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Sample records for arcuate nucleus neuropeptide

  1. Arcuate nucleus neuropeptide coexpression and connections to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones in the female rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    True, C; Takahashi, D; Kirigiti, M; Lindsley, S R; Moctezuma, C; Arik, A; Smith, M S; Kievit, P; Grove, K L

    2017-06-01

    The underlying hypothalamic neurocircuitry by which metabolism and feeding regulates reproductive function has been well-studied in the rodent; however, recent data have demonstrated significant neuroanatomical differences in the human brain. The present study had three objectives, centred on arcuate nucleus neuropeptides regulating feeding and reproduction: (i) to characterise coexpression patterns in the female nonhuman primate; (ii) to establish whether these neuronal populations make potential contacts with gonadotophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones; and (iii) to determine whether these contacts differ between the low and high GnRH-releasing states of pre-puberty and adulthood, respectively. Female nonhuman primates have several coexpression patterns of hypothalamic neuropeptides that differ from those reported in rodents. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is not coexpressed with pro-opiomelanocortin but instead with neuropeptide Y (NPY). CART is also expressed in a subpopulation of kisspeptin cells in the nonhuman primate, similar to observations in humans but diverging from findings in rodents. Very few GnRH-expressing neurones received close appositions from double-labelled kisspeptin/CART fibres; however, both single-labelled kisspeptin and CART fibres were in frequent apposition with GnRH neurones, with no differences between prepubertal and adult animals. NPY/agouti-related peptide (AgRP) coexpressing fibres contacted significantly more GnRH neurones in prepubertal animals than adults, consistent with increased NPY and AgRP mRNA observed in prepubertal animals. The findings of the present study detail significant differences in arcuate nucleus neuropeptide coexpression in the monkey compared to the rodent and are consistent with the hypothesis that arcuate nucleus NPY/AgRP neurones play an inhibitory role in controlling GnRH neuronal regulation in the prepubertal primate. © 2017 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  2. Moderate Long-Term Modulation of Neuropeptide Y in Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus Induces Energy Balance Alterations in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Garrido, Manuel; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Nobrega, Clévio; Santos-Carvalho, Ana; Álvaro, Ana Rita; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Kaster, Manuella; Kügler, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) produced by arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons has a strong orexigenic effect on target neurons. Hypothalamic NPY levels undergo wide-ranging oscillations during the circadian cycle and in response to fasting and peripheral hormones (from 0.25 to 10-fold change). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a moderate long-term modulation of NPY within the ARC neurons on food consumption, body weight gain and hypothalamic neuropeptides. We achieved a physiological overexpression (3.6-fold increase) and down-regulation (0.5-fold decrease) of NPY in the rat ARC by injection of AAV vectors expressing NPY and synthetic microRNA that target the NPY, respectively. Our work shows that a moderate overexpression of NPY was sufficient to induce diurnal over-feeding, sustained body weight gain and severe obesity in adult rats. Additionally, the circulating levels of leptin were elevated but the immunoreactivity (ir) of ARC neuropeptides was not in accordance (POMC-ir was unchanged and AGRP-ir increased), suggesting a disruption in the ability of ARC neurons to response to peripheral metabolic alterations. Furthermore, a dysfunction in adipocytes phenotype was observed in these obese rats. In addition, moderate down-regulation of NPY did not affect basal feeding or normal body weight gain but the response to food deprivation was compromised since fasting-induced hyperphagia was inhibited and fasting-induced decrease in locomotor activity was absent. These results highlight the importance of the physiological ARC NPY levels oscillations on feeding regulation, fasting response and body weight preservation, and are important for the design of therapeutic interventions for obesity that include the NPY. PMID:21799827

  3. Calorie restriction increases lipopolysaccharide-induced neuropeptide Y immunolabeling and reduces microglial cell area in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Radler, M E; Wright, B J; Walker, F R; Hale, M W; Kent, S

    2015-01-29

    Calorie restriction (CR) increases longevity and elicits many health promoting benefits including delaying immunosenescence and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases. Although the mechanisms underlying the health-enhancing effects of CR are not known, a likely contributing factor is alterations in immune system functioning. CR suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, blocks LPS-induced fever, and shifts hypothalamic signaling pathways to an anti-inflammatory bias. Furthermore, we have recently shown that CR attenuates LPS-stimulated microglial activation in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), a brain region containing neurons that synthesize neuropeptide Y (NPY), an orexigenic neuropeptide that is upregulated by a CR diet and has anti-inflammatory properties. To determine if increased NPY expression in the ARC following CR was associated with changes in microglial activation, a set of brain sections from mice that were exposed to 50% CR or ad libitum feeding for 28 days before being injected with LPS were immunostained for NPY. The density of NPY-immunolabeling was assessed across the rostrocaudal extent of the ARC and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). An adjacent set of sections were immunostained for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule-1 (Iba1) and immunostained microglia in the ARC were digitally reconstructed to investigate the effects of CR on microglial morphology. We demonstrated that exposure to CR increased NPY expression in the ARC, but not the PVN. Digital reconstruction of microglia revealed that LPS increased Iba1 intensity in ad libitum fed mice but had no effect on Iba1 intensity in CR mice. CR also decreased the size of ARC microglial cells following LPS. Correlational analyses revealed strong associations between NPY and body temperature, and body temperature and microglia area. Together these results suggest that CR-induced changes in NPY are not directly involved in the

  4. Differential Gene Expression Between Neuropeptide Y Expressing Neurons of the Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus and the Arcuate Nucleus: Microarray Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Shin; Kirigiti, Melissa; Glavas, Maria; Grayson, Bernadette; Chong, C.N. Angie; Jiang, Betty; Smith, M Susan; Zeltser, Lori M.; Grove, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    The Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus (DMH) is known to play important roles in ingestive behavior and body weight homeostasis. The DMH contains neurons expressing Neuropeptide Y (NPY) during specific physiological conditions of hyperphagia and obesity, however, the role of DMH-NPY neurons has yet to be characterized. In contrast to the DMH-NPY neurons, NPY expressing neurons have been best characterized in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus (ARH). The purpose of this study is to characterize the chemical phenotype of DMH-NPY neurons by comparing the gene expression profiles of NPY neurons in the DMH and ARH isolated from postnatal NPY-hrGFP mice by microarray analysis. Twenty genes were differentially expressed in the DMH-NPY neurons compared to the ARH. Among them, there were several transcriptional factors that play important roles in the regulation of energy balance. DMH-NPY neurons expressed Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD) 65 and 67, suggesting that they may be GABAergic, similar to ARH-NPY neurons. While ARH-NPY neurons expressed leptin receptor (ObRb) and displayed the activation of STAT3 in response to leptin administration, DMH-NPY neurons showed neither. These findings strongly suggest that DMH-NPY neurons could play a distinct role in the control of energy homeostasis and are differentially regulated from ARH-NPY neurons through afferent inputs and transcriptional regulators. PMID:20380814

  5. Neuromedin B and gastrin releasing peptide excite arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y neurons in a novel transgenic mouse expressing strong renilla GFP in NPY neurons

    PubMed Central

    van den Pol, Anthony N.; Yao, Yang; Fu, Li-Ying; Foo, Kylie; Huang, Hao; Coppari, Roberto; Lowell, Brad; Broberger, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most widespread neuropeptides in the brain. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed bright renilla GFP in most or all of the known NPY cells in the brain, which otherwise were not identifiable. GFP expression in NPY cells was confirmed with immunocytochemistry and single cell RT-PCR. NPY neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus play an important role in energy homeostasis and endocrine control. Whole cell patch clamp recording was used to study identified arcuate NPY cells. Primary agents that regulate energy balance include melanocortin receptor agonists, AgRP, and cannabinoids; none of these substances substantially influenced electrical properties of NPY neurons. In striking contrast, neuropeptides of the bombesin family, including gastrin releasing peptide and neuromedin B which are found in axons in the arcuate nucleus and may also be released from the gut to signal the brain, showed strong direct excitatory actions at nanomolar levels on the NPY neurons, stronger than the actions of ghrelin and hypocretin/orexin. Bombesin-related peptides reduced input resistance and depolarized the membrane potential. The depolarization was attenuated by several factors: substitution of choline for sodium, extracellular Ni2+, inclusion of BAPTA in the pipette, KB-R7943 and SKF96365. Reduced extracellular calcium enhanced the current, which reversed around − 20 mV. Together, these data suggest two mechanisms, activation of non-selective cation channels and the sodium/calcium exchanger. Since both NPY and POMC neurons, which we also studied, are similarly directly excited by bombesin-like peptides, the peptides may function to initiate broad activation, rather than the cell-type selective activation or inhibition reported for many other compounds that modulate energy homeostasis. PMID:19357287

  6. Glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus regulates glucose intake

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Richardson, Errol; Ma, Yue; Holton, Christopher; De Backer, Ivan; Buckley, Niki; Dhillo, Waljit; Bewick, Gavin; Zhang, Shuai; Carling, David; Bloom, Steve; Gardiner, James

    2014-01-01

    The brain relies on a constant supply of glucose, its primary fuel, for optimal function. A taste-independent mechanism within the CNS that promotes glucose delivery to the brain has been postulated to maintain glucose homeostasis; however, evidence for such a mechanism is lacking. Here, we determined that glucokinase activity within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is involved in regulation of dietary glucose intake. In fasted rats, glucokinase activity was specifically increased in the arcuate nucleus but not other regions of the hypothalamus. Moreover, pharmacologic and genetic activation of glucokinase in the arcuate nucleus of rodent models increased glucose ingestion, while decreased arcuate nucleus glucokinase activity reduced glucose intake. Pharmacologic targeting of potential downstream glucokinase effectors revealed that ATP-sensitive potassium channel and P/Q calcium channel activity are required for glucokinase-mediated glucose intake. Additionally, altered glucokinase activity affected release of the orexigenic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y in response to glucose. Together, our results suggest that glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus specifically regulates glucose intake and that appetite for glucose is an important driver of overall food intake. Arcuate nucleus glucokinase activation may represent a CNS mechanism that underlies the oft-described phenomena of the “sweet tooth” and carbohydrate craving. PMID:25485685

  7. Arcuate neuropeptide Y inhibits sympathetic nerve activity via multiple neuropathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Madden, Christopher J; Brooks, Virginia L

    2017-06-30

    Obesity increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) via activation of proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ArcN), and this action requires simultaneous withdrawal of tonic neuropeptide Y (NPY) sympathoinhibition. However, the sites and neurocircuitry by which NPY decreases SNA are unclear. Here, using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) to selectively activate or inhibit ArcN NPY neurons expressing agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in mice, we have demonstrated that this neuronal population tonically suppresses splanchnic SNA (SSNA), arterial pressure, and heart rate via projections to the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). First, we found that ArcN NPY/AgRP fibers closely appose PVN and DMH presympathetic neurons. Second, nanoinjections of NPY or an NPY receptor Y1 (NPY1R) antagonist into PVN or DMH decreased or increased SSNA, respectively. Third, blockade of DMH NPY1R reversed the sympathoinhibition elicited by selective, DREADD-mediated activation of ArcN NPY/AgRP neurons. Finally, stimulation of ArcN NPY/AgRP terminal fields in the PVN and DMH decreased SSNA. Considering that chronic obesity decreases ArcN NPY content, we propose that the ArcN NPY neuropathway to the PVN and DMH is pivotal in obesity-induced elevations in SNA.

  8. Glucocorticoid signaling in the arcuate nucleus modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Foppen, Ewout; Abplanalp, William; Gao, Yuanqing; Alkemade, Anneke; la Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M; Tschöp, Matthias H; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2012-02-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors are highly expressed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and arcuate nucleus (ARC). As glucocorticoids have pronounced effects on neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression and as NPY neurons projecting from the ARC to the PVN are pivotal for balancing feeding behavior and glucose metabolism, we investigated the effect of glucocorticoid signaling in these areas on endogenous glucose production (EGP) and insulin sensitivity by local retrodialysis of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone into the ARC or the PVN, in combination with isotope dilution and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp techniques. Retrodialysis of dexamethasone for 90 min into the ARC or the PVN did not have significant effects on basal plasma glucose concentration. During the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, retrodialysis of dexamethasone into the ARC largely prevented the suppressive effect of hyperinsulinemia on EGP. Antagonizing the NPY1 receptors by intracerebroventricular infusion of its antagonist largely blocked the hepatic insulin resistance induced by dexamethasone in the ARC. The dexamethasone-ARC-induced inhibition of hepatic insulin sensitivity was also prevented by hepatic sympathetic denervation. These data suggest that glucocorticoid signaling specifically in the ARC neurons modulates hepatic insulin responsiveness via NPY and the sympathetic system, which may add to our understanding of the metabolic impact of clinical conditions associated with hypercortisolism.

  9. Developmental Changes in Synaptic Distribution in Arcuate Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kirigiti, Melissa A.; Baquero, Karalee C.; Lee, Shin J.; Smith, M. Susan; Grove, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons coexpressing neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, and GABA (NAG) play an important role in ingestive behavior and are located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. NAG neurons receive both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs, however, the developmental time course of synaptic input organization of NAG neurons in mice is unknown. In this study, we show that these neurons have low numbers of GABAergic synapses and that GABA is inhibitory to NAG neurons during early postnatal period. In contrast, glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons are relatively abundant by P13 and are comparatively similar to the levels observed in the adult. As mice reach adulthood (9–10 weeks), GABAergic tone onto NAG neurons increases. At this age, NAG neurons received similar numbers of inhibitory and EPSCs. To further differentiate age-associated changes in synaptic distribution, 17- to 18-week-old lean and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice were studied. Surprisingly, NAG neurons from lean adult mice exhibit a reduction in the GABAergic synapses compared with younger adults. Conversely, DIO mice display reductions in the number of GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons. Based on these experiments, we propose that synaptic distribution in NAG neurons is continuously restructuring throughout development to accommodate the animals' energy requirements. PMID:26041922

  10. The LIM-homeobox transcription factor Isl1 plays crucial roles in the development of multiple arcuate nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bora; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W

    2016-10-15

    Neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus relay and translate important cues from the periphery into the central nervous system. However, the gene regulatory program directing their development remains poorly understood. Here, we report that the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Isl1 is expressed in several subpopulations of developing arcuate neurons and plays crucial roles in their fate specification. Mice with conditional deletion of the Isl1 gene in developing hypothalamus display severe deficits in both feeding and linear growth. Consistent with these results, their arcuate nucleus fails to express key fate markers of Isl1-expressing neurons that regulate feeding and growth. These include the orexigenic neuropeptides AgRP and NPY for specifying AgRP-neurons, the anorexigenic neuropeptide αMSH for POMC-neurons, and two growth-stimulatory peptides, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) for GHRH-neurons and somatostatin (Sst) for Sst-neurons. Finally, we show that Isl1 directly enhances the expression of AgRP by cooperating with the key orexigenic transcription factors glucocorticoid receptor and brain-specific homeobox factor. Our results identify Isl1 as a crucial transcription factor that plays essential roles in the gene regulatory program directing development of multiple arcuate neuronal subpopulations. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the ewe express both dynorphin A and neurokinin B.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Robert L; Lehman, Michael N; Smith, Jeremy T; Coolen, Lique M; de Oliveira, Cleusa V R; Jafarzadehshirazi, Mohammad R; Pereira, Alda; Iqbal, Javed; Caraty, Alain; Ciofi, Philippe; Clarke, Iain J

    2007-12-01

    Kisspeptin is a potent stimulator of GnRH secretion that has been implicated in the feedback actions of ovarian steroids. In ewes, the majority of hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons are found in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), with a smaller population located in the preoptic area. Most arcuate kisspeptin neurons express estrogen receptor-alpha, as do a set of arcuate neurons that contain both dynorphin and neurokinin B (NKB), suggesting that all three neuropeptides are colocalized in the same cells. In this study we tested this hypothesis using dual immunocytochemistry and also determined if kisspeptin neurons contain MSH or agouti-related peptide. To assess colocalization of kisspeptin and dynorphin, we used paraformaldehyde-fixed tissue from estrogen-treated ovariectomized ewes in the breeding season (n = 5). Almost all ARC, but no preoptic area, kisspeptin neurons contained dynorphin. Similarly, almost all ARC dynorphin neurons contained kisspeptin. In experiment 2 we examined colocalization of kisspeptin and NKB in picric-acid fixed tissue collected from ovary intact ewes (n = 9). Over three quarters of ARC kisspeptin neurons also expressed NKB, and a similar percentage of NKB neurons contained kisspeptin. In contrast, no kisspeptin neurons stained for MSH or agouti-related peptide. These data demonstrate that, in the ewe, a high percentage of ARC kisspeptin neurons also produce dynorphin and NKB, and we propose that a single subpopulation of ARC neurons contains all three neuropeptides. Because virtually all of these neurons express estrogen and progesterone re-ceptors, they are likely to relay the feedback effects of these steroids to GnRH neurons to regulate reproductive function.

  12. The arcuate nucleus and NPY contribute to the antitumorigenic effect of calorie restriction

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Robin K.; López, Miguel; Younts, Caitlin M.; Jones, Bruce; Pearson, Kevin J.; Anson, R. Michael; Diéguez, Carlos; de Cabo, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Summary Calorie restriction (CR) is known to have profound effects on tumor incidence. A typical consequence of CR is hunger, and we hypothesized that the neuroendocrine response to CR might in part mediate CR's antitumor effects. We tested CR under appetite suppression using two models: neuropeptide Y (NPY) knockout mice and monosodium glutamate (MSG)-injected mice. While CR was protective in control mice challenged with a two-stage skin carcinogenesis model, papilloma development was neither delayed nor reduced by CR in the MSG-treated and NPY knockout mice. Adiponectin levels were also not increased by CR in the appetite-suppressed mice. We propose that some of CR’s beneficial effects cannot be separated from those imposed on appetite, and that NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are involved in the translation of reduced intake to downstream physiological and functional benefits. PMID:21385308

  13. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Nadia; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Avendaño-Pradel, Rafael; Basualdo, Maria del Carmen; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Chávez-Macías, Laura; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase in human brain are localized in the same areas as in rodent brain. The similar distribution of NPY, α-MSH and VGF indicated that these neurons in the human brain may share similar functionality as in the rodent brain. The number of NPY and VGF immuno positive cells was increased in the infundibular nucleus of diabetic subjects in comparison to non-diabetic controls. In contrast, NPY and VGF were down regulated in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius of diabetic patients. These results suggest an activation of NPY producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which, according to animal experimental studies, is related to a catabolic state and might be the basis for increased hepatic glucose production in type-2 diabetes. PMID:22808091

  14. Fasting enhances the response of arcuate neuropeptide Y-glucose-inhibited neurons to decreased extracellular glucose

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Beth Ann; Fioramonti, Xavier; Jochnowitz, Nina; Fakira, Kurt; Gagen, Karen; Contie, Sylvain; Lorsignol, Anne; Penicaud, Luc; Martin, William J.; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2009-01-01

    Fasting increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, peptide levels, and the excitability of NPY-expressing neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) nucleus. A subpopulation of ARC-NPY neurons (∼40%) are glucose-inhibited (GI)-type glucose-sensing neurons. Hence, they depolarize in response to decreased glucose. Because fasting enhances NPY neurotransmission, we propose that during fasting, GI neurons depolarize in response to smaller decreases in glucose. This increased excitation in response to glucose decreases would increase NPY-GI neuronal excitability and enhance NPY neurotransmission. Using an in vitro hypothalamic explant system, we show that fasting enhances NPY release in response to decreased glucose concentration. By measuring relative changes in membrane potential using a membrane potential-sensitive dye, we demonstrate that during fasting, a smaller decrease in glucose depolarizes NPY-GI neurons. Furthermore, incubation in low (0.7 mM) glucose enhanced while leptin (10 nM) blocked depolarization of GI neurons in response to decreased glucose. Fasting, leptin, and glucose-induced changes in NPY-GI neuron glucose sensing were mediated by 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We conclude that during energy sufficiency, leptin reduces the ability of NPY-GI neurons to sense decreased glucose. However, after a fast, decreased leptin and glucose activate AMPK in NPY-GI neurons. As a result, NPY-GI neurons become depolarized in response to smaller glucose fluctuations. Increased excitation of NPY-GI neurons enhances NPY release. NPY, in turn, shifts energy homeostasis toward increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure to restore energy balance. PMID:19211911

  15. Neuronal cell death in the arcuate nucleus of the medulla oblongata in stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Folkerth, Rebecca D; Zanoni, Sallie; Andiman, Sarah E; Billiards, Saraid S

    2008-02-01

    The hypothesis that unexplained stillbirth arises in a similar manner as the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is based in part on shared neuropathologic features between the two entities, including hypoxic-ischemic lesions such as white matter and brainstem gliosis, as well as aplasia or hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus on the ventral surface of the medulla. The arcuate nucleus is the putative homologue of the respiratory chemosensory region at the ventral medullary surface in animals that is involved in central chemosensitivity. To determine arcuate nucleus pathology in stillbirth, and its co-occurrence with evidence of hypoxia-ischemia, we reviewed brain specimens from the archives of our hospitals from 22 consecutive stillbirths from 22 to 41 gestational weeks. Explained causes of death (n=17) included nuchal cord, acute chorioamnionitis, placental abruption, and fetal glomerulosclerosis; 5 cases were unexplained. In 12 brains, we observed nuclear karyorrhexis and/or pyknosis with cytoplasmic hypereosinophilia in neurons in the arcuate nucleus in both explained (n=8) and unexplained (n=4) cases (54.5% of total cases). Three additional cases had arcuate aplasia (n=1) or hypoplasia (n=2) (13.6% of total cases); one of the latter cases also had neuronal necrosis in the hypoplastic arcuate. The degree of gliosis in the region of the arcuate nucleus was variable across all cases, without statistically significant differences between groups with and without arcuate nucleus necrosis. Other lesions in association with (n=14) and without (n=8) arcuate nucleus abnormalities were diffuse cerebral white matter gliosis, periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and neuronal necrosis in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, thalamus, basis pontis, and brainstem tegmentum. In 16/20 (80.0%) cases (with or without histologic necrosis of the arcuate), immunostaining with caspase-3 demonstrated positive neurons. Our findings suggest that neuronal pathology in the arcuate nucleus may be

  16. Ghrelin activates hypophysiotropic corticotropin-releasing factor neurons independently of the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Agustina; Portiansky, Enrique; Sánchez-Jaramillo, Edith; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Perello, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Previous work has established that the hormone ghrelin engages the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal neuroendocrine axis via activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The neuronal circuitry that mediates this effect of ghrelin is currently unknown. Here, we show that ghrelin-induced activation of PVN CRF neurons involved inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inputs, likely via ghrelin binding sites that were localized at GABAergic terminals within the PVN. While ghrelin activated PVN CRF neurons in the presence of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor antagonists or in arcuate nucleus (ARC)-ablated mice, it failed to do it so in mice with ghrelin receptor expression limited to ARC agouti gene related protein (AgRP)/NPY neurons. These data support the notion that ghrelin activates PVN CRF neurons via inhibition of local GABAergic tone, in an ARC-independent manner. Furthermore, these data suggest that the neuronal circuits mediating ghrelin's orexigenic action vs. its role as a stress signal are anatomically dissociated.

  17. The arcuate nucleus mediates GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide-dependent weight loss.

    PubMed

    Secher, Anna; Jelsing, Jacob; Baquero, Arian F; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Cowley, Michael A; Dalbøge, Louise S; Hansen, Gitte; Grove, Kevin L; Pyke, Charles; Raun, Kirsten; Schäffer, Lauge; Tang-Christensen, Mads; Verma, Saurabh; Witgen, Brent M; Vrang, Niels; Bjerre Knudsen, Lotte

    2014-10-01

    Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides lowering blood glucose, liraglutide also reduces body weight. It is not fully understood how liraglutide induces weight loss or to what degree liraglutide acts directly in the brain. Here, we determined that liraglutide does not activate GLP-1-producing neurons in the hindbrain, and liraglutide-dependent body weight reduction in rats was independent of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) in the vagus nerve, area postrema, and paraventricular nucleus. Peripheral injection of fluorescently labeled liraglutide in mice revealed the presence of the drug in the circumventricular organs. Moreover, labeled liraglutide bound neurons within the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and other discrete sites in the hypothalamus. GLP-1R was necessary for liraglutide uptake in the brain, as liraglutide binding was not seen in Glp1r(-/-) mice. In the ARC, liraglutide was internalized in neurons expressing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Electrophysiological measurements of murine brain slices revealed that GLP-1 directly stimulates POMC/CART neurons and indirectly inhibits neurotransmission in neurons expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) via GABA-dependent signaling. Collectively, our findings indicate that the GLP-1R on POMC/CART-expressing ARC neurons likely mediates liraglutide-induced weight loss.

  18. The arcuate nucleus mediates GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide-dependent weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Secher, Anna; Jelsing, Jacob; Baquero, Arian F.; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Cowley, Michael A.; Dalbøge, Louise S.; Hansen, Gitte; Grove, Kevin L.; Pyke, Charles; Raun, Kirsten; Schäffer, Lauge; Tang-Christensen, Mads; Verma, Saurabh; Witgen, Brent M.; Vrang, Niels; Bjerre Knudsen, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides lowering blood glucose, liraglutide also reduces body weight. It is not fully understood how liraglutide induces weight loss or to what degree liraglutide acts directly in the brain. Here, we determined that liraglutide does not activate GLP-1–producing neurons in the hindbrain, and liraglutide-dependent body weight reduction in rats was independent of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) in the vagus nerve, area postrema, and paraventricular nucleus. Peripheral injection of fluorescently labeled liraglutide in mice revealed the presence of the drug in the circumventricular organs. Moreover, labeled liraglutide bound neurons within the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and other discrete sites in the hypothalamus. GLP-1R was necessary for liraglutide uptake in the brain, as liraglutide binding was not seen in Glp1r–/– mice. In the ARC, liraglutide was internalized in neurons expressing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Electrophysiological measurements of murine brain slices revealed that GLP-1 directly stimulates POMC/CART neurons and indirectly inhibits neurotransmission in neurons expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) via GABA-dependent signaling. Collectively, our findings indicate that the GLP-1R on POMC/CART-expressing ARC neurons likely mediates liraglutide-induced weight loss. PMID:25202980

  19. Arcuate nucleus destruction does not block food deprivation-induced increases in food foraging and hoarding

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Megan J.; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the control of food intake are considerably better understood than those underlying the appetitive ingestive behaviors of foraging and hoarding of food, despite the prevalence of the latter across species including humans. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related protein (AgRP), two orexigenic neuropeptides known to stimulate food intake in a variety of species, applied centrally to Siberian hamsters increases foraging and especially hoarding with lesser increases in food intake. Both are expressed in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and their synthesis increases with food deprivation, a naturally-occurring stimulus that markedly increases foraging and hoarding in Siberian hamsters. Therefore, we tested whether destruction of Arc neurons blocks these ingestive behaviors. This was accomplished either by microinjecting NPY conjugated to saporin (NPY-SAP) bilaterally into the Arc to kill NPY receptor-bearing neurons or via neonatal monosodium glutamate (MSG) treatment. For both methods, Arc cresyl violet staining (cell density) and NPY and Y1 receptor immunoreactivity (ir) were significantly decreased. Although baseline foraging and food hoarding were not affected, food deprivation-induced increased food hoarding was surprisingly exaggerated ∼100 % with both types of Arc destruction. We found a substantial amount of remaining NPY-ir fibers, likely emanating from the brainstem, and a significant upregulation of Y1 receptors in Arc NPY projections areas (hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and perifornical area) after Arc denervation and their activation may have accounted for the exaggerated increases. The converging evidence from both Arc destruction methods suggests an intact Arc is not necessary for food deprivation-induced increases in food foraging and hoarding. PMID:20138163

  20. Modulation of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus on gastric motility in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-Yao; Ma, Rong; Cao, Qi; Su, Bao-Tian

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the arcuate nucleus (ARC) could modulate gastric motility, and if so, what are the mechanisms or pathways. METHODS: Wistar rats, anaesthetized with urethan, parameters of stimulation and electrolytic lesion sites were determined according to the Paxinos and Watson “ATLAS of rat brain in steriotaxic coordinate”. Intragastric pressure ( IGP ) and gastric motility were measured by Reybould¡äs method. RESULTS: Electrical stimulation of ARC could obviously decrease the IGP by 42.2% ± 5.4%, n = 15, P < 0.01, and the phasic gastric contractions disappeared. The analysis showed that the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe (DR) nuclei may be involved in central, but without the invovement of β-endorphinergic neurons rich in the ARC, while in periphery, the peripheral neural pathways are both vagus and sympathetic nerves. The fibers in vagus may be non-cholinergic. Humoral factors may also be involved. At the receptor level, Tonic action of adrenergic nerve in the stomach is mainly inhibitory; β-receptors, which may be present on the stomach wall and mediate inhibition; and α-receptors, which come into play through vagus, mediate inhibition, but those present on the smooth muscle mediate sympathetic excitation. Microinjection of TRH into ARC could significantly increase the IGP by 183.02% (0.53 kPa ± 0.08 kPa vs 1.5 kPa ± 0.6 kPa, n = 10, P < 0.001), the rate and amplitude of phasic gastric contraction were also increased (3 cpm vs 6 cpm-8 cpm). The peripheral pathway of such excitatory effects were transmitted with cholinergic vagus nerve mediated by M-receptor. CONCLUSION: ARC could modulate gastric motility biphasically, inhibitory and excitatory, depending on the nature of stimuli. PMID:11819337

  1. Glucose reverses fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus of mice.

    PubMed

    Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2008-01-08

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is an important target for metabolic and hormonal signals controlling food intake. As demonstrated by c-Fos studies, arcuate neurons are activated in food-deprived mice, whereas refeeding reverses the fasting-induced activation. To evaluate whether an increase in blood glucose has an inhibitory effect on these neurons, we analyzed the c-Fos response to an intraperitoneal glucose injection in fasted mice. This treatment increased blood glucose levels twofold and reduced 2-h food intake. Similar to refeeding, it also reversed the fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, an increase in blood glucose might be an important feeding-related signal acting via the arcuate nucleus to oppose orexigenic stimuli.

  2. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Regulation of Agouti-Related Protein and Pro-Opiomelanocortin Gene Expression in the Avian Arcuate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Timothy; Dunn, Ian C.

    2017-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus is generally conserved across vertebrate taxa in its neuroanatomy and neuropeptide expression. Gene expression of agouti-related protein (AGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has been established in the arcuate nucleus of several bird species and co-localization demonstrated for AGRP and NPY. The proteins encoded by these genes exert comparable effects on food intake in birds after central administration to those seen in other vertebrates, with AGRP and NPY being orexigenic and CART and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone anorexigenic. We have focused on the measurement of arcuate nucleus AGRP and POMC expression in several avian models in relation to the regulation of energy balance, incubation, stress, and growth. AGRP mRNA and POMC mRNA are, respectively, up- and downregulated after energy deprivation and restriction. This suggests that coordinated changes in the activity of AGRP and POMC neurons help to drive the homeostatic response to replace depleted energy stores in birds as in other vertebrates. While AGRP and POMC expression are generally positively and negatively correlated with food intake, respectively, we review here situations in some avian models in which AGRP gene expression is dissociated from the level of food intake and may have an influence on growth independent of changes in appetite. This suggests the possibility that the central melanocortin system exerts more pleiotropic functions in birds. While the neuroanatomical arrangement of AGRP and POMC neurons and the sensitivity of their activity to nutritional state appear generally conserved with other vertebrates, detailed knowledge is lacking of the key nutritional feedback signals acting on the avian arcuate nucleus and there appear to be significant differences between birds and mammals. In particular, recently identified avian leptin genes show differences between bird species in their tissue

  4. MCT2 Expression and Lactate Influx in Anorexigenic and Orexigenic Neurons of the Arcuate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Campos, Christian; Elizondo, Roberto; Carril, Claudio; Martínez, Fernando; Boric, Katica; Nualart, Francisco; Garcia-Robles, Maria Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons of the arcuate nucleus control food intake, releasing orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to changes in glucose concentration. Several studies have suggested that the glucosensing mechanism is governed by a metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells via lactate flux through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Hypothalamic glial cells (tanycytes) release lactate through MCT1 and MCT4; however, similar analyses in neuroendocrine neurons have yet to be undertaken. Using primary rat hypothalamic cell cultures and fluorimetric assays, lactate incorporation was detected. Furthermore, the expression and function of MCT2 was demonstrated in the hypothalamic neuronal cell line, GT1-7, using kinetic and inhibition assays. Moreover, MCT2 expression and localization in the Sprague Dawley rat hypothalamus was analyzed using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analyses. Confocal immunohistochemistry analyses revealed MCT2 localization in neuronal but not glial cells. Moreover, MCT2 was localized to ∼90% of orexigenic and ∼60% of anorexigenic neurons as determined by immunolocalization analysis of AgRP and POMC with MCT2-positives neurons. Thus, MCT2 distribution coupled with lactate uptake by hypothalamic neurons suggests that hypothalamic neurons control food intake using lactate to reflect changes in glucose levels. PMID:23638108

  5. Direct modulation of GFAP-expressing glia in the arcuate nucleus bi-directionally regulates feeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Naiyan; Barak, Boaz; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Multiple hypothalamic neuronal populations that regulate energy balance have been identified. Although hypothalamic glia exist in abundance and form intimate structural connections with neurons, their roles in energy homeostasis are less known. Here we show that selective Ca2+ activation of glia in the mouse arcuate nucleus (ARC) reversibly induces increased food intake while disruption of Ca2+ signaling pathway in ARC glia reduces food intake. The specific activation of ARC glia enhances the activity of agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y (AgRP/NPY)-expressing neurons but induces no net response in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons. ARC glial activation non-specifically depolarizes both AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons but a strong inhibitory input to POMC neurons balances the excitation. When AgRP/NPY neurons are inactivated, ARC glial activation fails to evoke any significant changes in food intake. Collectively, these results reveal an important role of ARC glia in the regulation of energy homeostasis through its interaction with distinct neuronal subtype-specific pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18716.001 PMID:27751234

  6. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Streamson; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat. PMID:27611685

  7. Cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in the rat: role of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) was studied in urethane-anesthetized adult male Wistar rats. At the baseline mean arterial pressure (BLMAP) close to normal, ARCN stimulation elicited decreases in MAP and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The decreases in MAP elicited by ARCN stimulation were attenuated by either gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), neuropeptide Y (NPY), or beta-endorphin receptor blockade in the ipsilateral hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Combined blockade of GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the ipsilateral PVN converted the decreases in MAP and SNA to increases in these variables. Conversion of inhibitory effects on the MAP and SNA to excitatory effects following ARCN stimulation was also observed when the BLMAP was decreased to below normal levels by an infusion of sodium nitroprusside. The pressor and tachycardic responses to ARCN stimulation at below normal BLMAP were attenuated by blockade of melanocortin 3/4 (MC3/4) receptors in the ipsilateral PVN. Unilateral blockade of GABA-A receptors in the ARCN increased the BLMAP and heart rate (HR) revealing tonic inhibition of the excitatory neurons in the ARCN. ARCN stimulation elicited tachycardia regardless of the level of BLMAP. ARCN neurons projecting to the PVN were immunoreactive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), NPY, and beta-endorphin. These results indicated that: 1) at normal BLMAP, decreases in MAP and SNA induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the PVN, 2) lowering of BLMAP converted decreases in MAP following ARCN stimulation to increases in MAP, and 3) at below normal BLMAP, increases in MAP and HR induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via MC3/4 receptors in the PVN. These results provide a base for future studies to explore the role of ARCN in cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Dopamine/Tyrosine Hydroxylase Neurons of the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus Release GABA, Communicate with Dopaminergic and Other Arcuate Neurons, and Respond to Dynorphin, Met-Enkephalin, and Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    We employ transgenic mice with selective expression of tdTomato or cre recombinase together with optogenetics to investigate whether hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) dopamine/tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons interact with other ARC neurons, how they respond to hypothalamic neuropeptides, and to test whether these cells constitute a single homogeneous population. Immunostaining with dopamine and TH antisera was used to corroborate targeted transgene expression. Using whole-cell recording on a large number of neurons (n = 483), two types of neurons with different electrophysiological properties were identified in the dorsomedial ARC where 94% of TH neurons contained immunoreactive dopamine: bursting and nonbursting neurons. In contrast to rat, the regular oscillations of mouse bursting neurons depend on a mechanism involving both T-type calcium and A-type potassium channel activation, but are independent of gap junction coupling. Optogenetic stimulation using cre recombinase-dependent ChIEF-AAV-DJ expressed in ARC TH neurons evoked postsynaptic GABA currents in the majority of neighboring dopamine and nondopamine neurons, suggesting for the first time substantial synaptic projections from ARC TH cells to other ARC neurons. Numerous met-enkephalin (mENK) and dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons appeared to contact ARC TH neurons. mENK inhibited both types of TH neuron through G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium currents mediated by δ and μ opioid receptors. Dynorphin-A inhibited both bursting and nonbursting TH neurons by activating κ receptors. Oxytocin excited both bursting and nonbursting neurons. These results reveal a complexity of TH neurons that communicate extensively with neurons within the ARC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we show that the great majority of mouse hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons that synthesize TH in the dorsomedial ARC also contain immunoreactive dopamine, and show either bursting or nonbursting electrical activity. Unlike

  9. Defining Subpopulations of Arcuate Nucleus GABA Neurons in Male, Female, and Prenatally Androgenized Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher J; Desroziers, Elodie; McLennan, Timothy; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2017-01-01

    Arcuate nucleus (ARN) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons are implicated in many critical homeostatic mechanisms, from food intake to fertility. To determine the functional relevance of ARN GABA neurons, it is essential to define the neurotransmitters co-expressed with and potentially co-released from ARN GABA neurons. The present study investigated the expression of markers of specific signaling molecules by ARN GABA neurons in brain sections from male, female, and, in some cases, prenatally androgen-treated (PNA) female, vesicular GABA transporter (VGaT)-ires-Cre/tdTomato reporter mice. Immunofluorescence for kisspeptin, β-endorphin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was detected by confocal microscopy, and co-localization with tdTomato VGaT reporter expression throughout the ARN was quantified. GABA neurons rarely co-localized with kisspeptin (<2%) or β-endorphin (<1%), and only a small proportion of kisspeptin (∼10%) or β-endorphin (∼3%) neurons co-localized with VGaT in male and female mice. In contrast, one-third of ARN GABA neurons co-localized with NPY, and nearly all NPY neurons (>95%) co-localized with VGaT across groups. Both TH and nNOS labeling was co-localized with ∼10% of ARN GABA neurons. The proportion of TH neurons co-localized with VGaT was significantly greater in males than either control or PNA females, and the proportion of nNOS neurons co-localizing VGaT was higher in control and PNA females compared with males. These data highlight NPY as a significant subpopulation of ARN GABA neurons, demonstrate no significant impact of PNA on signal co-expression, and, for the first time, show sexually dimorphic co-expression patterns of TH and nNOS with ARN GABA neurons. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively removing SCN-arcuate nucleus (ARC) interconnectivity in Wistar rats result in a loss of rhythmicity in locomotor activity, corticosterone levels, and body temperature in constant dark (DD) conditions. Elimination of these reciprocal connections did not affect SCN clock gene rhythmicity but did cause the ARC to desynchronize. Moreover, unilateral SCN lesions with contralateral retrochiasmatic microcuts resulted in identical arrhythmicity, proving that for the expression of physiological rhythms this reciprocal SCN-ARC interaction is essential. The unaltered SCN c-Fos expression following glucose administration in disconnected animals as compared to a significant decrease in controls demonstrates the importance of the ARC as metabolic modulator of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results indicate that the SCN is more than an autonomous clock, and forms an essential component of a larger network controlling homeostasis. The present novel findings illustrate how an imbalance between SCN and ARC communication through circadian disruption could be involved in the etiology of metabolic disorders. PMID:28374011

  11. Sudden and unexpected fetal death associated with agenesis of the arcuate nucleus in the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Franciosi, Ralph A; Segura, Annette D

    2004-10-01

    Abnormalities have been reported in the medullary arcuate nucleus (ARCN) in unexpected late fetal death. They speculated that this developmental anomaly may underlie cardioventilatory abnormalities intrapartum and postpartum. This article describes a case of an unexpected late fetal death associated with absence of the ARCN.

  12. The arcuate nucleus of the C57BL/6J mouse hindbrain is a displaced part of the inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu Hong; Watson, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus is a prominent cell group in the human hindbrain, characterized by its position on the pial surface of the pyramid. It is considered to be a precerebellar nucleus and has been implicated in the pathology of several disorders of respiration. An arcuate nucleus has not been convincingly demonstrated in other mammals, but we have found a similarly positioned nucleus in the C57BL/6J mouse. The mouse arcuate nucleus consists of a variable group of neurons lying on the pial surface of the pyramid. The nucleus is continuous with the ventrolateral part of the principal nucleus of the inferior olive and both groups are calbindin positive. At first we thought that this mouse nucleus was homologous with the human arcuate nucleus, but we have discovered that the neurons of the human nucleus are calbindin negative, and are therefore not olivary in nature. We have compared the mouse arcuate neurons with those of the inferior olive in terms of molecular markers and cerebellar projection. The neurons of the arcuate nucleus and of the inferior olive share three major characteristics: they both contain neurons utilizing glutamate, serotonin or acetylcholine as neurotransmitters; they both project to the contralateral cerebellum, and they both express a number of genes not present in the major mossy fiber issuing precerebellar nuclei. Most importantly, both cell groups express calbindin in an area of the ventral hindbrain almost completely devoid of calbindin-positive cells. We conclude that the neurons of the hindbrain mouse arcuate nucleus are a displaced part of the inferior olive, possibly separated by the caudal growth of the pyramidal tract during development. The arcuate nucleus reported in the C57BL/6J mouse can therefore be regarded as a subgroup of the rostral inferior olive, closely allied with the ventral tier of the principal nucleus.

  13. The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Modulates the Sensitivity of Arcuate Nucleus to Hypoglycemia in the Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Moro Chao, D; León-Mercado, L; Foppen, E; Guzmán-Ruiz, M; Basualdo, M C; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2016-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) have reciprocal connections; catabolic metabolic information activates the ARC and inhibits SCN neuronal activity. Little is known about the influence of the SCN on the ARC. Here, we investigated whether the SCN modulated the sensitivity of the ARC to catabolic metabolic conditions. ARC neuronal activity, as determined by c-Fos immunoreactivity, was increased after a hypoglycemic stimulus by 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The highest ARC neuronal activity after 2DG was found at the end of the light period (zeitgeber 11, ZT11) with a lower activity in the beginning of the light period (zeitgeber 2, ZT2), suggesting the involvement of the SCN. The higher activation of ARC neurons after 2DG at ZT11 was associated with higher 2DG induced blood glucose levels as compared with ZT2. Unilateral SCN-lesioned animals, gave a mainly ipsilateral activation of ARC neurons at the lesioned side, suggesting an inhibitory role of the SCN on ARC neurons. The 2DG-induced counterregulatory glucose response correlated with increased ARC neuronal activity and was significantly higher in unilateral SCN-lesioned animals. Finally, the ARC as site where 2DG may, at least partly, induce a counterregulatory response was confirmed by local microdialysis of 2DG. 2DG administration in the ARC produced a higher increase in circulating glucose compared with 2DG administration in surrounding areas such as the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH). We conclude that the SCN uses neuronal pathways to the ARC to gate sensory metabolic information to the brain, regulating ARC glucose sensitivity and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemic conditions.

  14. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuropeptide Expression in Patients with Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wamelen, Daniel J.; Aziz, N. Ahmad; Anink, Jasper J.; van Steenhoven, Robin; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Jockers, Ralf; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To study whether sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) arise from dysfunction of the body's master clock, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Design: Postmortem cohort study. Patients: Eight patients with HD and eight control subjects matched for sex, age, clock time and month of death, postmortem delay, and fixation time of paraffin-embedded hypothalamic tissue. Measurements and Results: Using postmortem paraffin-embedded tissue, we assessed the functional integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in patients with HD and control subjects by determining the expression of two major regulatory neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin. Additionally, we studied melatonin 1 and 2 receptor expression. Compared with control subjects, the suprachiasmatic nucleus contained 85% fewer neurons immunoreactive for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and 33% fewer neurons for arginine vasopressin in patients with HD (P = 0.002 and P = 0.027). The total amount of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin messenger RNA was unchanged. No change was observed in the number of melatonin 1 or 2 receptor immunoreactive neurons. Conclusions: These findings indicate posttranscriptional neuropeptide changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of patients with HD, and suggest that sleep and circadian rhythm disorders in these patients may at least partly arise from suprachiasmatic nucleus dysfunction. Citation: van Wamelen DJ; Aziz NA; Anink JJ; van Steenhoven R; Angeloni D; Fraschini F; Jockers R; Roos RAC; Swaab DF. Suprachiasmatic nucleus neuropeptide expression in patients with Huntington's disease. SLEEP 2013;36(1):117–125. PMID:23288978

  15. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  16. Characterisation of Kiss1r (Gpr54)-Expressing Neurones in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Female Rat Hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Higo, S; Iijima, N; Ozawa, H

    2017-02-01

    Kisspeptin is essential in reproduction and acts by stimulating neurones expressing gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Recent studies suggest that kisspeptin has multiple roles in the modulation of neuronal circuits in systems outside the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Our recent research using in situ hybridisation (ISH) clarified the histological distribution of Kiss1r (Gpr54)-expressing neurones in the rat brain that were presumed to be putative targets of kisspeptin. The arcuate nucleus (ARN) of the hypothalamus is one of the brain regions in which Kiss1r expression in non-GnRH neurones is prominent. However, the characteristics of Kiss1r-expressing neurones in the ARN remain unclear. The present study aimed to determine the neurochemical characteristics of Kiss1r-expressing neurones in the ARN using ISH and immunofluorescence. We revealed that the majority (approximately 63%) of Kiss1r-expressing neurones in the ARN were pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones, which have an anorexic effect in mammals. Additionally, a few Kiss1r-expressing neurones in the dorsal ARN are tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurones, which control milk production by inhibiting prolactin secretion from the anterior pituitary. TIDA neurones showed a relatively weak Kiss1r ISH signal compared to POMC neurones, as well as low co-expression of Kiss1r (approximately 15%). We also examined the expression of Kiss1r in neuropeptide Y and kisspeptin neurones, which are reported to arise from POMC-expressing progenitor cells during development. However, the vast majority of neuropeptide Y and kisspeptin neurones in the ARN did not express Kiss1r. These results suggest that kisspeptin may directly regulate energy homeostasis and milk production by modulating the activity of POMC and TIDA neurones, respectively. Our results provide an insight into the wide variety of roles that kisspeptin plays in homeostatic and neuroendocrine functions. © 2016 British Society for

  17. Research Resource: Gene Profiling of G Protein–Coupled Receptors in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Female

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Chunguang; Nestor, Casey C.; Mao, Peizhong; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus controls many critical homeostatic functions including energy homeostasis, reproduction, and motivated behavior. Although G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in the regulation of these functions, relatively few of the GPCRs have been identified specifically within the arcuate nucleus. Here, using TaqMan low-density arrays we quantified the mRNA expression of nonolfactory GPCRs in mouse arcuate nucleus. An unprecedented number of GPCRs (total of 292) were found to be expressed, of which 183 were known and 109 were orphan GPCRs. The known GPCR genes expressed were classified into several functional clusters including hormone/neurotransmitter, growth factor, angiogenesis and vasoactivity, inflammation and immune system, and lipid messenger receptors. The plethora of orphan genes expressed in the arcuate nucleus were classified into 5 structure-related classes including class A (rhodopsin-like), class B (adhesion), class C (other GPCRs), nonsignaling 7-transmembrane chemokine-binding proteins, and other 7-transmembrane proteins. Therefore, for the first time, we provide a quantitative estimate of the numerous GPCRs expressed in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Finally, as proof of principle, we documented the expression and function of one of these receptor genes, the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (Glp1r), which was highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that Glp1r mRNA was localized in proopiomelanocortin neurons, and using whole-cell recording we found that the glucagon-like peptide 1-selective agonist exendin-4 robustly excited proopiomelanocortin neurons. Thus, the quantitative GPCR data emphasize the complexity of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and furthermore provide a valuable resource for future neuroendocrine/endocrine-related experiments. PMID:24933249

  18. Interleukin-7, a new cytokine targeting the mouse hypothalamic arcuate nucleus: role in body weight and food intake regulation.

    PubMed

    Macia, Laurence; Viltart, Odile; Delacre, Myriam; Sachot, Christelle; Héliot, Laurent; Di Santo, James P; Wolowczuk, Isabelle

    2010-04-01

    Body weight is controlled through peripheral (white adipose tissue) and central (mainly hypothalamus) mechanisms. We have recently obtained evidence that overexpression of interleukin (IL)-7, a critical cytokine involved in lymphopoiesis, can protect against the development of diet-induced obesity in mice. Here we assessed whether IL-7 mediated its effects by modulating hypothalamic function. Acute subcutaneous injection of IL-7 prevented monosodium glutamate-induced obesity, this being correlated with partial protection against cell death in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Moreover, we showed that IL-7 activated hypothalamic areas involved in regulation of feeding behavior, as indicated by induction of the activation marker c-Fos in neural cells located in the ventromedial part of the ARC and by inhibition of food intake after fasting. Both chains of the IL-7 receptor (IL-7Ralpha and gamma(c)) were expressed in the ARC and IL-7 injection induced STAT-3 phosphorylation in this area. Finally, we established that IL-7 modulated the expression of neuropeptides that tune food intake, with a stimulatory effect on the expression of pro-opiomelanocortin and an inhibitory effect on agouti-related peptide expression in accordance with IL-7 promoting anorectic effects. These results suggest that the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-7 plays an important and unappreciated role in hypothalamic body weight regulation.

  19. Effects of hypoglycaemia on neurotransmitter and hormone receptor gene expression in laser-dissected arcuate neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide neurones.

    PubMed

    Briski, K P; Nedungadi, T P; Koshy Cherian, A

    2010-06-01

    Arcuate neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related pepide (AgRP) neurones regulate energy homeostasis, and express the putative glucosensor, glucokinase (GCK). The present study performed multi-transcriptional profiling of these neurones to characterise NPY, AgRP and GCK gene expression during intermediate insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, and to determine whether these transcriptional responses acclimate to repeated insulin dosing. We also examined whether these neurones express insulin, glucocorticoid and oestrogen receptor gene transcripts, and whether the levels of these receptor mRNAs are modified by insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Individual NPY-immunoreactive neurones were laser-microdissected from the caudal arcuate nucleus after single or serial dosing with neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin (NPH), and evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for the assessment of neurotransmitter and receptor gene expression. Mean NPY and AgRP mRNA in harvested NPY neurones was unchanged or augmented, respectively, by one NPH dose, although repeated NPH administration up-regulated NPY, whereas AgRP gene transcripts were down-regulated. NPH elicited divergent modifications in the ERalpha and ERbeta mRNA content of sampled neurones. ERalpha transcripts were amplified by both acute and chronic NPH-induced hypoglycaemia, whereas ERbeta gene expression was unaltered during a single bout, but suppressed during recurring hypoglycaemia. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were increased by a single insulin dose, but unaffected by serial NPH dosing. Insulin receptor-beta chain (InsRb) gene transcripts were insensitive to acute NPH-induced hypoglycaemia, but repeated NPH inhibited this gene transcript. Neither acute nor recurring hypoglycaemia modified GCK mRNA levels in caudal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) NPY/AgRP neurones, but baseline GCK transcription was suppressed by the latter. This evidence for the habituation of hypoglycaemic

  20. Chronic methamphetamine exposure significantly decreases microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Steven A; Corkill, Beau; Bruster, Matthew C; Roberts, Rick L; Shanks, Ryan A

    2017-03-18

    Methamphetamine is a powerful psychostimulant drug and its use and abuse necessitates a better understanding of its neurobiobehavioral effects. The acute effects of binge dosing of methamphetamine on the neurons in the CNS are well studied. However, the long-term effects of chronic, low-dose methamphetamine are less well characterized, especially in other cell types and areas outside of the major dopamine pathways. Mice were administered 5mg/kg/day methamphetamine for ten days and brain tissue was analyzed using histochemistry and image analysis. Increased microglia activity in the striatum confirmed toxic effects of methamphetamine in this brain region using this dosing paradigm. A significant decrease in microglia activity in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus was observed with no effect noted on dopamine neurons in the arcuate nucleus. Given the importance of this area in homeostatic and neuroendocrine regulation, the current study highlights the need to more fully understand the systemic effects of chronic, low-dose methamphetamine use. The novel finding of microglia downregulation after chronic methamphetamine could lead to advances in understanding neuroinflammatory responses towards addiction treatment and protection from psychostimulant-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. Muscimol microinjected in the arcuate nucleus affects metabolism, body temperature & ventilation.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H

    2016-06-15

    Effects of microinjection of 2 doses of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor agonist, muscimol (M), into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus on oxygen consumption and control of ventilation over time and body temperature (BT) at the end of the experiment were compared in adult male and female rats. Relative to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, 0 nmol), BT was decreased only in male rats with both doses of M, while in female rats, the 5 nmol dose depressed oxygen consumption. Ventilation was depressed by 5 nmol M in male and 10 nmol M in female rats by decreasing tidal volume. M did not affect the ventilatory response of male or female rats to hypoxia, whereas in females 5 and 10 nmol M and in males 10 nmol M depressed the ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Thus, in rats GABAA receptors in the arcuate nucleus modulate BT, oxygen consumption, and ventilation in air and in response to hypercapnia in a sexually dimorphic manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inter-relation between interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and body fat regulating circuits of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schéle, E; Benrick, A; Grahnemo, L; Egecioglu, E; Anesten, F; Pálsdóttir, V; Jansson, J-O

    2013-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are immune modulating cytokines that also affect metabolic function because both IL-1 receptor I deficient (IL-1RI⁻/⁻) and IL-6 deficient (IL-6⁻/⁻) mice develop late-onset obesity and leptin resistance. Both IL-1 and IL-6 appear to target the central nervous system (CNS) to increase energy expenditure. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is a major relay between the periphery and CNS in body fat regulation (e.g. by being a target of leptin). The present study aimed to investigate the possible mechanisms responsible for the effects exerted by endogenous IL-1 and IL-6 on body fat at the level of the ARC, as well as possible interactions between IL-1 and IL-6. Therefore, we measured the gene expression of neuropeptides of the ARC involved in energy balance in IL-1RI⁻/⁻ and IL-6⁻/⁻ mice. We also investigated the interactions between expression of IL-1 and IL-6 in these mice, and mapped IL-6 receptor α (IL-6Rα) in the ARC. The expression of the obesity promoting peptide neuropeptide Y (NPY), found in the ARC, was increased in IL-1RI⁻/⁻ mice. The expression of NPY and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), known to be co-expressed with NPY in ARC neurones, was increased in cold exposed IL-6⁻/⁻ mice. IL-6Rα immunoreactivity was densely localised in the ARC, especially in the medial part, and was partly found in NPY positive cell bodies and also α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone positive cell bodies. The expression of hypothalamic IL-6 was decreased in IL-1RI⁻/⁻ mice, whereas IL-1ß expression was increased in IL-6⁻/⁻ mice. The results of the present study indicate that depletion of the activity of the fat suppressing cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 in knockout mice can increase the expression of the obesity promoting neuropeptide NPY in the ARC. Depletion of IL-1 activity suppresses IL-6 expression, and IL-6Rα-like immunoreactivity is present in neurones in the medial ARC, including neurones containing NPY. Therefore, IL

  3. alpha-2-Adrenergic activation of proopiomelanocortin-containing neurons in the arcuate nucleus causes opioid-mediated hypotension and bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Li, S J; Scanlon, M N; Járai, Z; Varga, K; Gantenberg, N S; Lazar-Wesley, E; Kunos, G

    1996-03-01

    Treatment of rats for 4 days with alpha-methyldopa, 200 mg/kg/day i.p., increases steady state levels of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA in the mediobasal hypothalamus, as measured by DNA excess solution hybridization. The increase is prevented by parallel treatment with yohimbine, 2 mg/kg/day i.p., but not by naltrexone, 2 mg/kg/day i.p. Treatment with the peripheral vasodilator hydralazine, 2 mg/kg/day, does not affect POMC mRNA levels. In situ hybridization histochemistry with a cRNA probe for POMC indicates that POMC-containing cells are located within the confines of the arcuate nucleus both in control and in alpha-methyldopa-treated rats, and confirms the increase in POMC mRNA in the latter. Microinjection of 2 micrograms of alpha-methylnorepinephrine unilaterally into the arcuate nucleus of urethane-anesthetized rats causes hypotension and bradycardia, which can be inhibited by 200 ng of yohimbine microinjected into the same site, or by 100 ng l-naloxone microinjected into the ipsilateral nucleus tractus solitarii, but not into the arcuate nucleus. These findings are interpreted to indicate that activation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors located on POMC-containing neurons in the arcuate nucleus causes beta-endorphin release and stimulation of opiate receptors in the NTS, which results in hypotension and bradycardia, and that this mechanism contributes to the hypotensive action of alpha-methyldopa.

  4. Remodeling of the arcuate nucleus energy-balance circuit is inhibited in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    McNay, David E.G.; Briançon, Nadege; Kokoeva, Maia V.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Flier, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    In the CNS, the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARN) energy-balance circuit plays a key role in regulating body weight. Recent studies have shown that neurogenesis occurs in the adult hypothalamus, revealing that the ARN energy-balance circuit is more plastic than originally believed. Changes in diet result in altered gene expression and neuronal activity in the ARN, some of which may reflect hypothalamic plasticity. To explore this possibility, we examined the turnover of hypothalamic neurons in mice with obesity secondary to either high-fat diet (HFD) consumption or leptin deficiency. We found substantial turnover of neurons in the ARN that resulted in ongoing cellular remodeling. Feeding mice HFD suppressed neurogenesis, as demonstrated by the observation that these mice both generated fewer new neurons and retained more old neurons. This suppression of neuronal turnover was associated with increased apoptosis of newborn neurons. Leptin-deficient mice also generated fewer new neurons, an observation that was explained in part by a loss of hypothalamic neural stem cells. These data demonstrate that there is substantial postnatal turnover of the arcuate neuronal circuitry in the mouse and reveal the unexpected capacity of diet and leptin deficiency to inhibit this neuronal remodeling. This insight has important implications for our understanding of nutritional regulation of energy balance and brain function. PMID:22201680

  5. Remodeling of the arcuate nucleus energy-balance circuit is inhibited in obese mice.

    PubMed

    McNay, David E G; Briançon, Nadege; Kokoeva, Maia V; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Flier, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    In the CNS, the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARN) energy-balance circuit plays a key role in regulating body weight. Recent studies have shown that neurogenesis occurs in the adult hypothalamus, revealing that the ARN energy-balance circuit is more plastic than originally believed. Changes in diet result in altered gene expression and neuronal activity in the ARN, some of which may reflect hypothalamic plasticity. To explore this possibility, we examined the turnover of hypothalamic neurons in mice with obesity secondary to either high-fat diet (HFD) consumption or leptin deficiency. We found substantial turnover of neurons in the ARN that resulted in ongoing cellular remodeling. Feeding mice HFD suppressed neurogenesis, as demonstrated by the observation that these mice both generated fewer new neurons and retained more old neurons. This suppression of neuronal turnover was associated with increased apoptosis of newborn neurons. Leptin-deficient mice also generated fewer new neurons, an observation that was explained in part by a loss of hypothalamic neural stem cells. These data demonstrate that there is substantial postnatal turnover of the arcuate neuronal circuitry in the mouse and reveal the unexpected capacity of diet and leptin deficiency to inhibit this neuronal remodeling. This insight has important implications for our understanding of nutritional regulation of energy balance and brain function.

  6. Leptin modulates the intrinsic excitability of AgRP/NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Baver, Scott B; Hope, Kevin; Guyot, Shannon; Bjørbaek, Christian; Kaczorowski, Catherine; O'Connell, Kristen M S

    2014-04-16

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) is a brain region critical for regulation of food intake and a primary area for the action of leptin in the CNS. In lean mice, the adipokine leptin inhibits neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neuronal activity, resulting in decreased food intake. Here we show that diet-induced obesity in mice is associated with persistent activation of NPY neurons and a failure of leptin to reduce the firing rate or hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanism whereby diet uncouples leptin's effect on neuronal excitability remains to be fully elucidated. In NPY neurons from lean mice, the Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine inhibited leptin-induced changes in input resistance and spike rate. Consistent with this, we found that ARH NPY neurons have a large, leptin-sensitive delayed rectifier K(+) current and that leptin sensitivity of this current is blunted in neurons from diet-induced obese mice. This current is primarily carried by Kv2-containing channels, as the Kv2 channel inhibitor stromatoxin-1 significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate in NPY neurons from lean mice. In HEK cells, leptin induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Kv2.1 but had no effect on the function of the closely related channel Kv2.2 when these channels were coexpressed with the long isoform of the leptin receptor LepRb. Our results suggest that dynamic modulation of somatic Kv2.1 channels regulates the intrinsic excitability of NPY neurons to modulate the spontaneous activity and the integration of synaptic input onto these neurons in the ARH.

  7. PYY(3–36) Into The Arcuate Nucleus Inhibits Food Deprivation-Induced Increases In Food Hoarding and Intake

    PubMed Central

    Teubner, Brett J.W.; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Central administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) increases food intake in laboratory rats and mice, as well as food foraging and hoarding in Siberian hamsters. The NPY-Y1 and Y5 receptors (Rs) within the hypothalamus appear sufficient to account for these increases in ingestive behaviors. Stimulation of NPY-Y2Rs in the Arcuate nucleus (Arc) has an anorexigenic effect as shown by central or peripheral administration of its natural ligand peptide YY (3–36) and pharmacological NPY-Y2R antagonism by BIIE0246 increases food intake. Both effects on food intake by NPY-Y2R agonism and antagonism are relatively short-lived lasting ~4 h. The role of NPY-Y2Rs in appetitive ingestive behaviors (food foraging/hoarding) is untested, however. Therefore, Siberians hamsters, a natural food hoarder, were housed in a semi-natural burrow/foraging system that had a) foraging requirement (10 revolutions/ pellet), no free food (true foraging group), b) no running wheel access, free food (general malaise control) or c) running wheel access, free food (exercise control). We microinjected BIIE0246 (antagonist) and PYY(3–36) (agonist) into the Arc to test the role of NPY-Y2Rs there on ingestive behaviors. Food foraging, hoarding, and intake were not affected by Arc BIIE0246 microinjection in fed hamsters 1, 2, 4, and 24 h post injection. Stimulation of NPY-Y2Rs by PYY(3–36) inhibited food intake at 0–1 and 1–2 h and food hoarding at 1–2 h without causing general malaise or affecting foraging. Collectively, these results implicate a sufficiency, but not necessity, of the Arc NPY-Y2R in the inhibition of food intake and food hoarding by Siberian hamsters. PMID:23816798

  8. HYPERPHAGIA INDUCED BY SUCROSE: RELATION TO CIRCULATING AND CSF GLUCOSE AND CORTICOSTERONE AND OREXIGENIC PEPTIDES IN THE ARCUATE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Gaysinskaya, V. A.; Karatayev, O.; Shuluk, J.; Leibowitz, S. F.

    2010-01-01

    Sucrose-rich diets compared to starch-rich diets are known to stimulate overeating under chronic conditions. The present study in normal-weight rats established an acute “preload-to-test meal” paradigm for demonstrating sucrose-induced hyperphagia and investigating possible mechanisms that mediate this behavioral phenomenon. In this acute paradigm, the rats were first given a small (15 kcals) sucrose preload (30% sucrose) for 30 min compared to an equicaloric, starch preload (25% starch with 5% sucrose) and then allowed to freely consume a subsequent test meal of lab chow. The sucrose preload, when compared to a starch preload equal in energy density and palatability, consistently increased food intake in the subsequent test meal occurring between 60–120 min after the end of the preload. Measurements of hormones, metabolites and hypothalamic peptides immediately preceding this hyperphagia revealed marked differences between the sucrose vs starch groups that could contribute to the increase in food intake. Whereas the sucrose group compared to starch group immediately after the preload (at 10 min) had elevated levels of glucose in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) along with reduced expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related protein (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the subsequent effects (at 30–60 min) just preceding the test meal hyperphagia were the reverse. Along with lower levels of glucose, they included markedly elevated serum and CSF levels of corticosterone and mRNA levels of NPY and AgRP in the ARC. In addition to establishing an animal model for sucrose-induced hyperphagia, these results demonstrate peripheral and central mechanisms that may mediate this behavioral phenomenon. PMID:21036188

  9. Leptin Modulates the Intrinsic Excitability of AgRP/NPY Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Baver, Scott B.; Hope, Kevin; Guyot, Shannon; Bjørbaek, Christian; Kaczorowski, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) is a brain region critical for regulation of food intake and a primary area for the action of leptin in the CNS. In lean mice, the adipokine leptin inhibits neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neuronal activity, resulting in decreased food intake. Here we show that diet-induced obesity in mice is associated with persistent activation of NPY neurons and a failure of leptin to reduce the firing rate or hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanism whereby diet uncouples leptin's effect on neuronal excitability remains to be fully elucidated. In NPY neurons from lean mice, the Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine inhibited leptin-induced changes in input resistance and spike rate. Consistent with this, we found that ARH NPY neurons have a large, leptin-sensitive delayed rectifier K+ current and that leptin sensitivity of this current is blunted in neurons from diet-induced obese mice. This current is primarily carried by Kv2-containing channels, as the Kv2 channel inhibitor stromatoxin-1 significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate in NPY neurons from lean mice. In HEK cells, leptin induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Kv2.1 but had no effect on the function of the closely related channel Kv2.2 when these channels were coexpressed with the long isoform of the leptin receptor LepRb. Our results suggest that dynamic modulation of somatic Kv2.1 channels regulates the intrinsic excitability of NPY neurons to modulate the spontaneous activity and the integration of synaptic input onto these neurons in the ARH. PMID:24741039

  10. Leptin-sensitive neurons in the arcuate nucleus integrate activity and temperature circadian rhythms and anticipatory responses to food restriction.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Michael F; Li, Ai-Jun; Dinh, Thu T; Jansen, Heiko T; Ritter, Sue

    2013-10-15

    Previously, we investigated the role of neuropeptide Y and leptin-sensitive networks in the mediobasal hypothalamus in sleep and feeding and found profound homeostatic and circadian deficits with an intact suprachiasmatic nucleus. We propose that the arcuate nuclei (Arc) are required for the integration of homeostatic circadian systems, including temperature and activity. We tested this hypothesis using saporin toxin conjugated to leptin (Lep-SAP) injected into Arc in rats. Lep-SAP rats became obese and hyperphagic and progressed through a dynamic phase to a static phase of growth. Circadian rhythms were examined over 49 days during the static phase. Rats were maintained on a 12:12-h light-dark (LD) schedule for 13 days and, thereafter, maintained in continuous dark (DD). After the first 13 days of DD, food was restricted to 4 h/day for 10 days. We found that the activity of Lep-SAP rats was arrhythmic in DD, but that food anticipatory activity was, nevertheless, entrainable to the restricted feeding schedule, and the entrained rhythm persisted during the subsequent 3-day fast in DD. Thus, for activity, the circuitry for the light-entrainable oscillator, but not for the food-entrainable oscillator, was disabled by the Arc lesion. In contrast, temperature remained rhythmic in DD in the Lep-SAP rats and did not entrain to restricted feeding. We conclude that the leptin-sensitive network that includes the Arc is required for entrainment of activity by photic cues and entrainment of temperature by food, but is not required for entrainment of activity by food or temperature by photic cues.

  11. An Intact Dorsomedial Posterior Arcuate Nucleus is Not Necessary for Photoperiodic Responses in Siberian Hamsters1

    PubMed Central

    Teubner, Brett J.W.; Leitner, Claudia; Thomas, Michael A.; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal responses of many animal species are triggered by changes in daylength and its transduction into a neuroendocrine signal by the pineal gland through the nocturnal duration of melatonin (MEL) release. The precise central sites necessary to receive, transduce, and relay the short day (SD) fall-winter MEL signals into seasonal responses and changes in physiology and behavior are unclear. In Siberian hamsters, SDs trigger decreases in body and lipid mass, testicular regression and pelage color changes. Several candidate genes and their central sites of expression have been proposed as components of the MEL transduction system with considerable recent focus on the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and its component, the dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus (dmpARC). This site has been postulated as a critical relay of SD information through the modulation of a variety of neurochemicals/receptors important for the control of energy balance. Here the necessity of an intact dmpARC for SD responses was tested by making electrolytic lesions of the Siberian hamster dmpARC and then exposing them to either long days (LD) or SDs for 12 weeks. The SD typical decreases in body and fat mass, food intake, testicular volume, serum testosterone concentrations, pelage color change and increased UCP-1 protein expression (a proxy for brown adipose tissue thermogenesis) all occurred despite the lack of an intact dmpARC. Although the Siberian hamster dmpARC contains photoperiod-modulated constituents, these data demonstrate that an intact dmpARC is not necessary for SD responses and not integral to the seasonal energy- and reproductive-related responses measured here. PMID:25647158

  12. Estradiol implants in the arcuate nucleus induce lactogenesis in virgin rats. Role of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Carón, R W; Deis, R P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the centrally administered estradiol, and the effects of the consequent hypersecretion of prolactin (PRL) and progesterone, on lactogenesis as evaluated by mammary accumulation of casein and lactose. Bilateral cannulae containing 17beta-estradiol or cholesterol were implanted in the arcuate nucleus of virgin rats on the day of estrus (Day 0). In the first experiment different groups of rats were killed on Days 6, 9, 15, 17, or 19. Trunk blood was collected and abdominal mammary glands were taken. In the second experiment, estradiol-implanted rats received the progesterone antagonist mifepristone or vehicle at 14.00 h on Day 8 or 16 post-implant, and were killed 28 or 48 h later. Serum PRL and progesterone and mammary casein were measured by RIA and lactose was determined by an enzymatic assay. Estradiol-implanted rats showed a significant increase in both milk components at all time points after implant compared to controls. On Day 9 after estradiol implant, mifepristone had no effect on mammary content of casein or lactose. By contrast, on Day 16, mifepristone markedly increased both casein and lactose contents without modifying serum PRL and progesterone concentrations. In conclusion, 17beta-estradiol implants in the arcuate nucleus of virgin rats results in hyperprolactinaemia and stimulates mammary accumulation of casein and lactose in the absence of feto-placental units. Despite the prolonged luteal activation, the sustained high levels of circulating progesterone become inhibitory to lactogenesis after a relatively long period after implant.

  13. GABA and glycine receptors in the nucleus ambiguus mediate tachycardia elicited by chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2015-07-01

    We have previously reported that stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) elicits tachycardia, which is partially mediated via inhibition of vagal inputs to the heart. The neuronal pools and neurotransmitters in them mediating tachycardia elicited from the ARCN have not been identified. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardia elicited from the ARCN may be mediated by inhibitory neurotransmitters in the nucleus ambiguus (nAmb). Experiments were done in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In separate groups of rats, unilateral and bilateral microinjections of muscimol (1 mM), gabazine (0.01 mM), and strychnine (0.5 mM) into the nAmb significantly attenuated tachycardia elicited by unilateral microinjections of NMDA (10 mM) into the ARCN. Histological examination of the brains showed that the microinjections sites were within the targeted nuclei. Retrograde anatomic tracing from the nAmb revealed direct bilateral projections from the ARCN and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to the nAmb. The results of the present study suggest that tachycardia elicited by stimulation of the ARCN by microinjections of NMDA is mediated via GABAA and glycine receptors located in the nAmb.

  14. Catalase inhibition in the Arcuate nucleus blocks ethanol effects on the locomotor activity of rats.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Correa, Mercé; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2005-03-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there is a bidirectional modulation of ethanol-induced locomotion produced by drugs that regulate brain catalase activity. In the present study we have assessed the effect in rats of intraperitoneal, intraventricular or intracraneal administration of the catalase inhibitor sodium azide in the locomotor changes observed after ethanol (1 g/kg) administration. Our results show that sodium azide prevents the effects of ethanol in rats locomotion not only when sodium azide was systemically administered but also when it was intraventricularly injected, then confirming that the interaction between catalase and ethanol takes place in Central Nervous System (CNS). Even more interestingly, the same results were observed when sodium azide administration was restricted to the hypothalamic Arcuate nucleus (ARC), a brain region which has one of the highest levels of expression of catalase. Therefore, the results of the present study not only confirm a role for brain catalase in the mediation of ethanol-induced locomotor changes in rodents but also point to the ARC as a major neuroanatomical location for this interaction. These results are in agreement with our reports showing that ethanol-induced locomotor changes are clearly dependent of the ARC integrity and, especially of the POMc-synthesising neurons of this nucleus. According to these data we propose a model in which ethanol oxidation via catalase could produce acetaldehyde into the ARC and to promote a release of beta-endorphins that would activate opioid receptors to produce locomotion and other ethanol-induced neurobehavioural changes.

  15. Reproductive experience increases prolactin responsiveness in the medial preoptic area and arcuate nucleus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Greg M; Grattan, David R; van den Ancker, Willemijn; Bridges, Robert S

    2006-10-01

    The experience of pregnancy plus lactation produces long-term enhancements in maternal behavior as well as reduced secretion of prolactin, a key hormone for the initial establishment of maternal care. Given that prolactin acts centrally to induce maternal care as well as regulate its own secretion, we tested whether prolactin receptors in brain regions known to regulate behavioral and neuroendocrine processes were up-regulated and more responsive to prolactin in reproductively experienced females. Diestrous primiparous (8 wk after weaning) and age-matched virgin rats were treated with 250 microg ovine prolactin sc or vehicle and the brains collected 2 h later for measurement of mRNA for genes involved in prolactin signaling. Reproductively experienced rats had lower serum prolactin concentrations, compared with virgin rats, suggesting enhanced prolactin feedback on the arcuate neurons regulating prolactin secretion. In the medial preoptic area and arcuate nucleus (regions involved in regulating maternal behavior and prolactin secretion, respectively), the level of long-form prolactin receptor mRNA was higher in primiparous rats, and prolactin treatment induced a further increase in receptor expression in these animals. In the same regions, suppressors of cytokine signaling-1 and -3 mRNA levels were also markedly increased after prolactin treatment in reproductively experienced but not virgin rats. These results support the idea that reproductive experience increases central prolactin responsiveness. The induction of prolactin receptors and enhanced prolactin responsiveness as a result of pregnancy and lactation may help account for the retention of maternal behavior and shifts in prolactin secretion in reproductively experienced females.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for axonal growth of selective groups of neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guey-Ying; Bouyer, Karine; Kamitakahara, Anna; Sahibzada, Niaz; Wang, Chien-Hua; Rutlin, Michael; Simerly, Richard B.; Xu, Baoji

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent regulator of neuronal development, and the Bdnf gene produces two populations of transcripts with either a short or long 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR). Deficiencies in BDNF signaling have been shown to cause severe obesity in humans; however, it remains unknown how BDNF signaling impacts the organization of neuronal circuits that control energy balance. Methods We examined the role of BDNF on survival, axonal projections, and synaptic inputs of neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARH), a structure critical for the control of energy balance, using Bdnfklox/klox mice, which lack long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA and develop severe hyperphagic obesity. Results We found that a small fraction of neurons that express the receptor for BDNF, TrkB, also expressed proopiomelanocortin (POMC) or neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein (AgRP) in the ARH. Bdnfklox/klox mice had normal numbers of POMC, NPY, and TrkB neurons in the ARH; however, retrograde labeling revealed a drastic reduction in the number of ARH axons that project to the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) in these mice. In addition, fewer POMC and AgRP axons were found in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and the lateral part of PVH, respectively, in Bdnfklox/klox mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the impact of BDNF deficiency on inputs to ARH neurons. We found that excitatory inputs onto POMC and NPY neurons were increased and decreased, respectively, in Bdnfklox/klox mice, likely due to a compensatory response to marked hyperphagia displayed by the mutant mice. Conclusion This study shows that the majority of TrkB neurons in the ARH are distinct from known neuronal populations and that BDNF plays a critical role in directing projections from these neurons to the DMH and PVH. We propose that hyperphagic obesity due to BDNF deficiency is in part attributable to impaired axonal growth of TrkB-expressing ARH neurons. PMID:26042201

  17. Molecular Properties of Kiss1 Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gottsch, Michelle L.; Popa, Simina M.; Lawhorn, Janessa K.; Qiu, Jian; Tonsfeldt, Karen J.; Bosch, Martha A.; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Sanz, Elisenda; McKnight, G. Stanley; Clifton, Donald K.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Neurons that produce kisspeptin play a critical role in reproduction. However, understanding the molecular physiology of kisspeptin neurons has been limited by the lack of an in vivo marker for those cells. Here, we report the development of a Kiss1-CreGFP knockin mouse, wherein the endogenous Kiss1 promoter directs the expression of a Cre recombinase-enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein. The pattern of GFP expression in the brain of the knockin recapitulates what has been described earlier for Kiss1 in the male and female mouse, with prominent expression in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) (in both sexes) and the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (in females). Single-cell RT-PCR showed that the Kiss1 transcript is expressed in 100% of GFP-labeled cells, and the CreGFP transcript was regulated by estradiol in the same manner as the Kiss1 gene (i.e. inhibited in the ARC and induced in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus). We used this mouse to evaluate the biophysical properties of kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons in the ARC of the female mouse. GFP-expressing Kiss1 neurons were identified in hypothalamic slice preparations of the ARC and patch clamped. Whole-cell (and loose attached) recordings revealed that Kiss1 neurons exhibit spontaneous activity and expressed both h- (pacemaker) and T-type calcium currents, and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated 1–4 and CaV3.1 channel subtypes (measured by single cell RT-PCR), respectively. N-methyl-D-aspartate induced bursting activity, characterized by depolarizing/hyperpolarizing oscillations. Therefore, Kiss1 neurons in the ARC share molecular and electrophysiological properties of other CNS pacemaker neurons. PMID:21933870

  18. Effect of motilin on gastric distension sensitive neurons in arcuate nucleus and gastric motility in rat.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Gao, S; Guo, F; Sun, X

    2011-03-01

    Intestinal motilin is known to stimulate gastrointestinal (GI) motility and the arcuate nucleus (Arc) of hypothalamus is shown to be involved in the regulation of GI motility. Single unit discharges in the Arc were recorded extracellularly by implantation of a force transducer into the stomach in rats, to evaluate the effect of motilin on gastric motility. Projection of nerve fiber and expression of motilin were observed by retrograde tracer deposits of Fluoro-Gold (FG) and fluo-immunohistochemistry staining. 65.5% of neurons in Arc responded to gastric distension (GD), 55.6% of which showed excitation (GD-E), and 44.4% showed inhibition (GD-I). After GD, the firing rate of GD-E neurons significantly increased (P<0.01), but decreased for GD-I neurons (P<0.01). Most of both GD-E and GD-I neurons were activated by motilin (P<0.05). The frequency and amplitude of gastric contractions significantly increased by administration of motilin in Arc with a dose dependent manner (P<0.05-0.01). However, pretreatment with GM109 could abolish the responses of neurons and excitatory effect of gastric motility induced by motilin. Motilin immunoreactive neurons were increased in Arc via gastric distention (P<0.05). Motilin/FG-labeled neurons were detected in hypothalamus paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Our findings suggest that motilin neurons in Arc may accept peripheral somatosensory afferent inputs from gastric mechanoreceptors of the stomach, and also may acts as a stimulatory factor in Arc to regulate gastric motility via some inferior nucleus relay pathway. The results provide insight into the role of Arc in the control of digestion mediated via motilin. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Kisspeptin, Neurokinin B, and Dynorphin Act in the Arcuate Nucleus to Control Activity of the GnRH Pulse Generator in Ewes

    PubMed Central

    Hileman, Stanley M.; Nestor, Casey C; Porter, Katrina L.; Connors, John M.; Hardy, Steve L.; Millar, Robert P.; Cernea, Maria; Coolen, Lique M.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has led to the hypothesis that kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) neurons in the arcuate nucleus play a key role in GnRH pulse generation, with kisspeptin driving GnRH release and neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin acting as start and stop signals, respectively. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by determining the actions, if any, of four neurotransmitters found in KNDy neurons (kisspeptin, NKB, dynorphin, and glutamate) on episodic LH secretion using local administration of agonists and antagonists to receptors for these transmitters in ovariectomized ewes. We also obtained evidence that GnRH-containing afferents contact KNDy neurons, so we tested the role of two components of these afferents: GnRH and orphanin-FQ. Microimplants of a Kiss1r antagonist briefly inhibited LH pulses and microinjections of 2 nmol of this antagonist produced a modest transitory decrease in LH pulse frequency. An antagonist to the NKB receptor also decreased LH pulse frequency, whereas NKB and an antagonist to the receptor for dynorphin both increased pulse frequency. In contrast, antagonists to GnRH receptors, orphanin-FQ receptors, and the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor had no effect on episodic LH secretion. We thus conclude that the KNDy neuropeptides act in the arcuate nucleus to control episodic GnRH secretion in the ewe, but afferent input from GnRH neurons to this area does not. These data support the proposed roles for NKB and dynorphin within the KNDy neural network and raise the possibility that kisspeptin contributes to the control of GnRH pulse frequency in addition to its established role as an output signal from KNDy neurons that drives GnRH pulses. PMID:23959940

  20. Effect of intermittent hypoxia on arcuate nucleus in the leptin-deficient rat.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John; Moreau, Jason M; McCoy, Aaron; Jones, Douglas L

    2016-07-28

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major pathophysiological consequence of obstructive sleep apnea. Recently, it has been shown that IH results in changes in body energy balance, leptin secretion and concomitant alterations in arcuate nucleus (ARC). In this study, the role of leptin on these changes was investigated in leptin-deficient rats exposed to IH or normoxic control conditions. Body weights, consumatory and locomotor behaviours, and protein signaling in ARC were assessed immediately after IH exposure. Compared to normoxia, IH altered body weight, food intake, locomotor pattern, and the plasma concentration of leptin and angiotensin II in the wild-type rat. However, these changes were not observed in the leptin-deficient rat. Within ARC of wild-type animals, IH increased phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and pro-opiomelanocortin protein expression, but not in the leptin-deficient rat. The long-form leptin receptor protein expression was not altered following IH in either rat strain. These data suggest that leptin is involved in mediating the alterations to body energy balance and ARC activity following IH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus on Intraocular Pressure and the Role of Opioid Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ji; Xu, Guo-xu; Yuan, Zhi-lan

    2014-01-01

    Background An opioid peptide neuron/humoral feedback regulation might be involved in changes of intraocular pressure (IOP). The aims of this study are to investigate the effects of arcuate nucleus (ARC) and opioid peptides on intraocular pressure (IOP). Methods Fifty-four healthy purebred New Zealand white rabbits (108eyes) were randomly divided into 4 groups, including control group, electrical stimulation group, [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) group, and [D-Pen 2, D-Pen5]- enkephalin (DPDPE) group. Bilateral IOP was measured after unilateral electrical stimulation of the ARC or unilateral microinjection into the ARC of the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO or the selective δ opioid receptor agonist DPDPE, both alone and after pre-administration of either the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or saline. Results Both electrical stimulation in ARC and micro-injection either or opioid receptor agonists, DAMGO or DPDPE, respectively, caused a significant bilateral reduction in IOP (P<0.05) which was more pronounced in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral eye. Pretreatment with naloxone prevented some, but not all IOP reductions. Conclusion The ARC takes part in the negative regulation of IOP, an action that may involve opioid neurons. PMID:24691128

  2. Antagonistic modulation of NPY/AgRP and POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus by noradrenalin

    PubMed Central

    Paeger, Lars; Karakasilioti, Ismene; Altmüller, Janine; Frommolt, Peter; Brüning, Jens; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) satiety signaling (anorexigenic) pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing and hunger signaling (orexigenic) agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-expressing neurons are key components of the neuronal circuits that control food intake and energy homeostasis. Here, we assessed whether the catecholamine noradrenalin directly modulates the activity of these neurons in mice. Perforated patch clamp recordings showed that noradrenalin changes the activity of these functionally antagonistic neurons in opposite ways, increasing the activity of the orexigenic NPY/AgRP neurons and decreasing the activity of the anorexigenic POMC neurons. Cell type-specific transcriptomics and pharmacological experiments revealed that the opposing effect on these neurons is mediated by the activation of excitatory α1A - and β- adrenergic receptors in NPY/AgRP neurons, while POMC neurons are inhibited via α2A – adrenergic receptors. Thus, the coordinated differential modulation of the key hypothalamic neurons in control of energy homeostasis assigns noradrenalin an important role to promote feeding. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25770.001 PMID:28632132

  3. Evidence that the Arcuate Nucleus Is an Important Site of Progesterone Negative Feedback in the Ewe

    PubMed Central

    Holaskova, Ida; Nestor, Casey C.; Connors, John M.; Billings, Heather J.; Valent, Miro; Lehman, Michael N.; Hileman, Stanley M.

    2011-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence that dynorphin neurons mediate the negative feedback actions of progesterone to inhibit GnRH and LH pulse frequency, but the specific neurons have yet to be identified. In ewes, dynorphin neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and preoptic area (POA) are likely candidates based on colocalization with progesterone receptors. These studies tested the hypothesis that progesterone negative feedback occurs in either the ARC or POA by determining whether microimplants of progesterone into either site would inhibit LH pulse frequency (study 1) and whether microimplants of the progesterone receptor antagonist, RU486, would disrupt the inhibitory effects of peripheral progesterone (study 2). Both studies were done in ovariectomized (OVX) and estradiol-treated OVX ewes. In study 1, no inhibitory effects of progesterone were observed during treatment in either area. In study 2, microimplants of RU486 into the ARC disrupted the negative-feedback actions of peripheral progesterone treatments on LH pulse frequency in both OVX and OVX+estradiol ewes. In contrast, microimplants of RU486 into the POA had no effect on the ability of systemic progesterone to inhibit LH pulse frequency. We thus conclude that the ARC is one important site of progesterone-negative feedback in the ewe. These data, which are the first evidence on the neural sites in which progesterone inhibits GnRH pulse frequency in any species, are consistent with the hypothesis that ARC dynorphin neurons mediate this action of progesterone. PMID:21693677

  4. Control of energy homeostasis by insulin and leptin: targeting the arcuate nucleus and beyond.

    PubMed

    Könner, A Christine; Klöckener, Tim; Brüning, Jens C

    2009-07-14

    As the obesity epidemic, diabetes mellitus type 2, and associated comorbidities show no signs of abating, large efforts have been put into a better understanding of the homeostatic control mechanisms involved in regulation of body weight and energy homeostasis. For decades, the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), which integrates peripheral signals and modulates appetite and metabolism, has been the focus of investigation. Besides these basic homeostatic circuits, food palatability and reward are thought to be major factors involved in the regulation of food intake. Highly palatable food is easily available, and is ingested even when there is no metabolic need for it. Thus, overriding of the homeostatic control systems by the cognitive, rewarding, social, and emotional aspects of palatable food may contribute to the obesity epidemic. This review aims to provide an updated view, how insulin and leptin as signals originating from the periphery of the body and communicating energy availability to the CNS act not only on ARC neurons, but also directly control the activity of neuronal circuits in control of food-associated reward mechanisms.

  5. Influence of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus on intraocular pressure and the role of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ji; Xu, Guo-xu; Yuan, Zhi-lan

    2014-01-01

    An opioid peptide neuron/humoral feedback regulation might be involved in changes of intraocular pressure (IOP). The aims of this study are to investigate the effects of arcuate nucleus (ARC) and opioid peptides on intraocular pressure (IOP). Fifty-four healthy purebred New Zealand white rabbits (108 eyes) were randomly divided into 4 groups, including control group, electrical stimulation group, [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) group, and [D-Pen 2, D-Pen5]- enkephalin (DPDPE) group. Bilateral IOP was measured after unilateral electrical stimulation of the ARC or unilateral microinjection into the ARC of the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO or the selective δ opioid receptor agonist DPDPE, both alone and after pre-administration of either the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or saline. Both electrical stimulation in ARC and micro-injection either or opioid receptor agonists, DAMGO or DPDPE, respectively, caused a significant bilateral reduction in IOP (P<0.05) which was more pronounced in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral eye. Pretreatment with naloxone prevented some, but not all IOP reductions. The ARC takes part in the negative regulation of IOP, an action that may involve opioid neurons.

  6. Knockdown of Tlr4 in the Arcuate Nucleus Improves Obesity Related Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongli; Li, Guohua; Li, Ying; Wang, Yuchuan; Liu, Zhengjuan

    2017-08-07

    High-fat diet-induced hypothalamic metabolic inflammation is emerging as a cause for the development of obesity. It is acknowledged that Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4) signaling plays a crucial role in triggering of the hypothalamic metabolic inflammation during the course of diet-induced obesity. Whether hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC)-restricted TLR4 knockdown improves obesity-related metabolic disorders remains unexplored. In this study, we used TLR4 shRNA lentiviral particles to suppress the TLR4 expression in the hypothalamic ARC of diet-induced obese rat model by stereotaxic injection. Our results demonstrate that ARC-restricted TLR4 knockdown protects obese rats from diet-induced weight gain and energy intake, from diet-induced impaired glucose homeostasis and peripheral insulin resistance, and from high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adipocyte hypertrophy. Thus, we define ARC-restricted TLR4 knockdown as a potential strategy to combat metabolic disorders associated with obesity.

  7. Effect of barodenervation on cardiovascular responses elicited from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) in the rat elicited increases as well as decreases in blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The type of response elicited from the ARCN (i.e., increase or decrease in BP and SNA) depended on the level of baroreceptor activity which, in turn, was determined by baseline BP in rats with intact baroreceptors. Based on this information, it was hypothesized that baroreceptor unloading may play a role in the type of response elicited from the ARCN. Therefore, the effect of barodenervation on the ARCN-induced cardiovascular and sympathetic responses and the neurotransmitters in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) mediating the excitatory responses elicited from the ARCN were investigated in urethane-anesthetized adult male Wistar rats. Bilateral barodenervation converted decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and greater splanchnic nerve activity (GSNA) elicited by chemical stimulation of the ARCN with microinjections of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid to increases in MAP and GSNA and exaggerated the increases in heart rate (HR). Combined microinjections of NBQX and D-AP7 (ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists) into the PVN in barodenervated rats converted increases in MAP and GSNA elicited by the ARCN stimulation to decreases in MAP and GSNA and attenuated increases in HR. Microinjections of SHU9119 (a melanocortin 3/4 receptor antagonist) into the PVN in barodenervated rats attenuated increases in MAP, GSNA and HR elicited by the ARCN stimulation. ARCN neurons projecting to the PVN were immunoreactive for proopiomelanocortin, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). It was concluded that increases in MAP and GSNA and exaggeration of tachycardia elicited by the ARCN stimulation in barodenervated rats may be mediated via release of alpha-MSH and/or ACTH and glutamate from the ARCN neurons projecting

  8. The Arcuate Nucleus: A Site of Fast Negative Feedback for Corticosterone Secretion in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Leon-Mercado, Luis; Herrera Moro Chao, Daniela; Basualdo, María Del Carmen; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2017-01-01

    Variations in circulating corticosterone (Cort) are driven by the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), mainly via the sympathetic autonomic nervous system (ANS) directly stimulating Cort release from the adrenal gland and via corticotropin-releasing hormone targeting the adenohypophysis to release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Cort feeds back through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Here we show in male Wistar rats that PVN neurons projecting to the adrenal gland do not express GRs, leaving the question of how the ANS in the PVN gets information about circulating Cort levels to control the adrenal. Since the arcuate nucleus (ARC) shows a less restrictive blood-brain barrier, expresses GRs, and projects to the PVN, we investigated whether the ARC can detect and produce fast adjustments of circulating Cort. In low Cort conditions (morning), local microdialysis in the ARC with type I GR antagonist produced a fast and sustained increase of Cort. This was not observed with a type II antagonist. At the circadian peak levels of Cort (afternoon), a type II GR antagonist, but not a type I antagonist, increased Cort levels but not ACTH levels. Antagonist infusions in the PVN did not modify circulating Cort levels, demonstrating the specificity of the ARC to give Cort negative feedback. Furthermore, type I and II GR agonists in the ARC prevented the increase of Cort after stress, demonstrating the role of the ARC as sensor to modulate Cort release. Our findings show that the ARC may be essential to sense blood levels of Cort and adapt Cort secretion depending on such conditions as stress or time of day.

  9. The Arcuate Nucleus: A Site of Fast Negative Feedback for Corticosterone Secretion in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Escobar, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Variations in circulating corticosterone (Cort) are driven by the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), mainly via the sympathetic autonomic nervous system (ANS) directly stimulating Cort release from the adrenal gland and via corticotropin-releasing hormone targeting the adenohypophysis to release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Cort feeds back through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Here we show in male Wistar rats that PVN neurons projecting to the adrenal gland do not express GRs, leaving the question of how the ANS in the PVN gets information about circulating Cort levels to control the adrenal. Since the arcuate nucleus (ARC) shows a less restrictive blood–brain barrier, expresses GRs, and projects to the PVN, we investigated whether the ARC can detect and produce fast adjustments of circulating Cort. In low Cort conditions (morning), local microdialysis in the ARC with type I GR antagonist produced a fast and sustained increase of Cort. This was not observed with a type II antagonist. At the circadian peak levels of Cort (afternoon), a type II GR antagonist, but not a type I antagonist, increased Cort levels but not ACTH levels. Antagonist infusions in the PVN did not modify circulating Cort levels, demonstrating the specificity of the ARC to give Cort negative feedback. Furthermore, type I and II GR agonists in the ARC prevented the increase of Cort after stress, demonstrating the role of the ARC as sensor to modulate Cort release. Our findings show that the ARC may be essential to sense blood levels of Cort and adapt Cort secretion depending on such conditions as stress or time of day. PMID:28275717

  10. Agmatine in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus stimulates feeding in rats: involvement of neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Taksande, BG; Kotagale, NR; Nakhate, KT; Mali, PD; Kokare, DM; Hirani, K; Subhedar, NK; Chopde, CT; Ugale, RR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Agmatine, a multifaceted neurotransmitter, is abundantly expressed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Our aim was to assess (i) the effect of agmatine on feeding behaviour and (ii) its association, if any, with neuropeptide Y (NPY). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Satiated rats fitted with intra-PVN cannulae were administered agmatine, alone or jointly with (i) α2-adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine, or antagonist, yohimbine; (ii) NPY, NPY Y1 receptor agonist, [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY, or antagonist, BIBP3226; or (iii) yohimbine and NPY. Cumulative food intake was monitored at different post-injection time points. Furthermore, the expression of hypothalamic NPY following i.p. treatment with agmatine, alone or in combination with yohimbine (i.p.), was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. KEY RESULTS Agmatine robustly increased feeding in a dose-dependent manner. While pretreatment with clonidine augmented, yohimbine attenuated the orexigenic response to agmatine. Similarly, NPY and [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY potentiated the agmatine-induced hyperphagia, whereas BIBP3226 inhibited it. Moreover, yohimbine attenuated the synergistic orexigenic effect induced by the combination of NPY and agmatine. Agmatine increased NPY immunoreactivity in the PVN fibres and in the cells of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and this effect was prevented by pretreatment with yohimbine. NPY immunoreactivity in the fibres of the ARC, dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral nuclei of the hypothalamus was not affected by any of the above treatments. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The orexigenic effect of agmatine is coupled to increased NPY activity mediated by stimulation of α2-adrenoceptors within the PVN. This signifies the importance of agmatine or α2-adrenoceptor modulators in the development of novel therapeutic agents to treat feeding-related disorders. PMID:21564088

  11. Mechanisms of cardiovascular actions of urocortins in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C.; Kawabe, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    The presence of urocortins (UCNs) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors has been reported in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN). We have previously reported that UCNs are involved in central cardiovascular regulation. Based on this information, we hypothesized that the ARCN may be one of the sites where UCNs exert their central cardiovascular actions. Experiments were done in artificially ventilated, adult male Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane. Unilateral microinjections (30 nl) of UCN1 (0.12–2 mM) elicited decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Maximum cardiovascular responses were elicited by a 1 mM concentration of UCN1. Microinjections of UCN2 and UCN3 (1 mM each) into the ARCN elicited similar decreases in MAP and HR. UCN1 was used as a prototype for the other experiments described below. HR responses elicited by UCN1 were significantly attenuated by bilateral vagotomy. Prior microinjections of NBI-27914 (CRF-1 receptor antagonist) and astressin (CRF-1 receptor and CRF-2 receptor antagonist) (1 mM each) into the ARCN significantly attenuated the cardiovascular responses elicited by UCN1 microinjections at the same site. Microinjections of UCN1 into the ARCN decreased efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. It was concluded that microinjections of UCN1, UCN2, and UCN3 into the ARCN elicited decreases in MAP and HR. Decreases in MAP, HR, and renal sympathetic nerve activity elicited by UCN1 microinjections into the ARCN were mediated via CRF receptors. Bradycardic responses to UCN1 were mediated via the activation of vagus nerves, and decreases in MAP may be mediated via decreases in sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:23686711

  12. Mechanisms of cardiovascular actions of urocortins in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-07-15

    The presence of urocortins (UCNs) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors has been reported in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN). We have previously reported that UCNs are involved in central cardiovascular regulation. Based on this information, we hypothesized that the ARCN may be one of the sites where UCNs exert their central cardiovascular actions. Experiments were done in artificially ventilated, adult male Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane. Unilateral microinjections (30 nl) of UCN1 (0.12-2 mM) elicited decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Maximum cardiovascular responses were elicited by a 1 mM concentration of UCN1. Microinjections of UCN2 and UCN3 (1 mM each) into the ARCN elicited similar decreases in MAP and HR. UCN1 was used as a prototype for the other experiments described below. HR responses elicited by UCN1 were significantly attenuated by bilateral vagotomy. Prior microinjections of NBI-27914 (CRF-1 receptor antagonist) and astressin (CRF-1 receptor and CRF-2 receptor antagonist) (1 mM each) into the ARCN significantly attenuated the cardiovascular responses elicited by UCN1 microinjections at the same site. Microinjections of UCN1 into the ARCN decreased efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. It was concluded that microinjections of UCN1, UCN2, and UCN3 into the ARCN elicited decreases in MAP and HR. Decreases in MAP, HR, and renal sympathetic nerve activity elicited by UCN1 microinjections into the ARCN were mediated via CRF receptors. Bradycardic responses to UCN1 were mediated via the activation of vagus nerves, and decreases in MAP may be mediated via decreases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  13. Local synaptic release of glutamate from neurons in the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Belousov, A B; van den Pol, A N

    1997-01-01

    1. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) contains neuroendocrine neurons that regulate endocrine secretions by releasing substances which control anterior pituitary hormonal release into the portal blood stream. Many neuroactive substances have been identified in the ARC, but the existence of excitatory neurons in the ARC and the identity of an excitatory transmitter have not been investigated physiologically. 2. In the present experiments using whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp recording of neurons from cultures and slices of the ARC, we demonstrate for the first time that some of the neurons in the ARC secrete glutamate as their transmitter. 3. Using microdrop stimulation of presynaptic neurons in ARC slices, we found that local axons from these glutamatergic neurons make local synaptic contact with other neurons in the ARC and that all evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials could be blocked by the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 10 microM) and D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5; 100 microM). To determine the identity of ARC neurons postsynaptic to local glutamatergic neurons, we used antidromic stimulation to reveal that many of these cells were neuroendocrine neurons by virtue of their maintaining axon terminals in the median eminence. 4. In ARC cultures, postsynaptic potentials, both excitatory and inhibitory, were virtually eliminated by the glutamate receptor antagonists AP5 and CNQX, underlining the functional importance of glutamate within this part of the neuroendocrine brain. 5. GABA was secreted by a subset of ARC neurons from local axons. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline released glutamatergic neurons from chronic inhibition mediated by synaptically released GABA, resulting in further depolarization and an increase in the amplitude and frequency of glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Images Figure 1 PMID:9130170

  14. GHRP-6-induced changes in electrical activity of single cells in the arcuate, ventromedial and periventricular nucleus neurones [correction of nuclei] of a hypothalamic slice preparation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hewson, A K; Viltart, O; McKenzie, D N; Dyball, R E; Dickson, S L

    1999-12-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that systemic injection of the growth hormone secretagogue, growth hormone-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6, selectively activated cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, as reflected by increased electrical activity and induction of the immediate early gene c-fos. The growth hormone secretagogue receptor distribution is not confined to the arcuate nucleus, suggesting that additional sites of action may exist. In the present study we characterized the electrophysiological responses of cells in the arcuate nucleus, ventromedial nucleus and periventricular nucleus in an in-vitro hypothalamic slice preparation, following bath application of GHRP-6. Additionally, since central somatostatin administration has been shown to attenuate the induction of the c-fos gene by GHRP-6, we sought to determine whether the arcuate cells activated by GHRP-6 are also somatostatin-sensitive. Male Wistar rats (100-150 g body weight (BW)) were anaesthetized (urethane; 1.2 g/kg BW) and the brains removed. Coronal sections (400 microm thickness) were cut through a block of hypothalamus and were transferred to a slice chamber perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Forty-one arcuate nucleus cells were tested with bath application of 15 microm GHRP-6 for 10 min, 16 of which were tested subsequently (>30 min later) with application of 10 microM somatostatin. Following GHRP-6 administration, 19 cells (46. 3%) showed a significant increase in firing rate during the 15-min period after GHRP-6 application (P<0.001), 17 cells (41.5%) did not respond and the remaining five cells (12.2%) were significantly inhibited. Six of the eight arcuate nucleus cells that were excited by GHRP-6 were significantly inhibited by somatostatin. By contrast, five of the six arcuate nucleus cells that were unresponsive to GHRP-6 were also unresponsive to somatostatin. In the ventromedial nucleus, of 19 cells tested, eight cells (42.1%) were excited by GHRP-6, eight cells (42.1%) were

  15. The central anorexigenic mechanism of amylin in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) involves pro-opiomelanocortin, calcitonin receptor, and the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jingwei; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2017-08-01

    Amylin is a 37-amino acid peptide hormone that exerts anorexigenic effects in humans and animals. We demonstrated that central injection of amylin into chicks affected feeding and related behaviors via the hypothalamus and brainstem, although the molecular mechanisms remained elusive. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying anorexigenic effects of amylin in 7 day-old Japanese quail. Food but not water intake was reduced after intracerebroventricular amylin injection, and the behavior analysis indicated that this was associated with decreased food pecks and preening. Whole hypothalamus and hypothalamic nuclei including the arcuate nucleus (ARC), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and lateral hypothalamic area (LH) were extracted from quail at 1h post-injection for total RNA isolation. Real time PCR was performed to quantify mRNA abundance of amylin receptors, appetite-associated neuropeptides and monoamine-synthesis-related enzymes. Central amylin injection increased the mRNA abundance of calcitonin receptor (CALCR), receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the hypothalamus and individual hypothalamic nuclei. Relative quantities of CALCR and POMC mRNA were greater in the ARC of the amylin- than vehicle-treated group. Thus, amylin-mediated effects on food intake may involve POMC, monoamine synthesis, and amylin receptor 1 (a complex of CALCR and RAMP1) in the ARC. Together, these data provide novel insights on the hypothalamic-specific molecular mechanisms of amylin-induced food intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jennifer A; Mamounis, Kyle J; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2's actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B's actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression.

  17. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jennifer A.; Mamounis, Kyle J.; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A.

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2’s actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B’s actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression. PMID:26768413

  18. Differential gene regulation of GHSR signaling pathway in the arcuate nucleus and NPY neurons by fasting, diet-induced obesity, and 17β-estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Yasrebi, Ali; Hsieh, Anna; Mamounis, Kyle J.; Krumm, Elizabeth A.; Yang, Jennifer A.; Magby, Jason; Hu, Pu; Roepke, Troy A.

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin’s receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Fasting, diet-induced obesity (DIO), and 17β-estradiol (E2) influence ARC Ghsr expression. It is unknown if these effects occur in NPY neurons. Therefore, we examined the expression of Npy, Agrp, and GHSR signaling pathway genes after fasting, DIO, and E2 replacement in ARC and pools of NPY neurons. In males, fasting increased ARC Ghsr and NPY Foxo1 but decreased NPY Ucp2. In males, DIO decreased ARC and NPY Ghsr and Cpt1c. In fed females, E2 increased Agrp, Ghsr, Cpt1c, and Foxo1 in ARC. In NPY pools, E2 decreased Foxo1 in fed females but increased Foxo1 in fasted females. DIO in females suppressed Agrp and augmented Cpt1c in NPY neurons. In summary, genes involved in GHSR signaling are differentially regulated between the ARC and NPY neurons in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:26577678

  19. Differential gene regulation of GHSR signaling pathway in the arcuate nucleus and NPY neurons by fasting, diet-induced obesity, and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Yasrebi, Ali; Hsieh, Anna; Mamounis, Kyle J; Krumm, Elizabeth A; Yang, Jennifer A; Magby, Jason; Hu, Pu; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-02-15

    Ghrelin's receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Fasting, diet-induced obesity (DIO), and 17β-estradiol (E2) influence ARC Ghsr expression. It is unknown if these effects occur in NPY neurons. Therefore, we examined the expression of Npy, Agrp, and GHSR signaling pathway genes after fasting, DIO, and E2 replacement in ARC and pools of NPY neurons. In males, fasting increased ARC Ghsr and NPY Foxo1 but decreased NPY Ucp2. In males, DIO decreased ARC and NPY Ghsr and Cpt1c. In fed females, E2 increased Agrp, Ghsr, Cpt1c, and Foxo1 in ARC. In NPY pools, E2 decreased Foxo1 in fed females but increased Foxo1 in fasted females. DIO in females suppressed Agrp and augmented Cpt1c in NPY neurons. In summary, genes involved in GHSR signaling are differentially regulated between the ARC and NPY neurons in a sex-dependent manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel insight in distribution of nesfatin-1 and phospho-mTOR in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus of rats

    PubMed Central

    Inhoff, Tobias; Stengel, Andreas; Peter, Lisa; Goebel, Miriam; Taché, Yvette; Bannert, Norbert; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recently, two proteins have been localized in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and implicated in the regulation of food intake: the serine-threonine-kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as part of the TOR signaling complex 1 (TORC1), and nesfatin-1 derived from the precursor protein nucleobindin2. However, the exact cell types are not well described. Therefore, we performed double-labeling studies for NPY, CART, nesfatin-1 and pmTOR in the ARC. In this study, we showed that nesfatin-1 is not only intracellularly co-localized with cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide as reported before, but also with phospho-mTOR (pmTOR) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in ARC neurons. Quantification revealed that 59 ± 5% of the pmTOR-immunoreactive (ir) neurons were immunoreactive for nesfatin-1. Moreover, double labeling for nesfatin-1 and NPY exhibited that 19 ± 5% of the NPY positive cells were also immunoreactive for nesfatin-1. Furthermore, we could also confirm results from previous studies, showing that the majority of nesfatin-1 neurons are also positive for CART peptide, whereas most of the pmTOR is co-localized with NPY and only to a lesser extent with CART. PMID:19961888

  1. Transplantable rat glucagonomas cause acute onset of severe anorexia and adipsia despite highly elevated NPY mRNA levels in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P B; Blume, N; Mikkelsen, J D; Larsen, P J; Jensen, H I; Holst, J J; Madsen, O D

    1998-01-01

    We have isolated a stable, transplantable, and small glucagonoma (MSL-G-AN) associated with abrupt onset of severe anorexia occurring 2-3 wk after subcutaneous transplantation. Before onset of anorexia, food consumption is comparable to untreated controls. Anorexia is followed by adipsia and weight loss, and progresses rapidly in severity, eventually resulting in reduction of food and water intake of 100 and 80%, respectively. During the anorectic phase, the rats eventually become hypoglycemic and hypothermic. The tumor-associated anorexia shows no sex difference, and is not affected by bilateral abdominal vagotomy, indicating a direct central effect. The adipose satiety factor leptin, known to suppress food intake by reducing hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels, was not found to be expressed by the tumor, and circulating leptin levels were reduced twofold in the anorectic phase. A highly significant increase in hypothalamic (arcuate nucleus) NPY mRNA levels was found in anorectic rats compared with control animals. Since elevated hypothalamic NPY is among the most potent stimulators of feeding and a characteristic of most animal models of hyperphagia, we conclude that the MSL-G-AN glucagonoma releases circulating factor(s) that overrides the hypothalamic NPY-ergic system, thereby eliminating the orexigenic effect of NPY. We hypothesize a possible central role of proglucagon-derived peptides in the observed anorexia. PMID:9435324

  2. Magel2 Is Required for Leptin-Mediated Depolarization of POMC Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Rebecca E.; Michaelson, Sheldon D.; Chee, Melissa J. S.; Atallah, Tanya A.

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome is the most common syndromic form of human obesity and is caused by the loss of function of several genes, including MAGEL2. Mice lacking Magel2 display increased weight gain with excess adiposity and other defects suggestive of hypothalamic deficiency. We demonstrate Magel2-null mice are insensitive to the anorexic effect of peripherally administered leptin. Although their excessive adiposity and hyperleptinemia likely contribute to this physiological leptin resistance, we hypothesized that Magel2 may also have an essential role in intracellular leptin responses in hypothalamic neurons. We therefore measured neuronal activation by immunohistochemistry on brain sections from leptin-injected mice and found a reduced number of arcuate nucleus neurons activated after leptin injection in the Magel2-null animals, suggesting that most but not all leptin receptor–expressing neurons retain leptin sensitivity despite hyperleptinemia. Electrophysiological measurements of arcuate nucleus neurons expressing the leptin receptor demonstrated that although neurons exhibiting hyperpolarizing responses to leptin are present in normal numbers, there were no neurons exhibiting depolarizing responses to leptin in the mutant mice. Additional studies demonstrate that arcuate nucleus pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expressing neurons are unresponsive to leptin. Interestingly, Magel2-null mice are hypersensitive to the anorexigenic effects of the melanocortin receptor agonist MT-II. In Prader-Willi Syndrome, loss of MAGEL2 may likewise abolish leptin responses in POMC hypothalamic neurons. This neural defect, together with increased fat mass, blunted circadian rhythm, and growth hormone response pathway defects that are also linked to loss of MAGEL2, could contribute to the hyperphagia and obesity that are hallmarks of this disorder. PMID:23341784

  3. Arcuate nucleus transcriptome profiling identifies ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signalling box-containing protein 4 as a gene regulated by fasting in central nervous system feeding circuits.

    PubMed

    Li, J-Y; Kuick, R; Thompson, R C; Misek, D E; Lai, Y-M; Liu, Y-Q; Chai, B-X; Hanash, S M; Gantz, I

    2005-06-01

    The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus is a primary site for sensing blood borne nutrients and hormonal messengers that reflect caloric status. To identify novel energy homeostatic genes, we examined RNA extracts from the microdissected arcuate nucleus of fed and 48-h fasted rats using oligonucleotide microarrays. The relative abundance of 118 mRNA transcripts was increased and 203 mRNA transcripts was decreased during fasting. One of the down-regulated mRNAs was ankyrin-repeat and suppressor of cytokine signalling box-containing protein 4 (Asb-4). The predicted structure of Asb-4 protein suggested that it might encode an intracellular regulatory protein, and therefore its mRNA expression was investigated further. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate down-regulation of Asb-4 mRNA in the arcuate nucleus of the fasted Sprague-Dawley rat (relative expression of Asb-4 mRNA: fed = 4.66 +/- 0.26; fasted = 3.96 +/- 0.23; n = 4, P < 0.01). Down-regulation was also demonstrated in the obese fa/fa Zucker rat, another model of energy disequilibrium (relative expression of Asb-4 mRNA: lean Zucker = 3.91 +/- 0.32; fa/fa = 2.93 +/- 0.26; n = 5, P < 0.001). In situ hybridisation shows that Asb-4 mRNA is expressed in brain areas linked to energy homeostasis, including the arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, dorsomedial nucleus, lateral hypothalamus and posterodorsal medial amygdaloid area. Double in situ hybridisation revealed that Asb-4 mRNA colocalises with key energy homeostatic neurones. In the fed state, Asb-4 mRNA is expressed by 95.6% of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones and 46.4% of neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurones. By contrast, in the fasted state, the percentage of POMC neurones expressing Asb-4 mRNA drops to 73.2% (P < 0.001). Moreover, the density of Asb-4 mRNA per fasted POMC neurone is markedly decreased. Conversely, expression of Asb-4 mRNA by NPY neurones in the fasted state is modestly increased to 52.7% (P < 0

  4. Peptide YY directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus and reverses fasting-induced c-Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Thomas; Bothe, Christine; Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) monitors and integrates hormonal and metabolic signals involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The orexigenic peptide ghrelin is secreted from the stomach during negative status of energy intake and directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. In contrast to ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) is released postprandially from the gut and reduces food intake when applied peripherally. Neurons in the ArcM express ghrelin receptors and neuropeptide Y receptors. Thus, PYY may inhibit feeding by acting on ghrelin-sensitive Arc neurons. Using extracellular recordings, we (1) characterized the effects of PYY on the electrical activity of ghrelin-sensitive neurons in the ArcM of rats. In order to correlate the effect of PYY on neuronal activity with the energy status, we (2) investigated the ability of PYY to reverse fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. In addition, we (3) sought to confirm that PYY reduces food intake under our experimental conditions. Superfusion of PYY reversibly inhibited 94% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. The PYY-induced inhibition was dose-dependent and occurred at a threshold concentration of 10(-8)M. Consistent with the opposite effects of ghrelin and PYY on food intake, a high percentage (50%) of Arc neurons was activated by ghrelin and inhibited by PYY. In line with this inhibitory action, peripherally injected PYY partly reversed the fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. Similarly, refeeding of food-deprived mice reversed the fasting-induced activation in the Arc. Furthermore, peripherally injected PYY reduced food intake in 12-hour fasted mice. Thus the activity of Arc neurons correlated with the feeding status and was not only reduced by feeding but also by administration of PYY in non-refed mice. In conclusion, our current observations suggest that PYY may contribute to signaling a positive status of energy intake

  5. Differential modulation of arcuate nucleus and mesolimbic gene expression levels by central leptin in rats on short-term high-fat high-sugar diet.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, José K; Eggels, Leslie; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; Adan, Roger A H; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2014-01-01

    Leptin resistance is a common hallmark of obesity. Rats on a free-choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS) diet are resistant to peripherally administered leptin. The aim of this study was to investigate feeding responses to central leptin as well as the associated changes in mRNA levels in hypothalamic and mesolimbic brain areas. Rats on a CHOW or fcHFHS diet for 8 days received leptin or vehicle intracerebro(lateral)ventricularly (ICV) and food intake was measured 5 h and 24 h later. Four days later, rats were sacrificed after ICV leptin or vehicle and mRNA levels were quantified for hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and for preproenkephalin (ppENK) in nucleus accumbens and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in ventral tegmental area (VTA). ICV leptin decreased caloric intake both in CHOW and fcHFHS rats. In fcHFHS, leptin preferentially decreased chow and fat intake. Leptin increased POMC and decreased NPY mRNA in CHOW, but not in fcHFHS rats. In CHOW rats, leptin had no effect on ppENK mRNA and decreased TH mRNA. In fcHFHS, leptin decreased ppENK mRNA and increased TH mRNA. Despite peripheral and arcuate leptin resistance, central leptin suppresses feeding in fcHFHS rats. As the VTA and nucleus accumbens are still responsive to leptin, these brain areas may therefore, at least partly, account for the leptin-induced feeding suppression in rats on a fcHFHS diet.

  6. Differential Modulation of Arcuate Nucleus and Mesolimbic Gene Expression Levels by Central Leptin in Rats on Short-Term High-Fat High-Sugar Diet

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, José K.; Eggels, Leslie; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; Adan, Roger A. H.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leptin resistance is a common hallmark of obesity. Rats on a free-choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS) diet are resistant to peripherally administered leptin. The aim of this study was to investigate feeding responses to central leptin as well as the associated changes in mRNA levels in hypothalamic and mesolimbic brain areas. Design and Methods Rats on a CHOW or fcHFHS diet for 8 days received leptin or vehicle intracerebro(lateral)ventricularly (ICV) and food intake was measured 5 h and 24 h later. Four days later, rats were sacrificed after ICV leptin or vehicle and mRNA levels were quantified for hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and for preproenkephalin (ppENK) in nucleus accumbens and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in ventral tegmental area (VTA). Results ICV leptin decreased caloric intake both in CHOW and fcHFHS rats. In fcHFHS, leptin preferentially decreased chow and fat intake. Leptin increased POMC and decreased NPY mRNA in CHOW, but not in fcHFHS rats. In CHOW rats, leptin had no effect on ppENK mRNA and decreased TH mRNA. In fcHFHS, leptin decreased ppENK mRNA and increased TH mRNA. Conclusion Despite peripheral and arcuate leptin resistance, central leptin suppresses feeding in fcHFHS rats. As the VTA and nucleus accumbens are still responsive to leptin, these brain areas may therefore, at least partly, account for the leptin-induced feeding suppression in rats on a fcHFHS diet. PMID:24498181

  7. Organizational effects of perinatal exposure to bisphenol-A and diethylstilbestrol on arcuate nucleus circuitry controlling food intake and energy expenditure in male and female CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Harry; Patterson, Zachary R; Khazall, Rim; Patel, Shoyeb; Tsirlin, Dina; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    The endocrine disrupting compound bisphenol-A (BPA) has been reported to act as an obesogen in rodents exposed perinatally. In this study, we investigated the effects of early-life BPA exposure on adult metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic energy balance circuitry. Pregnant and lactating CD-1 dams were exposed, via specially prepared diets, to 2 environmentally relevant doses of BPA. Dams consumed an average of 0.19 and 3.49 μg/kg per day of BPA in the low and high BPA treatments prenatally and an average of 0.36 and 7.2 μg/kg per day of BPA postnatally. Offspring were weaned initially onto a normal (AIN93G) diet, then as adults exposed to either a normal or high-fat diet (HFD). Males exposed to the high dose of BPA showed impaired glucose tolerance on both diets. They also showed reduced proopiomelanocortin fiber innervation into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and when exposed to HFD, they demonstrated increased neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related peptide expression in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Females exposed to the high BPA dose were heavier, ate more, and had increased adiposity and leptin concentrations with reduced proopiomelanocortin mRNA expression in the ARC when consuming a HFD. BPA-exposed females showed ARC estrogen receptor α expression patterns similar to those seen in males, suggesting a masculinizing effect of BPA. These results demonstrate that early-life exposure to the obesogen BPA leads to sexually dimorphic alterations in the structure of hypothalamic energy balance circuitry, leading to increased vulnerability for developing diet-induced obesity and metabolic impairments, such as glucose intolerance.

  8. Hormonal Modulation of Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Metabolism in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Adult Female Rat: A Novel Action of Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Blutstein, Tamara; Baab, Peter J.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Mong, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    Morphological plasticity in response to estradiol is a hallmark of astrocytes in the arcuate nucleus. The functional consequences of these morphological changes have remained relatively unexplored. Here we report that in the arcuate nucleus estradiol significantly increased the protein levels of the two enzymes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle, glutamine synthetase and glutaminase. We further demonstrate that these estradiol-mediated changes in the enzyme protein levels may underlie functional changes in neurotransmitter availability as: 1) total glutamate concentration in the arcuate nucleus was significantly increased and 2) microdialysis revealed a significant increase in extracellular glutamate levels after a synaptic challenge in the presence of estradiol. These data implicate the glutamate-glutamine cycle in the generation and/or maintenance of glutamate and suggest that the difference in extracellular glutamate between estradiol- and oil-treated animals may be related to an increased efficiency of the cycle enzymes. In vivo enzyme activity assays revealed that the estradiol mediated increase in glutamate-glutamine cycle enzymes in the arcuate nucleus led to an increase in γ-aminobutyric acid and is likely not related to the increase in extracellular glutamate. Thus, we have observed two-independent effects of estradiol on amino acid neurotransmission in the arcuate nucleus. These data suggest a possible functional consequence of the well-established changes in glial morphology that occur in the arcuate nucleus in the presence of estradiol and suggest the importance of neuronal-glial cooperation in the regulation of hypothalamic functions such as food intake and body weight. PMID:19299450

  9. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein Exhibit Early Metabolic Deficits and a Pathologically Low Leptin State Associated with Hypothalamic Dysfunction in Arcuate Neuropeptide Y Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. PMID:24990930

  10. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  11. GLP-1R Signaling Directly Activates Arcuate Nucleus Kisspeptin Action in Brain Slices but Does not Rescue Luteinizing Hormone Inhibition in Ovariectomized Mice During Negative Energy Balance.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Kristy M; Baquero, Arian F; Bennett, Camdin M; Lindsley, Sarah R; Kirigiti, Melissa A; Bennett, Baylin; Bosch, Martha A; Mercer, Aaron J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K; True, Cadence; Grove, Kevin L; Smith, M Susan

    2017-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) are key components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as they regulate the basal pulsatile release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). ARC Kiss1 action is dependent on energy status, and unmasking metabolic factors responsible for modulating ARC Kiss1 neurons is of great importance. One possible factor is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an anorexigenic neuropeptide produced by brainstem preproglucagon neurons. Because GLP fiber projections and the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) are abundant in the ARC, we hypothesized that GLP-1R signaling could modulate ARC Kiss1 action. Using ovariectomized mice, we found that GLP-producing fibers come in close apposition with ARC Kiss1 neurons; these neurons also contain Glp1r mRNA. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that liraglutide (a long-acting GLP-1R agonist) increased action potential firing and caused a direct membrane depolarization of ARC Kiss1 cells in brain slices. We determined that brainstem preproglucagon mRNA is decreased after a 48-h fast in mice, a negative energy state in which ARC Kiss1 expression and downstream GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH) release are potently suppressed. However, activation of GLP-1R signaling in fasted mice with liraglutide was not sufficient to prevent LH inhibition. Furthermore, chronic central infusions of the GLP-1R antagonist, exendin(9-39), in ad libitum-fed mice did not alter ARC Kiss1 mRNA or plasma LH. As a whole, these data identify a novel interaction of the GLP-1 system with ARC Kiss1 neurons but indicate that CNS GLP-1R signaling alone is not critical for the maintenance of LH during fasting or normal feeding.

  12. Effects of nutritional status and gonadal steroids on expression of appetite-regulatory genes in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of sheep.

    PubMed

    Archer, Z A; Findlay, P A; McMillen, S R; Rhind, S M; Adam, C L

    2004-09-01

    Sheep exhibit photoperiod-driven seasonal changes in appetite and body weight so that nutritional status increases in long days (LD) and decreases in short days (SD); additionally, they are reproductively active in SD and inactive in LD. We addressed the hypothesis that appetite-regulatory genes in the hypothalamus respond differently to changes in nutritional feedback induced by photoperiod as opposed to food restriction, and that responses would be influenced by gonadal steroid status. Castrated oestradiol-implanted male sheep were kept in SD (8 h light/day) or LD (16 h light/day) for 11 weeks, with ad libitum or restricted food (experiment 1; n=8/group). Rams were kept in SD or LD for 12 weeks with ad libitum or restricted food (experiment 2; n=6/group). Gene expression (by in situ hybridisation) in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus for leptin receptor (OB-Rb), neuropeptide Y (NPY), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptide (AGRP) was unaffected by photoperiod treatment, but food restriction increased NPY and AGRP mRNAs, in experiment 1. In experiment 2, mRNAs for POMC and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) were up-regulated and AGRP down-regulated in SD, while food restriction increased OB-Rb mRNA, increased NPY and AGRP mRNAs only in LD and decreased POMC mRNA only in SD. Thus, gene expression responded differently to photoperiod and food restriction, and the melanocortin pathway was up-regulated in SD in reproductively activated rams but not in oestradiol-implanted castrates. These data support the hypothesis that hypothalamic appetite-regulatory pathways respond differently to changes in nutritional feedback induced by photoperiod as opposed to food restriction, with gonadal steroid feedback additionally influencing the responses.

  13. GLP-1R Signaling Directly Activates Arcuate Nucleus Kisspeptin Action in Brain Slices but Does not Rescue Luteinizing Hormone Inhibition in Ovariectomized Mice During Negative Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Baquero, Arian F.; True, Cadence; Grove, Kevin L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) are key components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as they regulate the basal pulsatile release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). ARC Kiss1 action is dependent on energy status, and unmasking metabolic factors responsible for modulating ARC Kiss1 neurons is of great importance. One possible factor is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an anorexigenic neuropeptide produced by brainstem preproglucagon neurons. Because GLP fiber projections and the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) are abundant in the ARC, we hypothesized that GLP-1R signaling could modulate ARC Kiss1 action. Using ovariectomized mice, we found that GLP-producing fibers come in close apposition with ARC Kiss1 neurons; these neurons also contain Glp1r mRNA. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that liraglutide (a long-acting GLP-1R agonist) increased action potential firing and caused a direct membrane depolarization of ARC Kiss1 cells in brain slices. We determined that brainstem preproglucagon mRNA is decreased after a 48-h fast in mice, a negative energy state in which ARC Kiss1 expression and downstream GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH) release are potently suppressed. However, activation of GLP-1R signaling in fasted mice with liraglutide was not sufficient to prevent LH inhibition. Furthermore, chronic central infusions of the GLP-1R antagonist, exendin(9–39), in ad libitum–fed mice did not alter ARC Kiss1 mRNA or plasma LH. As a whole, these data identify a novel interaction of the GLP-1 system with ARC Kiss1 neurons but indicate that CNS GLP-1R signaling alone is not critical for the maintenance of LH during fasting or normal feeding. PMID:28144621

  14. Photoperiodic and Diurnal Regulation of WNT Signaling in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Female Djungarian Hamster, Phodopus sungorus.

    PubMed

    Boucsein, Alisa; Benzler, Jonas; Hempp, Cindy; Stöhr, Sigrid; Helfer, Gisela; Tups, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    The WNT pathway was shown to play an important role in the adult central nervous system. We previously identified the WNT pathway as a novel integration site of the adipokine leptin in mediating its neuroendocrine control of metabolism in obese mice. Here we investigated the implication of WNT signaling in seasonal body weight regulation exhibited by the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus), a seasonal mammal that exhibits profound annual changes in leptin sensitivity. We furthermore investigated whether crucial components of the WNT pathway are regulated in a diurnal manner. Gene expression of key components of the WNT pathway in the hypothalamus of hamsters acclimated to either long day (LD) or short day (SD) photoperiod was analyzed by in situ hybridization. We detected elevated expression of the genes WNT-4, Axin-2, Cyclin-D1, and SFRP-2, in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, a key energy balance integration site, during LD compared with SD as well as a diurnal regulation of Axin-2, Cyclin-D1, and DKK-3. Investigating the effect of photoperiod as well as leptin on the activation (phosphorylation) of the WNT coreceptor LRP-6-(Ser1490) by immunohistochemistry, we found elevated activity in the arcuate nucleus during LD relative to SD as well as after leptin treatment (2 mg/kg body weight). These findings indicate that differential WNT signaling may be associated with seasonal body weight regulation and is partially regulated in a diurnal manner in the adult brain. Furthermore, they suggest that this pathway plays a key role in the neuroendocrine regulation of body weight and integration of the leptin signal.

  15. Central Administration of Insulin and Leptin Together Enhance Renal Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Fos Production in the Arcuate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Habeeballah, Hamza; Alsuhaymi, Naif; Stebbing, Martin J.; Jenkins, Trisha A.; Badoer, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the central actions of insulin and leptin. Both induce sympatho-excitation. This study (i) investigated whether centrally administered leptin and insulin together elicits greater increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) than when given alone, and (ii) quantified the number of activated neurons in brain regions influencing SNA, to identify potential central sites of interaction. In anesthetised (urethane 1.4–1.6 g/kg iv) male Sprague-Dawley rats, RSNA, MAP, and HR were recorded following intracerebroventricular (ICV) saline (control; n = 5), leptin (7 μg; n = 5), insulin (500 mU; n = 4) and the combination of leptin and insulin; (n = 4). Following leptin or insulin alone, RSNA was significantly increased (74 and 62% respectively). MAP responses were not significantly different between the groups. Insulin alone significantly increased HR. Leptin alone also increased HR but it was significantly less than following insulin alone (P < 0.005). When leptin and insulin were combined, the RSNA increase (124%) was significantly greater than the response to either alone. There were no differences between the groups in MAP responses, however, the increase in HR induced by insulin was attenuated by leptin. Of the brain regions examined, only in the arcuate nucleus did leptin and insulin together increase the number of Fos-positive cell nuclei significantly more than leptin or insulin alone. In the lamina terminalis and rostroventrolateral medulla, leptin and insulin together increased Fos, but the effect was not greater than leptin alone. The results suggest that when central leptin and insulin levels are elevated, the sympatho-excitatory response in RSNA will be greater. The arcuate nucleus may be a common site of cardiovascular integration. PMID:28119622

  16. P2X4 Receptor Reporter Mice: Sparse Brain Expression and Feeding-Related Presynaptic Facilitation in the Arcuate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji; Bernstein, Alexander M.; Wong, Angela; Lu, Xiao-Hong; Khoja, Sheraz; Yang, X. William; Davies, Daryl L.; Micevych, Paul; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptors are ATP-gated cation channels that are widely expressed in the nervous system. To identify P2X4 receptor-expressing cells, we generated BAC transgenic mice expressing tdTomato under the control of the P2X4 receptor gene (P2rx4). We found sparse populations of tdTomato-positive neurons in most brain areas with patterns that matched P2X4 mRNA distribution. tdTomato expression within microglia was low but was increased by an experimental manipulation that triggered microglial activation. We found surprisingly high tdTomato expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) (i.e., within parts of the neural circuitry controlling feeding). Immunohistochemistry and genetic crosses of P2rx4 tdTomato mice with cell-specific GFP reporter lines showed that the tdTomato-expressing cells were mainly AgRP-NPY neurons and tanycytes. There was no electrophysiological evidence for functional expression of P2X4 receptors on AgRP-NPY neuron somata, but instead, we found clear evidence for functional presynaptic P2X4 receptor-mediated responses in terminals of AgRP-NPY neurons onto two of their postsynaptic targets (Arc POMC and paraventricular nucleus neurons), where ATP dramatically facilitated GABA release. The presynaptic responses onto POMC neurons, and the expression of tdTomato in AgRP-NPY neurons and tanycytes, were significantly decreased by food deprivation in male mice in a manner that was partially reversed by the satiety-related peptide leptin. Overall, we provide well-characterized tdTomato reporter mice to study P2X4-expressing cells in the brain, new insights on feeding-related regulation of presynaptic P2X4 receptor responses, and the rationale to explore extracellular ATP signaling in the control of feeding behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cells expressing ATP-gated P2X4 receptors have proven problematic to identify and study in brain slice preparations because P2X4 expression is sparse. To address this limitation, we generated and characterized

  17. Transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein exhibit early metabolic deficits and a pathologically low leptin state associated with hypothalamic dysfunction in arcuate neuropeptide Y neurons.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P; Iadecola, Costantino

    2014-07-02

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349096-11$15.00/0.

  18. Ethanol injected into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus induces behavioral stimulation in rats: an effect prevented by catalase inhibition and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Raúl; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2008-10-01

    It is suggested that some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including its psychomotor properties, are mediated by beta-endorphin and opioid receptors. Ethanol-induced increases in the release of hypothalamic beta-endorphin depend on the catalasemic conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. Here, we evaluated the locomotor activity in rats microinjected with ethanol directly into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ArcN), the main site of beta-endorphin synthesis in the brain and a region with high levels of catalase expression. Intra-ArcN ethanol-induced changes in motor activity were also investigated in rats pretreated with the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (0-2 mg/kg) or the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT; 0-1 g/kg). We found that ethanol microinjections of 64 or 128, but not 256 microg, produced locomotor stimulation. Intra-ArcN ethanol (128 microg)-induced activation was prevented by naltrexone and AT, whereas these compounds did not affect spontaneous activity. The present results support earlier evidence indicating that the ArcN and the beta-endorphinic neurons of this nucleus are necessary for ethanol to induce stimulation. In addition, our data suggest that brain structures that, as the ArcN, are rich in catalase may support the formation of ethanol-derived pharmacologically relevant concentrations of acetaldehyde and, thus be of particular importance for the behavioral effects of ethanol.

  19. PGC-1α may associated with the anti-obesity effect of taurine on rats induced by arcuate nucleus lesion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng-juan; Jin, Yong-jun; Li, Ming-e; Zhou, Rong; Yang, Mei-zi

    2016-01-01

    To observe the effect of taurine treatment in rats with monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity. Rats with MSG-induced obesity were administered taurine for five weeks. The Lee's index, food intake, blood pressure, body temperature, body mass index (BMI), fat weight, and triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were compared. The PGC-1α expression levels in white and brown adipose were measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and pathological changes in the arcuate nucleus and liver were examined. Compared with the model group, BMI, TG, and LDL in the high and low taurine dose groups were significantly lower, while HDL was higher. Body temperature in the taurine treatment groups was higher, and blood pressure was lower. The weight of brown fat in the taurine treatment groups was significantly higher than in the model group, while the white fat weight was significantly lower. Compared with the control group, the PGC-1α levels in white and brown adipose were higher in the taurine treatment groups and more significantly up-regulated in brown adipose. This study suggests that taurine prevents obesity in MSG-treated rats and may be closely associated with energy metabolism.

  20. Estrogen evokes a rapid effect on intracellular calcium in neurons characterized by calcium oscillations in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Oliver; Kow, Lee-Ming; Bogun, Magda; Pfaff, Donald W

    2007-06-01

    Rapid estrogen effects became an interesting topic to explain estrogen effects not associated with the classical nuclear pathway. The rapid estrogen effect on intracellular calcium oscillations was characterized in neurons of the arcuate nucleus. Ratiometric calcium imaging (fura-2AM) was used to measure intracellular calcium in brain slices of female Swiss Webster mice (median of age 27 days p.n.). Calcium oscillations were dependent on intracellular calcium and also on calcium influx from the extracellular space. The perfusion of slices with calcium-free solution inhibited spontaneous calcium oscillations. The metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD (5 microM) and low concentrated ryanodine (100 nM) induced intracellular calcium release when slices were perfused with calcium-free solution. 17beta-estradiol (10 nM) also induced intracellular calcium release in calcium-free ACSF. This effect was inhibited by the preceding administration of thapsigargin (2 microM) indicating the association of the rapid estrogen effect with intracellular calcium stores. The administration of the non-selective phospholipase C-inhibitor ET-18 (30 microM), but not U73122 (10 microM), and the inhibition of protein kinase A by H-89 (0.25 microM) suppressed the rapid estrogen effect. Analyses indicated a qualitative, but not quantitatively significant effect of 17beta-estradiol on calcium oscillations.

  1. Changes in mRNA expression of arcuate nucleus appetite-regulating peptides during lactation in rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Nakahara, Keiko; Maruyama, Keisuke; Okame, Rieko; Ensho, Takuya; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Noboru

    2014-04-01

    The contribution of hypothalamic appetite-regulating peptides to further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation in rats was investigated by using PCR array and real-time PCR. Furthermore, changes in the mRNA expression for appetite-regulating peptides in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) were analyzed at all stages of pregnancy and lactation, and also after weaning. Food intake was significantly higher during pregnancy, lactation, and after weaning than during non-lactation periods. During lactation, ARC expression of mRNAs for agouti-related protein (AgRP) and peptide YY was increased, whereas that of mRNAs for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cholecystokinin (CCK) was decreased, in comparison with non-lactation periods. The increase in AgRP mRNA expression during lactation was especially marked. The plasma level of leptin was significantly decreased during the course of lactation, whereas that of acyl-ghrelin was unchanged. In addition, food intake was negatively correlated with the plasma leptin level during lactation. This study has clarified synchronous changes in the expression of many appetite-regulating peptides in ARC of rats during lactation. Our results suggest that hyperphagia during lactation in rats is caused by decreases in POMC and CCK expression and increases in AgRP expression in ARC, the latter being most notable. Together with the decrease in the blood leptin level, such changes in mRNA expression may explain the further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation.

  2. Stimulation of food intake after central galanin is associated with arcuate nucleus activation and does not differ between genetically selected low and high body weight lines of chickens.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christopher J; Newmyer, Brandon A; Webster, Rebekah I; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Siegel, Paul B; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Cline, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    Galanin, a 29 residue peptide found in the hypothalamus, causes orexigenic effects in a variety of species. In the present study, we investigated appetite-associated effects of galanin in chicks from lines which have been selected from a common founder population for either low or high body weight. The low line consists of some anorexic individuals and there are obese individuals in the high line. Central galanin caused increased food intake in both lines with the magnitude of response similar in both lines. We also quantified the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells in several hypothalamic nuclei that are associated with appetite. Only the arcuate nucleus had an increase in the number of reactive cells, a response that was similar for both lines. From these results we concluded that selection for body weight likely did not affect galanin function on induction of feeding in either lines, and that the effect of galanin is associated with arcuate nucleus activation in chicks.

  3. Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic activity in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is attenuated in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that tonic γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic activity in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) modulates blood pressure control and attenuation of this inhibitory activity contributes to hypertension in the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and greater splanchnic nerve activity (GSNA) were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, adult male SHR and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Microinjections of gabazine into the ARCN elicited significantly smaller increases in MAP, HR, and GSNA in baroreceptor-intact SHR compared with baroreceptor-intact WKY. Attenuation of the responses to gabazine in SHR persisted, despite lowering of their baseline MAP to levels of WKY or barodenervation. Microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) into the ARCN elicited decreases in MAP and GSNA and increases in HR in baroreceptor-intact WKY. However, after microinjections of gabazine into the ARCN, microinjections of NMDA into the same nucleus elicited pressor responses in baroreceptor-intact WKY. In barodenervated WKY, increases in MAP and GSNA were elicited by ARCN stimulation by NMDA and the increases in HR were exaggerated. In baroreceptor-intact SHR, ARCN stimulation by NMDA elicited increases in MAP, GSNA, and HR which persisted, despite lowering of baseline MAP or barodenervation. Increases in MAP and GSNA elicited by ARCN stimulation by NMDA in barodenervated SHR were significantly greater than corresponding increases in barodenervated WKY. These results indicated that attenuated γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic activity in the ARCN and impaired baroreflex function may contribute to increases in blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity after ARCN stimulation by NMDA and elevation of baseline blood pressure in SHR.

  4. Properties of native P2X receptors in large multipolar neurons dissociated from rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wakamori, Minoru; Sorimachi, Masaru

    2004-04-16

    ATP, the ligand of P2X receptors, is a candidate of neurotransmitter or co-transmitter in the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Anatomical studies have revealed the wide distribution of P2X receptors in the brain. So far, P2X-mediated small synaptic responses have been recorded in some brain regions. To determine the physiological significance of postsynaptic ATP receptors in the brain, we have investigated the P2X responses in rat dissociated hypothalamic arcuate neurons by using the patch-clamp technique. ATP evoked inward currents in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=42 microM) at a holding potential of -70 mV. The current-voltage relationship showed a marked inward rectification starting around -10 mV. Although neither 300 microM alphabeta-methylene-ATP nor 300 microM betagamma-methylene-ATP induced any currents, 100 microM ATPgammaS and 100 microM 2-methylthio-ATP evoked inward currents of which amplitude was about 60% of the control currents evoked by 100 microM ATP. PPADS, one of P2 receptor antagonists, inhibited the ATP-evoked currents in a time- and a concentration-dependent manners (IC(50)=19 microM at 2 min). Permeant Ca(2+) inhibited the ATP-evoked currents in the range of millimolars (IC(50)=7 mM); however, Cd(2+) (1-300 microM), a broad cation channel blocker, facilitated the currents with slow off-response. Zn(2+) in the range of 1-100 microM facilitated the currents whereas Zn(2+) at the concentrations over 100 microM inhibited the currents. These observations suggest that functional P2X receptors are expressed in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. The most likely subunit combinations of the P2X receptors are P2X(2)-homomultimer and P2X(2)/P2X(6)-heteromultimer.

  5. Regulation of nucleus accumbens activity by the hypothalamic neuropeptide MCH

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Robert M.; Liu, Rong-Jian; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Sharf, Ruth; Yeckel, Mark F.; Laubach, Mark; Aghajanian, George K.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2010-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) are brain regions important for food intake. The AcbSh contains high levels of receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a lateral hypothalamic peptide critical for feeding and metabolism. MCH receptor (MCHR1) activation in the AcbSh increases food intake while AcbSh MCHR1 blockade reduces feeding. Here biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MCH action in the rodent AcbSh are described. A reduction of phosphorylation of GluR1 at Serine 845 (pSer845) is shown to occur after both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of MCHR1 activity. These changes depend upon signaling through Gi/o, and result in decreased surface expression of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Electrophysiological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the AcbSh revealed decreased amplitude of AMPAR-mediated synaptic events (mEPSC) with MCH treatment. In addition, MCH suppressed action potential firing MSNs through K+ channel activation. Finally, in vivo recordings confirmed that MCH reduces neuronal cell firing in the AcbSh in freely moving animals. The ability of MCH to reduce cell firing in the AcbSh is consistent with a general model from other pharmacological and electrophysiological studies whereby reduced AcbSh neuronal firing leads to food intake. The current work integrates the hypothalamus into this model, providing biochemical and cellular mechanisms whereby metabolic and limbic signals converge to regulate food intake. PMID:20554878

  6. Hypothalamic neuronal origin of neuropeptide Y (NPY) or cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) fibers projecting to the tuberomammillary nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Y; Hwang, Young G; Lee, Hyun S

    2017-02-15

    Based on the importance of tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) as a target for feeding/arousal-related functions, we aimed in the present study to investigate hypothalamic neuronal origin of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) fibers projecting to the histaminergic nucleus. In the first series of experiments, we examined NPY (or CART) fiber distribution within the boundary of adenosine deaminase (ADA)-immunoreactive (ir) TMN regions; extensive NPY (or CART)-ir axon terminals were observed in E4 (TMMd), E3 (TMMv), and E2 (TMVr) subdivisions. NPY varicosities co-contained vesicular GABA transporters (vGAT). CART boutons, however, contained either vGAT or vesicular glutamate transporters (vGLU), which suggested dual (or multiple) origins of CART fibers. Based on the previous observation on melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-ir neuronal elements in the TMN, their coexistence with CART peptide was examined in detail. In E4 subdivision, approximately 40.8% of MCH-ir somata co-contained CART, but the proportion was reduced to 24.1% in E3 region. In E2 and E1 (TMVc) regions, only MCH-ir axon terminals existed without any MCH-ir somata. In the second series of experiments, we investigated hypothalamic neuronal origin of NPY (or CART) fibers projecting to the TMN. The arcuate nucleus (Arc) was the sole source of hypothalamic NPY fibers projecting to the nucleus. In contrast, CART fibers in the TMN originated from the Arc as well as the other hypothalamic nuclei including the retrochiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamus (LH), zona incerta (ZI), and dorsal hypothalamic area. Quantitative analysis showed that arcuate CART projection to the TMN occupied approximately 23.5% of the total hypothalamic CART input to the nucleus, while the rest originated mainly from the LH and ZI. The present observations suggested that the TMN might play a key role in energy balance and arousal, by receiving periphery-derived, first

  7. Enhanced expressions of mRNA for neuropeptide Y and interleukin 1 beta in hypothalamic arcuate nuclei during adjuvant arthritis-induced anorexia in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Stofkova, Andrea; Haluzik, Martin; Zelezna, Blanka; Kiss, Alexander; Skurlova, Martina; Lacinova, Zdenka; Jurcovicova, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Food intake is activated by hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is mainly under the dual control of leptin and ghrelin. Rat adjuvant arthritis (AA), similarly as human rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with cachexia caused by yet unknown mechanisms. The aim of our study was to evaluate NPY expression in hypothalamic arcuate nuclei (nARC) under the conditions of AA-induced changes in leptin, ghrelin and adiponectin. Since IL-1beta is involved in the central induction of anorexia, we studied its expression in the nARC as well. AA was induced to Lewis rats using complete Freund's adjuvant. On days 12, 15 and 18 after complete Freund's adjuvant injection, the levels of leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin and IL-1beta were determined by RIA or ELISA. The mRNA expressions for NPY, leptin receptor (OB-R), ghrelin receptor (Ghsr) and IL-1beta were determined by TaqMan RT-PCR from isolated nARC. In AA rats, decreased appetite, body mass and epididymal fat stores positively correlated with reduced circulating and epididymal fat leptin and adiponectin. Ghrelin plasma levels were increased. In nARC, mRNA for OB-R, Ghsr and NPY were overexpressed in AA rats. AA rats showed overexpression of mRNA for IL-1beta in nARC while circulating, and spleen IL-1beta was unaltered. During AA, overexpression of orexigenic NPY mRNA in nARC along with enhanced plasma ghrelin and lowered leptin levels occur. Decreased food intake indicates a predominant effect of the anorexigenic pathway. Activated expression of IL-1beta in nARC suggests its role in keeping AA-induced anorexia in progress. The reduction in adiponectin may also contribute to AA-induced anorexia. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Effects of oleic acid on distinct populations of neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus are dependent on extracellular glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, C; Migrenne, S; Magnan, C; Cotero, V E; Routh, V H

    2006-03-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of fatty acid metabolism in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) alters energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Thus, we tested the hypotheses that distinctive populations of ARC neurons are oleic acid (OA) sensors that exhibit a glucose dependency, independent of whether some of these OA sensors are also glucose-sensing neurons. We used patch-clamp recordings to investigate the effects of OA on ARC neurons in brain slices from 14- to 21-day-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Additionally, we recorded spontaneous discharge rate in ARC neurons in 8-wk-old fed and fasted SD rats in vivo. Patch-clamp studies showed that in 2.5 mM glucose 12 of 94 (13%) ARC neurons were excited by 2 microM OA (OA-excited or OAE neurons), whereas six of 94 (6%) were inhibited (OA-inhibited2.5 or OAI2.5 neurons). In contrast, in 0.1 mM glucose, OA inhibited six of 20 (30%) ARC neurons (OAI0.1 neurons); none was excited. None of the OAI0.1 neurons responded to OA in 2.5 mM glucose. Thus OAI2.5 and OAI0.1 neurons are distinct. Similarly, in seven of 20 fed rats (35%) the overall response was OAE-like, whereas in three of 20 (15%) it was OAI-like. In contrast, in fasted rats only OAI-like response were observed (three of 15; 20%). There was minimal overlap between OA-sensing neurons and glucose-sensing neurons. In conclusion, OA regulated three distinct subpopulations of ARC neurons in a glucose-dependent fashion. These data suggest that an interaction between glucose and fatty acids regulates OA sensing in ARC neurons.

  9. Seasonal regulation of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in the arcuate nucleus of Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Khorooshi, Reza; Helwig, Michael; Werckenthin, Achim; Steinberg, Nicole; Klingenspor, Martin

    2008-06-01

    The hypothalamic neuropeptidergic system involved in the photoperiodic control of energy metabolism in seasonal mammals, is poorly understood. In the present study we examined whether distribution and number of the hypothalamic neuronal cell populations containing cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) are influenced by different photoperiod and ambient temperature, or by food status in the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). Hamsters bred and raised in long day photoperiod at room temperature (16 h light/8h dark at 23 degrees C; LD) were transferred to short day photoperiod and moderate cold (8h light/16 h dark at 16 degrees C; SD). After a 4 weeks acclimation period, uterus and body weight were decreased in SD as compared to controls maintained in LD. The number of CART-immunoreactive cells within the arcuate nucleus (ARC) was significantly higher in SD hamsters compared to LD control. This increase was restricted to the rostro to mid portion of the ARC, specifically in the hypothalamic retrochiasmatic area close to the rostral ARC and in the hypothalamic region lateral to the ARC and ventral to the ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei. In similar hypothalamic regions, food deprivation for 48 h significantly decreased the number of CART-immunoreactive cells in SD hamsters. Shortening of photoperiod combined with lowering of ambient temperature and food deprivation had no effect on the number of CART-immunoreactive cells in the lateral hypothalamic area. These findings suggest that photoperiod and ambient temperature influence energy metabolism potentially by alterations of the CART neuronal system in the rostral portion of the ARC in Djungarian hamsters.

  10. Increased litter size and suckling intensity inhibit KiSS-1 mRNA expression in rat arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Atefeh; Shirazi, Mohammad Reza Jafarzadeh; Zamiri, Mohammad Javad; Tamadon, Amin; Akhlaghi, Amir; Tanideh, Nader; Niazi, Ali; Moghadam, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The effect of litter size and suckling intensity on the expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of rats were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Thirty two pregnant and four non-lactating ovariectomized (as control group) rats were used in this experiment. Lactating rats were allotted to eight equal groups. In three groups, litter size was adjusted to 5, 10, or 15 pups upon parturition and allowed to suckle their pups continuously by 8 days postpartum. In the other three groups, litter size was adjusted to five upon birth; the pups were separated from the dams for 6 hr on day 8 postpartum, after which the pups were allowed to suckle their dams for 2.5, 5, or 7.5 min prior to killing the dams. Two groups of lactating rats with either 10 or 15 pups were separated from their pups for 6 hr on day 8 postpartum, after which the pups were allowed to suckle their dams for 5 min before the dams were killed on day 8 postpartum. The ARC was removed and the expression of KiSS-1 mRNA was evaluated, using real-time PCR. Results: The expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in the ARC was decreased as the litter size and intensity of suckling stimulus were increased. The effect of suckling intensity on the expression of KiSS-1 mRNA was more pronounced than that of litter size. Conclusion: Increased litter size and suckling intensity decreased KiSS-1 mRNA expression in the ARC which may contribute to lactation anestrus in rat. PMID:25422754

  11. Stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus increases brown adipose tissue nerve activity via hypothalamic paraventricular and dorsomedial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2016-08-01

    Hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) stimulation elicited increases in sympathetic nerve activity (IBATSNA) and temperature (TBAT) of interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). The role of hypothalamic dorsomedial (DMN) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei in mediating these responses was studied in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In different groups of rats, inhibition of neurons in the DMN and PVN by microinjections of muscimol attenuated the increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid into the ipsilateral ARCN. In other groups of rats, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors by combined microinjections of D(-)-2-amino-7-phosphono-heptanoic acid (D-AP7) and NBQX into the DMN and PVN attenuated increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ARCN stimulation. Blockade of melanocortin 3/4 receptors in the DMN and PVN in other groups of rats resulted in attenuation of increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ipsilateral ARCN stimulation. Microinjections of Fluoro-Gold into the DMN resulted in retrograde labeling of cells in the ipsilateral ARCN, and some of these cells contained proopiomelanocortin (POMC), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), or vesicular glutamate transporter-3. Since similar projections from ARCN to the PVN have been reported by us and others, these results indicate that neurons containing POMC, α-MSH, and glutamate project from the ARCN to the DMN and PVN. Stimulation of ARCN results in the release of α-MSH and glutamate in the DMN and PVN which, in turn, cause increases in IBATSNA and TBAT. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Chronic oestradiol reduces the dendritic spine density of KNDy (kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin) neurones in the arcuate nucleus of ovariectomised Tac2-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Cholanian, Marina; Krajewski-Hall, Sally J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurones in the arcuate nucleus that express neurokinin B (NKB), kisspeptin and dynorphin (KNDy) play an important role in the reproductive axis. Oestradiol modulates the gene expression and somatic size of these neurones but there is limited information whether their dendritic structure, a correlate of cellular plasticity, is altered by oestrogens. Here we study the morphology of KNDy neurones by filling fluorescent neurones in the arcuate nucleus of Tac2-EGFP transgenic mice with biocytin. Filled neurones from ovariectomized (OVX) or OVX plus 17β-oestradiol (E2)-treated mice were visualized with anti-biotin immunohistochemistry and reconstructed in three dimensions with computer-assisted microscopy. KNDy neurones exhibited two primary dendrites, each with a few branches confined to the arcuate nucleus. Quantitative analysis revealed that E2 treatment of OVX mice decreased the cell size and dendritic spine density of KNDy neurones. The axons of KNDy neurones originated from the cell body or proximal dendrite and gave rise to local branches that appeared to terminate within the arcuate nucleus. Numerous terminal boutons were also visualized within the ependymal layer of the third ventricle adjacent to the arcuate nucleus. Axonal branches also projected to the adjacent median eminence and exited the arcuate nucleus. Confocal microscopy revealed close apposition of EGFP and GnRH-immunoreactive fibers within the median eminence and confirmed the presence of KNDy axon terminals in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle. The axonal branching pattern of KNDy neurones suggests that a single KNDy neurone could influence multiple arcuate neurones, tanycytes in the wall of the third ventricle, axon terminals in the median eminence and numerous areas outside of the arcuate nucleus. In parallel with its inhibitory effects on electrical excitability, E2 treatment of OVX Tac2-EGFP mice induces structural changes in the somata and dendrites of KNDy neurones. PMID:25659412

  13. Chronic oestradiol reduces the dendritic spine density of KNDy (kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin) neurones in the arcuate nucleus of ovariectomised Tac2-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Cholanian, M; Krajewski-Hall, S J; McMullen, N T; Rance, N E

    2015-04-01

    Neurones in the arcuate nucleus that express neurokinin B (NKB), kisspeptin and dynorphin (KNDy) play an important role in the reproductive axis. Oestradiol modulates the gene expression and somatic size of these neurones, although there is limited information available about whether their dendritic structure, a correlate of cellular plasticity, is altered by oestrogens. In the present study, we investigated the morphology of KNDy neurones by filling fluorescent neurones in the arcuate nucleus of Tac2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic mice with biocytin. Filled neurones from ovariectomised (OVX) or OVX plus 17β-oestradiol (E2)-treated mice were visualised with anti-biotin immunohistochemistry and reconstructed in three dimensions with computer-assisted microscopy. KNDy neurones exhibited two primary dendrites, each with a few branches confined to the arcuate nucleus. Quantitative analysis revealed that E2 treatment of OVX mice decreased the cell size and dendritic spine density of KNDy neurones. The axons of KNDy neurones originated from the cell body or proximal dendrite and gave rise to local branches that appeared to terminate within the arcuate nucleus. Numerous terminal boutons were also visualised within the ependymal layer of the third ventricle adjacent to the arcuate nucleus. Axonal branches also projected to the adjacent median eminence and exited the arcuate nucleus. Confocal microscopy revealed close apposition of EGFP and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-immunoreactive fibres within the median eminence and confirmed the presence of KNDy axon terminals in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle. The axonal branching pattern of KNDy neurones suggests that a single KNDy neurone could influence multiple arcuate neurones, tanycytes in the wall of the third ventricle, axon terminals in the median eminence and numerous areas outside of the arcuate nucleus. In parallel with its inhibitory effects on electrical excitability, E2 treatment

  14. Insulin acts in the arcuate nucleus to increase lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Hermes, Sam M; Aicher, Sue A; Brooks, Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although the central effects of insulin to activate the sympathetic nervous system and enhance baroreflex gain are well known, the specific brain site(s) at which insulin acts has not been identified. We tested the hypotheses that (1) the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the arcuate nucleus (ArcN) are necessary brain sites and (2) insulin initiates its effects directly in the PVN and/or the ArcN. In α-chloralose anaesthetised female Sprague–Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) were recorded continuously, and baroreflex gain of HR and LSNA were measured before and during a hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp. After 60 min, intravenous infusion of insulin (15 mU kg−1 min−1), but not saline, significantly increased (P < 0.05) basal LSNA (to 228 ± 28% control) and gain of baroreflex control of LSNA (from 3.8 ± 1.1 to 7.4 ± 2.4% control mmHg−1). These effects were reversed (P < 0.05) by local inhibition (bilateral microinjection of musimol) of the PVN (LSNA to 124 ± 8.8% control; LSNA gain to 3.9 ± 1.7% control mmHg−1) or of the ArcN (LSNA in % control: from 100 ± 0 to 198 ± 24 (insulin), then 133 ± 23 (muscimol) LSNA gain in % control mmHg−1: from 3.9 ± 0.3 to 8.9 ± 0.9 (insulin), then 5.1 ± 0.5 (muscimol)). While insulin receptor immunoreactivity was identified in neurons in pre-autonomic PVN subnuclei, microinjection of insulin (0.6, 6 and 60 nU) into the PVN failed to alter LSNA or LSNA gain. However, ArcN insulin increased (P < 0.05) basal LSNA (in % control to 162 ± 19, 0.6 nU; 193 ± 19, 6 nU; and 205 ± 28, 60 nU) and LSNA baroreflex gain (in % control mmHg−1 from 4.3 ± 1.2 to 6.9 ± 1.0, 0.6 nU; 7.7 ± 1.2, 6 nU; and 7.8 ± 1.3, 60 nU). None of the treatments altered MAP, HR, or baroreflex control of HR. Our findings identify the ArcN as the site at which insulin acts to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase baroreflex

  15. Insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity in part by suppression of tonic inhibitory neuropeptide Y inputs into the paraventricular nucleus in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2016-07-01

    Following binding to receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ArcN), insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and baroreflex control of SNA via a pathway that includes the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Previous studies in males indicate that the sympathoexcitatory response is mediated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which binds to PVN melanocortin type 3/4 receptors (MC3/4R). The present study was conducted in α-chloralose-anesthetized female rats to test the hypothesis that suppression of inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) inputs to the PVN is also involved. In support of this, blockade of PVN NPY Y1 receptors with BIBO 3304 (NPY1x), ArcN insulin nanoinjections, and PVN NPY1x followed by ArcN insulin each increased lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation similarly. Moreover, prior PVN injections of NPY blocked the sympathoexcitatory effects of ArcN insulin. Finally, PVN nanoinjections of the MC3/4R inhibitor SHU9119 prevented both the acute (15 min) and longer, more slowly developing (60 min), increases in LSNA in response to ArcN insulin. In conclusion, in females, ArcN insulin increases LSNA, in part, by suppressing tonic PVN NPY inhibition, which unmasks excitatory α-MSH drive of LSNA. Moreover, the steadily increasing rise in LSNA induced by ArcN insulin is also dependent on PVN MC3/4R. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Identification of a Neuropeptide S Responsive Circuitry Shaping Amygdala Activity via the Endopiriform Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Meis, Susanne; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge Ricardo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Stork, Oliver; Munsch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor are thought to define a set of specific brain circuits involved in fear and anxiety. Here we provide evidence for a novel, NPS-responsive circuit that shapes neural activity in the mouse basolateral amygdala (BLA) via the endopiriform nucleus (EPN). Using slice preparations, we demonstrate that NPS directly activates an inward current in 20% of EPN neurons and evokes an increase of glutamatergic excitation in this nucleus. Excitation of the EPN is responsible for a modulation of BLA activity through NPS, characterized by a general increase of GABAergic inhibition and enhancement of spike activity in a subset of BLA projection neurons. Finally, local injection of NPS to the EPN interferes with the expression of contextual, but not auditory cued fear memory. Together, these data suggest the existence of a specific NPS-responsive circuitry between EPN and BLA, likely involved in contextual aspects of fear memory. PMID:18628994

  17. Arcuate nucleus homeostatic systems are not altered immediately prior to the scheduled consumption of large, binge-type meals of palatable solid or liquid diet in rats and Mice.

    PubMed

    Bake, T; Duncan, J S; Morgan, D G A; Mercer, J G

    2013-04-01

    Meal feeding is a critical issue in the over-consumption of calories leading to human obesity. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the regulation of meal feeding in rodents, we studied a scheduled feeding regime that induces substantial food intake over short periods of time. Male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice were fed one of four palatable diets [45% fat pellet, 60% fat pellet or standard pellet supplemented with Ensure (EN; Abbott Laboratories, Maidenhead, UK) or 12.5% sucrose (SUC)] either ad lib. or with daily 2-h scheduled access and standard pellet available for 22 h. Energy balance gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) reward gene expression were assessed by in situ hybridisation. Rats fed ad lib. on 45% or 60% fat diet were heavier and fatter than controls, and had reduced neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the ARC. Mice fed ad lib. on any of the palatable diets were heavier, fatter and had higher blood leptin than controls, and had reduced NPY and increased cocaine- and-amphetamine-regulated transcript mRNA in the ARC. Schedule-fed rats and mice quickly adapted their feeding behaviour to 2-h access on palatable food. Three schedule-fed groups binged: the percentage of daily calories consumed in 2 h on 45% fat diet, 60% fat diet or EN, respectively, was 55%, 63% and 49% in rats, and 86%, 86% and 45% in mice. However, changed feeding behaviour was not reflected in an induction of orexigenic neuropeptide or suppression of anorexigenic neuropeptide gene expression in the ARC, in the 2-h period prior to scheduled feeding. The mechanisms underlying large meal/binge-type eating may be regulated by nonhomeostatic processes involving other genes in the hypothalamus or other brain areas. However, assessment of opioid and dopamine receptor gene expression in the NAcc did not reveal evidence of the involvement of these genes in driving large meals, at least at the investigated time point.

  18. Neurokinin 3 receptor immunoreactivity in the septal region, preoptic area and hypothalamus of the female sheep: colocalisation in neurokinin B cells of the arcuate nucleus but not in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones.

    PubMed

    Amstalden, M; Coolen, L M; Hemmerle, A M; Billings, H J; Connors, J M; Goodman, R L; Lehman, M N

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence has implicated neurokinin B (NKB) in the complex neuronal network mediating the effects of gonadal steroids on the regulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. Because the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) is considered to mediate the effects of NKB at the cellular level, we determined the distribution of immunoreactive NK3R in the septal region, preoptic area (POA) and hypothalamus of the ewe. NK3R cells and/or fibres were found in areas including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, POA, anterior hypothalamic and perifornical areas, dopaminergic A15 region, dorsomedial and lateral hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventral premammillary nucleus. We also used dual-label immunocytochemistry to determine whether a neuroanatomical basis for direct modulation of GnRH neurones by NKB was evident. No GnRH neurones at any rostral-caudal level were observed to contain NK3R immunoreactivity, although GnRH neurones and fibres were in proximity to NK3R-containing fibres. Because NKB fibres formed close contacts with NKB neurones in the ARC, we determined whether these NKB neurones also contained immunoreactive NK3R. In luteal-phase ewes, 64% +/- 11 of NKB neurones colocalised NK3R. In summary, NK3R is distributed in areas of the sheep POA and hypothalamus known to be involved in the control of reproductive neuroendocrine function. Colocalisation of NK3R in NKB neurones of the ARC suggests a potential mechanism for the autoregulation of this subpopulation; however, the lack of NK3R in GnRH neurones suggests that the actions of NKB on GnRH neurosecretory activity in the ewe are mediated indirectly via other neurones and/or neuropeptides.

  19. Neurokinin 3 Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Septal Region, Preoptic Area and Hypothalamus of the Female Sheep: Colocalization in Neurokinin B Cells of the Arcuate Nucleus but not in Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Amstalden, M.; Coolen, L. M.; Hemmerle, A. M.; Billings, Heather J.; Connors, John M.; Goodman, Robert L.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence has implicated neurokinin B (NKB) in the complex neuronal network mediating the effects of gonadal steroids on the regulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. Since the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) is thought to mediate the effects of NKB at the cellular level, we determined the distribution of immunoreactive NK3R in the septal region, preoptic area (POA) and hypothalamus of the ewe. NK3R cells and/or fibres were found in areas including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, POA, anterior hypothalamic and perifornical areas, dopaminergic A15 region, dorsomedial and lateral hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventral premammillary nucleus. We also used dual-label immunocytochemistry to determine whether a neuroanatomical basis for direct modulation of GnRH neurones by NKB was evident. No GnRH neurones at any rostral-caudal level were observed to contain NK3R immunoreactivity, although GnRH neurones and fibres were in proximity to NK3R-containing fibres. Because NKB fibres formed close contacts with NKB neurones in the ARC, we determined whether these NKB neurones also contained immunoreactive NK3R. In luteal-phase ewes, 64% ± 11 of NKB neurones colocalised NK3R. In summary, NK3R is distributed in areas of the sheep preoptic area and hypothalamus known to be involved in the control of reproductive neuroendocrine function. Colocalization of NK3R in NKB neurones of the ARC suggests a potential mechanism of autoregulation of this subpopulation; however, the lack of NK3R in GnRH neurones suggests that the actions of NKB on GnRH neurosecretory activity in the ewe are mediated indirectly via other neurones and/or neuropeptides. PMID:19912479

  20. MC4R dimerization in the paraventricular nucleus and GHSR/MC3R heterodimerization in the arcuate nucleus: is there relevance for body weight regulation?

    PubMed

    Rediger, Anne; Piechowski, Carolin Leonie; Habegger, Kirk; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Tschöp, Matthias H; Kleinau, Gunnar; Biebermann, Heike

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide obesity epidemic is increasing, yet at this time, no long-acting and specific pharmaceutical therapies are available. Peripheral hormonal signals communicate metabolic status to the hypothalamus by activating their corresponding receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). In this brain region, a variety of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are expressed that are potentially involved in weight regulation, but so far, the detailed function of most hypothalamic GPCRs is only partially understood. An important and underappreciated feature of GPCRs is the capacity for regulation via di- and heterodimerization. Increasing evidence implicates that heterodimerization of GPCRs results in profound functional consequences. Recently, we could demonstrate that interaction of the melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) and the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-1a results in a modulation of function in both receptors. Although the physiological role of GPCR-GPCR interaction in the hypothalamus is yet to be elucidated, this concept promises new avenues for investigation and understanding of hypothalamic functions dependent on GPCR signaling. Since GPCRs are important targets for drugs to combat many diseases, identification of heterodimers may be a prerequisite for highly specific drugs. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms and their involvement in weight regulation is necessary. Fundamental to this understanding is the interplay of GPCR-GPCR in the hypothalamic nuclei in energy metabolism. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on melanocortin receptors and GHSR-1a in hypothalamic weight regulation, especially as they pertain to possible drug targets. Furthermore, we include available evidence for the participation and significance of GPCR dimerization. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits ghrelin-excited neurons of the arcuate nucleus and reduces food intake via central nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Borner, Tito; Pinkernell, Sarah; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces anorexia and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc). Peripheral administration of the iNOS inhibitor 1400 W counteracts the anorectic effects of LPS. Here we investigated the role of central NO signaling in LPS anorexia. In electrophysiological studies we tested whether 1400 W counteracts the iNOS-dependent inhibition of Arc neurons triggered by in vivo or in vitro stimulation with LPS. We used the hormone ghrelin as a functional reference stimulus because ghrelin is known to activate orexigenic Arc neurons. Further, we investigated whether in vitro LPS stimulation induces an iNOS-mediated formation of the second messenger cGMP. Since the STAT1 pathway contributes to the regulation of iNOS expression we investigated whether LPS treatment induces STAT1 phosphorylation in the Arc. Finally we tested the effect of intracerebroventricular injection of 1400 W on LPS-induced anorexia. Superfusion with 1400 W (10(-4) M) increased neuronal activity in 37% of neurons in Arc slices from LPS treated (100 μg/kg ip) but not from saline treated rats. Similarly, 1400 W excited 45% of Arc neurons after in vitro stimulation with LPS (100 ng/ml). In both approaches, a considerable percentage of 1400 W sensitive neurons were excited by ghrelin (10(-8)M; 50% and 75%, respectively). In vitro stimulation with LPS induced cGMP formation in the Arc, which was blocked by co-incubation with 1400 W. LPS treatment elicited a pSTAT1 response in the Arc of mice. Central 1400 W injection (4 μg/rat) attenuated LPS-induced anorexia and counteracted the LPS-dependent decrease in respiratory quotient and energy expenditure. In conclusion, the current findings substantiate a role of central iNOS dependent NO formation in LPS-induced effects on eating and energy homeostasis. A pharmacological blockade of NO formation might be a therapeutic approach to ameliorate disease-related anorexia.

  2. Nutritional Programming of Accelerated Puberty in Heifers: Involvement of Pro-Opiomelanocortin Neurones in the Arcuate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, R C; Alves, B R C; Sharpton, S M; Williams, G L; Amstalden, M

    2015-08-01

    The timing of puberty and subsequent fertility in female mammals are dependent on the integration of metabolic signals by the hypothalamus. Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) comprise a critical metabolic-sensing pathway controlling the reproductive neuroendocrine axis. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH), a product of the POMC gene, has excitatory effects on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones and fibres containing αMSH project to GnRH and kisspeptin neurones. Because kisspeptin is a potent stimulator of GnRH release, αMSH may also stimulate GnRH secretion indirectly via kisspeptin neurones. In the present work, we report studies conducted in young female cattle (heifers) aiming to determine whether increased nutrient intake during the juvenile period (4-8 months of age), a strategy previously shown to advance puberty, alters POMC and KISS1 mRNA expression, as well as αMSH close contacts on GnRH and kisspeptin neurones. In Experiment 1, POMC mRNA expression, detected by in situ hybridisation, was greater (P < 0.05) in the ARC in heifers that gained 1 kg/day of body weight (high-gain, HG; n = 6) compared to heifers that gained 0.5 kg/day (low-gain, LG; n = 5). The number of KISS1-expressing cells in the middle ARC was reduced (P < 0.05) in HG compared to LG heifers. In Experiment 2, double-immunofluorescence showed limited αMSH-positive close contacts on GnRH neurones, and the magnitude of these inputs was not influenced by nutritional status. Conversely, a large number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells in the ARC were observed in close proximity to αMSH-containing varicosities. Furthermore, HG heifers (n = 5) exhibited a greater (P < 0.05) percentage of kisspeptin neurones in direct apposition to αMSH fibres and an increased (P < 0.05) number of αMSH close contacts per kisspeptin cell compared to LG heifers (n = 6). These results indicate that the POMC-kisspeptin pathway may be important

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Controls Ingestive Behavior, Agouti-Related Protein, and Neuropeptide Y mRNA in the Arcuate Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Garretson, John T.; Teubner, Brett J.W.; Grove, Kevin L.; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ controls ingestive behavior, agouti-related protein, and neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Garretson, John T; Teubner, Brett J W; Grove, Kevin L; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-03-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354571-11$15.00/0.

  5. Corticotropin-releasing factor-overexpressing mice exhibit reduced neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and food intake in response to fasting.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Million, Mulugeta; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulating ghrelin levels, and gastric emptying of a nonnutrient meal. CRF-OE mice injected ip with saline showed a 47 and 44% reduction of 30-min and 4-h cumulative food intake response to an overnight fast, respectively, compared with WT. However, the 30-min food intake decrease induced by ip cholecystokinin (3 microg/kg) and increase by ghrelin (300 microg/kg) were similar in CRF-OE and WT mice. Overnight fasting increased the plasma total ghrelin to similar levels in CRF-OE and WT mice, although CRF-OE mice had a 2-fold reduction of nonfasting ghrelin levels. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells induced by fasting in the arcuate nucleus was reduced by 5.9-fold in CRF-OE compared with WT mice whereas no significant changes were observed in other hypothalamic nuclei. In contrast, fasted CRF-OE mice displayed a 5.6-fold increase in Fos-immunoreactive cell number in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and a 34% increase in 20-min gastric emptying. These findings indicate that sustained overproduction of hypothalamic CRF in mice interferes with fasting-induced activation of arcuate nucleus neurons and the related hyperphagic response.

  6. Neuropeptide Y content in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus responds to fasting and refeeding in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weidong; Murakami, Makoto; Hasegawa, Shin; Yoshizawa, Fumiaki; Sugahara, Kunio

    2005-06-01

    To examine the neural mechanism by which hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) regulates energy homeostasis and feeding behavior in commercial broilers, we measured NPY content in several hypothalamic regions of birds that were fasted and then refed. After fasting for 48 and 72 h, body weight significantly decreased, and food intake significantly increased during the subsequent refeeding. The lost body weight was not restored to ad libitum feeding levels even after 3 days of refeeding. Plasma glucose concentration and body fat content significantly decreased and plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration significantly increased after 48- and 72-h fasting. Refeeding for 24 h restored plasma metabolites and body fat content to pre-fasting levels. NPY content in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and infundibular nucleus significantly increased during fasting, and NPY content of the PVN was restored to pre-fasting levels after 24-h refeeding. However, there was no significant change in the NPY content of the lateral hypothalamic area during fasting or refeeding. The present results of changes in the hypothalamic NPY content during fasting and refeeding support the hypothesis that NPY plays a central role in regulation of energy homeostasis, with especially important effect on feeding behavior and body weight in broiler chickens.

  7. Neuroendocrine-Autonomic Integration in the Paraventricular Nucleus: Novel Roles for Dendritically Released Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Communication between pairs of neurones in the central nervous system typically involves classical ‘hard-wired’ synaptic transmission, characterised by high temporal and spatial precision. Over the last two decades, however, knowledge regarding the repertoire of communication modalities used in the brain has notably expanded to include less conventional forms, characterised by a diffuse and less temporally precise transfer of information. These forms are best suited to mediate communication among entire neuronal populations, now recognised to be a fundamental process in the brain for the generation of complex behaviours. In response to an osmotic stressor, the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) generates a multimodal homeostatic response that involves orchestrated neuroendocrine (i.e. systemic release of vasopressin) and autonomic (i.e. sympathetic outflow to the kidneys) components. The precise mechanisms that underlie interpopulation cross-talk between these two distinct neuronal populations, however, remain largely unknown. The present review summarises and discusses a series of recent studies that have identified the dendritic release of neuropeptides as a novel interpopulation signalling modality in the PVN. A current working model is described in which it is proposed that the activity-dependent dendritic release of vasopressin from neurosecretory neurones in the PVN acts in a diffusible manner to increase the activity of distant presympathetic neurones, resulting in an integrated sympathoexcitatory population response, particularly within the context of a hyperosmotic challenge. The cellular mechanism underlying this novel form of intercellular communication, as well as its physiological and pathophysiological implications, is discussed. PMID:25546497

  8. Neuroendocrine-autonomic integration in the paraventricular nucleus: novel roles for dendritically released neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Stern, J E

    2015-06-01

    Communication between pairs of neurones in the central nervous system typically involves classical 'hard-wired' synaptic transmission, characterised by high temporal and spatial precision. Over the last two decades, however, knowledge regarding the repertoire of communication modalities used in the brain has notably expanded to include less conventional forms, characterised by a diffuse and less temporally precise transfer of information. These forms are best suited to mediate communication among entire neuronal populations, now recognised to be a fundamental process in the brain for the generation of complex behaviours. In response to an osmotic stressor, the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) generates a multimodal homeostatic response that involves orchestrated neuroendocrine (i.e. systemic release of vasopressin) and autonomic (i.e. sympathetic outflow to the kidneys) components. The precise mechanisms that underlie interpopulation cross-talk between these two distinct neuronal populations, however, remain largely unknown. The present review summarises and discusses a series of recent studies that have identified the dendritic release of neuropeptides as a novel interpopulation signalling modality in the PVN. A current working model is described in which it is proposed that the activity-dependent dendritic release of vasopressin from neurosecretory neurones in the PVN acts in a diffusible manner to increase the activity of distant presympathetic neurones, resulting in an integrated sympathoexcitatory population response, particularly within the context of a hyperosmotic challenge. The cellular mechanism underlying this novel form of intercellular communication, as well as its physiological and pathophysiological implications, is discussed. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  9. An Indirect Action Contributes to C-Fos Induction in Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus by Neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengjie; Dakshinamoorthy, Janani; Kim, Eun Ran; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively to examine the underlying NPY orexigenic neural pathways. However, PVH C-Fos induction is in discordance with the abundant expression of NPY receptors, a group of inhibitory Gi protein coupled receptors in the PVH, and with the overall role of PVH neurons in feeding inhibition, suggesting a mechanism of indirect action. Here we showed that the ability of NPY on C-Fos induction in the PVH was blunted in conditions of insulin deficiency and fasting, a condition associated with a high level of NPY and a low level of insulin. Moreover, insulin insufficiency blunted C-Fos induction in the PVH by fasting-induced re-feeding, and insulin and NPY induced c-Fos induction in the same group of PVH neurons. Finally, NPY produced normal C-Fos induction in the PVH with disruption of GABA-A receptors. Thus, our results revealed that PVH C-Fos induction by NPY is mediated by an indirect action, which is at least partially mediated by insulin action, but not GABA-A receptors. PMID:26813148

  10. [Concentration of monoamines and activity of several enzymes in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in young and aging rats during the estrous cycle].

    PubMed

    Grantyn', V A

    1976-07-01

    The arcuate nucleus (AN) and the median eminence (ME) of the hypothalamus were investigated in young and ageing female rats. During the estral cycle (EC) the monoamine (MA) content, the monoaminoxidase (MAO), NADP and NAD-diaphorase activities were determined in the AN, and the MA content and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) -- in the ME. In young rats in the proestrus-estrus there was an increase in the activity of the NADP and NAD-diaphorase and of the MA content, but a decrease of the MAO activity. This indicated an intensified function of the nucleus at these stages of the EC. Accumulation of the MA in the ME was noted in the diestrus, while in the proestrus their concentration sharply fell; on the other hand, the activity of the AP was considerably increased. In the ageing rats the dynamics of the indices under study during the EC were largely unchanged. However, the functional activity of the AN proved to increase, and in the ME and elevation of the MA concentration and disturbance of its release from the nerve terminals was seen.

  11. Upregulation of cystathionine β-synthetase in the arcuate nucleus produces pain hypersensitivity via PKC upregulation and GluN2B phosphorylation in rats with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hang; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Meng; Xiao, Ying; Xu, Guang-Yin; Jiang, Xing-Hong

    2016-10-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) contributes to visceral hyperalgesia in primary sensory neurons, but its role in central nervous system remains largely unknown. This study was to investigate the roles and underlying mechanisms of H2S and its endogenous synthesis enzymes in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) in rat pancreatic hyperalgesia. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) was induced in male adult Sprague-Dawley rats by intra-pancreatic ductal injection of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Abdominal hyperalgesia was assessed by referred somatic behaviors to mechanical stimulation of rat abdomen. Western blot analysis was performed to detect protein expression in the ARC. CP markedly upregulated cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) expression but did not alter cystathionine-γ-lyase level in the ARC at 4 weeks after TNBS injection. Although the expression of total GluN2B was not altered, CP greatly enhanced the phosphorylation level of GluN2B in the ARC when compared with age- and sex-matched control rats. CP also significantly increased expression of protein kinase Cγ (PKCγ) in the ARC. Arcuate microinjection of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA, an inhibitor of CBS) significantly attenuated abdominal pain in CP rats in a dose-dependent manner and reversed the CP-induced upregulation of p-GluN2B and PKCγ in the ARC. Furthermore, the GluN2B inhibitor or specific PKC inhibitor chelerythrine significantly attenuated abdominal hyperalgesia in CP rats. The p-GluN2B expression was also suppressed by PKC inhibitor. Taken together, our results suggest that the upregulation of CBS in the ARC leads to an activation of GluN2B via PKCγ, which may play an important role in generation of pain hypersensitivity of CP.

  12. Expression of Ankyrin Repeat and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Box Protein 4 (Asb-4) in Proopiomelanocortin Neurons of the Arcuate Nucleus of Mice Produces a Hyperphagic, Lean Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-Yao; Chai, Biao-Xin; Zhang, Weizhen; Wang, Hui; Mulholland, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling box-containing protein 4 (Asb-4) is specifically expressed in the energy homeostasis-related brain areas and colocalizes with proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Injection of insulin into the third ventricle of the rat brain increased Asb-4 mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus but not in the ARC of the hypothalamus, whereas injection of leptin (ip) increased Asb-4 expression in both mouse paraventricular nucleus and ARC. A transgenic mouse in which Myc-tagged Asb-4 is specifically expressed in POMC neurons of the ARC was made and used to study the effects of Asb-4 on ingestive behavior and metabolic rate. Animals with overexpression of Asb-4 in POMC neurons demonstrated an increase in food intake. However, POMC-Asb-4 transgenic animals gained significantly less weight from 6–30 wk of age. The POMC-Asb-4 mice had reduced fat mass and increased lean mass and lower levels of blood leptin. The transgenic animals were resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Transgenic mice had significantly higher rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production than wild-type mice during both light and dark periods. The locomotive activity of transgenic mice was increased. The overexpression of Asb-4 in POMC neurons increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The transgenic animals had no observed effect on peripheral glucose metabolism and the activity of the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that Asb-4 is a key regulatory protein in the central nervous system, involved in the control of feeding behavior and metabolic rate. PMID:19934378

  13. A critical period for the trophic actions of leptin on AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Kamitakahara, Anna; Bouyer, Karine; Wang, Chien-Hua; Simerly, Richard

    2017-09-10

    In the developing hypothalamus, the fat-derived hormone leptin stimulates the growth of axons from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) to other regions that control energy balance. These projections are significantly reduced in leptin deficient (Lep(ob/ob) ) mice and this phenotype is largely rescued by neonatal leptin treatments. However, treatment of mature Lep(ob/ob) mice is ineffective, suggesting that the trophic action of leptin is limited to a developmental critical period. To temporally delineate closure of this critical period for leptin-stimulated growth, we treated Lep(ob/ob) mice with exogenous leptin during a variety of discrete time periods, and measured the density of Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP) containing projections from the ARH to the ventral part of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMHv), and to the medial parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus (PVHmp). The results indicate that leptin loses its neurotrophic potential at or near postnatal day 28. The duration of leptin exposure appears to be important, with 9- or 11-day treatments found to be more effective than shorter (5-day) treatments. Furthermore, leptin treatment for 9 days or more was sufficient to restore AgRP innervation to both the PVHmp and DMHv in Lep(ob/ob) females, but only to the DMHv in Lep(ob/ob) males. Together, these findings reveal that the trophic actions of leptin are contingent upon timing and duration of leptin exposure, display both target and sex specificity, and that modulation of leptin-dependent circuit formation by each of these factors may carry enduring consequences for feeding behavior, metabolism, and obesity risk. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Expression of ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling box protein 4 (Asb-4) in proopiomelanocortin neurons of the arcuate nucleus of mice produces a hyperphagic, lean phenotype.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Yao; Chai, Biao-Xin; Zhang, Weizhen; Wang, Hui; Mulholland, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling box-containing protein 4 (Asb-4) is specifically expressed in the energy homeostasis-related brain areas and colocalizes with proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Injection of insulin into the third ventricle of the rat brain increased Asb-4 mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus but not in the ARC of the hypothalamus, whereas injection of leptin (ip) increased Asb-4 expression in both mouse paraventricular nucleus and ARC. A transgenic mouse in which Myc-tagged Asb-4 is specifically expressed in POMC neurons of the ARC was made and used to study the effects of Asb-4 on ingestive behavior and metabolic rate. Animals with overexpression of Asb-4 in POMC neurons demonstrated an increase in food intake. However, POMC-Asb-4 transgenic animals gained significantly less weight from 6-30 wk of age. The POMC-Asb-4 mice had reduced fat mass and increased lean mass and lower levels of blood leptin. The transgenic animals were resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Transgenic mice had significantly higher rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production than wild-type mice during both light and dark periods. The locomotive activity of transgenic mice was increased. The overexpression of Asb-4 in POMC neurons increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The transgenic animals had no observed effect on peripheral glucose metabolism and the activity of the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that Asb-4 is a key regulatory protein in the central nervous system, involved in the control of feeding behavior and metabolic rate.

  15. Neuropeptide Y signaling in the dorsal raphe nucleus inhibits male sexual behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A; Komori, Y; Muroi, Y; Kinoshita, K; Ishii, T

    2016-04-21

    Animals change their biological activities depending on their nutritional state. Reproductive functions, including sexual behavior, are suppressed under low-energy conditions; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism is poorly understood. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic molecule released in response to low-energy conditions and has an inhibitory effect on sexual behavior. We examined how NPY is involved in energy state-dependent regulation of male sexual behavior. Mounting, intromission, and ejaculation were evaluated as parameters of sexual behavior. Almost all parameters indicated that fasting for 24h suppressed male sexual behavior. Intracerebroventricular injection of NPY inhibited sexual behavior in males that free-fed for 8h following 24-h fasting (fed males). We next examined whether the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which serotonergic (5-HT) neurons are distributed, is involved in NPY-mediated inhibition of male sexual behavior. NPY-positive processes immunoreactive for a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin, were distributed in the DRN of both fed and fasted males. Expression of the NPY Y1 receptor in 5-HT neurons was also observed. Direct injection of NPY or 8-OH-DPAT (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist that inhibits the activity of 5-HT neurons) into the DRN inhibited male sexual behavior in fed males. In contrast, injection of BIBP-3226, a NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, or (+)-DOI hydrochloride (DOI), a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist that activates 5-HT neurons, into the DRN partially recovered male sexual behavior in 24-h fasted males. These results suggest that NPY inhibits serotonergic neuronal activity via the Y1 receptor in the DRN, resulting in suppression of male sexual behavior in low-energy conditions. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Apolipoprotein A-IV inhibits AgRP/NPY neurons and activates POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Shu, Gang; Wang, Chunmei; Yang, Yongjie; Saito, Kenji; Xu, Pingwen; Hinton, Antentor Othrell; Yan, Xiaofeng; Yu, Likai; Wu, Qi; Tso, Patrick; Tong, Qingchun; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) in the brain potently suppresses food intake. However the mechanisms underlying its anorexigenic effects remain to be identified. Methods We first examined the effects of apoA-IV on cellular activities in hypothalamic neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and in neurons that express pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). We then compared anorexigenic effects of apoA-IV in wild type mice and in mutant mice lacking melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4Rs, the receptors of AgRP and the POMC gene product). Finally, we examined expression of apoA-IV in mouse hypothalamus and quantified its protein levels at fed vs. fasted states. Results We demonstrate that apoA-IV inhibited the firing rate of AgRP/NPY neurons. The decreased firing was associated with hyperpolarized membrane potential and decreased miniature excitatory postsynaptic current. We further used c-fos immunoreactivity to show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of apoA-IV abolished the fasting-induced activation of AgRP/NPY neurons in mice. Further, we found that apoA-IV depolarized POMC neurons and increased their firing rate. In addition, genetic deletion of MC4Rs blocked anorexigenic effects of i.c.v. apoA-IV. Finally, we detected endogenous apoA-IV in multiple neural populations in mouse hypothalamus, including AgRP/NPY neurons, and food deprivation suppresses hypothalamic apoA-IV protein levels. Conclusion Our findings support a model where central apoA-IV inhibits AgRP/NPY neurons and activates POMC neurons to activate MC4Rs, which in turn suppresses food intake. PMID:26337236

  17. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion by kisspeptin/dynorphin/neurokinin B neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, VM; Gottsch, ML; Chavkin, C; Okamura, H; Clifton, DK; Steiner, RA

    2009-01-01

    Kisspeptin is encoded by the Kiss1 gene and kisspeptin signaling plays a critical role in reproduction. In rodents, kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) provide tonic drive to GnRH neurons, which in turn supports basal LH secretion. Our objectives were to determine whether preprodynorphin (Dyn) and neurokinin B (NKB) are coexpressed in Kiss1 neurons in the mouse and to evaluate its physiological significance. Using in situ hybridization, we found that Kiss1 neurons in the Arc of female mice not only express the Dyn and NKB genes, but also the NKB receptor gene (NK3) and the Dyn receptor (the kappa opioid receptor, KOR) gene. We also found that expression of the Dyn, NKB, KOR, and NK3 in the Arc are inhibited by estradiol (E2), as has been established for Kiss1, and confirmed that Dyn and NKB inhibit LH secretion. Moreover, using Dyn and KOR knockout mice, we found that long-term disruption of Dyn/KOR signaling compromises the rise of LH after ovariectomy. We propose a model whereby NKB and dynorphin act autosynaptically on kisspeptin neurons in the Arc to synchronize and shape the pulsatile secretion of kisspeptin and drive the release of GnRH from fibers in the median eminence. PMID:19776272

  18. The impact of ageing, fasting and high-fat diet on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and glucose-sensing neural networks in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    van den Top, Marco; Zhao, Fei-Yue; Pattaranit, Ratchada; Michael, Natalie J; Munder, Astrid; Pryor, Jack T; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2017-08-23

    Obesity and aging are risk factors for diabetes. Here we investigated effects of aging, obesity and fasting on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and on glucose-sensing neuronal function in the arcuate nucleus of rats, with a view to providing insight into central mechanisms regulating glucose homeostasis and how they change or are subject to dysfunction with aging and obesity. We show that following a glucose load, central glucose tolerance at the level of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma is significantly reduced in rats maintained on high fat diet (HFD). With aging, up to 2 years, central glucose tolerance was impaired in an age-dependent manner whilst peripheral glucose tolerance remained unaffected. Aging-induced peripheral glucose intolerance was improved by a 24 hour fast, whilst central glucose tolerance was not corrected. Pre-wean, immature animals have elevated basal plasma glucose levels and a delayed increase in central glucose levels following peripheral glucose injection compared to mature animals. Electrophysiological recording techniques revealed an energy-status-dependent role for glucose excited, inhibited and adapting neurons along with glucose-induced changes in synaptic transmission. We conclude that aging affects central whilst HFD profoundly affects central and peripheral glucose tolerance, and glucose-sensing neurons adapt function in an energy-status-dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of blockade of dopamine receptors on the inhibition of episodic luteinizing hormone release during electrical stimulation of the arcuate nucleus in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gallo, R V

    1978-04-01

    This study examined the possible involvement of dopamine (DA) in mediating the inhibition of episodic LH release that occurs during electrical stimulation of the arcuate nucleus (ARH) in ovariectomized rats. Animals were treated before stimulation with pimozide (1.26--2.0 mg/kg) or d-butaclamol (1 mg/kg), blockers of DA receptors, or l-butaclamol. Apomorphine, which inhibits episodic LH release by activating DA receptors, was given near the end of the experiment to determine if these receptors were blocked. ARH stimulation suppressed pulsatile LH release in six rats when DA receptors were not blocked by pimozide (as well as two in which blockade was not tested). A transient increase occurred in one other animal. When DA receptors were blocked by pimozide, stimulation of the ARH inhibited episodic LH release in nine rats, suggesting that DA may have no role in mediating this inhibition. However, because increased LH release occurred in five additional animals, as well as in one with partial receptor blockade, the possibility remains that DA may perhaps have a minor role in this inhibitory response. Although ARH stimulation increased LH release after DA receptor blockade by d-butaclamol, this effect could not be ascribed to the DA antagonist property of this agent, because elevated blood LH levels also occurred during stimulation in rats treated with l-butaclamol, in which DA receptors were not blocked. d- and l-butaclamol may possess a non-stereospecific action on a non-dopaminergic event, thus reversing the response to ARH stimulation. Finally, whether DA receptors were blocked or not by pimozide, d-, or l-butaclamol, activation of the ventromedial hypothalamic and periventricular nucleus regions suppressed episodic LH release, but did not increase LH secretion. This suggests that the region through which stimulation can inhibit, but not increase, LH release may extend in the hypothalamus to these two areas.

  20. [Implication of the neuropeptides methionine enkephalin, neurotensin and somatostatin of the caudal trigeminal nucleus in the experimental migraine].

    PubMed

    Samsam, M; Coveñas, R; Yajeya, J; Ahangari, R; Narváez, J A; Montes-Gonzalo, M C; González-Barón, S

    Primary peptidergic sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglion that innervate the cerebral dura have been involved in the pathogenesis of headache, including the migraine. In addition, it is known that nociceptive central processes of the trigeminal neurons terminate in the caudal trigeminal nucleus. Moreover, the electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion has been used as an experimental model in order to study the vascular headache, including the migraine. To study whether there is or not a decrease of the immunoreactivity for methionine enkephalin, somatostatin and neurotensin in the caudal trigeminal nucleus after electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion. The trigeminal ganglia of Wistar albino rats of both sexes were electrically stimulated (frequency, 5 Hz; duration, 5 ms; intensity, 0,8 1.4 mA) and unilaterally for five minutes. Sections of the medulla oblongata containing the caudal trigeminal nucleus were obtained and processed for immunocytochemistry, in which specific antibodies were used against methionine enkephalin, neurotensin and somatostatin 28. In stimulated animals, we observed a decrease in the immunoreactivity for the three neuropeptides studied in the stimulated (ipsilateral) side, in comparison with the not stimulated side (contralateral). In control animals (not stimulated) the degree of the immunoreactivity was the same on both sides. 1. The decrease of the immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral side (stimulated) suggests that methionine enkephalin, neurotensin and somatostatin 28 are released in the caudal trigeminal nucleus after electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion; 2. Methionine enkephalin and somatostatin 28 could act in the caudal trigeminal nucleus as inhibitors (with antinociceptive action) of another released exciters neuropeptides (with nociceptive action); and 3. These data will allow in the future to try new therapeutic strategies (e.g., the inhibition of the receptors implicated.), in order to

  1. Involvement of the Beta-Endorphin Neurons of the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus in Ethanol-Induced Place Preference Conditioning in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Raúl; Font, Laura; Miquel, Marta; Phillips, Tamara J.; Aragon, Carlos M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence indicates that mu- and delta-opioid receptors are decisively involved in the retrieval of memories underlying conditioned effects of ethanol. The precise mechanism by which these receptors participate in such effects remains unclear. Given the important role of the proopiomelanocortin (POMc)-derived opioid peptide beta-endorphin, an endogenous mu- and delta-opioid receptor agonist, in some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, we hypothesized that beta-endorphin would also be involved in ethanol conditioning. Methods In the present study we treated female Swiss mice with estradiol valerate (EV), which induces a neurotoxic lesion of the beta-endorphin neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ArcN). These mice were compared to saline-treated controls to investigate the role of beta-endorphin in the acquisition, extinction and reinstatement of ethanol (0 or 2 g/kg; i.p.)-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Results Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed a decreased number of POMc-containing neurons of the ArcN with EV treatment. EV did not affect the acquisition or reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP, but facilitated its extinction. Behavioral sensitization to ethanol, seen during the conditioning days, was not present in EV-treated animals. Conclusions The present data suggest that ArcN beta-endorphins are involved in the retrieval of conditioned memories of ethanol, and are implicated in the processes that underlie extinction of ethanol-cue associations. Results also reveal a dissociated neurobiology supporting behavioral sensitization to ethanol and its conditioning properties, as a beta-endorphin deficit affected sensitization to ethanol, while leaving acquisition and reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP unaffected. PMID:22014186

  2. Effects of insulin and leptin in the ventral tegmental area and arcuate hypothalamic nucleus on food intake and brain reward function in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.; Corrie, Lu W.; Rogers, Jessica A.; Yamada, Hidetaka

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence for a role of insulin and leptin in food intake, but the effects of these adiposity signals on the brain reward system are not well understood. Furthermore, the effects of insulin and leptin on food intake in females are underinvestigated. These studies investigated the role of insulin and leptin in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc) on food intake and brain reward function in female rats. The intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the effects of insulin and leptin on the reward system. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a decrease in brain reward function. The bilateral administration of leptin into the VTA (15–500 ng/side) or Arc (15–150 ng/side) decreased food intake for 72 h. The infusion of leptin into the VTA or Arc resulted in weight loss during the first 48 (VTA) or 24 h (Arc) after the infusions. The administration of insulin (0.005–5 mU/side) into the VTA or Arc decreased food intake for 24 h but did not affect body weights. The bilateral administration of low, but not high, doses of leptin (15 ng/side) or insulin (0.005 mU/side) into the VTA elevated brain reward thresholds. Neither insulin nor leptin in the Arc affected brain reward thresholds. These studies suggest that a small increase in leptin or insulin levels in the VTA leads to a decrease in brain reward function. A relatively large increase in insulin or leptin levels in the VTA or Arc decreases food intake. PMID:21255613

  3. The ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 mimics the neuronal effects of ghrelin in the arcuate nucleus and attenuates anorexia-cachexia syndrome in tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Borner, Tito; Loi, Laura; Pietra, Claudio; Giuliano, Claudio; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The gastric hormone ghrelin positively affects energy balance by increasing food intake and reducing energy expenditure. Ghrelin mimetics are a possible treatment against cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS). This study aimed to characterize the action of the nonpeptidergic ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 on neuronal function, energy homeostasis and muscle mass in healthy rats and to evaluate its possible usefulness for the treatment of CACS in a rat tumor model. Using extracellular single-unit recordings, we tested whether HM01 mimics the effects of ghrelin on neuronal activity in the arcuate nucleus (Arc). Furthermore, we assessed the effect of chronic HM01 treatment on food intake (FI), body weight (BW), lean and fat volumes, and muscle mass in healthy rats. Using a hepatoma model, we investigated the possible beneficial effects of HM01 on tumor-induced anorexia, BW loss, muscle wasting, and metabolic rate. HM01 (10(-7)-10(-6) M) mimicked the effect of ghrelin (10(-8) M) by increasing the firing rate in 76% of Arc neurons. HM01 delivered chronically for 12 days via osmotic minipumps (50 μg/h) increased FI in healthy rats by 24%, paralleled by increased BW, higher fat and lean volumes, and higher muscle mass. Tumor-bearing rats treated with HM01 had 30% higher FI than tumor-bearing controls and were protected against BW loss. HM01 treatment resulted in higher muscle mass and fat mass. Moreover, tumor-bearing rats reduced their metabolic rate following HM01 treatment. Our studies substantiate the possible therapeutic usefulness of ghrelin receptor agonists like HM01 for the treatment of CACS and possibly other forms of disease-related anorexia and cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Preliminary investigation for effects of hypothalamic Leptin/Ghrelin and arcuate nucleus pro-opiomelanocortin system on regulation of high-altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Nian; Ma, Qi-Sheng; Wu, Qiong

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the mechanism of hypothalamic Leptin/Ghrelin and arcuate nucleus pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) system in the regulation of high-altitude acclimatization. SD rats (male) were divided into two groups and separately fed at the 2260m and 4700m altitude. Tow groups contained 5 small groups separately, including 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, 15 d and 30 d, and 8 rats in each group. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid and tissues were taken at setting time. Leptin and Ghrelin were detected by using radioactivity immuno-assay. RNA expression of NPY and POMC were detected by using RT-PCR assay. The number of NPY positive neurons was detected by using immunofluorescence (IF) and cell counting. Other rats were sent to the 4300m and fed in animal room with regular diet and drinking. The results indicated that after being sent to high altitude region, Leptin levels at the 3rd and 7th day were significantly higher than the 1st day, while decreased at 15th, and the level at 30th day was closed to the 1st day. Ghrelin levels decreased at the 3rd, 7th and 15th day, and were lower at the 30th day. Comparing to the 1st day, NPY transcription levels increased at the 7th day, while decreased at the 30th. POMC transcription level decreased at the 7th day, while increased at the 30th gradually. The feeding of the rats fed at the 4300m decreased at the 3rd and the 5th, while increased at the 7th, 15th and 30th day. The weight of the rats changed as the feeding changing. In conclusion, after being sent to the high region, the rats were adaptive to the hypoxia environment gradually, and the steady of neuro-endocrine regulation recovered or established. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Control of chronic excessive alcohol drinking by genetic manipulation of the Edinger–Westphal nucleus urocortin-1 neuropeptide system

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, W J; Rodriguez, E D; Smith, M L; Ford, M M; Galili, D; Mitchell, S H; Chen, A; Ryabinin, A E

    2017-01-01

    Midbrain neurons of the centrally projecting Edinger–Westphal nucleus (EWcp) are activated by alcohol, and enriched with stress-responsive neuropeptide modulators (including the paralog of corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortin-1). Evidence suggests that EWcp neurons promote behavioral processes for alcohol-seeking and consumption, but a definitive role for these cells remains elusive. Here we combined targeted viral manipulations and gene array profiling of EWcp neurons with mass behavioral phenotyping in C57BL/6 J mice to directly define the links between EWcp-specific urocortin-1 expression and voluntary binge alcohol intake, demonstrating a specific importance for EWcp urocortin-1 activity in escalation of alcohol intake. PMID:28140406

  6. Expression of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 (RFRP-3) mRNA in Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus and KiSS-1 mRNA in Arcuate Nucleus of Rat during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Tamadon, Amin; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Mohammadi Nezhad, Saeed; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tanideh, Nader; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) and kisspeptin (KiSS-1) are known to respectively inhibit and stimulate gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and lute- inizing hormone (LH) secretion in rat. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relative mRNA expression of RFRP-3 and KiSS-1 in the hypothalamus of pregnant rats. In a randomized controlled experimental study, the exact preg- nancy day of 18 Sprague-Dawley rats were confirmed using the vaginal smear method and were equally assigned to three groups of days 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy. Four non- pregnant female rats were ovariectomized and assigned as the control group. All rats were decapitated, and the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and the arcuate nucleus (ARC) for detection of KiSS-1 mRNA were separated from their hypothalamus to detect RFRP-3 and KiSS-1 mRNA respectively. Then, their relative expressions were compared between control and pregnant groups using real-time polymerase chain reac- tion (PCR). The relative expression of RFRP-3 mRNA in DMH did not change significantly during pregnancy (p>0.01). However, the relative expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in ARC was at its highest in day 7 of pregnancy and decreased until day 21 of pregnancy (p<0.01). Decrease in GnRH and LH secretion during the pregnancy of rat may be controlled by constant expression of RFRP-3 mRNA and reduced expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in hypothalamus.

  7. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10(-5)-10(-2) M dose dependently increased [Ca(2+)]i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca(2+)-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation

  8. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10−5–10−2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12–16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation mainly

  9. Neuropeptide signaling in the integration of metabolism and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Crown, Angelena; Clifton, Donald K; Steiner, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Fertility is gated by nutrition and the availability of stored energy reserves, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that link energy stores and reproduction are not well understood. Neuropeptides including galanin-like peptide (GALP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), products of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC; e.g., alpha-MSH and beta-endorphin), and kisspeptin are thought to be involved in this process for several reasons. First, the neurons that express these neuropeptides all reside in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, a critical site for the regulation of both metabolism and reproduction. Second, these neuropeptides are all targets for regulation by metabolic hormones, such as leptin and insulin. And third, these neuropeptides have either direct or indirect effects on feeding and metabolism, as well as on the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). As the target for the action of metabolic hormones and sex steroids, these neuropeptides serve as molecular motifs integrating the control of metabolism and reproduction.

  10. Role of the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in the Sympathoexcitatory Effects of Leptin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-11-01

    Leptin binds to receptors in multiple hypothalamic nuclei to increase sympathetic nerve activity; however, the neurocircuitry is unclear. Here, using anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats, we investigated the role of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Intracerebroventricular injection of leptin slowly increased lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA), heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and baroreflex control of LSNA and heart rate. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus with muscimol completely reversed leptin's effects. Blockade of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 or ionotropic glutamate receptors with kynurenate, alone or together, each partially reversed the effects of leptin, implicating increased activation of glutamate and melanocortin 3/4 receptors. Conversely, although blockade of neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus increased LSNA, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate, these responses were prevented by intracerebroventricular or arcuate nucleus injections of leptin, suggesting that, at least in part, leptin also increases sympathetic nerve activity by suppression of tonic neuropeptide Y inhibitory inputs from the arcuate nucleus. Injection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor agonist melanotan-II into the paraventricular nucleus increased LSNA, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate only after blockade of neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors. Therefore, we conclude that leptin increases LSNA in part via increased glutamatergic and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone drive of paraventricular sympathoexcitatory neurons, the latter of which requires simultaneous withdrawal of tonic neuropeptide Y inhibition. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Regulation of nucleus accumbens activity by the hypothalamic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone.

    PubMed

    Sears, Robert M; Liu, Rong-Jian; Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Sharf, Ruth; Yeckel, Mark F; Laubach, Mark; Aghajanian, George K; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2010-06-16

    The lateral hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) are brain regions important for food intake. The AcbSh contains high levels of receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a lateral hypothalamic peptide critical for feeding and metabolism. MCH receptor (MCHR1) activation in the AcbSh increases food intake, while AcbSh MCHR1 blockade reduces feeding. Here biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MCH action in the rodent AcbSh are described. A reduction of phosphorylation of GluR1 at serine 845 (pSer(845)) is shown to occur after both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of MCHR1 activity. These changes depend upon signaling through G(i/o), and result in decreased surface expression of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Electrophysiological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the AcbSh revealed decreased amplitude of AMPAR-mediated synaptic events (mEPSCs) with MCH treatment. In addition, MCH suppressed action potential firing MSNs through K(+) channel activation. Finally, in vivo recordings confirmed that MCH reduces neuronal cell firing in the AcbSh in freely moving animals. The ability of MCH to reduce cell firing in the AcbSh is consistent with a general model from other pharmacological and electrophysiological studies whereby reduced AcbSh neuronal firing leads to food intake. The current work integrates the hypothalamus into this model, providing biochemical and cellular mechanisms whereby metabolic and limbic signals converge to regulate food intake.

  12. Androgen Receptors in the Posterior Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Increase Neuropeptide Expression and the Stress-Induced Activation of the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Brenda; Myung, Clara; Innala, Leyla; Gray, Megan; Anonuevo, Adam; Viau, Victor

    2011-01-01

    The posterior bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST) are important neural substrate for relaying limbic influences to the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus to inhibit hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to emotional stress. Androgen receptor-expressing cells within the posterior BST have been identified as projecting to the PVN region. To test a role for androgen receptors in the posterior BST to inhibit PVN motor neurons, we compared the effects of the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide (HF), or a combination of both drugs implanted unilaterally within the posterior BST. Rats bearing unilateral implants were analyzed for PVN Fos induction in response to acute-restraint stress and relative levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 and GAD 67 mRNA were analyzed in the posterior BST to test a local involvement of GABA. There were no changes in GAD expression to support a GABA-related mechanism in the BST. For PVN neuropeptide expression and Fos responses, basic effects were lateralized to the sides of the PVN ipsilateral to the implants. However, opposite to our expectations of an inhibitory influence of androgen receptors in the posterior BST, PVN AVP mRNA and stress-induced Fos were augmented in response to DHT and attenuated in response to HF. These results suggest that a subset of androgen receptor-expressing cells within the posterior BST region may be responsible for increasing the biosynthetic capacity and stress-induced drive of PVN motor neurons. PMID:21412226

  13. Neuropeptide Y in the central nucleus of the amygdala suppresses dependence-induced increases in alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Misra, Kaushik; Koob, George F

    2008-09-01

    The anxiolytic effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) are mediated in part by the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region involved in the regulation of alcohol-drinking behaviors. Centrally administered NPY suppresses alcohol drinking in subpopulations of rats vulnerable to the development of high alcohol-drinking behavior. The purpose of the current study was to determine the role of NPY in the CeA on elevated alcohol drinking produced by alcohol dependence. Adult male Wistar rats were trained to respond for 10% w/v alcohol in an operant situation with the use of a supersaccharin fading procedure. Following stabilization of responding, rats were divided into two groups matched for intake and given daily access to either alcohol-containing (9.2% v/v) liquid diet or an isocaloric control diet. Following extended access to the diet and reliable separation of operant responding between dependent and non-dependent rats during 6-h withdrawal tests, all rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae aimed at the CeA. Rats were then infused with 4 NPY doses (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 microg/0.5 microl aCSF) in a within-subjects Latin-square design during acute withdrawal and tested for operant alcohol responding 30 min later. Alcohol-dependent rats exhibited higher operant alcohol responding than non-dependent rats when infused with vehicle, but responding was similar in the two groups following infusion of all doses of NPY. These results indicate that NPY abolishes dependence-induced elevations in alcohol drinking and implicate the recruitment of limbic NPY systems in the motivational drive to consume alcohol following the transition to dependence.

  14. Neuropeptide Y response to alcohol is altered in nucleus accumbens of mice selectively bred for drinking to intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M.; Ryabinin, Andrey E.; Crabbe, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The High Drinking in the Dark (HDID) mice have been selectively bred for drinking to intoxicating blood alcohol levels and represent a genetic model of risk for binge-like drinking. Presently, little is known about the specific genetic factors that promote excessive intake in these mice. Previous studies have identified neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a potential target for modulating alcohol intake. NPY expression differs in some rodent lines that have been selected for high and low alcohol drinking phenotypes, as well as inbred mouse strains that differ in alcohol preference. Alcohol drinking and alcohol withdrawal also produce differential effects on NPY expression in the brain. Here, we assessed brain NPY protein levels in HDID mice of two replicates of selection and control heterogeneous stock (HS) mice at baseline (water drinking) and after binge-like alcohol drinking to determine whether selection is associated with differences in NPY expression and its sensitivity to alcohol. NPY levels did not differ between HDID and HS mice in any brain region in the water-drinking animals. HS mice showed a reduction in NPY levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) – especially in the shell – in ethanol-drinking animals vs. water-drinking controls. However, HDID mice showed a blunted NPY response to alcohol in the NAc core and shell compared to HS mice. These findings suggest that the NPY response to alcohol has been altered by selection for drinking to intoxication in a region-specific manner. Thus, the NPY system may represent a potential target for altering binge-like alcohol drinking in these mice. PMID:26779672

  15. Neuropeptide Y response to alcohol is altered in nucleus accumbens of mice selectively bred for drinking to intoxication.

    PubMed

    Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M; Ryabinin, Andrey E; Crabbe, John C

    2016-04-01

    The High Drinking in the Dark (HDID) mice have been selectively bred for drinking to intoxicating blood alcohol levels and represent a genetic model of risk for binge-like drinking. Presently, little is known about the specific genetic factors that promote excessive intake in these mice. Previous studies have identified neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a potential target for modulating alcohol intake. NPY expression differs in some rodent lines that have been selected for high and low alcohol drinking phenotypes, as well as inbred mouse strains that differ in alcohol preference. Alcohol drinking and alcohol withdrawal also produce differential effects on NPY expression in the brain. Here, we assessed brain NPY protein levels in HDID mice of two replicates of selection and control heterogeneous stock (HS) mice at baseline (water drinking) and after binge-like alcohol drinking to determine whether selection is associated with differences in NPY expression and its sensitivity to alcohol. NPY levels did not differ between HDID and HS mice in any brain region in the water-drinking animals. HS mice showed a reduction in NPY levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) - especially in the shell - in ethanol-drinking animals vs. water-drinking controls. However, HDID mice showed a blunted NPY response to alcohol in the NAc core and shell compared to HS mice. These findings suggest that the NPY response to alcohol has been altered by selection for drinking to intoxication in a region-specific manner. Thus, the NPY system may represent a potential target for altering binge-like alcohol drinking in these mice.

  16. Arcuate Kisspeptin/Neurokinin B/Dynorphin (KNDy) Neurons Mediate the Estrogen Suppression of Gonadotropin Secretion and Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Mittelman-Smith, Melinda A.; Williams, Hemalini; Krajewski-Hall, Sally J.; Lai, Josephine; Ciofi, Philippe; McMullen, Nathaniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen withdrawal increases gonadotropin secretion and body weight, but the critical cell populations mediating these effects are not well understood. Recent studies have focused on a subpopulation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons that coexpress estrogen receptor α, neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R), kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin for the regulation of reproduction. To investigate the function of kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) neurons, a novel method was developed to ablate these cells using a selective NK3R agonist conjugated to the ribosome-inactivating toxin, saporin (NK3-SAP). Stereotaxic injections of NK3-SAP in the arcuate nucleus ablated KNDy neurons, as demonstrated by the near-complete loss of NK3R, NKB, and kisspeptin-immunoreactive (ir) neurons and depletion of the majority of arcuate dynorphin-ir neurons. Selectivity was demonstrated by the preservation of proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, and GnRH-ir elements in the arcuate nucleus and median eminence. In control rats, ovariectomy (OVX) markedly increased serum LH, FSH, and body weight, and these parameters were subsequently decreased by treatment with 17β-estradiol. KNDy neuron ablation prevented the rise in serum LH after OVX and attenuated the rise in serum FSH. KNDy neuron ablation did not completely block the suppressive effects of E2 on gonadotropin secretion, a finding consistent with redundant pathways for estrogen negative feedback. However, regardless of estrogen status, KNDy-ablated rats had lower levels of serum gonadotropins compared with controls. Surprisingly, KNDy neuron ablation prevented the dramatic effects of OVX and 17β-estradiol (E2) replacement on body weight and abdominal girth. These data provide evidence that arcuate KNDy neurons are essential for tonic gonadotropin secretion, the rise in LH after removal of E2, and the E2 modulation of body weight. PMID:22508514

  17. Feeding behavior and gene expression of appetite-related neuropeptides in mice lacking for neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor subclass.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Niki, Takeshi; Shiiya, Tomohiro

    2008-11-07

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent neurotransmitter for feeding. Besides NPY, orexigenic neuropeptides such as agouti-related protein (AgRP), and anorexigenic neuropeptides such as alpha-melatonin stimulating hormone (MSH) and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) are also involved in central feeding regulation. During fasting, NPY and AgRP gene expressions are up-regulated and POMC and CART gene expressions are down-regulated in hypothalamus. Based on the network of peptidergic neurons, the former are involved in positive feeding regulation, and the latter are involved in negative feeding, which exert these feeding-regulated peptides especially in paraventricular nucleus (PVN). To clarify the compensatory mechanism of knock-out of NPY system on feeding, change in gene expressions of appetite-related neuropeptides and the feeding behavior was studied in NPY Y5-KO mice. Food intake was increased in Y5-KO mice. Fasting increased the amounts of food and water intake in the KO mice more profoundly. These data indicated the compensatory phenomenon of feeding behavior in Y5-KO mice. RT-PCR and ISH suggested that the compensation of feeding is due to change in gene expressions of AgRP, CART and POMC in hypothalamus. Thus, these findings indicated that the compensatory mechanism involves change in POMC/CART gene expression in arcuate nucleus (ARC). The POMC/CART gene expression is important for central compensatory regulation in feeding behavior.

  18. Neuropeptides and central control of sexual behaviour from the past to the present: a review.

    PubMed

    Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Of the numerous neuropeptides identified in the central nervous system, only a few are involved in the control of sexual behaviour. Among these, the most studied are oxytocin, adrenocorticotropin, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone and opioid peptides. While opioid peptides inhibit sexual performance, the others facilitate sexual behaviour in most of the species studied so far (rats, mice, monkeys and humans). However, evidence for a sexual role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, galanin and galanin-like peptide, cholecystokinin, substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, vasopressin, angiotensin II, hypocretins/orexins and VGF-derived peptides are also available. Corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, vasopressin and angiotensin II inhibit, while substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, hypocretins/orexins and some VGF-derived peptide facilitate sexual behaviour. Neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour by acting mainly in the hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., lateral hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial nucleus, arcuate nucleus), in the medial preoptic area and in the spinal cord. However, it is often unclear whether neuropeptides influence the anticipatory phase (sexual arousal and/or motivation) or the consummatory phase (performance) of sexual behaviour, except in a few cases (e.g., opioid peptides and oxytocin). Unfortunately, scarce information has been added in the last 15 years on the neural mechanisms by which neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour, most studied neuropeptides apart. This may be due to a decreased interest of researchers on neuropeptides and sexual behaviour or on sexual behaviour in general. Such a decrease may be related to the discovery of orally effective, locally acting type V phosphodiesterase inhibitors for the therapy of erectile dysfunction.

  19. 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan Suppressed Food Intake in Rats Despite an Increase in the Arcuate NPY Expression.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Wha; Choi, Si Ho; Yoo, Sang Bae; Lee, Jong-Ho; Jahng, Jeong Won

    2010-12-01

    This study was conducted to define the underlying mechanism of hypophagia induced by increased central serotonergic action. Rats received 3 daily injections of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), a serotonin precursor, at a dose of 100 mg/kg/10 ml saline at 1 h before lights off. A significant suppression in food intake was observed shortly after the 5-HTP injection and persisted during 3 daily 5-HTP injections. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression in the arcuate nucleus increased after 3 days of 5-HTP treatment, as high as in the pair-fed group. Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (pERK1/2) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was increased markedly by 3 days of 5-HTP treatment, but not by 3 days of pair-fed. mRNA expression levels of serotonin reuptake transporter (5-HTT) was increased in the dorsal raphe nucleus of the 5-HTP treated rats, but not in the pair-fed group. Results suggest that increased pERK1/2 in the PVN of 5-HTP injected rats may be a part of serotonergic anorectic signaling, perhaps blunting the orectic action of NPY; i.e., 5-HTP injected rats showed hypophagia despite of increased NPY expression in the arcuate nucleus.

  20. Neurons in the rat arcuate nucleus are hyperpolarized by GABAB and mu-opioid receptor agonists: evidence for convergence at a ligand-gated potassium conductance.

    PubMed

    Loose, M D; Ronnekleiv, O K; Kelly, M J

    1991-12-01

    Both gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the endogenous opioid peptides have pervasive effects on neuroendocrine function. This study examined the effects of selective activation of GABAB and/or mu-opioid receptors on neurons of the arcuate nucelus (ARC) of the rat hypothalamus using intracellular recording of cells in a hypothalamic slice. Some recorded neurons were filled with biocytin allowing subsequent identification and immunocytochemical evaluation for the presence of beta-endorphin. ARC neurons exhibited a broad array of active and passive conductances. Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAGOL), a mu-opioid receptor agonist, inhibited spontaneous firing, hyperpolarized 68% of ARC cells in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell conductance. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, hyperpolarized all cells tested. The reversal potentials for both the DAGOL- and baclofen-induced currents were near that of a potassium conductance. Maximal activation by either of the agonists blocked the effects of the other agonist. Identified beta-endorphin cells were inhibited by both DAGOL and baclofen. The results of these in vitro studies suggest that GABAB and mu-opioid receptors are coupled to the same set of potassium channels and that these channels directly and powerfully inhibit most ARC cells, including beta-endorphin neurons. We propose that convergence of inhibitory influences at the ligand-gated potassium conductance described here may be an important site of interaction for opioidergic, GABAergic and other putative neurotransmitter systems in the control of neuroendocrine circuits by the ARC.

  1. Influence of 17β-estradiol and progesterone on GABAergic gene expression in the arcuate nucleus, amygdala and hippocampus of the rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Nigel C.; Eghlidi, Dominique H.; Garyfallou, Vasilios T.; Kohama, Steven G.; Kryger, Sharon G.; Urbanski, Henryk F.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, and the responsiveness of neurons to GABA can be modulated by sex steroids. To better understand how ovarian steroids influence GABAergic system in the primate brain, we evaluated the expression of genes encoding GABA receptor subunits, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and a GABA transporter in the brains of female rhesus macaques. Ovariectomized adults were subjected to a hormone replacement paradigm involving either 17β-estradiol (E), or E plus progesterone (E+P). Untreated animals served as controls. Using GeneChip® microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), we examined gene expression differences within and between the amygdala (AMD), hippocampus (HPC) and arcuate nuclei of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). The results from PCR corresponded with results from representative GeneChip® probesets, and showed similar effects of sex steroids on GABA receptor subunit gene expression in the AMD and HPC, and a more pronounced expression than in the MBH. Exposure to E+P attenuated GAD1, GAD2 and SLC32A1 gene expression in the AMD and HPC, but not in the MBH. GABA receptor subunit gene expression was generally higher in the AMD and HPC than in the MBH, with the exception of receptor subunits ε and γ2. Taken together, the data demonstrate differential regulation of GABA receptor subunits and GABAergic system components in the MBH compared to the AMD and HPC of rhesus macaques. Elevated ε and reduced δ subunit expression in the MBH supports the hypothesis that the hypothalamic GABAergic system is resistant to the modulatory effects of sex steroids. PMID:19833106

  2. Anorexigenic effects of central neuropeptide K are associated with hypothalamic changes in juvenile Gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Prall, Brian C; Cline, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    The central mechanisms that mediate neuropeptide K (NPK) associated anorexia are poorly understood in any species, and information in this area of avian biology is totally lacking. Thus, the effects of intracerebroventricular NPK treatment were studied in Cobb-500 chicks (Gallus gallus). In Experiment 1, NPK caused decreased feed intake, but did not affect water intake or whole blood glucose concentration. In Experiment 2, NPK-treated chicks had increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the parvicellular division of the paraventricular nucleus and arcuate nucleus. The lateral hypothalamus, ventromedial hypothalamus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, periventricular nucleus, magnocellular division of the paraventricular nucleus, and the superchiasmatic nucleus were not affected by NPK treatment. In Experiment 3, the number of feed pecks, exploratory pecks, jumps, escape attempts, and distance moved were decreased, while time spent standing was increased. None of the NPK-treated chicks sat or entered deep rest. In Experiment 4, blockage of corticotrophin releasing factor receptors did not affect NPK-induced anorexia. Thus, we conclude that NPK is a regulator of chick appetite and the effects may be mediated directly in the arcuate nucleus and parvicellular division of the paraventricular nucleus.

  3. Suckling-induced activation of neuronal input to the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus: possible candidates for mediating the activation of DMH neuropeptide Y neurons during lactation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peilin; Smith, M Susan

    2003-09-12

    Activation of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) neuronal system in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) during lactation in the rat is in part due to neural impulses arising from the suckling stimulus. However, the afferent neuronal input to the DMH that is activated during lactation and is responsible for activation of NPY neurons is currently unknown. Previously, using cFos as a marker for neuronal activation, we identified several brain areas in the lactating animals that were activated by the suckling stimulus. Thus, the objective of the present study was to determine if any of these suckling activated areas project directly to the DMH. The retrograde tracer, fluorogold (FG), was injected into the DMH on day 4 postpartum. FG-injected lactating rats were then deprived of their eight-pup litters on day 9 postpartum, and 48 h later, the pups were returned to the females to reinitiate the suckling stimulus for 90 min and induce cFos expression. The animals were then perfused and the brains were subjected to double-label immunohistochemistry to visualize both FG- and cFos-positive cells. Substantial numbers of FG/cFos double-labeled cells were found in forebrain regions, including the preoptic area, lateral septal nucleus, ventral subiculum, and supramammillary nucleus, and in brainstem regions, including the lateral parabrachial nucleus, periaqeductal gray, and ventrolateral medulla. In conclusion, these areas are potentially important candidates for mediating the activation of the NPY neuronal system in the DMH during lactation.

  4. Rutecarpine ameliorates bodyweight gain through the inhibition of orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AgRP in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jin; Lee, Sung-Jin; Lee, Sanghyun; Chae, Sungwook; Han, Man-Deuk; Mar, Woongchon; Nam, Kung-Woo

    2009-11-20

    Orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AgRP play major roles in feeding and are closely related to obesity and diabetic metabolic syndrome. This study explored the inhibitory effect of rutecarpine on feeding and obesity in high-fat-diet-induced (C57BL/6) and leptin-deficient (ob/ob) obese mice. Both mice strains developed obesity, but the obesity was inhibited by the reduced food intake resulting from rutecarpine treatment (0.01%, p<0.01). Blood cholesterol, non-fasting glucose, insulin, and leptin levels were reduced, compared with the control group. Rutecarpine inhibited the expression of NPY and AgRP in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus and suppressed the expression of both neuropeptides in N29-4 neuronal cells. These results indicate that rutecarpine ameliorates obesity by inhibiting food intake, which involves inhibited expression of the orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AgRP.

  5. TRPV1 receptor in the human trigeminal ganglion and spinal nucleus: immunohistochemical localization and comparison with the neuropeptides CGRP and SP.

    PubMed

    Quartu, Marina; Serra, Maria Pina; Boi, Marianna; Poddighe, Laura; Picci, Cristina; Demontis, Roberto; Del Fiacco, Marina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents new data concerning the immunohistochemical occurrence of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptor in the human trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal nucleus of subjects at different ontogenetic stages, from prenatal life to postnatal old age. Comparisons are made with the sensory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). TRPV1-like immunoreactive (LI) material was detected by western blot in homogenates of TG and medulla oblongata of subjects at prenatal and adult stages of life. Immunohistochemistry showed that expression of the TRPV1 receptor is mostly restricted to the small- and medium-sized TG neurons and to the caudal subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5C). The extent of the TRPV1-LI TG neuronal subpopulation was greater in subjects at early perinatal age than at late perinatal age and in postnatal life. Centrally, the TRPV1 receptor localized to fibre tracts and punctate elements, which were mainly distributed in the spinal tract, lamina I and inner lamina II of the Sp5C, whereas stained cells were rare. The TRPV1 receptor colocalized partially with CGRP and SP in the TG, and was incompletely codistributed with both neuropeptides in the spinal tract and in the superficial laminae of the Sp5C. Substantial differences were noted with respect to the distribution of the TRPV1-LI structures described in the rat Sp5C and with respect to the temporal expression of the receptor during the development of the rat spinal dorsal horn. The distinctive localization of TRPV1-LI material supports the concept of the involvement of TRPV1 receptor in the functional activity of the protopathic compartment of the human trigeminal sensory system, i.e. the processing and neurotransmission of thermal and pain stimuli.

  6. Immunohistochemical mapping of neuropeptide Y in the tree shrew brain.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rong-Jun; Shu, Yu-Mian; Luo, Peng-Hao; Fang, Hui; Wang, Yu; Yao, Lei; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2015-02-15

    Day-active tree shrews are promising animals as research models for a variety of human disorders. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) modulates many behaviors in vertebrates. Here we examined the distribution of NPY in the brain of tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) using immunohistochemical techniques. The differential distribution of NPY-immunoreactive (-ir) cells and fibers were observed in the rhinencephalon, telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, metencephalon, and myelencephalon of tree shrews. Most NPY-ir cells were multipolar or bipolar in shape with triangular, fusiform, and/or globular perikarya. The densest cluster of NPY-ir cells were found in the mitral cell layer of the main olfactory bulb (MOB), arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, and pretectal nucleus of the thalamus. The MOB presented a unique pattern of NPY immunoreactivity. Laminar distribution of NPY-ir cells was observed in the MOB, neocortex, and hippocampus. Compared to rats, the tree shrews exhibited a particularly robust and widespread distribution of NPY-ir cells in the MOB, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and amygdala as well as the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus and pretectal nucleus of the thalamus. By contrast, a low density of neurons were scattered in the striatum, neocortex, polymorph cell layer of the dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, inferior colliculus, and dorsal tegmental nucleus. These findings provide the first detailed mapping of NPY immunoreactivity in the tree shrew brain and demonstrate species differences in the distribution of this neuropeptide, providing an anatomical basis for the participation of the NPY system in the regulation of numerous physiological and behavioral processes.

  7. Impact of glucose infusion on the structural and functional characteristics of adipose tissue and on hypothalamic gene expression for appetite regulatory neuropeptides in the sheep fetus during late gestation.

    PubMed

    Mühlhäusler, B S; Adam, C L; Marrocco, E M; Findlay, P A; Roberts, C T; McFarlane, J R; Kauter, K G; McMillen, I C

    2005-05-15

    In the present study, our aim was to determine whether intrafetal glucose infusion increases fetal adiposity, synthesis and secretion of leptin and regulates gene expression of the 'appetite regulatory' neuropeptides neuropepetide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AGRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and receptors (leptin receptor (OB-Rb) and melancortin 3 receptor (MC3R)) within the fetal hypothalamus. Glucose (50% dextrose in saline) or saline was infused (7.5 ml h(-1)) into fetal sheep between 130 and 140 days gestation (term = 150 +/- 3 days gestation). Glucose infusion increased circulating glucose and insulin concentrations, mean lipid locule size (532.8 +/- 3.3 microm2 versus 456.7 +/- 14.8 microm2) and total unilocular fat mass (11.7 +/- 0.6 g versus 8.9 +/- 0.6 g) of the perirenal fat depot. The expression of OB-Rb mRNA was higher in the ventromedial nucleus compared to the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in both glucose and saline infused fetuses (F= 8.04; P < 0.01) and there was a positive correlation between expression of OB-Rb and MC3R mRNA in the arcuate nucleus (r= 0.81; P < 0.005). Glucose infusion increased mRNA expression for POMC, but not for the anorectic neuropeptide CART, or the orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AGRP, in the arcuate nucleus of the fetal hypothalamus. These findings demonstrate that increased circulating glucose and insulin regulate gene expression of the neuropeptides within the fetal hypothalamus that are part of the neural network regulating energy balance in adult life.

  8. Neuropeptides and obesity.

    PubMed

    Beck, B

    2000-10-01

    This review focuses on the expression, content, and release of neuropeptides and on their role in the development of obesity in animal models with single-gene mutations. The balance between neuropeptides that contribute to the control of feeding behavior is profoundly and variously altered in these models, supporting the concept of the existence of several types of obesity. The hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) systems are the networks most studied in relation to energy intake. Both receive information about the nutritional status and the level of energy storage through insulin and leptin signaling mediated by specific receptors located on POMC and NPY neurons present predominantly in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). When leptin signaling is defective, through a defect in either the receptor (Zucker fa/fa rat, cp/cp rat, and db/db mouse) or in the peptide itself (ob/ob mouse), the NPY system is upregulated as shown by mRNA overexpression and increased peptide release, whereas the content and/or release of some inhibitory peptides (neurotensin, cholecystokinin) are diminished. For the POMC system, there is a complex interaction between the tonic inhibition of food intake exerted by alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and the Agouti-related protein at the level of the type 4 melanocortin receptor. The latter peptide is coexpressed with NPY in the ARC. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the link between food intake and environmental factors. It not only inhibits food intake and prevents weight gain, likely through hypothalamic effects, but also activates the hypothalamo-pituitary axis and therefore contributes to energy storage in adipose tissue. The factors that prod the CRF system toward the hypothalamic or hypothalamo-pituitary axis system remain to be more clearly defined (comodulators, connections between limbic system and ARC, cellular location, and type of receptors, etc. ). The pathways used by all of these

  9. Early weaning is associated with higher neuropeptide Y (NPY) and lower cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) expressions in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; da Silva Lima, Natália; Barradas, Penha Cristina; Manhães, Alex C; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia Cristina

    2012-12-28

    The interruption of lactation for a short period, without the use of pharmacological substances or maternal separation, causes offspring malnutrition and hypoleptinaemia and programmes for metabolic disorders such as higher body weight and adiposity, hyperphagia, hyperleptinaemia and central leptin resistance in adulthood. Here, in order to clarify the mechanisms underlying the phenotype observed in adult early-weaned (EW) rats, we studied the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in different hypothalamic nuclei by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In the EW group, the teats of lactating rats were blocked with a bandage to interrupt lactation during the last 3 d, while control pups had free access to milk throughout the entire lactation period. At age 180 d, EW offspring showed higher NPY staining in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), as well as NPY protein content (+68 %) in total hypothalamus than control ones. AgRP showed no changes in staining or Western blot. POMC content was not affected; however, its distribution pattern was altered. CART-positive cells of EW offspring had lower immunoreactivity associated with reduced cell number in the PVN and lower protein content ( - 38 %) in total hypothalamus. The present data indicate that precocious weaning can imprint the neuronal circuitry, especially in the PVN, and cause a long-term effect on the expression of specific orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as NPY and CART, that can be caused by leptin resistance and are coherent with the hyperphagia observed in these animals.

  10. Effects of Orchidectomy and Testosterone Replacement on Numbers of Kisspeptin-, Neurokinin B-, and Dynorphin A-Immunoreactive Neurones in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Obese and Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Dudek, M; Kołodziejski, P A; Pruszyńska-Oszmałek, E; Ziarniak, K; Sliwowska, J H

    2017-02-01

    Neurones expressing kisspeptin, neurokinin B and dynorphin A, located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), are important regulators of reproduction. Their functions depend on metabolic and hormonal status. We hypothesised that male rats with high-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) and/or streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) will have alterations in numbers of immunoreactive (-IR) cells: kisspeptin-IR and/or neurokinin B-IR and dynorphin A-IR neurones in the ARC in the sham condition. In addition, orchidectomy alone (ORX) and with testosterone treatment (ORX+T) will unmask possible deficits in the response of these neurones in DIO, and/or DM1 and DM2 rats. Rats were assigned to four groups: a control (C) and one diabetic group (DM1) were fed a regular chow diet, whereas the obese group (DIO) and the other diabetic group (DM2) were fed a high-fat diet. To induce diabetes, streptozotocin was injected. After 6 weeks, each group was divided into three subgroups: ORX, ORX+T and sham. After another 2 weeks, metabolic and hormonal profiles were assessed and immunocytochemistry was performed. We found that: (1) under sham conditions: (i) DM1 and DM2 animals had higher numbers of kisspeptin-IR cells than controls and (ii) DM2 rats had increased numbers of neurokinin B-IR and dynorphin A-IR cells compared to C animals; (2) ORX and ORX+T treatments unmasked deficits of the studied neurones in DM1 and DM2 but not in DIO animals; and (3) DIO, DM1 and DM2 rats had altered metabolic and hormonal profiles, in particular decreased levels of testosterone. We concluded that alterations in numbers of kisspeptin-IR and neurokinin B-IR neurones in the ARC and their response to ORX and ORX+T may account for disruptions of metabolic and reproductive functions in diabetic but not in obese rats. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  11. Effect of ghrelin receptor agonist and antagonist on the activity of arcuate nucleus tyrosine hydroxylase containing neurons in C57BL/6 male mice exposed to normal or high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Pirnik, Z; Majercikova, Z; Holubova, M; Pirnik, R; Zelezna, B; Maletinska, L; Kiss, A

    2014-08-01

    Catecholamines participate in the food intake regulation, however, there are no literature data available, dealing with the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons in response to stimulation or inhibition of GHS-R (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). The present study was focused to reveal whether [Dpr(N-octanoyl) 3ghrelin], a stable GHS-R agonist, itself in doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg (s.c.) or in combination with GHS-R receptor antagonist ([DLys3]GHRP-6) in dose of 10 mg/kg (s.c.), may affect the activity of ARC TH-containing neurons in C57BL/6 male mice fed either with standard (SD) or high fat diet (HFD) that developed a diet-induced obesity (DIO). The data of the present study clearly indicate that both doses of GHS-R agonist stimulated food intake in SD mice and GHS-R antagonist significantly reduced GHS-R agonist orexinergic effect in SD mice and suppressed the voluntary food intake in HFD mice. Both doses of the GHS-R agonist stimulated Fos expression in ARC neurons in both diet groups of mice which was not abolished by GHS-R antagonist pretreatment. Moreover, both doses of the GHS-R agonist significantly influenced the activation of TH neurons in the ARC of SD mice. The GHS-R antagonist also significantly increased TH neurons activation after GHS-R agonist although this effect was less powerful in HFD mice. This is the first study demonstrating response of local ARC TH neurons to peripherally applied GHS-R agonist and antagonist. The present data point out that the response of TH neurons to GHS-R agonist and antagonist is different in normal and DIO mice and extend our knowledge about the further ARC neuronal phenotype responding to peripheral ghrelin. To bring insight into the understanding of the functional significance of the activated TH neurons in ARC, in the context of the ghrelin peripheral increase, further studies are required.

  12. Differential effects of recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated neuropeptide Y overexpression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and lateral hypothalamus on feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Tiesjema, Birgitte; Adan, Roger A H; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2007-12-19

    It is well known that neuropeptide Y (NPY) increases food intake. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are both involved in the acute, hyperphagic effects of NPY. Although it is obvious that increased energy intake may lead to obesity, it is less understood which aspects of feeding behavior are affected and whether one or multiple neural sites mediate the effects of long-term increased NPY signaling. By long-term overexpressing NPY in either the PVN or the LH, we uncovered brain site-specific effects of NPY on meal frequency, meal size, and diurnal feeding patterns. In rats injected with adeno-associated virus-NPY in the PVN, increased food intake resulted from an increase in the amount of meals consumed, whereas in rats injected in the LH, increased food intake was attributable to increased meal size. Interestingly, food intake and body weight gain were only temporarily increased in PVN-injected rats, whereas in LH-injected rats hyperphagia and body weight gain remained for the entire 50 d. Moreover, in LH-NPY rats, but not in PVN-NPY rats, diurnal rhythmicity with regard to food intake and body core temperature was lost. These data clearly show that the NPY system differentially regulates energy intake and energy expenditure in the PVN and LH, which together adjust energy balance.

  13. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  14. Appetite regulatory neuropeptides are expressed in the sheep hypothalamus before birth.

    PubMed

    Mühlhäusler, B S; McMillen, I C; Rouzaud, G; Findlay, P A; Marrocco, E M; Rhind, S M; Adam, C L

    2004-06-01

    In the adult, a hypothalamic neural network acts to maintain energy balance in response to nutritional feedback from the periphery. Although there is an immediate requirement for this system to be functional at birth, it is unknown whether the components of this central neural network are expressed in the developing brain before birth. We therefore examined in the fetal sheep hypothalamus during late gestation gene expression for leptin receptor (OB-Rb) and neuropeptides that regulate energy balance in the adult. Brains were collected from fetal sheep at 110 days (n = 12) and 140 days of gestation (n = 5) (term = 150 days) and gene expression was detected in all hypothalami using in situ hybridization with radiolabelled riboprobes for OB-Rb, neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide, pro-opiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). All mRNAs were expressed in the arcuate nucleus of fetuses at both time points. Additional sites of mRNA expression were the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) for NPY, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and lateral hypothalamic area for CART, and the DMH, PVN and VMH for OB-Rb. We have therefore demonstrated that adult-like localization of gene expression for OB-Rb and key appetite regulatory neuropeptides is established in the ovine hypothalamus before birth. Thus, the fetus possesses a central appetite regulatory neural network with the potential to respond to changes in nutrient supply, which could impact on energy balance regulation both before and after birth.

  15. The effects of aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment on circadian rhythms and suprachiasmatic nucleus expression of neuropeptide genes and 5-HT1B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Marilyn J.; Hester, James M.; Hopper, Jason A.; Franklin, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related changes in circadian rhythms, including attenuation of photic phase shifts, are associated with changes in the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Aging decreases expression of mRNA for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a key neuropeptide for rhythm generation and photic phase shifts, and increases expression of serotonin transporters and 5-HT1B receptors, whose activation inhibits these phase shifts. Here we describe studies in hamsters showing that aging decreases SCN expression of mRNA for gastrin-releasing peptide, which also modulates photic phase resetting. Because serotonin innervation trophically supports SCN VIP mRNA expression, and serotonin transporters decrease extracellular serotonin, we predicted that chronic administration of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, would attenuate the age-related changes in SCN VIP mRNA expression and 5-HT1B receptors. In situ hybridization studies showed that fluoxetine treatment does not alter SCN VIP mRNA expression, in either age group, at zeitgeber time (ZT)6 or 13 (ZT12 corresponds to lights off). However, receptor autoradiographic studies showed that fluoxetine prevents the age-related increase in SCN 5-HT1B receptors at ZT6, and decreases SCN 5-HT1B receptors in both ages at ZT13. Therefore, aging effects on SCN VIP mRNA and SCN 5-HT1B receptors are differentially regulated; the age-related increase in serotonin transporter sites mediates the latter but not the former. The studies also showed that aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment decrease total daily wheel running without altering the phase of the circadian wheel running rhythm, in contrast to previous reports of phase resetting by acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:20525077

  16. Immunohistochemical and genomic evidence for the involvement of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in phenylpropranolamine-mediated appetite suppression.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Yang, Shun-Fa; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2004-12-01

    Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is an appetite suppressant. The mechanism for the anorectic effect of PPA has been attributed to its action on the site of hypothalamic paraventriculum. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an appetite stimulant that is widely distributed in the site of hypothalamus. It is not clear whether hypothalamic NPY is involved in the anorectic action of PPA. This study was aimed to investigate the mechanism underlying the involvement of NPY gene in the anorectic action of PPA. Results revealed that PPA treatment in rats could decrease both NPY content and mRNA level in the hypothalamus. In addition, the expression of NPY immunoreactivity following PPA treatment was decreased in areas of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus and periventricular area using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting an involvement of NPYergic pathway in the action of PPA anorexia. Our results provided immunohistochemical and genomic evidence to suggest that PPA might reduce feeding by altering NPY gene expression.

  17. Neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide mediate complementary functions of hyperphagia and reduced energy expenditure in leptin receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luo, Na; Marcelin, Genevieve; Liu, Shun Mei; Schwartz, Gary; Chua, Streamson

    2011-03-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AGRP) can produce hyperphagia, reduce energy expenditure, and promote triglyceride deposition in adipose depots. As these two neuropeptides are coexpressed within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and mediate a major portion of the obesity caused by leptin signaling deficiency, we sought to determine whether the two neuropeptides mediated identical or complementary actions. Because of separate neuropeptide receptors and signal transduction mechanisms, there is a possibility of distinct encoding systems for the feeding and energy expenditure aspects of leptin-regulated metabolism. We have genetically added NPY deficiency and/or AGRP deficiency to LEPR deficiency isolated to AGRP cells. Our results indicate that the obesity of LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons can produce obesity with either AGRP or NPY alone with AGRP producing hyperphagia while NPY promotes reduced energy expenditure. The absence of both NPY and AGRP prevents the development of obesity attributable to isolated LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons. Operant behavioral testing indicated that there were no alterations in the reward for a food pellet from the AGRP-specific LEPR deficiency.

  18. Olanzapine-Induced Hyperphagia and Weight Gain Associate with Orexigenic Hypothalamic Neuropeptide Signaling without Concomitant AMPK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Fernø, Johan; Vázquez, María Jesús; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Steen, Vidar M.; López, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The success of antipsychotic drug treatment in patients with schizophrenia is limited by the propensity of these drugs to induce hyperphagia, weight gain and other metabolic disturbances, particularly evident for olanzapine and clozapine. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in antipsychotic-induced hyperphagia remain unclear. Here, we investigate the effect of olanzapine administration on the regulation of hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake, namely neuropeptide expression and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in rats. Our results show that subchronic exposure to olanzapine upregulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related protein (AgRP) and downregulates proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC). This effect was evident both in rats fed ad libitum and in pair-fed rats. Of note, despite weight gain and increased expression of orexigenic neuropeptides, subchronic administration of olanzapine decreased AMPK phosphorylation levels. This reduction in AMPK was not observed after acute administration of either olanzapine or clozapine. Overall, our data suggest that olanzapine-induced hyperphagia is mediated through appropriate changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides, and that this effect does not require concomitant AMPK activation. Our data shed new light on the hypothalamic mechanism underlying antipsychotic-induced hyperphagia and weight gain, and provide the basis for alternative targets to control energy balance. PMID:21695181

  19. The investigation of leptin and hypothalamic neuropeptides role in first attack psychotic male patients: olanzapine monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ak, Mehmet; Sezlev, Deniz; Sutcigil, Levent; Akarsu, Suleyman; Ozgen, Fuat; Yanik, Tulin

    2013-03-01

    The mechanism underlying the weight gain due to treatment with olanzapine and other second generation antipsychotics has not been fully understood. To examine olanzapine's weight gain effects, we accepted first attack psychotic patients with no medication (pre-treatment) (n=22) and the healthy control group (n=26) in this study. After patientś diagnosis, they were hospitalized and then treated for four weeks with olanzapine (post-treatment). We used case-control association design to test body mass index (BMI) and biochemical changes in each group. We also investigated peripheral leptin and neuropeptides/hormones namely, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetaime regulated transcript (CART), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels. These neuropeptides which are synthesized/secreted from arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus affect food intake and therefore, body weight. After 4 weeks of olanzapine treatment; BMI (body mass index), waist circumference, blood triglyceride, total cholesterol, and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels were increased significantly in patients compared to their pre-treatment baseline. In pre-treatment, patients' NPY levels were significantly lower while α-MSH, the anorexigenic product of POMC levels were significantly higher vs. control. Both leptin and NPY levels were significantly increased in patients after the treatment but the NPY levels were also significantly lower in post-treatment vs. the control group. The CART levels did not change after the treatment. We may presume that the antagonist effect of olanzapine on the serotonin (5HT2CR and 5HT1BR) receptors of the arcuate hypothalamic neurons may be a basis for a deregulation of the neurohormones secretion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Maternal nicotine exposure during lactation alters hypothalamic neuropeptides expression in the adult rat progeny.

    PubMed

    Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; Moura, Egberto G; Manhães, Alex C; Pinheiro, Cintia R; Santos-Silva, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia C

    2013-08-01

    Maternal exposure to nicotine during lactation causes hyperleptinemia in the pups and, at adulthood, these animals are overweight and hyperleptinemic, while, in their hypothalamus, the leptin signaling pathway is reduced, evidencing a central leptin resistance. Then, we evaluated the expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and others in different hypothalamic nuclei in order to better understand the mechanisms underlying the obese phenotype observed in these animals at adulthood. On the 2nd postnatal day (P2), dams were subcutaneously implanted with osmotic minipumps releasing nicotine (NIC-6 mg/kg/day) or saline for 14 days. Offspring were killed in P180 and immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were carried out. Significance data had p<0.05. Adult NIC offspring showed more intense NPY staining in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) (+21%) and increased number of POMC-positive cells in the: arcuate nucleus (+33%), as an increase in fiber density of α-MSH in PVN (+85%). However, the number of CART-positive cells was reduced in the PVN (-25%). CRH staining was more intense in NIC offspring (+136%). Orexins and AgRP were not altered. Thus, maternal nicotine exposure changes hypothalamic neuropeptides in the adult progeny that is partially compatible with leptin resistance.

  1. Forebrain Projections of Arcuate Neurokinin B Neurons Demonstrated by Anterograde Tract-Tracing and Monosodium Glutamate Lesions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Sally J.; Burke, Michelle C.; Anderson, Miranda J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin receptor signaling are essential components of the reproductive axis. A population of neurons resides within the arcuate nucleus of the rat that expresses NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and estrogen receptor α. Here we investigate the projections of these neurons using NKB-immunocytochemistry as a marker. First, the loss of NKB-immunoreactive (ir) somata and fibers was characterized after ablation of the arcuate nucleus by neonatal injections of monosodium glutamate. Second, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the arcuate nucleus and anterogradely labeled NKB-ir fibers were identified using dual-labeled immunofluorescence. Four major projection pathways are described: 1) Local projections within the arcuate nucleus bilaterally, 2) Projections to the median eminence including the lateral palisade zone, 3) Projections to a periventricular pathway extending rostrally to multiple hypothalamic nuclei, the septal region and BNST and dorsally to the dorsomedial nucleus and 4) Projections to a ventral hypothalamic tract to the lateral hypothalamus and medial forebrain bundle. The diverse projections provide evidence that NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons could integrate the reproductive axis with multiple homeostatic, behavioral and neuroendocrine processes. Interestingly, anterograde tract-tracing revealed NKB-ir axons originating from arcuate neurons terminating on other NKB-ir somata within the arcuate nucleus. Combined with previous studies, these experiments reveal a bilateral interconnected network of sex-steroid responsive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat that express NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and ERα and project to GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This circuitry provides a mechanism for bilateral synchronization of arcuate NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons to modulate the pulsatile secretion of GnRH. PMID:20038444

  2. Re-purposing of histological tissue sections for corroborative western blot analysis of hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression following delineation of transactivated structures by Fos immuno-mapping.

    PubMed

    Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P

    2015-04-01

    Fos immunocytochemistry is a valuable anatomical mapping tool for distinguishing cells within complex tissues that undergo genomic activation, but it is seldom paired with corroborative molecular analytical techniques. Due to preparatory requirements that include protein cross-linking for specimen sectioning, histological tissue sections are regarded as unsuitable for those methods. Our studies show that pharmacological activation of the hindbrain energy sensor AMPK by AICAR elicits estradiol (E)-dependent patterns of Fos immunolabeling of hypothalamic metabolic loci. Here, Western blotting was applied to hypothalamic tissue removed from histological sections of E- versus oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) female rat brain to measure levels of metabolic transmitters associated with Fos-positive structures. In both E and O rats, AICAR treatment elicited alterations in pro-opiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, SF-1, and orexin-A neuropeptide expression that coincided with patterns of Fos labeling of structures containing neurons that synthesize these neurotransmitters, e.g. arcuate and ventromedial nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area. O, but not E animals also exhibited parallel augmentation of tissue corticotropin-releasing hormone neuropeptide levels and paraventricular nucleus Fos staining. Data demonstrate the utility of immunoblot analysis as a follow-through technique to capitalize on Fos mapping of transactivation sites in the brain. Findings that induction of Fos immunoreactivity coincides with adjustments in hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression affirms that this functional indicator reflects changes in neurotransmission in pathways governing metabolic outflow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    McClintick, Jeanette N; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5-3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Immunoreactivities in the Arcuate-Median Eminence Complex and their Link to the Tubero-Infundibular Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Fernandez, W.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Vargas-Barroso, V.; Narváez, M.; Di Palma, M.; Agnati, L.F.; Sahd, J. Larriva

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially

  5. Crustacean neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Stemmler, Elizabeth A; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2010-12-01

    Crustaceans have long been used for peptide research. For example, the process of neurosecretion was first formally demonstrated in the crustacean X-organ-sinus gland system, and the first fully characterized invertebrate neuropeptide was from a shrimp. Moreover, the crustacean stomatogastric and cardiac nervous systems have long served as models for understanding the general principles governing neural circuit functioning, including modulation by peptides. Here, we review the basic biology of crustacean neuropeptides, discuss methodologies currently driving their discovery, provide an overview of the known families, and summarize recent data on their control of physiology and behavior.

  6. Divergent regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein by photoperiod in F344 rats with differential food intake and growth.

    PubMed

    Ross, A W; Johnson, C E; Bell, L M; Reilly, L; Duncan, J S; Barrett, P; Heideman, P D; Morgan, P J

    2009-07-01

    Hypothalamic genes involved in food intake and growth regulation were studied in F344 rats in response to photoperiod. Two sub-strains were identified: F344/NHsd (F344/N) and F344/NCrHsd (F344/NCr); sensitive and relatively insensitive to photoperiod respectively. In F344/N rats, marked, but opposite, changes in the genes for neuropeptide Y (NPY) (+97.5%) and agouti-related protein (AgRP) (-39.3%) expression in the arcuate nucleus were observed in response to short (8 : 16 h light/dark cycle, SD) relative to long (16 : 8 h light/dark cycle, LD) day photoperiods. Changes were associated with both reduced food intake and growth. Expression of the genes for cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the arcuate nucleus was unchanged by photoperiod. POMC in the ependymal layer around the third ventricle was markedly inhibited by SD. Parallel decreases in the genes for growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (Somatostatin) mRNA in the arcuate nucleus and Somatostatin in the periventricular nucleus were observed in SD. Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and insulin were lower in F344/N rats in SD, whereas neither leptin nor corticosterone levels were affected. By contrast, F344/NCr rats that show only minor food intake and growth rate changes showed minimal responses in these genes and hormones. Thus, NPY/AgRP neurones may be pivotal to the photoperiodic regulation of food intake and growth. Potentially, the SD increase in NPY expression may inhibit growth by decreasing GHRH and Somatostatin expression, whereas the decrease in AgRP expression probably leads to reduced food intake. The present study reveals an atypical and divergent regulation of NPY and AgRP, which may relate to their separate roles with respect to growth and food intake, respectively.

  7. Ethanol-Induced Increase of Agouti-Related Protein (AgRP) Immunoreactivity in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus of C57BL/6J, but not 129/SvJ, Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cubero, Inmaculada; Navarro, Montserrat; Carvajal, Francisca; Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel; Thiele, Todd E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The melanocortin (MC) system is composed of peptides that are cleaved from the polypeptide precursor, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Previous research has shown that MC receptor (MCR) agonists reduce, and MCR antagonists increase, ethanol consumption in rats and mice. Consistently, genetic deletion of the endogenous MCR antagonist, agouti-related protein (AgRP), causes reductions of ethanol-reinforced lever pressing and binge-like ethanol drinking in C57BL/6J mice. Ethanol also has direct effects on the central MC system, as chronic exposure to an ethanol-containing diet causes significant reductions of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) immunoreactivity in specific brain regions of Sprague-Dawley rats. Together, these observations suggest that the central MC system modulates neurobiological responses to ethanol. To further characterize the role of the MC system in responses to ethanol, here we compared AgRP and α-MSH immunoreactivity in response to an acute injection of saline or ethanol between high ethanol drinking C57BL/6J mice and moderate ethanol drinking 129/SvJ mice. Methods Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ethanol (1.5 g/kg or 3.5 g/kg; mixed in 0.9% saline) or an equivolume of 0.9% saline. Two hours after injection, animals were sacrificed and their brains were processed for AgRP and α-MSH immunoreactivity. Results Results indicated that acute ethanol administration triggered a dose-dependent increase in AgRP immunoreactivity in the arcuate (ARC) of C57BL/6J mice, an effect that was not evident in the 129/SvJ strain. Although acute administration of ethanol did not influence α-MSH immunoreactivity, C57BL/6J mice had significantly greater overall α-MSH immunoreactivity in the ARC, dorsomedial, and lateral regions of the hypothalamus relative to the 129/SvJ strain. In contrast, C57BL/6J mice displayed significantly lower α-MSH immunoreactivity in the medial amygdala. Conclusions The results show that acute ethanol

  8. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  9. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH. PMID:26443858

  10. Diet-induced obesity causes ghrelin resistance in arcuate NPY/AgRP neurons.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Dana I; Enriori, Pablo J; Lemus, Moyra B; Cowley, Michael A; Andrews, Zane B

    2010-10-01

    Circulating ghrelin is decreased in obesity, and peripheral ghrelin does not induce food intake in obese mice. We investigated whether ghrelin resistance was a centrally mediated phenomenon involving dysregulated neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) circuits. We show that diet-induced obesity (DIO) (12 wk) suppresses the neuroendocrine ghrelin system by decreasing acylated and total plasma ghrelin, decreasing ghrelin and Goat mRNA in the stomach, and decreasing expression of hypothalamic GHSR. Peripheral (ip) or central (intracerebroventricular) ghrelin injection was able to induce food intake and arcuate nucleus Fos immunoreactivity in chow-fed but not high-fat diet-fed mice. DIO decreased expression of Npy and Agrp mRNA, and central ghrelin was unable to promote expression of these genes. Ghrelin did not induce AgRP or NPY secretion in hypothalamic explants from DIO mice. Injection of NPY intracerebroventricularly increased food intake in both chow-fed and high-fat diet-fed mice, indicating that downstream NPY/AgRP neural targets are intact and that defective NPY/AgRP function is a primary cause of ghrelin resistance. Ghrelin resistance in DIO is not confined to the NPY/AgRP neurons, because ghrelin did not stimulate growth hormone secretion in DIO mice. Collectively, our data suggests that DIO causes ghrelin resistance by reducing NPY/AgRP responsiveness to plasma ghrelin and suppressing the neuroendocrine ghrelin axis to limit further food intake. Ghrelin has a number of functions in the brain aside from appetite control, including cognitive function, mood regulation, and protecting against neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, central ghrelin resistance may potentiate obesity-related cognitive decline, and restoring ghrelin sensitivity may provide therapeutic outcomes for maintaining healthy aging.

  11. Na⁺/Ca²⁺ Exchanger 2 (NCX2) in the Circadian Clock of the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Colocalization with Neuropeptides and Daily Profiles of Gene Expression and Protein Levels.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pi-Cheng; Chen, Ya-Shuan; Huang, Rong-Chi

    2017-08-31

    The plasmalemmal Na⁺/Ca²⁺ changer (NCX) regulates intracellular Ca²⁺ by exchanging 3 Na⁺ for 1 Ca²⁺ in either the Ca²⁺ exit or Ca²⁺ entry mode. All three NCX isoforms NCX1, NCX2, and NCX3 are expressed in the rat brain, with isoform-specific differential distribution. In the central clock of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), intracellular Ca²⁺ controls the circadian release of major neuropeptides, which are the arginine vasopressin (AVP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), and the NCX, most likely NCX1, rapidly clears depolarization-induced somatic Ca²⁺ influx. However, the role of NCX2 in the SCN remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the colocalization of NCX2 with neuropeptides and daily expression profiles of NCX2 in mRNA and protein levels. Consistent with the restricted distribution of NCX2 in the retinorecipient ventral SCN, the immunostaining results showed colocalization of NCX2 with VIP, GRP and VIP/GRP in the ventral SCN, but not with AVP in the dorsal SCN, or markers for astrocyte and major input pathways. Importantly, the presynaptic marker Bassoon was found to colocalize with NCX2/GRP and NCX2/ VIP, indicating localization of both VIP/NCX2 and GRP/NCX2 at the presynaptic sites. Furthermore, real-time PCR and western blotting revealed no day-night difference in NCX2 mRNA and protein levels, in contrast to a robust circadian rhythm in the expression of clock genes Per1 and Per2. Together the results suggest a role of NCX2 in the regulation of the release of VIP and GRP.

  12. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  13. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  14. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  15. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  16. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIV

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  17. Adolescent Alcohol Exposure-Induced Changes in Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone and Neuropeptide Y Pathways via Histone Acetylation in the Brain During Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kokare, Dadasaheb M; Kyzar, Evan J; Zhang, Huaibo; Sakharkar, Amul J; Pandey, Subhash C

    2017-09-01

    Adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure causes long-lasting alterations in brain epigenetic mechanisms. Melanocortin and neuropeptide Y signaling interact and are affected by ethanol exposure in the brain. Here, the persistent effects of adolescent intermittent ethanol on alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, melanocortin 4 receptor, and neuropeptide Y expression and their regulation by histone acetylation mechanisms were investigated in adulthood. Male rats were exposed to adolescent intermittent ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.) or volume-matched adolescent intermittent saline from postnatal days 28 to 41 and allowed to grow to postnatal day 92. Anxiety-like behaviors were measured by the elevated plus-maze test. Brain regions from adult rats were used to examine changes in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, melanocortin 4 receptor, and neuropeptide Y expression and the histone acetylation status of their promoters. Adolescent intermittent ethanol-exposed adult rats displayed anxiety-like behaviors and showed increased pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA levels in the hypothalamus and increased melanocortin 4 receptor mRNA levels in both the amygdala and hypothalamus compared with adolescent intermittent saline-exposed adult rats. The alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone and melanocortin 4 receptor protein levels were increased in the central and medial nucleus of the amygdala, paraventricular nucleus, and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in adolescent intermittent ethanol-exposed compared with adolescent intermittent saline-exposed adult rats. Neuropeptide Y protein levels were decreased in the central and medial nucleus of the amygdala of adolescent intermittent ethanol-exposed compared with adolescent intermittent saline-exposed adult rats. Histone H3K9/14 acetylation was decreased in the neuropeptide Y promoter in the amygdala but increased in the melanocortin 4 receptor gene promoter in the amygdala and the melanocortin 4 receptor and pro-opiomelanocortin promoters in the

  18. Brain levels of neuropeptides in human chronic methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Paul S; Alburges, Mario E; Bush, Lloyd; Hanson, Glen R; Kish, Stephen J

    2007-09-01

    Animal data show that neuropeptide systems in the dopamine-rich brain areas of the striatum (caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens) are influenced by exposure to psychostimulants, suggesting that neuropeptides are involved in mediating aspects of behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. To establish in an exploratory study whether levels of neuropeptides are altered in brain of human methamphetamine users, we measured tissue concentrations of dynorphin, metenkephalin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin, and substance P in autopsied brains of 16 chronic methamphetamine users and 17 matched control subjects. As expected, levels of most neuropeptides were enriched in dopamine-linked brain regions such as the nucleus accumbens and striatum of normal human brain. In contrast to animal findings of increased neuropeptide levels following short-term methamphetamine exposure, striatal neuropeptide concentrations were either normal or moderately decreased in the methamphetamine users. In other examined dopamine-poor cortical and subcortical brain areas, neuropeptide levels were generally either normal or variably reduced. Although the neuropeptide differences might be explained by methamphetamine-induced damage to neuropeptide-containing neurons, our human data are consistent with the possibility that, at least in the human striatum, long-term methamphetamine exposure leads to an adaptive process that is distinct from that which increases neuropeptide levels after acute methamphetamine exposure.

  19. Neuropeptide Y and leptin sensitivity is dependent on diet composition.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, J K; Eggels, L; van Rozen, A J; Luijendijk, M C M; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A; Adan, R A H; la Fleur, S E

    2014-06-01

    Rats on different free-choice (fc) diets for 1 week of either chow, saturated fat and liquid sugar (fcHFHS), chow and saturated fat (fcHF), or chow and liquid sugar (fcHS) have differential levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Because these differences were not explained by plasma leptin levels but did predict subsequent feeding behaviour, in the present study, we first examined whether leptin sensitivity could explain these differences. Second, we focused on the role of NPY on feeding behaviour, and measured NPY mRNA levels and sensitivity to NPY after 4 weeks on the different choice diets. To determine leptin sensitivity, we measured food intake after i.p. leptin or vehicle injections in male Wistar rats subjected to the fcHFHS, fcHS, fcHF or Chow diets for 7 days. Next, we measured levels of arcuate nucleus NPY mRNA with in situ hybridisation in rats subjected to the choice diets for 4 weeks. Finally, we studied NPY sensitivity in rats subjected to the fcHFHS, fcHS, fcHF or Chow diet for 4 weeks by measuring food intake after administration of NPY or vehicle in the lateral ventricle. Leptin decreased caloric intake in rats on Chow, fcHS and fcHF but not in rats on the fcHFHS diet. After 4 weeks, rats on the fcHFHS diet remained hyperphagic, whereas fcHS and fcHF rats decreased caloric intake to levels similar to rats on Chow. By contrast to 1 week, after 4 weeks, levels of NPY mRNA were not different between the diet groups. Lateral ventricle administration of NPY resulted in higher caloric intake in fcHFHS rats compared to rats on the other choice diets or rats on Chow. Our data show that consuming a combination of saturated fat and liquid sugar results in leptin resistance and increased NPY sensitivity that is associated with persistent hyperphagia.

  20. Neuropeptide Y conjugated to saporin alters anxiety-like behavior when injected into the central nucleus of the amygdala or basomedial hypothalamus in BALB/cJ mice.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Angela M; Thiele, Todd E

    2010-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid neuromodulator that is distributed throughout the central nervous system and has been implicated in a wide range of neurobiological responses including the integration of emotional behavior. The anxiolytic properties of NPY are modulated by NPY signaling in the hippocampus and in the central (CeA) and basolateral (BLA) nuclei of the amygdala. Recently, the neurotoxin saporin, when conjugated to NPY (NPY-SAP), was shown to selectively kill NPY receptor-expressing neurons and has been used as a tool to study the central NPY neurocircuitry involved with feeding behaviors. Here we determined if NPY-SAP can be used as a tool to study the central NPY neurocircuitry that modulates anxiety-like behaviors. BALB/cJ mice were given injection of either NPY-SAP or a control blank saporin (B-SAP) into the CeA or the basomedial hypothalamus (BMH) as a control injection site. The elevated zero maze test was used to assess anxiety-like behavior and NPY-SAP-induced lesions were verified using NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) immunoreactivity (IR). Results showed that injection of NPY-SAP into the CeA site-specifically blunted Y1R IR in the CeA which was associated with a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior. Injection of NPY-SAP into the BMH, while locally blunting Y1R IR, promoted a compensatory increase of Y1R IR in the BLA and the CA3 region of the hippocampus which was associated with a significant reduction of anxiety-like behavior. The present set of experiments suggest that the NPY-SAP neurotoxin may be a useful tool for studying the NPY neurocircuitry that modulates anxiety-like behaviors.

  1. Neuropeptide Y attenuates anxiety- and depression-like effects of cholecystokinin-4 in mice.

    PubMed

    Desai, S J; Borkar, C D; Nakhate, K T; Subhedar, N K; Kokare, D M

    2014-09-26

    We investigated the involvement of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the modulation of cholecystokinin-4 (CCK-4)-evoked anxiety and depression. Adult male mice were injected with vehicle, CCK-4, NPY, NPY Y1 receptor agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY or antagonist BIBP3226, via intracerebroventricular route, and subjected to social interaction or forced swim test (FST) for the evaluation of anxiety- and depression-like phenotypes, respectively. To assess the interactions between the two systems, if any, NPYergic agents were administered prior to CCK-4 and the animals were subjected to these behavioral tests. Treatment with CCK-4 or BIBP3226 dose-dependently reduced social interaction time, while NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY produced opposite effect. CCK-4 treatment increased immobility time in FST. This effect was reversed by NPY and [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY, although BIBP3226 per se did not alter the immobility time. In a combination study, the anxiogenic or depressive effects of CCK-4 were attenuated by NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY and potentiated by BIBP3226. The brains of CCK-4 treated rats were processed for NPY immunohistochemistry. Following CCK-4 treatment, the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), ventral part of lateral division of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BSTLV), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and locus coeruleus showed a reduction in NPY-immunoreactive fibers. Population of NPY-immunopositive cells was also decreased in the AcbSh, BSTLV, prefrontal cortex and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). However, NPY-immunoreaction in the fibers of the ARC and cells of the central nucleus of amygdala was unchanged. We conclude that, inhibition of NPY signaling in the brain by CCK-4 might be causal to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in the baroreceptor reflex arc: connections between the nucleus of the solitary tract and the ventrolateral medulla oblongata in the rat.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, M; Mezey, E; Fodor, M; Ganten, D; Bahner, U; Geiger, H; Heidland, A

    1995-01-01

    The primary baroreceptor area (nucleus of the solitary tract-NTS) is anatomically interconnected with the rostral ("vasomotor area") and the caudal ("vasodepressor area") ventrolateral medulla by a well-defined arc of neuronal pathways. The chemical character and the direction of these pathways have been investigated with immunohistochemical and neurochemical techniques in intact and brainstem-operated rats. The transection of the neuronal arc resulted in an accumulation of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in a small group of cells in the NTS adjacent to the area postrema, ipsilateral to the knife cut. Decreased angiotensinogen mRNA and atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations were measured in the ventrolateral medulla after the cut, and an accumulation of angiotensin II-immunoreactivity was found in neuronal perikarya in the ipsilateral NTS. Intracranial vagotomy caused marked depletions in glutamate levels in the subcommissural portion of the NTS and in the caudal ventrolateral medulla but nowhere else in the brainstem investigated including the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

  3. Distribution, parabrachial region projection, and coexistence of neuropeptide and catecholamine cells of the nucleus of the solitary tract in the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Berk, M L; Smith, S E; Mullins, L A

    1993-01-15

    The chemical nature of the cells of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) that project to the parabrachial nucleus (PB) was investigated in the pigeon by the use of fluorescent bead retrograde tracer and immunofluorescence for the detection of substance P (SP), leucine-enkephalin (LENK), cholecystokinin (CCK), neurotensin (NT), somatostatin (SS), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Cells immunoreactive for CCK were located in subnuclei lateralis dorsalis pars anterior (LDa) and medialis superficialis pars posterior, and caudal NTS (cNTS); 22-26.5% of these cells were double-labeled bilaterally. Immunoreactive SP cells were found in ventral NTS subnuclei; 24-25% of these cells were double-labeled bilaterally. Cells immunoreactive for LENK and NT were concentrated in the anterior NTS; 5.5-7.5% of the LENK cells were double-labeled bilaterally, while 11% (ipsilateral) and 21% (contralateral) of the NT immunoreactive cells were double-labeled. Many SS immunoreactive cells were found in peripherally located subnuclei; 5.5-6.5% of these cells were double-labeled bilaterally. Catecholamine cells were distributed in LDa, peripheral subnuclei, and cNTS; 23% of these cells were double-labeled ipsilaterally and 8.5% contralaterally. A two-color double-labeling immunofluorescence technique revealed many cells immunoreactive for both NT and LENK, only a rare cell immunoreactive for both SS and SP, and no cells immunoreactive for both TH and SP. Cells immunoreactive for SP, CCK, NT, and TH are major contributors to NTS projections to PB. The confinement of these substances to specific NTS subnuclei, which receive visceral sensory information from specific organs, may contribute to the chemical encoding of ascending visceral information.

  4. AgRP and NPY expression in the human hypothalamic infundibular nucleus correlate with body mass index, whereas changes in αMSH are related to type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Alkemade, Anneke; Yi, Chun-Xia; Pei, Lei; Harakalova, Magdalena; Swaab, Dick F; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2012-06-01

    Rodent data show that altered hypothalamic signaling contributes to the development of obesity and insulin resistance. To determine differences in hypothalamic expression levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), and αMSH in the infundibular nucleus, the human equivalent of the arcuate nucleus, in relation to body mass index (BMI). In addition, the expression in the infundibular nucleus of eight subjects diagnosed with type 2 diabetes was measured to determine possible interference of type 2 diabetes with the association observed between neuropeptides and BMI. We studied AgRP, NPY, and αMSH expression by means of quantitative immunocytochemistry in postmortem hypothalami of 30 subjects with known BMI. In separate experiments, we compared neuropeptide expression in eight subjects with type 2 diabetes with eight matched controls. We found that AgRP immunoreactivity showed a U-shaped correlation with BMI. No evidence was found for possible influences of corticosteroid treatment. NPY immunoreactivity was significantly lower in overweight and obese subjects. αMSH did not correlate with BMI but was significantly lower in subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with controls. By contrast, NPY and AgRP expression was not affected in type 2 diabetes. Our results indicate that the expression of AgRP and NPY are correlated with body weight changes, rather than the presence of type 2 diabetes, whereas changes in αMSH immunoreactivity are related to the presence of type 2 diabetes, indicating separate hypothalamic mechanisms.

  5. Relationship of the Chemokine, CXCL12, to Effects of Dietary Fat on Feeding-Related Behaviors and Hypothalamic Neuropeptide Systems

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kinning; Barson, Jessica R.; Ho, Hui T.; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2016-01-01

    The intake of a high fat diet (HFD), in addition to stimulating orexigenic neuropeptides in the hypothalamus while promoting overeating and reducing locomotor behavior, is known to increase inflammatory mediators that modulate neuronal systems in the brain. To understand the involvement of chemokines in the effects of a HFD, we examined in rats whether HFD intake affects a specific chemokine, CXCL12, and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, in the hypothalamus together with the neuropeptides and whether CXCL12 itself acts similarly to a HFD in stimulating the neuropeptides and altering ingestion and locomotor behavior. Compared to low-fat chow, a HFD for 5 days significantly increased the expression of CXCL12 and its receptors, in both the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) where the neuropeptides enkephalin (ENK) and galanin were also stimulated and the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PFLH) where orexin (OX) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were increased. In contrast, the HFD had no impact on expression of CXCL12 or its receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) where the carbohydrate-related peptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), was suppressed. Analysis of protein levels revealed a similar stimulatory effect of a HFD on CXCL12 levels in the PVN and PFLH, as well as in blood, and an increase in the number of CXCR4-positive cells in the PVN. In the ARC, in contrast, levels of CXCL12 and number of CXCR4-positive cells were too low to measure. When centrally administered, CXCL12 was found to have similar effects to a HFD. Injection of CXCL12 into the third cerebral ventricle immediately anterior to the hypothalamus significantly stimulated the ingestion of a HFD, reduced novelty-induced locomotor activity, and increased expression of ENK in the PVN where the CXCR4 receptors were dense. It had no impact, however, on NPY in the ARC or on OX and MCH in the PFLH where the CXCR4 receptors were not detected. These results, showing CXCL12 in the hypothalamus to be stimulated by a HFD

  6. Effects of Organophosphate Esters on Neuropeptide Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    major efferent projections of the paraventricular nucleus of vasopressin and oxytocin secreting neurons of the hypothalamus: (a) to the posterior...enkephalins, vasopressin and oxytocin are purified from the terminal fields and the rate of biosynthesis determined for control and organophosphate...different neuropeptide systems appear to contribute to the regulation of cardiovascular and respiratory function; e.g. the projection of oxytocin and

  7. Neuropeptides in flatworms.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, M K S; Halton, D W; Kreshchenko, N D; Movsessian, S O; Raikova, O I; Reuter, M; Terenina, N B

    2002-11-01

    The use of well-characterized antibodies raised to neuronal signal substances and their application through immunocytochemistry and confocal scanning laser microscopy has revolutionized studies of the flatworm nervous system (NS). Data about flatworm neuropeptides and the spatial relationship between neuropeptides and other neuronal signal substances and muscle fibers are presented. Neuropeptides form a large part of the flatworm NS. Neuropeptides are especially important as myoexcitatory transmitters or modulators, controlling the musculature of the attachment organs, the stomatogastric and the reproductive systems.

  8. Hypothalamic neuropeptide systems and anticipatory weight change in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Adam, C L; Mercer, J G

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal animals are able both to programme changes in body weight in response to annual changes in photoperiod (anticipatory regulation) and to correct changes in body weight caused by imposed energetic demand (compensatory regulation). Experimental evidence from the Siberian hamster suggests that seasonally appropriate body weight is continually reset according to photoperiodic history, even when actual body weight is driven away from this target weight by manipulation of energy intake. These characteristics constitute the "sliding set point" of seasonal body weight regulation. To define the mechanisms and molecules underlying anticipatory body weight regulation, we are investigating the involvement of hypothalamic systems with an established role in the compensatory defence of body weight. Weight loss or restricted growth induced by short days (SD) results in low circulating leptin compared with long day (LD) controls. However, this chronic low leptin signal is read differently from acute low leptin resulting from food deprivation; leptin receptor gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is lower in SD, whereas food deprivation increases expression levels, suggesting changes in sensitivity to leptin feedback. SD alterations in mRNA levels for a number of hypothalamic neuropeptide and receptor genes appear counter-intuitive for a SD body weight trajectory. However, early increases in ARC cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression in SDs could be involved in driving body weight loss or growth restriction. The sites of photoperiod interaction with energy balance neuronal circuitry and the neurochemical encoding of body weight set point require full characterisation. Study of anticipatory regulation in seasonal animals offers new insight into body weight regulation across mammalian species, including man.

  9. Neuropeptides controlling energy balance: orexins and neuromedins

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Joshua P.; Kotz, Catherine M.; Novak, Colleen M.; Billington, Charles J.; Teske, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we review the feeding and energy expenditure effects of orexin (also known as hypocretin) and neuromedin. Orexins are multifunctional neuropeptides that affect energy balance by participating in regulation of appetite, arousal, and spontaneous physical activity. Central orexin signaling for all functions originates in the lateral hypothalamus–perifornical area, and is likely functionally differentiated based on site of action and on interacting neural influences. The effect of orexin on feeding is likely related to arousal in some ways, but is nonetheless a separate neural process that depends on interactions with other feeding related neuropeptides. In a pattern distinct from other neuropeptides, orexin stimulates both feeding and energy expenditure. Orexin increases in energy expenditure are mainly by increasing spontaneous physical activity, and this energy expenditure effect is more potent than the effect on feeding. Global orexin manipulations, such as in transgenic models, produce energy balance changes consistent with a dominant energy expenditure effect of orexin. Neuromedins are gut-brain peptides that reduce appetite. There are gut sources of neuromedin, but likely the key appetite related neuromedin producing neurons are in hypothalamus and parallel other key anorectic neuropeptide expression in the arcuate to paraventricular hypothalamic projection. As with other hypothalamic feeding related peptides, hindbrain sites are likely also important sources and targets of neuromedin anorectic action. Neuromedin increases physical activity in addition to reducing appetite, thus producing a consistent negative energy balance effect. Together with the various other neuro-peptides, -transmitters, -modulators and –hormones, neuromedin and orexin act in the appetite network to produce changes in food intake and energy expenditure, which ultimately influences the regulation of body weight. PMID:22249811

  10. Neuropeptides controlling energy balance: orexins and neuromedins.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Joshua P; Kotz, Catherine M; Novak, Colleen M; Billington, Charles J; Teske, Jennifer A

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the feeding and energy expenditure effects of orexin (also known as hypocretin) and neuromedin. Orexins are multifunctional neuropeptides that affect energy balance by participating in regulation of appetite, arousal, and spontaneous physical activity. Central orexin signaling for all functions originates in the lateral hypothalamus-perifornical area and is likely functionally differentiated based on site of action and on interacting neural influences. The effect of orexin on feeding is likely related to arousal in some ways but is nonetheless a separate neural process that depends on interactions with other feeding-related neuropeptides. In a pattern distinct from other neuropeptides, orexin stimulates both feeding and energy expenditure. Orexin increases in energy expenditure are mainly by increasing spontaneous physical activity, and this energy expenditure effect is more potent than the effect on feeding. Global orexin manipulations, such as in transgenic models, produce energy balance changes consistent with a dominant energy expenditure effect of orexin. Neuromedins are gut-brain peptides that reduce appetite. There are gut sources of neuromedin, but likely the key appetite-related neuromedin-producing neurons are in the hypothalamus and parallel other key anorectic neuropeptide expression in the arcuate to paraventricular hypothalamic projection. As with other hypothalamic feeding-related peptides, hindbrain sites are likely also important sources and targets of neuromedin anorectic action. Neuromedin increases physical activity in addition to reducing appetite, thus producing a consistent negative energy balance effect. Together with the other various neuropeptides, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones, neuromedin and orexin act in the appetite network to produce changes in food intake and energy expenditure, which ultimately influences the regulation of body weight.

  11. Reduced fasting-induced activation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons is associated with hyperleptinemia and increased leptin sensitivity in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Fasting increases c-Fos expression in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) in lean, but not in hyperleptinemic mice with late-onset obesity (LOO). Although obesity is associated with leptin resistance, we hypothesized that under fasting conditions, leptin sensitivity might be restored and that hyperleptinemia may counteract the neuronal response to fasting. We investigated whether the reduced fasting response of ARC neurons in LOO is paralleled by an increase in leptin sensitivity, as measured by leptin-induced STAT-3 phosphorylation. To assess leptin's role in the modulation of the fasting-induced ARC activation, we investigated c-Fos responses and hormone and metabolite levels in hyperleptinemic diet-induced obese (DIO) and in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Leptin induced a stronger STAT-3 phosphorylation in fasted LOO and lean mice than in ad libitum-fed animals. Similar to LOO, hyperleptinemic DIO mice showed no c-Fos response after fasting, while ob/ob mice showed a stronger response than lean control mice. Mimicking hyperleptinemia by repeated leptin injections in lean mice during fasting attenuated the fasting-induced c-Fos expression. Our findings indicate that high leptin levels prevent the fasting-induced activation of ARC neurons in mice. Moreover, leptin sensitivity is dynamic in obese subjects and depends on the feeding status. During short-term increases in leptin sensitivity, e.g., during fasting, leptin signaling appears to be effective, even in hyperleptinemic obesity. As reflected by the blockade of the fasting-induced ARC activation, fasting seems to interfere with the responsiveness of the ARC to signals related to the status of energy intake.

  12. Arcuate Na+,K+-ATPase senses systemic energy states and regulates feeding behavior through glucose-inhibited neurons.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Hideharu; Xu, Kai Y; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Dezaki, Katsuya; Santoso, Putra; Yang, Yifei; Arai, Takeshi; Gantulga, Darambazar; Muroya, Shinji; Lefor, Alan K; Kakei, Masafumi; Watanabe, Eiju; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-08-15

    Feeding is regulated by perception in the hypothalamus, particularly the first-order arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons, of the body's energy state. However, the cellular device for converting energy states to the activity of critical neurons in ARC is less defined. We here show that Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA) in ARC senses energy states to regulate feeding. Fasting-induced systemic ghrelin rise and glucose lowering reduced ATP-hydrolyzing activity of NKA and its substrate ATP level, respectively, preferentially in ARC. Lowering glucose concentration (LG), which mimics fasting, decreased intracellular NAD(P)H and increased Na(+) concentration in single ARC neurons that subsequently exhibited [Ca(2+)]i responses to LG, showing that they were glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons. Third ventricular injection of the NKA inhibitor ouabain induced c-Fos expression in agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons in ARC and evoked neuropeptide Y (NPY)-dependent feeding. When injected focally into ARC, ouabain stimulated feeding and mRNA expressions for NPY and AgRP. Ouabain increased [Ca(2+)]i in single NPY/AgRP neurons with greater amplitude than in proopiomelanocortin neurons in ARC. Conversely, the specific NKA activator SSA412 suppressed fasting-induced feeding and LG-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in ARC GI neurons. NPY/AgRP neurons highly expressed NKAα3, whose knockdown impaired feeding behavior. These results demonstrate that fasting, via ghrelin rise and LG, suppresses NKA enzyme/pump activity in ARC and thereby promotes the activation of GI neurons and NPY/AgRP-dependent feeding. This study identifies ARC NKA as a hypothalamic sensor and converter of metabolic states to key neuronal activity and feeding behaviour, providing a new target to treat hyperphagic obesity and diabetes.

  13. Reproductive neuropeptides: prevalence of GnRH and KNDy neural signalling components in a model avian, gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Nerine T; Tello, Javier A; Bedecarrats, Gregoy Y; Millar, Robert P

    2013-09-01

    Diverse external and internal environmental factors are integrated in the hypothalamus to regulate the reproductive system. This is mediated through the pulsatile secretion of GnRH into the portal system to stimulate pituitary gonadotrophin secretion, which in turn regulates gonadal function. A single subpopulation of neurones termed 'KNDy neurones' located in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus co-localise kisspeptin (Kiss), neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn) and are responsive to negative feedback effects of sex steroids. The co-ordinated secretion from KNDy neurones appears to modulate the pulsatile release of GnRH, acting as a proximate pacemaker. This review briefly describes the neuropeptidergic control of reproduction in the avian class, highlighting the status of reproductive neuropeptide signalling systems homologous to those found in mammalian genomes. Genes encoding the GnRH system are complete in the chicken with similar roles to the mammalian counterparts, whereas genes encoding Kiss signalling components appear missing in the avian lineage, indicating a differing set of hypothalamic signals controlling avian reproduction. Gene sequences encoding both NKB and Dyn signalling components are present in the chicken genome, but expression analysis and functional studies remain to be completed. The focus of this article is to describe the avian complement of neuropeptidergic reproductive hormones and provide insights into the putative mechanisms that regulate reproduction in birds. These postulations highlight differences in reproductive strategies of birds in terms of gonadal steroid feedback systems, integration of metabolic signals and seasonality. Also included are propositions of KNDy neuropeptide gene silencing and plasticity in utilisation of these neuropeptides during avian evolution.

  14. Serotonin 2C receptor activates a distinct population of arcuate pro-opiomelanocortin neurons via TRPC channels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2CRs) expressed by pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus regulate food intake, energy homeostasis ,and glucose metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of 5-HT to regulate POMC neuronal activity via 5-HT2CRs have no...

  15. Necdin controls Foxo1 acetylation in hypothalamic arcuate neurons to modulate the thyroid axis.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2012-04-18

    The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 regulates energy homeostasis by modulating gene expression in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 undergoes post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, which modulate its functional activities. Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase, regulates the acetylation status of Foxo1 in mammalian cells. Necdin, a pleiotropic protein required for neuronal development and survival, interacts with both Sirt1 and p53 to facilitate p53 deacetylation. The necdin gene (Ndn), an imprinted gene transcribed only from the paternal allele, is strongly expressed in hypothalamic neurons. Here, we demonstrate that necdin controls the acetylation status of Foxo1 in vivo in hypothalamic arcuate neurons to modulate the thyroid function. Necdin forms a stable ternary complex with Sirt1 and Foxo1, diminishes Foxo1 acetylation, and suppresses the transcriptional activity of Foxo1 in vitro. Paternal Ndn mutant mice express high levels of acetylated Foxo1 and mRNAs encoding agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus in vivo during the juvenile period. The mutant mice exhibit endocrine dysfunction characteristic of hypothalamic hypothyroidism. Chemically induced hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism lead to hypothalamic responses similar to those under necdin-deficient and excessive conditions, respectively, suggesting that thyroid hormone serves as a negative regulator of this system. These results suggest that necdin regulates Foxo1 acetylation and neuropeptide gene expression in the arcuate neurons to modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis during development.

  16. Kisspeptin Stimulates Growth Hormone Release by Utilizing Neuropeptide Y Pathways and Is Dependent on the Presence of Ghrelin in the Ewe.

    PubMed

    Foradori, Chad D; Whitlock, Brian K; Daniel, Jay A; Zimmerman, Arthur D; Jones, Melaney A; Read, Casey C; Steele, Barbara P; Smith, Jeremy T; Clarke, Iain J; Elsasser, Theodore H; Keisler, Duane H; Sartin, James L

    2017-10-01

    Although kisspeptin is the primary stimulator of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and therefore the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, recent findings suggest kisspeptin can also regulate additional neuroendocrine processes including release of growth hormone (GH). Here we show that central delivery of kisspeptin causes a robust rise in plasma GH in fasted but not fed sheep. Kisspeptin-induced GH secretion was similar in animals fasted for 24 hours and those fasted for 72 hours, suggesting that the factors involved in kisspeptin-induced GH secretion are responsive to loss of food availability and not the result of severe negative energy balance. Pretreatment with the neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBO 3304, blocked the effects of kisspeptin-induced GH release, implicating NPY as an intermediary. Kisspeptin treatment induced c-Fos in NPY and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) cells of the arcuate nucleus. The same kisspeptin treatment resulted in a reduction in c-Fos in somatostatin (SS) cells in the periventricular nucleus. Finally, blockade of systemic ghrelin release or antagonism of the ghrelin receptor eliminated or reduced the ability of kisspeptin to induce GH release, suggesting the presence of ghrelin is required for kisspeptin-induced GH release in fasted animals. Our findings support the hypothesis that during short-term fasting, systemic ghrelin concentrations and NPY expression in the arcuate nucleus rise. This permits kisspeptin activation of NPY cells. In turn, NPY stimulates GHRH cells and inhibits SS cells, resulting in GH release. We propose a mechanism by which kisspeptin conveys reproductive and hormone status onto the somatotropic axis, resulting in alterations in GH release. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  17. The novel neuropeptide phoenixin is highly co-expressed with nesfatin-1 in the rat hypothalamus, an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa; Bogus, Katarzyna; Worthington, John J; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-04-10

    The hypothalamus regulates a number of autonomic functions essential for homeostasis; therefore, investigations concerning hypothalamic neuropeptides and their functions and distribution are of great importance in contemporary neuroscience. Recently, novel regulatory factors expressed in the hypothalamus have been discovered, of which nesfatin-1 and phoenixin (PNX), show intriguing similarities in their brain distributions. There are currently few studies characterizing PNX expression, so it is imperative to accurately trace its localization, with particular attention to the hypothalamic nuclei and nesfatin-1 co-expression. Using fluorescence and classical immunohistochemical stainings on adult rat brain, we visualized the potential co-expression of nesfatin-1 and PNX immunoreactive cells. We have demonstrated a distinct PNX-immunoreactivity in 21-32% of cells in the arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial and lateral hypothalamus. Nesfatin-1 expression reached 45-68% of all neurons in the same sites, while co-expression was strikingly seen in the vast majority (70-86%) of PNX-immunoreactive neurons in the rat hypothalamic nuclei. Our results demonstrate for the first time, a wide distribution of PNX in the hypothalamus which could implicate a potential functional relationship with nesfatin-1, possibly in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or other autonomic functions, which require further study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Expression of Neuropeptide Y gene in mouse testes during testicular development.

    PubMed

    Terado, M; Nomura, M; Mineta, K; Fujimoto, N; Matsumoto, T

    2006-07-01

    To elucidate the distribution and regulation of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in testes under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, such as testicular development, fasting and experimental cryptorchidism. In the first experiment, C57BL/6J male mice at the ages of 3 days as well as 2, 3, 5 and 8 weeks were used. In the second and third experiments, adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to fasting for 48 h and experimental cryptorchidism for 72 h. The NPY transcripts were detected by isotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry. The NPY transcripts were exclusively expressed in the interstitial cells regardless of the age groups and experimental conditions. The NPY mRNA levels were found to increase significantly with age (from the neonatal to prepubertal period [P<0.01] and from the prepubetal to postpubertal period [P<0.01]). Food deprivation for 48 h resulted in a significant increase in the NPY mRNA levels in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (P<0.01), but not in the testes. Experimental cryptorchidism for 72 h failed to regulate the NPY gene expression in the testes. NPY gene expression is distributed in Leydig cells and increases in line with testicular development. The regulation of testicular NPY is different from that of hypothalamic NPY.

  19. Role of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin in fluoxetine-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Myung, Chang-Seon; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Choi, Si Ho; Song, Gyu Yong; Lee, Seok Yong; Jahng, Jeong Won

    2005-06-01

    Fluoxetine is an anorexic agent known to reduce food intake and weight gain. However, the molecular mechanism by which fluoxetine induces anorexia has not been well-established. We examined mRNA expression levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the brain regions of rats using RT-PCR and in situ hybridization techniques after 2 weeks of administering fluoxetine daily. Fluoxetine persistently suppressed food intake and weight gain during the experimental period. The pair-fed group confirmed that the reduction in body weight in the fluoxetine treated rats resulted primarily from decreased food intake. RT-PCR analyses showed that mRNA expression levels of both NPY and POMC were markedly reduced by fluoxetine treatment in all parts of the brain examined, including the hypothalamus. POMC mRNA in situ signals were significantly decreased, NPY levels tended to increase in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of fluoxetine treated rats (compared to the vehicle controls). In the pair-fed group, NPY mRNA levels did not change, but the POMC levels decreased (compared with the vehicle controls). These results reveal that the chronic administration of fluoxetine decreases expression levels in both NPY and POMC in the brain, and suggests that fluoxetine-induced anorexia may not be mediated by changes in the ARC expression of either NPY or POMC. It is possible that a fluoxetine raised level of 5-HT play an inhibitory role in the orectic action caused by a reduced expression of ARC POMC (alpha-MSH).

  20. Neuropeptides, Microbiota, and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Holzer, P

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota and the brain interact with each other through multiple bidirectional signaling pathways in which neuropeptides and neuroactive peptide messengers play potentially important mediator roles. Currently, six particular modes of a neuropeptide link are emerging. (i) Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters contribute to the mutual microbiota-host interaction. (ii) The synthesis of neuroactive peptides is influenced by microbial control of the availability of amino acids. (iii) The activity of neuropeptides is tempered by microbiota-dependent autoantibodies. (iv) Peptide signaling between periphery and brain is modified by a regulatory action of the gut microbiota on the blood-brain barrier. (v) Within the brain, gut hormones released under the influence of the gut microbiota turn into neuropeptides that regulate multiple aspects of brain activity. (vi) Cerebral neuropeptides participate in the molecular, behavioral, and autonomic alterations which the brain undergoes in response to signals from the gut microbiota. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Median arcuate ligament syndrome in athletes.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jeffrey N; Haskins, Ivy N; Brody, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) is a common entity in young athletes. Most occurrences are due to a "cramp" or "stitch," but an uncommon, and often overlooked, etiology of ETAP is median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS). The initial presentation of MALS typically includes postprandial nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, but in athletes, the initial presentation may be ETAP. We present a case series of three athletes who presented with exercise-related transient abdominal pain and were ultimately diagnosed and treated for MALS. Unlike other patients with median arcuate ligament syndrome, these athletes presented with exercise-induced pain, rather than the common postprandial symptoms. These symptoms persisted despite conservative measures. Work-up of patients with suspected MALS include a computed tomography or magnetic resonance angiography showing compression of the celiac artery with post-stenotic dilation, or a celiac artery ultrasound demonstrating increased velocities (>200 cm/s(2)) with deep exhalation. All patients underwent a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release. Postoperatively, there were no complications, and all were discharged home on postoperative day #2. All patients have subsequently returned to athletics with resolution of their symptoms. ETAP is common in athletes and often resolves with preventative or conservative strategies. When ETAP persists despite these methods, alternative causes, including MALS, should be considered. A combination of a thorough history and physical exam, as well as radiographic data, is essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and treatment strategy.

  2. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding. PMID:27503800

  3. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Sar, M.; Sahu, A.; Crowley, W.R.; Kalra, S.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of (3H)estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-(2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H)estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of (3H)estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of (3H)estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear (3H)estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC.

  4. Role of estradiol in intrinsic hindbrain AMPK regulation of hypothalamic AMPK, metabolic neuropeptide, and norepinephrine activity and food intake in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Alenazi, F S H; Ibrahim, B A; Al-Hamami, H; Shakiya, M; Briski, K P

    2016-02-09

    This study addressed the hypothesis that dorsomedial hindbrain adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) imposes inherent estradiol-dependent control of hypothalamic AMPK, neuropeptide, and norepinephrine (NE) activity and feeding in the female rat. Estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized rats were injected with the AMPK inhibitor compound c (Cc) or vehicle into the caudal fourth ventricle (CV4) prior to micropunch-dissection of individual hypothalamic metabolic loci or assessment of food intake. Cc decreased hindbrain dorsal vagal complex phosphoAMPK (pAMPK) in both E and O; tissue ATP levels were reduced by this treatment in O only. In E/Cc, pAMPK expression was diminished in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and ventromedial (VMH) and paraventricular (PVH) nuclei; only PVH pAMPK was suppressed by this treatment in O/Cc. Cc decreased PVH corticotropin-releasing hormone and arcuate (ARH) proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y in O, but suppressed only POMC in E. O/Cc exhibited both augmented (PVH, VMH) and decreased (LHA, ARH) hypothalamic NE content, whereas Cc treatment of E elevated preoptic and dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus NE. Cc completely or incompletely repressed feeding in E versus O, respectively. Results implicate dorsomedial hindbrain AMPK in physiological stimulus-induced feeding in females. Excepting POMC, hypothalamic neuropeptide responses to this sensor may be contingent on estrogen. Estradiol likely designates hypothalamic targets of altered NE signaling due to hindbrain AMPK activation. Divergent changes in NE content of hypothalamic loci in O/Cc uniquely demonstrate sensor-induced bimodal catecholamine signaling to those sites. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of regulatory neuropeptides in the hypothalamus of red deer (Cervus elaphus) reveals anomalous relationships in the seasonal control of appetite and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Barrell, G K; Ridgway, M J; Wellby, M; Pereira, A; Henry, B A; Clarke, I J

    2016-04-01

    Red deer are seasonal with respect to reproduction and food intake, so we tested the hypothesis that their brains would show seasonal changes in numbers of cells containing hypothalamic neuropeptides that regulate these functions. We examined the brains of male and female deer in non-breeding and breeding seasons to quantify the production of kisspeptin, gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (γ-MSH - an index of pro-opiomelanocortin production), using immunohistochemistry. These neuropeptides are likely to be involved in the regulation of reproductive function and appetite. During the annual breeding season there were more cells producing kisspeptin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus than during the non-breeding season in males and females whereas there was no seasonal difference in the expression of GnIH. There were more cells producing the appetite stimulating peptide, NPY, in the arcuate/median eminence regions of the hypothalamus of females during the non-breeding season whereas the levels of an appetite suppressing peptide, γ-MSH, were highest in the breeding season. Male deer brains exhibited the converse, with NPY cell numbers highest in the breeding season and γ-MSH levels highest in the non-breeding season. These results support a role for kisspeptin as an important stimulatory regulator of seasonal breeding in deer, as in other species, but suggest a lack of involvement of GnIH in the seasonality of reproduction in deer. In the case of appetite regulation, the pattern exhibited by females for NPY and γ-MSH was as expected for the breeding and non-breeding seasons, based on previous studies of these peptides in sheep and the seasonal cycle of appetite reported for various species of deer. An inverse result in male deer most probably reflects the response of appetite regulating cells to negative energy balance during the mating season. Differences between the sexes in the seasonal

  6. Seasonal changes in body mass, serum leptin levels and hypothalamic neuropeptide gene expression in male Eothenomys olitor.

    PubMed

    Wan-long, Zhu; Zheng-kun, Wang

    2015-06-01

    The present study examined seasonal changes in body mass and energy metabolism in the Chaotung vole (Eothenomys olitor) and the physiological mechanisms underpinning these changes. Seasonal changes in the following parameters were measured in male E. olitor, body mass, food intake, thermogenesis, enzyme activity, masses of tissues and organs, hormone concentrations and expression of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus energy balance genes including neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Body mass was constant over the year, but the masses of tissues and organs differed significantly between seasons. There were significant changes in body fat mass and serum leptin levels over the four seasons. E. olitor showed significant seasonal changes in food intake and thermogenesis, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) content, enzyme activity, and serum tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels. Moreover, mRNA expression in the hypothalamus showed significant seasonal changes. All of our results suggested that E. olitor had constant body mass over the year, which was inconsistent with the prediction of the 'set-point' hypothesis. However, body fat mass and serum leptin levels were significantly different among the four seasons, providing support for the 'set-point' hypothesis. The changes in leptin, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART mRNA levels may play a role in the regulation of energy intake in E. olitor. Furthermore, the role of leptin and hypothalamic neuropeptide gene in the regulation of energy metabolism and body mass may be different in animals that are acclimated to different seasons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of long-term ingestion of aspartame on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, plasma leptin and body weight gain and composition.

    PubMed

    Beck, Bernard; Burlet, Arlette; Max, Jean Pierre; Stricker-Krongrad, Alain

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the chronic ingestion of aspartame (ASP) on brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) concentrations, plasma hormones, food intake and body fat. Two groups of male Long-Evans rats, fed on a control (C) well-balanced diet, had to drink either a 0.1% ASP solution or water for a period of 14 weeks starting at weaning. Food intake and body weight were weekly recorded. At the end of the experiment, fat pads were sampled, leptin and insulin were measured in the plasma and NPY in several microdissected brain areas. Substituting ASP for water led to lower body weight (-8%; P<.004) and lower fat depot weight (-20%; P<.01) with no differences in energy intake or plasma insulin concentrations. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced by 34% (P<.05). Leptin concentrations were well-correlated with final body weight (r=.47; P<.025) and fat pad mass (r=.53; P<.01). NPY concentrations were 23% lower (P<.03) in the arcuate nucleus of ASP rats with no differences in other brain areas. The beneficial effects on body composition could be related to the decreased effects of NPY on lipid and energy metabolism, independently of insulin. The reasons for the NPY decrease (regulatory or toxicological) are not obvious. The constitutive amino acids of the ASP molecule might participate in the NPY regulation.

  8. Early weaning by maternal prolactin inhibition leads to higher neuropeptide Y and astrogliosis in the hypothalamus of the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; Moura, Egberto G; Manhães, Alex C; Peixoto-Silva, Nayara; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia C

    2015-02-14

    The suppression of prolactin production with bromocriptine (BRO) in the last 3 d of lactation reduces milk yield (early weaning) and increases the transfer of leptin through the milk, causing hyperleptinaemia in pups. In adulthood, several changes occur in the offspring as a result of metabolic programming, including overweight, higher visceral fat mass, hypothyroidism, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperleptinaemia and central leptin resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether overweight rats programmed by early weaning with maternal BRO treatment have hypothalamic alterations in adulthood. We analysed the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) by immunohistochemistry in the following hypothalamic nuclei: medial and lateral arcuate nucleus (ARC); paraventricular nucleus (PVN); lateral hypothalamus (LH). Additionally, we sought to determine whether these programmed rats exhibited hypothalamic inflammation as indicated by astrogliosis. NPY immunostaining showed a denser NPY-positive fibre network in the ARC and PVN (+82% in both nuclei) of BRO offspring. Regarding the anorexigenic neuropeptides, no difference was found for CART, POMC and α-MSH. The number of astrocytes was higher in all the nuclei of BRO rats. The fibre density of glial fibrillary acidic protein was also increased in both medial and lateral ARC (6·06-fold increase and 9·13-fold increase, respectively), PVN (5·75-fold increase) and LH (2·68-fold increase) of BRO rats. We suggest that early weaning has a long-term effect on the expression of NPY as a consequence of developmental plasticity, and the presence of astrogliosis indicates hypothalamic inflammation that is closely related to overweight and hyperleptinaemia observed in our model.

  9. Changes in hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptide Y, and proopiomelanocortin gene expression during chronic rapid eye movement sleep deprivation of rats.

    PubMed

    Koban, Michael; Le, Wei Wei; Hoffman, Gloria E

    2006-01-01

    Chronic rapid eye movement (paradoxical) sleep deprivation (REM-SD) of rats leads to two conspicuous pathologies: hyperphagia coincident with body weight loss, prompted by elevated metabolism. Our goals were to test the hypotheses that 1) as a stressor, REM-SD would increase CRH gene expression in the hypothalamus and that 2) to account for hyperphagia, hypothalamic gene expression of the orexigen neuropeptide Y (NPY) would increase, but expression of the anorexigen proopiomelanocortin (POMC) would decrease. Enforcement of REM-SD of adult male rats for 20 d with the platform (flowerpot) method led to progressive hyperphagia, increasing to approximately 300% of baseline; body weight steadily declined by approximately 25%. Consistent with changes in food intake patterns, NPY expression rapidly increased in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus by d 5 of REM-SD, peaking at d 20; by contrast, POMC expression decreased progressively during REM-SD. CRH expression was increased by d 5, both in mRNA and ability to detect neuronal perikaryal staining in paraventricular nucleus with immunocytochemistry, and it remained elevated thereafter with modest declines. Taken together, these data indicate that changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides regulating food intake are altered in a manner consistent with the hyperphagia seen with REM-SD. Changes in CRH, although indicative of REM-SD as a stressor, suggest that the anorexigenic actions of CRH are ineffective (or disabled). Furthermore, changes in NPY and POMC agree with current models of food intake behavior, but they are opposite to their acute effects on peripheral energy metabolism and thermogenesis.

  10. Surge-Like Luteinising Hormone Secretion Induced by Retrochiasmatic Area NK3R Activation is Mediated Primarily by Arcuate Kisspeptin Neurones in the Ewe.

    PubMed

    Grachev, P; Porter, K L; Coolen, L M; McCosh, R B; Connors, J M; Hileman, S M; Lehman, M N; Goodman, R L

    2016-06-01

    The neuropeptides neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin are potent stimulators of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinsing hormone (LH) secretion and are essential for human fertility. We have recently demonstrated that selective activation of NKB receptors (NK3R) within the retrochiasmatic area (RCh) and the preoptic area (POA) triggers surge-like LH secretion in ovary-intact ewes, whereas blockade of RCh NK3R suppresses oestradiol-induced LH surges in ovariectomised ewes. Although these data suggest that NKB signalling within these regions of the hypothalamus mediates the positive-feedback effects of oestradiol on LH secretion, the pathway through which it stimulates GnRH/LH secretion remains unclear. We proposed that the action of NKB on RCh neurones drives the LH surge by stimulating kisspeptin-induced GnRH secretion. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the activation of the preoptic/hypothalamic populations of kisspeptin neurones in response to POA or RCh administration of senktide by dual-label immunohistochemical detection of kisspeptin and c-Fos (i.e. marker of neuronal activation). We then administered the NK3R agonist, senktide, into the RCh of ewes in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle and conducted frequent blood sampling during intracerebroventricular infusion of the kisspeptin receptor antagonist Kp-271 or saline. Our results show that the surge-like secretion of LH induced by RCh senktide administration coincided with a dramatic increase in c-Fos expression within arcuate nucleus (ARC) kisspeptin neurones, and was completely blocked by Kp-271 infusion. We substantiate these data with evidence of direct projections of RCh neurones to ARC kisspeptin neurones. Thus, NKB-responsive neurones in the RCh act to stimulate GnRH secretion by inducing kisspeptin release from KNDy neurones. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  11. Surge-Like Luteinising Hormone Secretion Induced by Retrochiasmatic Area NK3R Activation is Mediated Primarily by Arcuate Kisspeptin Neurones in the Ewe

    PubMed Central

    Grachev, P.; Porter, K. L.; Coolen, L. M.; McCosh, R. B.; Connors, J. M.; Hileman, S. M.; Lehman, M. N.; Goodman, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptides neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin are potent stimulators of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinsing hormone (LH) secretion and are essential for human fertility. We have recently demonstrated that selective activation of NKB receptors (NK3R) within the retrochiasmatic area (RCh) and the preoptic area (POA) triggers surge-like LH secretion in ovary-intact ewes, whereas blockade of RCh NK3R suppresses oestradiol-induced LH surges in ovariectomised ewes. Although these data suggest that NKB signalling within these regions of the hypothalamus mediates the positive-feedback effects of oestradiol on LH secretion, the pathway through which it stimulates GnRH/LH secretion remains unclear. We proposed that the action of NKB on RCh neurones drives the LH surge by stimulating kisspeptin-induced GnRH secretion. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the activation of the preoptic/hypothalamic populations of kisspeptin neurones in response to POA or RCh administration of senktide by dual-label immunohistochemical detection of kisspeptin and c-Fos (i.e. marker of neuronal activation). We then administered the NK3R agonist, senktide, into the RCh of ewes in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle and conducted frequent blood sampling during intracerebroventricular infusion of the kisspeptin receptor antagonist Kp-271 or saline. Our results show that the surge-like secretion of LH induced by RCh senktide administration coincided with a dramatic increase in c-Fos expression within arcuate nucleus (ARC) kisspeptin neurones, and was completely blocked by Kp-271 infusion. We substantiate these data with evidence of direct projections of RCh neurones to ARC kisspeptin neurones. Thus, NKB-responsive neurones in the RCh act to stimulate GnRH secretion by inducing kisspeptin release from KNDy neurones. PMID:27059932

  12. Neuropeptides as synaptic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Lossi, Laura; Ferrini, Francesco; Merighi, Adalberto

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptides are small protein molecules (composed of 3-100 amino-acid residues) that have been localized to discrete cell populations of central and peripheral neurons. In most instances, they coexist with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters within the same neurons. At the subcellular level, neuropeptides are selectively stored, singularly or more frequently in combinations, within large granular vesicles. Release occurs through mechanisms different from classical calcium-dependent exocytosis at the synaptic cleft, and thus they account for slow synaptic and/or non-synaptic communication in neurons. Neuropeptide co-storage and coexistence can be observed throughout the central nervous system and are responsible for a series of functional interactions that occur at both pre- and post-synaptic levels. Thus, the subcellular site(s) of storage and sorting mechanisms into different neuronal compartments are crucial to the mode of release and the function of neuropeptides as neuronal messengers.

  13. Neuropeptide Y and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Colmers, William F.; El Bahh, Bouchaïb

    2003-01-01

    It is a central tenet of the epilepsy field that seizures result from the imbalance of excitation over inhibition 1. The bulk of excitation is mediated by the neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas inhibition results mainly from the actions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In the neocortex and hippocampus, the intrinsic sources of GABA are the interneurons, which lately have come under intense scrutiny. It has become clear that a large number of distinct types of interneurons can be differentiated in part by the array of neuropeptides they coexpress (cf. 2). Evidence is emerging that the neuropeptide complement of interneurons plays important roles in the way that interneurons regulate excitability. Here we discuss what is known about the relation of one well-characterized neuropeptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and epilepsy in experimental animals and humans, and suggest possible roles for the receptors as targets for the control of excessive excitation in epilepsy. PMID:15309085

  14. Penultimate proline in neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Glover, Matthew S; Bellinger, Earl P; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E

    2015-08-18

    A recent ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) study revealed that tryptic peptide ions containing a proline residue at the second position from the N-terminus (i.e., penultimate proline) frequently adopt multiple conformations, owing to the cis-trans isomerization of Xaa(1)-Pro(2) peptide bonds [J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 26, 444]. Here, we present a statistical analysis of a neuropeptide database that illustrates penultimate proline residues are frequently found in neuropeptides. In order to probe the effect of penultimate proline on neuropeptide conformations, IMS-MS experiments were performed on two model peptides in which penultimate proline residues were known to be important for biological activity: the N-terminal region of human neuropeptide Y (NPY1-9, Tyr(1)-Pro(2)-Ser(3)-Lys(4)-Pro(5)-Asp(6)-Asn(7)-Pro(8)-Gly(9)-NH2) and a tachykinin-related peptide (CabTRP Ia, Ala(1)-Pro(2)-Ser(3)-Gly(4)-Phe(5)-Leu(6)-Gly(7)-Met(8)-Arg(9)-NH2). From these studies, it appears that penultimate prolines allow neuropeptides to populate multiple conformations arising from the cis-trans isomerization of Xaa(1)-Pro(2) peptide bonds. Although it is commonly proposed that the role of penultimate proline residues is to protect peptides from enzymatic degradation, the present results indicate that penultimate proline residues also are an important means of increasing the conformational heterogeneity of neuropeptides.

  15. Treatment of refractory arcuate hyperpigmentation using a fractional photothermolysis system.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Bin; Lee, Sang Ju; Kang, Jin Moon; Kim, Young Koo; Oh, Sang Ho

    2010-03-01

    This is a case report of a 27-year-old Korean woman with Fitzpatrick skin type IV presenting with refractory arcuate hyperpigmentation, which developed after non-ablative 1450-nm diode laser therapy. The refractory arcuate hyperpigmentation was unresponsive to the use of Q-switched lasers, vitamin C iontophoresis, and a bleaching agent, but was responsive to fractional photothermolysis system treatment.

  16. Neuropeptides in tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alexander; Bahr, Roald

    2014-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a clinical syndrome of pain, tendon thickening, and increased blood flow. The current review highlights evidence supporting an underlying role of neuropeptides in the etiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of painful overuse tendinopathy. Painful tendons demonstrate an increased presence of Substance P-containing nerves which are strongly implicated as a potential source of pain, but which also play important roles in the tendon’s attempt to self-repair. Recent findings have identified potential roles of additional sensory and autonomic neuropeptides which regulate pain, tissue remodeling, and vascular flow, including acetylcholine, noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y. Neuropeptide production within tendons is stimulated by mechanical load and exercise, and both direct and indirect neuropeptide effects may be responsible for the potential benefits of heavy-load eccentric loading. A model is presented which delineates the physiologic basis for signalling pathways between tenocytes, mast cells and sensory and autonomic nerves, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of traditional as well as emerging treatment strategies including sclerosing therapy and nitric oxide. PMID:19273194

  17. Leptin regulated calcium channels of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons by activation of different signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-H; Wang, F; Yang, M-J; Yu, D-F; Wu, W-N; Liu, J; Ma, L-Q; Cai, F; Chen, J-G

    2008-09-22

    The fat-derived hormone leptin regulates food intake and body weight in part by modulating the activity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). To investigate the electrophysiological activity of these neurons and their responses to leptin, we recorded whole-cell calcium currents on NPY and POMC neurons in the ARC of rats, which we identified by morphologic features and immunocytochemical identification at the end of recording. Leptin decreased the peak amplitude of high voltage-activated calcium currents (I(HVA)) in the isolated neurons from ARC, which were subsequently shown to be immunoreactive for NPY. The inhibition was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). In contrast, leptin increased the amplitude of I(HVA) in POMC-containing neurons. The stimulations of I(HVA) were inhibited by blockers of JAK2 and phosphatidylino 3-kinase (PI3-k). Both of these effects were counteracted by the L-type calcium channel antagonist nifedipine, suggesting that L-type calcium channels were involved in the regulation induced by leptin. These data indicated that leptin exerted opposite effects on these two classes of neurons. Leptin directly inhibited I(HVA) in NPY neurons via leptin receptor (LEPR) -JAK2-MAPK pathways, whereas evoked I(HVA) in POMC neurons by LEPR-JAK2-PI3-k pathways. These neural pathways and intracellular signaling mechanisms may play key roles in regulating NPY and POMC neuron activity, anorectic action of leptin and, thereby, feeding.

  18. Glucokinase inhibitor glucosamine stimulates feeding and activates hypothalamic neuropeptide Y and orexin neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ligang; Yueh, Chen-Yu; Lam, Daniel D; Shaw, Jill; Osundiji, Mayowa; Garfield, Alastair S; Evans, Mark; Heisler, Lora K

    2011-09-12

    Maintaining glucose levels within the appropriate physiological range is necessary for survival. The identification of specific neuronal populations, within discreet brain regions, sensitive to changes in glucose concentration has led to the hypothesis of a central glucose-sensing system capable of directly modulating feeding behaviour. Glucokinase (GK) has been identified as a glucose-sensor responsible for detecting such changes both within the brain and the periphery. We previously reported that antagonism of centrally expressed GK by administration of glucosamine (GSN) was sufficient to induce protective glucoprivic feeding in rats. Here we examine a neurochemical mechanism underlying this effect and report that GSN stimulated food intake is highly correlated with the induction of the neuronal activation marker cFOS within two nuclei with a demonstrated role in central glucose sensing and appetite, the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). Furthermore, GSN stimulated cFOS within the ARC was observed in orexigenic neurons expressing the endogenous melanocortin receptor antagonist agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), but not those expressing the anorectic endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH). In the LHA, GSN stimulated cFOS was found within arousal and feeding associated orexin/hypocretin (ORX), but not orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) expressing neurons. Our data suggest that GK within these specific feeding and arousal related populations of AgRP/NPY and ORX neurons may play a modulatory role in the sensing of and appetitive response to hypoglycaemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunochemical analysis of neuropeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Rehfeld, J.F.; Hilsted, L.

    1987-08-17

    Measurement of neuropeptides requires assays that take into account the basic characteristics of bioactive peptides, i.e. the structural homology; the molecular heterogeneity of a given neuropeptide system; the widespread synthesis in different neurons and cells; and cell-specific processing of the primary translation product. Development of libraries of sensitive radioimmunoassays (RIAs), each of which is monospecific for essential sequences of propeptides, comply with some of the needs. Processing-site specific RIAs have proven particularly useful in combination with chromatography and enzymography. 4 references, 1 figure.

  20. Effects of early and late neonatal bromocriptine treatment on hypothalamic neuropeptides, dopaminergic reward system and behavior of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Janaine C; Lisboa, Patricia C; de Oliveira, Elaine; Peixoto-Silva, Nayara; Pinheiro, Cintia R; Fraga, Mabel C; Claudio-Neto, Sylvio; Franci, Celso R; Manhães, Alex C; Moura, Egberto G

    2016-06-14

    In humans, bromocriptine (BRO) is used as a treatment for many disorders, such as prolactinomas, even during pregnancy and lactation. Previously we demonstrated that maternal BRO treatment at the end of lactation programs offspring for obesity and several endocrine dysfunctions. Here, we studied the long-term effects of direct BRO injection in neonatal Wistar rats on their dopaminergic pathway, anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity at adulthood. Male pups were either s.c. injected with BRO (0.1μg/once daily) from postnatal day (PN) 1 to 10 or from PN11 to 20. Controls were injected with methanol-saline. Body mass, food intake, neuropeptides, dopamine pathway parameters, anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity were analyzed. The dopamine pathway was analyzed in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS) at PN180. PN1-10 BRO-treated animals had normal body mass and adiposity but lower food intake and plasma prolactin (PRL). This group had higher POMC in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), higher tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the VTA, higher dopa decarboxylase (DDc), higher D2R and μu-opioid receptor in the NAc. Concerning behavior in elevated plus maze (EPM), BRO-treated animals displayed more anxiety-like behaviors. PN11-20 BRO-treated showed normal body mass and adiposity but higher food intake and plasma PRL. This group had lower POMC in the ARC, lower TH in the VTA and lower DAT in the NAc. BRO-treated animals showed less anxiety-like behaviors in the EPM. Thus, neonatal BRO injection, depending on the time of treatment, leads to different long-term dysfunctions in the dopaminergic reward system, food intake behavior and anxiety levels, findings that could be partially due to PRL and POMC changes. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reproduction Symposium: hypothalamic neuropeptides and the nutritional programming of puberty in heifers.

    PubMed

    Amstalden, M; Cardoso, R C; Alves, B R C; Williams, G L

    2014-08-01

    Nutrition during the juvenile period has a major impact on timing reproductive maturity in heifers. Restricted growth delays puberty, whereas elevated BW gain advances the onset of puberty. The initiation of high-frequency episodic release of GnRH and, consequently, LH during the peripubertal period is crucial for maturation of the reproductive axis and establishment of normal estrous cycles. Nutritional signals are perceived by metabolic-sensing cells in the hypothalamus, which interact with estradiol-receptive neurons to regulate the secretory activity of GnRH neurons. The orexigenic peptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and the anorexigenic peptide derived from the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene, melanocyte-stimulating hormone α (αMSH), are believed to be major afferent pathways that transmit inhibitory (NPY) and excitatory (αMSH) inputs to GnRH neurons. The neuropeptide kisspeptin is considered a major stimulator of GnRH secretion and has been shown to mediate estradiol's effect on GnRH neuronal activity. Kisspeptin may also integrate the neuronal pathways mediating the metabolic and gonadal steroid hormone control of gonadotropin secretion. Recent studies in our laboratories indicate that functional and structural changes in the pathways involving NPY, POMC, and kisspeptin neurons occur in response to high rates of BW gain during the juvenile period in heifers. Changes include regulation of expression in NPY, POMC, and KISS1 and plasticity in the neuronal projections to GnRH neurons and within the neuronal network comprising these cells. Moreover, an intricate pattern of differential gene expression in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus occurs in response to feeding high concentrate diets that promote elevated BW gain. Genes involved include those controlling feeding intake and cell metabolism, neuronal growth and remodeling, and synaptic transmission. Characterizing the cellular pathways and molecular networks involved in the mechanisms that control the

  2. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Projections from a single NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neuron in the paraventricular nucleus to different brain regions involved in feeding.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Yuko; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Shimomura, Kenju

    2016-12-01

    The anorexigenic neuropeptide NEFA/nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1-containing neurons are distributed in the brain regions involved in feeding regulation, including the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Functionally, NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neurons in the PVN regulate feeding through the hypothalamus and brain stem. However, the neural network of PVN NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neurons has yet to be elucidated. Axon collateral branches allow individual neurons to target multiple neurons. In some cases, each target neuron can be located in different nuclei. Here we show that a single neuron in the PVN projects axonal collaterals to both the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) and the arcuate nucleus (ARC), which are important brain regions for feeding regulation. In this study, after injection of different retrograde tracers into the DVC and ARC, both tracer-labeled neurons were detected in the identical PVN neuron, indicating the axon collateral projections from the single PVN neuron to the DVC and ARC. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that approximately 50 % of the neurons with axon collateral projections from the PVN to the DVC and ARC were found to be NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neurons. Our data suggest that a single NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neuron in the PVN projects to both the ARC and the DVC with axon collateral projection. Although the physiological significance remains to be elucidated, our data offer new perspectives on NUCB2/nesfatin-1 function at the neural network level and food intake regulation.

  4. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  5. Hypothalamic and Brainstem Sources of Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Nerve Fibers Innervating the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    DAS, MAHASWETA; VIHLEN, CHRISTOPHER S.; LEGRADI, GABOR

    2007-01-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) coordinates major neuroendocrine and behavioral mechanisms, particularly responses to homeostatic challenges. Parvocellular and magnocellular PVN neurons are richly innervated by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) axons. Our recent functional observations have also suggested that PACAP may be an excitatory neuropeptide at the level of the PVN. Nevertheless, the exact localization of PACAP-producing neurons that project to the PVN is not understood. The present study examined the specific contribution of various brain areas sending PACAP innervation to the rat PVN by using iontophoretic microinjections of the retrograde neuroanatomical tracer cholera toxin B subunit (CTb). Retrograde transport was evaluated from hypothalamic and brainstem sections by using multiple labeling immunofluorescence for CTb and PACAP. PACAP-containing cell groups were found to be retrogradely labeled from the PVN in the median preoptic nucleus; preoptic and lateral hypothalamic areas; arcuate, dorsomedial, ventromedial, and supramammillary nuclei; ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray; rostral and midlevel ventrolateral medulla, including the C1 catecholamine cell group; nucleus of the solitary tract; and dorsal motor nucleus of vagus. Minor PACAP projections with scattered double-labeled neurons originated from the parabrachial nucleus, pericoeruleus area, and caudal regions of the nucleus of the solitary tract and ventrolateral medulla. These observations indicate a multisite origin of PACAP innervation to the PVN and provide a strong chemical neuroanatomical foundation for interaction between PACAP and its potential target neurons in the PVN, such as parvocellular CRH neurons, controlling physiologic responses to stressful challenges and other neuroendocrine or preautonomic PVN neurons. PMID:17154257

  6. Differential effects of methamphetamine on expression of neuropeptide Y mRNA in hypothalamus and on serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations in ad libitum-fed and schedule-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Crowley, W R; Ramoz, G; Keefe, K A; Torto, R; Kalra, S P; Hanson, G R

    2005-01-01

    Relatively little is known concerning the interaction of psychostimulants with hypothalamic neuropeptide systems or metabolic hormones implicated in regulation of energy balance. The present studies tested whether methamphetamine alters the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), two important orexigenic neuropeptides, or proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor for the anorexigenic peptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, or the secretion of leptin, insulin and ghrelin, concomitant with inhibition of food intake. Female rats were either fed ad libitum (AL) or placed on a scheduled feeding (SF) regimen, with access to food limited to 4 h/day. Administration of (+/-)-methamphetamine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 2 h prior to food presentation significantly inhibited food intake in SF animals, but did not affect intake in AL animals. In a separate study, AL and SF animals were killed just prior to expected food presentation, and expression of NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNAs in hypothalamus was determined using in situ hybridisation; concentrations of leptin, insulin and ghrelin in serum were determined with radioimmunoassays. In saline-treated, SF controls, NPY and AgRP mRNA expression in arcuate nucleus and serum ghrelin were significantly elevated, and serum leptin and insulin were significantly reduced. Methamphetamine reversed the up-regulation of NPY mRNA expression observed in the SF condition, without affecting AgRP mRNA or the serum concentrations of metabolic hormones. However, in AL animals, NPY mRNA expression in arcuate and dorsomedial nuclei was significantly increased by methamphetamine, which also reduced serum leptin and insulin and increased serum ghrelin concentrations. These findings suggest that the inhibition of NPY expression in SF animals may be a mechanism underlying the anorexigenic effect of methamphetamine seen in this condition. The increase in NPY expression produced by methamphetamine in AL animals may be mediated by the

  7. Role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova; Kruzliak, Peter; Rabkin, Simon W

    2014-11-01

    The role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathy-associated heart failure has been garnering more attention. Several neuropeptides--Neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and their receptors have been studied in the various types of cardiomyopathies. The data indicate associations with the strength of the association varying depending on the kind of neuropeptide and the nature of the cardiomyopathy--diabetic, ischemic, inflammatory, stress-induced or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Several neuropeptides appear to alter regulation of genes involved in heart failure. Demonstration of an association is an essential first step in proving causality or establishing a role for a factor in a disease. Understanding the complexity of neuropeptide function should be helpful in establishing new or optimal therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure in cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute headache attributed to whiplash in arcuate foramen and non-arcuate foramen subjects.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Luis; Mata-Escolano, Federico; Blanco-Pérez, Esther; Llidó, Susanna; Bastir, Markus; Sanchis-Gimeno, Juan A

    2017-04-01

    To test the association between arcuate foramen (AF) in the first cervical vertebra with acute headache attributed to whiplash. Retrospective study of 128 patients that suffered a whiplash. The presence or absence of AF was recorded after a radiographic study, as well as the presence or absence of acute headache after the whiplash. The frequency of AF was 17.2%. Patients with bilateral AF presented a significant (p = 0.000, Fisher's test) increase in the frequency of acute headache (90.9%) in comparison with the non-AF group (5.7%). The ratio between the presence and absence of acute headache was 166.6 times higher (IC 95% 18.2-1526.22) in subjects with bilateral AF in comparison with non-AF subjects. The presence of bilateral AF is associated to an increased frequency of acute headache after suffering a whiplash, information of interest for the attention to these patients.

  9. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  10. [Neuropeptides in the raphe nuclei: an immunocytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Coveñas, R; Marcos, P; Belda, M; de León, M; Narváez, J A; Aguirre, J A; González-Barón, S

    The raphe nuclei are involved in numerous mechanisms, included the antinociceptives. In the raphe nuclei of the cat, the distribution of neuropeptides is not very studied. Aim. To know the distribution of peptidergic fibers and cell bodies in the raphe nuclei of the cat. We studied a total of fifteen neuropeptides. We used four control cats (without colchicine) and six with colchicine (administered into the Sylvian aqueduct). We used an indirect immunocytochemical technique. The histologic controls carried out confirm the specificity of the primary and secondary antibodies used. We observed in the fibers and/or the cell bodies located in the dorsal raphe nucleus a total of 14 neuropeptides, 12 in the raphe pallidus, 11 in the medial raphe, 10 in the raphe magnus, 8 in the raphe pontis and 7 in the raphe obscurus. We observed immunoreactive cell bodies in the raphe pallidus (with neurokinin A/leucine enkephalin), in the medial raphe (beta endorphin/alpha neo endorphin), in the raphe magnus (leucine enkephalin) and in the dorsal raphe (beta endorphin/alpha neo endorphin/methionine enkephalin Arg6 Gly7 Leu8/leucine enkephalin/neurokinin A/neurotensin). 1. There are differences on the distribution of the peptidergic fibers/cell bodies observed in the raphe nuclei of the rat, the cat and the man; 2. The raphe nuclei could receive peptidergic afferences containing dynorphin A, galanin, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin ; 3. The cell bodies located in the medial raphe and containing beta endorphin or alpha neo endorphin could be projecting neurons; 4. There is a great functional complexity in the raphe nuclei due to the great number of neuropeptides observed in them; 5. The neuropeptides could interact between them, and 6. The neuropeptides located in the raphe nuclei could be involved in the control of the nociceptive information.

  11. Neuropeptide Y in normal eating and in genetic and dietary-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Beck, B

    2006-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one the most potent orexigenic peptides found in the brain. It stimulates food intake with a preferential effect on carbohydrate intake. It decreases latency to eat, increases motivation to eat and delays satiety by augmenting meal size. The effects on feeding are mediated through at least two receptors, the Y1 and Y5 receptors. The NPY system for feeding regulation is mostly located in the hypothalamus. It is formed of the arcuate nucleus (ARC), where the peptide is synthesized, and the paraventricular (PVN), dorsomedial (DMN) and ventromedial (VMN) nuclei and perifornical area where it is active. This activity is modulated by the hindbrain and limbic structures. It is dependent on energy availability, e.g. upregulation with food deprivation or restriction, and return to baseline with refeeding. It is also sensitive to diet composition with variable effects of carbohydrates and fats. Leptin signalling and glucose sensing which are directly linked to diet type are the most important factors involved in its regulation. Absence of leptin signalling in obesity models due to gene mutation either at the receptor level, as in the Zucker rat, the Koletsky rat or the db/db mouse, or at the peptide level, as in ob/ob mouse, is associated with increased mRNA abundance, peptide content and/or release in the ARC or PVN. Other genetic obesity models, such as the Otsuka–Long–Evans–Tokushima Fatty rat, the agouti mouse or the tubby mouse, are characterized by a diminution in NPY expression in the ARC nucleus and by a significant increase in the DMN. Further studies are necessary to determine the exact role of NPY in these latter models. Long-term exposure to high-fat or high-energy palatable diets leads to the development of adiposity and is associated with a decrease in hypothalamic NPY content or expression, consistent with the existence of a counter-regulatory mechanism to diminish energy intake and limit obesity development. On the other hand, an

  12. Corneal ectasia secondary to LASIK after arcuate keratotomy.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ramon C; Ghanem, Marcielle A; Bogoni, Ayla; Ghanem, Vinícius C

    2013-06-01

    To present a case of corneal ectasia after LASIK in a patient with previous arcuate keratotomy. Case report. The patient underwent arcuate keratotomy in both eyes in 1997 for with-the-rule regular hyperopic astigmatism and uneventful bilateral LASIK for residual astigmatism 5 years later. Visual acuity and refraction remained stable for 5 years, when the patient noticed worsening visual acuity. Corneal topography showed progressive inferior steepening, confirming the diagnosis of ectasia. Corneal high-resolution optical coherence tomography revealed a normal LASIK flap. The patient had no risk factors for corneal ectasia other than previous incisional surgery. This case suggests that isolated arcuate keratotomy can be a significant risk factor for the development of corneal ectasia after LASIK. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Mapping of the transcription start site (TSS) and identification of SNPs in the bovine neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Bojlul; Sweeney, Torres

    2008-12-23

    Neuropeptide Y is a key neurotransmitter of the central nervous system which plays a vital role in the feed energy homeostasis in mammals. Mutations in the regulatory and coding regions of the bovine NPY gene can potentially affect the neuronal regulation of appetite and feeding behaviour in cattle. The objectives of this experiment were to: a) fully characterize the bovine NPY gene transcript and b) identify the SNP diversity in both coding and non-coding regions of the NPY gene in a panel of Bos taurus and B. indicus cattle. Bovine NPY gene consists of four exons (99, 188, 81 and 195 nucleotides) and three introns. The promoter region of the NPY gene consists of TATA and GC boxes which are separated from the transcription start site (TSS) by 29 and ~100 nt, respectively. Analyses of the tissue specific expression of the bovine NPY gene revealed the presence of highly abundant NPY gene transcripts in the arcuate nucleus, cerebral and cerebellar regions of the bovine brain. We identified a total of 59 SNPs in the 8.4 kb region of the bovine NPY gene. Seven out of nine total SNPs in the promoter region affect binding of putative transcription factors. A high level of nucleotide diversity was evident in the promoter regions (2.84 x 10(-3)) compared to the exonic (1.44 x 10(-3)), intronic (1.30 x 10(-3)) and 3' untranslated (1.26 x 10(-3)) regions. The SNPs identified in different regions of bovine NPY gene may serve as a basis for understanding the regulation of the expression of the bovine NPY gene under a variety of physiological conditions and identification of genotypes with high feed energy conversion efficiency.

  14. Function of neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein at weaning: relation to corticosterone, dietary carbohydrate and body weight.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, Sarah F; Sepiashvili, Kate; Akabayashi, Akira; Karatayev, Olga; Davydova, Zoya; Alexander, Jesline T; Wang, Jian; Chang, Guo-Qing

    2005-03-02

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related protein (AgRP), potent stimulants of feeding, have been linked in adult rats to both corticosterone (CORT) and dietary carbohydrate. To understand the significance of this relationship early in life, measurements were taken of these parameters at different ages around weaning, in rats given a choice of macronutrient diets or maintained on a carbohydrate-rich diet. The results demonstrate that, in both male and female rat pups, the expression and production of NPY and AgRP in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) peak on postnatal day 21 (P21), compared to P15 before weaning and P27 after weaning. These elevated levels of peptide were associated with peak levels of CORT and glucose and also a strong, natural preference for carbohydrate at weaning, which accounted for 55-65% of the pups' total diet. In subgroups defined by their body weight at these stages, rats with as little as 4% lower body weight (compared to higher weight pups) had 30-60% greater expression of NPY and AgRP in the ARC and elevated levels of CORT, with no difference in leptin or insulin. This response was significantly more pronounced at P21 than at P15 or P27. The importance of carbohydrate during this stage was suggested by additional results showing elevated NPY expression, CORT levels, body weight and inguinal fat pad weights in P27 pups raised on a 65% carbohydrate diet vs. 45% carbohydrate. These results suggest that hypothalamic NPY and AgRP, together with CORT, have glucoregulatory as well as feeding stimulatory functions that help mediate the transition from suckling of a fat-rich diet to independent feeding of a carbohydrate-rich diet. During this critical period, the carbohydrate together with the peptides and CORT provide the important signals, including elevated glucose, that promote de novo lipogenesis and enable weanling animals to survive periods of food deprivation.

  15. Increase of long-term 'diabesity' risk, hyperphagia, and altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression in neonatally overnourished 'small-for-gestational-age' (SGA) rats.

    PubMed

    Schellong, Karen; Neumann, Uta; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Plagemann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data have shown long-term health adversity in low birth weight subjects, especially concerning the metabolic syndrome and 'diabesity' risk. Alterations in adult food intake have been suggested to be causally involved. Responsible mechanisms remain unclear. By rearing in normal (NL) vs. small litters (SL), small-for-gestational-age (SGA) rats were neonatally exposed to either normal (SGA-in-NL) or over-feeding (SGA-in-SL), and followed up into late adult age as compared to normally reared appropriate-for-gestational-age control rats (AGA-in-NL). SGA-in-SL rats displayed rapid neonatal weight gain within one week after birth, while SGA-in-NL growth caught up only at juvenile age (day 60), as compared to AGA-in-NL controls. In adulthood, an increase in lipids, leptin, insulin, insulin/glucose-ratio (all p<0.05), and hyperphagia under normal chow as well as high-energy/high-fat diet, modelling modern 'westernized' lifestyle, were observed only in SGA-in-SL as compared to both SGA-in-NL and AGA-in-NL rats (p<0.05). Lasercapture microdissection (LMD)-based neuropeptide expression analyses in single neuron pools of the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARC) revealed a significant shift towards down-regulation of the anorexigenic melanocortinergic system (proopiomelanocortin, Pomc) in SGA-in-SL rats (p<0.05). Neuropeptide expression within the orexigenic system (neuropeptide Y (Npy), agouti-related-peptide (Agrp) and galanin (Gal)) was not significantly altered. In essence, the 'orexigenic index', proposed here as a neuroendocrine 'net-indicator', was increased in SGA-in-SL regarding Npy/Pomc expression (p<0.01), correlated to food intake (p<0.05). Adult SGA rats developed increased 'diabesity' risk only if exposed to neonatal overfeeding. Hypothalamic malprogramming towards decreased anorexigenic activity was involved into the pathophysiology of this neonatally acquired adverse phenotype. Neonatal overfeeding appears to be a critical long-term risk factor in

  16. Increase of Long-Term ‘Diabesity’ Risk, Hyperphagia, and Altered Hypothalamic Neuropeptide Expression in Neonatally Overnourished ‘Small-For-Gestational-Age’ (SGA) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schellong, Karen; Neumann, Uta; Rancourt, Rebecca C.; Plagemann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data have shown long-term health adversity in low birth weight subjects, especially concerning the metabolic syndrome and ‘diabesity’ risk. Alterations in adult food intake have been suggested to be causally involved. Responsible mechanisms remain unclear. Methods and Findings By rearing in normal (NL) vs. small litters (SL), small-for-gestational-age (SGA) rats were neonatally exposed to either normal (SGA-in-NL) or over-feeding (SGA-in-SL), and followed up into late adult age as compared to normally reared appropriate-for-gestational-age control rats (AGA-in-NL). SGA-in-SL rats displayed rapid neonatal weight gain within one week after birth, while SGA-in-NL growth caught up only at juvenile age (day 60), as compared to AGA-in-NL controls. In adulthood, an increase in lipids, leptin, insulin, insulin/glucose-ratio (all p<0.05), and hyperphagia under normal chow as well as high-energy/high-fat diet, modelling modern ‘westernized’ lifestyle, were observed only in SGA-in-SL as compared to both SGA-in-NL and AGA-in-NL rats (p<0.05). Lasercapture microdissection (LMD)-based neuropeptide expression analyses in single neuron pools of the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARC) revealed a significant shift towards down-regulation of the anorexigenic melanocortinergic system (proopiomelanocortin, Pomc) in SGA-in-SL rats (p<0.05). Neuropeptide expression within the orexigenic system (neuropeptide Y (Npy), agouti-related-peptide (Agrp) and galanin (Gal)) was not significantly altered. In essence, the ‘orexigenic index’, proposed here as a neuroendocrine ‘net-indicator’, was increased in SGA-in-SL regarding Npy/Pomc expression (p<0.01), correlated to food intake (p<0.05). Conclusion Adult SGA rats developed increased ‘diabesity’ risk only if exposed to neonatal overfeeding. Hypothalamic malprogramming towards decreased anorexigenic activity was involved into the pathophysiology of this neonatally acquired adverse phenotype. Neonatal

  17. The Role of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Byron; Ardila, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    In aphasia literature, it has been considered that a speech repetition defect represents the main constituent of conduction aphasia. Conduction aphasia has frequently been interpreted as a language impairment due to lesions of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) that disconnect receptive language areas from expressive ones. Modern neuroradiological…

  18. The Role of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Byron; Ardila, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    In aphasia literature, it has been considered that a speech repetition defect represents the main constituent of conduction aphasia. Conduction aphasia has frequently been interpreted as a language impairment due to lesions of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) that disconnect receptive language areas from expressive ones. Modern neuroradiological…

  19. Mapping of Kisspeptin Receptor mRNA in the Whole Rat Brain and its Co-Localisation with Oxytocin in the Paraventricular Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Higo, S; Honda, S; Iijima, N; Ozawa, H

    2016-04-01

    The neuropeptide kisspeptin and its receptor play an essential role in reproduction as a potent modulator of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurone. In addition to its reproductive function, kisspeptin signalling is also involved in extra-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis systems, including oxytocin and arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion. By contrast to the accumulating information for kisspeptin neurones and kisspeptin fibres, the histological distribution and function of the kisspeptin receptor in the rat brain remain poorly characterised. Using in situ hybridisation combined with immunofluorescence, the present study aimed to determine the whole brain map of Kiss1r mRNA (encoding the kisspeptin receptor), and to examine whether oxytocin or AVP neurones express Kiss1r. Neurones with strong Kiss1r expression were observed in several rostral brain areas, including the olfactory bulb, medial septum, diagonal band of Broca and throughout the preoptic area, with the most concentrated population being around 0.5 mm rostral to the bregma. Co-immunofluorescence staining revealed that, in these rostral brain areas, the vast majority of the Kiss1r-expressing neurones co-expressed GnRH. Moderate levels of Kiss1r mRNA were also noted in the rostral periventricular area, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and throughout the arcuate nucleus. Relatively weak Kiss1r expression was observed in the supraoptic nucleus and supramammillary nuclei. Moderate to weak expression of Kiss1r was also observed in several regions in the midbrain, including the periaqueductal gray and dorsal raphe nucleus. We also examined whether oxytocin and AVP neurones in the PVN co-express Kiss1r. Immunofluorescence revealed the co-expression of Kiss1r in a subset of the oxytocin neurones but not in the AVP neurones in the PVN. The present study provides a fundamental anatomical basis for further examination of the kisspeptin signalling system in the extra-HPG axis, as well as in

  20. Interaction between neuropeptide Y and noradrenaline on central catecholamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Illes, P; Regenold, J T

    1990-03-01

    Despite their widespread occurrence in the central nervous system, interactions between co-localized transmitters and their receptors remain poorly understood. Noradrenergic neurons of the nucleus locus coeruleus contain the peptide co-transmitter neuropeptide Y (refs 1,2). In locus coeruleus cells, stimulation of alpha2-adrenoceptors 3,4 or opioid mu-receptors 5,6 increases a potassium conductance and thereby leads to hyperpolarization and inhibition of spontaneous firing. Coupling between these receptors and the inward rectifying K+ channels involves a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP-binding protein (Gi or Go)7. Here we investigate whether the neuropeptide Y and alpha2-receptors of locus coeruleus neurons interact with one another. When administered alone, neuropeptide Y reduces the discharge of action potentials, probably by increasing the permeability of the membrane to potassium ions through the activation of a G protein; this effect is reduced in the presence of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists. Moreover, the peptide selectively increases the hyperpolarizing effect of alpha2-agonists, but does not enhance responses to opioid mu-agonists. We suggest that noradrenaline and its co-transmitter neuropeptide Y stimulate separate receptors, which influence each other in a specific way.

  1. Neuropeptide GPCRs in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Frooninckx, Lotte; Van Rompay, Liesbeth; Temmerman, Liesbet; Van Sinay, Elien; Beets, Isabel; Janssen, Tom; Husson, Steven J.; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-01-01

    Like most organisms, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans relies heavily on neuropeptidergic signaling. This tiny animal represents a suitable model system to study neuropeptidergic signaling networks with single cell resolution due to the availability of powerful molecular and genetic tools. The availability of the worm’s complete genome sequence allows researchers to browse through it, uncovering putative neuropeptides and their cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Many predictions have been made about the number of C. elegans neuropeptide GPCRs. In this review, we report the state of the art of both verified as well as predicted C. elegans neuropeptide GPCRs. The predicted neuropeptide GPCRs are incorporated into the receptor classification system based on their resemblance to orthologous GPCRs in insects and vertebrates. Appointing the natural ligand(s) to each predicted neuropeptide GPCR (receptor deorphanization) is a crucial step during characterization. The development of deorphanization strategies resulted in a significant increase in the knowledge of neuropeptidergic signaling in C. elegans. Complementary localization and functional studies demonstrate that neuropeptides and their GPCRs represent a rich potential source of behavioral variability in C. elegans. Here, we review all neuropeptidergic signaling pathways that so far have been functionally characterized in C. elegans. PMID:23267347

  2. Mesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environments.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Toshiyuki; Long, Jeffrey M; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Sinton, Christopher M; Skach, Amber; Williams, S Clay; Hammer, Robert E; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2016-05-24

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) are endogenous neuropeptide ligands for the G protein-coupled receptors NPBWR1 and NPBWR2. Here we report that the majority of NPW neurons in the mesolimbic region possess tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, indicating that a small subset of dopaminergic neurons coexpress NPW. These NPW-containing neurons densely and exclusively innervate two limbic system nuclei in adult mouse brain: the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral part of the central amygdala nucleus (CeAL). In the CeAL of wild-type mice, restraint stress resulted in an inhibition of cellular activity, but this stress-induced inhibition was attenuated in the CeAL neurons of NPW(-/-) mice. Moreover, the response of NPW(-/-) mice to either formalin-induced pain stimuli or a live rat (i.e., a potential predator) was abnormal only when they were placed in a novel environment: The mice failed to show the normal species-specific self-protective and aversive reactions. In contrast, the behavior of NPW(-/-) mice in a habituated environment was indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice. These results indicate that the NPW/NPBWR1 system could play a critical role in the gating of stressful stimuli during exposure to novel environments.

  3. Mesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environments

    PubMed Central

    Motoike, Toshiyuki; Long, Jeffrey M.; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Sinton, Christopher M.; Skach, Amber; Williams, S. Clay; Hammer, Robert E.; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) are endogenous neuropeptide ligands for the G protein-coupled receptors NPBWR1 and NPBWR2. Here we report that the majority of NPW neurons in the mesolimbic region possess tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, indicating that a small subset of dopaminergic neurons coexpress NPW. These NPW-containing neurons densely and exclusively innervate two limbic system nuclei in adult mouse brain: the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral part of the central amygdala nucleus (CeAL). In the CeAL of wild-type mice, restraint stress resulted in an inhibition of cellular activity, but this stress-induced inhibition was attenuated in the CeAL neurons of NPW−/− mice. Moreover, the response of NPW−/− mice to either formalin-induced pain stimuli or a live rat (i.e., a potential predator) was abnormal only when they were placed in a novel environment: The mice failed to show the normal species-specific self-protective and aversive reactions. In contrast, the behavior of NPW−/− mice in a habituated environment was indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice. These results indicate that the NPW/NPBWR1 system could play a critical role in the gating of stressful stimuli during exposure to novel environments. PMID:27140610

  4. Laparoscopic management of the median arcuate ligament syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam; Neale, Michael; Lane, Rodney; Schiavone, Vivienne; Samra, Jaswinder S; Hugh, Thomas J

    2012-04-01

    The median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is an infrequent cause of abdominal pain. This diagnosis is made after exclusion of other more common causes of upper abdominal symptoms. Mesenteric duplex and a computerized tomography mesenteric angiography demonstrate dynamic compression of the coeliac axis during expiration. Retrospective analysis of presenting symptoms, preoperative findings and postoperative outcomes. Five consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic division of the median arcuate ligament over a 4-year period (2006-2010) are presented. This procedure was associated with low morbidity and complete relief of symptoms in all patients. A minimally invasive procedure is the treatment of choice in selected patients with MALS. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. Neuropeptide Y regulation of LHRH release in the median eminence: immunocytochemical and physiological evidence in hens.

    PubMed

    Contijoch, A M; Malamed, S; McDonald, J K; Advis, J P

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that hypothalamic median eminence (ME) might be a control site for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) release. Thus, stimulatory and/or inhibitory inputs acting at this site might be involved in regulating LHRH release from the ME and, therefore, luteinizing hormone (LH) release from the anterior pituitary. Since a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) on LH release has been suggested, we have hypothesized that NPY might act in the ME to control preovulatory LHRH release in hens. To examine this possibility we have determined: (a) the immunocytochemical distribution of LHRH and NPY in the ME of the hen, (b) the basal and NPY-stimulated release of LHRH in vitro from the ME of hens undergoing a natural or a premature preovulatory surge of LH, and (c) the tissue content of LHRH and NPY in microdissected MEs, at various times before and during a natural or a premature preovulatory surge of LH. A potential role for NPY on LHRH release in the ME is suggested for the following reasons. (a) There are opportunities for synaptic interactions between NPY and LHRH-containing axons at this site. LHRH-containing cell bodies localized in the anterior hypothalamus/medial preoptic area project to the ME. NPY-containing perikarya, concentrated in the ventromedial aspect of the arcuate nucleus, might contact LHRH processes going to the ME and/or might themselves send axons to the ME, (b) Addition of NPY to the incubation media increases LHRH release from microdissected ME tissue of hens killed at the time of the natural preovulatory surge of LH, but not in hens killed 7 h before the occurrence of this surge. However, the stimulatory effect of NPY on LHRH release can be induced at this latter time when a premature LH surge is elicited. While the natural preovulatory surge of LH occurs 4 h before the second ovulation in a sequence (C2 ovulation), administration of progesterone (P4) 10-14 h before the expected natural C2 ovulation advances the natural LH surge by

  6. Oblique contractional reactivation of inherited heterogeneities: Cause for arcuate orogens

    PubMed Central

    Sokoutis, D.; Willingshofer, E.; Brun, J.‐P.; Gueydan, F.; Cloetingh, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We use lithospheric‐scale analog models to study the reactivation of pre‐existing heterogeneities under oblique shortening and its relation to the origin of arcuate orogens. Reactivation of inherited rheological heterogeneities is an important mechanism for localization of deformation in compressional settings and consequent initiation of contractional structures during orogenesis. However, the presence of an inherited heterogeneity in the lithosphere is in itself not sufficient for its reactivation once the continental lithosphere is shortened. The heterogeneity orientation is important in determining if reactivation occurs and to which extent. This study aims at giving insights on this process by means of analog experiments in which a linear lithospheric heterogeneity trends with various angles to the shortening direction. In particular, the key parameter investigated is the orientation (angle α) of a strong domain (SD) with respect to the shortening direction. Experimental results show that angles α ≥ 75° (high obliquity) allow for reactivation along the entire SD and the development of a linear orogen. For α ≤ 60° (low obliquity) the models are characterized by the development of an arcuate orogen, with the SD remaining partially non‐reactivated. These results provide a new mechanism for the origin of some arcuate orogens, in which orocline formation was not driven by indentation or subduction processes, but by oblique shortening of inherited heterogeneities, as exemplified by the Ouachita orogen of the southern U.S. PMID:28670046

  7. Oblique contractional reactivation of inherited heterogeneities: Cause for arcuate orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, D.; Willingshofer, E.; Brun, J.-P.; Gueydan, F.; Cloetingh, S.

    2017-03-01

    We use lithospheric-scale analog models to study the reactivation of pre-existing heterogeneities under oblique shortening and its relation to the origin of arcuate orogens. Reactivation of inherited rheological heterogeneities is an important mechanism for localization of deformation in compressional settings and consequent initiation of contractional structures during orogenesis. However, the presence of an inherited heterogeneity in the lithosphere is in itself not sufficient for its reactivation once the continental lithosphere is shortened. The heterogeneity orientation is important in determining if reactivation occurs and to which extent. This study aims at giving insights on this process by means of analog experiments in which a linear lithospheric heterogeneity trends with various angles to the shortening direction. In particular, the key parameter investigated is the orientation (angle α) of a strong domain (SD) with respect to the shortening direction. Experimental results show that angles α ≥ 75° (high obliquity) allow for reactivation along the entire SD and the development of a linear orogen. For α ≤ 60° (low obliquity) the models are characterized by the development of an arcuate orogen, with the SD remaining partially non-reactivated. These results provide a new mechanism for the origin of some arcuate orogens, in which orocline formation was not driven by indentation or subduction processes, but by oblique shortening of inherited heterogeneities, as exemplified by the Ouachita orogen of the southern U.S.

  8. Oblique contractional reactivation of inherited heterogeneities: Cause for arcuate orogens.

    PubMed

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, D; Willingshofer, E; Brun, J-P; Gueydan, F; Cloetingh, S

    2017-03-01

    We use lithospheric-scale analog models to study the reactivation of pre-existing heterogeneities under oblique shortening and its relation to the origin of arcuate orogens. Reactivation of inherited rheological heterogeneities is an important mechanism for localization of deformation in compressional settings and consequent initiation of contractional structures during orogenesis. However, the presence of an inherited heterogeneity in the lithosphere is in itself not sufficient for its reactivation once the continental lithosphere is shortened. The heterogeneity orientation is important in determining if reactivation occurs and to which extent. This study aims at giving insights on this process by means of analog experiments in which a linear lithospheric heterogeneity trends with various angles to the shortening direction. In particular, the key parameter investigated is the orientation (angle α) of a strong domain (SD) with respect to the shortening direction. Experimental results show that angles α ≥ 75° (high obliquity) allow for reactivation along the entire SD and the development of a linear orogen. For α ≤ 60° (low obliquity) the models are characterized by the development of an arcuate orogen, with the SD remaining partially non-reactivated. These results provide a new mechanism for the origin of some arcuate orogens, in which orocline formation was not driven by indentation or subduction processes, but by oblique shortening of inherited heterogeneities, as exemplified by the Ouachita orogen of the southern U.S.

  9. Neuropeptide Y and sleep.

    PubMed

    Dyzma, Michal; Boudjeltia, Karim Z; Faraut, Brice; Kerkhofs, Myriam

    2010-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a 36-amino-acid peptide from the pancreatic polypeptide family, is one of the more abundant peptides in the central nervous system. It acts as a neurohormone and as a neuromodulator. NPY is widely distributed in the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, the amygdala, the locus coeruleus and the cerebral cortex. At least six NPY receptors subtypes have been identified. NPY is involved in the regulation of several physiological functions such as food intake, hormonal release, circadian rhythms, cardiovascular disease, thermoregulation, stress response, anxiety and sleep. Sleep promoting effects of NPY as well as wakefulness effects of NPY were found in animals, depending on the site of injection as well as on the functional state of the structure. In humans, NPY was found to have hypnotic properties, possibly acting as a physiological antagonist of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). In conclusion, NPY participates in sleep regulation in humans, particularly in the timing of sleep onset and may as such play a role in the integration of sleep regulation, food intake and metabolism.

  10. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers.

    PubMed

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  11. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  12. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Food Intake-Induced Neuropeptide Level Changes in Rat Brain: Functional Assessment of Selected Neuropeptides as Feeding Regulators.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Wang, Jingxin; Tian, Zichuan; Ma, Fengfei; Dowell, James A; Bremer, Quentin; Lu, Gaoyuan; Baldo, Brian; Li, Lingjun

    2017-09-01

    Endogenous neuropeptides are important signaling molecules that function as regulators of food intake and body weight. Previous work has shown that neuropeptide gene expression levels in a forebrain reward site, the nucleus accumbens (NAc), were changed by feeding. In order to directly monitor feeding-induced changes in neuropeptide expression levels within the NAc, we employed a combination of cryostat dissection, heat stabilization, neuropeptide extraction and label-free quantitative neuropeptidomics via a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry platform. Using this methodology, we described the first neuropeptidome in NAc and discovered that feeding caused the expression level changes of multiple neuropeptides derived from different precursors, especially proSAAS-derived peptides such as Big LEN, PEN and little SAAS. We further investigated the regulatory functions of these neuropeptides derived from the ProSAAS family by performing an intra-NAc microinjection experiment using the identified ProSAAS neuropeptides, ‘Big-LEN’ and ‘PEN’. Big LEN significantly increased rats’ food and water intake, whereas both big LEN and PEN affected other behaviors including locomotion, drinking and grooming. In addition, we quantified the feeding-induced changes of peptides from hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum to reveal the neuropeptide interplay among different anatomical regions. In summary, our study demonstrated neuropeptidomic changes in response to food intake in the rat NAc and other key brain regions. Importantly, the microinfusion of ProSAAS peptides into NAc revealed that they are behaviorally active in this brain site, suggesting the potential utility of these peptides as therapeutics for eating disorders. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Cloning and expression of a novel neuropeptide Y receptor.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D H; Sirinathsinghji, D J; Tan, C P; Shiao, L L; Morin, N; Rigby, M R; Heavens, R H; Rapoport, D R; Bayne, M L; Cascieri, M A; Strader, C D; Linemeyer, D L; MacNeil, D J

    1996-07-12

    The neuropeptide Y family of peptides, which includes neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are found in the central and peripheral nervous system and display a wide array of biological activities. These actions are believed to be mediated through pharmacologically distinct G protein-coupled receptors, and, to date, three members of the NPY receptor family have been cloned. In this study we describe the cloning and expression of a novel NPY receptor from mouse genomic DNA. This receptor, designated NPY Y5, shares 60% amino acid identity to the murine NPY Y1 receptor. The pharmacology of this novel receptor resembles that of the NPY Y1 receptor and is distinct from that described for the NPY Y2, Y3, and Y4 receptors. In situ hybridization of mouse brain sections reveals expression of this receptor within discrete regions of the hypothalamus including the suprachiasmatic nucleus, anterior hypothalamus, bed nucleus stria terminalis, and the ventromedial nucleus with no localization apparent elsewhere in the brain.

  14. Inputs to the ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Won; Geerling, Joel C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2009-01-01

    The ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTvl) receives direct input from two specific subpopulations of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). It is heavily innervated by aldosterone-sensitive NTS neurons, which are selectively activated by sodium depletion, and by the A2 noradrenergic neurons, which are activated by visceral, immune- and stress-related stimuli. Here, we used a retrograde neuronal tracer to identify other brain sites that innervate the BSTvl. Five general brain regions contained retrogradely labeled neurons: cerebral cortex (infralimbic and insular regions), rostral forebrain structures (subfornical organ, organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, taenia tecta, nucleus accumbens, lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, dorsal BST, substantia innominata, and most prominently the amygdala – primarily its basomedial and central subnuclei), thalamus (central medial, intermediodorsal, reuniens, and most prominently the paraventricular thalamic nucleus), hypothalamus (medial preoptic area, perifornical, arcuate, dorsomedial, parasubthalamic, and posterior hypothalamic nuclei), and brainstem (periaqueductal gray matter, dorsal and central superior raphe nuclei, parabrachial nucleus, pre-locus coeruleus region, NTS, and A1 noradrenergic neurons in the caudal ventrolateral medulla). In the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus, some retrogradely-labeled neurons contained either agouti-related peptide or cocaine-amphetamine regulated transcript. Of the numerous retrogradely labeled neurons in the perifornical hypothalamic area, few contained melanin concentrating hormone or orexin. In the brainstem, many retrogradely labeled neurons were either serotoninergic or catecholaminergic. In summary, the BSTvl receives inputs from a variety of brain sites implicated in hunger, salt and water intake, stress, arousal, and reward. PMID:18853414

  15. Neuropeptide signalling systems in flatworms.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, P; Kimber, M J; Novozhilova, E; Day, T A

    2005-01-01

    Two distinct families of neuropeptides are known to endow platyhelminth nervous systems - the FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) and the neuropeptide Fs (NPFs). Flatworm FLPs are structurally simple, each 4-6 amino acids in length with a carboxy terminal aromatic-hydrophobic-Arg-Phe-amide motif. Thus far, four distinct flatworm FLPs have been characterized, with only one of these from a parasite. They have a widespread distribution within the central and peripheral nervous system of every flatworm examined, including neurones serving the attachment organs, the somatic musculature and the reproductive system. The only physiological role that has been identified for flatworm FLPs is myoexcitation. Flatworm NPFs are believed to be invertebrate homologues of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of peptides. Flatworm NPFs are 36-39 amino acids in length and are characterized by a caboxy terminal GRPRFamide signature and conserved tyrosine residues at positions 10 and 17 from the carboxy terminal. Like FLPs, NPF occurs throughout flatworm nervous systems, although less is known about its biological role. While there is some evidence for a myoexcitatory action in cestodes and flukes, more compelling physiological data indicate that flatworm NPF inhibits cAMP levels in a manner that is characteristic of NPY action in vertebrates. The widespread expression of these neuropeptides in flatworm parasites highlights the potential of these signalling systems to yield new targets for novel anthelmintics. Although platyhelminth FLP and NPF receptors await identification, other molecules that play pivotal roles in neuropeptide signalling have been uncovered. These enzymes, involved in the biosynthesis and processing of flatworm neuropeptides, have recently been described and offer other distinct and attractive targets for therapeutic interference.

  16. Leptin stimulates neuropeptide Y and cocaine amphetamine-regulated transcript coexpressing neuronal activity in the dorsomedial hypothalamus in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin J; Verma, Saurabh; Simonds, Stephanie E; Kirigiti, Melissa A; Kievit, Paul; Lindsley, Sarah R; Loche, Alberto; Smith, M Susan; Cowley, Michael A; Grove, Kevin L

    2013-09-18

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons in both the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) have been implicated in food intake and obesity. However, while ARH NPY is highly expressed in the lean animal, DMH NPY mRNA expression is observed only after diet-induced obesity (DIO). Furthermore, while ARH NPY neurons are inhibited by leptin, the effect of this adipokine on DMH NPY neurons is unknown. In this study we show that in contrast to the consistent expression in the ARH, DMH NPY mRNA expression was undetectable until after 10 weeks in mice fed a high-fat diet, and peaked at 20 weeks. Surprisingly, electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that leptin directly depolarized and increased the firing rate of DMH NPY neurons in DIO mice. To further differentiate the regulation of DMH and ARH NPY populations, fasting decreased expression of DMH NPY expression, while it increased ARH NPY expression. However, treatment with a leptin receptor antagonist failed to alter DMH NPY expression, indicating that leptin may not be the critical factor regulating mRNA expression. Importantly, we also demonstrated that DMH NPY neurons coexpress cocaine amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART); however, CART mRNA expression in the DMH peaked earlier in the progression of DIO. This study demonstrates novel and important findings. First, NPY and CART are coexpressed in the same neurons within the DMH, and second, leptin stimulates DMH NPY neurons. These studies suggest that during the progression of DIO, there is an unknown signal that drives the expression of the orexigenic NPY signal within the DMH, and that the chronic hyperleptinemia increases the activity of these NPY/CART neurons.

  17. Leanness in postnatally nutritionally programmed rats is associated with increased sensitivity to leptin and a melanocortin receptor agonist and decreased sensitivity to neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Stocker, C J; Wargent, E T; Martin-Gronert, M S; Cripps, R L; O'Dowd, J F; Zaibi, M S; Cottrell, E C; Mercer, J G; Duncan, J S; Cawthorne, M A; Ozanne, S E; Arch, J R S

    2012-08-01

    Pups of normally nourished dams that are cross-fostered after birth to dams fed a low-protein (8% by weight) diet (postnatal low protein (PLP)) grow slower during the suckling period and remain small and lean throughout adulthood. At weaning, they have increased expression in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and decreased expression of pro-opiomelanocortin, the precursor of anorexigenic melanocortins. We investigated, using third ventricle administration, whether 3-month-old male PLP rats display altered sensitivity to leptin with respect to food intake, NPY and the melanocortin 3/4-receptor agonist MTII, and using in situ hybridization or laser capture microdissection of the ARC followed by RT-PCR, whether the differences observed were associated with changes in the hypothalamic expression of NPY or the leptin receptor, NPY receptors and melanocortin receptors. PLP rats were smaller and had reduced percentage body fat content and plasma leptin concentration compared with control rats. Leptin (5 μg) reduced food intake over 0-48 h more in PLP than control rats (P<0.05). Submaximal doses of NPY increased the food intake less in PLP rats than in controls, whereas submaximal doses of MTII reduced the food intake more in PLP rats. Maximal responses did not differ between PLP and control rats. Leptin and melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) expression were increased in both ARC and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei in PLP animals compared with the controls. MC4R, NPY Y1R, Y5R and NPY expression were unchanged. Postnatal undernourishment results in food intake in adult rats being more sensitive to reduction by leptin and melanocortins, and less sensitive to stimulation by NPY. We propose that this contributes to increased leptin sensitivity and resistance to obesity. Increased expression of ObRb and MC3R may partly explain these findings but other downstream mechanisms must also be involved.

  18. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy.

  19. Sex-dependent regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptor gene expression in moderate/high fat, high-energy diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Zammaretti, Francesca; Panzica, Giancarlo; Eva, Carola

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether long-term consumption of a moderate/high fat (MHF), high-energy diet can affect the gene expression of the Y1 receptor (Y1R) for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial (DMH), ventromedial (VMH), arcuate (ARC) and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei of male and female Y1R/LacZ transgenic mice, carrying the murine Y1R promoter linked to the LacZ gene. MHF diet-fed male mice showed an increased consumption of metabolizable energy that was associated with a significant increase in body weight as compared with chow-fed controls. In parallel, consumption of a MHF diet for 8 weeks significantly decreased Y1R/LacZ transgene expression in the DMH and VMH of male mice whereas no changes were found in the ARC and PVN. Leptin treatment reduced body weight of both MHF diet- and chow-fed male mice but failed to prevent the decrease in Y1R/LacZ transgene expression apparent in the DMH and VMH of male mice after 8 weeks of MHF diet intake. Conversely, no significant changes of metabolizable energy intake, body weight or hypothalamic β-galactosidase expression were found in MHF diet-fed female Y1R/LacZ transgenic mice. A gender-related difference of Y1R/LacZ transgenic mice was also observed in response to leptin treatment that failed to decrease body weight of both MHF diet- and chow-fed female mice. Results herein demonstrate that Y1R/LacZ FVB mice show a sexual dimorphism both on energy intake and on nucleus-specific regulation of the NPY Y1R system in the hypothalamus. Overall, these results provide new insights into the mechanism by which diet composition affects the hypothalamic circuit that controls energy homeostasis. PMID:17584829

  20. Ghrelin receptors mediate ghrelin-induced excitation of agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y but not pro-opiomelanocortin neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Pradhan, Geetali; Sun, Yuxiang; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, De-Pei

    2017-08-01

    Ghrelin increases food intake and body weight by stimulating orexigenic agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons and inhibiting anorexic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamus. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghsr) mediates the effect of ghrelin on feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. However, the role of Ghsr in the ghrelin effect on these two populations of neurons is unclear. We hypothesized that Ghsr mediates the effect of ghrelin on AgRP and POMC neurons. In this study, we determined whether Ghsr similarly mediates the effects of ghrelin on AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons using cell type-specific Ghsr-knockout mice. Perforated whole-cell recordings were performed on green fluorescent protein-tagged AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus in hypothalamic slices. In Ghsr(+/+) mice, ghrelin (100 nM) significantly increased the firing activity of AgRP/NPY neurons but inhibited the firing activity of POMC neurons. In Ghsr(-/-) mice, the excitatory effect of ghrelin on AgRP/NPY neurons was abolished. Ablation of Ghsr also eliminated ghrelin-induced increases in the frequency of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents of POMC neurons. Strikingly, ablation of Ghsr converted the ghrelin effect on POMC neurons from inhibition to excitation. Des-acylated ghrelin had no such effect on POMC neurons in Ghsr(-/-) mice. In both Ghsr(+/+) and Ghsr(-/-) mice, blocking GABAA receptors with gabazine increased the basal firing activity of POMC neurons, and ghrelin further increased the firing activity of POMC neurons in the presence of gabazine. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence that Ghsr is essential for ghrelin-induced excitation of AgRP/NPY neurons. However, ghrelin excites POMC neurons through an unidentified mechanism that is distinct from conventional Ghsr. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gotthardt, Juliet D.; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Yeomans, Bryn L.; Yang, Jennifer A.; Yasrebi, Ali; Bello, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%–52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%–13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%–42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%–60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%–32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%–75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy. PMID:26653760

  2. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2016-01-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24 hours and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24 hour time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:27473896

  3. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Anorexia in human and experimental animal models: physiological aspects related to neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia, a loss of appetite for food, can be caused by various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, firstly, clinical aspects of anorexia nervosa are summarized in brief. Secondly, hypothalamic neuropeptides responsible for feeding regulation in each hypothalamic nucleus are discussed. Finally, three different types of anorexigenic animal models; dehydration-induced anorexia, cisplatin-induced anorexia and cancer anorexia-cachexia, are introduced. In conclusion, hypothalamic neuropeptides may give us novel insight to understand and find effective therapeutics strategy essential for various kinds of anorexia.

  5. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Miramontes-Gonzalez, Jose Pablo; Hightower, C. Makena; Vaught, Brian; Chen, Yuhong; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Schork, Andrew J.; Wang, Lei; Mahata, Manjula; Stridsberg, Mats; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Biswas, Nilima; Fung, Maple M.; Waalen, Jill; Middelberg, Rita P.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.; Baker, Dewleen G.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; O’Connor, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to understand whether genetic variation at the Neuropeptide Y (NPY) locus governs secretion and stress responses in vivo as well as NPY gene expression in sympathochromaffin cells. Background The NPY is a potent pressor peptide co-released with catecholamines during stress by sympathetic axons. Genome-wide linkage on NPY secretion identified a LOD (logarithm of the odds ratio) peak spanning the NPY locus on chromosome 7p15. Methods Our approach began with genomics (linkage and polymorphism determination), extended into NPY genetic control of heritable stress traits in twin pairs, established transcriptional mechanisms in transfected chromaffin cells, and concluded with observations on blood pressure (BP) in the population. Results Systematic polymorphism tabulation at NPY (by re-sequencing across the locus: promoter, 4 exons, exon/intron borders, and untranslated regions; on 2n = 160 chromosomes of diverse biogeographic ancestries) identified 16 variants, of which 5 were common. We then studied healthy twin/sibling pairs (n = 399 individuals), typing 6 polymorphisms spanning the locus. Haplotype and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses indicated that proximal promoter variant ∇−880Δ (2-bp TG/—, Ins/Del, rs3037354) minor/Δ allele was associated with several heritable (h2) stress traits: higher NPY secretion (h2 = 73 ± 4%) as well as greater BP response to environmental (cold) stress, and higher basal systemic vascular resistance. Association of ∇−880Δ and plasma NPY was replicated in an independent sample of 361 healthy young men, with consistent allelic effects; genetic variation at NPY also associated with plasma NPY in another independent series of 2,212 individuals derived from Australia twin pairs. Effects of allele −880Δ to increase NPY expression were directionally coordinate in vivo (on human traits) and in cells (transfected NPY promoter/luciferase reporter activity). Promoter −880Δ interrupts a novel

  6. Leptin-sensitive neurons in the arcuate nuclei contribute to endogenous feeding rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Wiater, Michael F.; Oostrom, Marjolein T.; Smith, Bethany R.; Wang, Qing; Dinh, Thu T.; Roberts, Brandon L.; Jansen, Heiko T.; Ritter, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Neural sites that interact with the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) to generate rhythms of unrestricted feeding remain unknown. We used the targeted toxin, leptin conjugated to saporin (Lep-SAP), to examine the importance of leptin receptor-B (LepR-B)-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) for generation of circadian feeding rhythms. Rats given Arc Lep-SAP injections were initially hyperphagic and rapidly became obese (the “dynamic phase” of weight gain). During this phase, Lep-SAP rats were arrhythmic under 12:12-h light-dark (LD) conditions, consuming 59% of their total daily intake during the daytime, compared with 36% in blank-SAP (B-SAP) controls. Lep-SAP rats were also arrhythmic in continuous dark (DD), while significant circadian feeding rhythms were detected in all B-SAP controls. Approximately 8 wk after injection, Lep-SAP rats remained obese but transitioned into a “static phase” of weight gain marked by attenuation of their hyperphagia and rate of weight gain. In this phase, Arc Lep-SAP rats exhibited circadian feeding rhythms under LD conditions, but were arrhythmic in continuous light (LL) and DD. Lep-SAP injections into the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus did not cause hyperphagia, obesity, or arrhythmic feeding in either LD or DD. Electrolytic lesion of the SCN produced feeding arrhythmia in DD but not hyperphagia or obesity. Results suggest that both Arc Lep-SAP neurons and SCN are required for generation of feeding rhythms entrained to photic cues, while also revealing an essential role for the Arc in maintaining circadian rhythms of ad libitum feeding independent of light entrainment. PMID:22492818

  7. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Grace Z.; Speaker, Christopher; Anderson, Kristen; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Lorenz, Jonathan; Drossos, Tina; Liu, Donald C.; Skelly, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is a vascular compression syndrome with symptoms that overlap chronic functional abdominal pain (CFAP). We report our experience treating MALS in a pediatric cohort previously diagnosed with CFAP. PATIENTS AND METHODS We prospectively evaluated 46 pediatric (<21 years of age) patients diagnosed with MALS at a tertiary care referral center from 2008 to 2012. All patients had previously been diagnosed with CFAP. Patients were evaluated for celiac artery compression by duplex ultrasound and diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography. Quality of life (QOL) was determined by pre- and post-surgical administration of PedsQLtm questionnaire. The patients underwent laparoscopic release of the median arcuate ligament overlying the celiac artery which included surgical neurolysis. We examined the hemodynamic changes in parameters of the celiac artery and peri-operative QOL outcomes to determine correlation. RESULTS All patients had studies suggestive of MALS on duplex and computed tomography. 91% (n=42) positive for MALS were females. All patients underwent a technically satisfactory laparoscopic surgical release resulting in a significant improvement in blood flow through the celiac artery. There were no deaths and a total of 9 complications, 8 requiring a secondary procedure. 33 patients were administered QOL surveys. 18 patients completed the survey with 15 (83%) patients reporting overall improvement in the QOL. Overall, 31/46 patients (67%) reported improvement of symptoms since the time of surgery. CONCLUSIONS MALS was found to be more common in pediatric females than males. Laparoscopic release of the celiac artery can be performed safely in the pediatric population. Surgical release of the artery and resultant neurolysis resulted in significant improvement in the blood flow, symptoms, and overall QOL in this cohort. The overall improvement in QOL outcome measures after surgery leads us to conclude that MALS might

  8. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars. PMID:28241060

  9. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Neil D; Wilson, Leonie; Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G; Dalzell, Johnathan J

    2017-02-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars.

  10. Epigenetic control of cancer by neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Galoian, Karina; Patel, Parthik

    2017-01-01

    Neuropeptides act as neurohormones, neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators. Neuropeptides maintain physiological homeostasis and are paramount in molecular mechanisms of disease progression and regulation, including in cancer. Neuropeptides, by their definition, originate and are secreted from the neuronal cells, they are able to signal to neighboring cells or are released into the blood flow, if they act as neurohormones. The majority of neuropeptides exert their functions through G protein-coupled receptors, with certain exceptions. Although previous studies indicate that neuropeptides function in supporting proliferation of malignant cells in many types of solid tumor, the antitumorigenic action of the neuropeptides and their receptors, for example, in gastric cancers and chondrosarcoma, were also reported. It is known that epigenetically modified chromatin regulates molecular mechanisms involved in gene expression and malignant progression. The epigenetic modifications are genetically heritable, although they do not cause changes in DNA sequence. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNA expression are subject to those modifications. While there is substantial data on epigenetic regulation of neuropeptides, the epigenetic control of cancer by neuropeptides is considered to be uncharted territory. The aim of the current review is to describe the involvement of neuropeptides in the epigenetic machinery of cancer based on data obtained from our laboratory and from other authors.

  11. Thalamic neuropeptide mediating the effects of nursing on lactation and maternal motivation.

    PubMed

    Cservenák, Melinda; Szabó, Éva R; Bodnár, Ibolya; Lékó, András; Palkovits, Miklós; Nagy, György M; Usdin, Ted B; Dobolyi, Arpád

    2013-12-01

    Nursing has important physiological and psychological consequences on mothers during the postpartum period. Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) may contribute to its effects on prolactin release and maternal motivation. Since TIP39-containing fibers and the receptor for TIP39, the parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2 receptor) are abundant in the arcuate nucleus and the medial preoptic area, we antagonized TIP39 action locally to reveal its actions. Mediobasal hypothalamic injection of a virus encoding an antagonist of the PTH2 receptor markedly decreased basal serum prolactin levels and the suckling-induced prolactin release. In contrast, injecting this virus into the preoptic area had no effect on prolactin levels, but did dampen maternal motivation, judged by reduced time in a pup-associated cage during a place preference test. In support of an effect of TIP39 on maternal motivation, we observed that TIP39 containing fibers and terminals had the same distribution within the preoptic area as neurons expressing Fos in response to suckling. Furthermore, TIP39 terminals closely apposed the plasma membrane of 82% of Fos-ir neurons. Retrograde tracer injected into the arcuate nucleus and the medial preoptic area labeled TIP39 neurons in the posterior intralaminar complex of the thalamus (PIL), indicating that these cells but not other groups of TIP39 neurons project to these hypothalamic regions. We also found that TIP39 mRNA levels in the PIL markedly increased around parturition and remained elevated throughout the lactation period, demonstrating the availability of the peptide in postpartum mothers. Furthermore, suckling, but not pup exposure without physical contact, increased Fos expression by PIL TIP39 neurons. These results indicate that suckling activates TIP39 neurons in the PIL that affect prolactin release and maternal motivation via projections to the arcuate nucleus and the preoptic area, respectively.

  12. THALAMIC NEUROPEPTIDE MEDIATING THE EFFECTS OF NURSING ON LACTATION AND MATERNAL MOTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Cservenák, Melinda; Szabó, Éva R.; Bodnár, Ibolya; Lékó, András; Palkovits, Miklós; Nagy, György M.; Usdin, Ted B.; Dobolyi, Arpád

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Nursing has important physiological and psychological consequences on mothers during the postpartum period. Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) may contribute to its effects on prolactin release and maternal motivation. Since TIP39-containing fibers and the receptor for TIP39, the parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2 receptor) are abundant in the arcuate nucleus and the medial preoptic area, we antagonized TIP39 action locally to reveal its actions. Mediobasal hypothalamic injection of a virus encoding an antagonist of the PTH2 receptor markedly decreased basal serum prolactin levels and the suckling-induced prolactin release. In contrast, injecting this virus into the preoptic area had no effect on prolactin levels, but did dampen maternal motivation judged by reduced time in a pup-associated cage during a place-preference test. In support of an effect of TIP39 on maternal motivation, we observed that TIP39 containing fibers and terminals had the same distribution within the preoptic area as neurons expressing Fos in response to suckling. Furthermore, TIP39 terminals closely apposed the plasma membrane of 82% of Fos-ir neurons. Retrograde tracer injected into the arcuate nucleus and the medial preoptic area labeled TIP39 neurons in the posterior intralaminar complex of the thalamus (PIL), indicating that these cells but not other groups of TIP39 neurons project to these hypothalamic regions. We also found that TIP39 mRNA levels in the PIL markedly increased around parturition and remained elevated throughout the lactation period, demonstrating the availability of the peptide in postpartum mothers. Furthermore, suckling, but not pup exposure without physical contact, increased Fos expression by PIL TIP39 neurons. These results indicate that suckling activates TIP39 neurons in the PIL that affect prolactin release and maternal motivation via projections to the arcuate nucleus and the preoptic area, respectively. PMID:24094875

  13. The hypothalamic neuropeptide FF network is impaired in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Goncharuk, Valeri D; Buijs, Ruud M; Jhamandas, Jack H; Swaab, Dick F

    2014-01-01

    Background The human hypothalamus contains the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) neurochemical network. Animal experiments demonstrated that NPFF is implicated in the central cardiovascular regulation. We therefore studied expression of this peptide in the hypothalamus of individuals who suffered from essential hypertension (n = 8) and died suddenly due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and compared to that of healthy individuals (controls) (n = 6) who died abruptly due to mechanical trauma of the chest. Methods The frozen right part of the hypothalamus was cut coronally into serial sections of 20 μm thickness, and each tenth section was stained immunohistochemically using antibody against NPFF. The central section through each hypothalamic nucleus was characterized by the highest intensity of NPFF immunostaining and thus was chosen for quantitative densitometry. Results In hypertensive patients, the area occupied by NPFF immunostained neuronal elements in the central sections through the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pa), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), perinuclear zone (PNZ) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), dorso- (DMH), ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, and perifornical nucleus (PeF) was dramatically decreased compared to controls, ranging about six times less in the VMH to 15 times less in the central part of the BST (BSTC). The NPFF innervation of both nonstained neuronal profiles and microvasculature was extremely poor in hypertensive patients compared to control. Conclusions The decreased NPFF expression in the hypothalamus of hypertensive patients might be a cause of impairment of its interaction with other neurochemical systems, and thereby might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25161813

  14. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  15. Neuropeptides as Regulators of Behavior in Insects.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, Liliane; De Loof, Arnold; Van Hiel, Matthias Boris

    2017-01-31

    Neuropeptides are by far the largest and most diverse group of signaling molecules in multicellular organisms. They are ancient molecules important in regulating a multitude of processes. Their small proteinaceous character allowed them to evolve and radiate quickly into numerous different molecules. On average, hundreds of distinct neuropeptides are present in animals, sometimes with unique classes that do not occur in distantly related species. Acting as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, hormones, or growth factors, they are extremely diverse and are involved in controlling growth, development, ecdysis, digestion, diuresis, and many more physiological processes. Neuropeptides are also crucial in regulating myriad behavioral actions associated with feeding, courtship, sleep, learning and memory, stress, addiction, and social interactions. In general, behavior ensures that an organism can survive in its environment and is defined as any action that can change an organism's relationship to its surroundings. Even though the mode of action of neuropeptides in insects has been vigorously studied, relatively little is known about most neuropeptides and only a few model insects have been investigated. Here, we provide an overview of the roles neuropeptides play in insect behavior. We conclude that multiple neuropeptides need to work in concert to coordinate certain behaviors. Additionally, most neuropeptides studied to date have more than a single function.

  16. Arcuate Src activation-induced phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit contributes to inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Zhu, Qi; Gong, Shan; Tao, Jin; Xu, Guang-Yin; Jiang, Xinghong

    2012-12-01

    The tyrosine kinases of Src family play an important role in the central sensitization following peripheral inflammation. However, whether the Src family in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of mediobasal hypothalamus is involved in central sensitization remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanisms of tyrosine kinases of Src family in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the ARC following peripheral inflammation. Peripheral inflammation was induced by unilateral injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into rat hindpaw. The neuronal activities of the ARC were recorded using electrophysiological field recording from the in vitro mediobasal hypothalamic slices from control and CFA rats. Expression of total and phosphorylated Src and NR2B subunit protein was analyzed by Western blot and immuoprecipitation. Our results showed that CFA injection resulted in an increase in mechanical and thermal sensitivity, which was partially blocked by neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment. CFA injection also enhanced spontaneous firings of ARC neurons, which were reversed by the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit specific antagonist Ro25-6981 and by PP2, an Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In addition, peripheral inflammation enhanced Src phosphorylation and NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation without alteration of total NR2B subunit expression in the ARC. Peripheral inflammation also increased the association of NR2B protein with p-Src protein in the ARC. Administration of PP2 blocked the upregulation of NR2B phosphorylation induced by CFA injection. Taken together, our present results suggest that the arcuate Src activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit may contribute to inflammatory pain.

  17. Learning to read improves the structure of the arcuate fasciculus.

    PubMed

    Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Amemiya, Eduardo; Braga, Lucia W; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2014-04-01

    The acquisition of literacy results from an effortful learning process that leads to functional changes in several cortical regions. We explored whether learning to read also leads to anatomical changes within the left intrahemispheric white matter pathways that interconnect these regions. Using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, we compared illiterates with ex-illiterates who learned to read during adulthood and literates who learned to read during their childhood. Literacy related to an increase in fractional anisotropy and a decrease in perpendicular diffusivity in the temporo-parietal portion of the left arcuate fasciculus. The microstructure within this pathway correlated with the reading performance and the degree of functional activation within 2 dominant brain regions involved in reading: The Visual Word Form Area in response to letter strings, and the posterior superior temporal cortex in response to spoken language. Thus, the acquisition of literacy is associated with a reinforcement of left temporo-parietal connections whose microstructure predicts overall reading performance and the functional specialization of the Visual Word Form Area. This anatomical magnetic resonance imaging marker may be useful to predict developmental reading disorders.

  18. The direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus is predictive of longitudinal reading change.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Booth, James R

    2015-06-01

    Structural coherence across the arcuate fasciculus has previously been related to reading skill, but the arcuate may be divisible into distinct subtracts which support different functions. Here, we examine longitudinal data from 30 children between the ages of 8 and 14 to determine whether initial coherence in any of the arcuate's subsections is predictive of changes in reading across a longitudinal interval of approximately three years. The arcuate was divided using probabilistic tractography; mean fractional anisotropy across each subtract was extracted for each participant. Time 1 to Time 2 change in reading skill (identification, fluency score average) was significantly and uniquely predicted by only direct fronto-temporal arcuate segment coherence. Participants with lower direct segment FA demonstrated decreases in reading scores, potentially reflecting lessened improvements due to continued inefficient processing. These results were consistent in the older and younger halves of the sample. As such, we demonstrate that it is specifically the direct segment of the arcuate that may support and be predictive of reading skill both initially and longitudinally across development.

  19. Neuropeptides in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system: lateral retrochiasmatic area as a common gate for neuronal fibers towards the median eminence.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, M

    1984-01-01

    The source and topography of neuropeptide-containing axons in the median eminence are summarized. Several of these neuropeptide-containing neurons (thyrotropin-releasing hormone, corticotropin-releasing hormone, vasopressin, oxytocin, cholecystokinin) are localized in the paraventricular nucleus. The periventricular and medial preoptic nuclei constitute the main sources of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone axons in the median eminence, respectively. Dynorphins and alpha-neo-endorphin-synthetizing neurons in the supraoptic nucleus also project to the median eminence. Wherever they originate, the projections may follow a common organization pattern and use a common gate--the lateral retrochiasmatic area--to enter the median eminence.

  20. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  1. Reading impairment in a patient with missing arcuate fasciculus.

    PubMed

    Rauschecker, Andreas M; Deutsch, Gayle K; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Schwartzman, Armin; Perry, Lee M; Dougherty, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    We describe the case of a child ("S") who was treated with radiation therapy at age 5 for a recurrent malignant brain tumor. Radiation successfully abolished the tumor but caused radiation-induced tissue necrosis, primarily affecting cerebral white matter. S was introduced to us at age 15 because of her profound dyslexia. We assessed cognitive abilities and performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure cerebral white matter pathways. Diffuse white matter differences were evident in T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion anisotropy, and mean diffusivity measures in S compared to a group of 28 normal female controls. In addition, we found specific white matter pathway deficits by comparing tensor-orientation directions in S's brain with those of the control brains. While her principal diffusion direction maps appeared consistent with those of controls over most of the brain, there were tensor-orientation abnormalities in the fiber tracts that form the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) in both hemispheres. Tractography analysis indicated that the left and right arcuate fasciculus (AF), as well as other tracts within the SLF, were missing in S. Other major white matter tracts, such as the corticospinal and inferior occipitofrontal pathways, were intact. Functional MRI measurements indicated left-hemisphere dominance for language with a normal activation pattern. Despite the left AF abnormality, S had preserved oral language with average sentence repetition skills. In addition to profound dyslexia, S exhibited visuospatial, calculation, and rapid naming deficits and was impaired in both auditory and spatial working memory. We propose that the reading and visuospatial deficits were due to the abnormal left and right SLF pathways, respectively. These results advance our understanding of the functional significance of the SLF and are the first to link radiation necrosis with selective damage to a specific set of fiber tracts.

  2. Signaling by Drosophila capa neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Davies, Shireen-A; Cabrero, Pablo; Povsic, Manca; Johnston, Natalie R; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T

    2013-07-01

    The capa peptide family, originally identified in the tobacco hawk moth, Manduca sexta, is now known to be present in many insect families, with increasing publications on capa neuropeptides each year. The physiological actions of capa peptides vary depending on the insect species but capa peptides have key myomodulatory and osmoregulatory functions, depending on insect lifestyle, and life stage. Capa peptide signaling is thus critical for fluid homeostasis and survival, making study of this neuropeptide family attractive for novel routes for insect control. In Dipteran species, including the genetically tractable Drosophila melanogaster, capa peptide action is diuretic; via elevation of nitric oxide, cGMP and calcium in the principal cells of the Malpighian tubules. The identification of the capa receptor (capaR) in several insect species has shown this to be a canonical GPCR. In D. melanogaster, ligand-activated capaR activity occurs in a dose-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-12)M. Lower concentrations of capa peptide do not activate capaR, either in adult or larval Malpighian tubules. Use of transgenic flies in which capaR is knocked-down in only Malpighian tubule principal cells demonstrates that capaR modulates tubule fluid secretion rates and in doing so, sets the organismal response to desiccation. Thus, capa regulates a desiccation-responsive pathway in D. melanogaster, linking its role in osmoregulation and fluid homeostasis to environmental response and survival. The conservation of capa action between some Dipteran species suggests that capa's role in desiccation tolerance may not be confined to D. melanogaster.

  3. Anatomical Variant of Atlas : Arcuate Foramen, Occpitalization of Atlas, and Defect of Posterior Arch of Atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine anatomic variations of the atlas and the clinical significance of these variations. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 1029 cervical 3-dimensional (3D) CT images. Cervical 3D CT was performed between November 2011 and August 2014. Arcuate foramina were classified as partial or complete and left and/or right. Occipitalization of the atlas was classified in accordance with criteria specified by Mudaliar et al. Posterior arch defects of the atlas were classified in accordance with criteria specified by Currarino et al. Results One hundred and eight vertebrae (108/1029, 10.5%) showed an arcuate foramen. Bilateral arcuate foramina were present in 41 of these vertebrae and the remaining 67 arcuate foramina were unilateral (right 31, left 36). Right-side arcuate foramina were partial on 18 sides and complete on 54 sides. Left-side arcuate foramina were partial on 24 sides and complete on 53 sides. One case of atlas assimilation was found. Twelve patients (12/1029, 1.17%) had a defect of the atlantal posterior arch. Nine of these patients (9/1029, 0.87%) had a type A posterior arch defect. We also identified one type B, one type D, and one type E defect. Conclusion Preoperative diagnosis of occipitalization of the atlas and arcuate foramina using 3D CT is of paramount importance in avoiding neurovascular injury during surgery. It is important to be aware of posterior arch defects of the atlas because they may be misdiagnosed as a fracture. PMID:26819687

  4. Reduced Volume of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Correia, Marta M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Mohr, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Atypical language is a fundamental feature of autism spectrum conditions (ASC), but few studies have examined the structural integrity of the arcuate fasciculus, the major white matter tract connecting frontal and temporal language regions, which is usually implicated as the main transfer route used in processing linguistic information by the brain. Abnormalities in the arcuate have been reported in young children with ASC, mostly in low-functioning or non-verbal individuals, but little is known regarding the structural properties of the arcuate in adults with ASC or, in particular, in individuals with ASC who have intact language, such as those with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. We used probabilistic tractography of diffusion-weighted imaging to isolate and scrutinize the arcuate in a mixed-gender sample of 18 high-functioning adults with ASC (17 Asperger syndrome) and 14 age- and IQ-matched typically developing controls. Arcuate volume was significantly reduced bilaterally with clearest differences in the right hemisphere. This finding remained significant in an analysis of all male participants alone. Volumetric reduction in the arcuate was significantly correlated with the severity of autistic symptoms as measured by the Autism-Spectrum Quotient. These data reveal that structural differences are present even in high-functioning adults with ASC, who presented with no clinically manifest language deficits and had no reported developmental language delay. Arcuate structural integrity may be useful as an index of ASC severity and thus as a predictor and biomarker for ASC. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27242478

  5. Asymmetry, connectivity, and segmentation of the arcuate fascicle in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Yibao; Pathak, Sudhir; Stefaneau, Lucia; Verstynen, Timothy; Yeh, Fang-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The structure and function of the arcuate fascicle is still controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate the asymmetry, connectivity, and segmentation patterns of the arcuate fascicle. We employed diffusion spectrum imaging reconstructed by generalized q-sampling and we applied both a subject-specific approach (10 subjects) and a template approach (q-space diffeomorphic reconstruction of 30 subjects). We complemented our imaging investigation with fiber microdissection of five post-mortem human brains. Our results confirmed the highly leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fascicle. In the template, the left arcuate had a volume twice as large as the right one, and the left superior temporal gyrus provided five times more volume of fibers than its counterpart. We identified four cortical frontal areas of termination: pars opercularis, pars triangularis, ventral precentral gyrus, and caudal middle frontal gyrus. We found clear asymmetry of the frontal terminations at pars opercularis and ventral precentral gyrus. The analysis of patterns of connectivity revealed the existence of a strong structural segmentation in the left arcuate, but not in the right one. The left arcuate fascicle is formed by an inner or ventral pathway, which interconnects pars opercularis with superior and rostral middle temporal gyri; and an outer or dorsal pathway, which interconnects ventral precentral and caudal middle frontal gyri with caudal middle and inferior temporal gyri. The fiber microdissection results provided further support to our tractography studies. We propose the existence of primary and supplementary language pathways within the dominant arcuate fascicle with potentially distinct functional and lesional features.

  6. Aging-Resilient Associations between the Arcuate Fasciculus and Vocabulary Knowledge: Microstructure or Morphology?

    PubMed Central

    Vaden, Kenneth I.; Cute, Stephanie L.; Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Vocabulary knowledge is one of the few cognitive functions that is relatively preserved in older adults, but the reasons for this relative preservation have not been well delineated. We tested the hypothesis that individual differences in vocabulary knowledge are influenced by arcuate fasciculus macrostructure (i.e., shape and volume) properties that remain stable during the aging process, rather than white matter microstructure that demonstrates age-related declines. Vocabulary was not associated with age compared to pronounced age-related declines in cognitive processing speed across 106 healthy adults (19.92–88.29 years) who participated in this neuroimaging experiment. Fractional anisotropy in the left arcuate fasciculus was significantly related to individual variability in vocabulary. This effect was present despite marked age-related differences in a T1-weighted/T2-weighted ratio (T1w/T2w) estimate of myelin that were observed throughout the left arcuate fasciculus and associated with age-related differences in cognitive processing speed. However, atypical patterns of arcuate fasciculus morphology or macrostructure were associated with decreased vocabulary knowledge. These results suggest that deterioration of tissue in the arcuate fasciculus occurs with normal aging, while having limited impact on tract organization that underlies individual differences in the acquisition and retrieval of lexical and semantic information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Vocabulary knowledge is resilient to widespread age-related declines in brain structure that limit other cognitive functions. We tested the hypothesis that arcuate fasciculus morphology, which supports the development of reading skills that bolster vocabulary, could explain this relative preservation. We disentangled (1) the effects of age-related declines in arcuate microstructure (mean diffusivity; myelin content estimate) that predicted cognitive processing speed but not vocabulary, from (2) relatively stable

  7. Prediction of neuropeptide cleavage sites in insects.

    PubMed

    Southey, Bruce R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2008-03-15

    The production of neuropeptides from their precursor proteins is the result of a complex series of enzymatic processing steps. Often, the annotation of new neuropeptide genes from sequence information outstrips biochemical assays and so bioinformatics tools can provide rapid information on the most likely peptides produced by a gene. Predicting the final bioactive neuropeptides from precursor proteins requires accurate algorithms to determine which locations in the protein are cleaved. Predictive models were trained on Apis mellifera and Drosophila melanogaster precursors using binary logistic regression, multi-layer perceptron and k-nearest neighbor models. The final predictive models included specific amino acids at locations relative to the cleavage sites. Correct classification rates ranged from 78 to 100% indicating that the models adequately predicted cleaved and non-cleaved positions across a wide range of neuropeptide families and insect species. The model trained on D.melanogaster data had better generalization properties than the model trained on A. mellifera for the data sets considered. The reliable and consistent performance of the models in the test data sets suggests that the bioinformatics strategies proposed here can accurately predict neuropeptides in insects with sequence information based on neuropeptides with biochemical and sequence information in well-studied species.

  8. Neuropeptide Receptor Transcriptome Reveals Unidentified Neuroendocrine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Yamamoto, Sachie; Žitňan, Dušan; Watanabe, Ken; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Kaneko, Yu; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT), remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA). Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC), an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research. PMID:18725956

  9. Elucidation of the anatomy of a satiety network: Focus on connectivity of the parabrachial nucleus in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Zséli, Györgyi; Vida, Barbara; Martinez, Anais; Lechan, Ronald M; Khan, Arshad M; Fekete, Csaba

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that brain regions showing neuronal activation after refeeding comprise major nodes in a satiety network, and tested this hypothesis with two sets of experiments. Detailed c-Fos mapping comparing fasted and refed rats was performed to identify candidate nodes of the satiety network. In addition to well-known feeding-related brain regions such as the arcuate, dorsomedial, and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, lateral hypothalamic area, parabrachial nucleus (PB), nucleus of the solitary tract and central amygdalar nucleus, other refeeding activated regions were also identified, such as the parastrial and parasubthalamic nuclei. To begin to understand the connectivity of the satiety network, the interconnectivity of PB with other refeeding-activated neuronal groups was studied following administration of anterograde or retrograde tracers into the PB. After allowing for tracer transport time, the animals were fasted and then refed before sacrifice. Refeeding-activated neurons that project to the PB were found in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamic area; arcuate, paraventricular, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; parasubthalamic nucleus; central amygdalar nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. Axons originating from the PB were observed to closely associate with refeeding-activated neurons in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamus; paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; central amygdalar nucleus; parasubthalamic nucleus; ventral posterior thalamic nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. These data indicate that the PB has bidirectional connections with most refeeding-activated neuronal groups, suggesting that short-loop feedback circuits exist in this satiety network. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2803-2827, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  10. Elucidation of the Anatomy of a Satiety Network: Focus on Connectivity of the Parabrachial Nucleus in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Zséli, Györgyi; Vida, Barbara; Martinez, Anais; Lechan, Ronald M.; Khan, Arshad M.; Fekete, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that brain regions showing neuronal activation after refeeding comprise major nodes in a satiety network, and tested this hypothesis with two sets of experiments. Detailed c-Fos mapping comparing fasted and refed rats was performed to identify candidate nodes of the satiety network. In addition to well-known feeding-related brain regions such as the arcuate, dorsomedial and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, lateral hypothalamic area, parabrachial nucleus (PB), nucleus of solitary tract and central amygdalar nucleus; other refeeding activated regions were also identified, such as the parastrial and parasubthalamic nuclei. To begin understanding the connectivity of the satiety network, the interconnectivity of PB with other refeeding-activated neuronal groups was studied following administration of anterograde or retrograde tracers into the PB. After allowing for tracer transport time, the animals were fasted and then refed before sacrifice. Refeeding-activated neurons that project to the PB were found in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamic area; arcuate, paraventricular and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; parasubthalamic nucleus; central amygdalar nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of solitary tract. Axons originating from PB were observed to closely associate with refeeding-activated neurons in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamus; paraventricular, arcuate and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; central amygdalar nucleus; parasubthalamic nucleus; ventral posterior thalamic nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of solitary tract. These data indicate that the PB has bidirectional connections with most refeeding-activated neuronal groups, suggesting that short loop feedback circuits exist in this satiety network. PMID:26918800

  11. The direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus is predictive of longitudinal reading change

    PubMed Central

    Gullick, Margaret M.; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Structural coherence across the arcuate fasciculus has previously been related to reading skill, but the arcuate may be divisible into distinct subtracts which support different functions. Here, we examine longitudinal data from 30 children between the ages of 8 and 14 to determine whether initial coherence in any of the arcuate’s subsections is predictive of changes in reading across a longitudinal interval of approximately three years. The arcuate was divided using probabilistic tractography; mean fractional anisotropy across each subtract was extracted for each participant. Time 1 to Time 2 change in reading skill (identification, fluency score average) was significantly and uniquely predicted by only direct frontotemporal arcuate segment coherence. Participants with lower direct segment FA demonstrated decreases in reading scores, potentially reflecting lessened improvements due to continued inefficient processing. These results were consistent in the older and younger halves of the sample. As such, we demonstrate that it is specifically the direct segment of the arcuate that may support and be predictive of reading skill both initially and longitudinally across development. PMID:26011750

  12. Microstructural connectivity of the arcuate fasciculus in adolescents with high-functioning autism

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, P. Thomas; Whitaker, Ross T.; Tao, Ran; DuBray, Molly B.; Froehlich, Alyson; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2010-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus is a white matter fiber bundle of great importance in language. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to infer white matter integrity in the arcuate fasciculi of a group of subjects with high-functioning autism and a control group matched for age, handedness, IQ, and head size. The arcuate fasciculus for each subject was automatically extracted from the imaging data using a new volumetric DTI segmentation algorithm. The results showed a significant increase in mean diffusivity (MD) in the autism group, due mostly to an increase in the radial diffusivity (RD). A test of the lateralization of DTI measurements showed that both MD and fractional anisotropy (FA) were less lateralized in the autism group. These results suggest that white matter microstructure in the arcuate fasciculus is affected in autism and that the language specialization apparent in the left arcuate of healthy subjects is not as evident in autism, which may be related to poorer language functioning. PMID:20132894

  13. Effect of starvation on Fos and neuropeptide immunoreactivities in the brain and pituitary gland of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Calle, M; Kozicz, T; van der Linden, E; Desfeux, A; Veening, J G; Barendregt, H P; Roubos, E W

    2006-07-01

    In mammals complex interactions between various brain structures and neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and urocortin 1 (Ucn1) underlay the control of feeding by the brain. Recently, in the amphibian Xenopus laevis, CRF- and Ucn1-immunoreactivities were shown in the hypothalamic magnocellular nucleus (Mg) and evidence was obtained for their involvement in food intake. To gain a better understanding of the brain structures controlling feeding in X. laevis, the effects of 16 weeks starvation on neurones immunoreactive (ir) to Fos and neuropeptides in various brain structures were quantified. In the Mg, compared to controls, starved animals showed fewer neurones immunopositive for Fos (-55.9%), Ucn1 (-44.0%), cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) (-94.3%) and metenkephalin (ENK) (-65.0%), whereas CRF-ir neurones were 2.1 times more numerous. These differences were mainly apparent in the ventral part of the Mg, followed by the medial and dorsal part of the nucleus. In the neural lobe of the pituitary gland a 22.5% lower optical density of CART-ir was observed. In the four other brain structures investigated, starvation had different effects. The dorsomedial part of the suprachiasmatic nucleus showed 5.9 times more NPY-ir cells and in the ventromedial thalamic area a lower number of NPY-ir cells (-33.6%) was found, whereas the Edinger-Westphal nucleus contained fewer CART-ir cells (-42.2%); no effect of starvation was seen in the ventral hypothalamic nucleus. Our results support the hypothesis that in X. laevis, the Mg plays a pivotal role in feeding-related processes and, moreover, that starvation also has neuropeptide- and brain structure-specific effects in other parts of the brain and in the pituitary gland, suggesting particular roles of these structures and their neuropeptides in physiological adaptation to starvation.

  14. Pediatric traumatic brain injury: language outcomes and their relationship to the arcuate fasciculus.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Frédérique J; Mahony, Kate; Connelly, Alan; Pigdon, Lauren; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Morgan, Angela T

    2013-12-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in long-lasting language impairments alongside dysarthria, a motor-speech disorder. Whether this co-morbidity is due to the functional links between speech and language networks, or to widespread damage affecting both motor and language tracts, remains unknown. Here we investigated language function and diffusion metrics (using diffusion-weighted tractography) within the arcuate fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the corpus callosum in 32 young people after TBI (approximately half with dysarthria) and age-matched healthy controls (n=17). Only participants with dysarthria showed impairments in language, affecting sentence formulation and semantic association. In the whole TBI group, sentence formulation was best predicted by combined corpus callosum and left arcuate volumes, suggesting this "dual blow" seriously reduces the potential for functional reorganisation. Word comprehension was predicted by fractional anisotropy in the right arcuate. The co-morbidity between dysarthria and language deficits therefore seems to be the consequence of multiple tract damage.

  15. Arcuate hypothalamic AgRP and putative POMC neurons show opposite changes in spiking across multiple timescales

    PubMed Central

    Mandelblat-Cerf, Yael; Ramesh, Rohan N; Burgess, Christian R; Patella, Paola; Yang, Zongfang; Lowell, Bradford B; Andermann, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Agouti-related-peptide (AgRP) neurons—interoceptive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC)—are both necessary and sufficient for driving feeding behavior. To better understand the functional roles of AgRP neurons, we performed optetrode electrophysiological recordings from AgRP neurons in awake, behaving AgRP-IRES-Cre mice. In free-feeding mice, we observed a fivefold increase in AgRP neuron firing with mounting caloric deficit in afternoon vs morning recordings. In food-restricted mice, as food became available, AgRP neuron firing dropped, yet remained elevated as compared to firing in sated mice. The rapid drop in spiking activity of AgRP neurons at meal onset may reflect a termination of the drive to find food, while residual, persistent spiking may reflect a sustained drive to consume food. Moreover, nearby neurons inhibited by AgRP neuron photostimulation, likely including satiety-promoting pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, demonstrated opposite changes in spiking. Finally, firing of ARC neurons was also rapidly modulated within seconds of individual licks for liquid food. These findings suggest novel roles for antagonistic AgRP and POMC neurons in the regulation of feeding behaviors across multiple timescales. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07122.001 PMID:26159614

  16. Laparoscopic Treatment of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Chronic Severe Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Divarci, Emre; Celtik, Ulgen; Dokumcu, Zafer; Celik, Ahmet; Ergun, Orkan

    2017-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by chronic postprandial abdominal pain and weight loss caused by compression on celiac artery. A 17-year-old girl with chronic severe abdominal pain and weight loss was referred to our clinic. Other causes of chronic abdominal pain were investigated and excluded. The compression on celiac artery was detected on Doppler ultrasound and diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography angiography. The patient underwent laparoscopic release of median arcuate ligament. There were no intraoperative complications; however, partial pain response was observed postoperatively that necessitated para-spinal ganglion blockage. The patient is symptom-free in 1-year follow-up period. PMID:28082779

  17. Neuropeptide Action in Insects and Crustaceans*

    PubMed Central

    Mykles, Donald L.; Adams, Michael E.; Gäde, Gerd; Lange, Angela B.; Marco, Heather G.; Orchard, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Physiological processes are regulated by a diverse array of neuropeptides that coordinate organ systems. The neuropeptides, many of which act through G protein–coupled receptors, affect the levels of cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) and Ca2+ in target tissues. In this perspective, their roles in molting, osmoregulation, metabolite utilization, and cardiovascular function are highlighted. In decapod crustaceans, inhibitory neuropeptides (molt-inihibiting hormone and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone) suppress the molting gland through cAMP- and cGMP-mediated signaling. In insects, the complex movements during ecdysis are controlled by ecdysis-triggering hormone and a cascade of downstream neuropeptides. Adipokinetic/hypertrehalosemic/hyperprolinemic hormones mobilize energy stores in response to increased locomotory activity. Crustacean cardioacceleratory (cardioactive) peptide, proctolin, and FMRFamide-related peptides act on the heart, accessory pulsatile organs, and excurrent ostia to control hemolymph distribution to tissues. The osmoregulatory challenge of blood gorging in Rhodnius prolixus requires the coordinated release of serotonin and diuretic and antidiuretic hormones acting on the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These studies illustrate how multiple neuropeptides allow for flexibility in response to physiological challenges. PMID:20550437

  18. Neuropeptide action in insects and crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Mykles, Donald L; Adams, Michael E; Gäde, Gerd; Lange, Angela B; Marco, Heather G; Orchard, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Physiological processes are regulated by a diverse array of neuropeptides that coordinate organ systems. The neuropeptides, many of which act through G protein-coupled receptors, affect the levels of cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) and Ca(2+) in target tissues. In this perspective, their roles in molting, osmoregulation, metabolite utilization, and cardiovascular function are highlighted. In decapod crustaceans, inhibitory neuropeptides (molt-inhibiting hormone and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone) suppress the molting gland through cAMP- and cGMP-mediated signaling. In insects, the complex movements during ecdysis are controlled by ecdysis-triggering hormone and a cascade of downstream neuropeptides. Adipokinetic/hypertrehalosemic/hyperprolinemic hormones mobilize energy stores in response to increased locomotory activity. Crustacean cardioacceleratory (cardioactive) peptide, proctolin, and FMRFamide-related peptides act on the heart, accessory pulsatile organs, and excurrent ostia to control hemolymph distribution to tissues. The osmoregulatory challenge of blood gorging in Rhodnius prolixus requires the coordinated release of serotonin and diuretic and antidiuretic hormones acting on the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These studies illustrate how multiple neuropeptides allow for flexibility in response to physiological challenges.

  19. Neuropeptide Y: A stressful review

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Florian; Holzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stress is defined as an adverse condition that disturbs the homeostasis of the body and activates adaptation responses. Among the many pathways and mediators involved, neuropeptide Y (NPY) stands out due to its unique stress-relieving, anxiolytic and neuroprotective properties. Stress exposure alters the biosynthesis of NPY in distinct brain regions, the magnitude and direction of this effect varying with the duration and type of stress. NPY is expressed in particular neurons of the brainstem, hypothalamus and limbic system, which explains why NPY has an impact on stress-related changes in emotional-affective behaviour and feeding as well as on stress coping. The biological actions of NPY in mammals are mediated by the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptor, Y1 receptor stimulation being anxiolytic whereas Y2 receptor activation is anxiogenic. Emerging evidence attributes NPY a role in stress resilience, the ability to cope with stress. Thus there is a negative correlation between stress-induced behavioural disruption and cerebral NPY expression in animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder. Exogenous NPY prevents the negative consequences of stress, and polymorphisms of the NPY gene are predictive of impaired stress processing and increased risk of neuropsychiatric diseases. Stress is also a factor contributing to, and resulting from, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, in which NPY appears to play an important neuroprotective role. This review summarizes the evidence for an implication of NPY in stress-related and neurodegenerative pathologies and addresses the cerebral NPY system as a therapeutic target. PMID:26441327

  20. Neuropeptide Y: A stressful review.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Florian; Holzer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Stress is defined as an adverse condition that disturbs the homeostasis of the body and activates adaptation responses. Among the many pathways and mediators involved, neuropeptide Y (NPY) stands out due to its unique stress-relieving, anxiolytic and neuroprotective properties. Stress exposure alters the biosynthesis of NPY in distinct brain regions, the magnitude and direction of this effect varying with the duration and type of stress. NPY is expressed in particular neurons of the brainstem, hypothalamus and limbic system, which explains why NPY has an impact on stress-related changes in emotional-affective behaviour and feeding as well as on stress coping. The biological actions of NPY in mammals are mediated by the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptors, Y1 receptor stimulation being anxiolytic whereas Y2 receptor activation is anxiogenic. Emerging evidence attributes NPY a role in stress resilience, the ability to cope with stress. Thus there is a negative correlation between stress-induced behavioural disruption and cerebral NPY expression in animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder. Exogenous NPY prevents the negative consequences of stress, and polymorphisms of the NPY gene are predictive of impaired stress processing and increased risk of neuropsychiatric diseases. Stress is also a factor contributing to, and resulting from, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, in which NPY appears to play an important neuroprotective role. This review summarizes the evidence for an implication of NPY in stress-related and neurodegenerative pathologies and addresses the cerebral NPY system as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  2. Neuropeptides: developmental signals in placode progenitor formation.

    PubMed

    Lleras-Forero, Laura; Tambalo, Monica; Christophorou, Nicolas; Chambers, David; Houart, Corinne; Streit, Andrea

    2013-07-29

    Few families of signaling factors have been implicated in the control of development. Here, we identify the neuropeptides nociceptin and somatostatin, a neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine hormone, as a class of developmental signals in both chick and zebrafish. We show that signals from the anterior mesendoderm are required for the formation of anterior placode progenitors, with one of the signals being somatostatin. Somatostatin controls ectodermal expression of nociceptin, and both peptides regulate Pax6 in lens and olfactory progenitors. Consequently, loss of somatostatin and nociceptin signaling leads to severe reduction of lens formation. Our findings not only uncover these neuropeptides as developmental signals but also identify a long-sought-after mechanism that initiates Pax6 in placode progenitors and may explain the ancient evolutionary origin of neuropeptides, predating a complex nervous system.

  3. RFamide neuropeptide actions on the molluscan heart.

    PubMed

    Moulis, A

    2004-01-01

    FMRFamide and the related tetrapeptide FLRFamide are highly excitatory in molluscan non-cardiac smooth muscle. They are also exceptionally excitatory in the atrium and internally perfused ventricle of Busycon canaliculatum. These two peptides, usually thought of as classic molluscan cardio-acceleratory agents are in fact simply two members of a large and ever growing superfamily, the RFamide family, whose phylogenetic distribution has been so elegantly mapped by Walker. Members of this family, often with extended peptide chains (e.g. penta, hepta and decapeptides), stretch in their known distribution from the cnidaria to the chordates. The effects of some of the members of this superfamily (FMRFamide. FLRFamide, YMRFamide, TNRNFLRFamide, SDPFLRFamide, LMS) were examined. The neuropeptides were found to be very potent at very low concentrations (10(-9) M) in the ventricle of both Buccinium and Busycon. Other neuropeptides (HFMRdFamide, SCPb, NLERFamide and pEGRFamide) were found to be without any effect. The Ca2+ dependency of these neuropeptides was also tested. The peptides appear to induce contraction of the ventricles by release of Ca2+ from internal pools. The neuropeptides appear to stimulate contraction in these cardiac muscles through a completely different pathway to Serotonin (the main excitatory neurotransmitter for the cardiac muscle). When the peptides were applied together with Serotonin an additive effect was observed clearly indicating the release of Ca2+ through different pathways. The nature of the RFamide receptor was also tested. It appears that the RFamide neuropeptides mobilize the 2nd messenger IP3 (Inositol trisphosphate), since the IP3 blocker Neomycin Sulphate inhibited the response of the neuropeptides.

  4. Anatomical Properties of the Arcuate Fasciculus Predict Phonological and Reading Skills in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Wandell, Brian A.; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, neurologists have hypothesized that the arcuate fasciculus carries signals that are essential for language function; however, the relevance of the pathway for particular behaviors is highly controversial. The primary objective of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to examine the relationship between individual…

  5. Anatomical Properties of the Arcuate Fasciculus Predict Phonological and Reading Skills in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Wandell, Brian A.; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, neurologists have hypothesized that the arcuate fasciculus carries signals that are essential for language function; however, the relevance of the pathway for particular behaviors is highly controversial. The primary objective of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to examine the relationship between individual…

  6. Neuropeptides in helminths: occurrence and distribution.

    PubMed

    Marks, Nikki J; Maule, Aaron G

    2010-01-01

    Nematode neuropeptide systems comprise an exceptionally complex array of approximately 250 peptidic signaling molecules that operate within a structurally simple nervous system of approximately 300 neurons. A relatively complete picture of the neuropeptide complement is available for Caenorhabditis elegans, with 30 flp, 38 ins and 43 nlp genes having been documented; accumulating evidence indicates similar complexity in parasitic nematodes from clades I, III, IV and V. In contrast, the picture for parasitic platyhelminths is less clear, with the limited peptide sequence data available providing concrete evidence for only FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) and neuropeptide F (NPF) signaling systems, each of which only comprises one or two peptides. With the completion of the Schmidtea meditteranea and Schistosoma mansoni genome projects and expressed sequence tag datasets for other flatworm parasites becoming available, the time is ripe for a detailed reanalysis ofneuropeptide signalingin flatworms. Although the actual neuropeptides provide limited obvious value as targets for chemotherapeutic-based control strategies, they do highlight the signaling systems present in these helminths and provide tools for the discovery of more amenable targets such as neuropeptide receptors or neuropeptide processing enzymes. Also, they offer opportunities to evaluate the potential of their associated signaling pathways as targets through RNA interference (RNAi)-based, target validation strategies. Currently, within both helminth phyla, theflp signaling systems appear to merit further investigation as they are intrinsically linked with motor function, a proven target for successful anti-parasitics; it is clear that some nematode NLPs also play a role in motor function and could have similar appeal. At this time, it is unclear if flatworm NPF and nematode INS peptides operate in pathways that have utility for parasite control. Clearly, RNAi-based validation could be a starting point for

  7. An anatomical study of arcuate foramen and its clinical implications: a case report.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, Salman; Hoiriis, Kathryn T; Fox, R Bruce; Demons, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the relationship of the vertebral artery (VA) to the Atlas (C1) in the sub-occipital region in the presence of arcuate foramen; and discuss the clinical implications related to manual therapies and surgical implications related to screw placement. This study is an anatomical cadaveric case report of symmetrical bilateral lateral and dorsal arcuate foramina on the C1 dorsal arch. Out of 40 cadavers that were available for use in teaching anatomy in the university setting, three presented with anomalies of the C1 dorsal arch. The sub-occipital regions were skillfully prosected to preserve related structures, especially VAs, sub-occipital and greater occipital nerves. Visual observations, photographs, measurements, and radiographic examinations were performed between January 15, 2014 and August 25, 2014. One cadaver (Specimen A) presented with complete bilateral ossified arcuate foramina, and two presented with partial ossification of the atlanto-occipital membrane. Specimen A presented the bilateral anomaly which is almost symmetrical. The VAs were found passing through double foramina (lateral and dorsal) on each side. Arcuate foramina have been shown to be commonly found anomalies with highly variable shapes and sizes, even in the same individual with a bilateral condition. This study found a rare type of the anomaly associated with the C1 dorsal arch, which protected the VA against manual pressure. However, VA, in this case, would be more susceptible to dissection. The presence of the arcuate foramen would also complicate screw placement during surgery. Clinical pre-screening for signs of vertebrobasilar insufficiency is important for chiropractic and manual therapies.

  8. Effect of progesterone on kisspeptin and neurokinin B cell numbers in the arcuate nucleus of the female pig

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Progesterone acts at the hypothalamus to inhibit LH secretion in the pig, but the mechanism for this is unknown. Kisspeptin and neurokinin B (NKB) have both been shown to influence GnRH/LH secretion and mediate steroid negative feedback in several species and to be critical for normal reproductive f...

  9. Apolipoprotein A-IV inhibits AgRP/NPY neurons and activates POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) in the brain potently suppresses food intake. However the mechanisms underlying its anorexigenic effects remain to be identified. We first examined the effects of apoA-IV on cellular activities in hypothalamic neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and ne...

  10. Active conformation of an insect neuropeptide family.

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, R J; Roberts, V A; Dyson, H J; Holman, G M; Tainer, J A

    1991-01-01

    To understand the structural and chemical basis for insect neuropeptide activity, we have designed, synthesized, and determined the conformation of a biologically active cyclic analog of the pyrokinins, an insect neuropeptide family that mediates myotropic (visceral muscle contractile) activity. Members of this insect neuropeptide family share the common C-terminal pentapeptide sequence Phe-Xaa-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH2 (Xaa = Ser, Thr, or Val). Circular dichroic, nuclear magnetic resonance, and molecular dynamics analyses of the conformationally restricted cyclic pyrokinin analog cyclo(-Asn-Thr-Ser-Phe-Thr-Pro-Arg-Leu-) indicated the presence of a beta-turn in the active core region encompassing residues Thr-Pro-Arg-Leu. The rigid cyclic analog retains biological activity, suggesting that its C-terminal beta-turn is the active pyrokinin conformation recognized by the myotropic receptor. As individual pyrokinins and pyrokinin-like neuropeptides demonstrate both oviduct-contractile and pheromone-biosynthesis activities in various insects, the biologically active beta-turn structure reported here holds broad significance for many biological processes. Images PMID:2034692

  11. Crustacean neuropeptides: structures, functions and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Keller, R

    1992-05-15

    In this article, an attempt is made to review the presently known, completely identified crustacean neuropeptides with regard to structure, function and distribution. Probably the most important progress has been made in the elucidation of a novel family of large peptides from the X-organ-sinus gland system which includes crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH), putative molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and vitellogenesis (= gonad)-inhibiting hormone (VIH). These peptides have so far only been found in crustaceans. Renewed interest in the neurohemal pericardial organs has led to the identification of a number of cardioactive/myotropic neuropeptides, some of them unique to crustaceans. Important contributions have been made by immunocytochemical mapping of peptidergic neurons in the nervous system, which has provided evidence for a multiple role of several neuropeptides as neurohormones on the one hand and as local transmitters or modulators on the other. This has been corroborated by physiological studies. The long-known chromatophore-regulating hormones, red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH) and pigment-dispending hormone (PDH), have been placed in a broader perspective by the demonstration of an additional role as local neuromodulators. The scope of crustacean neuropeptide research has thus been broadened considerably during the last years.

  12. Neuropeptides as possible targets in sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Seiji; Fujiki, Nobuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Insomnia and hypersomnia are frequent sleep disorders, and they are most often treated pharmacologically with hypnotics and wake-promoting compounds. These compounds act on classical neurotransmitter systems, such as benzodiazepines on GABA-A receptors, and amfetamine-like stimulants on monoaminergic terminals to modulate neurotransmission. In addition, acetylcholine, amino acids, lipids and proteins (cytokines) and peptides, are known to significantly modulate sleep and are, therefore, possibly involved in the pathophysiology of some sleep disorders. Due to the recent developments of molecular biological techniques, many neuropeptides have been newly identified, and some are found to significantly modulate sleep. It was also discovered that the impairment of the hypocretin/orexin neurotransmission (a recently isolated hypothalamic neuropeptide system) is the major pathophysiology of narcolepsy, and hypocretin replacement therapy is anticipated to treat the disease in humans. In this article, the authors briefly review the history of neuropeptide research, followed by the sleep modulatory effects of various neuropeptides. Finally, general strategies for the pharmacological therapeutics targeting the peptidergic systems for sleep disorders are discussed.

  13. The neuropeptide bursicon acts in cuticle metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bursicon is a heterodimeric neuropeptide formed of bursicon a (burs a) and bursicon B (burs B) that controls cuticle tanning and wing expansion in insects. Burs a-a and burs B-B homodimers are also formed; they act via an unknown receptor to induce expression of prophylactic immune and stress genes ...

  14. THE NEUROPEPTIDE BURSICON ACTS IN CUTICLE METABOLISM

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide composed of two cysteine knot proteins, bursicon a (burs a) and bursicon b (burs b), responsible for cuticle tanning (melanization and sclerotization) and for wing expansion in newly-eclosed adult Drosophila melanogaster, and probably most insect species. Aside from formin...

  15. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  16. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  17. Neuropeptide localisation in the substantia innominata and adjacent regions of the human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Candy, J M; Perry, R H; Thompson, J E; Johnson, M; Oakley, A E

    1985-01-01

    A dense peptidergic innervation has been demonstrated in the substantia innominata region in postmortem specimens of human brain using immunocytochemical techniques. A peptidergic innervation of the nucleus of Meynert - the prominent nucleus of this area containing the cholinergic cell bodies which innervate the cerebral cortex - has been demonstrated by immunostaining with antisera against the following eight neuropeptides: somatostatin, substance P, cholecystokinin octapeptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, met-enkephalin, ACTH, alpha-MSH and oxytocin. Other immunocytochemical features of the substantia innominata region include a dense band of peptide immunoreactivity beneath the medial aspect of the anterior commissure and islands of somatostatin and substance P terminal immunoreactivity in the rostral part of the substantia innominata. Somatostatin immunostained cell bodies have been located in a discrete area of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and in the rostral portion of the substantia innominata, nucleus accumbens and the ventral part of the putamen. The dense band of peptide immunoreactivity beneath the medial aspect of the anterior commissure consists of ribbon-like processes stained with antisera against somatostatin, substance P, cholecystokinin octapeptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and met-enkephalin. Less intense immunostaining of ribbon-like elements is also present in the globus pallidus. The presence of a peptidergic innervation to the nucleus of Meynert suggests a possible important modulatory role in cortical cholinergic function. Images Fig. 1 (cont.) Fig. 1 Fig. 3 (cont.) Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2416723

  18. IL-10 gene transfer upregulates arcuate POMC and ameliorates hyperphagia, obesity and diabetes by substituting for leptin.

    PubMed

    Nakata, M; Yamamoto, S; Okada, T; Gantulga, D; Okano, H; Ozawa, K; Yada, T

    2016-03-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is caused by increased food intake and/or decreased energy expenditure. Leptin potently inhibits food intake and promotes energy expenditure. These effects of leptin involve the activation of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamus arcuate nucleus (ARC). Disruption of leptin signaling in POMC neuron is considered one of the major causes for obesity. The present study aimed to examine whether overexpression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) could substitute for the leptin action and ameliorate obesity in leptin-deficient Lep(ob/ob) mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing murine IL-10 (AAV-mIL-10) was injected into the skeletal muscle to overexpress IL-10 in mice. These mice were subsequently subjected to analysis of body weight, food intake, glucose metabolism and underlying mechanisms. In Lep(ob/ob) mice, AAV-IL-10 ameliorated hyperphagia, obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, as well as attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α expression. The IL-10 treatment also improved glucose-induced insulin release. Furthermore, IL-10 treatment increased POMC mRNA expression in ARC and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) in ARC and white adipose tissue (WAT). In neuron-specific STAT3-null mice that exhibited obesity and hyperphagia, AAV-mIL-10 administration failed to affect food intake, body weight and phosphorylation of STAT3 in WAT. These results demonstrate that peripheral overexpression of IL-10 induces STAT3 phosphorylation in ARC POMC neurons, and thereby ameliorates hyperphagia and obesity caused by leptin deficiency. IL-10 gene transfer may provide an effective approach for preventing progression of metabolic syndrome due to leptin resistance.

  19. Enhancement of a robust arcuate GABAergic input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in a model of polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Aleisha M.; Prescott, Mel; Marshall, Christopher J.; Yip, Siew Hoong; Campbell, Rebecca E.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), the leading cause of female infertility, is associated with an increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency, implicating abnormal steroid hormone feedback to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. This study investigated whether modifications in the synaptically connected neuronal network of GnRH neurons could account for this pathology. The PCOS phenotype was induced in mice following prenatal androgen (PNA) exposure. Serial blood sampling confirmed that PNA elicits increased LH pulse frequency and impaired progesterone negative feedback in adult females, mimicking the neuroendocrine abnormalities of the clinical syndrome. Imaging of GnRH neurons revealed greater dendritic spine density that correlated with increased putative GABAergic but not glutamatergic inputs in PNA mice. Mapping of steroid hormone receptor expression revealed that PNA mice had 59% fewer progesterone receptor-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARN). To address whether increased GABA innervation to GnRH neurons originates in the ARN, a viral-mediated Cre-lox approach was taken to trace the projections of ARN GABA neurons in vivo. Remarkably, projections from ARN GABAergic neurons heavily contacted and even bundled with GnRH neuron dendrites, and the density of fibers apposing GnRH neurons was even greater in PNA mice (56%). Additionally, this ARN GABA population showed significantly less colocalization with progesterone receptor in PNA animals compared with controls. Together, these data describe a robust GABAergic circuit originating in the ARN that is enhanced in a model of PCOS and may underpin the neuroendocrine pathophysiology of the syndrome. PMID:25550522

  20. Kisspeptin expression features in the arcuate and anteroventral periventricular nuclei of hypothalamus of letrozole-induced polycystic ovarian syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi, Elham; Namavar, Mohammad Reza; Mortezaee, Keywan; Toolee, Heidar; Keshtgar, Sara; Mirkhani, Hossein; Akbari, Mohammad; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Solhjoo, Somayeh

    2017-09-05

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder of the reproductive system characterized by polycystic ovaries and androgen excess. Letrozole is a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor that is used in experimental research to induce PCOS. Kisspeptin is an essential protein in regulation of cyclicity. Kisspeptin receptor is expressed in the hypothalamus and pituitary glands, and kisspeptin containing neurons are affected from sex steroid hormones. We aimed to investigate the number of kisspeptin-positive cells in the arcuate (Arc) and anteroventral periventricular nuclei (AVPV) of hypothalamus in the letrozole-induced PCOS. 40 female Wistar rats were divided into the proestrus control, diestrus control, proestrus vehicle, diestrus vehicle and letrozole. Animals were sacrificed after 3 weeks, and sera, ovary and brain samples were harvested for further evaluations. Letrozole group had high weight gain, high numbers of ovarian follicular cysts, high levels of luteinizing hormone and testosterone and increase number of kisspeptin-positive cells in the Arc nucleus, as compared with the control groups (P ≤ 0.05 vs. proestrus control and proestrus vehicle). Letrozole group showed a decrease in the number of kisspeptin-positive cells in the AVPV nucleus (P ≤ 0.05 vs. proestrus control and proestrus vehicle). Our findings show that the number of kisspeptin-positive cells may be affected from letrozole, and that the changes in the number of these cells may be in favor of the appearance of PCOS features in this group.

  1. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  2. Neuropeptide Y promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Kristiansen, Heidi; Christiansen, Søren H; Ferreira, Raquel; Silva, Bruno; Grade, Sofia; Woldbye, David P D; Malva, João O

    2008-06-01

    Stem cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ) represent a reliable source of neurons for cell replacement. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) promotes neurogenesis in the hippocampal subgranular layer and the olfactory epithelium and may be useful for the stimulation of SVZ dynamic in brain repair purposes. We describe that NPY promotes SVZ neurogenesis. NPY (1 microM) treatments increased proliferation at 48 hours and neuronal differentiation at 7 days in SVZ cell cultures. NPY proneurogenic properties are mediated via the Y1 receptor. Accordingly, Y1 receptor is a major active NPY receptor in the mouse SVZ, as shown by functional autoradiography. Moreover, short exposure to NPY increased immunoreactivity for the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the nucleus, compatible with a trigger for proliferation, whereas 6 hours of treatment amplified the phosphorylated form of c-Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase signal in growing axons, consistent with axonogenesis. NPY, as a promoter of SVZ neurogenesis, is a crucial factor for future development of cell-based brain therapy. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  3. Evaluating the Arcuate Fasciculus With Combined Diffusion-Weighted MRI Tractography and Electrocorticography

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Erik C.; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Muzik, Otto; Rothermel, Robert; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhász, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2014-01-01

    The conventional model of language-related brain structure describing the arcuate fasciculus as a key white matter tract providing a direct connection between Wernicke’s region and Broca’s area has been called into question. Specifically, the inferior precentral gyrus, possessing both primary motor (Brodmann Area [BA] 4) and premotor cortex (BA 6), has been identified as a potential alternative termination. The authors initially localized cortical sites involved in language using measurement of event-related gamma-activity on electrocorticography (ECoG). The authors then determined whether language-related sites of the temporal lobe were connected, via white matter structures, to the inferior frontal gyrus more tightly than to the precentral gyrus. The authors found that language-related sites of the temporal lobe were far more likely to be directly connected to the inferior precentral gyrus through the arcuate fasciculus. Furthermore, tractography was a significant predictor of frontal language-related ECoG findings. Analysis of an interaction between anatomy and tractography in this model revealed tractrography to have the highest predictive value for language-related ECoG findings of the precentral gyrus. This study failed to support the conventional model of language-related brain structure. More feasible models should include the inferior precentral gyrus as a termination of the arcuate fasciculus. The exact functional significance of direct connectivity between temporal language-related sites and the precentral gyrus requires further study. PMID:23982893

  4. The Arcuate Fasciculus and Language Development in a Cohort of Pediatric Patients with Malformations of Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Paldino, M J; Hedges, K; Golriz, F

    2016-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy and malformations of cortical development have a high prevalence of language deficits. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the status of the arcuate fasciculus at diffusion tractography could provide a clinically meaningful marker of language function in patients with cortical malformations. Thirty-seven patients 3-18 years of age who had DTI performed at 3T and language evaluation by a pediatric neurologist were retrospectively identified. Twenty-two age-matched children without any neurologic, language, or MR imaging abnormalities who had identical DTI performed for an indication of headache were selected as a control cohort. The arcuate fasciculi were constructed and segmented by deterministic tractography for all subjects. Twenty-one patients had intact language; 11 had mild-to-moderate and 5, profound language impairment. All patients with normal language and all control subjects had an identifiable left arcuate. The left arcuate was absent in 11 patients; all 11 were language-impaired. Failure to identify the left arcuate was strongly associated with some degree of language impairment (P < .001). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for language dysfunction were 65%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. The absence of the arcuate bilaterally was associated with complete failure to develop oral language (P < .015). Failure to identify the left arcuate fasciculus at diffusion tractography was a highly specific marker of language dysfunction in a cohort of pediatric patients with malformations of cortical development. Failure to identify the arcuate fasciculus on either side was associated with failure to develop oral language. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. The role of neuropeptides in sleep modulation.

    PubMed

    Prospéro-García, Oscar; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica

    2004-10-01

    Several neuropeptides affect the sleep-wake cycle, for example, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, cholecystokinin octapeptide, orexin, somatostatin, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y and cortistatin, which regulate food ingestion. There are also proteins from the immunological system: tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, as well as trophic molecules, such as growth hormone-releasing hormone, growth hormone, prolactin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin-4. Based on this information, we believe that some functions of sleep can be suggested. One of these functions could be the regulation of energy, since many, if not all, of the neuropeptides that regulate feeding affect the level of alertness. Likewise, the immunological system and the trophic molecules establish a dialog with the brain during sleep in order to reestablish neuronal structure. These proteins are the expression of genes that accomplish the function of regulating our waking and our sleep, suggesting the important control the genome is exerting on this activity. (c) 2004 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of Neuropeptides in Suicidal Behavior: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, Maurizio; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing evidence that neuropeptides may be involved in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior. A critical review of the literature was conducted to investigate the association between neuropeptides and suicidal behavior. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals were selected for the inclusion in the present review. Twenty-six articles were assessed for eligibility but only 22 studies were included. Most studies have documented an association between suicidality and some neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), VGF, cholecystokinin, substance P, and neuropeptide Y (NPY), which have been demonstrated to act as key neuromodulators of emotional processing. Significant differences in neuropeptides levels have been found in those who have attempted or completed suicide compared with healthy controls or those dying from other causes. Despite cross-sectional associations between neuropeptides levels and suicidal behavior, causality may not be inferred. The implications of the mentioned studies were discussed in this review paper. PMID:23986909

  7. Neuropeptide regulation of fear and anxiety: Implications of cholecystokinin, endogenous opioids, and neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mallory E; Choi, Dennis C; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-12-05

    The neural circuitry of fear likely underlies anxiety and fear-related disorders such as specific and social phobia, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The primary pharmacological treatments currently utilized for these disorders include benzodiazepines, which act on the GABAergic receptor system, and antidepressants, which modulate the monamine systems. However, recent work on the regulation of fear neural circuitry suggests that specific neuropeptide modulation of this system is of critical importance. Recent reviews have examined the roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis neuropeptides as well as the roles of neurotrophic factors in regulating fear. The present review, instead, will focus on three neuropeptide systems which have received less attention in recent years but which are clearly involved in regulating fear and its extinction. The endogenous opioid system, particularly activating the μ opioid receptors, has been demonstrated to regulate fear expression and extinction, possibly through functioning as an error signal within the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray to mark unreinforced conditioned stimuli. The cholecystokinin (CCK) system initially led to much excitement through its potential role in panic disorder. More recent work in the CCK neuropeptide pathway suggests that it may act in concordance with the endogenous cannabinoid system in the modulation of fear inhibition and extinction. Finally, older as well as very recent data suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a very interesting role in counteracting stress effects, enhancing extinction, and enhancing resilience in fear and stress preclinical models. Future work in understanding the mechanisms of neuropeptide functioning, particularly within well-known behavioral circuits, are likely to provide fascinating new clues into the understanding of fear behavior as well as suggesting novel therapeutics for treating disorders of anxiety and fear dysregulation. Copyright

  8. Neuropeptide Regulation of Fear and Anxiety: Implications of Cholecystokinin, Endogenous Opioids, and Neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Mallory E.; Choi, Dennis C.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    The neural circuitry of fear likely underlies anxiety and fear-related disorders such as specific and social phobia, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The primary pharmacological treatments currently utilized for these disorders include benzodiazepines, which act on the GABAergic receptor system, and antidepressants, which modulate the monamine systems. However, recent work on the regulation of fear neural circuitry suggests that specific neuropeptide modulation of this system is of critical importance. Recent reviews have examined the roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis neuropeptides as well as the roles of neurotrophic factors in regulating fear. The present review, instead, will focus on three neuropeptide systems which have received less attention in recent years but which are clearly involved in regulating fear and its extinction. The endogenous opioid system, particularly activating the μ opioid receptors, has been demonstrated to regulate fear expression and extinction, possibly through functioning as an error signal within the amygdala to mark unreinforced conditioned stimuli. The cholecystokinin (CCK) system initially led to much excitement through its potential role in panic disorder. More recent work in the CCK neuropeptide pathway suggests that it may act in concordance with the endogenous cannabinoid system in the modulation of fear inhibition and extinction. Finally, older as well as very recent data suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a very interesting role in counteracting stress effects, enhancing extinction, and enhancing resilience in fear and stress preclinical models. Future work in understanding the mechanisms of neuropeptide functioning, particularly within well-known behavioral circuits, are likely to provide fascinating new clues into the understanding of fear behavior as well as suggesting novel therapeutics for treating disorders of anxiety and fear dysregulation. PMID:22429904

  9. Identification of a new member of PBAN family of neuropeptides from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neuropeptide hormones produced by neurosecretory cells in the central or peripheral nervous systems regulate various physiological and behavioral events during insect development and reproduction. Pyrokinin/Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) is a major neuropeptide family, chara...

  10. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  11. Investigating Late Amazonian Volcanotectonic Activity on Olympus Mons, Mars using Flank Vents and Arcuate Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanism, a fundamental process in shaping the Martian surface, is crucial to understanding its evolution. Olympus Mons, the largest volcano on Mars, is one of several large shield volcanoes. Previous studies were technologically limited to large features associated with these constructs. With the advent of high resolution datasets, we are now able to investigate smaller features, such as flank vents and arcuate graben. Flank vents, common on polygenetic volcanoes, indicate that magma has propagated away from the main conduit and/or magma chamber. Vent morphology allows for the characterization of magma properties and eruption rates. Graben indicate extensional deformation. The distribution of graben provides information on stresses that acted on the volcano. In lieu of geophysical, spectral and in-situ data, morphology, morphometry and spatial relationships are powerful tools. We utilized high resolution image data (CTX, HiRISE and THEMIS IR) and topographic data (HRSC DTM, MOLA) to identify and characterize flank vents and graben. We observed 60 flank vents and 84 arcuate graben on Olympus Mons. Flank vents display varying morphologies and morphometries, suggesting different eruption styles and variable magma volatility. Vents occur primarily on the lower flank. This suggests magma has propagated substantial distances from the magma chamber. Observed clustering of vents may also indicate shallow magma sources. Similarly, graben are observed on the lower flank crosscutting young lava flows that have mantled portions of the escarpment. This indicates either gravitational spreading of Olympus Mons or flexure of the lithosphere in response to the load of the edifice. Collectively, the distribution of flank vents and arcuate graben suggests a similar development to that proposed for Ascraeus Mons. Based on superposition relationships and dates from previous studies, the flank vents and graben formed in the Late Amazonian (≤500 Ma).

  12. Vector Analysis of Corneal Astigmatism After Combined Femtosecond-Assisted Phacoemulsification and Arcuate Keratotomy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy C Y; Cheng, George P M; Wang, Zheng; Tham, Clement C Y; Woo, Victor C P; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of femtosecond-assisted arcuate keratotomy combined with cataract surgery in eyes with low to moderate corneal astigmatism. Retrospective, interventional case series. This study included patients who underwent combined femtosecond-assisted phacoemulsification and arcuate keratotomy between March 2013 and August 2013. Keratometric astigmatism was evaluated before and 2 months after the surgery. Vector analysis of the astigmatic changes was performed using the Alpins method. Overall, 54 eyes of 54 patients (18 male and 36 female; mean age, 68.8 ± 11.4 years) were included. The mean preoperative (target-induced astigmatism) and postoperative astigmatism was 1.33 ± 0.57 diopters (D) and 0.87 ± 0.56 D, respectively (P < .001). The magnitude of error (difference between surgically induced and target-induced astigmatism) (-0.13 ± 0.68 D), as well as the correction index (ratio of surgically induced and target-induced astigmatism) (0.86 ± 0.52), demonstrated slight undercorrection. The angle of error was very close to 0, indicating no significant systematic error of misaligned treatment. However, the absolute angle of error showed a less favorable range (17.5 ± 19.2 degrees), suggesting variable factors such as healing or alignment at an individual level. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Combined phacoemulsification with arcuate keratotomy using femtosecond laser appears to be a relatively easy and safe means for management of low to moderate corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery candidates. Misalignment at an individual level can reduce its effectiveness. This issue remains to be elucidated in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Physiology of invertebrate oxytocin and vasopressin neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Christian W

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides and regulatory peptide hormones control many developmental, physiological and behavioural processes in animals, including humans. The nonapeptides oxytocin and arginine vasopressin are produced and released by the pituitary gland and have actions on many organs and tissues. Receptive cells possess particular receptors to which the peptides bind as ligands, leading to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, hence cellular responses. In humans and other mammalian species, oxytocin and vasopressin mediate a range of peripheral and central physiological functions that are important for osmoregulation, reproduction, complex social behaviours, memory and learning. The origin of the oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system is thought to date back more than 600 million years. All vertebrate oxytocin- and vasopressin-like peptides have presumably evolved from the ancestral nonapeptide vasotocin by gene duplication and today are present in vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Oxytocin- and vasopressin-like peptides have been identified in several invertebrate species, including molluscs, annelids, nematodes and arthropods. Members of this peptide family share high sequence similarity, and it is possible that they are functionally related across the entire animal kingdom. However, it is evident that not all animals express oxytocin/vasopressin neuropeptides and that there is little information available about the biology and physiology of this signalling system of invertebrates and, in particular, of insects, which represent more than half of all known living organisms. This report describes the discovery of novel oxytocin- and vasopressin-like peptides in arthropods and summarizes the status quo of the functional relevance of this neuropeptide signalling system in invertebrates, which will have beneficial implications for the design of selective and potent ligands to human oxytocin and vasopressin receptors.

  14. Large arcuate scars: A geological legacy of the Earth's accretionary past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saul, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Immediately following accretion, the surface of the Earth was densely patterned with circular scars which were the surface expressions of 3-D craterform structures. In the course of geological time these structures would have become less and less visible due to the workings of the Earth's atmosphere, surface waters, and plate tectonics regime but there is no compelling reason to assume that they have been entirely eradicated. Furthermore, a very imperfect analogy with the other inner planets suggests that geological processes may not in fact be capable of totally erasing such deep features. Some illustrative examples of arcuate scars are discussed.

  15. Physiology of invertebrate oxytocin and vasopressin neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W

    2014-01-01

    New findings • What is the topic of this review? This article describes the discovery and function of invertebrate oxytocin and vasopressin neuropeptides. • What advances does it highlight? The novel discovery of oxytocin-like peptides in arthropods is described. An up-to date overview is gven of the functional role (physiology and behaviour) of oxytocin and vasopressin signalling. The application of natural peptides for drug development is discussed. Neuropeptides and regulatory peptide hormones control many developmental, physiological and behavioural processes in animals, including humans. The nonapeptides oxytocin and arginine vasopressin are produced and released by the pituitary gland and have actions on many organs and tissues. Receptive cells possess particular receptors to which the peptides bind as ligands, leading to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, hence cellular responses. In humans and other mammalian species, oxytocin and vasopressin mediate a range of peripheral and central physiological functions that are important for osmoregulation, reproduction, complex social behaviours, memory and learning. The origin of the oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system is thought to date back more than 600 million years. All vertebrate oxytocin- and vasopressin-like peptides have presumably evolved from the ancestral nonapeptide vasotocin by gene duplication and today are present in vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Oxytocin- and vasopressin-like peptides have been identified in several invertebrate species, including molluscs, annelids, nematodes and arthropods. Members of this peptide family share high sequence similarity, and it is possible that they are functionally related across the entire animal kingdom. However, it is evident that not all animals express oxytocin/vasopressin neuropeptides and that there is little information available about the biology and physiology of this signalling system of invertebrates

  16. Cells immunoreactive for neuropeptide in human thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Lauriola, L; Maggiano, N; Larocca, L M; Ranelletti, F O; Ricci, R; Piantelli, M; Capelli, A

    1990-01-01

    The presence of opioid peptides, bombesin, and substance P was investigated by immunohistochemistry in tissue sections from six human thymomas. The number of immunoreactive cells seemed to vary from one case to another. Ultrastructural investigation, showing the presence of desmosomes in labelled cells, allowed these cells to be classified as epithelial lineage cells. The occurrence of cells containing neuropeptide in thymomas suggest that peptide molecules could have modulated the behaviour of this tumour, given the reported influence of these molecules on immune functions and their growth promoting activity on several cell types, including mesenchymal and epithelial cells. Images PMID:1699978

  17. Neuropeptide Y: An Anti-Aging Player?

    PubMed

    Botelho, Mariana; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) has a role in aging and lifespan determination. In this review, we critically discuss age-related changes in NPY levels in the brain, together with recent findings concerning the contribution of NPY to, and impact on, six hallmarks of aging, specifically: loss of proteostasis, stem cell exhaustion, altered intercellular communication, deregulated nutrient sensing, cellular senescence, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Understanding how NPY contributes to, and counteracts, these hallmarks of aging will open new avenues of research on limiting damage related to aging.

  18. Transcriptomic identification of starfish neuropeptide precursors yields new insights into neuropeptide evolution

    PubMed Central

    Semmens, Dean C.; Mirabeau, Olivier; Moghul, Ismail; Pancholi, Mahesh R.; Wurm, Yannick; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are evolutionarily ancient mediators of neuronal signalling in nervous systems. With recent advances in genomics/transcriptomics, an increasingly wide range of species has become accessible for molecular analysis. The deuterostomian invertebrates are of particular interest in this regard because they occupy an ‘intermediate' position in animal phylogeny, bridging the gap between the well-studied model protostomian invertebrates (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans) and the vertebrates. Here we have identified 40 neuropeptide precursors in the starfish Asterias rubens, a deuterostomian invertebrate from the phylum Echinodermata. Importantly, these include kisspeptin-type and melanin-concentrating hormone-type precursors, which are the first to be discovered in a non-chordate species. Starfish tachykinin-type, somatostatin-type, pigment-dispersing factor-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type precursors are the first to be discovered in the echinoderm/ambulacrarian clade of the animal kingdom. Other precursors identified include vasopressin/oxytocin-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type, cholecystokinin/gastrin-type, orexin-type, luqin-type, pedal peptide/orcokinin-type, glycoprotein hormone-type, bursicon-type, relaxin-type and insulin-like growth factor-type precursors. This is the most comprehensive identification of neuropeptide precursor proteins in an echinoderm to date, yielding new insights into the evolution of neuropeptide signalling systems. Furthermore, these data provide a basis for experimental analysis of neuropeptide function in the unique context of the decentralized, pentaradial echinoderm bauplan. PMID:26865025

  19. Transcriptomic identification of starfish neuropeptide precursors yields new insights into neuropeptide evolution.

    PubMed

    Semmens, Dean C; Mirabeau, Olivier; Moghul, Ismail; Pancholi, Mahesh R; Wurm, Yannick; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptides are evolutionarily ancient mediators of neuronal signalling in nervous systems. With recent advances in genomics/transcriptomics, an increasingly wide range of species has become accessible for molecular analysis. The deuterostomian invertebrates are of particular interest in this regard because they occupy an 'intermediate' position in animal phylogeny, bridging the gap between the well-studied model protostomian invertebrates (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans) and the vertebrates. Here we have identified 40 neuropeptide precursors in the starfish Asterias rubens, a deuterostomian invertebrate from the phylum Echinodermata. Importantly, these include kisspeptin-type and melanin-concentrating hormone-type precursors, which are the first to be discovered in a non-chordate species. Starfish tachykinin-type, somatostatin-type, pigment-dispersing factor-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type precursors are the first to be discovered in the echinoderm/ambulacrarian clade of the animal kingdom. Other precursors identified include vasopressin/oxytocin-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type, cholecystokinin/gastrin-type, orexin-type, luqin-type, pedal peptide/orcokinin-type, glycoprotein hormone-type, bursicon-type, relaxin-type and insulin-like growth factor-type precursors. This is the most comprehensive identification of neuropeptide precursor proteins in an echinoderm to date, yielding new insights into the evolution of neuropeptide signalling systems. Furthermore, these data provide a basis for experimental analysis of neuropeptide function in the unique context of the decentralized, pentaradial echinoderm bauplan.

  20. Mimetic analogs of pyrokinin neuropeptides for pest management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neuropeptides are potent regulators of critical life processes in insects, but are subjected to rapid degradation by peptidases in the hemolymph (blood), tissues and gut. This limitation can be overcome via replacement of peptidase susceptible portions of the insect neuropeptides to create analogs ...

  1. [Effects of neuropeptides on interferon production in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    The study of an interferon-inducing action of neuropeptides (a cerebrolysin model) on production of interferons by human blood leukocytes has shown that neuropeptides induce gamma-interferon production in the titer 267 IU/ml that determines one of the mechanisms of a neuroimmunocorrecting effect of cerebrolysin (Ebewe, Austria) in many neurological diseases (acute stroke, brain traumas and different neuroinfectious diseases).

  2. Neuropeptides of human thymus in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Mignini, F; Sabbatini, M; D'Andrea, V; Cavallotti, C

    2011-05-01

    Human thymus of healthy subjects and patients affected by thymoma-associated Myastenia Gravis were studied in order to visualize and compare the morphological distributive pattern of four neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, neuropeptide Y, and neurotensin. Based on our observations, we formulated hypotheses on their relations in neuro-immunomodulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Immuno-histochemical staining for neuropeptides was performed and morphological and morphometrical analyses were conducted on healthy and diseased thymus. In normal thymus, a specific distributive pattern was observed for the several neuropeptide-positive nerves in different thymus lobular zones. In particular substance P-positive fibers were observed in subcapsular zone, specifically located into parenchyma, where they represent the almost total amount of fibers; neurotensin-positive fibers were observed primarily located in parenchyma than perivascular site of several thymus lobular zones, and more abundant the cortico-medullary and medullary zones. Instead VIP- and NPY-positive fibers were widely distributed in perivascular and parenchymal sites of several thymus lobular zones. In thymoma, the distribution of neuropeptide-positive fibers was quantitatively reduced, while cells immunopositive to VIP and substance P were quantitatively increased and dispersed. Observation of the perivascular and parenchymal distribution of the analyzed neuropeptides suggests evidence that a regulatory function is performed by nerves and cells that secrete neuropeptide into the thymus. The alteration of neuropeptide patterns in thymoma suggests that these neurotransmitters play a role in autoimmune diseases such as Myastenia Gravis.

  3. Mini-review: the evolution of neuropeptide signaling.

    PubMed

    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Hauser, Frank

    2012-08-10

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in basal animals with primitive nervous systems such as cnidarians (Hydra, jellyfishes, corals, and sea anemones). Most animals emerging after the Cnidaria belong to two evolutionary lineages, the Protostomia (to which the majority of invertebrates belong) and Deuterostomia (to which some minor groups of invertebrates, and all vertebrates belong). These two lineages split about 700 million years (Myr) ago. Many mammalian neuropeptide GPCRs have orthologues in the Protostomia and this is also true for some of the mammalian neuropeptides. Examples are oxytocin/vasopressin, GnRH, gastrin/CCK, and neuropeptide Y and their GPCRs. These results implicate that protostomes (for example insects and nematodes) can be used as models to study the biology of neuropeptide signaling.

  4. NG peptides: a novel family of neurophysin-associated neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Maurice R

    2010-06-15

    Neurophysins are prohormone-derived polypeptides that are required for biosynthesis of the neurohypophyseal hormones vasopressin and oxytocin. Accordingly, mutations in the neurophysin domain of the human vasopressin gene can cause diabetes insipidus. The association of neurophysins with vasopressin/oxytocin-type peptides dates back to the common ancestor of bilaterian animals and until recently it was thought to be unique. This textbook perspective on neurophysins changed with the discovery of a gene in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (phylum Echinodermata) encoding a precursor protein comprising a neurophysin domain in association with NGFFFamide, a myoactive neuropeptide that is structurally unrelated to vasopressin/oxytocin-type neuropeptides (Elphick, M.R., Rowe, M.L., 2009. NGFFFamide and echinotocin: structurally unrelated myoactive neuropeptides derived from neurophysin-containing precursors in sea urchins. J. Exp. Biol. 212, 1067-1077). What is not known, however, is when and how the association of neurophysin with NGFFFamide-like neuropeptides originated. Here I report the discovery of genes encoding proteins comprising a neurophysin domain in association with putative NGFFFamide-like peptides in the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii (NGFWNamide and NGFYNamide) and in the cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae (SFRNGVamide). Together with NGFFFamide, these peptides constitute a novel family of neuropeptides in invertebrate deuterostomes that are derived from neurophysin-containing precursors and that have the sequence motif NG - "NG peptides". Genes encoding NG peptides in association with neurophysin were not found in protostomes, urochordates or vertebrates. Interestingly, however, SFRNGVamide is identical to the N-terminal region of neuropeptide S, a peptide that modulates arousal and anxiety in mammals, whilst NGFFFamide shares sequence similarity with SIFamide (AYRKPPFNGSIFamide), a neuropeptide that regulates sexual behaviour in

  5. A neuropeptide speeds circadian entrainment by reducing intercellular synchrony.

    PubMed

    An, Sungwon; Harang, Rich; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Tsai, Connie A; Mazuski, Cristina; Kim, Jihee; Doyle, Francis J; Petzold, Linda R; Herzog, Erik D

    2013-11-12

    Shift work or transmeridian travel can desynchronize the body's circadian rhythms from local light-dark cycles. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates and entrains daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Paradoxically, we found that vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide implicated in synchrony among SCN cells, can also desynchronize them. The degree and duration of desynchronization among SCN neurons depended on both the phase and the dose of VIP. A model of the SCN consisting of coupled stochastic cells predicted both the phase- and the dose-dependent response to VIP and that the transient phase desynchronization, or "phase tumbling", could arise from intrinsic, stochastic noise in small populations of key molecules (notably, Period mRNA near its daily minimum). The model also predicted that phase tumbling following brief VIP treatment would accelerate entrainment to shifted environmental cycles. We tested this using a prepulse of VIP during the day before a shift in either a light cycle in vivo or a temperature cycle in vitro. Although VIP during the day does not shift circadian rhythms, the VIP pretreatment approximately halved the time required for mice to reentrain to an 8-h shifted light schedule and for SCN cultures to reentrain to a 10-h shifted temperature cycle. We conclude that VIP below 100 nM synchronizes SCN cells and above 100 nM reduces synchrony in the SCN. We show that exploiting these mechanisms that transiently reduce cellular synchrony before a large shift in the schedule of daily environmental cues has the potential to reduce jet lag.

  6. Neuropeptide Regulation of Signaling and Behavior in the BNST

    PubMed Central

    Kash, Thomas L.; Pleil, Kristen E.; Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G.; Crowley, Nicole; Mazzone, Christopher; Sugam, Jonathan; Hardaway, J. Andrew; McElligott, Zoe A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical developments have transformed how neuroscientists can probe brain function. What was once thought to be difficult and perhaps impossible, stimulating a single set of long range inputs among many, is now relatively straight-forward using optogenetic approaches. This has provided an avalanche of data demonstrating causal roles for circuits in a variety of behaviors. However, despite the critical role that neuropeptide signaling plays in the regulation of behavior and physiology of the brain, there have been remarkably few studies demonstrating how peptide release is causally linked to behaviors. This is likely due to both the different time scale by which peptides act on and the modulatory nature of their actions. For example, while glutamate release can effectively transmit information between synapses in milliseconds, peptide release is potentially slower [See the excellent review by Van Den Pol on the time scales and mechanisms of release (van den Pol, 2012)] and it can only tune the existing signals via modulation. And while there have been some studies exploring mechanisms of release, it is still not as clearly known what is required for efficient peptide release. Furthermore, this analysis could be complicated by the fact that there are multiple peptides released, some of which may act in contrast. Despite these limitations, there are a number of groups making progress in this area. The goal of this review is to explore the role of peptide signaling in one specific structure, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, that has proven to be a fertile ground for peptide action. PMID:25475545

  7. A neuropeptide speeds circadian entrainment by reducing intercellular synchrony

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Harang, Rich; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Tsai, Connie A.; Mazuski, Cristina; Kim, Jihee; Doyle, Francis J.; Petzold, Linda R.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Shift work or transmeridian travel can desynchronize the body's circadian rhythms from local light–dark cycles. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates and entrains daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Paradoxically, we found that vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide implicated in synchrony among SCN cells, can also desynchronize them. The degree and duration of desynchronization among SCN neurons depended on both the phase and the dose of VIP. A model of the SCN consisting of coupled stochastic cells predicted both the phase- and the dose-dependent response to VIP and that the transient phase desynchronization, or “phase tumbling”, could arise from intrinsic, stochastic noise in small populations of key molecules (notably, Period mRNA near its daily minimum). The model also predicted that phase tumbling following brief VIP treatment would accelerate entrainment to shifted environmental cycles. We tested this using a prepulse of VIP during the day before a shift in either a light cycle in vivo or a temperature cycle in vitro. Although VIP during the day does not shift circadian rhythms, the VIP pretreatment approximately halved the time required for mice to reentrain to an 8-h shifted light schedule and for SCN cultures to reentrain to a 10-h shifted temperature cycle. We conclude that VIP below 100 nM synchronizes SCN cells and above 100 nM reduces synchrony in the SCN. We show that exploiting these mechanisms that transiently reduce cellular synchrony before a large shift in the schedule of daily environmental cues has the potential to reduce jet lag. PMID:24167276

  8. Neuropeptide Y and posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sah, R; Geracioti, TD

    2016-01-01

    Resiliency to the adverse effects of extraordinary emotional trauma on the brain varies within the human population. Accordingly, some people cope better than others with traumatic stress. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid peptide transmitter abundantly expressed in forebrain limbic and brain stem areas that regulate stress and emotional behaviors. Studies largely in rodents demonstrate a role for NPY in promoting coping with stress. Moreover, accruing data from the genetic to the physiological implicate NPY as a potential ‘resilience-to-stress’ factor in humans. Here, we consolidate findings from preclinical and clinical studies of NPY that are of relevance to stress-associated syndromes, most prototypically posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Collectively, these data suggest that reduced central nervous system (CNS) NPY concentrations or function may be associated with PTSD. We also link specific symptoms of human PTSD with extant findings in the NPY field to reveal potential physiological contributions of the neuropeptide to the disorder. In pursuit of understanding the physiological basis and treatment of PTSD, the NPY system is an attractive target. PMID:22801411

  9. Neuropeptide Y stimulates autophagy in hypothalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aveleira, Célia A.; Botelho, Mariana; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Nóbrega, Clévio; Cortes, Luísa; Valero, Jorge; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Álvaro, Ana R.; Santana, Magda; Kügler, Sebastian; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by autophagy impairment that contributes to age-related disease aggravation. Moreover, it was described that the hypothalamus is a critical brain area for whole-body aging development and has impact on lifespan. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the major neuropeptides present in the hypothalamus, and it has been shown that, in aged animals, the hypothalamic NPY levels decrease. Because caloric restriction (CR) delays aging, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy, and also increases hypothalamic NPY levels, we hypothesized that NPY could have a relevant role on autophagy modulation in the hypothalamus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of NPY on autophagy in the hypothalamus. Using both hypothalamic neuronal in vitro models and mice overexpressing NPY in the hypothalamus, we observed that NPY stimulates autophagy in the hypothalamus. Mechanistically, in rodent hypothalamic neurons, NPY increases autophagy through the activation of NPY Y1 and Y5 receptors, and this effect is tightly associated with the concerted activation of PI3K, MEK/ERK, and PKA signaling pathways. Modulation of hypothalamic NPY levels may be considered a potential strategy to produce protective effects against hypothalamic impairments associated with age and to delay aging. PMID:25775546

  10. Aplysia californica neurons express microinjected neuropeptide genes.

    PubMed Central

    DesGroseillers, L; Cowan, D; Miles, M; Sweet, A; Scheller, R H

    1987-01-01

    Neuropeptide genes are expressed in specific subsets of large polyploid neurons in Aplysia californica. We have defined the transcription initiation sites of three of these neuropeptide genes (the R14, L11, and ELH genes) and determined the nucleotide sequence of the promoter regions. The genes contain the usual eucaryotic promoter signals as well as other structures of potential regulatory importance, including inverted and direct repeats. The L11 and ELH genes, which are otherwise unrelated, have homology in the promoter regions, while the R14 promoter was distinct. When cloned plasmids were microinjected into Aplysia neurons in organ culture, transitions between supercoiled, relaxed circular, and linear DNAs occurred along with ligation into high-molecular-weight species. About 20% of the microinjected neurons expressed the genes. The promoter region of the R14 gene functioned in expression of the microinjected DNA in all cells studied. When both additional 5' and 3' sequences were included, the gene was specifically expressed only in R14, suggesting that the specificity of expression is generated by a multicomponent repression system. Finally, the R14 peptide could be expressed in L11, demonstrating that it is possible to alter the transmitter phenotype of these neurons by introduction of cloned genes. Images PMID:3670293

  11. Neuropeptides as lung cancer growth factors.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript is written in honor of the Festschrift for Abba Kastin. I met Abba at a Society for Neuroscience meeting and learned that he was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Peptides. I submitted manuscripts to the journal on "Neuropeptides as Growth Factors in Cancer" and subsequently was named to the Editorial Advisory Board. Over the past 30 years I have published dozens of manuscripts in Peptides and reviewed hundreds of submitted manuscripts. It was always rewarding to interact with Abba, a consummate professional. When I attended meetings in New Orleans I would sometimes go out to dinner with him at the restaurant "Commanders Palace". When I chaired the Summer Neuropeptide Conference we were honored to have him receive the Fleur Strand Award one year in Israel. I think that his biggest editorial contribution has been the "Handbook of Biologically Active Peptides." I served as a Section Editor on "Cancer/Anticancer Peptides" and again found that it was a pleasure working with him. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which bombesin-like peptides, neurotensin and vasoactive intestinal peptide regulate the growth of lung cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Micellar nanomedicine of human neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Kuzmis, Antonina; Lim, Sok Bee; Desai, Esha; Jeon, Eunjung; Lee, Bao-Shiang; Rubinstein, Israel; Onyüksel, Hayat

    2011-08-01

    Human neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important biologics that regulates a multitude of physiological functions and could be amenable to therapeutic manipulations in certain disease states. However, rapid (within minutes) enzymatic degradation and inactivation of NPY precludes its development as a drug. Accordingly, we determined whether self-association of NPY with biocompatible and biodegradable sterically stabilized phospholipid micelles (SSM) improves its stability and bioactivity. We found that in saline NPY spontaneously aggregates; however, in the presence of SSM it self-associates with the micelles as monomers. Three NPY molecules self-associate with 1 SSM at saturation. This process stabilizes the peptide in α-helix conformation, abrogates its degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and potentiates NPY-induced inhibition of cAMP elaboration in SK-N-MC cells. Collectively, these data indicate that self-association of NPY with SSM stabilizes and protects the peptide in active monomeric conformation, thereby amplifying its bioactivity in vitro. We propose further development of NPY in SSM as a novel, long-acting nanomedicine. Human neuropeptide Y (NPY) regulates a multitude of physiological functions and could be amenable to therapeutic manipulations, which is currently limited by its short half life. Self-association of NPY with spherically stabilized micelles (SSM) protects and stabilizes the peptide in active monomeric conformation, thereby amplifying its bioactivity in vitro, enabling future therapeutic considerations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Role of estrogen-sensitive neurons in the arcuate region of the hypothalamus in the mechanism of luteinizing hormone release].

    PubMed

    Babichev, V N; Ignatkov, V Ia

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on rats; estradiol brought to the arcuate region of the hypothalamus by means of microionophoresis led to the increase of the region of the hypothalamus by means of microionophoresis led to the increase of the blood luteinizing hormone (LH) level during the following stages of the estral cycle-diestrus 1, diestrus 2, and the first half day of the proestrus; as to the second half of the proestrus day--estradiol decreased its level. Changes in the LH level in the hypophysis under the influence of the microionophoretic introduction of estradiol into the arcuate region occurred during the second half of the day of diestrus 2 (reduction), and during the estrus (elevation). In the majority of cases a rise of the blood level was combined with the neuron activation in the arcuate region under the influence of estradiol.

  14. Beyond the arcuate fasciculus: consensus and controversy in the connectional anatomy of language.

    PubMed

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Tremblay, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    The growing consensus that language is distributed into large-scale cortical and subcortical networks has brought with it an increasing focus on the connectional anatomy of language, or how particular fibre pathways connect regions within the language network. Understanding connectivity of the language network could provide critical insights into function, but recent investigations using a variety of methodologies in both humans and non-human primates have provided conflicting accounts of pathways central to language. Some of the pathways classically considered language pathways, such as the arcuate fasciculus, are now argued to be domain-general rather than specialized, which represents a radical shift in perspective. Other pathways described in the non-human primate remain to be verified in humans. In this review, we examine the consensus and controversy in the study of fibre pathway connectivity for language. We focus on seven fibre pathways-the superior longitudinal fasciculus and arcuate fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, extreme capsule, middle longitudinal fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus-that have been proposed to support language in the human. We examine the methods in humans and non-human primate used to investigate the connectivity of these pathways, the historical context leading to the most current understanding of their anatomy, and the functional and clinical correlates of each pathway with reference to language. We conclude with a challenge for researchers and clinicians to establish a coherent framework within which fibre pathway connectivity can be systematically incorporated to the study of language.

  15. Map view retrodeformation of an arcuate fold-and-thrust belt: The Jura case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Thomas; Gratier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-03-01

    The mechanism of arcuate mountain range formation is a matter of debate. Here we perform a map view restoration of a detailed three-dimensional model of the Jura arc, a typical arcuate mountain range in the foothills of the Swiss and French Alps. This retrodeformation is performed using the UNFOLD surface-balanced program, based on a "block mosaic" method. It results in a displacement field divergent toward the deformation front. This displacement field suggests counterclockwise rigid rotations in the horizontal plane up to 30° in the southern Internal Jura and a corresponding vertical axis rotation or shear strain of the Savoie molasse basin hinterlandward. We also predict a 10° clockwise, vertical axis rotation of the molasse basin in Switzerland. All these rotations agree with those documented by paleomagnetic data. The former are taken to result from a substantial decrease in shortening at the southern Jura end, while the divergence of displacements is interpreted to result from variations in the detachment level distribution.

  16. Left hemisphere diffusivity of the arcuate fasciculus: influences of autism spectrum disorder and language impairment.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T P L; Heiken, K; Zarnow, D; Dell, J; Nagae, L; Blaskey, L; Solot, C; Levy, S E; Berman, J I; Edgar, J C

    2014-03-01

    There has been much discussion whether brain abnormalities associated with specific language impairment and autism with language impairment are shared or are disorder specific. Although white matter tract abnormalities are observed in both specific language impairment and autism spectrum disorders, the similarities and differences in the white matter abnormalities in these 2 disorders have not been fully determined. Diffusion tensor imaging diffusion parameters of the arcuate fasciculus were measured in 14 children with specific language impairment as well as in 16 children with autism spectrum disorder with language impairment, 18 with autism spectrum disorder without language impairment, and 25 age-matched typically developing control participants. Language impairment and autism spectrum disorder both had (elevating) main effects on mean diffusivity of the left arcuate fasciculus, initially suggesting a shared white matter substrate abnormality. Analysis of axial and radial diffusivity components, however, indicated that autism spectrum disorder and language impairment differentially affect white matter microstructural properties, with a main effect of autism spectrum disorder on axial diffusivity and a main effect of language impairment on radial diffusivity. Although white matter abnormalities appear similar in language impairment and autism spectrum disorder when examining broad white matter measures, a more detailed analysis indicates different mechanisms for the white matter microstructural anomalies associated with language impairment and autism spectrum disorder.

  17. Immunohistochemical characterization of the arcuate kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) and preoptic kisspeptin neuronal populations in the hypothalamus during the estrous cycle in heifers

    PubMed Central

    HASSANEEN, A; NANIWA, Yousuke; SUETOMI, Yuta; MATSUYAMA, Shuichi; KIMURA, Koji; IEDA, Nahoko; INOUE, Naoko; UENOYAMA, Yoshihisa; TSUKAMURA, Hiroko; MAEDA, Kei-ichiro; MATSUDA, Fuko; OHKURA, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that control reproduction is an obvious strategy for improving the fertility of cattle and developing new agents to control reproductive functions. The present study aimed to identify kisspeptin neurons in the bovine hypothalamus, clarifying that a central mechanism is also present in the cattle brain, as kisspeptin is known to play an important role in the stimulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/gonadotropin secretion in other mammals. To characterize kisspeptin neurons in the bovine hypothalamus, the co-localizations of kisspeptin and neurokinin B (NKB) or kisspeptin and dynorphin A (Dyn) were examined. Hypothalamic tissue was collected from Japanese Black or Japanese Black × Holstein crossbred cows during the follicular and luteal phases. Brain sections, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the preoptic area (POA), were dual immunostained with kisspeptin and either NKB or Dyn. In the ARC, both NKB and Dyn were co-localized in kisspeptin neurons during both the follicular and luteal phases, demonstrating the presence of kisspeptin/NKB/Dyn-containing neurons, referred to as KNDy neurons, in cows. In the POA, no co-localization of kisspeptin with either NKB or Dyn was detected. Kisspeptin expression in the follicular phase was higher than that in the luteal phase, suggesting that kisspeptin expression in the POA is positively controlled by estrogen in cows. The kisspeptin neuronal populations in the ARC and POA likely play important roles in regulating the GnRH pulse and surge, respectively, in cows. PMID:27349533

  18. Comparative distribution of neuropeptide-immunoreactive systems in the brain of the green molly, Poecilia latipinna.

    PubMed

    Batten, T F; Cambre, M L; Moons, L; Vandesande, F

    1990-12-22

    The comparative distribution of peptidergic neural systems in the brain of the euryhaline, viviparous teleost Poecilia latipinna (green molly) was examined by immunohistochemistry. Topographically distinct, but often overlapping, systems of neurons and fibres displaying immunoreactivity (ir) related to a range of neuropeptides were found in most brain areas. Neurosecretory and hypophysiotrophic hormones were localized to specific groups of neurons mostly within the preoptic and tuberal hypothalamus, giving fibre projections to the neurohypophysis, ventral telencephalon, thalamus, and brain stem. Separate vasotocin (AVT)-ir and isotocin (IST)-ir cells were located in the nucleus preopticus (nPO), but many AVT-ir nPO neurons also displayed growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF)-like-ir, and in some animals corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF)-like-ir. The main group of CRF-ir neurons was located in the nucleus recessus anterioris, where coexistence with galanin (GAL) was observed in some cells. Enkephalin (ENK)-like-ir was occasionally present in a few IST-ir cells of the nPO and was also found in small neurons in the posterior tuberal hypothalamus and in a cluster of large cells in the dorsal midbrain tegmentum. Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH)-ir cells were found near the rostromedial tip of the nucleus recessus lateralis. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-ir cells were present in the nucleus olfactoretinalis, ventral telencephalon, preoptic area, and dorsal midbrain tegmentum. Molluscan cardioexcitatory peptide (FMRF-amide)-ir was colocalized with GnRH-ir in the ganglion cells and central projections of the nervus terminalis. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-ir neurons were restricted to the tuberal hypothalamus, mostly within the nucleus lateralis tuberis pars lateralis, and somatostatin (SRIF)-ir neurons were numerous throughout the periventricular areas of the diencephalon. A further group of SRIF-ir neurons extending from the ventral telencephalon

  19. Intracerebral baclofen administration decreases amphetamine-induced behavior and neuropeptide gene expression in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenxia; Mailloux, Adam W; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2005-05-01

    In a previous study, systemic administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist, R-(+)-baclofen (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked acute amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced rearing and neuropeptide (preprodynorphin (PPD), preprotachykinin (PPT), preproenkephalin (PPE), and secretogranin II (SGII)) mRNA expression in the striatum (Zhou et al, 2004). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the site(s) of action of these baclofen effects in the dorsal and ventral striatal circuitries. Infusion of baclofen (75 ng/side) into the ventral tegmental area (VTA), substantia nigra (SN), nucleus accumbens (NA), caudate-putamen (Cpu), or medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) had no effect on behavioral activity in saline-treated rats habituated to a photocell apparatus. However, intra-VTA infusion of baclofen (75 ng/side) completely blocked, whereas intra-NA and intra-SN infusion of baclofen attenuated, amphetamine-induced vertical activity without affecting amphetamine-induced total distance traveled. In contrast, intramedial PFC and intra-CPu infusion of baclofen had no effect on behavioral activity in amphetamine-treated rats. Infusion of baclofen into the VTA, NA, or SN decreased amphetamine-induced neuropeptide gene expression in the striatum. These results indicate that GABA(B) receptor stimulation within the ventral striatal circuitry is involved in mediating acute amphetamine-induced behaviors and neuropeptide gene expression in the dorsal and ventral striatum. The present study provides information on the potential targets in the brain for baclofen in the initial behavioral and genomic response to amphetamine.

  20. Neuropeptide Signaling in Crustaceans Probed by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhidan

    Neuropeptides are one of the most diverse classes of signaling molecules whose identities and functions are not yet fully understood. They have been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes, including feeding-related and motivated behaviors, and also environmental adaptations. In this work, improved mass spectrometry-based analytical platforms were developed and applied to the crustacean systems to characterize signaling molecules. This dissertation begins with a review of mass spectrometry-based neuropeptide studies from both temporal- and spatial-domains. This review is then followed by several chapters detailing a few research projects related to the crustacean neuropeptidomic characterization and comparative analysis. The neuropeptidome of crayfish, Orconectes rusticus is characterized for the first time using mass spectrometry-based tools. In vivo microdialysis sampling technique offers the capability of direct sampling from extracellular space in a time-resolved manner. It is used to investigate the secreted neuropeptide and neurotransmitter content in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, in this work. A new quantitation strategy using alternative mass spectrometry data acquisition approach is developed and applied for the first time to quantify neuropeptides. Coupling of this method with microdialysis enables the study of neuropeptide dynamics concurrent with different behaviors. Proof-of-principle experiments validating this approach have been carried out in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis to study feeding- and circadian rhythm-related neuropeptide changes using micoridialysis in a time-resolved manner. This permits a close correlation between behavioral and neurochemical changes, providing potential candidates for future validation of regulatory roles. In addition to providing spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) technique enables the characterization of signaling molecules while preserving the temporal resolution. A

  1. Central neuropeptide FF reduces feed consumption and affects hypothalamic chemistry in chicks.

    PubMed

    Cline, Mark A; Nandar, Wint; Rogers, J Orion

    2007-12-01

    Information on the physiological functions of neuropeptide FF; NPFF, a morphine modulating octapeptide in avians is lacking. Thus, we designed a study to investigate the effects of central NPFF with particular emphasis on appetite-related processes. Cobb-500 chicks were intracerebroventricularly (ICV) injected with 0, 4.16, 8.32 or 16.6nmol NPFF, and feed and water intake were quantified. Feed intake was linearly decreased as NPFF dose increased, and this effect decayed over time and was not significant by 120min post-injection. Water intake was not affected by ICV NPFF. In a second exp, we observed that naloxone completely reversed the NPFF-induced decrease in feed intake. The amount of time a visible marker took to travel through the total length of the alimentary canal linearly increased as NPFF dose increased. We measured neuronal activation in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), paraventricular nucleus (PVN) dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMN) of the hypothalamus, and nucleus dorsomedialis posterior thalami (DMP) of the thalamus. The DMN, DMP, PVN and VMH were all activated by ICV NPFF while the LH was not affected. Finally, we determined that the anorexigenic effect of ICV NPFF is primarily behavior specific, since behaviors unrelated to ingestion were not increased the same duration of time as was consumatory pecking. We conclude that NPFF causes anorexigenic effects in chicks that are primarily behavior specific.

  2. Identification of the CART neuropeptide circuitry processing TMT-induced predator stress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anju; Rale, Abhishek; Utturwar, Kaweri; Ghose, Aurnab; Subhedar, Nishikant

    2014-12-01

    Abundance of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neuropeptide in the limbic areas like the olfactory system, central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), ventral bed nucleus of stria terminalis (vBNST) and the hypothalamus suggests involvement of the peptide in emotive processing. We examined the role of CART in mediating fear, a strong emotion with profound survival value. Rats, exposed to 2,4,5-trimethyl-3-thiazoline (TMT), a predator related cue extracted from fox feces, showed significant increase in freezing, escape and risk assessment behavior, whereas grooming was reduced. Neuronal activity was up-regulated in the CeA and vBNST in terms of increased immunoreactivity in CART elements and c-Fos expression. Increased expression of both the markers was also seen in some discrete magnocellular as well as parvicellular subdivisions of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). However, CART containing mitral cells in the main or accessory olfactory bulb did not respond. CART antibody was stereotaxically injected bilaterally into the CeA to locally immunoneutralize endogenous CART. On exposure to TMT, these rats showed reduced freezing, risk assessment and escape behavior while grooming was restored to normal value. We suggest that the CART signaling in the CeA and vBNST, but not in the olfactory system, might be an important component of the innate fear processing, and expression of stereotypic behavior, while CART in the PVN subdivisions might mediate the neuroendocrine response to predator stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. GABAB receptor stimulation decreases amphetamine-induced behavior and neuropeptide gene expression in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenxia; Mailloux, Adam W; Jung, Bruce J; Edmunds, Hayward S; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2004-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether GABA(B) receptor activation blocks acute amphetamine-induced behavioral activity, dopamine release, and neuropeptide mRNA expression in the striatum. Systemic administration of R-(+)-baclofen (1.25 mg/kg, i.p.) did not alter total distance traveled or vertical rearing induced by amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). At 2.5 mg/kg, baclofen did not alter spontaneous motor activity or total distance traveled, but completely blocked vertical rearing induced by amphetamine. At 5.0 mg/kg, baclofen completely blocked both total distance traveled and vertical rearing induced by amphetamine. Quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that baclofen (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the ability of amphetamine to increase preprodynorphin (PPD), preprotachykinin (PPT), preproenkephalin (PPE), and secretogranin II (SGII) mRNA levels in the striatum without altering the basal levels of these signals. Baclofen also blocked the amphetamine-induced rise in SGII mRNA in the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens and cingulate cortex. In a separate experiment, systemic baclofen (2.5 mg/kg) decreased the amphetamine-induced increase in dialysate dopamine levels in the striatum. These results suggest that reduced striatal dopamine release contributes to the ability of GABA(B) receptor activation to decrease acute amphetamine-induced behavioral activity and striatal neuropeptide gene expression.

  4. Hypotension and reduced catecholamines in neuropeptide Y transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Michalkiewicz, Mieczyslaw; Knestaut, Kriss M; Bytchkova, Elena Yu; Michalkiewicz, Teresa

    2003-05-01

    The neurons that control blood pressure express neuropeptide Y. Administered centrally, this neuropeptide reduces blood pressure and anxiety, together with lowering sympathetic outflow. The generation of neuropeptide Y transgenic rats overexpressing this peptide, under its natural promoter, has allowed us to examine the role of endogenous neuropeptide Y in the long-term control of blood pressure by the sympathetic nervous system. This study tested a hypothesis that endogenous neuropeptide Y acts to reduce blood pressure and catecholamine release. Blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry in conscious male transgenic and nontransgenic littermates (control). Novel cage with cold water and forced swimming were used as stressors. Catecholamines were determined in 24-hour urine (baseline) and plasma (cold water stress) by a radioenzymatic assay. Blood pressures in baseline and during the stresses were significantly reduced in the transgenic rats. The lower blood pressure was associated with reduced catecholamines, lower decrease in pressure after autonomic ganglionic blockade, and increased longevity. Data obtained through the use of this transgenic rat model support and extend the evidence for the previously postulated sympatholytic and hypotensive effects of neuropeptide Y and provide novel evidence for an important physiological role of endogenous peptide in blood pressure regulation. As indicated by the increased longevity of these rats, in long-term regulation, these buffering actions of neuropeptide Y may have important cardiovascular protective effects against sympathetic hyperexcitation.

  5. NeuroPep: a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mingxia; Yin, Sanwen; Jang, Richard; Wang, Jian; Xue, Zhidong; Xu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides play a variety of roles in many physiological processes and serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of some nervous-system disorders. In recent years, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified neuropeptides. Therefore, we have developed NeuroPep, a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides, which holds 5949 non-redundant neuropeptide entries originating from 493 organisms belonging to 65 neuropeptide families. In NeuroPep, the number of neuropeptides in invertebrates and vertebrates is 3455 and 2406, respectively. It is currently the most complete neuropeptide database. We extracted entries deposited in UniProt, the database (www.neuropeptides.nl) and NeuroPedia, and used text mining methods to retrieve entries from the MEDLINE abstracts and full text articles. All the entries in NeuroPep have been manually checked. 2069 of the 5949 (35%) neuropeptide sequences were collected from the scientific literature. Moreover, NeuroPep contains detailed annotations for each entry, including source organisms, tissue specificity, families, names, post-translational modifications, 3D structures (if available) and literature references. Information derived from these peptide sequences such as amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, molecular weight and other physicochemical properties of peptides are also provided. A quick search feature allows users to search the database with keywords such as sequence, name, family, etc., and an advanced search page helps users to combine queries with logical operators like AND/OR. In addition, user-friendly web tools like browsing, sequence alignment and mapping are also integrated into the NeuroPep database. Database URL: http://isyslab.info/NeuroPep PMID:25931458

  6. Neuromodulatory function of neuropeptides in the normal CNS.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Adalberto; Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Lossi, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Neuropeptides are small protein molecules produced and released by discrete cell populations of the central and peripheral nervous systems through the regulated secretory pathway and acting on neural substrates. Inside the nerve cells, neuropeptides are selectively stored within large granular vesicles (LGVs), and commonly coexist in neurons with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, amino acids, and catecholamines). Storage in LGVs is responsible for a relatively slow response to secretion that requires enhanced or repeated stimulation. Coexistence (i.e. the concurrent presence of a neuropeptide with other messenger molecules in individual neurons), and co-storage (i.e. the localization of two or more neuropeptides within individual LGVs in neurons) give rise to a complicated series of pre- and post-synaptic functional interactions with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters. The typically slow response and action of neuropeptides as compared to fast-neurotransmitters such as excitatory/inhibitory amino acids and catecholamines is also due to the type of receptors that trigger neuropeptide actions onto target cells. Almost all neuropeptides act on G-protein coupled receptors that, upon ligand binding, activate an intracellular cascade of molecular enzymatic events, eventually leading to cellular responses. The latter occur in a time span (seconds or more) considerably longer (milliseconds) than that of low-molecular-weight fast-neurotransmitters, directly operating through ion channel receptors. As reviewed here, combined immunocytochemical visualization of neuropeptides and their receptors at the ultrastructural level and electrophysiological studies, have been fundamental to better unravel the role of neuropeptides in neuron-to-neuron communication.

  7. A Combined fMRI and DTI Examination of Functional Language Lateralization and Arcuate Fasciculus Structure: Effects of Degree versus Direction of Hand Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propper, Ruthe E.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.; Whalen, Stephen; Tie, Yanmei; Norton, Isaiah H.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Zollei, Lilla; Radmanesh, Alireza; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between hand preference degree and direction, functional language lateralization in Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and structural measures of the arcuate fasciculus. Results revealed an effect of degree of hand preference on arcuate fasciculus structure, such that consistently-handed individuals,…

  8. A Combined fMRI and DTI Examination of Functional Language Lateralization and Arcuate Fasciculus Structure: Effects of Degree versus Direction of Hand Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propper, Ruthe E.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.; Whalen, Stephen; Tie, Yanmei; Norton, Isaiah H.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Zollei, Lilla; Radmanesh, Alireza; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between hand preference degree and direction, functional language lateralization in Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and structural measures of the arcuate fasciculus. Results revealed an effect of degree of hand preference on arcuate fasciculus structure, such that consistently-handed individuals,…

  9. Amphetamine, an appetite suppressant, decreases neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in rat hypothalamic paraventriculum.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Yang, Shun-Fa; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2005-04-15

    Amphetamine (AMPH) is a well-known anorectic agent. The mechanism underlying the anorectic response of AMPH has been attributed to its inhibitory effect on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), an orexigenic peptide in the brain. However, there is still lack of genomic or in situ immunohistochemical evidence to prove it. The present study was aimed to assess the molecular mechanism of AMPH anorexia by immunostaining of hypothalamic NPY protein in the area of paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and by detecting the change of hypothalamic NPY mRNA level using RT-PCR. Results revealed that an AMPH treatment might reduce the expression of NPY at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Comparatively, a treatment of clomipramine, a serotonin transporter inhibitor, was unable to reduce NPY mRNA level, revealing the noninvolvement of hypothalamic NPY gene in serotonin anorexia. Our results provided genomic and in situ immunohistochemical evidence to confirm the mediation of hypothalamic NPY neurons in the anorectic action of AMPH.

  10. [Effect of the intermittent hypoxic training on the functioning of peptidergic neurons of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and brain stem neurons in rats].

    PubMed

    Abramov, A V

    1998-03-01

    Internittent hypoxic training (IHT) increased the quantity and secretory activity of peptidergic neurons of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PHN) and activated neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of n.vagus. These structures seem to take part in realisation of the IHT activating effect on condition of the pancreatic delta-cells. The effect involves insulin-stimulating and insuloprotective effects realised via hypothalamic and neuro-conducting ways of regulation of the endocrine pancreas with a direct participation of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

  11. A possible homologue of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus of lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis L.).

    PubMed

    Weigle, C; Wicht, H; Korf, H W

    1996-10-18

    This study in lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) is concerned with the phylogenetic age of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus which in mammals receives input from the retinohypothalamic tract and acts as circadian pacemaker. Tracing experiments with the fluorescent dye DiI demonstrated a retinohypothalamic projection in lampreys which terminates in a distinct area of the hypothalamus corresponding to the infrachiasmatic part of the nucleus of the postoptic commissure. Immunocytochemical investigations showed vasotocinergic neurons and a relatively high concentration of neuropeptide Y-, substance P- and serotonin-immunoreactive nerve fibers in this region. These hodological and immunocytochemical data suggest that the infrachiasmatic part of the nucleus of the postoptic commissure of lampreys might be homologous to the suprachiasmatic nucleus of other craniates.

  12. Distribution of the neuronal inputs to the ventral premammillary nucleus of male and female rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Judney Cley; Bittencourt, Jackson Cioni; Elias, Carol Fuzeti

    2014-01-01

    The ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV) expresses dense collections of sex steroid receptors and receptors for metabolic cues, including leptin, insulin and ghrelin. The PMV responds to opposite sex odor stimulation and projects to areas involved in reproductive control, including direct innervation of gonadotropin releasing hormone neurons. Thus, the PMV is well positioned to integrate metabolic and reproductive cues, and control downstream targets that mediate reproductive function. In fact, lesions of PMV neurons blunt female reproductive function and maternal aggression. However, although the projections of PMV neurons have been well documented, little is known about the neuronal inputs received by PMV neurons. To fill this gap, we performed a systematic evaluation of the brain sites innervating the PMV neurons of male and female rats using the retrograde tracer subunit B of the cholera toxin (CTb). In general, we observed that males and females show a similar pattern of afferents. We also noticed that the PMV is preferentially innervated by neurons located in the forebrain, with very few projections coming from brainstem nuclei. The majority of inputs originated from the medial nucleus of the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the medial preoptic nucleus. A moderate to high density of afferents was also observed in the ventral subiculum, the arcuate nucleus and the ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Our findings strengthen the concept that the PMV is part of the vomeronasal system and integrates the brain circuitry controlling reproductive functions. PMID:25084037

  13. Pseudophakic astigmatism reduction with femtosecond laser-assisted corneal arcuate incisions: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Blehm, Clayton; Potvin, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Verion-LenSx guided arcuate incision technique to reduce refractive astigmatism in a pseudophakic population. Patients and methods A prospective single-arm study was conducted in which one or both eyes of subjects required reduction of 1.0–2.0 D of refractive astigmatism after previous cataract surgery or refractive lens exchange. The surgeon used the refractive cylinder in the eye and the Woodcock astigmatism nomogram for preoperative planning, while the LenSx femtosecond laser with the Verion Image Guided System was used to create all arcuate incisions. The primary outcome measure was the uncorrected monocular distance visual acuity (UCVA). Secondary outcome measures included the change in corneal astigmatism, the change in refractive astigmatism, the best-corrected visual acuity and spectacle independence at distance from preoperative stage to 1 month and 2 months postoperatively. Results Twenty-eight eyes of 18 subjects were treated. The best-corrected visual acuity at the 2-month postoperative (PO) stage was not statistically significantly different from the preoperative visual acuity (0.02 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR] in both cases, P>0.05). Uncorrected visual acuity was statistically significantly better at the 2-month PO stage relative to the preoperative value (0.14 versus 0.34 logMAR, P<0.01). The mean change in refractive cylinder from the preoperative stage to the 2-month PO stage was 1.0 D. At the 2-month PO stage, two-thirds of the subjects (12/18) reported that they did not use glasses for distance vision and that their spectacle use for distance vision at 2 months was “lower” or “much lower” than the preoperative stage; in 71% of eyes (20/28), the residual refractive cylinder was ≤0.50 D. Vector changes in keratometric astigmatism were weakly associated with changes in refractive cylinder. Conclusion Arcuate incisions made with a femtosecond

  14. Pseudophakic astigmatism reduction with femtosecond laser-assisted corneal arcuate incisions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Blehm, Clayton; Potvin, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Verion-LenSx guided arcuate incision technique to reduce refractive astigmatism in a pseudophakic population. A prospective single-arm study was conducted in which one or both eyes of subjects required reduction of 1.0-2.0 D of refractive astigmatism after previous cataract surgery or refractive lens exchange. The surgeon used the refractive cylinder in the eye and the Woodcock astigmatism nomogram for preoperative planning, while the LenSx femtosecond laser with the Verion Image Guided System was used to create all arcuate incisions. The primary outcome measure was the uncorrected monocular distance visual acuity (UCVA). Secondary outcome measures included the change in corneal astigmatism, the change in refractive astigmatism, the best-corrected visual acuity and spectacle independence at distance from preoperative stage to 1 month and 2 months postoperatively. Twenty-eight eyes of 18 subjects were treated. The best-corrected visual acuity at the 2-month postoperative (PO) stage was not statistically significantly different from the preoperative visual acuity (0.02 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR] in both cases, P>0.05). Uncorrected visual acuity was statistically significantly better at the 2-month PO stage relative to the preoperative value (0.14 versus 0.34 logMAR, P<0.01). The mean change in refractive cylinder from the preoperative stage to the 2-month PO stage was 1.0 D. At the 2-month PO stage, two-thirds of the subjects (12/18) reported that they did not use glasses for distance vision and that their spectacle use for distance vision at 2 months was "lower" or "much lower" than the preoperative stage; in 71% of eyes (20/28), the residual refractive cylinder was ≤0.50 D. Vector changes in keratometric astigmatism were weakly associated with changes in refractive cylinder. Arcuate incisions made with a femtosecond laser to treat moderate levels of residual refractive

  15. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  16. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J; Spaltenstein, A

    1995-09-26

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats.

  17. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive neurons in the suprachiasmatic-subparaventricular region in the hedgehog-tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Unger, J W

    1992-04-03

    The distribution of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) was studied in geniculate and peri-chiasmatic regions in the lesser hedgehog-tenrec, Echinops telfairi (Insectivora). Only few neurons demonstrated NPY-like immunoreactivity in the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus. In contrast, NPY-immunoreactive perikarya were clearly present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and dorsal and caudal to it. The latter region might correspond to the subparaventricular zone (SPV), recently identified in the rat as an additional area involved in processing circadian rhythms. While the distribution of a distinct cell population across nuclear boundries in both SCh and SPV might conform to the present idea of processing circadian rhythms, the presence of NPY-like immunoreactive neurons in these areas is rather unusual. In mammals, such neurons have only been demonstrated so far in the mentioned insectivore as well as in man.

  18. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  19. Bilateral agenesis of arcuate fasciculus demonstrated by fiber tractography in congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Ozden; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Demirkol, Ezgi; Agan, Kadriye

    2015-03-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a type of cortical developmental abnormality associated with distinctive clinical and imaging features. Clinical spectrum of this syndrome is quite heterogeneous, with different degrees of neurological impairment in affected individuals. High-definition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a great importance in revealing the presence of CBPS, but is limited in elucidating the heterogeneous clinical spectrum. The arcuate fasciculus (AF) is a prominent language tract in the perisylvian region interconnecting Broca and Wernicke areas, and has a high probability of being affected developmentally in CBPS. Herein, we report a case of CBPS with investigation of AF using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fiber tractography in relation to clinical findings. We postulated that proven absence of AF on DTI and fiber tractography would correlate with a severe phenotype of CBPS.

  20. Arcuate fasciculus variability and repetition: the left sometimes can be right.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Marcelo L; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Pujol, Jesús; Green, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Repetition ability is a major criterion for classifying aphasic syndromes and its status is helpful in the determination of the involved neural structures. It is widely assumed that repetition deficits correlate with injury to the left perisylvian core including the arcuate fasciculus (AF). However, descriptions of normal repetition despite damage to the AF or impaired repetition without AF involvement cast doubts on its role in repetition. To explain these paradoxes, we analyse two different aphasic syndromes - in which repetition is selectively impaired (conduction aphasia) or spared (transcortical aphasias) - in light of recent neuroimaging findings. We suggest that the AF and other white matter bundles are the anatomical signatures of language repetition and that individual variability in their anatomy and lateralisation may explain negative cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothalamic plasticity of neuropeptide Y is lacking in brain-type creatine kinase double knockout mice with defective thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Van der Zee, Catharina E E M

    2013-11-05

    The neural substrate of adaptive thermoregulation in mice lacking both brain-type creatine kinase isoforms is further investigated. The cytosolic brain-type creatine kinase (CK-B) and mitochondrial ubiquitous creatine kinase (UbCKmit) are expressed in neural cells throughout the central and peripheral nervous system, where they have an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. Several integral functions appear altered when creatine kinases are absent in the brain (Jost et al., 2002; Streijger et al., 2004, 2005), which has been explained by inefficient neuronal transmission. The CK--/-- double knockout mice demonstrate every morning a body temperature drop of ~1.0 °C, and they have impaired thermogenesis, as revealed by severe hypothermia upon cold exposure. This defective thermoregulation is not associated with abnormal food intake, decreased locomotive activity, or increased torpor sensitivity. Although white and brown adipose tissue fat pads are diminished in CK--/-- mice, intravenous norepinephrine infusion results in a normal brown adipose tissue response with increasing core body temperatures, indicating that the sympathetic innervation functions correctly (Streijger et al., 2009). This study revealed c-fos changes following a cold challenge, and that neuropeptide Y levels were decreased in the paraventricular nucleus of wildtype, but not CK--/--, mice. A reduction in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y is coupled to increased uncoupling protein 1 expression in brown adipose tissue, resulting in thermogenesis. In CK--/-- mice the neuropeptide Y levels did not change. This lack of hypothalamic plasticity of neuropeptide Y might be the result of inefficient neuronal transmission or can be explained by the previous observation of reduced circulating levels of leptin in CK--/-- mice.

  2. A review of the arcuate structures in the Iberian Variscides; constraints and genetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, R.; Ribeiro, A.; Romão, J.; Coke, C.; Moreira, N.

    2016-06-01

    The main Ibero-Armorican Arc (IAA) is essentially defined by a predominant NW-SE trend in the Iberian branch and an E-W trend in the Brittany one. However, in northern Spain it presents a 180° rotation, sometimes known as the Cantabrian Arc (CA). The relation between both arcs is controversial, being considered either as a single arc due to one tectonic event, or as the result of a polyphasic process. According to the last assumption, there is a later arcuate structure (CA), overlapping a previous major one (IAA). Whatever the models, they must be able to explain the presence of a Variscan sinistral transpression in Iberia and a dextral one in Armorica, and a deformation spanning from the Devonian to the Upper Carboniferous. Another arcuate structure, in continuity with the CA, the Central-Iberian Arc (CIA) was recently proposed mainly based upon on magnetic anomalies, geometry of major folds and Ordovician paleocurrents. The critical review of the structural, stratigraphic and geophysical data supports both the IAA and the CA, but as independent structures. However, the presence of a CIA is highly questionable and could not be supported. The complex strain pattern of the IAA and the CA could be explained by a Devonian - Carboniferous polyphasic indentation of a Gondwana promontory. In this model the CA is essentially a thin-skinned arc, while the IAA has a more complex and longer evolution that has led to a thick-skinned first order structure. Nevertheless, both arcs are essentially the result of a lithospheric bending process during the Iberian Variscides.

  3. Hybrid (laparoscopy + stent) treatment of celiac trunk compression syndrome (Dunbar syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS))

    PubMed Central

    Michalik, Maciej; Lech, Paweł; Majda, Kaja; Gutowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Celiac trunk (CT) compression syndrome caused by the median arcuate ligament (MAL) is a rarely diagnosed disease because of its nonspecific symptoms, which cause a delay in the correct diagnosis. Intestinal ischemia occurs, which causes symptoms of abdominal angina. One method of treatment for this disease is surgical release of the CT – the intersection of the MAL. Laparoscopy is the first step of the hybrid technique combined with percutaneous angioplasty and stenting of the CT. Aim To demonstrate the usefulness and advantages of the laparoscopic approach in the treatment of Dunbar syndrome. Material and methods Between 2013 and 2016 in the General and Minimally Invasive Surgery Department of the Medical Sciences Faculty of the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, 6 laparoscopic procedures were performed because of median arcuate ligament syndrome. During the laparoscopy the MAL was cut with a harmonic scalpel. One month after laparoscopy 5 patients had Doppler percutaneous angioplasty of the CT with stent implantation in the Vascular Surgery Department in Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin. Results In one case, there was a conversion of laparoscopic surgery to open due to unmanageable intraoperative bleeding. In one case, postoperative ultrasound examination of the abdominal cavity demonstrated the presence of a large hematoma in the retroperitoneal space. All patients reported relief of symptoms in the first days after the operation. Conclusions The hybrid method, combining laparoscopy and angioplasty, seems to be a long-term solution, which increases the comfort of the patient, brings the opportunity for normal functioning and minimizes the risk of restenosis. PMID:28194242

  4. Differential distribution and energy status-dependent regulation of the four CART neuropeptide genes in the zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Akash, G; Kaniganti, Tarun; Tiwari, Neeraj Kumar; Subhedar, Nishikant K; Ghose, Aurnab

    2014-07-01

    The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neuropeptide has been implicated in the neural regulation of energy homeostasis across vertebrate phyla. By using gene-specific in situ hybridization, we have mapped the distribution of the four CART mRNAs in the central nervous system of the adult zebrafish. The widespread neuronal expression pattern for CART 2 and 4 suggests a prominent role for the peptide in processing sensory information from diverse modalities including olfactory and visual inputs. In contrast, CART 1 and 3 have a much more restricted distribution, predominantly located in the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (NMLF) and entopeduncular nucleus (EN), respectively. Enrichment of CART 2 and 4 in the preoptic and tuberal areas emphasizes the importance of CART in neuroendocrine functions. Starvation resulted in a significant decrease in CART-positive cells in the nucleus recessus lateralis (NRL) and nucleus lateralis tuberis (NLT) hypothalamic regions, suggesting a function in energy homeostasis for these neurons. Similarly, the EN emerges as a novel energy status-responsive region. Not only is there abundant and overlapping expression of CART 2, 3, and 4 in the EN, but also starvation induced a decrease in CART-expressing neurons in this region. The cellular resolution mapping of CART mRNA and the response of CART-expressing nuclei to starvation underscores the importance of CART neuropeptide in energy processing. Additionally, the regional and gene-specific responses to energy levels suggest a complex, interactive network whereby the four CART gene products may have nonredundant functions in energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Advances in Mass Spectrometric Tools for Probing Neuropeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchberger, Amanda; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators in the functionality of the brain and other neurological organs. Because neuropeptides exist in a wide range of concentrations, appropriate characterization methods are needed to provide dynamic, chemical, and spatial information. Mass spectrometry and compatible tools have been a popular choice in analyzing neuropeptides. There have been several advances and challenges, both of which are the focus of this review. Discussions range from sample collection to bioinformatic tools, although avenues such as quantitation and imaging are included. Further development of the presented methods for neuropeptidomic mass spectrometric analysis is inevitable, which will lead to a further understanding of the complex interplay of neuropeptides and other signaling molecules in the nervous system.

  6. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bakos, Jan; Zatkova, Martina; Bacova, Zuzana; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits. PMID:26881105

  7. Locus coeruleus response to single-prolonged stress and early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Sabban, Esther L; Laukova, Marcela; Alaluf, Lishay G; Olsson, Emelie; Serova, Lidia I

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulation of the central noradrenergic system is a core feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we examined molecular changes in locus coeruleus (LC) triggered by single-prolonged stress (SPS) PTSD model at a time when behavioral symptoms are manifested, and the effect of early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). Immediately following SPS stressors, male SD rats were administered intranasal NPY (SPS/NPY) or vehicle (SPS/V). Seven days later, TH protein, but not mRNA, was elevated in LC only of the SPS/V group. Although 90% of TH positive cells expressed GR, its levels were unaltered. Compared to unstressed controls, LC of SPS/V, but not SPS/NPY, expressed less Y2 receptor mRNA with more CRHR1 mRNA in subset of animals, and elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in central nucleus of amygdala. Following testing for anxiety on elevated plus maze (EPM), there were significantly increased TH, DBH and NPY mRNAs in LC of SPS-treated, but not previously unstressed animals. Their levels highly correlated with each other but not with behavioral features on EPM. Thus, SPS triggers long-term noradrenergic activation and higher sensitivity to mild stressors, perhaps mediated by the up-regulation influence of amygdalar CRH input and down-regulation of Y2R presynaptic inhibition in LC. Results also demonstrate the therapeutic potential of early intervention with intranasal NPY for traumatic stress-elicited noradrenergic impairments. Single-prolonged stress (SPS)-triggered long-term changes in the locus coeruleus/norepinephrine (LC/NE) system with increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and CRH receptor 1(CRHR1) mRNA and lower neuropeptide Y receptor 2 (Y2R) mRNA levels as well as elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) that were prevented by early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). SPS treatment led to increased sensitivity of LC to mild stress of elevated plus maze

  8. Neuropeptide K-like immunoreactivity in human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Casasco, A; Calligaro, A; Springall, D R; Casasco, M; Poggi, P; Valentino, K L; Polak, J M

    1990-01-01

    Nerve fibres displaying such immunoreactivity were revealed by indirect immunofluorescence. Neuropeptide K-like immunoreactive fibres, entering the pulp within large nerve trunks, were distributed around blood vessels as well as in the stroma. Some immunoreactive fibres were also observed in the para-odontoblastic region. In view of the biological activity of neuropeptide K, it is tentatively proposed that it may act in the dental pulp as a regulatory peptide involved in neurogenic inflammation, blood flow regulation and sensory transmission.

  9. Current views on neuropeptide Y and diabetes-related atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Ping; Shi, Yan-Chuan; Zhang, Chen-Liang; Huang, Xu-Feng; Liang, Shi-Yu; Song, Zhi-Yuan; Lin, Shu

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes-induced atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death of diabetic patients. Neuronal regulation plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and cardiovascular function under physiological and pathological conditions, among which, neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y has been shown to be closely involved in these two processes. Elevated central neuropeptide Y level promotes food intake and reduces energy expenditure, thereby increasing adiposity. Neuropeptide Y is co-localized with noradrenaline in central and sympathetic nervous systems. As a major peripheral vascular contractive neurotransmitter, through interactions with its receptors, neuropeptide Y has been implicated in the pathology and progression of diabetes, by promoting the proliferation of endothelial cells and vascular fibrosis, which may contribute to diabetes-induced cardiovascular disease. Neuropeptide Y also participates in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the major form of cardiovascular disease, via aggravating endothelial dysfunction, growth of vascular smooth muscle cells, formation of foam cells and platelets aggregation. This review highlights the causal role of neuropeptide Y and its receptor system in the development of diabetes mellitus and one of its complications: atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The information from this review provides both critical insights onto the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and evidence for the development of therapeutic strategies.

  10. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J; Day, Tim A; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-09-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era.

  11. Molecular evolution of neuropeptides in the genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Christian; Gorbashov, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Background Neuropeptides comprise the most diverse group of neuronal signaling molecules. They often occur as multiple sequence-related copies within single precursors (the prepropeptides). These multiple sequence-related copies have not arisen by gene duplication, and it is debated whether they are mutually redundant or serve specific functions. The fully sequenced genomes of 12 Drosophila species provide a unique opportunity to study the molecular evolution of neuropeptides. Results We data-mined the 12 Drosophila genomes for homologs of neuropeptide genes identified in Drosophila melanogaster. We then predicted peptide precursors and the neuropeptidome, and biochemically identified about half of the predicted peptides by direct mass spectrometric profiling of neuroendocrine tissue in four species covering main phylogenetic lines of Drosophila. We found that all species have an identical neuropeptidome and peptide hormone complement. Calculation of amino acid distances showed that ortholog peptide copies are highly sequence-conserved between species, whereas the observed sequence variability between peptide copies within single precursors must have occurred prior to the divergence of the Drosophila species. Conclusion We provide a first genomic and chemical characterization of fruit fly neuropeptides outside D. melanogaster. Our results suggest that neuropeptides including multiple peptide copies are under stabilizing selection, which suggests that multiple peptide copies are functionally important and not dispensable. The last common ancestor of Drosophila obviously had a set of neuropeptides and peptide hormones identical to that of modern fruit flies. This is remarkable, since drosophilid flies have adapted to very different environments. PMID:18717992

  12. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R.; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J.; Day, Tim A.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2009-01-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era. PMID:19361512

  13. Interaction between dopamine and neuropeptide Y in the telencephalon of the Indian major carp, Cirrhinus cirrhosus.

    PubMed

    Saha, Soham; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Uday; Singh, Omprakash; Singru, Praful S

    2015-09-01

    In teleosts, while neuropeptide Y (NPY) has emerged as one of the potent regulators of GnRH-LH axis, entopeduncular nucleus (EN) in the ventral telencephalon serves as major site for NPY synthesis/storage. Neurons of the EN innervate preoptic area and pituitary, respond to gonadal steroids, undergo reproduction phase-related changes, and are believed to convey sex steroid-borne information to GnRH neurons. In spite of the importance of EN, the neural circuitry associated with the nucleus has not been defined. Aim of the present study is to examine the possibility of the dopaminergic regulation of EN. NPY-immunoreactive cells and fibers were extensively distributed in the forebrain and pituitary of Cirrhinus cirrhosus. NPY immunoreactivity was observed in the olfactory receptor neurons, ganglion cells of terminal nerve, and in neurons of area ventralis telencephali/pars lateralis, EN, nucleus preopticus periventricularis (NPP), and nucleus lateralis tuberis. NPY-fibers were observed in the dorsal telencephalon, tuberal area and pituitary. While the area ventralis telencephali/pars intermedialis (Vi) located just above the EN contained a distinct population of tyrosine hydroxylase neurons, their axons seem to innervate NPY neurons in EN. Superfused brain slices containing EN were treated with DA D1- and D2-like receptor agonists. NPY-immunoreactivity in the EN showed significant increase (P<0.001) following DA D1-like receptor agonist, SKF-38393 treatment, but DA D2-like receptor agonist, quinpirole was ineffective. DA may regulate NPY neurons in EN via D1-like receptors. DA-NPY interaction in the EN might be important in the central regulation of reproduction in teleosts.

  14. Ambient Temperature and 17β-Estradiol Modify Fos Immunoreactivity in the Median Preoptic Nucleus, a Putative Regulator of Skin Vasomotion

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Penny A.; Krajewski, Sally J.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen has pronounced effects on thermoregulation, but the anatomic sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes are unknown. In this study, we tested whether estradiol-17β (E2) treatment would alter the activity of thermoregulatory brain regions responding to mild changes in ambient temperature (TAMBIENT). Core and tail skin temperatures were recorded at the ambient temperatures of 20, 24, or 31 C in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with and without E2. Neuronal activity was evaluated by counting the number of Fos-immunoreactive cells in the brains of rats killed 90 min after exposure to one of the three ambient temperatures. Of 14 brain areas examined, the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) was the only site that exhibited increased Fos immunoreactivity at the high TAMBIENT of 31 C. At 24 C, OVX rats exhibited increased numbers of MnPO Fos-immunoreactive cells, compared with OVX + E2 rats. Interestingly, tail skin vasomotion and MnPO Fos expression were affected in a similar manner by TAMBIENT and E2 treatment. In the arcuate nucleus and anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), Fos immunoreactivity was highest at the low TAMBIENT of 20 C, with inhibitory (arcuate nucleus) and stimulatory (AVPV) effects of E2. No other areas responded to both TAMBIENT and E2 treatment. These results implicate the MnPO, the arcuate nucleus, and the AVPV as sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes. Combined with studies showing the importance of MnPO neurons in heat-defense pathways, the MnPO emerges as a likely site for E2 modulation of thermoregulatory vasomotion. PMID:21521752

  15. Ambient temperature and 17β-estradiol modify Fos immunoreactivity in the median preoptic nucleus, a putative regulator of skin vasomotion.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Penny A; Krajewski, Sally J; Rance, Naomi E

    2011-07-01

    Estrogen has pronounced effects on thermoregulation, but the anatomic sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes are unknown. In this study, we tested whether estradiol-17β (E(2)) treatment would alter the activity of thermoregulatory brain regions responding to mild changes in ambient temperature (T(AMBIENT)). Core and tail skin temperatures were recorded at the ambient temperatures of 20, 24, or 31 C in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with and without E(2). Neuronal activity was evaluated by counting the number of Fos-immunoreactive cells in the brains of rats killed 90 min after exposure to one of the three ambient temperatures. Of 14 brain areas examined, the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) was the only site that exhibited increased Fos immunoreactivity at the high T(AMBIENT) of 31 C. At 24 C, OVX rats exhibited increased numbers of MnPO Fos-immunoreactive cells, compared with OVX + E(2) rats. Interestingly, tail skin vasomotion and MnPO Fos expression were affected in a similar manner by T(AMBIENT) and E(2) treatment. In the arcuate nucleus and anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), Fos immunoreactivity was highest at the low T(AMBIENT) of 20 C, with inhibitory (arcuate nucleus) and stimulatory (AVPV) effects of E(2). No other areas responded to both T(AMBIENT) and E(2) treatment. These results implicate the MnPO, the arcuate nucleus, and the AVPV as sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes. Combined with studies showing the importance of MnPO neurons in heat-defense pathways, the MnPO emerges as a likely site for E(2) modulation of thermoregulatory vasomotion.

  16. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents.

  17. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-01-01

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers’ attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one’s favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands. PMID:26449882

  18. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-10-09

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers' attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one's favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands.

  19. [Neuropeptide Y and autonomic nervous system].

    PubMed

    Nozdrachev, A D; Masliukov, P M

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) containing 36 amino acid residues belongs to peptides widely spread in the central and peripheral nervous system. NPY and its receptors play an extremely diverse role in the nervous system, including regulation of satiety, of emotional state, of vascular tone, and of gastrointestinal secretion. In mammals, NPY has been revealed in the majority of sympathetic ganglion neurons, in a high number of neurons of parasympathetic cranial ganglia as well as of intramural ganglia of the metasympathetic nervous system. At present, six types of receptors to NPY (Y1-Y6) have been identified. All receptors to NPY belong to the family of G-bound proteins. Action of NPY on peripheral organs-targets is predominantly realized through postsynaptic receptors Y1, Y3-Y5, and presynaptic receptors of the Y2 type. NPY is present in large electron-dense vesicles and is released at high-frequency stimulation. NPY affects not only vascular tone, frequency and strength of heart contractions, motorics and secretion of the gastrointestinal tract, but also has trophic effect and produces proliferation of cells of organs-targets, specifically of vessels, myocardium, and adipose tissue. In early postnatal ontogenesis the percent of the NPY-containing neurons in ganglia of the autonomic nervous system increases. In adult organisms, this parameter decreases. This seems to be connected with the trophic NPY effect on cells-targets as well as with regulation of their functional state.

  20. MICELLAR NANOMEDICINE OF HUMAN NEUROPEPTIDE Y

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmis, Antonina; Lim, Sok Bee; Desai, Esha; Jeon, Eunjung; Lee, Bao-Shiang; Rubinstein, Israel; Önyüksel, Hayat

    2011-01-01

    Human neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important biologics that regulates multitude of physiological functions and could be amenable to therapeutic manipulations in certain disease states. However, rapid (minutes) enzymatic degradation and inactivation of NPY precludes its development as a drug. Accordingly, we determined whether self-association of NPY with biocompatible and biodegradable sterically stabilized phospholipid micelles (SSM) improves its stability and bioactivity. We found that in saline NPY spontaneously aggregates whereas in the presence of SSM it self-associates with the micelles as monomers. Three NPY molecules self-associate with one SSM at saturation. This process stabilizes the peptide in α-helix conformation, abrogates its degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and potentiates NPY-induced inhibition of cAMP elaboration in SK-N-MC cells. Collectively, these data indicate that self-association of NPY with SSM stabilizes and protects the peptide in active monomeric conformation, thereby amplifying its bioactivity in vitro. We propose further development of NPY in SSM as a novel, long-acting nanomedicine. PMID:21272667

  1. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  2. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of number density distributions of the nucleus, harmonic well and Woods-Saxon models, are used with the t-matrix that is taken from the scattering experiments to find a simple optical potential. The parameterized two body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are shown. The eikonal approximation was chosen as the solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  3. Evolution of neuropeptides in non-pterygote hexapods.

    PubMed

    Derst, Christian; Dircksen, Heinrich; Meusemann, Karen; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Shanlin; Predel, Reinhard

    2016-02-29

    Neuropeptides are key players in information transfer and act as important regulators of development, growth, metabolism, and reproduction within multi-cellular animal organisms (Metazoa). These short protein-like substances show a high degree of structural variability and are recognized as the most diverse group of messenger molecules. We used transcriptome sequences from the 1KITE (1K Insect Transcriptome Evolution) project to search for neuropeptide coding sequences in 24 species from the non-pterygote hexapod lineages Protura (coneheads), Collembola (springtails), Diplura (two-pronged bristletails), Archaeognatha (jumping bristletails), and Zygentoma (silverfish and firebrats), which are often referred to as "basal" hexapods. Phylogenetically, Protura, Collembola, Diplura, and Archaeognatha are currently placed between Remipedia and Pterygota (winged insects); Zygentoma is the sistergroup of Pterygota. The Remipedia are assumed to be among the closest relatives of all hexapods and belong to the crustaceans. We identified neuropeptide precursor sequences within whole-body transcriptome data from these five hexapod groups and complemented this dataset with homologous sequences from three crustaceans (including Daphnia pulex), three myriapods, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Our results indicate that the reported loss of several neuropeptide genes in a number of winged insects, particularly holometabolous insects, is a trend that has occurred within Pterygota. The neuropeptide precursor sequences of the non-pterygote hexapods show numerous amino acid substitutions, gene duplications, variants following alternative splicing, and numbers of paracopies. Nevertheless, most of these features fall within the range of variation known from pterygote insects. However, the capa/pyrokinin genes of non-pterygote hexapods provide an interesting example of rapid evolution, including duplication of a neuropeptide gene encoding different ligands. Our findings delineate

  4. Damage to the anterior arcuate fasciculus predicts non-fluent speech production in aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dazhou; Fillmore, Paul; Holland, Audrey; Rorden, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Non-fluent aphasia implies a relatively straightforward neurological condition characterized by limited speech output. However, it is an umbrella term for different underlying impairments affecting speech production. Several studies have sought the critical lesion location that gives rise to non-fluent aphasia. The results have been mixed but typically implicate anterior cortical regions such as Broca’s area, the left anterior insula, and deep white matter regions. To provide a clearer picture of cortical damage in non-fluent aphasia, the current study examined brain damage that negatively influences speech fluency in patients with aphasia. It controlled for some basic speech and language comprehension factors in order to better isolate the contribution of different mechanisms to fluency, or its lack. Cortical damage was related to overall speech fluency, as estimated by clinical judgements using the Western Aphasia Battery speech fluency scale, diadochokinetic rate, rudimentary auditory language comprehension, and executive functioning (scores on a matrix reasoning test) in 64 patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke. A region of interest analysis that included brain regions typically implicated in speech and language processing revealed that non-fluency in aphasia is primarily predicted by damage to the anterior segment of the left arcuate fasciculus. An improved prediction model also included the left uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract connecting the middle and anterior temporal lobe with frontal lobe regions, including the pars triangularis. Models that controlled for diadochokinetic rate, picture-word recognition, or executive functioning also revealed a strong relationship between anterior segment involvement and speech fluency. Whole brain analyses corroborated the findings from the region of interest analyses. An additional exploratory analysis revealed that involvement of the uncinate fasciculus adjudicated between Broca’s and global aphasia

  5. Damage to the anterior arcuate fasciculus predicts non-fluent speech production in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Fridriksson, Julius; Guo, Dazhou; Fillmore, Paul; Holland, Audrey; Rorden, Chris

    2013-11-01

    Non-fluent aphasia implies a relatively straightforward neurological condition characterized by limited speech output. However, it is an umbrella term for different underlying impairments affecting speech production. Several studies have sought the critical lesion location that gives rise to non-fluent aphasia. The results have been mixed but typically implicate anterior cortical regions such as Broca's area, the left anterior insula, and deep white matter regions. To provide a clearer picture of cortical damage in non-fluent aphasia, the current study examined brain damage that negatively influences speech fluency in patients with aphasia. It controlled for some basic speech and language comprehension factors in order to better isolate the contribution of different mechanisms to fluency, or its lack. Cortical damage was related to overall speech fluency, as estimated by clinical judgements using the Western Aphasia Battery speech fluency scale, diadochokinetic rate, rudimentary auditory language comprehension, and executive functioning (scores on a matrix reasoning test) in 64 patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke. A region of interest analysis that included brain regions typically implicated in speech and language processing revealed that non-fluency in aphasia is primarily predicted by damage to the anterior segment of the left arcuate fasciculus. An improved prediction model also included the left uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract connecting the middle and anterior temporal lobe with frontal lobe regions, including the pars triangularis. Models that controlled for diadochokinetic rate, picture-word recognition, or executive functioning also revealed a strong relationship between anterior segment involvement and speech fluency. Whole brain analyses corroborated the findings from the region of interest analyses. An additional exploratory analysis revealed that involvement of the uncinate fasciculus adjudicated between Broca's and global aphasia

  6. Changes in GABA and GABA(B) receptor expressions are involved in neuropathy in the rat cuneate nucleus following median nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Seu-Hwa; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Lin, Chi-Te; Wang, Hsin-Ying; Li, Shin-Fang; Lue, June-Horng

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between changes in GABA transmission and behavioral abnormalities after median nerve transection. Following unilateral median nerve transection, the percentage of GABA-like immunoreactive neurons in the cuneate nucleus and that of GABA(B) receptor-like immunoreactive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion in the injured side decreased and reached a nadir at 4 weeks after median nerve transection. Four weeks after bilateral median nerve transection and intraperitoneal application with saline, baclofen (2 mg kg⁻¹), or phaclofen (2 mg kg⁻¹) before unilateral electrical stimulation of the injured median nerve, we investigated the level of neuropeptide Y release and c-Fos expression in the stimulated side of the cuneate nucleus. The neuropeptide Y release level and the number of c-Fos-like immunoreactive neurons in the baclofen group were significantly attenuated, whereas those in the phaclofen group had increased compared to the saline group. These findings indicate that median nerve transection reduces GABA transmission, promoting injury-induced neuropeptide Y release and consequently evoking c-Fos expression in cuneate nucleus neurons. Furthermore, this study used the CatWalk method to assess behavioral abnormalities in rats following median nerve transection. These abnormalities were reversed by baclofen treatment. Overall, the results suggest that baclofen treatment block neuropeptide Y release, subsequently lessening c-Fos expression in cuneate neurons and consequently attenuating neuropathic signal transmission to the thalamus. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Multiple Neuropeptide-Coding Genes Involved in Planarian Pharynx Extension.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Seira; Inoue, Takeshi; Kashima, Makoto; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Planarian feeding behavior involves three steps: moving toward food, extending the pharynx from their planarian's ventral side after arriving at the food, and ingesting the food through the pharynx. Although pharynx extension is a remarkable behavior, it remains unknown what neuronal cell types are involved in its regulation. To identify neurons involved in regulating pharynx extension, we quantitatively analyzed pharynx extension and sought to identify these neurons by RNA interference (RNAi) and in situ hybridization. This assay, when performed using planarians with amputation of various body parts, clearly showed that the head portion is indispensable for inducing pharynx extension. We thus tested the effects of knockdown of brain neurons such as serotonergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic neurons by RNAi, but did not observe any effects on pharynx extension behavior. However, animals with RNAi of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2, a neuropeptide processing enzyme) gene did not perform the pharynx extension behavior, suggesting the possible involvement of neuropeptide(s in the regulation of pharynx extension. We screened 24 neuropeptide-coding genes, analyzed their functions by RNAi using the pharynx extension assay system, and identified at least five neuropeptide genes involved in pharynx extension. These was expressed in different cells or neurons, and some of them were expressed in the brain, suggesting complex regulation of planarian feeding behavior by the nervous system.

  8. Costorage and coexistence of neuropeptides in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Merighi, A

    2002-02-01

    The term neuropeptides commonly refers to a relatively large number of biologically active molecules that have been localized to discrete cell populations of central and peripheral neurons. I review here the most important histological and functional findings on neuropeptide distribution in the central nervous system (CNS), in relation to their role in the exchange of information between the nerve cells. Under this perspective, peptide costorage (presence of two or more peptides within the same subcellular compartment) and coexistence (concurrent presence of peptides and other messenger molecules within single nerve cells) are discussed in detail. In particular, the subcellular site(s) of storage and sorting mechanisms within neurons are thoroughly examined in the view of the mode of release and action of neuropeptides as neuronal messengers. Moreover, the relationship of neuropeptides and other molecules implicated in neural transmission is discussed in functional terms, also referring to the interactions with novel unconventional transmitters and trophic factors. Finally, a brief account is given on the presence of neuropeptides in glial cells.

  9. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  10. Atypical hemispheric asymmetry in the arcuate fasciculus of completely nonverbal children with autism.

    PubMed

    Wan, Catherine Y; Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2012-04-01

    Despite the fact that as many as 25% of the children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders are nonverbal, surprisingly little research has been conducted on this population. In particular, the mechanisms that underlie their absence of speech remain unknown. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we compared the structure of a language-related white matter tract (the arcuate fasciculus, AF) in five completely nonverbal children with autism to that of typically developing children. We found that, as a group, the nonverbal children did not show the expected left-right AF asymmetry--rather, four of the five nonverbal children actually showed the reversed pattern. It is possible that this unusual pattern of asymmetry may underlie some of the severe language deficits commonly found in autism, particularly in children whose speech fails to develop. Furthermore, novel interventions (such as auditory-motor mapping training) designed to engage brain regions that are connected via the AF may have important clinical potential for facilitating expressive language in nonverbal children with autism.

  11. The arcuate line hernia: operative treatment and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, A; Petersson, U; Austrums, E

    2013-06-01

    An arcuate line hernia (ALH) is a rare diagnosis with no consensus on how to deal with this condition either when symptomatic or when found accidentally. Suggestions for laparoscopic and open operative techniques are given together with a review of the literature and a presentation of three new cases. The PubMed database was searched for publications on ALH. Identified cases, including three from our department, are reported. Five males and two females, with a median age of 53 years were identified. Three patients were correctly diagnosed on a preoperative CT scan and the rest at surgery. Two patients had bilateral ALHs and four had other concomitant hernias repaired. Small bowel was present in the hernia in three cases and sigmoid colon in one. In one case, an emergency operation was performed due to bowel incarceration. Five patients had laparoscopic repairs, three with mesh and two without. Two patients, one converted from laparoscopic to open operation, had open mesh repairs. The postoperative course was uneventful in all cases, and no recurrences have been reported at a median follow-up of 6 months. A laparoscopic approach is recommended for diagnostic purposes, for pre-peritoneal mesh placement and for repair of concomitant hernias in both elective and emergency settings. Highlighting its existence might help general surgeons in interpreting an unusual finding on a CT scan or at operation.

  12. Arcuate AgRP neurons mediate orexigenic and glucoregulatory actions of ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Liu, Chen; Uchida, Aki; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Walker, Angela; Liu, Tiemin; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Mason, Brittany L; Mosher, Christina; Berglund, Eric D; Elmquist, Joel K; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    The hormone ghrelin stimulates eating and helps maintain blood glucose upon caloric restriction. While previous studies have demonstrated that hypothalamic arcuate AgRP neurons are targets of ghrelin, the overall relevance of ghrelin signaling within intact AgRP neurons is unclear. Here, we tested the functional significance of ghrelin action on AgRP neurons using a new, tamoxifen-inducible AgRP-CreER(T2) transgenic mouse model that allows spa