanda; Law, Wen Jing; Stein, Andrew; Komuniecki, Richard

    2013-08-28

    Monoamines and neuropeptides interact to modulate most behaviors. To better understand these interactions, we have defined the roles of tyramine (TA), octopamine, and neuropeptides in the inhibition of aversive behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. TA abolishes the serotonergic sensitization of aversive behavior mediated by the two nociceptive ASH sensory neurons and requires the expression of the adrenergic-like, Gαq-coupled, TA receptor TYRA-3 on inhibitory monoaminergic and peptidergic neurons. For example, TA inhibition requires Gαq and Gαs signaling in the peptidergic ASI sensory neurons, with an array of ASI neuropeptides activating neuropeptide receptors on additional neurons involved in locomotory decision-making. The ASI neuropeptides required for tyraminergic inhibition are distinct from those required for octopaminergic inhibition, suggesting that individual monoamines stimulate the release of different subsets of ASI neuropeptides. Together, these results demonstrate that a complex humoral mix of monoamines is focused by more local, synaptic, neuropeptide release to modulate nociception and highlight the similarities between the tyraminergic/octopaminergic inhibition of nociception in C. elegans and the noradrenergic inhibition of nociception in mammals that also involves inhibitory peptidergic signaling.

  17. Mass spectrometric analysis of spatio-temporal dynamics of crustacean neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Liang, Zhidan; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides represent one of the largest classes of signaling molecules used by nervous systems to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Over the past several years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have revolutionized the discovery of neuropeptides in numerous model organisms, especially in decapod crustaceans. Here, we focus our discussion on recent advances in the use of MS-based techniques to map neuropeptides in the spatial domain and monitoring their dynamic changes in the temporal domain. These MS-enabled investigations provide valuable information about the distribution, secretion and potential function of neuropeptides with high molecular specificity and sensitivity. In situ MS imaging and in vivo microdialysis are highlighted as key technologies for probing spatio-temporal dynamics of neuropeptides in the crustacean nervous system. This review summarizes the latest advancement in MS-based methodologies for neuropeptide analysis including typical workflow and sample preparation strategies as well as major neuropeptide families discovered in decapod crustaceans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology.

  18. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets to combat stress-associated behavioral and neuroendocrinological effects.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2014-03-01

    Stress has become an integral part of human life and organisms are being constantly subjected to stress and the ability to cope with such stress is a crucial determinant of health and disease. Neuropeptides (bioactive peptides) play a crucial role in mediating different effects of acute and chronic stress. Some of these neuropeptides including oxytocin, urocortins, neuropeptide Y (NPY), neuropeptide S, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript, endorphins, enkephalins, ghrelin and thyrotropin-releasing hormone primarily attenuate stress and act as anxiolytic. On the other hand, neuropeptides including corticotropin releasing hormone, vasopressin, dynorphin, angiotensin, nesfatin-1, orexin and cholecystokinin primarily tend to promote stress related anxiety behavior. However, these neuropeptide tend to produce different actions depending on the type of receptors, the nature and intensity of the stressor. For example, NPY may exhibit anxiolytic effects by activating NPY1 and Y5 receptors, while pro-depressive effects are produced through NPY2 and Y4 receptors. Galanin may produce 'prodepressive' effects by activating its Gal 1 receptors and exert 'antidepressant' effects through Gal 2 receptors. The present review describes different neuropeptides as therapeutic targets to attenuate stress-induced behavioral and neuroendocrinological effects.

  19. C. elegans Stress-Induced Sleep Emerges from the Collective Action of Multiple Neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Nath, Ravi D; Chow, Elly S; Wang, Han; Schwarz, Erich M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-09-26

    The genetic basis of sleep regulation remains poorly understood. In C. elegans, cellular stress induces sleep through epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent activation of the EGF receptor in the ALA neuron. The downstream mechanism by which this neuron promotes sleep is unknown. Single-cell RNA sequencing of ALA reveals that the most highly expressed, ALA-enriched genes encode neuropeptides. Here we have systematically investigated the four most highly enriched neuropeptides: flp-7, nlp-8, flp-24, and flp-13. When individually removed by null mutation, these peptides had little or no effect on stress-induced sleep. However, stress-induced sleep was abolished in nlp-8; flp-24; flp-13 triple-mutant animals, indicating that these neuropeptides work collectively in controlling stress-induced sleep. We tested the effect of overexpression of these neuropeptide genes on five behaviors modulated during sleep-pharyngeal pumping, defecation, locomotion, head movement, and avoidance response to an aversive stimulus-and we found that, if individually overexpressed, each of three neuropeptides (nlp-8, flp-24, or flp-13) induced a different suite of sleep-associated behaviors. These overexpression results raise the possibility that individual components of sleep might be specified by individual neuropeptides or combinations of neuropeptides.

  20. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets to combat stress-associated behavioral and neuroendocrinological effects.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2014-03-01

    Stress has become an integral part of human life and organisms are being constantly subjected to stress and the ability to cope with such stress is a crucial determinant of health and disease. Neuropeptides (bioactive peptides) play a crucial role in mediating different effects of acute and chronic stress. Some of these neuropeptides including oxytocin, urocortins, neuropeptide Y (NPY), neuropeptide S, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript, endorphins, enkephalins, ghrelin and thyrotropin-releasing hormone primarily attenuate stress and act as anxiolytic. On the other hand, neuropeptides including corticotropin releasing hormone, vasopressin, dynorphin, angiotensin, nesfatin-1, orexin and cholecystokinin primarily tend to promote stress related anxiety behavior. However, these neuropeptide tend to produce different actions depending on the type of receptors, the nature and intensity of the stressor. For example, NPY may exhibit anxiolytic effects by activating NPY1 and Y5 receptors, while pro-depressive effects are produced through NPY2 and Y4 receptors. Galanin may produce 'prodepressive' effects by activating its Gal 1 receptors and exert 'antidepressant' effects through Gal 2 receptors. The present review describes different neuropeptides as therapeutic targets to attenuate stress-induced behavioral and neuroendocrinological effects. PMID:24625277

  1. C. elegans Stress-Induced Sleep Emerges from the Collective Action of Multiple Neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Nath, Ravi D; Chow, Elly S; Wang, Han; Schwarz, Erich M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-09-26

    The genetic basis of sleep regulation remains poorly understood. In C. elegans, cellular stress induces sleep through epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent activation of the EGF receptor in the ALA neuron. The downstream mechanism by which this neuron promotes sleep is unknown. Single-cell RNA sequencing of ALA reveals that the most highly expressed, ALA-enriched genes encode neuropeptides. Here we have systematically investigated the four most highly enriched neuropeptides: flp-7, nlp-8, flp-24, and flp-13. When individually removed by null mutation, these peptides had little or no effect on stress-induced sleep. However, stress-induced sleep was abolished in nlp-8; flp-24; flp-13 triple-mutant animals, indicating that these neuropeptides work collectively in controlling stress-induced sleep. We tested the effect of overexpression of these neuropeptide genes on five behaviors modulated during sleep-pharyngeal pumping, defecation, locomotion, head movement, and avoidance response to an aversive stimulus-and we found that, if individually overexpressed, each of three neuropeptides (nlp-8, flp-24, or flp-13) induced a different suite of sleep-associated behaviors. These overexpression results raise the possibility that individual components of sleep might be specified by individual neuropeptides or combinations of neuropeptides. PMID:27546573

  2. RFamide neuropeptide actions on the molluscan ventricle: Interactions with primary neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Moulis, A; Huddart, H

    2006-01-01

    Different RFamide neuropeptides, some of non-molluscan origin, were examined for their effect on the ventricles of Buccinum undatum and Busycon canaliculatum. None of the peptides tested were inhibitory on these ventricles. All the peptides were extremely active, causing excitation of the preparations at low concentrations. The neuropeptides were then tested with the primary neurotransmitters. In the case of serotonin, the excitatory primary neurotransmitter, the RFamide neuropeptides induced a response, which was greatly enhanced by serotonin. Acetylcholine, the inhibitory neurotransmitter, induced relaxation whenever added, following a neuropeptide. The neuropeptides seemed to be independent of external Ca(2+), since in Ca(2+)-free media tension was induced. On the contrary, serotonin was dependent on external Ca(2+). These findings indicate that the neuropeptides generated tension via a different receptor to that of the primary neurotransmitters, using a different 2nd messenger and activating different Ca(2+) sources. Finally, the parent neuropeptide Phe-Leu-Arg-Phe-NH(2), when added following a different RFamide peptide, excited the preparation further, thus indicating the presence of a receptor that has higher affinity for some structures than others. When Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH(2) followed Phe-Leu-Arg-Phe-NH(2), no such response was recorded since the latter is of higher potency than the former.

  3. An excitatory paraventricular nucleus to AgRP neuron circuit that drives hunger.

    PubMed

    Krashes, Michael J; Shah, Bhavik P; Madara, Joseph C; Olson, David P; Strochlic, David E; Garfield, Alastair S; Vong, Linh; Pei, Hongjuan; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko; Uchida, Naoshige; Liberles, Stephen D; Lowell, Bradford B

    2014-03-13

    Hunger is a hard-wired motivational state essential for survival. Agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) at the base of the hypothalamus are crucial to the control of hunger. They are activated by caloric deficiency and, when naturally or artificially stimulated, they potently induce intense hunger and subsequent food intake. Consistent with their obligatory role in regulating appetite, genetic ablation or chemogenetic inhibition of AgRP neurons decreases feeding. Excitatory input to AgRP neurons is important in caloric-deficiency-induced activation, and is notable for its remarkable degree of caloric-state-dependent synaptic plasticity. Despite the important role of excitatory input, its source(s) has been unknown. Here, through the use of Cre-recombinase-enabled, cell-specific neuron mapping techniques in mice, we have discovered strong excitatory drive that, unexpectedly, emanates from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, specifically from subsets of neurons expressing thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, also known as ADCYAP1). Chemogenetic stimulation of these afferent neurons in sated mice markedly activates AgRP neurons and induces intense feeding. Conversely, acute inhibition in mice with caloric-deficiency-induced hunger decreases feeding. Discovery of these afferent neurons capable of triggering hunger advances understanding of how this intense motivational state is regulated.

  4. The medial preoptic nucleus integrates the central influences of testosterone on the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and its extended circuitries.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Martin; Bingham, Brenda; Gray, Megan; Innala, Leyla; Viau, Victor

    2010-09-01

    Testosterone contributes to sex differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function in humans and rodents, but the central organization of this regulation remains unclear. The medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) stands out as an important candidate in this regard because it contains androgen receptors and projects to forebrain nuclei integrating cognitive-affective information and regulating HPA responses to homeostatic threat. These include the HPA effector neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, medial amygdala, and lateral septum. To test the extent to which androgen receptors in the MPN engage these cell groups, we compared in adult male rats the effects of unilateral microimplants of testosterone and the androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide into the MPN on acute restraint induced activation and/or neuropeptide expression levels. The basic effects of these implants were lateralized to the sides of the nuclei ipsilateral to the implants. Testosterone, but not hydroxyflutamide implants, decreased stress-induced Fos and arginine vasopressin (AVP) heteronuclear RNA expression in the PVN, as well as Fos expression in the lateral septum. In unstressed animals, AVP mRNA expression in the PVN decreased and increased in response to testosterone and hydroxflutamide MPN implants, respectively. The differential influences of these implants on AVP mRNA expression were opposite in the medial amygdala. These results confirm a role for androgen receptors in the MPN to concurrently modulate neuropeptide expression and activational responses in the PVN and its extended circuitries. This suggests that the MPN is capable of bridging converging limbic influences to the HPA axis with changes in gonadal status.

  5. More than two decades of research on insect neuropeptide GPCRs: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Caers, Jelle; Verlinden, Heleen; Zels, Sven; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Vuerinckx, Kristel; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the state of the art on neuropeptide receptors in insects. Most of these receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are involved in the regulation of virtually all physiological processes during an insect's life. More than 20 years ago a milestone in invertebrate endocrinology was achieved with the characterization of the first insect neuropeptide receptor, i.e., the Drosophila tachykinin-like receptor. However, it took until the release of the Drosophila genome in 2000 that research on neuropeptide receptors boosted. In the last decade a plethora of genomic information of other insect species also became available, leading to a better insight in the functions and evolution of the neuropeptide signaling systems and their intracellular pathways. It became clear that some of these systems are conserved among all insect species, indicating that they fulfill crucial roles in their physiological processes. Meanwhile, other signaling systems seem to be lost in several insect orders or species, suggesting that their actions were superfluous in those insects, or that other neuropeptides have taken over their functions. It is striking that the deorphanization of neuropeptide GPCRs gets much attention, but the subsequent unraveling of the intracellular pathways they elicit, or their physiological functions are often hardly examined. Especially in insects besides Drosophila this information is scarce if not absent. And although great progress made in characterizing neuropeptide signaling systems, even in Drosophila several predicted neuropeptide receptors remain orphan, awaiting for their endogenous ligand to be determined. The present review gives a précis of the insect neuropeptide receptor research of the last two decades. But it has to be emphasized that the work done so far is only the tip of the iceberg and our comprehensive understanding of these important signaling systems will still increase substantially in the coming years. PMID

  6. Intrinsic properties and neuropharmacology of midline paraventricular thalamic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li; Hermes, Michael L. H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei are components of an interconnected brainstem, limbic and prefrontal cortex neural network that is engaged during arousal, vigilance, motivated and addictive behaviors, and stress. To better understand the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions, here we review some of the recently characterized electrophysiological and neuropharmacological properties of neurons in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT), derived from whole cell patch clamp recordings in acute rat brain slice preparations. PVT neurons display firing patterns and ionic conductances (IT and IH) that exhibit significant diurnal change. Their resting membrane potential (RMP) is maintained by various ionic conductances that include inward rectifier (Kir), hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation (HCN) and TWIK-related acid sensitive (TASK) K+ channels. Firing patterns are regulated by high voltage-activated (HVA) and low voltage-activated (LVA) Ca2+ conductances. Moreover, transient receptor potential (TRP)-like nonselective cation channels together with Ca2+- and Na+-activated K+ conductances (KCa; KNa) contribute to unique slow afterhyperpolarizing potentials (sAHPs) that are generally not detectable in lateral thalamic or reticular thalamic nucleus neurons. The excitability of PVT neurons is also modulated by activation of neurotransmitter receptors associated with afferent pathways to PVT and other thalamic midline nuclei. We report on receptor-mediated actions of GABA, glutamate, monoamines and several neuropeptides: arginine vasopressin, gastrin-releasing peptide, thyrotropin releasing hormone and the orexins (hypocretins). This review represents an initial survey of intrinsic and transmitter-sensitive ionic conductances that are deemed to be unique to this population of midline thalamic neurons, information that is fundamental to an appreciation of the role these thalamic neurons may play in normal central nervous system

  7. Influence of ETR-p1/f1 antisense peptide on endothelin-induced constriction in rat renal arcuate arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaochun; Richards, Nicholas T; Johns, Edward J; Kohsaka, Takeo; Nakamura, Akio; Okada, Hidechika

    1997-01-01

    This study set out to examine the endothelin receptor subtypes mediating vasoconstriction in the rat renal arcuate artery. This was done in isolated vessels 120–200 μm in diameter, incubated with a selective agonist and the novel ‘antisense' peptide to part of the human endothelinA receptor. Groups of vessels (n=6) were incubated with increasing concentrations of endothelin-1 (ET-1), from 1 to 100 nM, which caused a 65% maximal contraction at the highest dose with an pEC50 of 8.16±0.11 M. By contrast, in six other vessels sarafotoxin 6c over the same dose range gave a minimal contraction (around 5% of maximum). Preincubation of six vessels with the antisense peptide ETR p1/f1 at 1 μM had no effect on the ET-1 induced vasoconstriction, in terms of displacement of the concentration-response curve or the maximal tension achieved by the agonist. In the six vessels exposed to 4 μM ETR p1/f1, there was a significant shift of the concentration-response curve and a lower pEC50 at 7.78±0.09 M (P<0.05). At the highest concentrations of ETR p1/f1, there was a marked suppression of all responses to ET-1, which at the maximal concentrations tested, 0.1 μM, only reached some 10% of the maximal achievable contraction. Increasing ET-1 concentrations up to 2 μM in vessels incubated with 40 μM ETR-p1/f1 showed that the blockade could be overcome and that the relationship was shifted to the right (P<0.001) by approximately one log unit with a pEC50 of 7.13±0.11 M. A Schild plot of the data indicated the antagonist to be acting competitively at a single population of receptors. At the highest concentrations tested, 40 μM, ETR-p1/f1 had no effect on noradrenaline-induced contractions, indicating a lack of non-specific actions. Together, these data suggest that at the rat renal arcuate artery the endothelinA receptor is the predominant functional receptor mediating contraction. Furthermore, this study has shown the potential usefulness of this novel

  8. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  9. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  10. Neuropeptide Y receptor gene y6: multiple deaths or resurrections?

    PubMed

    Starbäck, P; Wraith, A; Eriksson, H; Larhammar, D

    2000-10-14

    The neuropeptide Y family of G-protein-coupled receptors consists of five cloned members in mammals. Four genes give rise to functional receptors in all mammals investigated. The y6 gene is a pseudogene in human and pig and is absent in rat, but generates a functional receptor in rabbit and mouse and probably in the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), a distant relative of the pig family. We report here that the guinea pig y6 gene has a highly distorted nucleotide sequence with multiple frame-shift mutations. One evolutionary scenario may suggest that y6 was inactivated before the divergence of the mammalian orders and subsequently resurrected in some lineages. However, the pseudogene mutations seem to be distinct in human, pig, and guinea pig, arguing for separate inactivation events. In either case, the y6 gene has a quite unusual evolutionary history with multiple independent deaths or resurrections.

  11. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system. Studies in both humans and rodent models revealed that brain NPY levels are altered in some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease. In this review, we will focus on the roles of NPY in the pathological mechanisms of these disorders, highlighting NPY as a neuroprotective agent, as a neural stem cell proliferative agent, as an agent that increases trophic support, as a stimulator of autophagy and as an inhibitor of excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. Moreover, the effect of NPY in some clinical manifestations commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease, such as depressive symptoms and body weight loss, are also discussed. In conclusion, this review highlights NPY system as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Parker, S L; Balasubramaniam, A

    2008-02-01

    We briefly survey the current knowledge and concepts regarding structure and function of the neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor and its agonists, especially as related to pharmacology of the receptor and its roles in pathological processes. Specific structural features are considered that could be responsible for the known compartmentalization and participation of the receptor in cell and tissue organization. This is further discussed in relation to changes of levels of the Y2 receptor in pathological conditions (especially in epilepsy and drug abuse), to endocytosis and recycling, and to participation in wound healing, retinopathy and angiogenesis. Properties of the receptor and of Y2 agonists are considered and reviewed in connection to the negative regulation of transmitter release, feeding, mood and social behavior. The possible involvement of the Y2 receptor in diabetes, carcinogenesis and bone formation is also reviewed. PMID:17828288

  13. Microwave irradiation increases recovery of neuropeptides from brain tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Theodorsson, E.; Stenfors, C.; Mathe, A.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The effect of focused high energy microwave treatment (MW) on brain concentrations and molecular forms of substance P, neurokinin A, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin, galanin and calcitonin gene-related peptide was investigated. Groups of rats were treated as follows: (1) MW, storage for 60 min at 22 degrees C, (2) Decapitation, storage for 60 min at 22 degrees C, (3) Decapitation, storage for 60 min at 22 degrees C, MW treatment, (4) MW, decapitation, storage for 2 min at 22 degrees C and 5. Decapitation, storage for 2 min at 22 degrees C. Peptide concentrations were in all instances highest in the MW sacrificed groups. MW increased the concentration of intact peptides by rapid inhibition of peptidase activity and increase in peptide solubility/extractability.

  14. The effect of obesogenic diets on brain Neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Myrtille C R; van den Heuvel, José K; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a major health problem characterized by accumulated fat mass. The availability of an energy-dense, highly palatable diet plays an important role in obesity development. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), an orexigenic peptide, is affected by dietary composition and NPY can affect dietary preference. The hypothalamic NPY system is well characterized and has been studied in several models of obesity. However, findings from models of diet-induced obesity are not straightforward. In addition, NPY plays a role in (food-)motivated behaviors and interacts with the mesolimbic dopamine system, both of which are altered in obesity. We here review the effect of obesogenic diets on NPY levels in the hypothalamus and reward-related regions. PMID:27132202

  15. Salusin-β as a powerful endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Kemuriyama, Noriko; Nakano-Tateno, Tae; Tani, Yuji; Hirata, Yukio; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Salusin-β is an endogenous parasympathomimetic peptide, predominantly localized to the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary. Subcutaneously administered salusin-β (50 nmol/mouse) significantly increased water intake but did not affect locomotor activity or food intake. The salusin-β-induced increase in water intake was completely abrogated by pretreatment with muscarinic antagonist, atropine sulphate. In contrast, intracerebroventricular injection of salusin-β, at lower doses (10–100 fmol/mouse) caused a long-lasting decrease in water intake and locomotor activity throughout the entire dark phase of the diurnal cycle. Pre-injection of intracerebroventricular anti-salusin-β IgG completely abrogated the central salusin-β mediated suppression of water intake and locomotor activity. These results demonstrate contrasting actions of salusin-β in the control of water intake via the central and peripheral systems and highlight it as a potent endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide. PMID:26869388

  16. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tilan, Jason U.; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Abe, Ken; Kuo-Bonde, Lydia; Chalothorn, Dan; Kitlinska, Joanna; Burnett, Mary Susan; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faber, James E.; Zukowska, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the sympathetic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) is potently angiogenic, primarily through its Y2 receptor, and that endogenous NPY is crucial for capillary angiogenesis in rodent hindlimb ischemia. Here we sought to identify the source of NPY responsible for revascularization and its mechanisms of action. At d 3, NPY−/− mice demonstrated delayed recovery of blood flow and limb function, consistent with impaired collateral conductance, while ischemic capillary angiogenesis was reduced (∼70%) at d 14. This biphasic temporal response was confirmed by 2 peaks of NPY activation in rats: a transient early increase in neuronally derived plasma NPY and increase in platelet NPY during late-phase recovery. Compared to NPY-null platelets, collagen-activated NPY-rich platelets were more mitogenic (∼2-fold vs. ∼1.6-fold increase) for human microvascular endothelial cells, and Y2/Y5 receptor antagonists ablated this difference in proliferation. In NPY+/+ mice, ischemic angiogenesis was prevented by platelet depletion and then restored by transfusion of platelets from NPY+/+ mice, but not NPY−/− mice. In thrombocytopenic NPY−/− mice, transfusion of wild-type platelets fully restored ischemia-induced angiogenesis. These findings suggest that neuronally derived NPY accelerates the early response to femoral artery ligation by promoting collateral conductance, while platelet-derived NPY is critical for sustained capillary angiogenesis.—Tilan, J. U., Everhart, L. M., Abe, K., Kuo-Bonde, L., Chalothorn, D., Kitlinska, J., Burnett, M. S., Epstein, S. E., Faber, J. E., Zukowska, Z. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice. PMID:23457218

  17. GABA excitation in mouse hilar neuropeptide Y neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li-Ying; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2007-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the dentate hilar area play an important role in inhibiting the activity of hippocampal circuitry. Hilar cells are often among the first lost in hippocampal epilepsy. As many types of neurons are found in the hilus, we used a new transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a subset of neurons that colocalized neuropeptide Y (NPY), somatostatin (SST), and GABA for whole-cell, perforated, and cell-attached recording in 240 neurons. As these neurons have not previously been identifiable in live slices, they have not been the focus of physiological analysis. Hilar NPY neurons showed modest spike frequency adaptation, a large 15.6 ± 1.0 mV afterhyperpolarization, a mean input resistance of 335 ± 26 mΩ, and were capable of fast-firing. Muscimol-mediated excitatory actions were found in a nominally Ca2+-free/high-Mg2+ bath solution using cell-attached recording. GABAA receptor antagonists inhibited half the recorded neurons and blocked burst firing. Gramicidin perforated-patch recording revealed a GABA reversal potential positive to both the resting membrane potential and spike threshold. Together, these data suggest GABA is excitatory to many NPY cells. NPY and SST consistently hyperpolarized and reduced spike frequency in these neurons. No hyperpolarization of NPY on membrane potential was detected in the presence of tetrodotoxin, AP5, CNQX and bicuculline, supporting an indirect effect. Under similar conditions, SST hyperpolarized the cells, suggesting a direct postsynaptic action. Depolarizing actions of GABA and GABA-dependent burst-firing may synchronize a rapid release of GABA, NPY, and SST, leading to pre- and postsynaptic inhibition of excitatory hippocampal circuits. PMID:17204505

  18. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  19. Lessons learned from a case of multivessel median arcuate ligament syndrome in the setting of an Arc of Buhler.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kevin; Ferral, Hector

    2016-09-01

    The median arcuate ligament (MAL) can rarely compress both the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. We present a case of a 70-year male who presented with isolated episodes of upper abdominal pain and diarrhea associated with sweats and nausea. Angiography images demonstrated complete occlusion of the celiac axis and compression of the superior mesenteric artery during the expiration phases. The celiac axis was reconstituted distal to its origin by a patent Arc of Buhler. Other reported cases of multivessel MALs have produced severe symptoms in young adults requiring surgical and/or endovascular intervention. In this case, our patient's Arc of Buhler was protective against more severe chronic mesenteric ischemia. We suggest that a patent Arc of Buhler is protective against symptoms in a single vessel MALs patient. A significant percentage of patients receiving surgical intervention for MALs do not have relief of symptoms. There should be a search for an Arc of Buhler before surgical management of patients suspected to have single vessel MALs. PMID:27594946

  20. Relative Importance of the Arcuate and Anteroventral Periventricular Kisspeptin Neurons in Control of Puberty and Reproductive Function in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, M. H.; Li, X. F.; McCausland, B.; Li, S. Y.; Gresham, R.; Kinsey-Jones, J. S.; Gardiner, J. V.; Sam, A. H.; Bloom, S. R.; Poston, L.; Lightman, S. L.; Murphy, K. G.

    2015-01-01

    Kisspeptin plays a critical role in pubertal timing and reproductive function. In rodents, kisspeptin perikarya within the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) and anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) nuclei are thought to be involved in LH pulse and surge generation, respectively. Using bilateral microinjections of recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding kisspeptin antisense into the ARC or AVPV of female rats at postnatal day 10, we investigated the relative importance of these two kisspeptin populations in the control of pubertal timing, estrous cyclicity, and LH surge and pulse generation. A 37% knockdown of kisspeptin in the AVPV resulted in a significant delay in vaginal opening and first vaginal estrous, abnormal estrous cyclicity, and reduction in the occurrence of spontaneous LH surges, although these retained normal amplitude. This AVPV knockdown had no effect on LH pulse frequency, measured after ovariectomy. A 32% reduction of kisspeptin in the ARC had no effect on the onset of puberty but resulted in abnormal estrous cyclicity and decreased LH pulse frequency. Additionally, the knockdown of kisspeptin in the ARC decreased the amplitude but not the incidence of LH surges. These results might suggest that the role of AVPV kisspeptin in the control of pubertal timing is particularly sensitive to perturbation. In accordance with our previous studies, ARC kisspeptin signaling was critical for normal pulsatile LH secretion in female rats. Despite the widely reported role of AVPV kisspeptin neurons in LH surge generation, this study suggests that both AVPV and ARC populations are essential for normal LH surges and estrous cyclicity. PMID:25875299

  1. Neuropeptide receptors as potential drug targets in the treatment of inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Erika; Pozsgai, Gábor; Hajna, Zsófia; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Szolcsányi, János

    2014-01-01

    Cross-talk between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems exists via regulator molecules, such as neuropeptides, hormones and cytokines. A number of neuropeptides have been implicated in the genesis of inflammation, such as tachykinins and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Development of their receptor antagonists could be a promising approach to anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy. Anti-inflammatory neuropeptides, such as vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, urocortin, adrenomedullin, somatostatin, cortistatin, ghrelin, galanin and opioid peptides, are also released and act on their own receptors on the neurons as well as on different inflammatory and immune cells. The aim of the present review is to summarize the most prominent data of preclinical animal studies concerning the main pharmacological effects of ligands acting on the neuropeptide receptors. Promising therapeutic impacts of these compounds as potential candidates for the development of novel types of anti-inflammatory drugs are also discussed. PMID:23432438

  2. Diversity and abundance: the basic properties of neuropeptide action in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Tibor

    2011-05-15

    Neuropeptides, the most diverse group of signaling molecules, are responsible for regulating a variety of cellular and behavioral processes in all vertebrate and invertebrate animals. The role played by peptide signals in information processing is fundamentally different from that of conventional neurotransmitters. Neuropeptides may act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators and are released at either synaptic or non-synaptic sites. Peptide signals control developmental processes, drive specific behaviors or contribute to the mechanisms of learning and memory storage. Co-transmission within or across peptide families, and between peptide and non-peptide signaling molecules, is common; this ensures the great versatility of their action. How these tasks are fulfilled when multiple neuropeptides are released has become an important topic for peptide research. Although our knowledge concerning the physiological and behavioral roles of most of the neuropeptides isolated from molluscs is incomplete, this article provides examples to address the complexity of peptide signaling.

  3. Anti-epileptic effects of neuropeptide Y gene transfection into the rat brain☆

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Changzheng; Zhao, Wenqing; Li, Wenling; Lv, Peiyuan; Dong, Xiufang

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y gene transfection into normal rat brain tissue can provide gene overexpression, which can attenuate the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the neuropeptide Y gene was transfected into brain tissue of rats with kainic acid-induced epilepsy through stereotactic methods. Following these transfections, we verified overexpression of the neuropeptide Y gene in the epileptic brain. Electroencephalograms showed that seizure severity was significantly inhibited and seizure latency was significantly prolonged up to 4 weeks after gene transfection. Moreover, quantitative fluorescent PCR and western blot assays revealed that the mRNA and protein expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B was inhibited in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. These findings indicate that neuropeptide Y may inhibit seizures via down-regulation of the functional expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. PMID:25206425

  4. Probing neuropeptide signaling at the organ and cellular domains via imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Greer, Tyler; Li, Lingjun

    2012-08-30

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has evolved to be a promising technology due to its ability to detect a broad mass range of molecular species and create density maps for selected compounds. It is currently one of the most useful techniques to determine the spatial distribution of neuropeptides in cells and tissues. Although IMS is conceptually simple, sample preparation steps, mass analyzers, and software suites are just a few of the factors that contribute to the successful design of a neuropeptide IMS experiment. This review provides a brief overview of IMS sampling protocols, instrumentation, data analysis tools, technological advancements and applications to neuropeptide localization in neurons and endocrine tissues. Future perspectives in this field are also provided, concluding that neuropeptide IMS would greatly facilitate studies of neuronal network and biomarker discovery.

  5. Localization and characterization of neuropeptide Y-like peptides in the brain and islet organ of the anglerfish (Lophius americanus).

    PubMed

    Noe, B D; Milgram, S L; Balasubramaniam, A; Andrews, P C; Calka, J; McDonald, J K

    1989-08-01

    Results from a previous report demonstrate that more than one molecular form of neuropeptide Y-like peptide may be present in the islet organ of the anglerfish (Lophius americanus). Most of the neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive material was anglerfish peptide YG, which is expressed in a subset of islet cells, whereas an additional neuropeptide Y-like peptide(s) was localized in islet nerves. To learn more about the neuropeptide Y-like peptides in islet nerves, we have employed immunohistochemical and biochemical methods to compare peptides found in anglerfish islets and brain. Using antisera that selectively react with either mammalian forms of neuropeptide Y or with anglerfish peptide YG, subsets of neurons were found in the brain that labelled with only one or the other of the antisera. In separate sections, other neurons that were labelled with either antiserum exhibited similar morphologies. Peptides from brains and islets were subjected to gel filtration and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Radioimmunoassays employing either the neuropeptide Y or peptide YG antisera were used to examine chromatographic eluates. Immunoreactive peptides having retention times of human neuropeptide Y and porcine neuropeptide Y were identified in extracts of both brain and islets. This indicates that peptides structurally similar to both of these peptides from the neuropeptide Y-pancreatic polypeptide family are expressed in neurons of anglerfish brain and nerve fibers of anglerfish islets. The predominant form of neuropeptide Y-like peptide in islets was anglerfish peptide YG. Neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive peptides from islet extracts that had chromatographic retention times identical to human neuropeptide Y and porcine neuropeptide Y were present in much smaller quantities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2673525

  6. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Peng; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Wang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Li-Rong; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR). High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol) i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex (Pir), ventral tenia tecta (VTT), the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt). The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice.

  7. Unilateral optic nerve transection alters light response of suprachiasmatic nucleus and intergeniculate leaflet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, I-Hsiung; Murakami, Dean M.; Fuller, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the circadian pacemaker, receives photic input directly from the retina to synchronize the pacemaker to the environment. Additionally, the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL), which innervates the SCN, is known to modulate the retinal photic input to the SCN. To further understand the role of the IGL in mediating the photic input to the SCN, this study examined the effects of unilateral optic nerve transection (UONx) on the photic response of the SCN and IGL in adult and neonatal hamsters. UONx led to an overall reduction in light-induced c-Fos expression in the SCN and IGL. The c-Fos expression was greater in the SCN ipsilateral to the remaining eye, despite a symmetrically bilateral retinohypothalamic tract projection as revealed by intraocular injection of horseradish peroxidase. In contrast, UONx led to a greater c-Fos expression in the contralateral IGL. The contralateral IGL of UONx animals also revealed more neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive neurons, while the ipsilateral SCN of these animals exhibited a denser neuropeptide Y terminal field. The neonates with UONx showed a similar pattern with a slight compensation of the photic-induced c-Fos in the SCN. This study suggests that the IGL may have an ipsilateral inhibitory effect in mediating retinal photic input to the SCN.

  8. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Fior-Chadi, D R; Fuxe, K

    1998-02-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and noradrenaline (NA) are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of alpha 2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the alpha 2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II AT1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the alpha 2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension.

  9. Orexins excite ventrolateral geniculate nucleus neurons predominantly via OX2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Chrobok, Lukasz; Palus, Katarzyna; Lewandowski, Marian Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Orexins/hypocretins are two neuropeptides that influence many behaviours, such as feeding, sleep or arousal. Orexin A/hypocretin-1 (OXA) and orexin B/hypocretin-2 (OXB) bind to two metabotropic receptors, named the OX1 and OX2 receptors. The lateral geniculate complex of the thalamus is one of the many targets of orexinergic fibres derived from the lateral hypothalamus, although the impact of orexins on the ventrolateral geniculate nucleus (VLG) is poorly understood. The VLG, an important relay station of the subcortical visual system, is implicated in visuomotor and/or circadian processes. Therefore, in this study we evaluated the effects of orexins on single VLG neurons using a patch-clamp technique in vitro. Surprisingly, orexins depolarised the majority of the recorded neurons regardless of their localisation in the borders of the VLG. In addition, data presented in this article show that neurons synthesising NO were also affected by OXA. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining of OXB revealed the moderate density of orexinergic fibbers in the VLG. Our study using specific orexin receptor antagonists suggests that the OX2 receptor has a dominant role in the observed effects of OXA. To our knowledge, this article is the first to show orexinergic modulation of the VLG. These findings strengthen the postulated link between orexins and the circadian system, and propose a new role of these neuropeptides in the modulation of visuomotor functions.

  10. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  11. The Endoparasitoid, Cotesia vestalis, Regulates Host Physiology by Reprogramming the Neuropeptide Transcriptional Network

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Dong, Shuai; Li, Ming-tian; Yang, Yan-yan; Stanley, David; Chen, Xue-xin

    2015-01-01

    Endoparasitoids develop inside another insect by regulating host immunity and development via maternal factors injected into hosts during oviposition. Prior results have provided insights into parasitism-induced immunosuppression, including the neuropeptide accumulation in parasitized insects. Nonetheless, our understanding of neuropeptide influence on host development and behavior is not yet complete. We posed the hypothesis that parasitization alters expression of genes encoding pro-neuropeptides and used larvae of Plutella xylostella and its endoparasitoid, Cotesia vestalis to test our hypothesis. We prepared transcriptomes from the larval P. xylostella brain-CC-CA complex and identified transcripts encoding 19 neuropeptides. All corresponding cDNAs were confirmed by RACE. Our results demonstrate that parasitism significantly down-regulated, or delayed, expression of genes encoding pro-neuropeptides within 48 h post-parasitization. Changing expression of these genes may account for the previously reported decreased feeding behavior, reduced growth rates and aborted development in the host larvae. In effect, parasitization may operate at the molecular level within the CNS to create global changes in larval host biology. The significance of our finding is that, in addition to the known effects on immunity, parasitoids influence host pro-neuropeptide gene transcription. This finding reveals a new mechanism operating in host-parasitoid relationships to the advantage of the parasitoid. PMID:25640113

  12. Rapid Preconcentration for Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Assay of Trace Level Neuropeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of neuropeptides in the brain through in vivo microdialysis sampling provides direct correlation between neuropeptide concentration and brain function. Capillary liquid chromatography-multistage mass spectrometry (CLC-MSn) has proven to be effective at measuring endogenous neuropeptides in microdialysis samples. In the method, microliter samples are concentrated onto nanoliter volume packed beds before ionization and mass spectrometry analysis. The long times required for extensive preconcentration present a barrier to routine use because of the many samples that must be analyzed and instability of neuropeptides. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of 75 μm inner diameter (i.d.) capillary column packed with 10 μm reversed phase particles for increasing the throughput in CLC-MSn based neuropeptide measurement. Coupling a high injection flow rate for fast sample loading/desalting with a low elution flow rate to maintain detection sensitivity, this column has reduced analysis time from ˜30 min to 3.8 min for 5 μL sample, with 3 pM limit of detection (LOD) for enkephalins and 10 pM LOD for dynorphin A1-8 in 5 μL sample. The use of isotope-labeled internal standard lowered peptide signal variation to less than 5 %. This method was validated for in vivo detection of Leu and Met enkephalin with microdialysate collected from rat globus pallidus. The improvement in speed and stability makes CLC-MSn measurement of neuropeptides in vivo more practical.

  13. Quantitative Neuropeptidome Analysis Reveals Neuropeptides Are Correlated with Social Behavior Regulation of the Honeybee Workers.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Hu, Han; Qi, Yuping; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2015-10-01

    Neuropeptides play vital roles in orchestrating neural communication and physiological modulation in organisms, acting as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. The highly evolved social structure of honeybees is a good system for understanding how neuropeptides regulate social behaviors; however, much knowledge on neuropeptidomic variation in the age-related division of labor remains unknown. An in-depth comparison of the brain neuropeptidomic dynamics over four time points of age-related polyethism was performed on two strains of honeybees, the Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica, ITb) and the high royal jelly producing bee (RJb, selected for increasing royal jelly production for almost four decades from the ITb in China). Among the 158 identified nonredundant neuropeptides, 77 were previously unreported, significantly expanding the coverage of the honeybee neuropeptidome. The fact that 14 identical neuropeptide precursors changed their expression levels during the division of labor in both the ITb and RJb indicates they are highly related to task transition of honeybee workers. These observations further suggest the two lines of bees employ a similar neuropeptidome modification to tune their respective physiology of age polyethism via regulating excretory system, circadian clock system, and so forth. Noticeably, the enhanced level of neuropeptides implicated in regulating water homeostasis, brood pheromone recognition, foraging capacity, and pollen collection in RJb signify the fact that neuropeptides are also involved in the regulation of RJ secretion. These findings gain novel understanding of honeybee neuropeptidome correlated with social behavior regulation, which is potentially important in neurobiology for honeybees and other insects.

  14. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  15. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  16. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  17. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  18. Spontaneous development of arcuate single-sided subduction in global 3-D mantle convection models with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Fabio; Tackley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The work presented aims at a better understanding of plate tectonics, a crucial dynamical feature within the global framework of mantle convection. Special focus is given to the interaction of subduction-related mantle flow and surface topography. Thereby, the application of a numerical model with two key functional requirements is essential: an evolution over a long time period to naturally model mantle flow and a physically correct topography calculation. The global mantle convection model presented in Crameri et al. (2012a) satisfies both of these requirements. First, it is efficiently calculated by the finite-volume code Stag-YY (e.g., Tackley 2008) using a multi-grid method on a fully staggered grid. Second, it applies the sticky-air method (Matsumoto and Tomoda 1983; Schmeling et al, 2008) and thus approximates a free surface when the sticky-air parameters are chosen carefully (Crameri et al., 2012b). This leads to dynamically self-consistent mantle convection with realistic, single-sided subduction. New insights are thus gained into the interplay of obliquely sinking plates, toroidal mantle flow and the arcuate shape of slabs and trenches. Numerous two-dimensional experiments provide optimal parameter setups that are applied to three-dimensional models in Cartesian and fully spherical geometries. Features observed and characterised in the latter experiments give important insight into the strongly variable behaviour of subduction zones along their strike. This includes (i) the spontaneous development of arcuate trench geometry, (ii) regional subduction polarity reversals and slab tearing, and the newly discovered features (iii) 'slab tunnelling' and (iv) 'back-slab spiral flow'. Overall, this study demonstrates the strong interaction between surface topography and mantle currents and highlights the variability of subduction zones and their individual segments. REFERENCES Crameri, F., P. J. Tackley, I. Meilick, T. V. Gerya, and B. J. P. Kaus (2012a), A free

  19. Steroidal regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y release and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sahu, A; Phelps, C P; White, J D; Crowley, W R; Kalra, S P; Kalra, P S

    1992-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) readily stimulates the release of hypothalamic LHRH and pituitary LH release in intact and gonadal steroid-primed gonadectomized rats. We have now tested the hypothesis that the release and synthesis of hypothalamic NPY may be regulated by gonadal steroids. To measure the effects of gonadal hormones on NPY release, a permanent push-pull cannula was implanted in the anterior pituitary (AP) of sham castrated (controls) or castrated (CAST) male rats, and 1 week later, the AP was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid over a 3-4 h period. NPY concentrations in the perfusates collected at 10-min intervals were measured by RIAs. The NPY release pattern in the AP was episodic in both intact and CAST rats, and the frequency of NPY episodes was similar in two groups. However, the amount of NPY detected in the AP of CAST rats was significantly less than that of intact rats because the mean rate of release and the amplitude of NPY episodes in the perfusates of CAST rats were significantly reduced. This observation of attenuated hypothalamic NPY output in vivo and previous evidence of decreased hypothalamic NPY contents after CAST implied that the synthesis of hypothalamic NPY may be regulated by testicular secretions. Therefore, the effects of testosterone (T)-replacement on preproNPY messenger RNA (mRNA) in the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was evaluated. Rats were CAST and received either empty or T-filled Silastic capsules sc. Two weeks later, the level of perproNPY mRNA in the MBH was determined by solution hybridization/ribonuclease protection assay using a complementary RNA probe complementary to the rat NPY precursor mRNA. We observed that the levels of preproNPY mRNA were 2-fold higher in the MBH of T-replaced CAST as compared to control CAST rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that gonadal steroids enhance the neurosecretory activity of hypothalamic NPYergic neurons, and for the first time reveal a coupling between the

  20. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  1. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language. PMID:26441551

  2. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-09-15

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. As a result, the unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.

  3. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    DOE PAGES

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-09-15

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that themore » left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. As a result, the unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.« less

  4. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors. PMID:27353701

  5. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors. PMID:27353701

  6. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species.

  7. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species. PMID:26783017

  8. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid {beta} aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Flashner, Efrat; Raviv, Uri; Friedler, Assaf

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanistic explanation of how tachykinin neuropeptides reduce A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity. {yields} Biophysical studies suggest that tachykinins do not modulate the distribution of A{beta} oligomeric states, but rather may incorporate into the fibrils. {yields} A possible strategy to inhibit toxicity of amyloid fibrils. -- Abstract: A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid {beta} peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid {beta} assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid {beta} neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect A{beta}(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and A{beta}(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of A{beta}(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins.

  9. Role of neuropeptides in learning versus performance: focus on vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Koob, G F; Lebrun, C; Bluthé, R M; Dantzer, R; Le Moal, M

    1989-01-01

    Neuropeptides that have classical hormonal functions via the pituitary have been implicated in cognitive function. Systemically and centrally administered arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been well documented to prolong extinction and improve consolidation in avoidance tasks. However, major questions have centered on the physiological mechanism of action for these effects and whether these cognitive enhancing actions reflect learning or performance. Work with vasopressin antagonists has led to the hypothesis that the effects of systemically administered AVP may be mediated peripherally and may be secondary to increases in blood pressure and activating effects. Centrally administered AVP, however, can also facilitate memory and recent work using an olfactory social memory task suggests that these effects may be mediated, at least in part, by AVP systems in the lateral septum. These results suggest that the cognitive enhancing actions of AVP may involve two parallel, but ultimately homologous, systems at the functional level. Pituitary-derived AVP may facilitate memory actions through more nonspecific (performance) effects, whereas centrally derived AVP may facilitate memory actions through more direct effects on the neural substrates of memory processing in the limbic system.

  10. Evolution of neuropeptide Y and its related peptides.

    PubMed

    Larhammar, D; Blomqvist, A G; Söderberg, C

    1993-11-01

    1. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of peptides includes also the gut endocrine peptide YY (PYY), tetrapod pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and fish pancreatic peptide-tyrosine (PY). All peptides are 36 amino acids long. 2. Sequences from many types of vertebrates show that NPY has remained extremely well conserved throughout vertebrate evolution with 92% identity between mammals and cartilaginous fishes. 3. PYY has 97-100% identity between cartilaginous fishes and bony fishes, but is less conserved in amphibians and mammals (83% identity between amphibians and sharks and 75% identity between mammals and sharks). 4. NPY and PYY share 70-80% identity in most species. 5. Both NPY and PYY were present in the early vertebrate ancestor because both peptides have been found in lampreys. 6. The tissue distribution appears to have been largely conserved between phyla, except that PYY has more widespread neuronal expression in lower vertebrates. 7. Pancreatic polypeptide has diverged considerably among tetrapods leaving only 50% identity between mammals, birds/reptiles and frogs. 8. Several lines of evidence suggest that the PP gene arose by duplication of the PYY gene, probably in the early evolution of the tetrapods. 9. The pancreatic peptide PY found in anglerfish and daddy sculpin may have resulted from an independent duplication of the PYY gene. 10. The relationships of the recently described mollusc and worm peptides NPF and PYF with the NPY family still appear unclear. PMID:7905810

  11. Neuropeptide Y induces torpor-like hypothermia in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Paul, Matthew J; Freeman, David A; Park, Jin Ho; Dark, John

    2005-09-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of neuropeptide Y (NPY) are known to decrease body temperature (Tb) of laboratory rats by 1-3 degrees C. Several NPY pathways in the brain terminate in hypothalamic structures involved in energy balance and thermoregulation. Laboratory rats are homeothermic, maintaining Tb within a narrow range. We examined the effect of ICV injected NPY on Tb in the heterothermic Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus), a species that naturally undergoes daily torpor in which Tb decreases by as much as 15-20 degrees C. Minimum effective dose was determined in preliminary testing then various doses of NPY were tested in cold-acclimated Siberian hamsters while food was withheld. NPY markedly reduced Tb in the heterothermic Siberian hamster. In addition, the reduction in Tb in 63% of the observations was sufficient to reach the criterion for daily torpor (Tb < 32 degrees C for at least 30 min). Neither the incidence of torpor nor its depth or duration was related to NPY dose. Both likelihood and magnitude of response varied within animals on different test days. NPY decreased 24-h food intake and this was exaggerated in the animals reaching criterion for torpor; the decrease in food intake was positively correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in Tb. The mild hypothermia seen in homeothermic laboratory rats after NPY injected ICV is exaggerated, often greatly, in the heterothermic Siberian hamster. NPY treatment may be activating hypothalamic systems that normally integrate endogenous torpor-producing signals and initiate torpor.

  12. Genetic comparison of seizure control by norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Weinshenker, D; Szot, P; Miller, N S; Rust, N C; Hohmann, J G; Pyati, U; White, S S; Palmiter, R D

    2001-10-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of neuronal hyperexcitability, and pharmacological and genetic studies have identified norepinephrine (NE) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) as important endogenous regulators of neuronal excitability. Both transmitters signal through G-protein-coupled receptors, are expressed either together or separately, and are abundant in brain regions implicated in seizure generation. NPY knock-out (NPY KO) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase knock-out (DBH KO) mice that lack NE are susceptible to seizures, and agonists of NE and NPY receptors protect against seizures. To examine the relative contributions of NE and NPY to neuronal excitability, we tested Dbh;Npy double knock-out (DKO) mice for seizure sensitivity. In general, DBH KO mice were much more seizure-sensitive than NPY KO mice and had normal NPY expression, demonstrating that an NPY deficiency did not contribute to the DBH KO seizure phenotype. DKO mice were only slightly more sensitive than DBH KO mice to seizures induced by kainic acid, pentylenetetrazole, or flurothyl, although DKO mice were uniquely prone to handling-induced seizures. NPY contributed to the seizure phenotype of DKO mice at high doses of convulsant agents and advanced stages of seizures. These data suggest that NE is a more potent endogenous anticonvulsant than NPY, and that NPY has the greatest contribution under conditions of extreme neuronal excitability.

  13. Neuropeptides as endogenous neuronal growth regulatory factors on serotonergic maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Davila-Garcia, M.I.

    1989-01-01

    Products of the proopiomelanocortin molecule as well as leu- and met-enkephalin were tested for their effects on serotonergic neuronal maturation. High affinity uptake of ({sup 3}H)5-HT and morphometrics using immunocytochemistry specific for serotonergic neurons were used to monitor neuronal maturation. Cultured brainstem raphe neurons from 14 day fetuses, in the presence or absence of target tissue, were administered neuropeptides at various concentrations for 1,3 or 5 days in culture. ACTH peptides stimulate neurite length and, with the endorphins, the expression of ({sup 3}H)5-HT uptake by serotonergic fetal neurons cultured alone but had no effect when these neurons were cocultured with hippocampal target cells. A daily dose of leu-enkephalin to these cells inhibited neuronal uptake after 5 days of exposure and decreased neurite cell length in 24 hr cultures. In contrast, a single dose of leu-enkephalin at plating stimulated uptake after 5 days while co-administration of bacitracin inhibited uptake expression. Naloxone reversed the opioid effect and stimulated uptake when administered alone. Desulfated-CCK, which resembles leu-enkephalin, was equally potent as leu-enkephalin in inhibiting uptake.

  14. Ant Trail Pheromone Biosynthesis Is Triggered by a Neuropeptide Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  15. Ant trail pheromone biosynthesis is triggered by a neuropeptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  16. The adipokinetic neuropeptide of Mantodea. Sequence elucidation and evolutionary relationships.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1991-03-01

    A neuropeptide with adipokinetic activity in Locusta migratoria and the mantid Empusa pennata, and hypertrehalosaemic activity in Periplaneta americana, was isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography from corpora cardiaca of the mantids E. pennata and Sphodromantis sp. After brief enzymatic digestion by 5-oxoprolylpeptidase the primary structure of the peptide of each species was determined by pulsed-liquid phase sequencing employing Edman degradation. The C-terminus of both peptides was blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion with carboxypeptidase A. The peptides of both species were identical: a blocked, uncharged octapeptide with the sequence L-Glu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp-NH2. The peptide is now called mantid adipokinetic hormone (Emp-AKH). The synthetic peptide was chromatographically indistinguishable from the natural compound and increased blood lipids in locusts and blood carbohydrates in cockroaches when administered in low doses. The structural features clearly define the peptide as a novel member of the large AKH/RPCH-family of peptides. Seven amino-acid residues are at identical positions in Emp-AKH when compared with the adipokinetic hormone of a dragonfly (Lia-AKH) and the hypertrehalosaemic hormone I from the American cockroach (Pea-CAH-I). Evolutionary relationships to other insect orders are discussed.

  17. Neuropeptides degranulate serous cells of ferret tracheal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Gashi, A.A.; Borson, D.B.; Finkbeiner, W.E.; Nadel, J.A.; Basbaum, C.B.

    1986-08-01

    To determine whether serous or mucous cells in tracheal submucosal glands respond to the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The authors studied the peptide-induced changes in gland cell morphology accompanying release of TVSO4-labeled macromolecules from tracheal explants of ferrets. Explants were labeled for 1 h in medium containing TVSO4 and washed for 3.5 additional hours. Base-line secretion in the absence of drugs declined between 1.5 and 3.5 h after the pulse. Between 2.5 and 3.5 h, the average percent change in counts per minute recovered per sample period was not significantly different from zero. Substance P and VIP added 4 h after labeling each increased greatly the release of TVSO4-labeled macromolecules above base line. Bethanechol, a muscarinic-cholinergic agonist, increased secretion by an average of 142% above base line. Light and electron microscopy of the control tissues showed glands with narrow lumens and numerous secretory granules. Glands treated with SP or VIP had enlarged lumens and the serous cells were markedly degranulated. These phenomena were documented by morphometry and suggest that SP and VIP cause secretion from glands at least partially by stimulating exocytosis from serous cells.

  18. Phylogenetic appearance of Neuropeptide S precursor proteins in tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Reinscheid, Rainer K.

    2007-01-01

    Sleep and emotional behavior are two hallmarks of vertebrate animal behavior, implying that specialized neuronal circuits and dedicated neurochemical messengers may have been developed during evolution to regulate such complex behaviors. Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a newly identified peptide transmitter that activates a typical G protein-coupled receptor. Central administration of NPS produces profound arousal, enhances wakefulness and suppresses all stages of sleep. In addition, NPS can alleviate behavioral responses to stress by producing anxiolytic-like effects. A bioinformatic analysis of current genome databases revealed that the NPS peptide precursor gene is present in all vertebrates with the exception of fish. A high level of sequence conservation, especially of aminoterminal structures was detected, indicating stringent requirements for agonist-induced receptor activation. Duplication of the NPS precursor gene was only found in one out of two marsupial species with sufficient genome coverage (Monodelphis domestica; opossum), indicating that the duplicated opossum NPS sequence might have arisen as an isolated event. Pharmacological analysis of both Monodelphis NPS peptides revealed that only the closely related NPS peptide retained agonistic activity at NPS receptors. The duplicated precursor might be either a pseudogene or could have evolved different receptor selectivity. Together, these data show that NPS is a relatively recent gene in vertebrate evolution whose appearance might coincide with its specialized physiological functions in terrestrial vertebrates. PMID:17293003

  19. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Fröhlich, Esther E.; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for “enviromimetics”, therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation. PMID:27305846

  20. Mapping of Neuropeptides in the Crustacean Stomatogastric Nervous System by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Kellersberger, Katherine; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) with great emphasis on comprehensive analysis and mapping distribution of its diverse neuropeptide complement. Previously, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been applied to this endeavor, yet with identification accuracy and throughput compromised. Therefore, molecular imaging methods are pursued to unequivocally determine the identity and location of the neuropeptides at a high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a novel, multi-faceted mass spectrometric strategy combining profiling and imaging techniques to characterize and map neuropeptides from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus STNS at the network level. In total, 55 neuropeptides from 10 families were identified from the major ganglia in the C. sapidus STNS for the first time, including the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), the esophageal ganglion (OG), and the connecting nerve stomatogastric nerve ( stn) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and the MS/MS capability of this technique. In addition, the locations of multiple neuropeptides were documented at a spatial resolution of 25 μm in the STG and upstream nerve using MALDI-TOF/TOF and high-mass-resolution and high-mass-accuracy MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument. Furthermore, distributions of neuropeptides in the whole C. sapidus STNS were examined by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Different isoforms from the same family were simultaneously and unambiguously mapped, facilitating the functional exploration of neuropeptides present in the crustacean STNS and exemplifying the revolutionary role of this novel platform in neuronal network studies.

  1. Mapping of neuropeptides in the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system by imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Kellersberger, Katherine; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) with great emphasis on comprehensive analysis and mapping distribution of its diverse neuropeptide complement. Previously, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been applied to this endeavor, yet with identification accuracy and throughput compromised. Therefore, molecular imaging methods are pursued to unequivocally determine the identity and location of the neuropeptides at a high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a novel, multi-faceted mass spectrometric strategy combining profiling and imaging techniques to characterize and map neuropeptides from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus STNS at the network level. In total, 55 neuropeptides from 10 families were identified from the major ganglia in the C. sapidus STNS for the first time, including the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), the esophageal ganglion (OG), and the connecting nerve stomatogastric nerve (stn) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and the MS/MS capability of this technique. In addition, the locations of multiple neuropeptides were documented at a spatial resolution of 25 μm in the STG and upstream nerve using MALDI-TOF/TOF and high-mass-resolution and high-mass-accuracy MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument. Furthermore, distributions of neuropeptides in the whole C. sapidus STNS were examined by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Different isoforms from the same family were simultaneously and unambiguously mapped, facilitating the functional exploration of neuropeptides present in the crustacean STNS and exemplifying the revolutionary role of this novel platform in neuronal network studies.

  2. Cloning, characterization, and DNA sequence of a human cDNA encoding neuropeptide tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Minth, C D; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    In vitro translation of the RNA isolated from a human pheochromocytoma demonstrated that this tumor contained a mRNA encoding a 10.5-kDa protein, which was immunoprecipitated with antiserum raised against porcine neuropeptide Y. Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from total RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pUC8. Transformants containing the neuropeptide Y cDNA were identified using the mixed hybridization probe d[A-(A,G)-(A,G)-T-T-(A,G,T)-A-T-(A,G)-T-A-(A,G)-T-G]. The probe sequences were based on the known amino acid sequence, His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu, found in porcine neuropeptide Y. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was determined and contained 86 and 174 bases in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. The coding sequence consisted of 291 bases, suggesting a precursor to neuropeptide Y that was 97 amino acids long (10,839 Da). The deduced amino acid sequence of the precursor suggested that there were at least two sites of proteolytic processing, which would generate three peptides having 28 (signal peptide), 36 (human neuropeptide Y), and 30 (COOH-terminal peptide) amino acid residues. A partial NH2-terminal sequence obtained by Edman degradation of the immunoprecipitated in vitro translation product identified the positions of methionine and leucine in the first 30 residues of the prepropeptide. A highly sensitive single-stranded complementary mRNA hybridization probe specific for neuropeptide Y mRNA was prepared using the bacteriophage SP6 promoter. This probe was used to identify a mRNA corresponding to neuropeptide Y of approximately 800 bases. Images PMID:6589611

  3. Expression of neuropeptide receptor mRNA during osteoblastic differentiation of mouse iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Satomi; Goto, Tetsuya; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Joujima, Takaaki; Egusa, Hiroshi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Maki, Kenshi

    2014-12-01

    Various studies have shown a relationship between nerves and bones. Recent evidence suggests that both sensory and sympathetic nerves affect bone metabolism; however, little is known about how neuropeptides are involved in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into osteoblastic (OB) cells. To evaluate the putative effects of neuropeptides during the differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into calcified tissue-forming OB cells, we investigated the expression patterns of neuropeptide receptors at each differentiation stage. Mouse iPS cells were seeded onto feeder cells and then transferred to low-attachment culture dishes to form embryoid bodies (EBs). EBs were cultured for 4 weeks in osteoblastic differentiation medium. The expression of α1-adrenergic receptor (AR), α2-AR, β2-AR, neuropeptide Y1 receptor (NPY1-R), neuropeptide Y2 receptor (NPY2-R), calcitonin gene-related protein receptor (CGRP-R), and neurokinin 1-R (NK1-R) was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Among these neuropeptide receptors, CGRP-R and β2-AR were expressed at all stages of cell differentiation, including the iPS cell stage, with peak expression occurring at the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. Another sensory nervous system receptor, NK1-R, was expressed mainly in the late osteoblastic differentiation stage. Furthermore, CGRP-R mRNA showed an additional small peak corresponding to EBs cultured for 3 days, suggesting that EBs may be affected by serum CGRP. These data suggest that the sensory nervous system receptor CGRP-R and the sympathetic nervous system receptor β2-AR may be involved in the differentiation of iPS cells into the osteoblastic lineage. It follows from these findings that CGRP and β2-AR may regulate cell differentiation in the iPS and EB stages, and that each neuropeptide has an optimal period of influence during the differentiation process. PMID:25464890

  4. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  5. Transient expression of somatostatin messenger RNA and peptide in the hypoglossal nucleus of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Seroogy, K B; Bayliss, D A; Szymeczek, C L; Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-06-21

    The postnatal developmental expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in the rat hypoglossal nucleus was analyzed using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Both the neuropeptide and its cognate mRNA were found to be transiently present within a subpopulation of hypoglossal motoneurons during the neonatal period. At the day of birth, a large population of perikarya situated in caudal, ventral regions of the hypoglossal nucleus expressed somatostatin. By postnatal day 7, the number of hypoglossal somata which expressed somatostatin had diminished considerably, and by 2 weeks postnatal, only few such cell bodies were found. By 3-4 weeks postnatal, somatostatin peptide- and mRNA-containing hypoglossal motoneurons were rarely observed, and in the adult, they were never detected, despite the use of colchicine. A double-labeling co-localization technique was used to demonstrate that somatostatin, when present perinatally, always coexisted with calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypoglossal motoneurons. The latter peptide, in contrast to somatostatin, was expressed in large numbers of somata throughout the entire hypoglossal nucleus and persisted within the motoneurons throughout development into adulthood. These results demonstrate that somatostatin is transiently expressed in motoneurons of the caudal, ventral tier of the hypoglossal nucleus in the neonatal rat. The developmental disappearance of somatostatin is most likely not due to cell death; hypoglossal somata continue to express calcitonin gene-related peptide, with which somatostatin coexisted perinatally, a high levels throughout development. Thus, it appears that the regulation of somatostatin expression in hypoglossal neurons occurs at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stability/degradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680035

  6. Effects of loratadine and cetirizine on serum levels of neuropeptides in patients with chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Başak, Pinar Y; Vural, Huseyin; Kazanoglu, Oya O; Erturan, Ijlal; Buyukbayram, Halil I

    2014-12-01

    H1-receptor inhibiting drugs, namely loratadine and cetirizine, were frequently used in treatment of chronic urticaria. Urticarial weal and flare reactions, a neurogenic reflex due to neuropeptides, were reported to be more effectively inhibited by cetirizine than loratadine. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the effects of systemic loratadine and cetirizine treatments on serum levels of selected neuropeptides in chronic urticaria. Treatment groups of either systemic loratadine or cetirizine (10 mg/d), consisting of 16 and 22 patients, respectively, were included. Serum levels of stem cell factor (SCF), neuropeptide Y (NPY), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nerve growth factor (NGF), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P (SP) were detected before and after one week of treatment with antihistamines. Serum NPY and VIP levels were significantly decreased when compared before and after treatment with antihistamines (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). SCF and NGF values were also decreased after antihistamine treatment (P < 0.05). Post-treatment levels of CGRP were significantly higher compared with pretreatment values, while no significant difference was detected between pre and post treatment levels of SP. Cetirizine was significantly more effective than loratadine on lowering serum levels of SCF among the other neuropeptides. Systemic loratadine and cetirizine treatments in patients with chronic urticaria precisely caused variations in serum levels of neuropeptides. The predominant effect of cetirizine compared to loratadine on reducing serum SCF levels might be explained with anti-inflammatory properties of cetirizine.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of Substance P and Neuropeptide Y against laboratory strains of bacteria and oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christopher J; Burnell, Kindra K; Brogden, Kim A

    2006-08-01

    Infection and inflammation of mucosal tissue may induce the production of neuropeptides, specifically Substance P and Neuropeptide Y. Since these neuropeptides are similar to antimicrobial peptides in their amino acid composition, amphipathic design, cationic charge, and size, we wanted to determine if they had antimicrobial activity against a panel of common bacteria and oral microorganisms using the radial diffusion assay. Neuropeptide Y and Substance P had antimicrobial activity against E. coli (MIC 20.6+/-5.5 microg/ml SEM and 71.5+/-15 SEM microg/ml, respectively), but did not have activity against laboratory strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Serratia marcescens (MIC>500 microg/ml) nor oral strains of Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (MIC>500 microg/ml). While Substance P and Neuropeptide Y did not have direct antimicrobial activity against the microorganisms tested, they still may stimulate local epithelial cells to produce other innate immune factors like defensins and cathelicidins. However, this remains to be determined.

  8. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  9. Petrology, geochronology and emplacement model of the giant 1.37 Ga arcuate Lake Victoria Dyke Swarm on the margin of a large igneous province in eastern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkitie, Hannu; Data, Gabriel; Isabirye, Edward; Mänttäri, Irmeli; Huhma, Hannu; Klausen, Martin B.; Pakkanen, Lassi; Virransalo, Petri

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive description of the petrography, geochemical composition, Sm-Nd data and intrinsic field relationships of a giant arcuate Mesoproterozoic mafic dyke swarm in SW Uganda is presented for the first time. The swarm is ∼100 km wide and mainly hosted in the Palaeoproterozoic Rwenzori Belt between the Mesoproterozoic Karagwe-Ankole Belt and the Archaean Uganda Block. The dykes trend NW-SE across Uganda, but can be correlated across Lake Victoria to another set of arcuate aeromagnetic anomalies that continue southwards into Tanzania, resulting in a remarkably large semi-circular swarm with an outer diameter of ∼500 km. We propose that this unique giant dyke structure be named the Lake Victoria Dyke Swarm (LVDS). The dykes are tholeiites with Mg numbers between 0.69 and 0.44, and with inherited marked negative Nb and P anomalies in spider diagrams. Two dykes provide Sm-Nd mineral ages of 1368 ± 41 Ma and 1374 ± 42 Ma, with initial εNd values of -2.3 and -3.2, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ∼0.706-0.709. Geotectonic discrimination diagrams for the swarm exhibit more arc type than within-plate tectonic signatures, but this is in accordance with systematic enrichments in LREE, U and Th in the dolerites, more likely due to the involvement of the continental lithosphere during their petrogenesis. The LVDS is coeval with a regional ∼1375 Ma bimodal magmatic event across nearby Burundi, Rwanda and NW Tanzania, which can collectively be viewed as a large igneous province (LIP). It also indicates that the nearby Karagwe-Ankole Belt sequences - bracketed between 1.78 and 1.37 Ga and assumed by some to have been deposited within intracratonic basins - were capped by flood basalts that have subsequently been removed by erosion. Different geochemical signatures (e.g. LaN/SmN) suggest that most of the arcuate swarm was derived from an enriched SCLM, whereas related intrusions in the centre of this semi-circular segment have more or less enriched asthenospheric mantle

  10. Gene expression and pharmacology of nematode NLP-12 neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Leech, Suzie; Marks, Nikki J; Geary, Timothy G; Maule, Aaron G

    2006-05-31

    This study examines the biology of NLP-12 neuropeptides in Caenorhabditis elegans, and in the parasitic nematodes Ascaris suum and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. DYRPLQFamide (1 nM-10 microM; n > or =6) produced contraction of innervated dorsal and ventral Ascaris body wall muscle preparations (10 microM, 6.8+/-1.9 g; 1 microM, 4.6+/-1.8 g; 0.1 microM, 4.1+/-2.0 g; 10 nM, 3.8+/-2.0 g; n > or =6), and also caused a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively lower contractile response (10 microM, 4.0+/-1.5 g, n=6) on denervated muscle strips. Ovijector muscle displayed no measurable response (10 microM, n=5). nlp-12 cDNAs were characterised from A. suum (As-nlp-12) and T. colubriformis (Tc-nlp-12), both of which show sequence similarity to C. elegans nlp-12, in that they encode multiple copies of -LQFamide peptides. In C. elegans, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis showed that nlp-12 was transcribed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that DYRPLQFamide plays a constitutive role in the nervous system of this nematode. Transcription was also identified in both L3 and adult stages of T. colubriformis, in which Tc-nlp-12 is expressed in a single tail neurone. Conversely, As-nlp-12 is expressed in both head and tail tissue of adult female A. suum, suggesting species-specific differences in the transcription pattern of this gene.

  11. Gut Lymphocyte Phenotype Changes after Parenteral Nutrition and Neuropeptide Administration

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Mark A; Heneghan, Aaron F; Fechner, John H; Pierre, Joseph F; Sano, Yoshifumi; Lan, Jinggang; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Objective Define gut associated lymphocyte phenotype (GALT) changes with parenteral nutrition (PN) and PN with bombesin (BBS). Summary Background Data PN reduces respiratory tract (RT) & GALT Peyer’s patch and lamina propria (LP) lymphocytes, lowers gut and RT IgA levels and destroys established RT antiviral & antibacterial immunity. BBS, an enteric nervous system (ENS) neuropeptide, reverses PN-induced IgA and RT immune defects. Methods Exp 1: IV-cannulated ICR mice received Chow, PN or PN + BBS injections for 5 days. LSR-II flow cytometer analyzed PP and LP isolated lymphocytes for homing phenotypes (L-selectin+ & LPAM-1+) and state of activation (CD25+, CD44+) in T (CD3+) cell subsets (CD4+ & CD8+) along with homing phenotype (L-selectin+ & LPAM-1+) in naive B (IgD+) and antigen-activated (IgD− or IgM+) B (CD45R/B220+) cells. Exp 2: Following initial experiment 1 protocol, LP T regulatory (Treg) cell phenotype was evaluated by Foxp3 expression. Results Exp 1: PN significantly reduced LP 1) CD4+CD25+ (activated) and 2) CD4+CD25+LPAM-1+ (activated cells homed to LP) T cells while PN-BBS assimilated Chow levels. PN significantly reduced LP 1) IgD+ (naïve), 2) IgD-LPAM+ (antigen-activated homed to LP) and CD44+ memory B cells while PN-BBS assimilated Chow levels. Exp 2: PN significantly reduced LP CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells compared to Chow mice while PN+BBS assimilated Chow levels. Conclusions PN reduces LP activated and regulatory T cells as well as naïve and memory B cells. BBS addition to PN maintains these cell phenotypes, demonstrating the intimate involvement of the ENS in mucosal immunity. PMID:25563877

  12. Limited neuropeptide Y precursor processing in unfavourable metastatic neuroblastoma tumours.

    PubMed

    Bjellerup, P; Theodorsson, E; Jörnvall, H; Kogner, P

    2000-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is found at high concentrations in neural crest-derived tumours and has been implicated as a regulatory peptide in tumour growth and differentiation. Neuroblastomas, ganglioneuromas and phaeochromocytomas with significant concentrations of NPY-like immunoreactivity were investigated for different molecular forms of NPY and for significance of proNPY processing. Gel-permeation chromatography identified intact NPY (1-36) in all tumours, whereas proNPY (69 amino acids) was detected only in control adrenal tissue and malignant neuroblastomas. Purification of NPY-like immunoreactivity in tumour extracts and structural characterization revealed that both NPY (1-36) and the truncated form NPY (3-36) was present. The degree of processing of proNPY to NPY in tumour tissue was lower in advanced neuroblastomas with regional or metastatic spread (stage 3 and 4) (n = 6), (41%, 12-100%, median, range), compared to the less aggressive stage 1, 2 and 4S tumours (n = 12), (93%; 69-100%), (P= 0.012). ProNPY processing of less than 50% was correlated with poor clinical outcome (P = 0.004). MYCN oncogene amplification was also correlated to a low degree of proNPY processing (P = 0.025). In summary, a low degree of proNPY processing was correlated to clinical advanced stage and poor outcome in neuroblastomas. ProNPY/NPY processing generated molecular forms of NPY with known differences in NPY-receptor selectivity, implicating a potential for in vivo modulation of NPY-like effects in tumour tissue.

  13. Effects of a Skin Neuropeptide (Substance P) on Cutaneous Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Ramdani, Yasmina; Jaouen, Thomas; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Lati, Elian; Yvergnaux, Florent; Driouich, Azzedine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Farmer, Christine; Misery, Laurent; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin is the largest human neuroendocrine organ and hosts the second most numerous microbial population but the interaction of skin neuropeptides with the microflora has never been investigated. We studied the effect of Substance P (SP), a peptide released by nerve endings in the skin on bacterial virulence. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacill