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Sample records for area diode laser

  1. Fault protection of broad-area laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, J. H.; Petr, R.; Jaspan, M. A.; Swartz, S. D.; Knapczyk, M. T.; Flusberg, A. M.; Chin, A. K.; Smilanski, I.

    2009-02-01

    Detailed reliability studies of high-power, CW, broad-area, GaAs-based laser- diodes were performed. Optical and electrical transients occurring prior to device failure by catastrophic optical-damage (COD) were observed. These transients were correlated with COD formation as observed in laser diodes with an optical window in the n-side electrode. In addition, custom electronics were designed to fault-protect the laser diodes during aging tests, i.e. each time a transient (fault) was detected, the operating current was temporarily cut off within 4μs of fault detection. The lifetime of fault-protected 808-nm laser-diode bars operated at a constant current of 120A (~130W) and 35°C exceeded similar unprotected devices by factors of 2.

  2. Frequency narrowing of a 25 W broad area diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, J. F.; Miller, W.; Wright, D.; Zhdanov, B. V.; Knize, R. J.

    2009-02-01

    We report on the spectral narrowing of a high powered (25 W) broad area diode laser using an external cavity with a holographic diffraction grating. In a Littman-Metcalf configuration, the external cavity is able to reduce the linewidth of the diode laser to primarily a single longitudinal mode (1.8 MHz) for output powers of ≤10 W at 852 nm. Many physics applications could benefit from such high powered, narrow linewidth lasers; however both the frequency stability and the spatial profile of the output beam show room for improvement.

  3. Catastrophic Optical Damage in High-Power, Broad-Area Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Aland K.; Bertaska, Rick K.

    Catastrophic optical damage (COD) is semiconductor material within the optical cavity of laser diodes that is thermally damaged by the laser light. COD results in the failure of laser diodes. The phenomena of COD in high-power, broad-area laser diodes are described along with methods to eliminate it.

  4. Two photon absorption in high power broad area laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Michael, Christopher P.; Zheng, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Jacob, Jonah H.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in thermal management and improvements in fabrication and facet passivation enabled extracting unprecedented optical powers from laser diodes (LDs). However, even in the absence of thermal roll-over or catastrophic optical damage (COD), the maximum achievable power is limited by optical non-linear effects. Due to its non-linear nature, two-photon absorption (TPA) becomes one of the dominant factors that limit efficient extraction of laser power from LDs. In this paper, theoretical and experimental analysis of TPA in high-power broad area laser diodes (BALD) is presented. A phenomenological optical extraction model that incorporates TPA explains the reduction in optical extraction efficiency at high intensities in BALD bars with 100μm-wide emitters. The model includes two contributions associated with TPA: the straightforward absorption of laser photons and the subsequent single photon absorption by the holes and electrons generated by the TPA process. TPA is a fundamental limitation since it is inherent to the LD semiconductor material. Therefore scaling the LDs to high power requires designs that reduce the optical intensity by increasing the mode size.

  5. V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

    2012-12-25

    A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

  6. Holographic injection locking of a broad area laser diode via a photorefractive thin-film device.

    PubMed

    van Voorst, P D; de Wit, M R; Offerhaus, H L; Tay, S; Thomas, J; Peyghambarian, N; Boller, K-J

    2007-12-24

    We demonstrate locking of a high power broad area laser diode to a single frequency using holographic feedback from a photorefractive polymer thin-film device for the first time. A four-wave mixing setup is used to generate feedback for the broad area diode at the wavelength of the single frequency source (Ti:Sapphire laser) while the spatial distribution adapts to the preferred profile of the broad area diode. The result is an injection-locked broad area diode emitting with a linewidth comparable to the Ti:Sapphire laser.

  7. Spatial evolution of filaments in broad area diode laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Robert J.; Mehuys, David; Hardy, Amos; Dzurko, Ken M.; Welch, David F.

    1993-03-01

    We report a numerical model that demonstrates the evolution of a uniform array of filaments from random fluctuations in the input of a single-pass semiconductor laser amplifier. We also report the first direct experimental observation of the spatial evolution of filaments in a broad area active grating semiconductor laser amplifier. The observed filamentation shows good agreement with the numerical model. This agreement suggests that such filaments may result from the unstable growth of microscopic fluctuations in the input and/or nonuniformities within the amplifier.

  8. Six-wave mixing theory of tilted-grating, broad-area semiconductor diode lasers with suppressed filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William Ellison, III

    Modern semiconductor diode lasers are appealing sources of laser radiation for many applications. However, an important disadvantage of semiconductor diode lasers as laser sources for the widest range of applications is that they are limited in output power. The output power of typical narrow-stripe semiconductor diode lasers is limited by thermal runaway effects that cause catastrophic facet damage to the device. To address this problem, researchers have developed broad-area diode lasers that can achieve increased output power by virtue of their larger emission area on the facet. In practice, however, the loss of lateral confinement that produces single-mode lasing in narrow-stripe semiconductor diode lasers leads to complex, multi-mode lasing in broad-area semiconductor diode lasers. The lateral spatial distribution of laser energy is further complicated by an optical nonlinearity in the semiconductor laser gain region, due to the dependence of the refractive index on the free-charge carrier density. This nonlinearity is responsible for the self-deformation of the lateral field distribution, so that in the lateral direction, the active region has areas of higher and lower light intensity, often called filaments. This highly-nonuniform lateral field distribution results in poor beam quality and hot-spot facet damage at relatively low output power for typical broad-area semiconductor diode lasers. This dissertation proposes and analyzes a specific approach to suppress filamentation in broad-area semiconductor diode lasers, with the general goal of increasing the laser power that can be produced while retaining good beam quality. The analysis approach is based on a six-wave mixing methodology for the evaluation of filamentation in general broad-area semiconductor diode laser structures. This methodology is first applied to examine the growth of filamentation in typical broad-area semiconductor diode laser designs. A specific design modification to a broad-area laser

  9. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  10. Near-field evolution in strongly pumped broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Martin; Tomm, Jens W.; Bäumler, Martina; Konstanzer, Helmer; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Elsässer, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Many applications such as pumping of solid state lasers or ignition of explosives require high optical output powers during a short period. Pulsed operated diode lasers meet these requirements. They can be driven at elevated power levels, well above the ones specified for continuous wave (cw) operation. The optical near-field intensity of a diode laser in this operation regime is a key parameter since it determines the beam properties of the device. High power AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well broad area diode lasers are subjected to single pulse step tests carried out up to and beyond their ultimate limits of operation. Laser near-fields are monitored on a picosecond time scale using a streak-camera setup during pulse currents of up to ~50 times the threshold current. A transition from gain guiding to thermally-induced index guiding of the near-field is shown. A further power increase is prevented by catastrophic optical damage (COD). This sudden failure mechanism is studied in conjunction with filamentary properties of the near-field. The defect growth dynamics resolved on the picosecond time scale is used to gather inside into the physics behind COD.

  11. 980 nm high brightness external cavity broad area diode laser bar.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole B; Thestrup, Birgitte

    2009-03-30

    We demonstrate off-axis spectral beam combining applied to a 980 nm high power broad area diode laser bar. The experiments yielded 9 W of optical power at 30 A of operating current and the measured M2 values of the combined beam from 12 emitters were 1.9 and 6.4 for the fast and the slow axis, respectively. The slow axis beam quality was 5-6 times better than the value obtained from a single emitter in free running mode. A high brightness of 79 MW/cm2-str was achieved using this configuration. To our knowledge, this is the highest brightness level ever achieved from a broad area diode laser bar.

  12. Lighting with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are much more efficient than compact fluorescent lamps and hence are rapidly capturing the market for general illumination. LEDs are also replacing halogen lamps or even newer xenon based lamps in automotive headlamps. Because laser diodes are inherently much brighter and often more efficient than corresponding LEDs, there is great research interest in developing laser diode based illumination systems. Operating at higher current densities and with smaller form factors, laser diodes may outperform LEDs in the future. This article reviews the possibilities and challenges in the integration of visible laser diodes in future illumination systems.

  13. Velocimetry with diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mul, F. F. M.; Jentink, H. W.; Koelink, M.; Greve, J.; Aarnoudse, J. G.

    The history of the application of diode lasers in velocimetry is reviewed. Some problems arising when using those lasers, e.g., mode hopping and wavelength shifts caused by temperature effects, are discussed, together with coherence effects encountered with diode lasers. The application in dual-beam velocimetry, in direct-contact velocimetry and in velocimetry using self-mixing will be discussed.

  14. Broad-area laser diode with stable single-mode output and wavelength stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappez, Thomas; Ghibaudo, Elise; Rondeau, Philippe; Schlotterbeck, Jean-Pierre; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    High power single-mode pump laser diodes operating around 980nm are key components for Erbium-doped devices. Much effort is still currently devoted to improve both their wavelength stability and their achievable output power, while maintaining a stable single-mode operation. Usually, the emission wavelength is stabilized by an external Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). This configuration requires free-space optics between the laser diode output facet and the fiber or a lensed fiber to ensure an efficient coupling efficiency. This constraint increases fabrication costs, dimensions and mechanical instabilities. Moreover, the maximum achievable output power is limited because a high optical power density can damage the laser facets. To increase the achievable output power, a solution consists in using Broad-Area Laser Diodes (BALD), which are multimode emitters that are composed of large active ribbons with width of some hundreds of micrometers. The objective is then to improve the beam quality by locking the BALD emission on its transverse fundamental mode. We propose in this article to insert an integrated adiabatic transition between the multimode laser and a single-mode FBG. This taper, made by ion-exchange in glass, provides a coupling efficiency of -22.0dB from the multimode laser emission to the single-mode fiber. An optical feedback of -34dB demonstrates the stabilization of the BALD spectrum at the Bragg wavelength. The spectrum of the device is characterized by a maximum side-mode suppression ratio of 35dB, a RMS spectral width of (0.16 +/- 0.04) nm and a frequency shift with current of -12GHz/100mA.

  15. Etalon laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.B.; Koenig, H.G.; Rice, R.R.

    1981-08-18

    A laser diode is disclosed that is suitable for integrated and fiber optic applications requiring single transverse and single longitudinal mode operation. The single transverse mode is provided by making a gallium arsenide double heterostructural laser diode with a narrow stripe width and a relatively long length. The single longitudinal mode operation is provided by cracking the diode transverse to the stripe at one or more locations to form internal etalons in the laser cavity.

  16. High-Power Broad-Area Diode Lasers and Laser Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbert, Goetz; Baerwolff, Arthur; Sebastian, Juergen; Tomm, Jens

    This review presents the basic ideas and some examples of the chip technology of high-power diode lasers ( λ= 650,-1060,) in connection with the achievements of mounted single-stripe emitters in recent years.In the first section the optimization of the epitaxial layer structure for a low facet load and high conversion efficiency is discussed. The so-called broadened waveguide Large Optical Cavity (LOC) concept is described and also some advantages and disadvantages of Al-free material. The next section deals with the processing steps of epitaxial wafers to make single emitters and bars. Several possibilities to realize contact windows (implantation, insulators, and wet chemical oxidation) and laser mirrors are presented. The impact of heating in the CW regime and some aspects of reliability are the following topics. The calculation of thermal distributions in diode lasers, which shows the need for sophisticated mounting, will be given. In the last part the current state-of-the-art of single-stripe emitters will be reviewed.

  17. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    2005-11-01

    Contributors; 1. Monolithic phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays D. Botez; 2. High power coherent, semiconductor laser master oscillator power amplifiers and amplifier arrays D. F. Welch and D. G. Mehuys; 3. Microoptical components applied to incoherent and coherent laser arrays J. R. Leger; 4. Modeling of diode laser arrays G. R. Hadley; 5. Dynamics of coherent semiconductor laser arrays H. G. Winfuland and R. K. Defreez; 6. High average power semiconductor laser arrays and laser array packaging with an emphasis for pumping solid state lasers R. Solarz; 7. High power diode laser arrays and their reliability D. R. Scifres and H. H. Kung; 8. Strained layer quantum well heterostructure laser arrays J. J. Coleman; 9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser arrays C. J. Chang-Hasnain; 10. Individually addressed arrays of diode lasers D. Carlin.

  18. Progress in increasing the maximum achievable output power of broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2012-03-01

    High power broad area diode lasers provide the optical energy for all high performance laser systems, either directly or as pump sources for solid-state lasers. Continuous improvement is required in the peak achievable output power of these diode laser devices in order to enable performance improvements in full laser systems. In recent years, device technology has advanced to the point where the main limit to optical power is no longer device failure, but is instead power saturation due to various physical effects within the semiconductor device itself. For example, the combination of large optical cavity designs with advanced facet passivation means that facet failure is no longer the dominant limiting factor. Increases in the optical power therefore require firstly a clear identification of the limiting mechanisms, followed by design changes and material improvements to address these. Recent theoretical and experimental diagnostic studies at the Ferdinand-Braun-Institut have helped trace the saturation effects to three main effects: gain saturation, longitudinal-holeburning and current driven carrier leakage. Design changes based on these studies have enabled increases in the achievable emitted power density from broad area lasers. Recent experimental examples include ~100W from 100μm stripes under short-pulsed conditions, > 30W from 100μm stripes under quasi-continuous wave conditions and > 10W from 30μm stripes under continuous wave conditions. An overview of the results of the diagnostic studies performed at the FBH will be presented, and the design changes necessary to address the observed power saturation will be discussed.

  19. Injection-insensitive lateral divergence in broad-area diode lasers achieved by spatial current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tong, Cunzhu; Wang, Lijie; Zeng, Yugang; Tian, Sicong; Shu, Shili; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Lijun

    2016-11-01

    High-power broad-area (BA) diode lasers often suffer from low beam quality, broad linewidth, and a widened slow-axis far field with increasing current. In this paper, a two-dimensional current-modulated structure is proposed and it is demonstrated that it can reduce not only the far-field sensitivity to the injection current but also the linewidth of the lasing spectra. Injection-insensitive lateral divergence was realized, and the beam parameter product (BPP) was improved by 36.5%. At the same time, the linewidth was decreased by about 45% without significant degradations of emission power and conversion efficiency.

  20. Near-field characteristics of broad area diode lasers during catastrophic optical damage failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Martin; Tomm, Jens W.; Baeumler, Martina; Konstanzer, Helmer; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    One of the failure mechanisms preventing diode lasers in reaching ultra high optical output powers is the catastrophic optical damage (COD). It is a sudden degradation mechanism which impairs the device functionality completely. COD is caused by a positive feedback loop of absorbing laser light and increasing temperature at a small portion of the active material, leading to a thermal runaway on a nanosecond timescale. We analyze commercial gain-guided AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well broad area diode lasers in single pulse step tests. The near-field emission on the way to and at the COD is resolved on a picosecond time scale by a streak-camera combined with a microscope. In the final phase of the step tests the COD is occurring at ~50 times threshold current. The growth of the COD defect site is monitored and defect propagation velocities between 30 and 190 μm/μs are determined. The final shape of the damage is verified by opening the device and taking a micro-photoluminescence map of the active layer.

  1. Characteristics of red-emitting broad area stripe laser diodes with zinc diffused window structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Tomoki; Takiguchi, Mikio; Wakabayashi, Kazuya; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Naganuma, Kaori; Ohara, Maho; Ito, Satoshi; Hirata, Shoji

    2010-02-01

    We have applied zinc diffused window structures to 640 nm broad area stripe laser diodes (BALDs) for the first time. A solid-phase zinc diffusion technique was used for a thick single quantum well (SQW) in GaInP employing the short wavelength and disordered active layer possessed a blue shift of 58 nm in photoluminescence spectrum. We fabricated 10 mm arrays including twenty-five BALDs and each BALD consists of a 60 μm ridge stripe and a 1000 μm cavity. An initial catastrophic optical damage (COD) level of the window laser was increased by four times of a conventional none-window laser. A long-term reliability under automatic current control was investigated for initial output powers of 13W and 15W which overcome a previous demonstration of 7.2 W. Measured degradations within a period of 1000-hours were 5 % or less, in contrast a half-life period of our conventional none-window laser with an initial output power of 10 W was only 120-hours. Therefore the window structure improved the BALD in terms of the COD level and the long-term reliability.

  2. Rational Chebyshev spectral transform for the dynamics of broad-area laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Javaloyes, J.

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript details the use of the rational Chebyshev transform for describing the transverse dynamics of broad-area laser diodes and amplifiers. This spectral method can be used in combination with the delay algebraic equations approach developed in [1], which substantially reduces the computation time. The theory is presented in such a way that it encompasses the case of the Fourier spectral transform presented in [2] as a particular case. It is also extended to the consideration of index guiding with an arbitrary transverse profile. Because their domain of definition is infinite, the convergence properties of the Chebyshev rational functions allow handling the boundary conditions with higher accuracy than with the previously studied Fourier transform method. As practical examples, we solve the beam propagation problem with and without index guiding: we obtain excellent results and an improvement of the integration time between one and two orders of magnitude as compared with a fully distributed two dimensional model.

  3. Reliability study on high power 638-nm triple emitter broad area laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, T.; Kuramoto, K.; Kadoiwa, K.; Wakamatsu, R.; Miyashita, M.

    2016-03-01

    Reliabilities of the 638-nm triple emitter broad area laser diode (BA-LD) with the window-mirror structure were studied. Methodology to estimate mean time to failure (MTTF) due to catastrophic optical mirror degradation (COMD) in reasonable aging duration was newly proposed. Power at which the LD failed due to COMD (PCOMD) was measured for the aged LDs under the several aging conditions. It was revealed that the PCOMD was proportional to logarithm of aging duration, and MTTF due to COMD (MTTF(COMD)) could be estimated by using this relation. MTTF(COMD) estimated by the methodology with the aging duration of approximately 2,000 hours was consistent with that estimated by the long term aging. By using this methodology, the MTTF of the BA-LD was estimated exceeding 100,000 hours under the output of 2.5 W, duty cycles of 30% .

  4. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiš, S.; Cihelka, J.; Matulková, I.

    2010-12-01

    Three types of lasers (double-heterostructure 66 K InAsSb/InAsSbP laser diode, room temperature, multi quantum wells with distributed feedback (MQW with DFB) (GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb based) diode laser and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) (GaSb based) have been characterized using Fourier transform emission spectroscopy and compared. The photoacoustic technique was employed to determine the detection limit of formaldehyde (less than 1 ppmV) for the strongest absorption line of the v3 + v5 band in the emission region of the GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb diode laser. The detection limit (less than 10 ppbV) of formaldehyde was achieved in the 2820 cm-1 spectral range in case of InAsSb/InAsSbP laser (fundamental bands of v1, v5). Laser sensitive detection (laser absorption together with high resolution Fourier transform infrared technique including direct laser linewidth measurement, infrared photoacoustic detection of neutral molecules (methane, form-aldehyde) is discussed. Additionally, very sensitive laser absorption techniques of such velocity modulation are discussed for case of laser application in laboratory research of molecular ions. Such sensitive techniques (originally developed for lasers) contributed very much in identifying laboratory microwave spectra of a series of anions (C6H-, C4H-, C2H-, CN-) and their discovery in the interstellar space (C6H-, C4H-).

  5. Transparent conducting oxide clad limited area epitaxy semipolar III-nitride laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myzaferi, A.; Reading, A. H.; Cohen, D. A.; Farrell, R. M.; Nakamura, S.; Speck, J. S.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    The bottom cladding design of semipolar III-nitride laser diodes is limited by stress relaxation via misfit dislocations that form via the glide of pre-existing threading dislocations (TDs), whereas the top cladding is limited by the growth time and temperature of the p-type layers. These design limitations have individually been addressed by using limited area epitaxy (LAE) to block TD glide in n-type AlGaN bottom cladding layers and by using transparent conducting oxide (TCO) top cladding layers to reduce the growth time and temperature of the p-type layers. In addition, a TCO-based top cladding should have significantly lower resistivity than a conventional p-type (Al)GaN top cladding. In this work, LAE and indium-tin-oxide cladding layers are used simultaneously in a ( 20 2 ¯ 1 ) III-nitride laser structure. Lasing was achieved at 446 nm with a threshold current density of 8.5 kA/cm2 and a threshold voltage of 8.4 V.

  6. Assessment of the limits to peak power of 1100nm broad area single emitter diode lasers under short pulse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Crump, P.; Pietrzak, A.; Schultz, C.; Klehr, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Liero, A.; Ginolas, A.; Einfeldt, S.; Bugge, F.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2009-02-01

    High power diode lasers are the root source of optical energy in all high performance laser systems. As their performance advances, diode lasers are increasingly taking the place of other sources. Short pulse, sub-microsecond-class, high power lasers are important for many applications but historically, diode lasers have not been able to reach high enough peak pulse powers with adequate reliability, limited by physical effects such as facet failure. By combining robust facet passivation with thick super large optical cavity waveguides, greatly increased optical output power can be achieved. We present here the results of a study using commercial high current short pulse sources (>200A, <500ns) to assess the performance and endurance limits of high power broad area devices. We find that our lasers can be driven with a peak power density of over 110MWcm-2 without failure for more than 3×107 pulses. For example, on testing to 240A, single emitter 200μm stripe 1100nm broad area devices reach 124W (46μJ) without failure, and 60μm stripes reach 88W. In practice, high injection effects such as carrier accumulation in waveguide typically limit peak power. We review these remaining limitations, and discuss how they can be overcome.

  7. Diode lasers: From laboratory to industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Hira; Jamil, Yasir

    2014-03-01

    The invention of first laser in 1960 triggered the discovery of several new families of lasers. A rich interplay of different lasing materials resulted in a far better understanding of the phenomena particularly linked with atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Diode lasers have gone through tremendous developments on the forefront of applied physics that have shown novel ways to the researchers. Some interesting attributes of the diode lasers like cost effectiveness, miniature size, high reliability and relative simplicity of use make them good candidates for utilization in various practical applications. Diode lasers are being used by a variety of professionals and in several spectroscopic techniques covering many areas of pure and applied sciences. Diode lasers have revolutionized many fields like optical communication industry, medical science, trace gas monitoring, studies related to biology, analytical chemistry including elemental analysis, war fare studies etc. In this paper the diode laser based technologies and measurement techniques ranging from laboratory research to automated field and industry have been reviewed. The application specific developments of diode lasers and various methods of their utilization particularly during the last decade are discussed comprehensively. A detailed snapshot of the current state of the art diode laser applications is given along with a detailed discussion on the upcoming challenges.

  8. High power coherent polarization locked laser diode.

    PubMed

    Purnawirman; Phua, P B

    2011-03-14

    We have coherently combined a broad area laser diode array to obtain high power single-lobed output by using coherent polarization locking. The single-lobed coherent beam is achieved by spatially combining four diode emitters using walk-off crystals and waveplates while their phases are passively locked via polarization discrimination. While our previous work focused on coherent polarization locking of diode in Gaussian beams, we demonstrate in this paper, the feasibility of the same polarization discrimination for locking multimode beams from broad area diode lasers. The resonator is designed to mitigate the loss from smile effect by using retro-reflection feedback in the cavity. In a 980 nm diode array, we produced 7.2 W coherent output with M2 of 1.5x11.5. The brightness of the diode is improved by more than an order of magnitude.

  9. Generation of blue light by sum-frequency generation of a spectrally combined broad-area diode laser array.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhanda; Jiang, Menghua; Yu, Haoyang; Hui, Yongling; Lei, Hong; Li, Qiang

    2016-10-15

    We present the first demonstration of a spectrally beam combined diode laser array with subsequent sum-frequency generation (SFG). The combined beam of the diode laser array with 19 emitters has the same beam quality as a single emitter, and the wavelength of each emitter is different. The blue light is generated by sum-frequency mixing of pairs of emitters in the diode laser array. About 93 mW of blue light power is produced using a PPLN crystal. Compared with the SFG of two emitters, this approach can increase the number of lasers participating in nonlinear frequency conversion. Thus, it can enhance the available power.

  10. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeldt, M.; Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-08-01

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPPlat) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPPlat is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910 nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPPlat is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPPlat, whose influence on total BPPlat remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  11. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  12. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeldt, M. Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-08-14

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910 nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  13. Enhanced vbasis laser diode package

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-08-19

    A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

  14. Reliable operation of 976nm high power DFB broad area diode lasers with over 60% power conversion efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, P.; Schultz, C. M.; Wenzel, H.; Knigge, S.; Brox, O.; Maaßdorf, A.; Bugge, F.; Erbert, G.

    2011-02-01

    Diode lasers that deliver high continuous wave optical output powers (> 5W) within a narrow, temperature-stable spectral window are required for many applications. One technical solution is to bury Bragg-gratings within the semiconductor itself, using epitaxial overgrowth techniques to form distributed-feedback broad-area (DFB-BA) lasers. However, such stabilization is only of interest when reliability, operating power and power conversion efficiency are not compromised. Results will be presented from the ongoing optimization of such DFB-BA lasers at the Ferdinand-Braun- Institut (FBH). Our development work focused on 976nm devices with 90μm stripe width, as required for pumping Nd:YAG, as well as for direct applications. Such devices operate with a narrow spectral width of < 1nm (95% power content) to over 10W continuous wave (CW) optical output. Further optimization of epitaxial growth and device design has now largely eliminated the excess optical loss and electrical resistance typically associated with the overgrown grating layer. These developments have enabled, for the first time, DFB-BA lasers with peak CW power conversion efficiency of > 60% with < 1nm spectral width (95% power content). Reliable operation has also been demonstrated, with 90μm stripe devices operating for over 4000 hours to date without failure at 7W (CW). We detail the technological developments required to achieve these results and discuss the options for further improvements.

  15. Trace Detection with Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    Diode lasers were used to detect trace quantities of calcium, lead, chromium, cesium and rubidium. Extended -cavities were often employed for wavelength tuning and linewidth narrowing, and design considerations for the cavities are discussed. Calcium was detected under low pressure, Doppler-free conditions, and consequently the frequency stability of the laser's power spectrum was studied. The laser's frequency noise spectral density was measured and converted by calculation to the power spectrum. Examples of laser frequency noise densities with corresponding calculated power spectrums for free-running and frequency-locked conditions are given. An electronic feedback system to narrow a 657 nm wavelength diode laser's linewidth was constructed, and the resulting linewidth with respect to the locking cavity was measured to be approximately 500 Hz. Calcium atom concentrations of 0.35 x 10E-09 in water samples were measured by flame laser-enhanced ionization using a 423 nm wavelength frequency-doubled diode laser system. Analysis of the ionization signal and the noise was performed. Additional measurements of water samples with diode lasers demonstrated chromium detection at 25 x 10E-09, cesium at 0.25 x 10E -09, and rubidium at 0.25 x 10E-09. Lead was detected using a frequency-doubled diode system at a wavelength of 405 nm. The detection was by absorption from a metastable energy level; lead atoms in an argon vapor were excited into the metastable level by a radio-frequency discharge.

  16. Calibrated feedback for laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.G.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of calibrating the feedback output from the feedback light detector of the laser diode of an optical disk drive of a laser light pen which consists of mounting a first and a second resistor in a laser light pen; connecting the first resistor between the feedback light detector and ground; connecting the second resistor between the feedback light detector and a feedback output; operating the laser diode to produce a predetermined light power output; adjusting the resistance of the first resistor to produce a predetermined voltage at the feedback output; and adjusting the resistance of the second resistor to produce a predetermined impedance at the feedback output.

  17. Miniature long-range light beam transmitter resorting to a high-power broad area laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Wenjing; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2014-08-01

    A miniature long-range light beam transmitter, which taps into a high-power broad area laser diode (BALD), was realized to exhibit a uniform detectable width. An effective model was proposed to practically emulate the multimode characteristics of the beam generated by the BALD. The model, solely based on the emitting region and far-field divergence angle pertaining to the LD, is established through an incoherent superposition of multiple normalized Hermit-Gaussian modes. The feasibility of the proposed model was successfully verified in terms of the calculated and observed irradiance distributions of the light beams. A long-range light beam transmitter was then designed and constructed taking advantage of the BALD source in conjunction with a beam shaper. The manufactured transmitter was corroborated to provide an infrared beam with a constant detectable width of ~1 m, over a distance ranging up to 400 m, for a predefined threshold level.

  18. Diode-laser-based therapy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, Mircea V.; Nica, Adriana S.; Florian, Mariana; Poenaru, Daniela; Udrea, Gabriela; Lungeanu, Mihaela; Sporea, Dan G.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Vieru, Roxana

    2004-10-01

    A new therapy laser device is presented. The device consists of a central unit and different types of laser probes. The laser probe model SL7-650 delivers seven red (650 nm), 5 mW diode lasers convergent beams. The beams converge at about 30 cm in front of the laser probe and the irradiated area might be varied by simple displacement of the laser probe with respect to the target. The laser probe SL1-808 emits single infrared laser beam up to 500 mW. The efficiency of the use of this device in physiotherapy, and rheumatology, has been put into evidence after years of testing. Dermatology and microsurgery are users of infrared powerful laser probes. The device has successfully passed technical and clinical tests in order to be certified. The laser device design and some medical results are given.

  19. Coherent Beam Combining of High Power Broad-Area Laser Diode Array with a Closed-V-shape External Talbot Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    We have coherently combined a high-power broad-area laser diode array by using a feedback loop closed off-axis external Talbot cavity. The off-axis feedback from two gratings provides transverse-mode control of broad-area lasers. The Talbot configuration of the external cavity implements diffractive coupling among laser diodes. Feedback from two gratings increases external cavity quality factor and spectrum selection capability. As a result, spatial coherence was improved and spectral linewidth was narrowed down. The high visibility of the far-field profile indicates that high spatial coherence was achieved. We also observed symmetric far-field profiles indicating that laser array was phase locked to in-phase and out-of-phase super-modes, respectively. Transition between these super-modes was observed by tuning one grating's tilted angle.

  20. Coherent beam combining of high power broad-area laser diode array with a closed-V-shape external Talbot cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Liu, Y; Braiman, Y

    2010-03-29

    We have coherently combined a high-power broad-area laser diode array by using a feedback loop closed off-axis external Talbot cavity. The off-axis feedback from two gratings provides transverse-mode control of broad-area lasers. The Talbot configuration of the external cavity implements diffractive coupling among laser diodes. Feedback from two gratings increases external cavity quality factor and spectrum selection capability. As a result, spatial coherence was improved and spectral linewidth was narrowed down. The high visibility of the far-field profile indicates that high spatial coherence was achieved. We also observed symmetric far-field profiles indicating that laser array was phase locked to in-phase and out-of-phase super-modes, respectively. Transition between these super-modes was observed by tuning one grating's tilted angle.

  1. Diode laser and endoscopic laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullins, Kenneth E

    2002-05-01

    Two functionally important differences exist between the diode laser and the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (used more commonly in small animal surgery). Diode laser energy is delivered through a quartz fiber instead of being reflected through an articulated arm or waveguide. Quartz fibers are generally more flexible and resilient than waveguides and can be inserted through an endoscope for minimally invasive procedures. Laser-tissue interaction is the other significant difference. The CO2 laser is completely absorbed by water, which limits the effect to visible tissue. The diode wavelength is minimally absorbed by water and may affect tissue as deep as 10 mm below the surface in the free-beam mode. With proper respect for the tissue effect, these differences can be used to the advantage of the patient.

  2. Semiconductor Laser Diodes and the Design of a D.C. Powered Laser Diode Drive Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    the design of a laser diode modulation circuit is the determination of the input imped- ence and equivalent circuit of the laser diode and packag- ing...current source with a high internal impedance as compared to the input imped- ance of the laser. [Ref. l:p. 33] Summarizing the above, laser diodes...switches. The modula- tion circuitry is connected in parallel with the laser diode and provides a modulated input to the laser diode superim- posed onto

  3. Advances in laser diodes for pyrotechnic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Background information concerning the use of laser diodes in pyrotechnic applications is provided in viewgraph form. The following topics are discussed: damage limits, temperature stability, fiber coupling issues, and small (100 micron) and large (400 micron) fiber results. The discussions concerning fiber results concentrate on the areas of package geometry and electro-optical properties.

  4. Quantum Noise in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacobino, E.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Poizat, J. Ph.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Zhang, T.-C.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the intensity noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using different types of line narrowing techniques at room temperature. We have measured an intensity squeezing of 1.2 dB with grating-extended cavity lasers and 1.4 dB with injection locked lasers (respectively 1.6 dB and 2.3 dB inferred at the laser output). We have observed that the intensity noise of a free-running nominally single mode laser diode results from a cancellation effect between large anti-correlated fluctuations of the main mode and of weak longitudinal side modes. Reducing the side modes by line narrowing techniques results in intensity squeezing.

  5. High power, high reliability laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scifres, D. R.; Welch, D. F.; Craig, R. R.; Zucker, E.; Major, J. S.; Harnagel, G. L.; Sakamoto, M.; Haden, J. M.; Endriz, J. G.; Kung, H.

    1992-06-01

    Results are presented on catastrophic damage limits and life-test measurements for four types of high-power laser diodes operating at wavelengths between 980 nm and 690 nm. The laser diodes under consideration are CW multimode lasers, CW laser bars, quasi-CW bars/2D stacked arrays, and single transverse mode lasers.

  6. 20W continuous wave reliable operation of 980nm broad-area single emitter diode lasers with an aperture of 96μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, P.; Blume, G.; Paschke, K.; Staske, R.; Pietrzak, A.; Zeimer, U.; Einfeldt, S.; Ginolas, A.; Bugge, F.; Häusler, K.; Ressel, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.

    2009-02-01

    High power broad area diode lasers provide the optical energy for all high performance solid state and fiber laser systems. The maximum achievable power density from such systems is limited at source by the performance of the diode lasers. A crucial metric is the reliable continuous wave optical output power from a single broad area laser diode, typically for stripe widths in the 90-100 μm range, which is especially important for users relying on fibered multi-mode pumps. We present the results of a study investigating the reliable power limits of such 980nm sources. We find that 96μm stripe single emitters lasers at 20°C operate under continuous wave power of 20W per emitter for over 4000 hours (to date) without failure, with 60μm stripe devices operating reliably at 10W per stripe. Maximum power testing under 10Hz, 200μs QCW drive conditions shows that 96μm stripes reach 30W and 60μm stripes 21W per emitter, significantly above the reliable operation point. Results are also presented on step-stress-studies, where the current is step-wise increased until failure is observed, in order to clarify the remaining reliability limits. Finally, we detail the barriers to increased peak power and discuss how these can be overcome.

  7. Noninvasive blood glucose monitoring with laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Ooi, Ean Tat; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2006-02-01

    The non-invasive measurement of blood sugar level was studied by use of near infrared laser diodes. The in vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out using six laser diodes having wavelengths range from 1550 nm to 1750nm. Several volunteers were tested for OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) experiment. We took blood from a fingertip and measured its concentration with a glucose meter while taking signal voltage from laser diodes system. The data of signal voltage were processed to do calibration and prediction; in this paper PLS (Partial Least Square) method was used to do modeling. For in vitro experiment, good linear relationship between predicted glucose concentration and real glucose concentration was obtained. For in vivo experiments, we got the blood sugar level distributions in Clarke error grid that is a reference for doctors to do diagnosis and treatment. In the Clarke error grid, 75% of all data was in area A and 25 % was in area B. From the in vitro and in vivo results we know that multiple laser diodes are suitable for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring.

  8. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    acousto - optic beam deflector for greater absolute accuracy. The detection system was also upgraded to a response time of • 1 usec. The... 2 C. SUMMARY OF RESULTS.., 3 D . GENERAL PLAN 5 II. Nd:YAG FIBER PREPARATION 7 A. FIBER GROWTH 7 B. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF Nd:YAG...A. INTRODUCTION 25 B. GENERAL FORMALISM 26 C. FREE-SPACE LASERS 35 D . FIBER LASERS 43 1. Fiber Laser Configuration 43 2 . F

  9. High power diode and solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, H. J.; Fritsche, H.; Lux, O.; Strohmaier, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Diode lasers are now basic pump sources of crystal, glass fiber and other solid state lasers. Progress in the performance of all these lasers is related. Examples of recently developed diode pumped lasers and Raman frequency converters are described for applications in materials processing, Lidar and medical surgery.

  10. "Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers At 2 And 3 µm"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterowitz, Leon

    1988-06-01

    The most attractive alternative to flashlamp pumping of solid state lasers is the diode laser. In the past two decades numerous laboratory devices have been assembled which incorporated single diode lasers, small laser diode arrays or LED's for pumping of Nd:YAG, Nd:glass and a host of other Nd lasers. The low power output, low packaging density, and extremely high cost of diode lasers prevented any serious applications for laser pumping in the past. The reason for the continued interest in this area stems from the potential dramatic increase in system efficiency and component lifetime, and reduction of thermal load of the solid-state laser material. The latter not only will reduce thereto-optic effects and therefore lead to better beam quality but also will enable an increase in pulse repetition frequency. The attractive operating parameters combined with low voltage operation and the compactness of an all solid-state laser system have a potential high payoff. The high pumping efficiency compared to flashlamps stems from the good spectral match between the laser diode emission and the rare earth activator absorption bands. A significant advantage of laser diode pumping compared to arc lamps is system lifetime and reliability. Laser diode arrays have exhibited lifetimes on the order of 10,000 hours in cw operation and 109 shots in the pulsed mode. Flashlamp life is on the order of 107 shots, and about 200 hours for cw operation. In addition, the high pump flux combined with a substantial UV content in lamp pumped systems causes material degradation in the pump cavity and in the coolant. Such problems are virtually eliminated with laser diode pump sources. The absence of high voltage pulses, high temperatures and UV radiation encountered with arc lamps leads to much more benign operating features for solid state laser systems employing laser diode pumps. Laser diode technology dates back to 1962 when laser action in GaAs diodes was first demonstrated. However, it

  11. IC Fabrication Methods Improve Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.; Pickhardt, V.

    1984-01-01

    Family of high-performance, tunable diode lasers developed for use as local oscillators in passive laser heterodyne spectrometer. Diodes fabricated using standard IC processes include photolithography, selective etching and vacuum deposition of metals and insulators. Packaging refinements improved thermal-cycling characteristics of diodes and increased room-temperature shelf life.

  12. Industrial applications of high power diode lasers in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2003-03-01

    Diode lasers are widely used in communication, computer and consumer electronics technology. These applications are based on systems, which provide power in the milliwatt range. However, in the mean time high power diode lasers have reached the kilowatt power range. This became possible by special cooling and mounting as well as beam combination and beam forming technologies. Such units are nowadays used as a direct source for materials processing. High power diode lasers have entered the industrial manufacturing area [Proceedings of the Advanced Laser Technologies Conference 2001, Proc. SPIE, Constanta, Romania, 11-14 September 2001].

  13. Diode pumped tunable dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukova, O.; Gorbunkov, M.; Petukhov, V.; Semenov, M.

    2017-03-01

    A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by blue laser diodes (λ =445 nm) in a 200 ns pulsed mode has been developed. We used a 3-mirror cavity with transverse excitation and total internal reflection of laser beam in the active element. Tuning curves for 8 dyes in benzyl alcohol were measured in the range of 506-700 nm. Four dyes have their tuning range more than 60 nm, which is comparable to the tuning ranges of other dye lasers pumped by more expensive sources. The output energy obtained at the generation maximum of both DCM and coumarin 540A dyes was approximately 130 nJ while the pump energy was 2400 nJ.

  14. Self-Injection Locking Of Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1991-01-01

    Simple optical coupling scheme locks array of gain-guided diode lasers into oscillation in single mode and with single-lobed output beam. Selective feedback from thin etalon self-injection-locks array into desired mode. One application of new scheme for pumping of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet lasers with diode-laser arrays.

  15. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    72 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 2. Mechanical Q-Switching ..................... 72 3...nonuniform heating of the molten zone due to the manner in which the laser beams are inc ident upon the source rod, and (3) mechanical vibrations in the motor...were attached to a solid block of aluminum for better mechanical stability. Curved mirrors (R = 10 cm) were obtained from an outside manufacturer for

  16. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    mounting fixture beeame soft and gradually come out of the fixture. S)me chemical reaction was takin- place between the epoxy and the dye solvent , which...loose. The solvent apparenlly did no)t affect the bonding agent used to attach the fibers inside the capillarie,. \\lthmigh individual capillarv tubes...pure solvent . was added to the cavity laser oscillation ceased, and was onlv re, ,t()red after readjuisting the orientation of the output coupler, as

  17. Schlieren with a laser diode source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Franke, J. M.

    1981-10-01

    The use of a laser diode as a light source for a schlieren system designed to study phase objects such as a wind-tunnel flow is explored. A laser diode schlieren photograph and a white light schlieren photograph (zirconium arc source) are presented for comparison. The laser diode has increased sensitivity, compared with light schlieren, without appreciable image degradiation, and is an acceptable source for schlieren flow visualization.

  18. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  19. Advances in high power semiconductor diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Li

    2008-03-01

    High power semiconductor lasers have broad applications in the fields of military and industry. Recent advances in high power semiconductor lasers are reviewed mainly in two aspects: improvements of diode lasers performance and optimization of packaging architectures of diode laser bars. Factors which determine the performance of diode lasers, such as power conversion efficiency, temperature of operation, reliability, wavelength stabilization etc., result from a combination of new semiconductor materials, new diode structures, careful material processing of bars. The latest progress of today's high-power diode lasers at home and abroad is briefly discussed and typical data are presented. The packaging process is of decisive importance for the applicability of high-power diode laser bars, not only technically but also economically. The packaging techniques include the material choosing and the structure optimizing of heat-sinks, the bonding between the array and the heat-sink, the cooling and the fiber coupling, etc. The status of packaging techniques is stressed. There are basically three different diode package architectural options according to the integration grade. Since the package design is dominated by the cooling aspect, different effective cooling techniques are promoted by different package architectures and specific demands. The benefit and utility of each package are strongly dependent upon the fundamental optoelectronic properties of the individual diode laser bars. Factors which influence these properties are outlined and comparisons of packaging approaches for these materials are made. Modularity of package for special application requirements is an important developing tendency for high power diode lasers.

  20. Excess noise in tunable diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    The method and the apparatus for identifying excess-noise regions in tunable diode lasers are described. These diode lasers exhibit regions of excess noise as their wavelength is tuned. If a tunable diode laser is to be used as a local oscillator in a superheterodyne optical receiver, these excess-noise regions severely degrade the performance of the receiver. Measurement results for several tunable diode lasers are given. These results indicate that excess noise is not necessarily associated with a particular wavelength, and that it is possible to select temperature and injection current such that the most ideal performance is achieved.

  1. Composite photopolymerization with diode laser.

    PubMed

    Knezevic, Alena; Ristic, Mira; Demoli, Nazif; Tarle, Zrinka; Music, Svetozar; Negovetic Mandic, Visnja

    2007-01-01

    Under clinical conditions, the time needed for the proper light curing of luting composites or the multi-incremental buildup of a large restoration with halogen curing units is quite extensive. Due to the development of high power curing devices, such as argon lasers and plasma arc lights and, in order to decrease curing time, halogen and LED devices have developed a high intensity polymerization mode. This study compared the degree of conversion using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) of two composite materials: Tetric Ceram and Tetric EvoCeram polymerized with three polymerization modes (high, low and soft mode) of a Bluephase 16i LED curing unit and blue diode laser intensity of 50 mW on the output of the laser beam and 35 mW/cm2 on the resin composite sample. Descriptive statistic, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson Correlation and Tukey Post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses. The results show a higher degree of conversion for the polymerization of composite samples with all photopolymerization modes of the LED curing unit. However, there is no significant difference in the degree of conversion between the LED unit and 50-second polymerization with the blue diode laser. Tetric EvoCeram shows a lower degree of conversion regardless of the polymerization mode (or light source) used.

  2. Laser diode array pumped continuous wave Rubidium vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Stooke, A; Boyadjian, G; Voci, A; Knize, R J

    2008-01-21

    We have demonstrated continuous wave operation of a laser diode array pumped Rb laser with an output power of 8 Watts. A slope efficiency of 60% and a total optical efficiency of 45% were obtained with a pump power of 18 Watts. This laser can be scaled to higher powers by using multiple laser diode arrays or stacks of arrays.

  3. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2011-09-13

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  4. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, Robert J; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2012-06-12

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  5. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, Robert J; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2012-06-26

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  6. Hermetic diode laser transmitter module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollila, Jyrki; Kautio, Kari; Vahakangas, Jouko; Hannula, Tapio; Kopola, Harri K.; Oikarinen, Jorma; Sivonen, Matti

    1999-04-01

    In very demanding optoelectronic sensor applications it is necessary to encapsulate semiconductor components hermetically in metal housings to ensure reliable operation of the sensor. In this paper we report on the development work to package a laser diode transmitter module for a time- off-light distance sensor application. The module consists of a lens, laser diode, electronic circuit and optomechanics. Specifications include high acceleration, -40....+75 degree(s)C temperature range, very low gas leakage and mass-production capability. We have applied solder glasses for sealing optical lenses and electrical leads hermetically into a metal case. The lens-metal case sealing has been made by using a special soldering glass preform preserving the optical quality of the lens. The metal housings are finally sealed in an inert atmosphere by welding. The assembly concept to retain excellent optical power and tight optical axis alignment specifications is described. The reliability of the laser modules manufactured has been extensively tested using different aging and environmental test procedures. Sealed packages achieve MIL- 883 standard requirements for gas leakage.

  7. Coherent beam combining of high power broad-area laser diode array with near diffraction limited beam quality and high power conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Braiman, Y

    2013-12-16

    We explored a path of achieving high quality phase-locking of broad-area laser diode (BALD) array that operates at high electrical to optical power conversion efficiency (PCE). We found that (a) improving single transverse mode control for each individual BALD, (b) employing global Talbot optical coupling among diodes, and (c) enhancing strength of optical coupling among diodes are key factors in achieving high quality phase-locking of high power BALD array. Subsequently, we redesigned and improved a V-shaped external Talbot cavity and employed low reflectivity anti-reflection (AR) coated, low-"smile" BALD array to meet these three important requirements. We demonstrated near-diffraction limit far-field coherent pattern with 19% PCE and 95% visibility. The far-field angle (full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)) of center lobe was measured as 1.5 diffraction angular limited with visibility of 99% for 5A injection current and 1.6 diffraction angular limited with visibility of 95% for 14A injection current. Power scaling of diode array is discussed.

  8. Diode Lasers and Practical Trace Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imasaka, Totaro; Nobuhiko, Ishibashi

    1990-01-01

    Applications of lasers to molecular absorption spectrometry, molecular fluorescence spectrometry, visible semiconductor fluorometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, and atomic fluorescence spectrometry are discussed. Details of the use of the frequency-doubled diode laser are provided. (CW)

  9. Versatile subnanosecond laser diode driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żbik, Mateusz; Wieczorek, Piotr Z.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a laser diode driver that provides a fast modulation of a laser beam. A pulsed current source was designed and built to test Infra-Red (I-R) receivers in the Time Domain (TD). The proposed solution allows to estimate pulse responses of various photodetectors, whereas the testing was performed with a PiN photodetector. The pulse response brings the information on the behavior of the device under test in a wide frequency range. In addition, an experimental application of the proposed method is presented too. System discussed in this paper has been fully designed and manufactured in Warsaw University of Technology (WUT) in Institute of Electronic Systems (ISE).

  10. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser.

  11. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser. PMID:28163460

  12. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  13. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  14. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  15. Diode-pumped laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Isyanova, Y.

    1993-01-01

    TEM(sub 00)-mode output energies up to 22.5 mJ with 23 percent slope efficiencies were generated at 1.064 microns in a diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser using a transverse-pumping geometry. 1.32-micron performance was equally impressive at 10.2 mJ output energy with 15 percent slope efficiency. The same pumping geometry was successfully carried forward to several complex Q-switched laser resonator designs with no noticeable degradation of beam quality. Output beam profiles were consistently shown to have greater than 90 percent correlation with the ideal TEM(sub 00)-order Gaussian profile. A comparison study on pulse-reflection-mode (PRM), pulse-transmission-mode (PTM), and passive Q-switching techniques was undertaken. The PRM Q-switched laser generated 8.3 mJ pulses with durations as short as 10 ns. The PTM Q-switch laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 5 ns. The passively Q-switched laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 2.4 ns. Frequency doubling of both 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns with conversion efficiencies of 56 percent in lithium triborate and 10 percent in rubidium titanyl arsenate, respectively, was shown. Sum-frequency generation of the 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns radiations was demonstrated in KTP to generate 1.1 mJ of 0.589 micron output with 11.5 percent conversion efficiency.

  16. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

  17. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

    1991-02-19

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

  18. A compact high brilliance diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammer, F.; Holzinger, B.

    2006-02-01

    We explain some technical details regarding time-multiplexing of laser diodes, a method to improve the beam quality of diode lasers, which is still insufficient for many applications. Several pulsed laser diode beams are guided onto a common optical path to superpose the power of the laser diodes while maintaining the beam parameter product of a single laser diode. Pulsed operation of continuous wave laser diodes with average power equal to the specified cw-power of 4 W was tested for 150 hours without failure. We use a fast digital optical multiplexer built up by a cascade of binary optical switches. For the latter we use a Pockel's cell followed by a polarization filter, which allows addressing of two optical paths. Instead of direct on/off-switching we drive the crystals with a harmonic voltage course to avoid ringing caused by piezo-electricity. Up to now an optical power of 10.5 W was generated, 13 W are expected with some improvements. Furthermore we discuss the use of new 8 W laser diodes and the involved implications on driver technology.

  19. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  20. Bright diode laser light source.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2006-05-20

    A simplified multiwavelength prototype of an axially symmetric diode laser device based on stacks made of single emitters has been made, and the performance of the device has been demonstrated experimentally. The results verify that kilowatt-level light power can be focused into a circular spot with a 1/e2 diameter of 360 microm, a focal length of 100 mm, and a numerical aperture of 0.24, thus producing an average power density in excess of 10 kW/mm2 and a brightness of 6x10(10) W m-2 sr-1. The experiments also predict that it will be possible to increase these values to more than 60 kW/mm2 and 3x10(11) W m-2 sr-1.

  1. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  2. High power diode lasers reliability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guoguang; Xie, Shaofeng; Hao, Mingming; Huang, Yun; En, Yunfei

    2013-12-01

    In order to evaluate and obtain the actual lifetime data of high power laser diodes, an automated high power laser diodes reliability experiment was developed and reported in this paper. This computer controlled setup operates the laser diodes 24 hours a day, the parameters such as output power, wavelength were test once in one hour. The experiment has 60 work stations, the temperature control range is from 25°C to 70°C, and the output power of the aging device is beyond 20W.

  3. Laser diode initiated detonators for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewick, David W.; Graham, J. A.; Hawley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ensign Bickford Aerospace Company (EBAC) has over ten years of experience in the design and development of laser ordnance systems. Recent efforts have focused on the development of laser diode ordnance systems for space applications. Because the laser initiated detonators contain only insensitive secondary explosives, a high degree of system safety is achieved. Typical performance characteristics of a laser diode initiated detonator are described in this paper, including all-fire level, function time, and output. A finite difference model used at EBAC to predict detonator performance, is described and calculated results are compared to experimental data. Finally, the use of statistically designed experiments to evaluate performance of laser initiated detonators is discussed.

  4. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  5. Narrowband alexandrite laser injection seeded with frequency dithered diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Lee, H. S.; Prasad, Coorg

    1991-01-01

    Narrowband radiation is produced from a pulsed alexandrite laser when injection seeded with the output of a low power, tunable, continuous wave single mode diode laser. Injection seeded power oscillators are easier to frequency stabilize than etalon narrowed lasers, are more efficient and less prone to optical damage. AlGaAs diode lasers are available with wavelengths from 760 to 770 nm in the oxygen A band that can be used for differential absorption lidar remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature. Diodes with room temperature output at 740 nm may be cooled sufficiently to emit in the water vapor absorption band at 720-730 nm for humidity remote sensing. The diode laser linewidth of 200 MHz is sufficient to seed 2 or 3 longitudinal modes of the multi-transverse mode alexandrite laser, giving the pulsed laser a bandwidth of 0.007 to 0.014/cm.

  6. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  7. Microcollimated laser diode with low wavefront aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, S.; Sekii, H.; Maeda, T.; Goto, H.; Yamashita, T.; Imanaka, K. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors developed microcollimated laser diode( MCLD) utilizing a 1 mm short focal length, phi, lc 0.5 mm small diameter micro Fresnel lens (MFL) for the first time as the collimating lens. The MCLD is assembled with a 780 nm quantum-well laser diode dice and an MFL in the smallest commercial available laser package. The radiated laser beam form the MCLD has higher than 2mW power at 50 mA driving current, narrow enough as a phi 2 mm beam diameter with nearly Gaussian intensity profile, and low wavefront aberration less than {lambda}14 (rms value) measured at 1 m distance.

  8. 50% continuous-wave wallplug efficiency from 1.53μm-emitting broad-area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Garrod, T. Olson, D.; Klaus, M.; Zenner, C.; Galstad, C.; Mawst, L.; Botez, D.

    2014-08-18

    Long-wavelength InP-based diode lasers emitting at 1.53 μm have been optimized for maximum continuous-wave (CW) electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiency, so-called wallplug efficiency (WPE). Efficient electron and hole capture into a single-quantum-well (SQW) active region as well as suppression of electron and hole leakage out of the SQW result in high values for the internal differential efficiency: ∼97% for long-cavity (≥2 mm) uncoated-facet devices and ∼85%–89% for short-cavity (1.5 mm) optimized facet-coated devices. The characteristic temperature of the slope efficiency, T{sub 1}, reaches a high value of 323 K. Doping-level optimization of the p-cladding layer and the use of the SQW result in low values for the internal loss coefficient: ∼1.1 cm{sup −1} for long-cavity (≥2 mm) uncoated-facet devices and ∼1.5–2.0 cm{sup −1} for short-cavity (1.5 mm) optimized facet-coated devices. In turn, a maximum CW WPE value of 50% is achieved at room temperature and ∼1 W output power from conductively-cooled 100 μm-wide-aperture devices. The maximum CW power is 2.5 W. One beneficial byproduct of the CW-WPE maximization process is a large transverse spot size which, in turn, provides a very narrow transverse beamwidth: 26° full width half maximum. Reliability tests show no degradation when devices are run CW at high currents (4–5 A) and high temperatures (40–50 °C) for over 4000 h, at ∼2 W output power.

  9. Picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Rosker, M.J.; Christian, W.R.; McMichael, I.C.

    1994-12-31

    An external ring cavity containing as its active medium a pair of InGaAsP diodes is modelocked to produce picosecond pulses. In such a laser, a small frequency difference proportional to the nonreciprocal phase shift (resulting from, e.g., the Sagnac effect) can be observed by beating together the counter propagating laser arms; the device therefore acts as a rotating sensor. In contrast to a conventional (cw) ring laser gyroscope, the pulsed gyroscope can avoid gain competition, thereby enabling the use of homogeneously broadened gain media like semiconductor diodes. Temporal separation of the pulses within the cavity also discriminates against frequency locking of the lasers. The picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope is reviewed. Both active and passive modelocking are discussed.

  10. Improve the Performance of Integrated Diode Laser Beam Combining Through Grating Regrowth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-30

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This project aims to improve the output power and coherence of monolithically combined broad-area diode lasers through...grating regrowth. We have recently demonstrated coherent beam combining in a new, completely integrated approach to edge- emitting semiconductor lasers...2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Improve the Performance of Integrated Diode Laser Beam Combining Through Grating

  11. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  12. Comparison of violet diode laser with CO II laser in surgical performance of soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatayama, H.; Kato, J.; Inoue, A.; Akashi, G.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-02-01

    The violet diode laser (405nm) has recently begun to be studied for surgical use and authors reported the soft tissue could be effectively incised by irradiation power of even less than 1W. The wavelength of this laser is highly absorbed by hemoglobin, myoglobin or melanin pigment. Cutting or ablating soft tissues by lower irradiation power might be preferable for wound healing. The CO II laser is known to be preferable for low invasive treatment of soft tissues and widely used. The CO II laser light (10.6μm) is highly absorbed by water and proper for effective ablation of soft tissues. In this paper, we report the comparison of the violet diode laser with the CO II laser in surgical performance of soft tissues. Tuna tissue was used as an experimental sample. In the case of the violet diode laser, extensive vaporization of tissue was observed after the expansion of coagulation. Carbonization of tissue was observed after the explosion. On the other hand, consecutive vaporization and carbonization were observed immediately after irradiation in the case of CO II laser. The violet diode laser could ablate tissue equivalently with the CO II laser and coagulate larger area than the CO II laser. Therefore the violet diode laser might be expectable as a surgical tool which has excellent hemostatis.

  13. Improved atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Pax, Paul; Yi, Leon; Howells, Sam; Gallagher, Mark; Chen, Ting; Elings, Virgil; Bocek, Dan

    1992-08-01

    The performance of an atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer has been improved to the point where its resolution is comparable to that of laser beam deflection systems. We describe the structure of this microscope, present a model that takes into account the main parameters associated with its operation, and demonstrate its sensitivity by showing images of a small area scan with atomic resolution as well as a large area scan in a stand-alone configuration.

  14. Assessing the influence of the vertical epitaxial layer design on the lateral beam quality of high-power broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeldt, M.; Rieprich, J.; Knigge, S.; Maaßdorf, A.; Hempel, M.; Kernke, R.; Tomm, J. W.; Erbert, G.; Crump, P.

    2016-03-01

    GaAs-based high-power broad-area diode lasers deliver optical output powers Popt > 10W with efficiency > 60%. However, their application is limited due to poor in-plane beam parameter product BPPlat=0.25×Θ95%×w95% (Θ95% and w95% are emission angle and aperture, 95% power content). We present experimental investigations on λ = 9xx nm broad area lasers that aim to identify regulating factors of the BPPlat connected to the epitaxial layer design. First, we assess the thermal lens of vertical designs with varying asymmetry, using thermal camera images to determine its strength. Under study are an extreme-double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structure and a reference (i.e. more symmetric) design. The lateral thermal profiles clearly show that BPPlat increase is correlated to the bowing of the thermal lens. The latter is derived out of a quadratic temperature fit in the active region beneath the current injection of the laser device and depends on the details of the epitaxial layers. Second, we test the benefit of low modal gain factor Γg0, predicted to improve BPPlat via a suppression of filamentation. EDAS-based lasers with single quantum well (SQW) and double quantum well (DQW) active regions were compared, with 2.5x reduced Γg0, for 2.2x reduced filament gain. However, no difference is seen in measured BPPlat, giving evidence that filamentary processes are no longer a limit. In contrast, devices with lower Γg0 demonstrate an up to twofold reduced near field modulation depth, potentially enabling higher facet loads and increased device facet reliability, when operated near to the COD limit.

  15. Construction of an Extended Cavity Tunable Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward; Metcalf, Harold; Noe, John

    2001-03-01

    A diverse and vast amount of experiments at the forefront of experimental physics typically use diode lasers as an integral part of their arrangement. However, researchers who use unmodified commercially available diode lasers run into several complications. The laser diode that is purchased is often not of the same wavelength as is advertised; thus the researcher’s desired wavelength is not met. Because the semiconductor has such a short external cavity, it is very sensitive to the injection current, changes in room temperature, and has a large linewidth making it harder to tune. To obtain a finely tuned diode laser, temperature and current controlling of the diode laser are used in conjunction with an extended semiconductor cavity. This is achieved by mounting the hermetically sealed assembly atop a thermoelectric cooler, which uses the Peltier effect. Furthermore, the variation of the injection current may be used as an additional control for the wavelength output of the diode. The power range of 70 mW as controlled by the injection current adjusts the wavelength by a span of only 4 nanometers. The extended cavity consists of a diffraction grating adhered to a mirror mount and is used for grating feedback. That in turn is used to reduce the linewidth sufficiently enough in order to provide much better tunability. In the next three weeks, the tunable diode laser will be specifically applied to research in the areas of Second Harmonic Generation in a PPLN Crystal and Saturated Rubidium Spectroscopy. This study was supported in part by NSF grant PHY99-12312.

  16. Qualification and Selection of Flight Diode Lasers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Gontijo, Ivair; Forouhar, Siamak; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Cooper, Mark S.; Meras, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser diodes is critical to space missions. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission includes a metrology system that is based upon laser diodes. An operational test facility has been developed to qualify and select, by mission standards, laser diodes that will survive the intended space environment and mission lifetime. The facility is situated in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) certified clean-room and consist of an enclosed temperature-controlled stage that can accommodate up to 20 laser diodes. The facility is designed to characterize a single laser diode, in addition to conducting laser lifetime testing on up to 20 laser diodes simultaneously. A standard laser current driver is used to drive a single laser diode. Laser diode current, voltage, power, and wavelength are measured for each laser diode, and a method of selecting the most adequate laser diodes for space deployment is implemented. The method consists of creating histograms of laser threshold currents, powers at a designated current, and wavelengths at designated power. From these histograms, the laser diodes that illustrate a performance that is outside the normal are rejected and the remaining lasers are considered spaceborne candidates. To perform laser lifetime testing, the facility is equipped with 20 custom laser drivers that were designed and built by California Institute of Technology specifically to drive NuSTAR metrology lasers. The laser drivers can be operated in constant-current mode or alternating-current mode. Situated inside the enclosure, in front of the laser diodes, are 20 power-meter heads to record laser power throughout the duration of lifetime testing. Prior to connecting a laser diode to the current source for characterization and lifetime testing, a background program is initiated to collect current, voltage, and resistance. This backstage data collection enables the operational test facility to have full laser diode

  17. Phase Noise Reduction of Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. C.; Poizat, J.-Ph.; Grelu, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Levenson, M. D.; Giacobino, E.

    1996-01-01

    Phase noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using line narrowing technique at room temperature, namely injection-locking, has been investigated. It is shown that free-running diodes exhibit very large excess phase noise, typically more than 80 dB above shot-noise at 10 MHz, which can be significantly reduced by the above-mentioned technique.

  18. Rugged, Tunable Extended-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Donald; Brinza, David; Seidel, David; Klipstein, William; Choi, Dong Ho; Le, Lam; Zhang, Guangzhi; Iniguez, Roberto; Tang, Wade

    2007-01-01

    A rugged, tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed to satisfy stringent requirements for frequency stability, notably including low sensitivity to vibration. This laser is designed specifically for use in an atomic-clock experiment to be performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lasers of similar design would be suitable for use in terrestrial laboratories engaged in atomic-clock and atomic-physics research.

  19. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Skidmore, Jay A.; Freitas, Barry L.

    1999-01-01

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter.

  20. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Skidmore, J.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1999-07-13

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter. 12 figs.

  1. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  2. Computer processing of tunable diode laser spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled tunable diode laser spectrometer and spectral analysis software are described. The three-channel system records simultaneously the transmission of a subject gas, a temperature-stabilized etalon, and a calibration gas. The software routines are applied to diode laser spectra of HNO3 and NO2 to illustrate the procedures adopted for conversion of raw spectral data to useful transmission and harmonic spectra. Extraction of line positions, absorption intensities, collisional broadening coefficients, and gas concentrations from recorded spectra is also described.

  3. Case studies of industrial applications of high-power diode laser in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovikorpi, Jari; Jansson, Anssi; Salminen, Antti

    2003-06-01

    The high power diode laser is a new industrial tool. It has several advantages and disadvantages compared to the conventional industrially used CO2 and Nd:YAG laser. The most promising areas of application of diode laser have been considered to be thin sheet welding and hardening. Quite a few feasibility studies of the use of diode laser have been carried out in Finland. So far there has been some application in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. Typically, the HPDL is integrated to an industrial robot. The welding of stainless steel housing, car door lock and catalytic converters are typical examples of applications in which diode laser has technological as well as economical advantages over the conventional laser and welding techniques. The welding of these products requires good control over the heat input, short through put time and low investment. The weld cross-section of a diode laser weld is, because of conduction limited welding process, more suitable for these applications than the keyhole welding. Hardening of a large gear wheel presents also a good example of an application in which the diode laser makes it possible to economically produce structures that have not earlier been possible. Hardening requires a special form of heat delivery in order to ensure evenly hardened zone and acceptable quality. The application was performed with two high power diode lasers. The case studies of these four applications are presented and discussed in details in this paper.

  4. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  5. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  6. Laser Diode Cooling For High Average Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundinger, David C.; Beach, Raymond J.; Benett, William J.; Solarz, Richard W.; Sperry, Verry

    1989-06-01

    Many applications for semiconductor lasers that require high average power are limited by the inability to remove the waste heat generated by the diode lasers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of these applications a heat sink package has been developed which is based on water cooled silicon microstructures. Thermal resistivities of less than 0.025°C/01/cm2) have been measured which should be adequate for up to CW operation of diode laser arrays. This concept can easily be scaled to large areas and is ideal for high average power solid state laser pumping. Several packages which illustrate the essential features of this design have been fabricated and tested. The theory of operation will be briefly covered, and several conceptual designs will be described. Also the fabrication and assembly procedures and measured levels of performance will be discussed.

  7. A Treatment of Amblyopia Using Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Yi-Ding; Liu, Bing-Chun

    2000-04-01

    We propose the treatment of amblyopia using yellow-green laser diodes. There are amblyopia children in excess of fifty million in the world. Because the causative agent of amblyopia hasn't been well understood,only roughly considered to be concerned with visual sense cell, optic nerve network and function of nerve center, no appropriate treatment is found up to date. The vision of person is determined by the center hollow region of retina, where there are three kinds of cone cell. The corresponding peak wavelength in absorption spectrum locates 447nm (blue light), 532nm (green light) and 565nm (yellow light), respectively. When stimulated by white light, excited degree of three kinds of cone cell are identical,or yellow-green light, to which person eye is most sensitive, will significantly takes effects. Therefore the yellow-green laser diode is suitable for treating amblyopia. The weak laser, namely laser power less than mW order of magnitude, shows curative by stimulating bion tissue. When stimulating light power density is less than 0.001W/cm, the compounding speed of nucleic acid DNA is significantly increased. The growth rate of cell, activity of enzyme, content of hemoglobin and the growth of blood vessel, are all increased. However, it's key to control the dose of light. When the dose transcend some value, a inhibition will occur. The little dose of weak laser treatment can be accumulated with a parabolic characteristics, that is the weak laser generate bion response stengthening gradually versus time. Then it will weaken gradually after the peak. When the treatment duration is longer than a certain time, a inhibition also takes place. A suggested theraphy is characterized by little dose and short treatment course. In a conclusion, the yellow-green laser diode should be used for the treatment of amblyopia. The little dose and short treatment couse are to be adopted. Key words:treatment amblyopia laser diode

  8. Diode Laser Excision of Oral Benign Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ena; Sareen, Mohit; Dhaka, Payal; Baghla, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lasers have made tremendous progress in the field of dentistry and have turned out to be crucial in oral surgery as collateral approach for soft tissue surgery. This rapid progress can be attributed to the fact that lasers allow efficient execution of soft tissue procedures with excellent hemostasis and field visibility. When matched to scalpel, electrocautery or high frequency devices, lasers offer maximum postoperative patient comfort. Methods: Four patients agreed to undergo surgical removal of benign lesions of the oral cavity. 810 nm diode lasers were used in continuous wave mode for excisional biopsy. The specimens were sent for histopathological examination and patients were assessed on intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: Diode laser surgery was rapid, bloodless and well accepted by patients and led to complete resolution of the lesions. The excised specimen proved adequate for histopathological examination. Hemostasis was achieved immediately after the procedure with minimal postoperative problems, discomfort and scarring. Conclusion: We conclude that diode lasers are rapidly becoming the standard of care in contemporary dental practice and can be employed in procedures requiring excisional biopsy of oral soft tissue lesions with minimal problems in histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26464781

  9. Design Considerations for the Diode-pumped Laser Ignition Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT This technical note explores the design of the monolithic neodymium (Nd): yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser used in the diode-pumped laser...manufacturer on fabrication cost, the optimum design can be determined. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Solid state laser, neodymium , diode pumping 16... neodymium (Nd): yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser used in the diode-pumped laser ignition system (DPLIS). Emphasis is placed on the divergence of

  10. Power semiconductor laser diode arrays characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeni, Luigi; Campopiano, Stefania; Cutolo, Antonello; D'Angelo, Giuseppe

    2003-09-01

    Nowadays, power semiconductor laser diode arrays are becoming a widespread source for a large variety of industrial applications. In particular, the availability of low-cost high-power laser diode arrays makes their use possible in the industrial context for material cutting, welding, diagnostics and processing. In the above applications, the exact control of the beam quality plays a very important role because it directly affects the reliability of the final result. In this paper, we present two different approaches useful for the characterization of the beam quality in laser diode arrays. The first one, starting from total intensity measurements on planes orthogonal to the beam propagation path, is able to deduce the working conditions of each laser setting up the array. The second one is aimed at the measurement of a global quality factor of the array itself; to this end, the empirical extension of the M2 concept to composite beams is presented along with some experimental results. As the first technique is especially intended for the non-destructive detection of design problems in the array itself and in the bias circuitry, the second one represents a powerful tool for the rapid on-line diagnostics of the laser beam during its use.

  11. Intensity Scaling for Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    unphased diode lasers is absorbed in the near IR by atomic potassium, rubidium , or cesium. The gain cell for a DPAL system using a heat pipe design is...demonstrated linear scaling of a rubidium laser to 32 times threshold.3 In our present work, we explore scaling to pump in- tensities of >100kW/cm2. The...of output power. Each alkali atom in the laser medium may be required to cycle as many as 1010 pump photons per second. We demonstrated a rubidium

  12. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the consequences for solid-state lasers of novel diode laser-pumping technology. Diode laser-pumped neodymium lasers have operated at an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 10 percent in a single spatial mode, with linewidths of less than 10 kHz, and with a spectral power brightness sufficiently great to allow frequency extension by harmonic generation in nonlinear crystals; this has yielded green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Q-switched operation with kW peak powers and mode-locked operation with 10-picosec pulse widths have also been demonstrated. All-solid-state lasers at prices comparable to those of current flash-lamp-pumped laser systems are foreseen, as are power levels exceeding 1 kW, for coherent radar, global satellite sensing, and micromachining.

  13. 946 nm Diode Pumped Laser Produces 100mJ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axenson, Theresa J.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative approach to obtaining high energy at 946 nm has yielded 101 mJ of laser energy with an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 24.5%. A single gain module resonator was evaluated, yielding a maximum output energy of 50 mJ. In order to obtain higher energy a second gain module was incorporated into the resonator. This innovative approach produced un-surprised output energy of 101 mJ. This is of utmost importance since it demonstrates that the laser output energy scales directly with the number of gain modules. Therefore, higher energies can be realized by simply increasing the number of gain modules within the laser oscillator. The laser resonator incorporates two gain modules into a folded "M-shaped" resonator, allowing a quadruple pass gain within each rod. Each of these modules consists of a diode (stack of 30 microlensed 100 Watt diode array bars, each with its own fiber lens) end-pumping a Nd:YAG laser rod. The diode output is collected by a lens duct, which focuses the energy into a 2 mm diameter flat to flat octagonal pump area of the laser crystal. Special coatings have been developed to mitigate energy storage problems, including parasitic lasing and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), and encourage the resonator to operate at the lower gain transition at 946 nm.

  14. Low level diode laser accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Munqith S; Salman, Saif Dawood

    2013-05-01

    The effect of wound illumination time by pulsed diode laser on the wound healing process was studied in this paper. For this purpose, the original electronic drive circuit of a 650-nm wavelength CW diode laser was reconstructed to give pulsed output laser of 50 % duty cycle and 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Twenty male mice, 3 months old were used to follow up the laser photobiostimulation effect on the wound healing progress. They were subdivided into two groups and then the wounds were made on the bilateral back sides of each mouse. Two sessions of pulsed laser therapy were carried along 15 days. Each mice group wounds were illuminated by this pulsed laser for 12 or 18 min per session during these 12 days. The results of this study were compared with the results of our previous wound healing therapy study by using the same type of laser. The mice wounds in that study received only 5 min of illumination time therapy in the first and second days of healing process. In this study, we found that the wounds, which were illuminated for 12 min/session healed in about 3 days earlier than those which were illuminated for 18 min/session. Both of them were healed earlier in about 10-11 days than the control group did.

  15. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  16. Modeling the brain with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2007-09-01

    The Wilson-Cowan mathematical model is popular for representing a neuron in the brain and may be viewed as two cross-coupled dynamical nonlinear neural networks, one excitatory and one inhibitory. This gives rise to two coupled first order equations. Varying an input parameter, the sum of input intensities from all other incoming neurons, causes the Wilson-Cowan neural oscillator to move through a supercritical Hopf bifurcation so as to switch its output from a stable-off when the input is below a firing threshold to a stable-oscillation (limit cycle) for signals above the threshold; the frequency of which depends on the level of input stimulation. The use of frequency to represent pulse rate makes the brain robust against electromagnetic interference and drift. We show that the laser diode rate equations for a single optically injected laser diode can also be modeled by two coupled first order equations that give rise to supercritical Hopf bifurcations. But the laser rate equations have a complex variable where that for the Wilson-Cowan model equations is real. By using the real part of the complex variable (a projection onto the real plane), the optically injected laser diode can exactly simulate the movement through supercritical Hopf bifurcation of the Wilson-Cowan equations by varying the amplitude and frequency of the optical injection.

  17. Integrated software package for laser diodes characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan G.; Sporea, Radu A.

    2003-10-01

    The characteristics of laser diodes (wavelength of the emitted radiation, output optical power, embedded photodiode photocurrent, threshold current, serial resistance, external quantum efficiency) are strongly influenced by their driving circumstances (forward current, case temperature). In order to handle such a complex investigation in an efficient and objective manner, the operation of several instruments (a laser diode driver, a temperature controller, a wavelength meter, a power meter, and a laser beam analyzer) is synchronously controlled by a PC, through serial and GPIB communication. For each equipment, instruments drivers were designed using the industry standards graphical programming environment - LabVIEW from National Instruments. All the developed virtual instruments operate under the supervision of a managing virtual instrument, which sets the driving parameters for each unit under test. The manager virtual instrument scans as appropriate the driving current and case temperature values for the selected laser diode. The software enables data saving in Excel compatible files. In this way, sets of curves can be produced according to the testing cycle needs.

  18. Portable Diode Pumped Femtosecond Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    interest to the USAF is the possible development of enhanced laser gyroscopes. There are still a number of mechanical inertial navigation units being used...aerial systems such as unmanned aerial reconnaissance vehicles could benefit from inertial systems built around smaller and faster pulse rates...Related To Fast Ignitor In Inertial Confinement Fusion, 17, October 1998. 14. Jean-Claude Diels, Wolfgang Rudolph. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena: Fun

  19. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  20. Diode laser welding of high yield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The following article describes results of investigations on influence of laser welding parameters on the weld shape, quality and mechanical properties of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel for cold forming S420MC (according to EN 10149 - 3 and 060XLK according to ASTM) welded with high power diode laser HPDL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 with rectangular laser beam spot and 2.2 kW output power, and 808 nm wavelength. The investigations at the initial stage were focused on detailed analysis of influence of the basic laser welding parameters such as laser power and welding speed on the shape and quality of single bead produced during bead-on-plate welding. Then the optimal parameters were chosen for laser welding of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of the thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel sheets for cold forming S420MC. The test joints were prepared as single square groove and one-side laser welded without an additional material, at a flat position. Edges of steel sheets were melted in argon atmosphere by the laser beam focused on the top joint surface. The test welded joints were investigated by visual inspection, metallographic examinations, mechanical tests such as tensile tests and bending tests. It was found that the high power diode laser may be applied successfully for one-side welding of the S420MC steel butt joints. Additionally it was found that in the optimal range of laser welding parameters the high quality joint were produced.

  1. A new diode laser acupuncture therapy apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengwei; Huang, Zhen; Li, Dongyu; Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2006-06-01

    Since the first laser-needles acupuncture apparatus was introduced in therapy, this kind of apparatus has been well used in laser biomedicine as its non-invasive, pain- free, non-bacterium, and safetool. The laser acupuncture apparatus in this paper is based on single-chip microcomputer and associated by semiconductor laser technology. The function like traditional moxibustion including reinforcing and reducing is implemented by applying chaos method to control the duty cycle of moxibustion signal, and the traditional lifting and thrusting of acupuncture is implemented by changing power output of the diode laser. The radiator element of diode laser is made and the drive circuit is designed. And chaos mathematic model is used to produce deterministic class stochastic signal to avoid the body adaptability. This function covers the shortages of continuous irradiation or that of simple disciplinary stimulate signal, which is controlled by some simple electronic circuit and become easily adjusted by human body. The realization of reinforcing and reducing of moxibustion is technological innovation in traditional acupuncture coming true in engineering.

  2. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  3. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; McDonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-02-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  4. Interferometric investigation of a diode laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Creath, K.

    1985-05-01

    Diode lasers provide a coherent light source in the near IR. They have many desirable characteristics such as small size, high efficiency, a single-longitudinal mode output as large as 15 mW, and can be modulated at high pulse rates. An AlGaAs diode laser operating at 840 nm with an output of 5 mW was evaluated with a Smartt point diffraction interferometer. The wave front observed had astigmatism of approx.2 lambda present over the output beam divergence angle. In a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the coherence length measured was >15 m with high visibility fringes. This source was found to be stable and highly linearly polarized. When used as an interferometric source, many possibilities for small scale interferometers and test equipment are now viable.

  5. InGaN-BASED Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shuji

    1998-08-01

    Continuous-wave operation of InGaN multi-quantum-well (MQW) structure laser diodes (LDs) has been demonstrated at room temperature with output power up to 50 mW, operating temperature up to 100oC, emission wavelength of 400-420 nm, and a lifetime up to 300 h. InGaN MQW LDs with a lifetime of more than 1000 h are expected soon. Commercialization will begin in 1998 if research on the bluish-purple InGaN-based laser diodes continues to progress. The stimulated emission of the InGaN-based LDs originates from localized energy states of 100-250 meV depth, which are equivalent to quantum dot energy states, probably arising from from InGaN composition fluctuation in the InGaN well layers.

  6. Prototype laser-diode-pumped solid state laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Monolithic, diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers can provide diffraction-limited, single-frequency, narrow-linewidth, tunable output which is adequate for use as a local oscillator in a coherent communication system. A laser was built which had a linewidth of about 2 kHz, a power of 5 milliwatts, and which was tunable over a range of 30 MHz in a few microseconds. This laser was phase-locked to a second, similar laser. This demonstrates that the powerful technique of heterodyne detection is possible with a diode-pumped laser used as the local oscillator. Laser diode pumping of monolithic Nd:YAG rings can lead to output powers of hundreds of milliwatts from a single laser. A laser was built with a single-mode output of 310 mW. Several lasers can be chained together to sum their power, while maintaining diffraction-limited, single frequency operation. This technique was demonstrated with two lasers, with a total output of 340 mW, and is expected to be practical for up to about ten lasers. Thus with lasers of 310 mW, output of up to 3 W is possible. The chaining technique, if properly engineered, results in redundancy. The technique of resonant external modulation and doubling is designed to efficiently convert the continuous wave, infrared output of our lasers into low duty-cycle pulsed green output. This technique was verified through both computer modeling and experimentation. Further work would be necessary to develop a deliverable system using this technique.

  7. Wavelength Beam-Combined Laser Diode Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    focal length f f f Diffraction grating Output...lead Water in/out Figure 3. Lincoln Laboratory-designed WBC “laser in a box.” To reduce the overall size of the WBC device, multiple folding mirrors were implemented between the diode array and the concave mirror . ...spatially merges multiple wave- length sources into a single high-inten- sity beam with an order-of-magnitude improvement in brightness compared

  8. Diode Laser Sensor for Scramjet Inlet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-11

    Conference’. 1.2 O’Byrne, S., Huynh, L., Wittig, S. M. and Smith, N. S. A. (2009), Non- intrusive water vapour absorp- tion measurements in a simulated...O’Byrne, L. Huynh, S. M. Wittig and N. S. A. Smith, “Non- intrusive Water Vapour Absorp- tion Measurements in a Simulated Helicopter Exhaust”, Proceedings...rather than at a surface. The measurement techniques used at these hypersonic flow conditions should also be non- intrusive . Tuneable diode laser

  9. C. W. GaAs Diode Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    laser fabrication , assembly, and evaluation. The principal personnel responsible for the BeO materials effort at Rockwell International were Dr...principal areas. The first area was the optimization of the semiconductor growth and laser fabrication techniques to achieve lasers with low

  10. Precision UV laser scribing for cleaving mirror facets of GaN-based laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, O.; Kang, J.-H.; Spevak, M.; Zeimer, U.; Einfeldt, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser scribing with a nanosecond-pulsed UV laser operating at 355 nm was used to create precise perforation for die separation of GaN-based laser diodes. Machining depth of single- and multiple-pass scribing was investigated. For pulse energies between 1 and 45 µJ at a pulse repetition frequency of 20 kHz and single scan at 100 mm/min, scribe depths from 15 to 180 µm were obtained. Processing parameters were adjusted to minimize the formation of microcracks due to laser-induced local heating. By using the laser skip-and-scribe technique, the propagation of the cleavage plane could be controlled, irregular breaking could be minimized, and die yield could be improved. Smooth mirror facets with low density of terraces were formed by cleaving. In the vicinity of the laser-treated zone, no detrimental effects on the crystal quality of the multi-quantum wells could be detected by cathodoluminescence. The electro-optical characteristics of broad-area laser diodes fabricated by the laser-assisted process were similar to the ones fabricated using the conventional diamond-tip edge-scribing technique that suffers from low die yield. Our results demonstrate that nanosecond-pulsed UV laser scribing followed by cleaving is a powerful technique for the formation of mirror facets of GaN-based laser diodes.

  11. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic; Sun, X.

    1989-01-01

    This interim report describes the progress in the construction of a 220 Mbps Q=4 PPM optical communication system that uses a semiconductor laser as the optical transmitter and an avalanche photodiode (APD) as the photodetector. The transmitter electronics have been completed and contain both GaAs and ECL III IC's. The circuit was able to operate at a source binary data rate from 75 Mbps to 290 Mbps with pulse rise and fall times of 400 ps. The pulse shapes of the laser diode and the response from the APD/preamplifier module were also measured.

  12. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  13. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2002-06-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore, this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented result concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the sue laser system the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  14. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2003-09-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented results concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the used laser systems the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  15. Scaling brilliance of high power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Harald; Grönninger, Guenther; Lauer, Christian; Reill, Wolfgang; Arzberger, Markus; Strauß, Uwe; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Kösters, Arnd; Malchus, Joerg; Krause, Volker K.

    2010-02-01

    New direct diode laser systems and fiber lasers require brilliant fiber coupled laser diodes for efficient operation. In the German funded project HEMILAS different laser bar designs are investigated with tailored beam parameter products adapted for efficient fiber coupling. In this paper we demonstrate results on 9xx and 1020nm bars suitable for coupling into 200μm fibers. With special facet technology and optimised epitaxial structure COD-free laser bars were fabricated with maximum efficiency above 66%. For short bars consisting of five 100μm wide emitters 75W CW maximum output power was reached. In QCW-mode up to 140W are demonstrated. The 10% fill factor bars with 4mm cavity are mounted with hard solder. Lifetime tests in long pulse mode with 35W output power exceed 5000 hours of testing without degradation or spontaneous failures. Slow axis divergence stays below 7° up to power levels of 40W and is suitable for simple fiber coupling into 200μm NA 0.22 fibers with SAC and FAC lenses. For fiber coupling based on beam rearrangement with step mirrors, bars with higher fill factor of 50% were fabricated and tested. The 4mm cavity short bars reach efficiencies above 60%. Lifetime tests at accelerated powers were performed. Finally fiber coupling results with output powers of up to 2.4 kW and beam quality of 30 mm mrad are demonstrated.

  16. Space Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troupaki, Elisavet; Kashem, Nasir B.; Allan, Graham R.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Stephen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Laser instruments have great potential in enabling a new generation of remote-sensing scientific instruments. NASA s desire to employ laser instruments aboard satellites, imposes stringent reliability requirements under severe conditions. As a result of these requirements, NASA has a research program to understand, quantify and reduce the risk of failure to these instruments when deployed on satellites. Most of NASA s proposed laser missions have base-lined diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers that generally use quasi-constant wave (QCW), 808 nm Laser Diode Arrays (LDAs). Our group has an on-going test program to measure the performance of these LDAs when operated in conditions replicating launch and orbit. In this paper, we report on the results of tests designed to measure the effect of vibration loads simulating launch into space and the radiation environment encountered on orbit. Our primary objective is to quantify the performance of the LDAs in conditions replicating those of a satellite instrument, determine their limitations and strengths which will enable better and more robust designs. To this end we have developed a systematic testing strategy to quantify the effect of environmental stresses on the optical and electrical properties of the LDA.

  17. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Protection for a Laser Diode Ignited Actuator

    SciTech Connect

    SALAS, FREDERICK J.; SANCHEZ, DANIEL H.; WEINLEIN, JOHN HARVEY

    2003-06-01

    The use of laser diodes in devices to ignite pyrotechnics provides unique new capabilities including the elimination of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses entering the device. The Faraday cage formed by the construction of these devices removes the concern of inadvertent ignition of the energetic material. However, the laser diode itself can be damaged by ESD pulses, therefore, to enhance reliability, some protection of the laser diode is necessary. The development of the MC4612 Optical Actuator has included a circuit to protect the laser diode from ESD pulses including the ''Fisher'' severe human body ESD model. The MC4612 uses a laser diode and is designed to replace existing hot-wire actuators. Optical energy from a laser diode, instead of electrical energy, is used to ignite the pyrotechnic. The protection circuit is described along with a discussion of how the circuit design addresses and circumvents the historic 1Amp/1Watt requirement that has been applicable to hot-wire devices.

  18. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

  19. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

  20. Laser Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    CRYSTAL ._____ ____ &m? * Deuterated • Potassium Dihydrogen . Phosphate - ’ KD PO (KD*P) ~ .~ ,_ .i-; Deuterated Ceslum 43ssI6 1 .. r., Dihydrogen ...as a buffer layer to absorb the thermal strain differential between the diode and a copper heatsink has also been suggested in the past and a recent...Potassium Titanium d33829-3 0.16 *; . ~ Penta- Phosphate - ’(20 na) ;A.: KTiOPOi (KTP) - Barium Sodium d33 8 43 .0j 4 eNilhatsh RA.NaNhO

  1. Highly efficient multimode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Pivtsov, V. S.; Semenko, A. V.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    Record high differential efficiency (53.2%) and full optical efficiency (48%) for a multimode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser have been achieved. The characteristics of the laser and methods for improving its efficiency using a distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser (DBR TDL) are discussed.

  2. Diode Laser Measurements of Concentration and Temperature in Microgravity Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.; Kane, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Diode laser absorption spectroscopy provides a direct method of determinating species concentration and local gas temperature in combustion flames. Under microgravity conditions, diode lasers are particularly suitable, given their compact size, low mass and low power requirements. The development of diode laser-based sensors for gas detection in microgravity is presented, detailing measurements of molecular oxygen. Current progress of this work and future application possibilities for these methods on the International Space Station are discussed.

  3. A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Joshua Shapiro, Scott W. Teare New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy...gain media, such as is done in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), has been proposed and early experiments have shown promising results. However...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser 5a

  4. Diode laser potential in laser cleaning of stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo; Pini, Roberto; Siano, Salvatore; Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Meyer, Frank

    2001-10-01

    In this work we investigated for the first time the laser cleaning process of encrusted stones by employing a high power diode laser system. The test have been carried out using a Rofin-Sinar mod. DL025S emitting up to 2.5 kW CW power to clean various samples representing natural encrustation by pollution exposition and graffiti, typically encountered on historical monuments and buildings in urban environment.

  5. Use of a semiconductor diode laser in laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Ghazi; Watson, Graham M.; Lawrence, William

    1996-05-01

    The gold standard surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Over the past few years, TURP has been challenged by laser prostatectomy, a technique that offered many advantages including minimal bleeding, short hospital stay, no fluid absorption, rapid learning curve and better change to preserve antegrade ejaculation. Laser prostatectomy can be done by vaporizing or coagulating prostatic tissue and more recently by using a combination of both: The hybrid technique Nd:YAG lasers have been used, (coupled with contact tips or with side firing or even bare fibers) to either coagulate or vaporize prostatic tissue. Recently semiconductor diode lasers have become available and offer certain advantages. They are compact portable units with no need for water cooling, yet they have sufficient power for tissue vaporization. Diomed (Cambridge, U.K.), produces a 60 W gallium aluminum arsenide semiconductor diode laser emitting at 810 nm. We report the first clinical experience using a semiconductor diode laser for prostates using a combination of contact tip and sidefiring.

  6. Diode Laser for Laryngeal Surgery: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Helena Hotz; Neri, Larissa; Fussuma, Carina Yuri; Imamura, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The diode laser has been frequently used in the management of laryngeal disorders. The portability and functional diversity of this tool make it a reasonable alternative to conventional lasers. However, whether diode laser has been applied in transoral laser microsurgery, the ideal parameters, outcomes, and adverse effects remain unclear. Objective The main objective of this systematic review is to provide a reliable evaluation of the use of diode laser in laryngeal diseases, trying to clarify its ideal parameters in the larynx, as well as its outcomes and complications. Data Synthesis We included eleven studies in the final analysis. From the included articles, we collected data on patient and lesion characteristics, treatment (diode laser's parameters used in surgery), and outcomes related to the laser surgery performed. Only two studies were prospective and there were no randomized controlled trials. Most of the evidence suggests that the diode laser can be a useful tool for treatment of different pathologies in the larynx. In this sense, the parameters must be set depending on the goal (vaporization, section, or coagulation) and the clinical problem. Conclusion: The literature lacks studies on the ideal parameters of the diode laser in laryngeal surgery. The available data indicate that diode laser is a useful tool that should be considered in laryngeal surgeries. Thus, large, well-designed studies correlated with diode compared with other lasers are needed to better estimate its effects. PMID:27096024

  7. Quasi-CW Laser Diode Bar Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Krainak, Michael A.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing technology for satellite-based, high peak power, LIDAR transmitters requiring 3-5 years of reliable operation. Semi-conductor laser diodes provide high efficiency pumping of solid state lasers with the promise of long-lived, reliable operation. 100-watt quasi- CW laser diode bars have been baselined for the next generation laser altimeters. Multi-billion shot lifetimes are required. The authors have monitored the performance of several diodes for billions of shots and investigated operational modes for improving diode lifetime.

  8. Realization of high performance random laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. F.

    2011-03-01

    For the past four decades, extensive studies have been concentrated on the understanding of the physics of random lasing phenomena in scattering media with optical gain. Although lasing modes can be excited from the mirrorless scattering media, the characteristics of high scattering loss, multiple-direction emission, as well as multiple-mode oscillation prohibited them to be used as practical laser cavities. Furthermore, due to the difficulty of achieving high optical gain under electrical excitation, electrical excitation of random lasing action was seldom reported. Hence, mirrorless random cavities have never been used to realize lasers for practical applications -- CD, DVD, pico-projector, etc. Nowadays, studies of random lasing are still limited to the scientific research. Recently, the difficulty of achieving `battery driven' random laser diodes has been overcome by using nano-structured ZnO as the random medium and the careful design of heterojunctions. This lead to the first demonstration of room-temperature electrically pumped random lasing action under continuity wave and pulsed operation. In this presentation, we proposed to realize an array of quasi-one dimensional ZnO random laser diodes. We can show that if the laser array can be manipulated in a way such that every individual random laser can be coupled laterally to and locked with a particular phase relationship to its adjacent neighbor, the laser array can obtain coherent addition of random modes. Hence, output power can be multiplied and one lasing mode will only be supported due to the repulsion characteristics of random modes. This work was supported by HK PolyU grant no. 1-ZV6X.

  9. Long-Lifetime Laser Materials For Effective Diode Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Long quantum lifetimes reduce number of diodes required to pump. Pumping by laser diodes demonstrated with such common Nd laser materials as neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and Nd:YLiF4, but such materials as Nd:LaF3, Nd:NaF.9YF3, and possibly Nd:YF3 more useful because of long lifetimes of their upper laser energy levels. Cost effectiveness primary advantage of solid-state laser materials having longer upper-laser-level lifetimes. Because cost of diodes outweighs cost of laser material by perhaps two orders of magnitude, cost reduced significantly.

  10. Diode Laser Application in Soft Tissue Oral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Ehsan; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Diode laser with wavelengths ranging from 810 to 980 nm in a continuous or pulsed mode was used as a possible instrument for soft tissue surgery in the oral cavity. Discussion: Diode laser is one of laser systems in which photons are produced by electric current with wavelengths of 810, 940 and 980nm. The application of diode laser in soft tissue oral surgery has been evaluated from a safety point of view, for facial pigmentation and vascular lesions and in oral surgery excision; for example frenectomy, epulis fissuratum and fibroma. The advantages of laser application are that it provides relatively bloodless surgical and post surgical courses with minimal swelling and scarring. We used diode laser for excisional biopsy of pyogenic granuloma and gingival pigmentation. Conclusion: The diode laser can be used as a modality for oral soft tissue surgery PMID:25606331

  11. 450 nm diode laser: A new help in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the performance of 450 nm diode laser in oral surgery procedures. METHODS The case described consisted of the removal of a lower lip fibroma through a blue diode laser (λ = 450 nm). RESULTS The efficacy of this device, even at very low power (1W, CW), allows us to obtain very high intra and postoperative comfort for the patient, even with just topical anaesthesia and without needing suture. The healing process was completed in one week and, during the follow-up, the patient did not report any problems, pain or discomfort even without the consumption of any kind of drugs, such as painkillers and antibiotics. The histological examination performed by the pathologist showed a large area of fibrous connective tissue with some portions of epithelium-connective detachments and a regular incision with very scanty areas of carbonization. CONCLUSION The 450 nm diode laser proved of being very efficient in the oral soft tissue surgical procedures, with no side effects for the patients. PMID:27672639

  12. Compact high brightness diode laser emitting 500W from a 100μm fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Stefan; Fritsche, Haro; Kruschke, Bastian; Schmidt, Torsten; Gries, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    High power, high brightness diode lasers are beginning to compete with solid state lasers, i.e. disk and fiber lasers. The core technologies for brightness scaling of diode lasers are optical stacking and dense spectral combining (DSC), as well as improvements of the diode material. Diode lasers have the lowest cost of ownership, highest efficiency and most compact design among all lasers. Multiple Single Emitter (MSE) modules allow highest power and highest brightness diode lasers based on standard broad area diodes. Multiple single emitters, each rated at 12 W, are stacked in the fast axis with a monolithic slow axis collimator (SAC) array. Volume Bragg Gratings (VBG) stabilizes the wavelength and narrow the linewidth to less than 1 nm. Dichroic mirrors are used for dense wavelength multiplexing of 4 channels within 12 nm. Subsequently polarization multiplexing generates 450 W with a beam quality of 4.5 mm*mrad. Fast control electronics and miniaturized switched power supplies enable pulse rise times of less than 10 μs, with pulse widths continuously adjustable from 20 μs to cw. Further power scaling up to multi-kilowatts can be achieved by multiplexing up to 16 channels. The power and brightness of these systems enables the use of direct diode lasers for cutting and welding. The technologies can be transferred to other wavelengths to include 793 nm and 1530 nm. Optimized spectral combining enables further improvements in spectral brightness and power.

  13. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  14. Flight demonstration of laser diode initiated ordnance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, Craig J.; Schulze, Norman R.

    1995-01-01

    A program has been initiated by NASA Headquarters to validate laser initiated ordnance in flight applications. The primary program goal is to bring together a team of government and industry members to develop a laser initiated ordnance system having the test and analysis pedigree to be flown on launch vehicles. The culmination of this effort was a flight of the Pegasus launch vehicle which had two fin rockets initiated by this laser system. In addition, a laser initiated ordnance squib was fired into a pressure bomb during thrusting flight. The complete ordnance system comprising a laser diode firing unit, fiber optic cable assembly, laser initiated detonator, and laser initiated squib was designed and built by The Ensign Bickford Company. The hardware was tested to the requirements of the Pegasus launch vehicle and integrated into the vehicle by The Ensign Bickford Company and the Orbital Sciences Corporation. Discussions include initial program concept, contract implementation, team member responsibilities, analysis results, vehicle integration, safing architecture, ordnance interfaces, mission timeline and telemetry data. A complete system description, summary of the analyses, the qualification test results, and the results of flight are included.

  15. Diode laser photocoagulation in PHACES syndrome hemangiomas: a case series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Russo, N.; Polimeni, A.; Favia, G.; Lacaita, M. G.; Limongelli, L.; Franco, S.

    2014-01-01

    PHACES syndrome is a pediatric syndrome with cutaneous and extra-cutaneous manifestations, such as Posterior fossa defects, Hemangiomas, Arterial lesions, Cardiac abnormalities/aortic coarctation, Eye abnormalities and Sternal cleft. Facial hemangiomas affect the 75% of patients and may arise on the oral mucosa or perioral cutaneous regions. In this study we treated 26 Intraoral Haemangiomas (IH) and 15 Perioral Haemangiomas (PH) with diode laser photocoagulation using a laser of 800+/-10nm of wavelength. For IH treatment an optical fiber of 320 μm was used, and the laser power was set ted at 4 W (t-on 200 ms / t-off 400ms; fluence: 995 J/cm2). For PH treatment an optical fiber of 400 μm at the power of 5 W was used (t-on 100 ms / t-off 300 ms; fluence: 398 J/cm2). IH healed after one session (31%), the other (69%) after two sessions of Laser therapy. In each session, only a limited area of the PH was treated, obtaining a progressive improvement of the lesion. Diode laser photocoagulation is an effective option of treatment for IH and PH in patients affected by PHACE because of its minimal invasiveness. Moreover laser photocoagulation doesn't have side effects and can be performed repeatedly without cumulative toxicity. Nevertheless, more studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy in mid and long time period.

  16. Smart medical diode lasers: fantasy becoming reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltz, Barbara A.

    1995-05-01

    Design principles and rules are currently being formulated for building intelligent machines for `factories of the future'. The intelligent machine is one which has control functions that resemble the `brain', `eyes' and other anthropomorphic substitutes for the skilled expert. These skills are related to the expert's knowledge and abilities to plan complex actions and to detect errors with a continual upgrade of machine understanding. A craft related language enables a high level of communication between the system and the operator. These same capabilities can be embodied in a medical laser system. This paper will define the key characteristics of a smart medical laser and will describe the advantages of an intelligent system based on diode laser technology. System control functions and software architecture will be explained and the main subsystems highlighted.

  17. Influence of laser diode red beams on germination rate of tomato seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculita, P.; Danaila-Guidea, Silvana; Livadariu, Oana; Popa, M.; Ristici, M.; Ristici, Esofina

    2007-08-01

    Laser diodes are lighting devices in which the light is generated by stimulated emission rather than spontaneous emission, with high generation efficiency. A device using 20 red laser diodes is presented. Emission wavelengths are in the 650-670 nm range. Emission power for each laser diode is about 4 mW. This device is used to irradiate the tomato seeds with three different irradiating doses. There were three Petri vessels for each dose having 25 seeds each of them. Results show that the germination rate increases for irradiated seeds. The red light has a positive effect for vegetable cultivated in protected area.

  18. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R [Boston, MA

    2012-03-06

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  19. Using a Diode Laser for Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Yang; Whitten, J. E.

    2001-08-01

    The construction and use of a laser fluorimeter from a 635-nm red diode laser and an amplified photodiode detector are described. The low cost and monochromatic nature of diode lasers make them attractive as excitation sources for educational fluorescence experiments. Use of this type of fluorimeter is demonstrated by measuring fluorescence signals for various concentrations of Nile blue A dissolved in methanol; concentrations as low as 1 ppb are easily detected. The use of this instrument for monitoring the decomposition of a dye by an oxidizing agent is demonstrated by measuring the decay of fluorescence as a function of time for a 1 ppm Nile blue A solution after the addition of sodium hypochlorite.

  20. Efficiency of Nd laser materials with laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Cross, Patricia L.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    For pulsed laser-diode-pumped lasers, where efficiency is the most important issue, the choice of the Nd laser material makes a significant difference. The absorption efficiency, storage efficiency, and extraction efficiency for Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:GSGG, Nd:BEL, Nd:YVO4, and Nd:glass are calculated. The materials are then compared under the assumption of equal quantum efficiency and damage threshold. Nd:YLF is found to be the best candidate for the application discussed here.

  1. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  2. Semiconductor Laser Diode Pumps for Inertial Fusion Energy Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R J

    2011-01-03

    Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at the Omega Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY. For power plant applications, these lasers must be pumped by semiconductor diode lasers to achieve the required laser system efficiency, repetition rate, and lifetime. Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require approximately 40-to-80 GW of peak pump power, and must operate efficiently and with high system availability for decades. These considerations lead to requirements on the efficiency, price, and production capacity of the semiconductor pump sources. This document provides a brief summary of these requirements, and how they can be met by a natural evolution of the current semiconductor laser industry. The detailed technical requirements described in this document flow down from a laser ampl9ifier design described elsewhere. In brief, laser amplifiers comprising multiple Nd:glass gain slabs are face-pumped by two planar diode arrays, each delivering 30 to 40 MW of peak power at 872 nm during a {approx} 200 {micro}s quasi-CW (QCW) pulse with a repetition rate in the range of 10 to 20 Hz. The baseline design of the diode array employs a 2D mosaic of submodules to facilitate manufacturing. As a baseline, they envision that each submodule is an array of vertically stacked, 1 cm wide, edge-emitting diode bars, an industry standard form factor. These stacks are mounted on a common backplane providing cooling and current drive. Stacks are conductively cooled to the backplane, to minimize both diode package cost and the number of fluid interconnects for improved reliability. While the baseline assessment in this document is based on edge-emitting devices, the amplifier design does not preclude future use of surface emitting diodes, which may offer appreciable future cost reductions and

  3. Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays for Mercury Laser Altimeter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Schafer, John; Allan, Graham R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. The MESSENGER mission is flying the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) which is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser instrument designed to map the topography of Mercury. The environment imposed on the instrument by the orbital dynamics places special requirements on the laser diode arrays. In order to limit the radiative heating of the satellite from the surface of Mercury, the satellite is designed to have a highly elliptical orbit. The satellite will heat near perigee and cool near apogee. The laser power is cycled during these orbits so that the laser is on for only 30 minutes (perigee) in a 12 hour orbit. The laser heats 10 C while powered up and cools while powered down. In order to simulate these operational conditions, we designed a test to measure the LDA performance while being temperature and power cycled. Though the mission requirements are specific to NASA and performance requirements are derived from unique operating conditions, the results are general and widely applicable. We present results on the performance of twelve LDAs operating for several hundred million pulses. The arrays are 100 watt, quasi-CW, conductively-cooled, 808 nm devices. Prior to testing, we fully characterize each device to establish a baseline for individual array performance and status. Details of this characterization can be found in reference. Arrays are divided into four groups and subjected to the temperature and power cycling matrix are shown.

  4. Recent advances in antiguided diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Jansen, M.; Roth, T. J.; Zmudzinski, C.; Tu, C.; Yun, J.

    1992-06-01

    The paper discusses features of advanced antiguided diode laser arrays optimized for single-spatial-mode operation to high output power. Twenty-element antiguided arrays have been fabricated to operate reproducibly to CW power levels of 0.5 W with 48-50 percent efficiency. These devices were also shown to exhibit thousands of hours of reliable operation. The paper gives special attention to modeling and optimization of multiclad antiguided arrays and presents experimental results on multiclad antiguided arrays fabricated by either of the two techniques, the conventional self-aligned stripe and the complementary self-aligned stripe.

  5. Tunable Diode Laser Heterodyne Spectrophotometry of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, P. F.; McElroy, C. T.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Tunable diode laser heterodyne spectrophotometry (TDLHS) has been used to make extremely high resolution (less than 0.0005/ cm) solar spectra in the 9.6 micron ozone band. Observations have shown that a signal-to-noise ratio of 95 : 1 (35% of theoretical) for an integration time of 1/8 second can be achieved at a resolution of 0.0005 wavenumbers. The spectral data have been inverted to yield a total column amount of ozone, in good agreement with that. measured at the nearby National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ozone monitoring facility in Boulder, Colorado.

  6. Broadband External-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    A broadband external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been invented for use in spectroscopic surveys preparatory to optical detection of gases. Heretofore, commercially available ECDLs have been designed, in conjunction with sophisticated tuning assemblies, for narrow- band (and, typically, single-frequency) operation, as needed for high sensitivity and high spectral resolution in some gas-detection applications. However, for preparatory spectroscopic surveys, high sensitivity and narrow-band operation are not needed; in such cases, the present broadband ECDL offers a simpler, less-expensive, more-compact alternative to a commercial narrowband ECDL.

  7. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  8. Measurements of ambient ammonia using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer: Characteristics of ambient ammonia emissions in an urban area of New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongquan; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    2006-05-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) was deployed during the PMTACS-NY Supersite winter 2004 intensive field campaign at Queens College in New York City to measure the ambient gaseous ammonia. For the characterization of ammonia emissions from the mobile sources, a LI-7000 CO2/H2O analyzer was also collocated with the TDLAS to measure ambient CO2 and H2O vapor. The field measurements and laboratory calibration with certified ammonia standard have been used to evaluate the performance of the TDLAS system. High time resolved TDLAS ambient ammonia measurements performed at Queens College from 10 January to 6 February showed high variability, with NH3 concentrations ranging from below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) to maxima of 197.4 ppb and a mean value of 0.8 ppb over the entire campaign. Many high-frequency NH3 spikes spanning over a less than 1-min duration were observed during the high traffic periods. The occurrence of the NH3 spikes was closely correlated with observed CO2 spikes, a good marker of traffic exhaust. This correlation yielded an NH3 emission ratio of 0.12 ppbv/ppmv, which can be used to estimate an NH3 emission factor of 35.5 mg/km. The [NH3]/[CO2] ratios over the entire field study was also obtained and added into the best NH3 emission estimates. On a snowy day, no obvious drop of NH3 and CO2 concentrations was measured as the ambient H2O vapor increased. The observed dramatic decrease in the ambient NH3 and CO2 concentrations on a rainy day resulted from a quick air mass switch. Two similar bimodal diurnal patterns associated with the rush hour traffic were observed during school holidays and school days of Queens College, New York. More NH3 emissions from cold start vehicles might contribute to a higher peak in the late afternoon hours. Such observations suggest that the NH3 emissions from the traffic exhaust could be a major source of the ambient NH3 in urban areas.

  9. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  10. CO.sub.2 optically pumped distributed feedback diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A diode laser optically pumped by a CO.sub.2 coherent source. Interference fringes generated by feeding the optical pumping beam against a second beam, periodically alter the reflectivity of the diode medium allowing frequency variation of the output signal by varying the impingent angle of the CO.sub.2 laser beams.

  11. Monitoring The Atmosphere By Diode-Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James

    1988-01-01

    Report describes state of art of tunable-diode-laser second-harmonic spectroscopy applied to measurements of concentrations of trace constituents of atmosphere. Combination of temperature, composition, and drive-current tuning, wavelengths of tunable diode lasers varied over infrared range of 3 to 30 micrometer, containing spectral lines of many molecules of interest in atmospheric research.

  12. Means for phase locking the outputs of a surface emitting laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An array of diode lasers, either a two-dimensional array of surface emitting lasers, or a linear array of stripe lasers, is phase locked by a diode laser through a hologram which focuses the output of the diode laser into a set of distinct, spatially separated beams, each one focused onto the back facet of a separate diode laser of the array. The outputs of the diode lasers thus form an emitted coherent beam out of the front of the array.

  13. New diode wavelengths for pumping solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Beach, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    High-power laser-diode arrays have been demonstrated to be viable pump sources for solid-state lasers. The diode bars (fill factor of 0.7) were bonded to silicon microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power operation. Over 12 W of CW output power was achieved from a one cm AlGaInP tensile-strained single-quantum-well laser diode bar. At 690 nm, a compressively-strained single-quantum-well laser-diode array produced 360 W/cm{sup 2} per emitting aperture under CW operation, and 2.85 kW of pulsed power from a 3.8 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array. InGaAs strained single-quantum-well laser diodes emitting at 900 nm produced 2.8 kW pulsed power from a 4.4 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array.

  14. Digital control of diode laser for atmospheric spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Rutledge, C. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for remote absorption spectroscopy of trace species using a diode laser tunable over a useful spectral region of 50 to 200 cm(-1) by control of diode laser temperature over range from 15 K to 100 K, and tunable over a smaller region of typically 0.1 to 10 cm(-1) by control of the diode laser current over a range from 0 to 2 amps. Diode laser temperature and current set points are transmitted to the instrument in digital form and stored in memory for retrieval under control of a microprocessor during measurements. The laser diode current is determined by a digital to analog converter through a field effect transistor for a high degree of ambient temperature stability, while the laser diode temperature is determined by set points entered into a digital to analog converter under control of the microprocessor. Temperature of the laser diode is sensed by a sensor diode to provide negative feedback to the temperature control circuit that responds to the temperature control digital to analog converter.

  15. 915nm high-power broad area laser diodes with ultra-small optical confinement based on Asymmetric Decoupled Confinement Heterostructure (ADCH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Yuji; Yamada, Yumi; Muto, Masanori; Sato, Syunta; Nogawa, Ryozaburo; Sakamoto, Akira; Yamaguchi, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    915nm high-power and high-reliability single emitter laser diodes based on Asymmetric Decoupled Confinement Heterostructure (ADCH) are demonstrated. Advantage of ADCH is that it can optimize active layer confinement (?) and confinement ratio of p- to n-doped layer (?p/?n), independently, to manage large effective spot size and low internal loss without any penalty in carrier confinement. 4mm-cavity, 100μm wide stripe LDs with large effective spot size of 1.5μm demonstrates record high Catastrophic-optical-damage (COD) free operation over 42W output. Accelerated aging tests are conducted for 325 devices in total with 1.8 million device hours. Mean time to failure of random failure mode is estimated to be 1.1 million hours for 12W at room temperature.

  16. A technique for local area transfer and simultaneous crystallization of amorphous silicon layer with midair cavity by irradiation with near-infrared semiconductor diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaike, Kohei; Kobayashi, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Shogo; Akazawa, Muneki; Higashi, Seiichiro

    2014-04-01

    A technique for local layer transfer and simultaneous crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) films with midair cavity induced by near-infrared semiconductor diode laser (SDL) irradiation is demonstrated. After SDL irradiation, the silicon (Si) films were completely transferred and crystallized simultaneously on counter substrates. Electron backscatter diffraction pattern maps confirmed that the maximum grain size of the transferred Si films is 20 µm. High-performance polycrystalline Si thin-film transistors (TFTs) were successfully fabricated on the locally transferred Si films. These TFTs showed a high on/off ratio of more than 106 and a field-effect mobility as high as 492 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  17. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A. Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  18. Design of drive circuit of laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Yingying; Huang, Xuegong; Xu, Xiaobin

    2016-10-01

    Aiming at the difficult problem of high precision frequency stabilization of semiconductor laser diode, the laser frequency control is realized through the design of the semiconductor drive system. Above all, the relationship between the emission frequency and the temperature of LD is derived theoretically. Then the temperature corresponding to the stable frequency is obtained. According to the desired temperature stability of LD, temperature control system is designed, which is composed of a temperature setting circuit, temperature gathering circuit, the temperature display circuit, analog PID control circuit and a semiconductor refrigerator control circuit module. By sampling technology, voltage of platinum resistance is acquired, and the converted temperature is display on liquid crystal display. PID analog control circuit controls speed stability and precision of temperature control. The constant current source circuit is designed to provide the reference voltage by a voltage stabilizing chip, which is buffered by an operational amplifier. It is connected with the MOSFET to drive the semiconductor laser to provide stable current for the semiconductor laser. PCB circuit board was finished and the experimental was justified. The experimental results show that: the design of the temperature control system could achieve the goal of temperature monitoring. Meanwhile, temperature can be stabilized at 40°C +/- 0.1°C. The output voltage of the constant current source is 2 V. The current is 35 mA.

  19. Computer-Assisted Experiments with a Laser Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    A laser diode from an inexpensive laser pen (laser pointer) is used in simple experiments. The radiant output power and efficiency of the laser are measured, and polarization of the light beam is shown. The "h/e" ratio is available from the threshold of spontaneous emission. The lasing threshold is found using several methods. With a…

  20. Laser diode ignition characteristics of Zirconium Potassium Perchlorate (ZPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Jerry D.; Tindol, Scot

    1993-01-01

    Hi-Shear Technology, Corp., (HSTC) has designed and built a Laser equivalent NASA Standard Initiator (LNSI). Langlie tests with a laser diode output initiating ZPP were conducted as a part of this effort. The test parameters include time to first pressure, laser power density requirements, and ignition time. The data from these laser tests on ZPP are presented.

  1. High power laser diodes for the NASA direct detection laser transceiver experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seery, Bernard D.; Holcomb, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    High-power semiconductor laser diodes selected for use in the NASA space laser communications experiments are discussed. The diode selection rationale is reviewed, and the laser structure is shown. The theory and design of the third mirror lasers used in the experiments are addressed.

  2. High-power narrow-vertical-divergence photonic band crystal laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yejin; Zheng, Wanhua; Wang, Yufei; Qi, Aiyi

    2014-12-08

    900 nm longitudinal photonic band crystal (PBC) laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure are fabricated. With a same calculated fundamental-mode divergence, stronger mode discrimination is achieved by a quasi-periodic index modulation in the PBC waveguide than a periodic one. Experiments show that the introduction of over 5.5 μm-thick PBC waveguide contributes to only 10% increment of the internal loss for the laser diodes. For broad area PBC lasers, output powers of 5.75 W under continuous wave test and over 10 W under quasi-continuous wave test are reported. The vertical divergence angles are 10.5° at full width at half maximum and 21.3° with 95% power content, in conformity with the simulated angles. Such device shows a prospect for high-power narrow-vertical-divergence laser emission from single diode laser and laser bar.

  3. Multi-kW high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Segref, Armin; Wolf, Paul; Unger, Andreas; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens

    2013-02-01

    Fiber coupled diode laser devices are attractive light sources for applications in the area of solid-state laser pumping and materials processing. The ongoing improvement in the brightness of diode lasers, which means power per beam quality, makes more and more industrial applications accessible to diode lasers. For many applications in materials processing multi-kW output power with a beam quality of better than 30 mm x mrad is needed. Previously we have reported on a modular diode laser platform based on a tailored bar design (T-Bar) and have demonstrated an output power of up to 785 W out of a 200 μm NA 0.22 fiber at a single wavelength of 976 nm. We have now extended that tailored bar platform to different wavelengths in the range from 900 nm to 1100 nm. At each single wavelength efficient fiber coupling into a 200 μm NA 0.22 fiber will be demonstrated. One important concept for power scaling is coarse wavelength multiplexing with a spectral separation of typically about 40 nm. Combining of different wavelengths enables scalable multi-kW high-brightness diode laser units. Further power scaling can be achieved by dense wavelength multiplexing with a spectral separation of only about 5 nm. In this paper we report on a diode laser unit with 3.5 kW output power and a beam quality of 25 mm x mrad.

  4. Diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:glass laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, W. J.; Fan, T. Y.; Byer, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reports on diode-laser pumping of monolithic Nd:glass laser oscillators. End pumping with a single-stripe diode laser, a threshold of 2.2 mW, and a slope efficiency of 42 percent were observed on a 2-mm-long oscillator with a mode radius of 35 microns. The oscillator generated 2.5 mW of single-ended output power in many axial modes.

  5. Active cooling solutions for high power laser diodes stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karni, Yoram; Klumel, Genady; Levy, Moshe; Berk, Yuri; Openhaim, Yaki; Gridish, Yaakov; Elgali, Asher; Avisar, Meir; Blonder, Moshe; Sagy, Hila; Gertsenshtein, Alex

    2008-02-01

    High power water cooled diode lasers find increasing demand in biomedical, cosmetic and industrial applications, where very high brightness and power are required. The high brightness is achieved either by increasing the power of each bar or by reducing the emitting area of the stacks. Two new products will be presented: Horizontal CW stacks with output power as high as 1kW using 80 W bars with emitting area width as low as 50 μm Vertical QCW stacks with output power as high as 1.2kW using 120 W bars. Heat removal from high power laser stacks often requires microchannel coolers operated with finely filtered deionized (DI) water. However, for certain industrial applications the reliability of this cooling method is widely considered insufficient due to leakage failures caused the highly corrosive DI water. Two solutions to the above problem will be discussed. A microchannel cooler-based package, which vastly reduces the corrosion problem, and a novel high-power laser diode stack that completely eliminates it. The latter solution is especially effective for pulsed applications in high duty cycle range.

  6. Innovative Facet Passivation for High-Brightness Laser Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-05

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 high-power laser diodes, catastrophic optical damage, high energy lasers REPORT...factor bar) desired for military high energy lasers (HELs). COD of the front facet (laser mirror) is the main failure mechanism that constrains scaling... energy lasers (HELs). COD of the front facet (laser mirror) is the main failure mechanism that constrains scaling LD power by 10X over the SOA to 600 W

  7. Modular package for cooling a laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar packages and active cooling. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar package having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar packages are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink that is attached proximate to the laser bar so that it absorbs heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar package comprises a thin inlet manifold and a thin outlet manifold connected to an inlet corridor and an outlet corridor. The inlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array, and the outlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has application as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers. Further, it can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors, and in military and space applications, and it can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations.

  8. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  9. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  10. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography.As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc.Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity.Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care.

  11. Linewidth-tunable laser diode array for rubidium laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhiyong; Tan Rongqing; Xu Cheng; Li Lin

    2013-02-28

    To optimise the pump source for a high-power diodepumped rubidium vapour laser, we have designed a laser diode array (LDA) with a narrowed and tunable linewidth and an external cavity formed by two volume Bragg gratings (VBGs). Through controlling the temperature differences between the two VBGs, the LDA linewidth, which was 1.8 nm before mounting the two VBGs, was tunable from 100 pm to 0.2 nm, while the output power changed by no more than 4 %. By changing simultaneously the temperature in both VBGs, the centre wavelength in air of the linewidth-tunable LDA was tunable from 779.40 nm to 780.05 nm. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  12. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  13. Promoting Robust Design of Diode Lasers for Space: A National Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Kashem, Nasir B.; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Mense, Allan T.

    2007-01-01

    The Diode-laser Array Working Group (DAWG) is a national-level consumer/provider forum for discussion of engineering and manufacturing issues which influence the reliability and survivability of high-power broad-area laser diode devices in space, with an emphasis on laser diode arrays (LDAs) for optical pumping of solid-state laser media. The goals of the group are to formulate and validate standardized test and qualification protocols, operational control recommendations, and consensus manufacturing and certification standards. The group is using reliability and lifetime data collected by laser diode manufacturers and the user community to develop a set of standardized guidelines for specifying and qualifying laser diodes for long-duration operation in space, the ultimate goal being to promote an informed U.S. Government investment and procurement strategy for assuring the availability and durability of space-qualified LDAs. The group is also working to establish effective implementation of statistical design techniques at the supplier design, development, and manufacturing levels to help reduce product performance variability and improve product reliability for diodes employed in space applications

  14. Temperature control during diode laser welding in a human cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Pini, Roberto; Menabuoni, Luca

    2007-07-01

    Diode laser welding is a technique proposed in ophthalmic surgery to induce immediate sealing of clear corneal wounds. The welding effect is achieved irradiating the area, previously treated with a chromophore, by the use of a low power diode laser: the resulting thermal effect induces structural modifications in the stromal collagen, that welds upon cooling. We present a study on the temperature dynamics developing during welding in a human eye. An infrared thermocamera was used to measure the temperature variations on the surface of the cornea during clinical penetrating keratoplasty (corneal transplant). The experimental data were used as a starting point for a theoretical investigation of the temperature rising inside the ocular structures: we developed a mathematical model based on the bio-heat equation and solved by the use of the Finite Element Method (FEM). The predictive accuracy was verified by comparing the temperature post-processing description with the results obtained from the thermographic data. The model was then used to study the temperature rise and heat propagation inside the eye. Experimental results and model analysis indicated the occurrence of heat confinement during the treatment procedure and a modest enhancement of the temperature (reaching about 55°C inside the laser treated wound), thus evidencing the safety of the procedure in clinical applications.

  15. Optical monitoring of high power direct diode laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Farahmand, Parisa; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-12-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most advanced surface modification techniques which can be used to build and repair high-value components. High power direct diode laser (HPDDL) offers unique quality and cost advantages over other lasers (CO2, Nd:YAG). Especially its rectangular laser beam with top-hat intensity distribution makes HPDDL an ideal tool for large area cladding. In order to utilize this technique successfully, the development of on-line monitoring and process control is necessary. In this study, an optical monitoring system consisting of a high-speed CCD camera, a pyrometer, and an infrared camera was used to analyze the mass- and heat-transfer in the cladding process. The particle transport in flight was viewed by a high-speed CCD camera; the interaction between powder flow and laser beam was observed by an infrared camera; and the thermal behavior of the molten pool was recorded by the pyrometer and the infrared camera. The effects of the processing parameters on the laser attenuation, particle heating and clad properties were investigated based on the obtained signals. The optical monitoring method improved the understanding about mutual interrelated phenomena in the cladding process.

  16. High-power pulsed 976-nm DFB laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Wolfgang; Kamp, Martin; Koeth, Johannes; Worschech, Lukas

    2010-04-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes nowadays provide stable single mode emission for many different applications covering a wide wavelength range. The available output power is usually limited because of catastrophical optical mirror damage (COD) caused by the small facet area. For some applications such as trace gas detection output powers of several ten milliwatts are sufficiently high, other applications like distance measurement or sensing in harsh environments however require much higher output power levels. We present a process combining optimizations of the layer structure with a new lateral design of the ridge waveguide which is fully compatible with standard coating and passivation processes. By implementing a large optical cavity with the active layer positioned not in the middle of the waveguide layers but very close to the upper edge, the lasers' farfield angles can be drastically reduced. Furthermore, the travelling light mode can be pushed down into the large optical cavity by continuously decreasing the ridge waveguide width towards both laser facets. The light mode then spreads over a much larger area, thus reducing the surface power density which leads to significantly higher COD thresholds. Laterally coupled DFB lasers based on this concept emitting at wavelengths around 976 nm yield hitherto unachievable COD thresholds of 1.6 W under pulsed operation. The high mode stability during the 50 ns pulses means such lasers are ideally suited for high precision distance measurement or similar tasks.

  17. Short range laser obstacle detector. [for surface vehicles using laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriger, W. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A short range obstacle detector for surface vehicles is described which utilizes an array of laser diodes. The diodes operate one at a time, with one diode for each adjacent azimuth sector. A vibrating mirror a short distance above the surface provides continuous scanning in elevation for all azimuth sectors. A diode laser is synchronized with the vibrating mirror to enable one diode laser to be fired, by pulses from a clock pulse source, a number of times during each elevation scan cycle. The time for a given pulse of light to be reflected from an obstacle and received is detected as a measure of range to the obstacle.

  18. Transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2015-09-30

    We have studied theoretically the operation of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser. For the case of high-intensity laser radiation, we have obtained an analytical solution to a complex system of differential equations describing the laser. This solution allows one to exhaustively determine all the energy characteristics of the laser and to find optimal parameters of the working medium and pump radiation (temperature, buffer gas pressure, and intensity and width of the pump spectrum). (lasers)

  19. Multiple-Diode-Laser Gas-Detection Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Beer, Reinhard; Sander, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    Small concentrations of selected gases measured automatically. Proposed multiple-laser-diode spectrometer part of system for measuring automatically concentrations of selected gases at part-per-billion level. Array of laser/photodetector pairs measure infrared absorption spectrum of atmosphere along probing laser beams. Adaptable to terrestrial uses as monitoring pollution or control of industrial processes.

  20. Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, the principal applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays are as high intensity pump sources for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs). A simple end-pumping architecture has been developed and demonstrated that allows the radiation from microlens-conditioned, two-dimensional diode array apertures to be efficiently delivered to the end of rod lasers. To date, pump powers as high as 2.5 kW have been delivered to 3 mm diameter laser rods. Such high power levels are critical for pumping solid state lasers in which the terminal laser level is a Stark level lying in the ground state manifold. Previously, such systems have often required operation of the solid state gain medium at low temperature to freeze out the terminal laser Stark level population. The authors recently developed high intensity pump sources overcome this difficulty by effectively pumping to much higher inversion levels, allowing efficient operation at or near room temperature. Because the end-pumping technology is scalable in absolute power, the number of rare-earth ions and transitions that can be effectively accessed for use in practical DPSSL systems has grown tremendously.

  1. Investigation of temperature feedback signal parameters during neoplasms treatment by diode laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Gelfond, Mark L.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Semyashkina, Yulia V.

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of temperature signal in operation area and laser power at nevus, papilloma, and keratoma in vivo removal by a 980+/-10 nm diode laser with "blackened" tip operating in continuous (CW) mode and with temperature feedback (APC) mode are presented. Feedback allows maintaining temperature in the area of laser treatment at a preset level by regulating power of diode laser radiation (automatic power control). Temperature in the area of laser treatment was controlled by measuring the amplitude of thermal radiation, which occurs when tissue is heated by laser radiation. Removal of neoplasm was carried out in CW mode with laser radiation average power of 12.5+/-0.5 W; mean temperature in the area of laser treatment was 900+/-10°C for nevus, 800+/-15°C for papilloma, and 850+/-20°C for keratoma. The same laser radiation maximal power (12.5 W) and targeted temperature (900°C) were set for nevus removal in APC mode. The results of investigation are real time oscillograms of the laser power and temperature in the area of laser treatment at neoplasms removal in two described above modes. Simultaneously with the measurement of laser power and the temperature in the area of laser treatment video recording of surgeon manipulations was carried out. We discuss the correlation between the power of the laser radiation, the temperature in the area of laser treatment and consistency of surgeon manipulation. It is shown that the method of removal (excision with or without traction, scanning) influences the temperature in the area of laser treatment. It was found, that at removal of nevus with temperature feedback (APC) mode to achieve comparable with CW mode temperature in the area of laser treatment (900+/-10°C) 20-50% less laser power is required. Consequently, removing these neoplasms in temperature feedback mode can be less traumatic than the removal in CW mode.

  2. Stable diode lasers for hydrogen precision spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnis, J.; Matveev, A.; Kolachevsky, N.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.

    2008-10-01

    We report on an external cavity diode laser at 972 nmstabilized to a mid-plane mounted Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator with afinesse of 400000. The 0.5 Hz optical beat note line width betweentwo similar lasers (Allan deviation 2 × 10-15) is limitedby thermal noise properties of two independent FP resonators. Thelong term drift of the FP resonator and mirror substrates made fromUltra-Low-Expansion glass (ULE) is small and can be well predictedon time intervals up to many hours if the resonator is stabilized atthe zero thermal expansion temperature Tc. Using a Peltierelement in a vacuum chamber for temperature stabilization allowsstabilization of the FP cavity to Tc which is usually below theroom temperature. Beat note measurements with a femtosecond opticalfrequency comb referenced to a H-maser during 15 hours have shown awell defined linear drift of the FP resonance frequency of about 60 mHz/s with residual frequency excursions of less than ±20 Hz.

  3. High efficiency >26 W diode end-pumped Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Teppitaksak, Achaya; Minassian, Ara; Thomas, Gabrielle M; Damzen, Michael J

    2014-06-30

    We show for the first time that multi-ten Watt operation of an Alexandrite laser can be achieved with direct red diode-pumping and with high efficiency. An investigation of diode end-pumped Alexandrite rod lasers demonstrates continuous-wave output power in excess of 26W, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous diode end-pumping systems, and slope efficiency 49%, the highest reported for a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser. Wavelength tuning from 730 to 792nm is demonstrated using self-seeding feedback from an external grating. Q-switched laser operation based on polarization-switching to a lower gain axis of Alexandrite has produced ~mJ-pulse energy at 1kHz pulse rate in fundamental TEM(00) mode.

  4. Laser diodes for sensing applications: adaptive cruise control and more

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerlein, Joerg; Morgott, Stefan; Ferstl, Christian

    2005-02-01

    Adaptive Cruise Controls (ACC) and pre-crash sensors require an intelligent eye which can recognize traffic situations and deliver a 3-dimensional view. Both microwave RADAR and "Light RADAR" (LIDAR) systems are well suited as sensors. In order to utilize the advantages of LIDARs -- such as lower cost, simpler assembly and high reliability -- the key component, the laser diode, is of primary importance. Here, we present laser diodes which meet the requirements of the automotive industry.

  5. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  6. Athermal diode-pumped laser designator modules for targeting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepy, B.; Closse, G.; Da Cruz, J.; Sabourdy, D.; Montagne, J.; Nguyen, L.

    2012-10-01

    We report on the development and characteristics of athermal diode-pumped designator modules as Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) for targeting application. These modules are designed with the latest diode-pumped technology minimizing volume and power consumption. The core technology allows to address multi-platforms requirements such as land or airborne. Products are composed of a Laser Transmitter Unit (LTU) and Laser Electronic Unit (LEU) for modular approach.

  7. Diffraction Limited 3.15 Microns Cascade Diode Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    carriers recycling by the cascade pumping . The narrow ridge 6- m-wide waveguides were defined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching...diffraction limited, diode lasers, cascade pumping REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S...of GaSb-based type-I QW diode lasers by utilizing cascade pumping scheme4. The carriers were recycled with 100% efficiency between two gain stages

  8. Commercial applications of high-powered laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, David L.; Jacobs, Richard D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of high power laser diodes using surface emitting distributed feedback (SEDFB) techniques has matured to the point where serious marketing analyses have been conducted. While development of the base technology continues, the initiation of systems applications and manufacturing engineering has begun. This effort, in direct response to growing market demand, is the critical bridge between research and the development of viable products for commercial applications. This paper addresses the history of laser technology development, the current status of high powered laser diode development, the forces defining current and future markets and the role of `conventional wisdom' in laser technology and market development.

  9. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  10. Diode-pumped Alexandrite ring laser for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, A.; Jungbluth, B.; Strotkamp, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Poprawe, R.; Höffner, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present design and performance data of a diode-pumped Q-switched Alexandrite ring laser in the millijoule regime, which is longitudinally pumped by laser diode bar modules in the red spectral range. As a first step, a linear resonator was designed and characterized in qcw operation as well as in Q-switched operation. Based on these investigations, two separate linear cavities were set up, each with one Alexandrite crystal longitudinally pumped by one diode module. The two cavities are fused together and form a ring cavity which yields up to 6 mJ pulse burst energy in the qcw regime at 770 nm.

  11. Reliability of high power laser diodes with external optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsendorf, Dennis; Schneider, Stephan; Meinschien, Jens; Tomm, Jens W.

    2016-03-01

    Direct diode laser systems gain importance in the fields of material processing and solid-state laser pumping. With increased output power, also the influence of strong optical feedback has to be considered. Uncontrolled optical feedback is known for its spectral and power fluctuation effects, as well as potential emitter damage. We found that even intended feedback by use of volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for spectral stabilization may result in emitter lifetime reduction. To provide stable and reliable laser systems design, guidelines and maximum feedback ratings have to be found. We present a model to estimate the optical feedback power coupled back into the laser diode waveguide. It includes several origins of optical feedback and wide range of optical elements. The failure thresholds of InGaAs and AlGaAs bars have been determined not only at standard operation mode but at various working points. The influence of several feedback levels to laser diode lifetime is investigated up to 4000h. The analysis of the semiconductor itself leads to a better understanding of the degradation process by defect spread. Facet microscopy, LBIC- and electroluminescence measurements deliver detailed information about semiconductor defects before and after aging tests. Laser diode protection systems can monitor optical feedback. With this improved understanding, the emergency shutdown threshold can be set low enough to ensure laser diode reliability but also high enough to provide better machine usability avoiding false alarms.

  12. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.

  13. Extended-cavity diode lasers with tracked resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Long, Quan; Vo, Christoph; Müller, Holger; Chu, Steven

    2007-11-01

    We present a painless, almost-free upgrade to present extended-cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) that improves the long-term mode-hop-free performance by stabilizing the resonance of the internal cavity to the external cavity. This stabilization is based on the observation that the frequency or amplitude noise of the ECDL is lowest at the optimum laser diode temperature or injection current. Thus, keeping the diode current at the level where the noise is lowest ensures mode-hop-free operation within one of the stable regions of the mode chart, even if these should drift due to external influences. This method can be applied directly to existing laser systems without modifying the optical setup. We demonstrate the method in two ECDLs stabilized to vapor cells at 852 and 895 nm wavelengths. We achieve long-term mode-hop-free operation and low noise at low power consumption, even with an inexpensive non-antireflection-coated diode.

  14. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1988-01-01

    Slot timing recovery in a direct detection optical PPM communication system can be achieved by processing the photodetector waveform with a nonlinear device whose output forms the input to a phase lock group. The choice of a simple transition detector as the nonlinearity is shown to give satisfactory synchronization performance. The rms phase error of the recovered slot clock and the effect of slot timing jitter on the bit error probability were directly measured. The experimental system consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (lambda = 834 nm) and a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector and used Q=4 PPM signaling operated at a source data rate of 25 megabits/second. The mathematical model developed to characterize system performance is shown to be in good agreement with actual performance measurements. The use of the recovered slot clock in the receiver resulted in no degradation in receiver sensitivity compared to a system with perfect slot timing. The system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the minus 6 power at received signal energies corresponding to an average of less than 60 detected photons per information bit.

  15. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1987-01-01

    A 25 megabit/sec direct detection optical communication system that used Q=4 PPM signalling was constructed and its performance measured under laboratory conditions. The system used a single-mode AlGaAs laser diode transmitter and low noise silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector. Comparison of measured performance with the theoretical revealed that modeling the APD output as a Gaussian process under conditions of negligible background radiation and low (less than 10 to the -12 power A) APD bulk leakage currents leads to substantial underestimates of optimal APD gain to use and overestimates of system bit error probability. A procedure is given to numerically compute system performance which uses the more accurate Webb's Approximation of the exact Conradi distribution for the APD ouput signal that does not require excessive amounts of computer time (a few minutes of VAX 8600 CPU time per system operating point). Examples are given which illustrate the breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in assessing system performance. This system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6 power at a received signal energy corresponding to an average of 60 absorbed photons/bit and optimal APD gain of 700.

  16. High Power Laser Diode Arrays for 2-Micron Solid State Coherent Lidars Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra; Sudesh, Vikas; Baker, Nathaniel

    2003-01-01

    Laser diode arrays are critical components of any diode-pumped solid state laser systems, constraining their performance and reliability. Laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used as the pump source for energizing the solid state lasing media to generate an intense coherent laser beam with a high spatial and spectral quality. The solid state laser design and the characteristics of its lasing materials define the operating wavelength, pulse duration, and power of the laser diodes. The pump requirements for high pulse energy 2-micron solid state lasers are substantially different from those of more widely used 1-micron lasers and in many aspects more challenging [1]. Furthermore, the reliability and lifetime demanded by many coherent lidar applications, such as global wind profiling from space and long-range clear air turbulence detection from aircraft, are beyond the capability of currently available LDAs. In addition to the need for more reliable LDAs with longer lifetime, further improvement in the operational parameters of high power quasi-cw LDAs, such as electrical efficiency, brightness, and duty cycle, are also necessary for developing cost-effective 2-micron coherent lidar systems for applications that impose stringent size, heat dissipation, and power constraints. Global wind sounding from space is one of such applications, which is the main driver for this work as part of NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program. This paper discusses the current state of the 792 nm LDA technology and the technology areas being pursued toward improving their performance. The design and development of a unique characterization facility for addressing the specific issues associated with the LDAs for pumping 2-micron coherent lidar transmitters and identifying areas of technological improvement will be described. Finally, the results of measurements to date on various standard laser diode packages, as well as custom-designed packages with potentially longer lifetime, will be reported.

  17. 1047 nm laser diode master oscillator Nd:YLF power amplifier laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Krainak, M. A.; Unger, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter system at 1047 nm wavelength using a semiconductor laser diode and a diode pumped solid state (Nd:YLF) laser (DPSSL) amplifier is described. A small signal gain of 23 dB, a near diffraction limited beam, 1 Gbit/s modulation rates and greater than 0.6 W average power are achieved. This MOPA laser has the advantage of amplifying the modulation signal from the laser diode master oscillator (MO) with no signal degradation.

  18. Diode-Pumped, Q-Switched, Frequency-Doubling Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental Q-switched, diode-pumped, intracavity-frequency-doubling laser generates pulses of radiation at wavelength of 532 nm from excitation at 810 nm. Principal innovative feature distinguishing laser from others of its type: pulsed operation of laser at pulse-repetition frequencies higher than reported previously. Folded resonator keeps most of second-harmonic radiation away from Q-switcher, laser crystal, and laser diodes. Folding mirror highly reflective at fundamental laser wavelength and highly transmissive at second-harmonic laser wavelength. By virtue of difference of about 0.6 percent between reflectivities in two polarizations at fundamental wavelength, folding mirror favors polarized oscillation at fundamental wavelength. This characteristic desirable for doubling of frequency in some intracavity crystals.

  19. Respiratory complications after diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Miloš; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Quante, Mirja; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Schnoor, Jörg; Kaisers, Udo X; Dietz, Andreas; Kluba, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Children with certain risk factors, such as comorbidities or severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are known to require extended postoperative monitoring after adenotonsillectomy. However, there are no recommendations available for diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. A retrospective chart review of 96 children who underwent diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy (07/2011-06/2013) was performed. Data for general and sleep apnea history, power of the applied diode-laser (λ = 940 nm), anesthesia parameters, the presence of postoperative respiratory complications and postoperative healing were evaluated. After initially uncomplicated diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy, an adjustment of post-anesthesia care was necessary in 16 of 96 patients due to respiratory failure. Respiratory complications were more frequent in younger children (3.1 vs. 4.0 years, p = 0.049, 95 % CI -1.7952 to -0.0048) and in children who suffered from nocturnal apneas (OR = 5.00, p < 0.01, 95 % CI 1.4780-16.9152) or who suffered from relevant comorbidities (OR = 4.84, p < 0.01, 95 % CI 1.5202-15.4091). Moreover, a diode-laser power higher than 13 W could be identified as a risk factor for the occurrence of a postoperative oropharyngeal edema (OR = 3.45, p < 0.01, 95 % CI 1.3924-8.5602). Postoperative respiratory complications should not be underestimated in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Therefore, children with SDB, children with comorbidities or children younger than 3 years should be considered "at risk" and children with confirmed moderate to severe OSAS should be referred to a PICU following diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. We recommend a reduced diode-laser power (<13 W) to reduce oropharyngeal edema.

  20. High-power diode lasers for optical communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, D. B.; Goldstein, B.; Channin, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    High-power, single-mode, double-heterojunction AlGaAs diode lasers are being developed to meet source requirements for both fiber optic local area network and free space communications systems. An individual device, based on the channeled-substrate-planar (CSP) structure, has yielded single spatial and longitudinal mode outputs of up to 90 mW CW, and has maintained a single spatial mode to 150 mW CW. Phase-locked arrays of closely spaced index-guided lasers have been designed and fabricated with the aim of multiplying the outputs of the individual devices to even higher power levels in a stable, single-lobe, anastigmatic beam. The optical modes of the lasers in such arrays can couple together in such a way that they appear to be emanating from a single source, and can therefore be efficiently coupled into optical communications systems. This paper will review the state of high-power laser technology and discuss the communication system implications of these devices.

  1. Power blue and green laser diodes and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Thomas; Strauß, Uwe; Eichler, Christoph; Vierheilig, Clemens; Tautz, Sönke; Brüderl, Georg; Stojetz, Bernhard; Wurm, Teresa; Avramescu, Adrian; Somers, André; Ristic, Jelena; Gerhard, Sven; Lell, Alfred; Morgott, Stefan; Mehl, Oliver

    2013-03-01

    InGaN based green laser diodes with output powers up to 50mW are now well established for variety of applications ranging from leveling to special lighting effects and mobile projection of 12lm brightness. In future the highest market potential for visible single mode profile lasers might be laser projection of 20lm. Therefore direct green single-mode laser diodes with higher power are required. We found that self heating was the limiting factor for higher current operation. We present power-current characteristics of improved R and D samples with up to 200mW in cw-operation. An optical output power of 100mW is reached at 215mA, a current level which is suitable for long term operation. Blue InGaN laser diodes are also the ideal source for phosphor based generation of green light sources of high luminance. We present a light engine based on LARP (Laser Activated Remote Phosphor) which can be used in business projectors of several thousand lumens on screen. We discuss the advantages of a laser based systems in comparison with LED light engines. LARP requires highly efficient blue power laser diodes with output power above 1W. Future market penetration of LARP will require lower costs. Therefore we studied new designs for higher powers levels. R and D chips with power-current characteristics up to 4W in continuous wave operation on C-mount at 25°C are presented.

  2. Diode-pumped laser with improved pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    2004-03-09

    A laser wherein pump radiation from laser diodes is delivered to a pump chamber and into the lasing medium by quasi-three-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator light channels. The light channels have reflective side walls with a curved surface and reflective end walls with a curved surface. A flow tube between the lasing medium and the light channel has a roughened surface.

  3. High average power diode pumped solid state lasers for CALIOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Halpin, J.; Moran, B.

    1994-07-01

    Diode pumping of solid state media offers the opportunity for very low maintenance, high efficiency, and compact laser systems. For remote sensing, such lasers may be used to pump tunable non-linear sources, or if tunable themselves, act directly or through harmonic crystals as the probe. The needs of long range remote sensing missions require laser performance in the several watts to kilowatts range. At these power performance levels, more advanced thermal management technologies are required for the diode pumps. The solid state laser design must now address a variety of issues arising from the thermal loads, including fracture limits, induced lensing and aberrations, induced birefringence, and laser cavity optical component performance degradation with average power loading. In order to highlight the design trade-offs involved in addressing the above issues, a variety of existing average power laser systems are briefly described. Included are two systems based on Spectra Diode Laboratory`s water impingement cooled diode packages: a two times diffraction limited, 200 watt average power, 200 Hz multi-rod laser/amplifier by Fibertek, and TRW`s 100 watt, 100 Hz, phase conjugated amplifier. The authors also present two laser systems built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) based on their more aggressive diode bar cooling package, which uses microchannel cooler technology capable of 100% duty factor operation. They then present the design of LLNL`s first generation OPO pump laser for remote sensing. This system is specified to run at 100 Hz, 20 nsec pulses each with 300 mJ, less than two times diffraction limited, and with a stable single longitudinal mode. The performance of the first testbed version will be presented. The authors conclude with directions their group is pursuing to advance average power lasers. This includes average power electro-optics, low heat load lasing media, and heat capacity lasers.

  4. Temperature Gradients In Diode-pumped Alkali Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-18

    radiation from bars or stacks of diode lasers is absorbed by atomic potassium, rubidium , or cesium. Collision-induced energy transfer populates the upper...laser level, and lasing is achieved in the near-IR on the D1 (pump) line. A rubidium laser pumped by a 1.28kW diode stack with a 0.35nm spectral band...negligible, offering the potential for low waste heat loads. However, cycling of atoms by the pump beam can be >109photons/ atom -s. The energy of the spin

  5. Diode-pumped solid state laser for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Orth, C.D.

    1994-11-01

    The authors evaluate the prospect for development of a diode-pumped solid-state-laser driver in an inertial fusion energy power plant. Using a computer code, they predict that their 1 GWe design will offer electricity at 8.6 cents/kW {center_dot} hr with the laser operating at 8.6% efficiency and the recycled power level at 31%. The results of their initial subscale experimental testbed of a diode-pumped solid state laser are encouraging, demonstrating good efficiencies and robustness.

  6. Computer Processing Of Tunable-Diode-Laser Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1991-01-01

    Tunable-diode-laser spectrometer measuring transmission spectrum of gas operates under control of computer, which also processes measurement data. Measurements in three channels processed into spectra. Computer controls current supplied to tunable diode laser, stepping it through small increments of wavelength while processing spectral measurements at each step. Program includes library of routines for general manipulation and plotting of spectra, least-squares fitting of direct-transmission and harmonic-absorption spectra, and deconvolution for determination of laser linewidth and for removal of instrumental broadening of spectral lines.

  7. Novel diode laser-based sensors for gas sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittel, F. K.; Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The development of compact spectroscopic gas sensors and their applications to environmental sensing will be described. These sensors employ mid-infrared difference-frequency generation (DFG) in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystals pumped by two single-frequency solid state lasers such as diode lasers, diode-pumped solid state, and fiber lasers. Ultrasensitive, highly selective, and real-time measurements of several important atmospheric trace gases, including carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde [correction of formaldehye], and methane, have been demonstrated.

  8. On-chip coherent combining of angled-grating diode lasers toward bar-scale single-mode lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunsong; Zhu, Lin

    2012-03-12

    Single mode operation of broad-area diode lasers, which is the key to obtain high power, high brightness sources, is difficult due to highly nonlinear materials and strong coupling between gain and index. Conventional broad-area lasers usually operate with multiple modes and have poor beam quality. Laser bars usually consist of incoherently combined broad-area single emitters placed side by side. In this article, we have demonstrated a novel integrated laser architecture in which Bragg diffraction is used to realize simultaneous modal control and coherent combining of broad-area diode lasers. Our experimental results show that two 100 μm wide, 1.3mm long InP broad-area lasers provide near-diffraction-limited output beam and are coherently combined at the same time without any external optical components. Furthermore, our design can be expanded to a coherently combined broad-area laser array that turns a laser bar into a coherent single mode laser with diffraction-limited beam quality.

  9. A Direct Diode Laser System Using a Planar Lightwave Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Kazuo; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we propose a direct diode laser (DDL) system consisting of laser diode (LD) bars, a planar lightwave circuit (PLC), and an optical fiber. We have developed a PLC as an optical power combiner and an LD mounting technology that is suitable for coupling to the PLC. A DDL system is presented that consists of six LD-PLC optical modules for the laser-welding of highly heat-resistant plastics. The total output power is in the 200 W class, with a spot diameter of 5.52 mm for the major axis and 5.00 mm for the minor axis at a focal length of 50 mm. The total output efficiency is 60.9% from the laser diode to the welding torch.

  10. Photoporation and cell transfection using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, L.; Agate, B.; Comrie, M.; Ferguson, R.; Lake, T. K.; Morris, J. E.; Carruthers, A. E.; Brown, C. T. A.; Sibbett, W.; Bryant, P. E.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Riches, A. C.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2005-01-01

    The introduction and subsequent expression of foreign DNA inside living mammalian cells (transfection) is achieved by photoporation with a violet diode laser. We direct a compact 405 nm laser diode source into an inverted optical microscope configuration and expose cells to 0.3 mW for 40 ms. The localized optical power density of ~1200 MW/m2 is six orders of magnitude lower than that used in femtosecond photoporation (~104 TW/m2). The beam perforates the cell plasma membrane to allow uptake of plasmid DNA containing an antibiotic resistant gene as well as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Successfully transfected cells then expand into clonal groups which are used to create stable cell lines. The use of the violet diode laser offers a new and simple poration technique compatible with standard microscopes and is the simplest method of laser-assisted cell poration reported to date.

  11. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-11

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  12. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-01

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  13. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  14. 250W diode laser for low pressure Rb vapor pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvyaznyy, A.; Venus, G.; Smirnov, V.; Mokhun, O.; Koulechov, V.; Hostutler, D.; Glebov, L.

    2010-02-01

    The diode pumped alkali vapor lasers operating at subatmospheric pressure require developing of a new generation of high-power laser diode sources with about 10 GHz wide emission spectrum. The latest achievements in the technology of volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive glass opened new opportunities for the design and fabrication of compact external cavity laser diodes, diode bars and stacks with reflecting VBGs as output couplers. We present a diode laser system providing up to 250 W output power and emission spectral width of 20 pm (FWHM) at the wavelength of 780 nm. The stability and position of an emission wavelength is determined by the resonant wavelength of a VBG which is controlled by temperature. Stability of an emitting wavelength is within 5 pm. Thermal tuning of the wavelength provides maximum overlapping of emitting line with absorption spectrum of a Rb (rubidium)- cell. The designed system consists of 7 modules tuned to the same wavelength corresponding to D2 spectral line of Rb87 or Rb85 and coupled to a single output fiber. Analogous systems could be used for other Rb isotopes spectral lines as well as for lasers based on other alkali metal vapors (Cs and K) or any agents with narrow absorption lines.

  15. Degradation mechanism of laser diodes for 880-nm band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DÄ browska, E.; Nakielska, M.; Kozłowska, A.; Teodorczyk, M.; KrzyŻak, K.; Sobczak, G.; Kalbarczyk, J.; MalÄ g, A.

    2013-01-01

    The laser diodes (LD) have numerous applications and promise to become key elements for next generation laser technologies. LD are usually operated under conditions of heavy thermal load. As a result, the devices are affected by aging processes leading to changes of the operation parameters, degradation and, eventually, complete failure. Degradation of high power semiconductor lasers remains a serious problem for practical application of these devices. We investigated the effect of mounting induced strain and defects on the performance of high power laser. In this paper measurements of the temperature distribution and the electroluminescence along the cavity of InGaAs quantum well lasers before and after accelerated aging processes are presented. The electro-optical parameters of the high output power laser diodes, such as emission wavelength, output power, threshold current, slope efficiency, and operating lifetime are presented too.

  16. Welding of aluminum alloy with high power direct diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Morikawa, Atsuhito; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Maeda, Koichi; Namba, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    Characterized by high conversion efficiency, small size, light weight and a long lifetime, high power diode lasers are currently being developed for application to various types of metal fabrication, such as welding. In this report, a 4kW high power direct diode laser was used to weld aluminum alloys, which are the focus of increasing attention from the automobile industry because of their light weight, high formability and easy recyclability. The applicability of a direct diode laser to aluminum alloy bead-on plate, butt and lap-fillet welding was studied under various welding conditions. A sound bead without cracks was successfully obtained when 1 mm thick aluminum alloy was welded by bead-on welding at a speed of 12m/min. Moreover, the bead cross section was heat conduction welding type rather than the keyhole welding type of conventional laser welding. Investigation of the welding phenomena with a high-speed video camera showed no spattering or laser plasma, so there was no problem with laser plasma damaging the focusing lens despite the diode laser's short focusing distance.

  17. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  18. A simplified 461-nm laser system using blue laser diodes and a hollow cathode lamp for laser cooling of Sr.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yosuke; Chida, Yuko; Ohtsubo, Nozomi; Aoki, Takatoshi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kuga, Takahiro; Torii, Yoshio

    2013-06-01

    We develop a simplified light source at 461 nm for laser cooling of Sr without frequency-doubling crystals but with blue laser diodes. An anti-reflection coated blue laser diode in an external cavity (Littrow) configuration provides an output power of 40 mW at 461 nm. Another blue laser diode is used to amplify the laser power up to 110 mW by injection locking. For frequency stabilization, we demonstrate modulation-free polarization spectroscopy of Sr in a hollow cathode lamp. The simplification of the laser system achieved in this work is of great importance for the construction of transportable optical lattice clocks.

  19. A simplified 461-nm laser system using blue laser diodes and a hollow cathode lamp for laser cooling of Sr

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yosuke; Chida, Yuko; Ohtsubo, Nozomi; Aoki, Takatoshi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kuga, Takahiro; Torii, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    We develop a simplified light source at 461 nm for laser cooling of Sr without frequency-doubling crystals but with blue laser diodes. An anti-reflection coated blue laser diode in an external cavity (Littrow) configuration provides an output power of 40 mW at 461 nm. Another blue laser diode is used to amplify the laser power up to 110 mW by injection locking. For frequency stabilization, we demonstrate modulation-free polarization spectroscopy of Sr in a hollow cathode lamp. The simplification of the laser system achieved in this work is of great importance for the construction of transportable optical lattice clocks. PMID:23822327

  20. Thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerator. [assuring constant temperature for an infrared laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The wave length of an infrared, semiconductor laser diode having an output frequency that is dependent on the diode temperature is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the diode temperature constant. The diode is carried by a cold tip of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. The refrigerator has a tendency to cause the temperature of the cold tip to oscillate. A heater diode and a sensor diode are placed on a thermal heat sink that is the only highly conductive thermal path between the laser diode and the cold tip. The heat sink has a small volume and low thermal capacitance so that the sensing diode is at substantially the same temperature as the heater diode and substantially no thermal lag exists between them. The sensor diode is connected in a negative feedback circuit with the heater diode so that the tendency of the laser diode to thermally oscillate is virtually eliminated.

  1. Reliability of High Power Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability and lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays are greatly influenced by their thermal characteristics. This paper examines the thermal properties of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse duration regime.

  2. Direct laser diode welding system with anti-reflection unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayasu, Doukei; Wang, Jing-bo

    2003-11-01

    A high power laser diode system for welding is widely known. However, the reliability and the reasonability are required by an industrial market. Reliability, especially lifetime, mainly depends on the temperature of laser diode (LD) and it might be rise if LD would receive reflection from welding point. This paper conducted the measurement of the reflection during welding by applying 1/4 wavelength plate and PBS. Results indicated the reflection during welding was inevitable. We developed a prototype high power laser diode system, which equipped an anti-reflection unit, to improve the reliability. The system traveled 3m/min and its bead width was 1.2 mm for 1.5 mm Al (A5052) under the spot size 2.7 x 0.6 mm FWHM. Additionally, we started to develop fast and slow collimation lenses for LD to realize a reasonale price for system The brief evaluation of fast collimation lenses was also reported.

  3. Microchannel heatsinks for high average power laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Benett, B.; Freitas, B.; Ciarlo, D.; Sperry, V.; Comaskey, B.; Emanuel, M.; Solarz, R.; Mundinger, D.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed performance results and fabrication techniques for an efficient and low thermal impedance laser diode array heatsink are presented. High duty factor or even CW operation of fully filled laser diode arrays is enabled at high average power. Low thermal impedance is achieved using a liquid coolant and laminar flow through microchannels. The microchannels are fabricated in silicon using a photolithographic pattern definition procedure followed by anisotropic chemical etching. A modular rack-and-stack architecture is adopted for the heatsink design allowing arbitrarily large two-dimensional arrays to be fabricated and easily maintained. The excellent thermal control of the microchannel cooled heatsinks is ideally suited to pump array requirements for high average power crystalline lasers because of the stringent temperature demands that result from coupling the diode light to several nanometers wide absorption features characteristic of leasing ions in crystals.

  4. Microchannel cooled heatsinks for high average power laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.J.; Freitas, B.L.; Ciarlo, D.; Beach, R.; Sutton, S.; Emanuel, M.; Solarz, R.

    1993-01-15

    Detailed performance results for an efficient and low impedance laser diode array heatsink are presented. High duty factor and even cw operation of fully filled laser diode arrays at high stacking densities are enabled at high average power. Low thermal impedance is achieved using a liquid coolant and laminar flow through microchannels. The microchannels are fabricated in silicon using an anisotropic chemical etching process. A modular rack-and-stack architecture is adopted for heatsink design, allowing arbitrarily large two-dimensional arrays to be fabricated and easily maintained. The excellent thermal control of the microchannel heatsinks is ideally suited to pump army requirements for high average power crystalline laser because of the stringent temperature demands are required to efficiently couple diode light to several-nanometer-wide absorption features characteristic of lasing ions in crystals.

  5. External cavity diode laser setup with two interference filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexander; Baus, Patrick; Birkl, Gerhard

    2016-12-01

    We present an external cavity diode laser setup using two identical, commercially available interference filters operated in the blue wavelength range around 450 nm. The combination of the two filters decreases the transmission width, while increasing the edge steepness without a significant reduction in peak transmittance. Due to the broad spectral transmission of these interference filters compared to the internal mode spacing of blue laser diodes, an additional locking scheme, based on Hänsch-Couillaud locking to a cavity, has been added to improve the stability. The laser is stabilized to a line in the tellurium spectrum via saturation spectroscopy, and single-frequency operation for a duration of two days is demonstrated by monitoring the error signal of the lock and the piezo drive compensating the length change of the external resonator due to air pressure variations. Additionally, transmission curves of the filters and the spectra of a sample of diodes are given.

  6. Comparative hazard evaluation of near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1994-05-01

    Hazard evaluation methods from various laser protection standards differ when applied to extended-source, near-infrared lasers. By way of example, various hazard analyses are applied to laser training systems, which incorporate diode lasers, specifically those that assist in training military or law enforcement personnel in the proper use of weapons by simulating actual firing by the substitution of a beam of near-infrared energy for bullets. A correct hazard evaluation of these lasers is necessary since simulators are designed to be directed toward personnel during normal use. The differences among laser standards are most apparent when determining the hazard class of a laser. Hazard classification is based on a comparison of the potential exposures with the maximum permissible exposures in the 1986 and 1993 versions of the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, Z136.1, and the accessible emission limits of the federal laser product performance standard. Necessary safety design features of a particular system depend on the hazard class. The ANSI Z136.1-1993 standard provides a simpler and more accurate hazard assessment of low-power, near-infrared, diode laser systems than the 1986 ANSI standard. Although a specific system is evaluated, the techniques described can be readily applied to other near-infrared lasers or laser training systems.

  7. Overview on new diode lasers for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Joerg

    2012-11-01

    Diode lasers have a broad wavelength range, from the visible to beyond 2.2μm. This allows for various applications in the defense sector, ranging from classic pumping of DPSSL in range finders or target designators, up to pumping directed energy weapons in the 50+ kW range. Also direct diode applications for illumination above 1.55μm, or direct IR countermeasures are of interest. Here an overview is given on some new wavelengths and applications which are recently under discussion. In this overview the following aspects are reviewed: • High Power CW pumps at 808 / 880 / 940nm • Pumps for DPAL - Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers • High Power Diode Lasers in the range < 1.0 μm • Scalable Mini-Bar concept for high brightness fiber coupled modules • The Light Weight Fiber Coupled module based on the Mini-Bar concept Overall, High Power Diode Lasers offer many ways to be used in new applications in the defense market.

  8. Diode laser power module for beamed power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.; Williams, M. D.; Lee, J. H.; Conway, E. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress with powerful, efficient, and coherent monolithic diode master-oscillator/power-amplifier (M-MOPA) systems is promising for the development of a space-based diode laser power station. A conceptual design of a 50-kW diode laser power module was made for space-based power stations capable of beaming coherent power to the moon, Martian rovers, or other satellites. The laser diode power module consists of a solar photovoltaic array or nuclear power source, diode laser arrays (LDAs), a phase controller, beam-steering optics, a thermal management unit, and a radiator. Thermal load management and other relevant aspects of the system (such as power requirements and system mass) are considered. The 50-kW power module described includes the highest available efficiency of LD M-MOPA system to date. However, the overall efficiency of three amplifier stages, including the coupling efficiency, turns out to be 55.5 percent. Though a chain of PA stages generates a high-power coherent beam, there is a penalty due to the coupling loss between stages. The specific power of the 50-kW module using solar power is 6.58 W/kg.

  9. High-power diode laser versus electrocautery surgery on human papillomavirus lesion treatment.

    PubMed

    Baeder, Fernando Martins; Santos, Maria Teresa Botti R; Pelino, Jose Eduardo Pelizon; Duarte, Danilo Antonio; Genovese, Walter Joao

    2012-05-01

    The use of high-power lasers has facilitated and improved human papillomavirus (HPV) treatment protocols and has also become very popular in recent years. This application has been more frequently used in hospitals, especially in gynecology. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of high-power diode laser to remove oral lesions caused by HPV and the consequent effects on virus load following the wound tissue healing process compared with one of the most conventional surgical techniques involving electrocautery. Surgeries were performed on 5 patients who had 2 distinct lesions caused by HPV. All patients were submitted to both electrocautery and high-power diode laser. Following a 20-day period, when the area was healed, sample material was collected through curettage for virus load quantitative analysis.Observation verified the presence of virus in all the samples; however, surgeries performed with the laser also revealed a significant reduction in virus load per cell compared with those performed with electrocautery. The ease when handling the diode laser, because of the flexibility of its fibers and precision of its energy delivery system, provides high-accuracy surgery, which facilitates the treatment of large and/or multifocal lesions. The use of high-power diode laser is more effective in treatment protocols of lesions caused by HPV.

  10. Design of a kW-output fiber coupled diode laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hualing; Guo, Linhui; Yu, Junhong; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong

    2015-10-01

    Fiber-coupled diode laser pumping source is one of the key components of high-power fiber laser system. Its performance is significant to the output power of fiber laser system. A 1.8kW fiber-coupled diode laser system is designed by using ZEMAX optical design software. The technologies of high-precision beam collimation, spatial multiplexing, polarization multiplexing, beam expanding, focusing and coupling are used to couple the beams of 42 diode laser bars into a fiber with a core diameter of 200μm and NA 0.22. Every beam emit from diode laser bar is single polarization, and its central wavelength is 976nm @ 55W. The desigh result showed the fiber output power could reach 1800W, and the fiber-coupling efficiency was 78%, the brightness was 37MW/(cm2·sr),corresponding. This fiber-coupled system can be used in fiber pumping, material process and many other areas.

  11. Novel high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Matthias; Köhler, Bernd; Biesenbach, Jens; Brand, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    High brightness becomes more and more important in diode laser applications for fiber laser pumping and materials processing. For OEM customers fiber coupled devices have great advantages over direct beam modules: the fiber exit is a standardized interface, beam guiding is easy with nearly unlimited flexibility. In addition to the transport function the fiber serves as homogenizer: the beam profile of the laser radiation emitted from a fiber is symmetrical with highly repeatable beam quality and pointing stability. However, efficient fiber coupling requires an adaption of the slow-axis beam quality to the fiber requirements. Diode laser systems based on standard 10mm bars usually employ beam transformation systems to rearrange the highly asymmetrical beam of the laser bar or laser stack. These beam transformation systems (prism arrays, lens arrays, fiber bundles etc.) are expensive and become inefficient with increasing complexity. This is especially true for high power devices with small fiber diameters. On the other hand, systems based on single emitters are claimed to have good potential in cost reduction. Brightness of the inevitable fiber bundles, though, is limited due to inherent fill-factor losses. At DILAS a novel diode laser device has been developed combining the advantages of diode bars and single emitters: high brightness at high reliability with single emitter cost structure. Heart of the device is a specially tailored laser bar (T-Bar), which epitaxial and lateral structure was designed such that only standard fast- and slow-axis collimator lenses are required to couple the beam into a 200μm fiber. Up to 30 of these T-Bars of one wavelength can be combined to reach a total of > 500W ex fiber in the first step. Going to a power level of today's single emitter diodes even 1kW ex 200μm fiber can be expected.

  12. Making transmission and reflection holograms using 650 nm laser diode from laser pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexander; Brown, Eric; Martinez, Tracy; Panin, Dmitry

    2003-10-01

    We have made both transmission and reflection holograms using inexpensive set-up with a 5 mW, 650-nm diode InGaAlP laser (similar to lasers used in common red laser pointers and DVD players). The reflection holograms can be viewed both with laser sourses of light and with non-coherent moderately collimated natural sources (like Sun or light bulb). In the transmission holograms viewed with laser both real and virtual images can be seen. Our paper presents the description of experimental set-up of exposure and development techniques, and the discussion of controversial coherence length issue of laser diodes as it applies to holograms.

  13. Tunable continuous wave single-mode dye laser directly pumped by a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanska, D.; Suski, M.; Furmann, B.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a tunable continuous wave single-mode ring dye laser (a modified version of Coherent model CR 699-21), directly optically pumped by an economy-class diode laser, has been set up. The laser was operated on Coumarin 498, and its generation profile covered part of the green spectral region not easily accessible in single-mode operation. The performance of the laser in both broad-band and single-mode operation regimes was studied. It was proved that optical pumping by diode lasers allows one to obtain single-mode operation of dye lasers that is sufficiently stable for high-resolution spectroscopy applications.

  14. Tunable C- and L-band laser source based on colorless laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, P. C.; Jhang, J. J.; Peng, Y. W.; Bitew, M. A.; Chi, Y. C.; Wu, W. C.; Wang, H. Y.; Lin, G. R.; Li, C. Y.; Lu, H. H.

    2017-03-01

    In this letter, we propose and demonstrate a tunable laser source which covers C- and L-bands based on a colorless laser diode. The proposed laser source is tunable widely and it can tune single-wavelength, dual-wavelength, and triple-wavelength. Additionally, the optical side mode suppression ratio exceeds 30 dB. Since we combine the colorless laser diode with a tunable optical filter, the proposed tunable laser source stabilizes multi-wavelengths simultaneously. Our proposed tunable laser source is very useful for applications such as optical test instruments, optical communication systems, and optical fiber sensing systems.

  15. High-average-power diode-pumped Yb: YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Avizonis, P V; Beach, R; Bibeau, C M; Emanuel, M A; Harris, D G; Honea, E C; Monroe, R S; Payne, S A; Skidmore, J A; Sutton, S B

    1999-10-01

    A scaleable diode end-pumping technology for high-average-power slab and rod lasers has been under development for the past several years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This technology has particular application to high average power Yb:YAG lasers that utilize a rod configured gain element. Previously, this rod configured approach has achieved average output powers in a single 5 cm long by 2 mm diameter Yb:YAG rod of 430 W cw and 280 W q-switched. High beam quality (M{sup 2} = 2.4) q-switched operation has also been demonstrated at over 180 W of average output power. More recently, using a dual rod configuration consisting of two, 5 cm long by 2 mm diameter laser rods with birefringence compensation, we have achieved 1080 W of cw output with an M{sup 2} value of 13.5 at an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 27.5%. With the same dual rod laser operated in a q-switched mode, we have also demonstrated 532 W of average power with an M{sup 2} < 2.5 at 17% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. These q-switched results were obtained at a 10 kHz repetition rate and resulted in 77 nsec pulse durations. These improved levels of operational performance have been achieved as a result of technology advancements made in several areas that will be covered in this manuscript. These enhancements to our architecture include: (1) Hollow lens ducts that enable the use of advanced cavity architectures permitting birefringence compensation and the ability to run in large aperture-filling near-diffraction-limited modes. (2) Compound laser rods with flanged-nonabsorbing-endcaps fabricated by diffusion bonding. (3) Techniques for suppressing amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and parasitics in the polished barrel rods.

  16. Thermal management, beam control, and packaging designs for high power diode laser arrays and pump cavity designs for diode laser array pumped rod shaped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Te-Yuan

    Several novel techniques for controlling, managing and utilizing high power diode lasers are described. Low pressure water spray cooling for a high heat flux system is developed and proven to be an ideal cooling method for high power diode laser arrays. In order to enable better thermal and optical performance of diode laser arrays, a new and simple optical element, the beam control prism, is invented. It provides the ability to accomplish beam shaping and beam tilting at the same time. Several low thermal resistance diode packaging designs using beam control prisms are proposed, studied and produced. Two pump cavity designs using a diode laser array to uniformly pump rod shape gain media are also investigated.

  17. Characteristic of laser diode beam propagation through a collimating lens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2010-01-20

    A mathematical model of a laser diode beam propagating through a collimating lens is presented. Wave propagation beyond the paraxial approximation is studied. The phase delay of the laser diode wave in passing through the lens is analyzed in detail. The propagation optical field after the lens is obtained from the diffraction integral by the stationary phase method. The model is employed to predict the light intensity at various beam cross sections, and the computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements.

  18. Gummy Smile Correction with Diode Laser: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Mahesh; Laju, S; Erali, Susil M; Erali, Sunil M; Fathima, Al Zainab; Gopinath, P V

    2015-01-01

    Beautification of smiles is becoming an everyday requirement in dental practice. Apart from teeth, gingiva also plays an important role in smile esthetics. Excessive visualization of gingiva is a common complaint among patients seeking esthetic treatment. A wide variety of procedures are available for correction of excessive gum display based on the cause of the condition. Soft tissue diode laser contouring of gingiva is a common procedure that can be undertaken in a routine dental setting with excellent patient satisfaction and minimal post-operative sequale. Two cases of esthetic crown lengthening with diode laser 810 nm are presented here. PMID:26668491

  19. Arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Yariv, A.; Margalit, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode is described. This arrangement includes an additional layer which together with the conventional laser diode form a structure (35) of a bipolar transistor. Therein, the additional layer serves as the collector, the cladding layer next to it as the base, and the active region and the other cladding layer as the emitter. A capacitor is connected across the base and the collector. It is chosen so that at any frequency above a certain selected frequency which is far below the resonance frequency the capacitor impedance is very low, effectively shorting the base to the collector.

  20. Battery-driven miniature LDA system with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damp, S.

    1988-06-01

    A one-component miniature system with dimensions of 11 by 4 by 4 cubic centimeters for laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) is described. As power supply a 12V battery or any other source with the capability to drive a current up to 200mA can be used. The system contains the whole electronics to drive the used laser diode is a safe way. The electronics to amplify and buffer the LDA-signal which is received by a PIN-diode is included. The output of the system can directly fit a filterbank for example. Possible applications in rough environments are mentioned. Measurements show the reliability of the system.

  1. Coherent addition of high power laser diode array with a V-shape external Talbot cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Liu, Y; Braiman, Y

    2008-12-08

    We designed a V-shape external Talbot cavity for a broad-area laser diode array and demonstrated coherent laser beam combining at high power with narrow spectral linewidth. The V-shape external Talbot cavity provides good mode-discrimination and does not require a spatial filter. A multi-lobe far-field profile generated by a low filling-factor phase-locked array is confirmed by our numerical simulation.

  2. Next generation high-brightness diode lasers offer new industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, Andre; Meinschien, Jens; Bruns, Peter; Burke, Colin; Bartoschewski, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    So far, diode laser systems could not compete against CO II-lasers or DPSSL in industrial applications like marking or cutting due to their lower brightness. Recent developments in high-brightness diode laser bars and beam forming systems with micro-optics have led to new direct diode laser applications. LIMO presents 400W output from a 200μm core fibre with an NA of 0.22 at one wavelength. This is achieved via the combination of newly designed laser diode bars on passive heat sinks coupled with optimized micro-optical beam shaping. The laser is water cooled with a housing size of 375mm x 265mm x 70mm. The applications for such diode laser modules are mainly in direct marking, cutting and welding of metals and other materials, but improved pumping of fibre lasers and amplifiers is also possible. The small spot size leads to extremely high intensities and therefore high welding speeds in cw operation. For comparison: The M2 of the fibre output is 70, which gives a comparable beam parameter product (22mm*mrad) to that of a CO II laser with a M2 of 7 because of the wavelength difference. Many metals have a good absorption within the wavelength range of the laser diodes (NIR, 808nm to 980nm), which permits the cutting of thin sheets of aluminium or steel with a 200W version of this laser. First welding tests show reduced splatters and pores owing to the optimized process behaviour in cw operation with short wavelengths. The availability of a top-hat profile proves itself to be advantageous compared to the traditional Gaussian beam profiles of fibre, solid-state and gas lasers in that the laser energy is evenly distributed over the working area. For the future, we can announce an increase of the output power up to 1200W out of a 200μm fibre (0.22 NA). This will be achieved by further sophistication and optimisation of the coupling technique and the coupling of three wavelengths. The beam parameter product will then remain at 22mm*mrad with a power density of 3.8 MW

  3. Superluminescent diode versus Fabry-Perot laser diode seeding in pulsed MOPA fiber laser systems for SBS suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, M.; Sousa, J. M.; Salcedo, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the use of a pulsed superluminescent diode (SLD) through direct current injection modulation as seeding source in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration when compared to a Fabry-Perot (FP) laser diode in the same system. The performance limitations imposed by the use of the Fabry-Perot lasers, caused by the backward high peak power pulses triggered due to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) are not observed in the case of the SLD. Compared to conventional Fabry-Perot laser diodes, the SLD provides a smooth and broad output spectrum which is independent of the input pulse parameters. Moreover, the spectrum can be sliced and tailored to the application. Thus, free SBS operation is shown when using the SLD seeder in the same system, allowing for a significant increase on the extractable power and energy.

  4. Further development of high-power pump laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Berthold; Lichtenstein, Norbert; Sverdlov, Boris; Matuschek, Nicolai; Mohrdiek, Stefan; Pliska, Tomas; Mueller, Juergen; Pawlik, Susanne; Arlt, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Hans-Ulrich; Fily, Arnaud; Harder, Christoph

    2003-12-01

    AlGaAs/InGaAs based high power pump laser diodes with wavelength of around 980 nm are key products within erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA) for today's long haul and metro-communication networks, whereas InGaAsP/InP based laser diodes with 14xx nm emission wavelength are relevant for advanced, but not yet widely-used Raman amplifiers. Due to the changing industrial environment cost reduction becomes a crucial factor in the development of new, pump modules. Therefore, pump laser chips were aggressively optimized in terms of power conversion and thermal stability, which allows operation without active cooling at temperatures exceeding 70°C. In addition our submarine-reliable single mode technology was extended to high power multi-mode laser diodes. These light sources can be used in the field of optical amplifiers as well as for medical, printing and industrial applications. Improvements of pump laser diodes in terms of power conversion efficiency, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) locking performance of single mode devices, noise reduction and reliability will be presented.

  5. Using the diode laser in the lower labial frenum removal

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; AUTILI, N.; PETRONE, A.; PRETE, V.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the diode laser in the lower labial frenum removal. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the advantages of the use of diode laser to removal inferior labial frenum. Methods The treatment with the diode laser was proposed to a female patient of 32 years old in good general health having an abnormal inferior labial frenum that causes retracting of the gingival margin. The incision was carried out with diode laser at a wavelength of 940 nm and was removed the frenum mucosa and the deep tissue constitute of connective fiber and muscle fiber. Before the surgery wasn’t used the local anesthetic and after the cutting wasn’t necessary the use of suture. Results The wound had a good healing without scar. The patient didn’t have pain and bleeding during the healing and she didn’t report complications. It wasn’t necessary the use of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory. Conclusions The use of lasers has proved effective in the removal of labial frenum because it offers several advantages for the patient than traditional surgery. PMID:23285407

  6. Diode Laser Velocity Measurements by Modulated Filtered Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, J. J.; Varghese, P. L.; Jagodzinski, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of solid-state lasers to be tuned in operating frequency at MHz rates by input current modulation, while maintaining a relatively narrow line-width, has made them useful for spectroscopic measurements. Their other advantages include low cost, reliability, durability, compact size, and modest power requirements, making them a good choice for a laser source in micro-gravity experiments in drop-towers and in flight. For their size, they are also very bright. In a filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) experiment, a diode laser can be used to scan across an atomic or molecular absorption line, generating large changes in transmission at the resonances for very small changes in frequency. The hyperfine structure components of atomic lines of alkali metal vapors are closely spaced and very strong, which makes such atomic filters excellent candidates for sensitive Doppler shift detection and therefore for high-resolution velocimetry. In the work we describe here we use a Rubidium vapor filter, and work with the strong D(sub 2) transitions at 780 nm that are conveniently accessed by near infrared diode lasers. The low power output of infrared laser diodes is their primary drawback relative to other laser systems commonly used for velocimetry. However, the capability to modulate the laser frequency rapidly and continuously helps mitigate this. Using modulation spectroscopy and a heterodyne detection scheme with a lock-in amplifier, one can extract sub-microvolt signals occurring at a specific frequency from a background that is orders of magnitude stronger. The diode laser modulation is simply achieved by adding a small current modulation to the laser bias current. It may also be swept repetitively in wavelength using an additional lower frequency current ramp.

  7. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J

    2013-10-01

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  8. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James

    2016-05-03

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  9. Compact diode laser source for multiphoton biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niederriter, Robert D.; Ozbay, Baris N.; Futia, Gregory L.; Gibson, Emily A.; Gopinath, Juliet T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact, pulsed diode laser source suitable for multiphoton microscopy of biological samples. The center wavelength is 976 nm, near the peak of the two-photon cross section of common fluorescent markers such as genetically encoded green and yellow fluorescent proteins. The laser repetition rate is electrically tunable between 66.67 kHz and 10 MHz, with 2.3 ps pulse duration and peak powers >1 kW. The laser components are fiber-coupled and scalable to a compact package. We demonstrate >600 μm depth penetration in brain tissue, limited by laser power. PMID:28101420

  10. Diode laser treatment for osteal and osteoarticular panaritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valery A.; Krochek, Ivan V.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Poltavsky, Andrew N.; Antonov, Andrew A.

    2005-08-01

    Laser osteoperforation method, initially developed for treatment of osteomyelitis, was successfully applied to 66 patients with osteal and osteoarticular panaritium. The procedure consisted in perforation of the affected phalanx with diode laser radiation (wavelength 970nm; average power 10-12W; pulse mode 100/50 ms), delivered through quartz monofiber. Additional laser induced thermotherapy (power 2-3W; continuous mode) was fulfilled for persistent fistulas. In comparison with conventional surgery, laser osteoperforation provided faster pain relieve, edema dissipation, wound and fistula closure; good functional results; decreasing of disability cases number.

  11. Effect of parameters in diode laser welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpaeae, Veli; Maaranen, Petteri; Kostamo, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steel sheets and ordinary cold-rolled carbon steel sheets with variable thickness were welded with 1 kW diode laser. Different weld joints were utilized. The optimal parameters for each case were determined. The joints were examined by metallography and mechanical testing. The results show that diode laser is an optimal tool for sheet metal welding, when a considerable narrow weld is aimed. The edges prepared by mechanical sheering are acceptable as the joint preparation. The tensile strength and ductility of all the joints were acceptable and on the same level or better than that of base metal. The shielding gas seems to play a much higher role than in conventional laser welding (CO2 or Nd:YAG laser welding). When using the non-oxidizing shielding gas (nitrogen or argon), the welding speed to be reached is much slower than when welding without any shielding gas. This is probably due to the increase of absorption by oxygen.

  12. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  13. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-02

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  14. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-15

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  15. Progress in efficiency-optimized high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, A.; Hülsewede, R.; Zorn, M.; Hirsekorn, O.; Sebastian, J.; Meusel, J.; Hennig, P.; Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Knigge, S.; Maaßdorf, A.; Bugge, F.; Erbert, G.

    2013-10-01

    High-power diode lasers are highly efficient sources of optical energy for industrial and defense applications, either directly or as pump sources for solid state or fiber lasers. We review here how advances in diode laser design and device technology have enabled the performance to be continuously improved. An overview is presented of recent progress at JENOPTIK in the development of commercial diode lasers optimized for peak performance, robust high-yield manufacture and long lifetimes. These diode lasers are tailored to simultaneously operate with reduced vertical carrier leakage, low thermal and electrical resistance and low optical losses. In this way, the highest electro-optical efficiencies are sustained to high currents. For example, 940-nm bars with high fill factor are shown to deliver continuous wave (CW) output powers of 280 W with conversion efficiency of < 60%. These bars have a vertical far field angle with 95% power content of just 40°. In addition, 955-nm single emitters with 90μm stripe width deliver 12 W CW output with power conversion efficiency at the operating point of 69%. In parallel, the Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH) is working to enable the next generation of high power diode lasers, by determining the key limitations to performance and by pioneering new technologies to address these limits. An overview of recent studies at the FBH will therefore also be presented. Examples will include structures with further reduced far field angles, higher lateral beam quality and increased peak power and efficiency. Prospects for further performance improvement will be discussed.

  16. Polarization/Spatial Combining of Laser-Diode Pump Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsinger, Paul; Liu, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    A breadboard version of an optical beam combiner is depicted which make it possible to use the outputs of any or all of four multimode laser diodes to pump a non-planar ring oscillator (NPRO) laser. The output of each laser diode has a single-mode profile in the meridional plane containing an axis denoted the 'fast' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis. One of the purposes served by the beam-combining optics is to reduce the fast-axis numerical aperture (NA) of the laser-diode output to match the NA of the optical fiber. Along the slow axis, the unmodified laser-diode NA is already well matched to the fiber optic NA, so no further slow-axis beam shaping is needed. In this beam combiner, the laser-diode outputs are collimated by aspherical lenses, then half-wave plates and polarizing beam splitters are used to combine the four collimated beams into two beams. Spatial combination of the two beams and coupling into the optical fiber is effected by use of anamorphic prisms, mirrors, and a focusing lens. The anamorphic prisms are critical elements in the NA-matching scheme, in that they reduce the fast-axis beam width to 1/6 of its original values. Inasmuch as no slow-axis beam shaping is needed, the collimating and focusing lenses are matched for 1:1 iumaging. Because these lenses are well corrected for infinite conjugates the combiner offers diffraction-limited performance along both the fast and slow axes.

  17. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Degradation phenomena in laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beister, G.; Krispin, P.; Maege, J.; Richter, G.; Weber, H.; Rechenberg, I.

    1988-11-01

    Accelerated tests on GaAlAs/GaAs double heterostructure laser diodes showed, in agreement with earlier results on light-emitting diodes, that ageing appeared in three distinct forms: initial and slow degradation stages, both obeying a logarithmic time dependence, and a superimposed "gradation" (enhancement of the output power). Measurements made by the method of deep level transient spectroscopy during the accelerated tests on these lasers, operated as light-emitting diodes, revealed the appearance right from the beginning of B levels attributed to the antisite GaAs defects. The B levels appeared again in diodes tested in the lasing mode. In the case of a group of 21 laser diodes the mean time-to-failure was 9000 h at 70°C for 5 mW (in accordance with the Weibull statistics of degradation rates).

  18. Near-ultraviolet laser diodes for brilliant ultraviolet fluorophore excitation.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2015-12-01

    Although multiple lasers are now standard equipment on most modern flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. Nd:YVO4 frequency-tripled diode pumped solid-state lasers emitting at 355 nm are now the primary means of providing UV excitation on multilaser flow cytometers. Although a number of UV excited fluorochromes are available for flow cytometry, the cost of solid-state UV lasers remains prohibitively high, limiting their use to all but the most sophisticated multilaser instruments. The recent introduction of the brilliant ultraviolet (BUV) series of fluorochromes for cell surface marker detection and their importance in increasing the number of simultaneous parameters for high-dimensional analysis has increased the urgency of including UV sources in cytometer designs; however, these lasers remain expensive. Near-UV laser diodes (NUVLDs), a direct diode laser source emitting in the 370-380 nm range, have been previously validated for flow cytometric analysis of most UV-excited probes, including quantum nanocrystals, the Hoechst dyes, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. However, they remain a little-used laser source for cytometry, despite their significantly lower cost. In this study, the ability of NUVLDs to excite the BUV dyes was assessed, along with their compatibility with simultaneous brilliant violet (BV) labeling. A NUVLD emitting at 375 nm was found to excite most of the available BUV dyes at least as well as a UV 355 nm source. This slightly longer wavelength did produce some unwanted excitation of BV dyes, but at sufficiently low levels to require minimal additional compensation. NUVLDs are compact, relatively inexpensive lasers that have higher power levels than the newest generation of small 355 nm lasers. They can, therefore, make a useful, cost-effective substitute for traditional UV lasers in multicolor analysis involving the BUV and BV dyes.

  19. Diode laser osteoperforation and its application to osteomyelitis treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Krochek, Igor V.; Lappa, Alexander V.

    2001-10-01

    Laser osteoperforation, previously studied in experiment in rabbits at treatment for acute purulent osteomyelitis (Privalov V. et.al., SPIE Proc., v.3565., pp. 72-79), was applied in clinic to 36 patients with chronic purulent osteomyelitis and to 6 patients (children) with acute haematogenic osteomyelitis. Diode lasers of 805 and 980 nm wavelength were used. There was achieved full recovery in all acute cases, and stable remission in chronic cases during all the observation period (1 - 2.5 years).

  20. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  1. Modeling of diode pumped metastable rare gas lasers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zining; Yu, Guangqi; Wang, Hongyan; Lu, Qisheng; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-01

    As a new kind of optically pumped gaseous lasers, diode pumped metastable rare gas lasers (OPRGLs) show potential in high power operation. In this paper, a multi-level rate equation based model of OPRGL is established. A qualitative agreement between simulation and Rawlins et al.'s experimental result shows the validity of the model. The key parameters' influences and energy distribution characteristics are theoretically studied, which is useful for the optimized design of high efficient OPRGLs.

  2. Even Illumination from Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    A method of equipping fiber-optic-coupled laser diodes to evenly illuminate specified fields of view has been proposed. The essence of the method is to shape the tips of the optical fibers into suitably designed diffractive optical elements. One of the main benefits afforded by the method would be more nearly complete utilization of the available light. Diffractive optics is a relatively new field of optics in which laser beams are shaped by use of diffraction instead of refraction.

  3. Fiber Coupled Laser Diodes with Even Illumination Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An optical fiber for evenly illuminating a target. The optical fiber is coupled to a laser emitting diode and receives laser light. The la ser light travels through the fiber optic and exits at an exit end. T he exit end has a diffractive optical pattern formed thereon via etch ing, molding or cutting, to reduce the Gaussian profile present in co nventional fiber optic cables The reduction of the Gaussian provides an even illumination from the fiber optic cable.

  4. Iris retraction and retroflexion after transscleral contact diode laser photocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Sony, Parul; Sudan, Rajeev; Pangtey, Mayank S; Khokhar, Sudarshan; Kumar, Harsh

    2003-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with refractory glaucoma with an anterior chamber intraocular lens underwent transscleral contact diode laser cyclophotocoagulation. Slit-lamp examination and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed iris retraction and retroflexion at 2 weeks of follow-up. The probable cause of this complication is discussed.

  5. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia after diode laser oral surgery. An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Juan; González-Mosquera, Antonio; García-Martín, José-Manuel; García-Caballero, Lucía; Varela-Centelles, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background To examine the process of epithelial reparation in a surgical wound caused by diode laser. Material and Methods An experimental study with 27 Sprage-Dawley rats was undertaken. The animals were randomly allocated to two experimental groups, whose individuals underwent glossectomy by means of a diode laser at different wattages, and a control group treated using a number 15 scalpel blade. The animals were slaughtered at the 2nd, 7th, and 14th day after glossectomy. The specimens were independently studied by two pathologists (blinded for the specimens’ group). Results At the 7th day, re-epithelisation was slightly faster for the control group (conventional scalpel) (p=0.011). At the 14th day, complete re-epithelization was observed for all groups. The experimental groups displayed a pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. Conclusions It is concluded that, considering the limitations of this kind of experimental studies, early re-epithelisation occurs slightly faster when a conventional scalpel is used for incision, although re-epithelisation is completed in two weeks no matter the instrument used. In addition, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is a potential event after oral mucosa surgery with diode laser. Knowledge about this phenomenon (not previously described) may prevent diagnostic mistakes and inadequate treatment approaches, particularly when dealing with potentially malignant oral lesions. Key words:Diode laser, animal model, oral biopsy, oral cancer, oral precancer, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. PMID:26116841

  6. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita treated with diode laser epilation during infancy.

    PubMed

    Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Lopez-Cepeda, Larissa D; Elizondo-Rodriguez, Aurora; Morales-Barrera, Maria Enriqueta; Ramos-Garibay, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a girl with hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita treated with diode laser depilation since the age of 9 months. The treatment was well tolerated, and neither general nor local anesthesia was needed. A reduction of approximately 80% of facial and body hair was noted, which improved her condition significantly.

  7. Time delays in lead-salt semiconductor diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadeer, A.; Reed, J.; Bryant, F. J.

    1984-03-01

    Time delays of typically 15 17μ have been measured directly for PbS1-xSex, Pb1-xSnxSe and Pb1-xSnxTe diode lasers at injection levels just above threshold in each case. The corresponding minority carrier lifetimes, as determined using the one-carrier injection model, were typically 2 4μ.

  8. Chirped microlens arrays for diode laser circularization and beam expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Peter; Dannberg, Peter; Hoefer, Bernd; Beckert, Erik

    2005-08-01

    Single-mode diode lasers are well-established light sources for a huge number of applications but suffer from astigmatism, beam ellipticity and large manufacturing tolerances of beam parameters. To compensate for these shortcomings, various approaches like anamorphic prism pairs and cylindrical telescopes for circularization as well as variable beam expanders based on zoomed telescopes for precise adjustment of output beam parameters have been employed in the past. The presented new approach for both beam circularization and expansion is based on the use of microlens arrays with chirped focal length: Selection of lenslets of crossed cylindrical microlens arrays as part of an anamorphic telescope enables circularization, astigmatism correction and divergence tolerance compensation of diode lasers simultaneously. Another promising application of chirped spherical lens array telescopes is stepwise variable beam expansion for circular laser beams of fiber or solid-state lasers. In this article we describe design and manufacturing of beam shaping systems with chirped microlens arrays fabricated by polymer-on-glass replication of reflow lenses. A miniaturized diode laser module with beam circularization and astigmatism correction assembled on a structured ceramics motherboard and a modulated RGB laser-source for photofinishing applications equipped with both cylindrical and spherical chirped lens arrays demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system design approach.

  9. Neoplasms treatment by diode laser with and without real time temperature control on operation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Gelfond, Mark L.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Sosenkova, Svetlana A.; Lazareva, Anastasia A.; Semyashkina, Yulia V.

    2016-04-01

    Results of nevus, papilloma, dermatofibroma, and basal cell skin cancer in vivo removal by a 980+/-10 nm diode laser with "blackened" tip operating in continuous (CW) mode and automatic power control (APC) mode are presented. The collateral damage width and width of graze wound area around the collateral damage area were demonstrated. The total damage area width was calculated as sum of collateral damage width and graze wound area width. The mean width of total damage area reached 1.538+/-0.254 mm for patient group with nevus removing by 980 nm diode laser operating in CW mode, papilloma - 0.586+/-0.453 mm, dermatofibroma - 1.568+/-0.437 mm, and basal cell skin cancer - 1.603+/-0.613 mm. The mean width of total damage area reached 1.201+/-0.292 mm for patient group with nevus removing by 980 nm diode laser operating in APC mode, papilloma - 0.413+/-0.418 mm, dermatofibroma - 1.240+/-0.546 mm, and basal cell skin cancer - 1.204+/-0.517 mm. It was found that using APC mode decreases the total damage area width at removing of these nosological neoplasms of human skin, and decreases the width of graze wound area at removing of nevus and basal cell skin cancer. At the first time, the dynamic of output laser power and thermal signal during laser removal of nevus in CW and APC mode is presented. It was determined that output laser power during nevus removal for APC mode was 1.6+/-0.05 W and for CW mode - 14.0+/-0.1 W. This difference can explain the decrease of the total damage area width and width of graze wound area for APC mode in comparison with CW mode.

  10. The future of diode pumped solid state lasers and their applicability to the automotive industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarz, R.; Beach, R.; Hackel, L.

    1994-03-01

    The largest commercial application of high power lasers is for cutting and welding. Their ability to increase productivity by introducing processing flexibility and integrated automation into the fabrication process is well demonstrated. This paper addresses the potential importance of recent developments in laser technology to further impact their use within the automotive industry. The laser technology we will concentrate upon is diode laser technology and diode-pumped solid-state laser technology. We will review present device performance and cost and make projections for the future in these areas. Semiconductor laser arrays have matured dramatically over the last several years. They are lasers of unparalleled efficiency (greater than 50%), reliability (greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation), and offer the potential of dramatic cost reductions (less than a dollar per watt). They can be used directly in many applications or can be used to pump solid-state lasers. When used as solid-state laser pump arrays, they simultaneously improve overall laser efficiency, reduce size, and improve reliability.

  11. CrLiCaAlF6 Laser Pumped by Visible Laser Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    first demonstration of diode pumping was reported the polarization of the orthogonally polarized beams for alexandrite [1]. Recently a new Cr-doped...the fractional power of to perform as well as the more mature alexandrite laser. each that will be reflected by the second polarization beam For...gradually "dialed out" of higher than in alexandrite . These advantages, coupled the pump axis while the laser diode power was simulta- with highly

  12. Plasma formation in diode pumped alkali lasers sustained in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-11-01

    In diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), lasing action occurs on the resonant lines of alkali atoms following pumping by broadband semiconductor lasers. The goal is to convert the efficient but usually poor optical quality of inexpensive diode lasers into the high optical quality of atomic vapor lasers. Resonant excitation of alkali vapor leads to plasma formation through the excitation transfer from the 2P states to upper lying states, which then are photoionized by the pump and intracavity radiation. A first principles global model was developed to investigate the operation of the He/Cs DPAL system and the consequences of plasma formation on the efficiency of the laser. Over a range of pump powers, cell temperatures, excitation frequency, and mole fraction of the collision mixing agent (N2 or C2H6), we found that sufficient plasma formation can occur that the Cs vapor is depleted. Although N2 is not a favored collisional mixing agent due to large rates of quenching of the 2P states, we found a range of pump parameters where laser oscillation may occur. The poor performance of N2 buffered systems may be explained in part by plasma formation. We found that during the operation of the DPAL system with N2 as the collisional mixing agent, plasma formation is in excess of 1014-1015 cm-3, which can degrade laser output intensity by both depletion of the neutral vapor and electron collisional mixing of the laser levels.

  13. Mode control for high performance laser diode sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisher, Paul; Price, Kirk; Bashar, Shabbir; Bao, Ling; Huang, Hua; Wang, Jun; Wise, Damian; Zhang, Shiguo; Das, Suhit; DeFranza, Mark; Hodges, Aaron; Trifan, Utsu; Balsley, David; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; DeVito, Mark; Bell, Jake; Martinsen, Robert; Farmer, Jason; Crump, Paul; Patterson, Steve

    2008-04-01

    We report on recent progress in the control of optical modes toward the improvement of commercial high-performance diode laser modules. Control of the transverse mode has allowed scaling of the optical mode volume, increasing the peak output power of diode laser emitters by a factor of two. Commercially-available single emitter diodes operating at 885 nm now exhibit >25 W peak (12 W rated) at >60% conversion efficiency. In microchannel-cooled bar format, these lasers operate >120 W at 62% conversion efficiency. Designs of similar performance operating at 976 nm have shown >37,000 equivalent device hours with no failures. Advances in the control of lateral modes have enabled unprecedented brightness scaling in a fiber-coupled package format. Leveraging scalable arrays of single emitters, the conductively-cooled nLIGHT Pearl TM package now delivers >80 W peak (50 W rated) at >53% conversion efficiency measured from a 200-μm core fiber output and >45 W peak (35 W rated) at >52% conversion efficiency measured from a 100-μm fiber output. nLIGHT has also expanded its product portfolio to include wavelength locking by means of external volume Bragg gratings. By controlling the longitudinal modes of the laser, this technique is demonstrated to produce a narrow, temperature-stabilized spectrum, with minimal performance degradation relative to similar free-running lasers.

  14. In-volume heating using high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenkov, Valentin S.; Kiyko, Vadim V.; Vdovin, Gleb V.

    2015-03-01

    High-power lasers are useful instruments suitable for applications in various fields; the most common industrial applications include cutting and welding. We propose a new application of high-power laser diodes as in-bulk heating source for food industry. Current heating processes use surface heating with different approaches to make the heat distribution more uniform and the process more efficient. High-power lasers can in theory provide in-bulk heating which can sufficiently increase the uniformity of heat distribution thus making the process more efficient. We chose two media (vegetable fat and glucose) for feasibility experiments. First, we checked if the media have necessary absorption coefficients on the wavelengths of commercially available laser diodes (940-980 nm). This was done using spectrophotometer at 700-1100 nm which provided the dependences of transmission from the wavelength. The results indicate that vegetable fat has noticeable transmission dip around 925 nm and glucose has sufficient dip at 990 nm. Then, after the feasibility check, we did numerical simulation of the heat distribution in bulk using finite elements method. Based on the results, optimal laser wavelength and illuminator configuration were selected. Finally, we carried out several pilot experiments with high-power diodes heating the chosen media.

  15. Research and development for improved lead-salt diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A substantial increase in output power levels for lead-salt diode lasers, through the development of improved fabrication methods, as demonstrated. The goal of 1 mW of CW, single-mode, single-ended power output, was achieved, with exceptional devices exhibiting values greater than 8 mW. It was found that the current tuning rate could be controlled by adjusting the p-n junction depth, allowing the tuning rate to be optimized for particular applications. An unexpected phenomenon was encountered when crystal composition was observed to be significantly altered by annealing at temperatures as low as 600 C; the composition was changed by transport of material through the vapor phase. This effect caused problems in obtaining diode lasers with the desired operating characteristics. It was discovered that the present packaging method introduces gross damaging effects in the laser crystal through pressure applied by the C-bend.

  16. Utilization of pulsed diode lasers to lidar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penchev, S.; Pencheva, Vasilka H.; Naboko, Vassily N.; Naboko, Sergei V.; Simeonov, P.

    2001-04-01

    Investigation of new aspects of application of pulsed quantum well (In)GaAs/AlGaAs diode lasers to atmospheric spectroscopy and lidar remote sensing is reported. The presented method utilizing these powerful multichipstack diode lasers of broad radiation line is approved theoretically and experimentally for monitoring of atmospheric humidity. Molecular absorption of gas species in the investigated spectral band 0.85 - 0.9 micrometer implemented by laser technology initiates further development of prospective DIAL analysis. A mobile lidar system is realized, employing optimal photodetection based on computer-operated boxcar and adaptive digital filter processing of the lidar signal in the analytical system. Aerosol profile exhibiting cloud strata in open atmosphere by testing of the sensor is demonstrative of the efficiency and high sensitivity of long-range sounding.

  17. Small core fiber coupled 60-W laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, Douglas P.; Mannonen, Ilkka; Raven, Anthony L.

    1995-05-01

    Semiconductor laser diodes are compact, efficient and reliable sources of laser light and 25 W fiber coupled systems developed by Diomed have been in clinical use for over three years. For certain applications, particularly in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and flexible endoscopy, higher powers are desirable. In these applications the use of flexible optical fibers of no more than 600 micrometers core diameter is essential for compatibility with most commercial delivery fibers and instrumentation. A high power 60 W diode laser system for driving these small core fibers has been developed. The design requirements for medical applications are analyzed and system performance and results of use in gastroenterology and urology with small core fibers will be presented.

  18. High-power diode lasers and their direct industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loosen, Peter; Treusch, Hans-Georg; Haas, C. R.; Gardenier, U.; Weck, Manfred; Sinnhoff, V.; Kasperowski, S.; vor dem Esche, R.

    1995-04-01

    The paper summarizes activities of the two Fraunhofer-Institutes ILT and IPT concerning the development of high-power laser-diode stacks and their direct industrial applications. With microchannel coolers in copper technology and ultra-precision machined micro-optics a stack of 330 - 400 W total power with a maximum intensity of the focused beam of 2 104 W/cm2 has been built and tested in first applications. By further improvements of the lens-fabrication and -alignment technology as well as increase of the number of stacked diodes an output power in the kW-range and intensities up to about 105 W/cm2 shall be achieved in the near future. Applications of such laser sources in surface technology, in the processing of plastics, in laser-assisted machining and in brazing are discussed.

  19. Quantity change in collagen following 830-nm diode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; O'Callaghan, David; Rouy, Simone; Godlewski, Guilhem; Prudhomme, Michel

    1996-12-01

    The actual mechanism for production of laser welding of tissue is presently unknown, but collagen plays an important role is tissue welded after laser irradiance. The quantity change in collagen extracted from the abdominal aorta of Wistar rats after tissue welding using an 830 nm diode laser was investigated. The collagen contents following repeated pepsin digestion after acetic acid extraction were determined with Sircol collagen assay. Compared with untreated aorta, the collagen content of the treated vessel was obvious decreased immediately after laser irradiation and following an initial increase on day 3, there was a peak at day 10. The results suggest that a part of collagen molecules is denatured by the heat of laser. There is an effect of stimulating collagen synthesis after laser welding with parameters used in this study.

  20. Laser diode feedback interferometer for stabilization and displacement measurements.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, T; Nara, M; Mnatzakanian, S; Lee, B S; Strand, T C

    1987-03-01

    Active laser diode interferometers in which the interference signal is fed back to the diode current are investigated for Twyman-Green and self-coupling interferometers. The Twyman-Green interferometer is stabilized with a stabilization factor of more than 100. By using the feedback signal of either type of interferometer, displacement is measured in a linear scale over a dynamic range of 8-9,microm with a precision of 10-60 nm. The feedback signal vs displacement shows hysteresis and multistable behavior, in accordance with theoretical results.

  1. Infrared laser diode with visible illuminator for biomedical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Podbielska, Halina; Szafranski, C.; Kuzmin, Andrei N.; Ges, J. A.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.

    1995-02-01

    The special laser diode device (LDD) leasing in the near infrared region (IR) with two wavelengths: (lambda) 1 equals 850 nm and (lambda) 2 equals 1000 nm, designed for laser therapy, is presented. This device is characterized by a unique feature, namely a separate built-in illuminator, operating in 670 nm. The special construction of LDD and the illuminator enables the user to visualize exactly the surface irradiated by IR radiation. The exposure time and the output of laser power are also controlled and can be displayed on the LED monitor at the front panel. This new device, described here, is compact, low cost, and user friendly.

  2. Polarization control in ridge-waveguide-laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.

    1987-04-20

    The polarization dependence of the gain/current relation and threshold current of quasi-index-guided laser diodes is analyzed for the case of lambda = 1.3 ..mu..m InGaAsP-InP ridge-waveguide lasers. Thereby it is shown that three different regimes for the stripe width and the lateral effective index discontinuity can be distinguished where one modal polarization (TE or TM) predominates. The significance of this finding on laser design and polarization control is discussed, and a comparison is performed on experimental results.

  3. Treatment of Gingival Hyperpigmentation by Diode Laser for Esthetical Purposes

    PubMed Central

    El Shenawy, Hanaa M.; Nasry, Sherine A.; Zaky, Ahmed A.; Quriba, Mohamed A. A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gingival hyperpigmentation is a common esthetical concern in patients with gummy smile or excessive gingival display. Laser ablation has been recognized recently as the most effective, pleasant and reliable technique. It has the advantage of easy handling, short treatment time, hemostasis, decontamination, and sterilization effect. AIM: In the present study we wanted to explore the efficacy of a 980 nm wavelength diode laser in gingival depigmentation clinically by using both VAS and digital imaging method as means of assessment. METHODS: Diode laser ablation was done for 15 patients who requested cosmetic therapy for melanin pigmented gums. The laser beam delivered by fiberoptic with a diameter of 320 µm, the diode laser system has 980 nm wave lengths and 3 W irradiation powers, in a continuous contact mode in all cases, the entire surface of each pigmented maxillary and mandibular gingiva that required treatment was irradiated in a single session. Clinical examination and digital image analysis were done and the patients were followed up for 3 successive months. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant change in prevalence of bleeding after treatment, as none of the cases showed any signs of bleeding 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after ablation. No statistically significant change was observed in the prevalence of swelling after treatment The VAS evaluation demonstrated that only 4 patients complained of mild pain immediately after the procedure. No pain was perceived from the patients in the rest of the follow up period. There was no statistically significant change in prevalence of pain immediately after treatment compared to pain during treatment. There was a decrease in cases with mild pain after 1 week, 1 month as well as 3 months compared to pain during treatment and immediately after treatment. CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, the use of diode laser was shown to be a safe and effective treatment modality that provides

  4. Two-Pass, Diode-Pumped Nd:YAG Slab Laser Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry

    1992-01-01

    Neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) ring-laser head designed for compactness, simplicity, and increased efficiency for side pumping by diode lasers. Laser head includes two linear arrays of diode lasers, two fused-silica collimating rods, and Nd:YAG slab. Slab mounted on finned copper block, providing good thermal dissipation.

  5. Optical trapping with superfocused high-M2 laser diode beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Dudelev, V. V.; Melissinaki, V.; Losev, S. N.; Soboleva, K. K.; Deryagin, A. G.; Kuchinskii, V. I.; Farsari, M.; Sibbett, W.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2015-03-01

    Many applications of high-power laser diodes demand tight focusing. This is often not possible due to the multimode nature of semiconductor laser radiation possessing beam propagation parameter M2 values in double-digits. We propose a method of `interference' superfocusing of high-M2 diode laser beams with a technique developed for the generation of Bessel beams based on the employment of an axicon fabricated on the tip of a 100 μm diameter optical fiber with high-precision direct laser writing. Using axicons with apex angle 1400 and rounded tip area as small as ~10 μm diameter, we demonstrate 2-4 μm diameter focused laser `needle' beams with approximately 20 μm propagation length generated from multimode diode laser with beam propagation parameter M2=18 and emission wavelength of 960 nm. This is a few-fold reduction compared to the minimal focal spot size of ~11 μm that could be achieved if focused by an `ideal' lens of unity numerical aperture. The same technique using a 1600 axicon allowed us to demonstrate few-μm-wide laser `needle' beams with nearly 100 μm propagation length with which to demonstrate optical trapping of 5-6 μm rat blood red cells in a water-heparin solution. Our results indicate the good potential of superfocused diode laser beams for applications relating to optical trapping and manipulation of microscopic objects including living biological objects with aspirations towards subsequent novel lab-on-chip configurations.

  6. Frequency-comb-referenced tunable diode laser spectroscopy and laser stabilization applied to laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Fordell, Thomas; Wallin, Anders E; Lindvall, Thomas; Vainio, Markku; Merimaa, Mikko

    2014-11-01

    Laser cooling of trapped atoms and ions in optical clocks demands stable light sources with precisely known absolute frequencies. Since a frequency comb is a vital part of any optical clock, the comb lines can be used for stabilizing tunable, user-friendly diode lasers. Here, a light source for laser cooling of trapped strontium ions is described. The megahertz-level stability and absolute frequency required are realized by stabilizing a distributed-feedback semiconductor laser to a frequency comb. Simple electronics is used to lock and scan the laser across the comb lines, and comb mode number ambiguities are resolved by using a separate, saturated absorption cell that exhibits easily distinguishable hyperfine absorption lines with known frequencies. Due to the simplicity, speed, and wide tuning range it offers, the employed technique could find wider use in precision spectroscopy.

  7. Present state of applying diode laser in Toyota Motor Corp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    Since the mid-1980s, Toyota Motor Corporation has applied CO2 lasers and YAG lasers to machine (welding, piercing, cutting, surface modifying etc.) automobile parts. In recent years diode lasers, which are excellent in terms of cost performance, are now available on the market as a new type of oscillator and are expected to bring about a new age in laser technology. Two current problems with these lasers, however, are the lack of sufficient output and the difficulty in improving the focusing the beam, which is why it has not been easy to apply them to the machining of metal parts in the past. On the other hand, plastics can be joined with low energy because they have a lower melting point than metal and the rate of absorption of the laser is easy to control. Moreover, because the high degree of freedom in molding plastic parts results in many complex shapes that need to be welded, Toyota is looking into the use of diode lasers to weld plastic parts. This article will introduce the problems of plastics welding and the methods to solve them referring to actual examples.

  8. Diode Lasers used in Plastic Welding and Selective Laser Soldering - Applications and Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinl, S.

    Aside from conventional welding methods, laser welding of plastics has established itself as a proven bonding method. The component-conserving and clean process offers numerous advantages and enables welding of sensitive assemblies in automotive, electronic, medical, human care, food packaging and consumer electronics markets. Diode lasers are established since years within plastic welding applications. Also, soft soldering using laser radiation is becoming more and more significant in the field of direct diode laser applications. Fast power controllability combined with a contactless temperature measurement to minimize thermal damage make the diode laser an ideal tool for this application. These advantages come in to full effect when soldering of increasingly small parts in temperature sensitive environments is necessary.

  9. Diode Laser Sensor for Scramjet Inlets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-03

    Capacitor SM 0805 (2012) 1 C48, C49, C50 , C52 10p Capacitor SM 0805 (2012) 4 C62, C64, C66 10uF Capacitor TANT B (3528) 3 D1, D2 BAT54 Schottky Diode...ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for...with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1 . REPORT DATE 07 JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3

  10. Ruggedized microchannel-cooled laser diode array with self-aligned microlens

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    2003-11-11

    A microchannel-cooled, optically corrected, laser diode array is fabricated by mounting laser diode bars onto Si surfaces. This approach allows for the highest thermal impedance, in a ruggedized, low-cost assembly that includes passive microlens attachment without the need for lens frames. The microlensed laser diode array is usable in all solid-state laser systems that require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  11. Highly reliable, high-brightness 915nm laser diodes for fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuntu; Gao, Wei; Cheng, Lisen; Luo, Kejian; Shen, Kun; Mastrovito, Andre

    2008-02-01

    High brightness, high power, and highly reliable 915nm InAlGaAs laser diodes with optimized design are reported in this paper. The laser diodes exhibit excellent performance, such as, high slope efficiency, low threshold current, low voltage, etc., which make them suitable for high brightness operation. The aging test data shows no failures during aging test and more than 220,000 hours estimated lifetime for 90um emitter laser diodes at 8W CW operation. The aging test with the same emitter size at higher stress conditions showed sudden failure that corresponds to catastrophic optical damage (COD) on the facet. A novel large optical cavity (LOC) epi-structure with flat-top near field intensity distribution was developed. The maximum output power is up to 23W under CW testing condition at 25 °C, which is highest level achieved so far. The output power is limited by thermal roll over and there is no COD occurring. This data shows Axcel's technologies can further increase the brightness to over 110mW per micron for 915nm laser diodes. This type of laser diodes is essential for pumping fiber lasers to replace CO2 lasers for industry applications.

  12. Performance of high-power laser diode arrays for spaceborne lasers.

    PubMed

    Durand, Yannig; Culoma, Alain; Meynart, Roland; Pinsard, Jean-Luc; Volluet, Gerard

    2006-08-01

    The adequacy of commercial quasi-continuous high-power laser diode arrays (HPLDAs) as pump sources for spaceborne lasers has been assessed by endurance tests up to 3 x 10(9) shots under various stress conditions, vacuum operation up to 0.36 x 10(9) shots, and proton radiation tests. Observations of the evolution of the electro-optic parameters and of the near-field patterns of the HPLDAs during endurance tests have revealed that some diode bars could reach the required lifetime of a multibillion shots, suggesting how to build long lifetime HPLDAs by proper selection of the diode bars. The robustness of the HPLDAs against the proton environment experienced in a typical low Earth orbit has been checked. Finally, high-power laser diode arrays have been operated under vacuum, showing a behavior similar to that of HPLDAs operating in atmospheric conditions.

  13. Optomechanical design of the grating laser beam combiner (GLBC) laser diode header

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1989-01-01

    A laser diode header has been fabricated for a grating laser beam combiner (GLBC). The laser diode header provides the thermal control, the drive electronics, and the optical system necessary for proper operation of the beam combiner. The diode header is required to provide diffraction limited optical performance while providing correction for worst case defocus aberration, 0.6 mrad excess divergence, and worst case decenter aberration, 1.0 mrad pointing error. The design of the header considered the mechanical design and the optical design together resulting in a small, self-contained header with 0.7 mrad range for focus correction and +/- 2.5 mrad of beam steering. The complete diode header is currently undergoing optical and mechanical performance testing.

  14. Advances in tunable diode laser technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, W.

    1980-01-01

    The improvement of long-term reliability, the purification of mode properties, and the achievement of higher-temperature operation were examined. In reliability studies a slow increase in contact resistance during room temperature storage for lasers fabricated with In-Au or In-Pt contacts was observed. This increase is actually caused by the diffusion of In into the surface layer of laser crystals. By using a three layered structure of In-Au-Pt or In-Pt-Au, this mode of degradation was reduced. In characterizing the mode properties, it was found that the lasers emit in a highly localized, filamentary manner. For widestripe lasers the emission occurs near the corners of the junction. In order to achieve single-mode operation, stripe widths on the order of 8-10 micrometers are needed. Also, it was found that room temperature electroluminescence is possible near 4.6 micrometers.

  15. Off-line-locked laser diode species monitor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jamine (Inventor); Goldstein, Neil (Inventor); Richtsmeier, Steven (Inventor); Bien, Fritz (Inventor); Gersh, Michael (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An off-line-locked laser diode species monitor system includes: reference means for including at least one known species having a first absorption wavelength; a laser source for irradiating the reference means and at least one sample species having a second absorption wavelength differing from the first absorption wavelength by a predetermined amount; means for locking the wavelength of the laser source to the first wavelength of the at least one known species in the reference means; a controller for defeating the means for locking and for displacing the laser source wavelength from said first absorption wavelength by said predetermined amount to the second absorption wavelength; and a sample detector device for determining laser radiation absorption at the second wavelength transmitted through the sample to detect the presence of the at least one sample species.

  16. New ytterbium-phosphate glass for diode-pumped lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Galagan, B I; Glushchenko, I N; Denker, B I; Sverchkov, S E; Kisel', V E; Kuril'chik, S V; Kuleshov, N V

    2009-10-31

    A new ytterbium laser glass based on an alumoborophosphate composition is developed. It is shown that the chemical and thermal stabilities of this glass are record-high for phosphate glasses and that its spectral and luminescent characteristics compare well with popular laser glasses. A mould of laser-quality glass doped with ytterbium with a concentration of 5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is synthesised. Active laser elements 5x5x2 mm in size are prepared from this glass for longitudinal diode pumping. These elements were used to fabricate a laser, whose output power in the cw regime reached 783 mW and maximum slope efficiency was 28.9%. Pulses with a duration of {approx}150 fs and a peak power of about 5 kW are obtained in the passive mode-locking regime. (active media)

  17. GaAs Substrates for High-Power Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Georg; Berwian, Patrick; Buhrig, Eberhard; Weinert, Berndt

    GaAs substrate crystals with low dislocation density (Etch-Pit Density (EPD) < 500,^-2) and Si-doping ( ~10^18,^-3) are required for the epitaxial production of high-power diode-lasers. Large-size wafers (= 3 mathrm{in} -> >=3,) are needed for reducing the manufacturing costs. These requirements can be fulfilled by the Vertical Bridgman (VB) and Vertical Gradient Freeze (VGF) techniques. For that purpose we have developed proper VB/VGF furnaces and optimized the thermal as well as the physico-chemical process conditions. This was strongly supported by extensive numerical process simulation. The modeling of the VGF furnaces and processes was made by using a new computer code called CrysVUN++, which was recently developed in the Crystal Growth Laboratory in Erlangen.GaAs crystals with diameters of 2 and 3in were grown in pyrolytic Boron Nitride (pBN) crucibles having a small-diameter seed section and a conical part. Boric oxide was used to fully encapsulate the crystal and the melt. An initial silicon content in the GaAs melt of c (melt) = 3 x10^19,^-3 has to be used in order to achieve a carrier concentration of n = (0.8- 2) x10^18,^-3, which is the substrate specification of the device manufacturer of the diode-laser. The EPD could be reduced to values between 500,^-2 and 50,^-2 with a Si-doping level of 8 x10^17 to 1 x10^18,^-3. Even the 3in wafers have rather large dislocation-free areas. The lowest EPDs ( <100,^-2) are achieved for long seed wells of the crucible.

  18. 980nm diode laser pump modules operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jenna; Semenic, Tadej; Leisher, Paul; Bhunia, Avijit; Mashanovitch, Milan; Renner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Existing thermal management technologies for diode laser pumps place a significant load on the size, weight and power consumption of High Power Solid State and Fiber Laser systems, thus making current laser systems very large, heavy, and inefficient in many important practical applications. This problem is being addressed by the team formed by Freedom Photonics and Teledyne Scientific through the development of novel high power laser chip array architectures that can operate with high efficiency when cooled with coolants at temperatures higher than 50 degrees Celsius and also the development of an advanced thermal management system for efficient heat extraction from the laser chip array. This paper will present experimental results for the optical, electrical and thermal characteristics of 980 nm diode laser pump modules operating effectively with liquid coolant at temperatures above 50 degrees Celsius, showing a very small change in performance as the operating temperature increases from 20 to 50 degrees Celsius. These pump modules can achieve output power of many Watts per array lasing element with an operating Wall-Plug-Efficiency (WPE) of >55% at elevated coolant temperatures. The paper will also discuss the technical approach that has enabled this high level of pump module performance and opportunities for further improvement.

  19. Polarization competition in quasi-index-guided laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.; Stegmueller, B.

    1988-03-15

    The mechanism of polarization competition in laser diodes with a lateral quasi-index-guiding (QIG) structure is analyzed generally by way of the effective index approximation using a simplified QIG laser model. The influence of the relevant waveguide parameters on the polarization-dependent threshold current of QIG laser diodes is investigated in detail by example of lambda = 1.3-..mu..m ridge-waveguide lasers. Thereby, it is found that for intermediate values of the effective index step, the TM mode exhibits a higher gain and lower threshold current, whereas for pure gain guiding or strong index guiding, the TE mode prevails. This behavior, which compares excellently to published experimental results, is proven as a basic feature of the two-dimensional waveguiding mechanism in QIG devices. Accordingly, the effect of stress-induced anisotropy of the optical gain has been found to be of minor importance as the origin for TM-polarized QIG lasers made from lattice-matched heterostructures. It is further demonstrated that, for certain device parameters, the QIG lasers with a small effective index step exhibit somewhat higher threshold currents than the purely gain-guided devices of identical geometry.

  20. Optimization of rod diameter in solid state lasers side pumped with multiple laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Newton, Jr.; Chamblee, Christyl M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Cross, Patricia L.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the optimum laser rod diameter for maximum output energy in a solid state neodymium laser transversely pumped with multiple laser diode arrays are reported here. Experiments were performed with 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm and 2.0 mm rod radii of both neodymium doped Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and La2Be2O5 (Nd:BeL) pumped with laser diode arrays having a maximum combined energy of 10.5 mJ. Equations were derived which predict the optimum rod radius and corresponding output mirror reflectivity for a given laser material and total pump energy. Predictions of the equations agreed well with the experiments for each of the laser materials which possessed significantly different laser properties from one another.

  1. Laser diode self-mixing technique for liquid velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Using the self-mixing technique, or optical feedback interferometry, fluid velocity measurements of water seeded with titanium dioxide have been performed using a laser diode to measure the effect of the seeding particle concentration and also the pump speed of the flow. The velocimeter utilises commercially available laser diodes with a built-in photodiode for detection of the self-mixing effect. The device has demonstrated an accuracy better than 10% for liquid flow velocities up to 1.5 m/s with a concentration of scattering particles in the range of 0.8-0.03%. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The proposed velocimeter is to be developed further for application in gas-jet measurements.

  2. Use of laser diodes in cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zare, R.N.; Paldus, B.A.; Ma, Y.; Xie, J.

    1997-12-31

    We have demonstrated that cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), a highly sensitive absorption technique, is versatile enough to serve as a complete diagnostic for materials process control. In particular, we have used CRDS in the ultraviolet to determine the concentration profile of methyl radicals in a hot-filament diamond reactor; we have applied CRDS in the mid-infrared to detect 50 ppb of methane in a N{sub 2} environment; and, we have extended CRDS so that we can use continuous-wave diode laser sources. Using a laser diode at 810 nm, we were able to achieve a sensitivity of 2 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}. Thus, CRDS can be used not only as an in situ diagnostic for investigating the chemistry of diamond film deposition, but it can also be used as a gas purity diagnostic for any chemical vapor deposition system.

  3. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  4. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy as a technique for combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Yu. A.; Romanovskii, Yu. V.

    2015-04-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a proven method of rapid gas diagnostics. In the present review an overview of the state of the art of TDL-based sensors and their applications for measurements of temperature, pressure, and species concentrations of gas components in harsh environments is given. In particular, the contemporary tunable diode laser systems, various methods of absorption detection (direct absorption measurements, wavelength modulation based phase sensitive detection), and relevant algorithms for data processing that improve accuracy and accelerate the diagnostics cycle are discussed in detail. The paper demonstrates how the recent developments of these methods and algorithms made it possible to extend the functionality of TDLAS in the tomographic imaging of combustion processes. Some prominent examples of applications of TDL-based sensors in a wide range of practical combustion aggregates, including scramjet engines and facilities, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation combustors, and coal gasifiers, are given in the final part of the review.

  5. The study of laser beam riding guided system based on 980nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Xu, Haifeng; Sui, Xin; Yang, Kun

    2015-10-01

    With the development of science and technology, precision-strike weapons has been considered to be important for winning victory in military field. Laser guidance is a major method to execute precision-strike in modern warfare. At present, the problems of primary stage of Laser guidance has been solved with endeavors of countries. Several technical aspects of laser-beam riding guided system have been mature, such as atmosphere penetration of laser beam, clutter inhibition on ground, laser irradiator, encoding and decoding of laser beam. Further, laser beam quality, equal output power and atmospheric transmission properties are qualified for warfare situation. Riding guidance instrument is a crucial element of Laser-beam riding guided system, and is also a vital element of airborne, vehicle-mounted and individual weapon. The optical system mainly consist of sighting module and laser-beam guided module. Photoelectric detector is the most important sensing device of seeker, and also the key to acquire the coordinate information of target space. Currently, in consideration of the 1.06 u m of wavelength applied in all the semi-active laser guided weapons systems, lithium drifting silicon photodiode which is sensitive to 1.06 u m of wavelength is used in photoelectric detector. Compared to Solid and gas laser, diode laser has many merits such as small volume, simple construction, light weight, long life, low lost and easy modulation. This article introduced the composition and operating principle of Laser-beam riding guided system based on 980 nm diode laser, and made a analysis of key technology; for instance, laser irradiator, modulating disk of component, laser zooming system. Through the use of laser diode, Laser-beam riding guided system is likely to have smaller shape and very light.

  6. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  7. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Surface effects in laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beister, G.; Maege, J.; Richter, G.

    1988-11-01

    Changes in the current-voltage characteristics below the threshold current were observed in gain-guided stripe laser diodes after preliminary lasing. This effect was not fully understood. Similar changes in the laser characteristics appeared as a result of etching in a gaseous medium. The observed changes were attributed tentatively to surface currents.

  8. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  9. Laser diode pumped 106 mW blue upconversion fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, S.; Waarts, R. G.; Mehuys, D. G.; Welch, D. F.

    1995-09-01

    A laser diode pumped Tm3+-doped ZBLAN fiber upconversion laser is demonstrated with blue output power levels up to 106 mW. Differential optical-to-optical conversion efficiencies up to 30% are measured with respect to pump power coupled into the upconversion fiber. A single spatial mode blue output beam is demonstrated, with an M2 value of 1.4.

  10. Compact scanning-force microscope using a laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Iams, Doug; Weissenberger, Volker; Bell, L. Stephen

    1988-12-01

    The paper describes the operation of a compact scanning-force microscope in which the gradient of force acting on a vibrating tip is monitored by a diode laser and its integrated photodiode. The system does not require reflecting or focusing elements or complicated electronics. Experimental results using this system with magnetic domains on a magnetooptic storage medium attest to the feasibility of this concept.

  11. Quasi-cw 808-nm 300-W laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Kozyrev, A. A.; Kondakova, N. S.; Kondakov, S. A.; Krokhin, O. N.; Mikaelyan, G. T.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Popov, Yu. M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    Samples of 808-nm quasi-cw laser diode arrays (LDAs) with an output power exceeding 300 W, a pulse duration of 200 μs, and a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are developed and fabricated. The main output parameters of a set of five LDAs, including light – current characteristics, current – voltage characteristics, and emission spectra are measured. Preliminary life tests show that the LDA power remains stable for 108 pulses.

  12. Computer holography by means of the laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Arthur N.; Ilchenko, Volodymyr; Malov, Alexander N.; Sychevskiy, Alexey V.

    2007-02-01

    A computer holography is the optical hologram recording on the CCD-matrix with digital reconstruction of the 2Dimages for the different volume object cross-sections. The possibility to use compact semiconductor laser diodes in the computer holography for 3D-scene registration is experimentally proved in the D. Gabor's scheme. For off axis hologram recording the S. Benton's scheme for holography using is suggested.

  13. Excision of Mucocele Using Diode Laser in Lower Lip

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Subramaniam; Ramkumar, Lakshmi; Malathi, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    Mucoceles are nonneoplastic cystic lesions of major and minor salivary glands which result from the accumulation of mucus. These lesions are most commonly seen in children. Though usually these lesions can be treated by local surgical excision, in our case, to avoid intraoperative surgical complications like bleeding and edema and to enable better healing, excision was done using a diode laser in the wavelength of 940 nm. PMID:28097026

  14. A Comparative Study of Enamel Surface Roughness After Bleaching With Diode Laser and Nd: YAG Laser.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaiel; Ganji, Saber; Moradi, Zohreh; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bleaching process can affect surface roughness of enamel, which is a vital factor in esthetic and resistance of tooth. The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness of enamel in teeth bleached using Diode and Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd: YAG) lasers with those bleached using conventional method. Methods: In this study, 75 anterior human teeth from upper and lower jaws (These teeth extracted because of periodontal disease) were randomly divided into 5 groups. Group 1: Laser white gel (Biolase, USA) with 45% hydrogen peroxide concentration and GaAlAs Diode laser (CHEESE(TM), GIGAA, China), group 2: Heydent gel (JW, Germany) with 30% Hydrogen peroxide concentration and Diode laser, group 3: Laser white gel and Nd:YAG laser (FIDELIS(TM), Fotona, Slovenia), group 4: Heydent gel and Nd:YAG laser and group 5: The Iranian gel Kimia (Iran) with 35% hydrogen peroxide concentration were used. Surface roughness of the samples was measured using the Surface Roughness Tester system (TR 200 Time Group, Germany) before and after bleaching. In each group, one sample was randomly selected for SEM analysis. Results: The results showed that the mean surface roughness of the teeth before and after bleaching had a significant difference in all the study groups. It was indicated that after bleaching, the mean surface roughness had increased in all the study groups. The highest surface roughness was seen in the conventional bleaching group and the lowest surface roughness was reported in group 3 (laser white gel + diode laser), in which the average surface roughness increased by only 0.1 μm. Conclusion: It was concluded that using the Laser white gel and the diode laser for bleaching resulted in the least surface roughness compared to conventional method.

  15. Four-Pass Coupler for Laser-Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-pass optical coupler affords increased (in comparison with related prior two-pass optical couplers) utilization of light generated by a laser diode in side pumping of a solid-state laser slab. The original application for which this coupler was conceived involves a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal slab, which, when pumped by a row of laser diodes at a wavelength of 809 nm, lases at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. Heretofore, typically, a thin laser slab has been pumped in two passes, the second pass occurring by virtue of reflection of pump light from a highly reflective thin film on the side opposite the side through which the pump light enters. In two-pass pumping, a Nd:YAG slab having a thickness of 2 mm (which is typical) absorbs about 84 percent of the 809-nm pump light power, leaving about 16 percent of the pump light power to travel back toward the laser diodes. This unused power can cause localized heating of the laser diodes, thereby reducing their lifetimes. Moreover, if the slab is thinner than 2 mm, then even more unused power travels back toward the laser diodes. The four-pass optical coupler captures most of this unused pump light and sends it back to the laser slab for two more passes. As a result, the slab absorbs more pump light, as though it were twice as thick. The gain and laser cavity beam quality of a smaller laser slab in conjunction with this optical coupler can thus be made comparable to those of a larger two-pass-pumped laser slab.

  16. A Comparative Study of Enamel Surface Roughness After Bleaching With Diode Laser and Nd: YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaiel; Ganji, Saber; Moradi, Zohreh; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bleaching process can affect surface roughness of enamel, which is a vital factor in esthetic and resistance of tooth. The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness of enamel in teeth bleached using Diode and Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd: YAG) lasers with those bleached using conventional method. Methods: In this study, 75 anterior human teeth from upper and lower jaws (These teeth extracted because of periodontal disease) were randomly divided into 5 groups. Group 1: Laser white gel (Biolase, USA) with 45% hydrogen peroxide concentration and GaAlAs Diode laser (CHEESETM, GIGAA, China), group 2: Heydent gel (JW, Germany) with 30% Hydrogen peroxide concentration and Diode laser, group 3: Laser white gel and Nd:YAG laser (FIDELISTM, Fotona, Slovenia), group 4: Heydent gel and Nd:YAG laser and group 5: The Iranian gel Kimia (Iran) with 35% hydrogen peroxide concentration were used. Surface roughness of the samples was measured using the Surface Roughness Tester system (TR 200 Time Group, Germany) before and after bleaching. In each group, one sample was randomly selected for SEM analysis. Results: The results showed that the mean surface roughness of the teeth before and after bleaching had a significant difference in all the study groups. It was indicated that after bleaching, the mean surface roughness had increased in all the study groups. The highest surface roughness was seen in the conventional bleaching group and the lowest surface roughness was reported in group 3 (laser white gel + diode laser), in which the average surface roughness increased by only 0.1 μm. Conclusion: It was concluded that using the Laser white gel and the diode laser for bleaching resulted in the least surface roughness compared to conventional method. PMID:28144442

  17. Improving lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays for pumping 2-micron solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-04-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  18. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  19. Broadly tunable, longitudinally diode-pumped Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotkamp, M.; Witte, U.; Munk, A.; Hartung, A.; Gausmann, S.; Hengesbach, S.; Traub, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Hoeffner, J.; Jungbluth, B.

    2014-02-01

    We present design and first performance data of a broadly tunable Alexandrite laser longitudinally pumped by a newly developed high brightness single emitter diode laser module with output in the red spectral range. Replacing the flashlamps, which are usually used for pumping Alexandrite, will increase the efficiency and maintenance interval of the laser. The pump module is designed as an optical stack of seven single-emitter laser diodes. We selected an optomechanical concept for the tight overlay of the radiation using a minimal number of optical components for collimation, e.g. a FAC and a SAC lens, and focusing. The module provides optical output power of more than 14 W (peak pulse output in the focus) with a beam quality of M2 = 41 in the fast axis and M2 = 39 in the slow axis. The Alexandrite crystal is pumped from one end at a repetition rate of 35 Hz and 200μs long pump pulses. The temperature of the laser crystal can be tuned to between 30 °C and 190 °C using a thermostat. The diode-pumped Alexandrite laser reaches a maximum optical-optical efficiency of 20 % and a slope efficiency of more than 30 % in fundamental-mode operation (M2 < 1.10). When a Findlay-Clay analysis with four different output couplers is conducted, the round-trip loss of the cavity is determined to be around 1 %. The wavelength is tunable to between 755 and 788 nm via crystal temperature or between 745 and 805 nm via an additional Brewster prism.

  20. [Diode laser surgery in the endoscopic treatment of laryngeal paralysis].

    PubMed

    Ferri, E; García Purriños, F J

    2006-01-01

    Several surgical procedures have been proposed for the treatment of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral vocal cord paralysis. The aim of all surgical techniques used is to restore a glottic lumen sufficient to guarantee adequate breathing through the natural airway, without tracheotomy and preserving an acceptable phonatory quality. In this study we present our experience from 1998 to 2004 concerning the use of the diode contact laser for a modified Dennis-Kashima posterior endoscopic cordectomy (extended to the false homolateral chord in 3 cases and to the homolateral arytenoid vocal process in 6 cases). 18 patients (15 male, 3 female) were treated; the age range was 35-84 years. The etiology of paralysis varied: iatrogenic post-thyroidectomy and post-thoracic surgery in 5 cases (28%), post-traumatic in 2 cases (11%), secondary to a central lesion in 11 (61%). The operation was carried out with a diode contact laser (60W; 810 nm). Follow-up was 20 months. Dyspnea improved in all patients; the 9 tracheostomized patients were decannulated within 2 months after surgery. Final voice quality was subjectively good in 16 patients (88%). None of patients had any complications after surgery. In conclusion, the endoscopic posterior cordectomy performed by contact diode laser is an effective and reliable method for the treatment of dyspnea secondary to bilateral laryngeal paralysis, guaranteing a sufficient airway without impairing swallowing and maintaining acceptable voice quality.

  1. Efficient diffractive collimator for edge-emitting laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik, Andrzej; Góra, Krzysztof; Adamkiewicz, Grażyna; Ziętek, Monika; Mikuła, Grzegorz; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew

    2006-04-01

    Compared with conventional optical systems, diffractive optical elements are more suitable to transform laser diode beams because they can form more complex wavefronts and better fulfill requirements of miniaturization. However, high numerical aperture needed to collimate the fast axis of edge-emitting laser diodes demands extremely high spatial frequency elements when single DOE is used. That involves complicated design methods based on rigorous diffraction theory and fabricating technology with sub-wavelength resolution and nanometer accuracy. To overcome these difficulties we propose a transmission DOE consisting of elliptical and cylindrical zone plates fabricated onto opposite sides of a substrate. The main advantage of such a solution lies in fact that each of the zone plates has smaller spatial frequency and can be made even as 8-phase-level element with theoretically 95% diffraction efficiency using available microlithographic technology. In result, monolithic collimating system that allows to compensate astigmatism and to convert an elliptical laser diode light beam to circular one can be achieved with NA higher than 0.5 and efficiency over 80%.

  2. Industrial high-power diode lasers: reliability, power, and brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, Stephan; An, Haiyan; Vethake, Thilo

    2012-03-01

    High power semiconductor lasers, single emitters and bars are developing fast. During the last decade key parameters of diode lasers, such as beam quality, power, spatial and spectral brightness, efficiency as well as reliability have been greatly improved. However, often only individual parameters have been optimized, accepting an adverse effect in the other key parameters. For demanding industrial applications in most cases it is not sufficient to achieve a record value in one of the parameters, on the contrary it is necessary to optimize all the mentioned parameters simultaneously. To be able to achieve this objective it is highly advantageous to have insight in the whole process chain, from epitaxial device structure design and growth, wafer processing, mounting, heat sink design, product development and finally the customer needs your final product has to fulfill. In this publication an overview of recent advances in industrial diode lasers at TRUMPF will be highlighted enabling advanced applications for both high end pump sources as well as highest brightness direct diode.

  3. Innovation in Broad-Area Diode Laser Array Architecture: Coupling Grating-Confined Zigzag Modes for High Power, High Brightness Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-08

    spectra of each individual emitting aperture show the same lasing wavelengths. The light -current (L-I) curve of the combined mini-bar is also presented...region (106μm) indicates that light indeed emits from the designed angled-grating areas. The area between two emitters is illuminated a little bit... light from other apertures. This setup ensures that only the light emitting from one aperture can be collimated by the obj. lenses 2 and then

  4. Diode-pumped Yb,Y:CaF2 laser mode-locked by monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongtong; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Shouzhen; Xu, Shicai; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Qian, Xiaobo; Xu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The large-area and high-quality monolayer graphene saturable absorber with a sandwich structure is prepared by the chemical vapor deposition technique. Using graphene saturable absorber, the mode locking operation of a diode-pumped Yb,Y:CaF2 laser is demonstrated. Without extra negative dispersion elements, 4.8 ps pulses are yielded at 1051 nm. The pulse repetition rate is 60 MHz.

  5. External cavity diode laser with very-low frequency drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    An external cavity diode laser with significant mechanical robustness was installed in a housing that was sealed from outside for eliminating variations in the refractive index of air. Using the feedback signal for a frequency lock, it was found that the variation in the laser frequency under free running was suppressed to 275 MHz over one month and depended on the room temperature. Moreover, the upper limit of the linear frequency drift rate was evaluated as intrinsically 40 Hz/s. The frequency lock is expected to be sustainable for more than 110 days with temperature-controlled housing.

  6. Ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, Burrell E.; Myers, David R.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    A Planar-Buried-Heterostructure, Graded-Index, Separate-Confinement-Heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an ion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe.

  7. Hundred-watt diode laser source by spectral beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Peng, Hangyu; Liu, Yun; Qin, Li; Cao, Junsheng; Shan, Xiaonan; Zeng, Yugang; Fu, Xihong; Tong, Cunzhu; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2014-12-01

    A diode laser source with a continuous wavelength (CW) power of 106 W and the beam quality M2 of 14.6 is demonstrated by spectrum beam combining (SBC) of three 800 nm LDAs. With the help of relay optics, a wavelength interval of 0.21 nm and a whole spectrum span of 13.9 nm are achieved, which is almost 10 times narrower than those of the structure without the relay optics. This presents a method to obtain a high power and high beam quality SBC laser source with a narrow spectrum.

  8. Wave optics simulation of diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagaoka, Ryuji; Nagaoka, Hiroki; Nagai, Toru; Wani, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    A numerical simulation code for a diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) was developed. The code employs the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral for both laser mode and pump light propagations. A three-dimensional rate equation set was developed to determine the local gain. The spectral divergence of the pump beam was represented by a series of monochromatic beams with different wavelengths. The calculated results showed an excellent agreements with relevant experimental results. It was found that the main channel of the pump power drain is the spontaneous emission from the upper level of the lasing transition.

  9. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-04

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  10. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  11. Femtosecond diode-pumped mode-locked neodymium lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubeček, Václav; Jelínek, Michal; Čech, Miroslav; Vyhlídal, David; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Qian, Xiaobo; Wang, Jingya; Xu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride-type crystals (CaF2, SrF2) doped with neodymium Nd3+ and codoped with buffer ions for breaking clusters of active ions and increasing fluorescence efficiency, present interesting alternative as laser active media for the diode-pumped mode-locked lasers. In comparison with widely used materials as Nd:YAG or Nd:YVO4, they have broad emission spectra as well as longer fluorescence lifetime, in comparison with Nd:glass, SrF2 and CaF2 have better thermal conductivity. In spite of the fact, that this thermal conductivity decreases with Nd3+ doping concentration, these crystals are alternative for the Nd:glass in subpicosecond mode-locked laser systems. In this paper we review the basic results reported recently on these active materials and in the second part we present our results achieved in low power diode pumped passively mode locked lasers with Nd,La:CaF2 and Nd,Y:SrF2 crystals. The pulses as short as 258 fs at wavelength of 1057 nm were obtained in the first case, while 5 ps long pulses at 1065 nm were generated from the second laser system.

  12. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er: YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Charles E.; Furu, Laurence H.

    1997-01-01

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 .mu.m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 .mu.m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 .mu.m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 .mu.m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems.

  13. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  14. Calculation and comparison of thermal effect in laser diode pumped slab lasers with different pumping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Yuefeng; Dong, Wei; Niu, Yanxiong

    2008-03-01

    Laser diode (LD) pumped slab laser, as an important high average power solid-state laser, is a promising laser source in military and industrial fields. The different laser diode pumping structures lead to different thermal effect in the slab gain medium. The thermal and stress analysis of slab laser with different pumping structure are performed by finite element analysis (FEA) with the software program ANSYS. The calculation results show that the face pumped and cooled laser results in a near one-dimension temperature distribution and eliminates thermal stress induced depolarization. But the structure is low pump efficiency due to the small thickness of slabs and the requirement to cool and pump through the same faces. End-pumped slab laser is high pump efficiency and excellent mode match, but its pumping arrangement is fairly complicated. The edge-pumped face-cooling slab laser's pump efficiency is better than face-pumping, and its pumping structure is simpler than end-pumped laser, but the tensile stress on surfaces may initiate failure of the gain medium so it is important to design so that the stress is well below the stress fracture limit. The comparison of the thermal effects with different pumping structure shows that, the edge-pumped slab laser has engineering advantages in high power slab laser's application. Furthermore, the end-pumped slab laser tends to get the best beam quality, so it is fit for the application which has a special requirement on laser beam quality.

  15. Femtosecond Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers pumped by tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, Umit; Schmalz, Michael; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Petrich, Gale S; Kolodziejski, Leslie A; Fujimoto, James G; Kärtner, Franz X; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2011-10-10

    We report compact, low-cost and efficient Cr:Colquiriite lasers that are pumped by high brightness tapered laser diodes. The tapered laser diodes provided 1 to 1.2 W of output power around 675 nm, at an electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of about 30%. Using a single tapered diode laser as the pump source, we have demonstrated output powers of 500 mW and 410 mW together with slope efficiencies of 47% and 41% from continuous wave (cw) Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers, respectively. In cw mode-locked operation, sub-100-fs pulse trains with average power between 200 mW and 250 mW were obtained at repetition rates around 100 MHz. Upon pumping the Cr:Colquiriite lasers with two tapered laser diodes (one from each side of the crystal), we have observed scaling of cw powers to 850 mW in Cr:LiSAF and to 650 mW in Cr:LiCAF. From the double side pumped Cr:LiCAF laser, we have also obtained ~220 fs long pulses with 5.4 nJ of pulse energy at 77 MHz repetition rate. These are the highest energy levels reported from Cr:Colquiriite so far at these repetition rates. Our findings indicate that tapered diodes in the red spectral region are likely to become the standard pump source for Cr:Colquiriite lasers in the near future. Moreover, the simplified pumping scheme might facilitate efficient commercialization of Cr:Colquiriite systems, bearing the potential to significantly boost applications of cw and femtosecond lasers in this spectral region (750-1000 nm).

  16. Acute Suppurative Parotitis Treatment by Diode Laser Combined with ER:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jyuhn H.; Wang, Hong Lan

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim: The diode laser combined with Er:YAG laser is a new treatment modality for acute sialadenitis. A 78-year-old woman with acute suppurative parotitis was treated by traditional probe to the duct orifice with oral antibiotics for 2 weeks. The symptoms and signs did not subside after treatment. The Er:YAG laser was used to reduce severe infection and inflammation and low level laser therapy (LLLT) was applied to relieve pain sensation during incision and drainage. Less scar formation and obstruction was observed after the laser treatments. Results: Purulent secretions from the Stensen duct was noted after milking the parotid gland. The symptoms and signs were significantly relieved after combined laser treatments. The patient experienced no pain during the course of treatment. No recurrence of the symptoms and signs was noted after 1-year follow-up, and the prognosis was very good. Conclusion: The hemostatic properties of the diode laser enable better control of the surgical field and faster healing of the wound lesions. The bactericidal effect of Er:YAG lasers has been proved by many researchers, and has been shown to reduce infection and inflammation for better wound healing. The combined laser therapy of diode and Er:YAG lasers is recommended in treating acute sialadenitis. PMID:24610980

  17. Role of electron blocking layer in III-nitride laser diodes and light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yen-Kuang; Chang, Jih-Yuan; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2010-02-01

    A high energy bandgap electron blocking layer (EBL) just behind the active region is conventionally used in the nitride-based laser diodes (LDs) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to improve the confinement capability of electrons within the quantum wells. Nevertheless, the EBL may also act as a potential barrier for the holes and cause non-uniform distribution of holes among quantum wells. A most recent study by Han et al. (Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 231123, 2009) reported that, because of the blocking effect for holes, the InGaN LED device without an EBL has slighter efficiency droop and higher light output at high level of current injection when compared with the LED device with an EBL. This result seems to contradict with the original intention of using the EBL. Furthermore, findings from our previous studies (IEEE J. Lightwave Technol. 26, 329, 2008; J. Appl. Phys. 103, 103115, 2008; Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 201118, 2007) indicated that the utilization of EBL is essential for the InGaN laser diodes. Thus, in this work, the optical properties of the InGaN LDs and LEDs are explored numerically with the LASTIP simulation program and APSYS simulation program, respectively. The analyses focus particularly on the light output power, energy band diagrams, recombination rates, distribution of electrons and holes in the active region, and electron overflow. This study will then conclude with a discussion of the effect of EBL on the optical properties of the InGaN LDs and LEDs.

  18. Characterization of High-power Quasi-cw Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Troupaki, Elisavet; Allan, Graham R.; Kashem, Nasir B.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. Performance and comprehensive characterization data of Quasi-CW, High-power, laser diode arrays is presented.

  19. Laser cooling of beryllium ions using a frequency-doubled 626 nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Cozijn, F M J; Biesheuvel, J; Flores, A S; Ubachs, W; Blume, G; Wicht, A; Paschke, K; Erbert, G; Koelemeij, J C J

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate laser cooling of trapped beryllium ions at 313 nm using a frequency-doubled extended cavity diode laser operated at 626 nm, obtained by cooling a ridge waveguide diode laser chip to -31°C. Up to 32 mW of narrowband 626 nm laser radiation is obtained. After passage through an optical isolator and beam shaping optics, 14 mW of 626 nm power remains of which 70% is coupled into an external enhancement cavity containing a nonlinear crystal for second-harmonic generation. We produce up to 35 μW of 313 nm radiation, which is subsequently used to laser cool and detect 6×10(2) beryllium ions, stored in a linear Paul trap, to a temperature of about 10 mK, as evidenced by the formation of Coulomb crystals. Our setup offers a simple and affordable alternative for Doppler cooling, optical pumping, and detection to presently used laser systems.

  20. Evaluation of a satellite laser ranging technique using pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Carolyn Kay

    1987-01-01

    Several types of Satellite Laser Ranging systems exist, operating with pulsed, high-energy lasers. The distance between a ground point and an orbiting satellite can be determined to within a few centimeters. A new technique substitutes pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes, which are much more compact, reliable and less costly, for the lasers now used. Since laser diode technology is only now achieving sufficiently powerful lasers, the capabilities of the new technique are investigated. Also examined are the effects of using an avalanche photodiode detector instead of a photomultiplier tube. The influence of noise terms (including background radiation, detector dark and thermal noise and speckle) that limit the system range and performance is evaluated.

  1. Optical communication with laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a direct-detection optical communication system in which the laser transmitter sends short optical pulses of selected nonoverlapping center frequencies is analysed. This modulation format, in which a single light pulse is sent in one of M time slots at one of N optical center frequencies, is referred to as color coded optical pulse position modulation (CCPPM). The optimum energy-efficiency of this system, as measured by the channel capacity in nats per photon, exceeds that of ordinary optical pulse position modulation which uses a pulsed laser of fixed optical frequency. Reliable communication at optimal energy efficiency is easily achieved through the use of modest block length Reed-Solomon codes with the code words represented as CCPPM symbols.

  2. Forming of Brittle Materials—A New and Valuable Application of Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, D.; Bammer, F.; Schumi, T.; Holzinger, B.

    2010-10-01

    Laser assisted bending is a new and versatile method to allow simple bending of brittle materials. Laser technology is used to illuminate and heat the forming zone. Only a laser allows directing the power on a narrow area. Further there is no unnecessary heating of other parts of the bending equipment, no wear of the tool and, if properly done, no damage of the surface of the metal. We describe now the integration of 200 W-diode-laser-bars on micro-channel coolers that where installed into the lower tool of the bending press. The solution allows any required bending length by a combination of several bending tools with integrated lasers. The optical power of 16 kW per meter bending length allows achieving the temperature necessary to bend brittle sheet metals within seconds.

  3. 11-kW direct diode laser system with homogenized 55 × 20 mm2 Top-Hat intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Noeske, Axel; Kindervater, Tobias; Wessollek, Armin; Brand, Thomas; Biesenbach, Jens

    2007-02-01

    In comparison with other laser systems diode lasers are characterized by a unique overall efficiency, a small footprint and high reliability. However, one major drawback of direct diode laser systems is the inhomogeneous intensity distribution in the far field. Furthermore the output power of current commercially available systems is limited to about 6 kW. We report on a diode laser system with 11 kW output power at a single wavelength of 940 nm aiming for customer specific large area treatment. To the best of our knowledge this is the highest output power reported so far for a direct diode laser system. In addition to the high output power the intensity distribution of the laser beam is homogenized in both axes leading to a 55 x 20 mm2 Top-Hat intensity profile at a working distance of 400 mm. Homogeneity of the intensity distribution is better than 90%. The intensity in the focal plane is 1 kW/cm2. We will present a detailed characterization of the laser system, including measurements of power, power stability and intensity distribution of the homogenized laser beam. In addition we will compare the experimental data with the results of non-sequential raytracing simulations.

  4. Effect of welding parameters on high-power diode laser welding on thin sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Antti; Jansson, Anssi; Kujanpaa, Veli

    2003-06-01

    High power diode laser (HPDL) is the newest laser tool for industrial manufacturing. The most promising areas of application of HPDL are thin sheet welding and hardening. The HPDL has several advantages and disadvantages compared to lasers CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers currently used for welding. There is quite a few industrial applications in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. A typical industrial installation consists of a HPDL, an industrial robot, work piece manipulation and safety enclosures. The HPDL welding process is at this moment conduction limited and has therefore different parameters than the keyhole welding. In this study the basic HPDL welding parameters and the effect of the parameters on the welding process, weld quality and efficiency are examined. Joint types tested are butt joint and fillet lap joint. The parameters tested are beam intensity, welding speed, spot size, beam impingement angle. The materials tested are common carbon steel and stainless steel. By the experiments carried out it can be seen that all of these parameters have an effect on the weld quality and the absorption of the laser power during welding. The higher the beam intensity is the shorter also the throughput time is. However, in case of fillet joint the maximum welding speed and best visual out look are achieved with totally different set of parameters. Based on these experiments it can, however, be seen that reliable welding parameters can be established for the welding of various industrial products. The beam quality of the diode laser is not optimum for high speed keyhole welding but it is a flexible tool to be used for different joint types.

  5. Low absorption loss p-AlGaN superlattice cladding layer for current-injection deep ultraviolet laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, M.; Kuhn, C.; Ziffer, E.; Simoneit, T.; Kueller, V.; Knauer, A.; Rass, J.; Wernicke, T.; Einfeldt, S.; Weyers, M.; Kneissl, M.

    2016-04-01

    Current injection into AlGaN-based laser diode structures with high aluminum mole fractions for deep ultraviolet emission is investigated. The electrical characteristics of laser diode structures with different p-AlGaN short period superlattice (SPSL) cladding layers with various aluminum mole fractions are compared. The heterostructures contain all elements that are needed for a current-injection laser diode including cladding and waveguide layers as well as an AlGaN quantum well active region emitting near 270 nm. We found that with increasing aluminum content in the p-AlGaN cladding, the diode turn-on voltage increases, while the series resistance slightly decreases. By introducing an SPSL instead of bulk layers, the operating voltage is significantly reduced. A gain guided broad area laser diode structure with transparent p-Al0.70Ga0.30N waveguide layers and a transparent p-cladding with an average aluminum content of 81% was designed for strong confinement of the transverse optical mode and low optical losses. Using an optimized SPSL, this diode could sustain current densities of more than 4.5 kA/cm2.

  6. Packaging of complete indium-free high reliable and high power diode laser array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingwei; Li, Xiaoning; Feng, Feifei; Liu, Yalong; Hou, Dong; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    High power diode lasers have been widely used in many fields. For many applications, a diode laser needs to be robust under on-off power-cycling as well as environmental thermal cycling conditions. To meet the requirements, the conduction cooled single bar CS-packaged diode laser arrays must have high durability to withstand thermal fatigue and long lifetime. In this paper, a complete indium-free bonding technology is presented for packaging high power diode laser arrays. Numerical simulations on the thermal behavior of CS-packaged diode laser array with different packaging structure were conducted and analyzed. Based on the simulation results, the device structure and packaging process of complete indium-free CS-packaged diode laser array were optimized. A series of high power hard solder CS (HCS) diode laser arrays were fabricated and characterized. Under the harsh working condition of 90s on and 30s off, good lifetime was demonstrated on 825nm 60W single bar CS-packaged diode laser with a lifetime test of more than 6100hours achieved so far with less 5% power degradation and less 1.5nm wavelength shift. Additionally, the measurement results indicated that the lower smile of complete indium-free CS-packaged diode laser arrays were achieved by advanced packaging process.

  7. Effect of interface layer on the performance of high power diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pu; Wang, Jingwei; Xiong, Lingling; Li, Xiaoning; Hou, Dong; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    Packaging is an important part of high power diode laser (HPLD) development and has become one of the key factors affecting the performance of high power diode lasers. In the package structure of HPLD, the interface layer of die bonding has significant effects on the thermal behavior of high power diode laser packages and most degradations and failures in high power diode laser packages are directly related to the interface layer. In this work, the effects of interface layer on the performance of high power diode laser array were studied numerically by modeling and experimentally. Firstly, numerical simulations using finite element method (FEM) were conducted to analyze the effects of voids in the interface layer on the temperature rise in active region of diode laser array. The correlation between junction temperature rise and voids was analyzed. According to the numerical simulation results, it was found that the local temperature rise of active region originated from the voids in the solder layer will lead to wavelength shift of some emitters. Secondly, the effects of solder interface layer on the spectrum properties of high power diode laser array were studied. It showed that the spectrum shape of diode laser array appeared "right shoulder" or "multi-peaks", which were related to the voids in the solder interface layer. Finally, "void-free" techniques were developed to minimize the voids in the solder interface layer and achieve high power diode lasers with better optical-electrical performances.

  8. Research and Development of Laser Diode Based Instruments for Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael; Abshire, James; Cornwell, Donald; Dragic, Peter; Duerksen, Gary; Switzer, Gregg

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode technology continues to advance at a very rapid rate due to commercial applications such as telecommunications and data storage. The advantages of laser diodes include, wide diversity of wavelengths, high efficiency, small size and weight and high reliability. Semiconductor and fiber optical-amplifiers permit efficient, high power master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) transmitter systems. Laser diode systems which incorporate monolithic or discrete (fiber optic) gratings permit single frequency operation. We describe experimental and theoretical results of laser diode based instruments currently under development at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center including miniature lidars for measuring clouds and aerosols, water vapor and wind for Earth and planetary (Mars Lander) use.

  9. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.

    1998-10-27

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver > 4kW/cm{sup 2} of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources. 13 figs.

  10. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  11. Three Hundred Patients Treated with Ultrapulsed 980 nm Diode Laser for Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The use of lasers in skin diseases is quite common. In contrast to other laser types, medical literature about 980 nm ultrapulsed diode laser is sparse in dermatology. Herein, we report the use of ultrapulsed diode 980 nm laser in 300 patients with vascular lesions, cysts and pseudocysts, infectious disease, and malignant tumors. This laser is a versatile tool with excellent safety and efficacy in the hands of the experienced user. PMID:27688445

  12. Development of Advanced Laser Diode Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, J. J.; Papen, G. C.

    1998-01-01

    The design and operation of InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs asymmetric cladding ridge waveguide distributed Bragg reflector lasers is presented. Targeted for the remote sensing of water vapor with absorption lines in the lambda approximately 930 nm region, these devices operate CW with threshold currents as low as 11 MA and slope efficiencies as high as 0.37 W/A. Tbey also operate with over 30-dB side-mode suppression, and the typical CW characteristic temperature, T(sub o), is 95 K.

  13. Diode laser processed crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, S.; Eggleston, B.; Dore, J.; Evans, R.; Ong, D.; Kunz, O.; Huang, J.; Schubert, U.; Kim, K. H.; Egan, R.; Green, M.

    2013-03-01

    Line-focus diode laser is applied to advance crystalline silicon thin-film solar cell technology. Three new processes have been developed: 1) defect annealing/dopant activation; 2) dopant diffusion; 3) liquid phase crystallisation of thin films. The former two processes are applied to either create a solar cell device from pre-crystallised films or improve its performance while reducing the maximum temperature experienced by substrate. The later process is applied to amorphous silicon films to obtain high crystal and electronic quality material for thin-film solar cells with higher efficiency potential. Defect annealing/dopant activation and dopant diffusion in a few micron thick poly-Si films are achieved by scanning with line-focus 808 nm diode laser beam at 15-24 kW/cm2 laser power and 2~6 ms exposure. Temperature profile in the film during the treatment is independent from laser power and exposure but determined by beam shape. Solar cell open-circuit voltages of about 500 mV after such laser treatments is similar or even higher than voltages after standard rapid-thermal treatments while the highest temperature experienced by glass is 300C lower. Amorphous silicon films can be melted and subsequently liquid-phase crystallised by a single scan of line laser beam at about 20 kW/cm2 power and 10-15 ms exposure. Solar cells made of laser-crystallised material achieve 557 mV opencircuit voltage and 8.4% efficiency. Electronic quality of such cells is consistent with efficiencies exceeding 13% and it is currently limited by research-level simplified cell metallisation.

  14. Application of Diode Laser in the Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Hadzic, Sanja; Zukanovic, Amila; Pasic, Enes; Pavlic, Veriva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dentine hypersensitivity is characterized by acute, sharp pain arising from the exposed dentine, most commonly in response to thermal, tactile, or chemical stimuli, and which cannot be linked to any other pathological changes in the tooth or the environment. Therapy uses various impregnating agents in the form of solutions or gels and, in more recent times, laser. Aim: The aim of this research was to examine the effects of treatment of hypersensitive dental cervix with diode laser. Materials and Methods: The study included 18 patients with 82 sensitive teeth. The degree of dentine hypersensitivity was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), and the treatment was carried out by application of low-power diode laser over the span of three visits, which depended on the initial sensitivity. Results: There is a significant difference in VAS values measured at the onset of treatment (baseline) and immediately after the first laser treatment (t=9.275; p=0.000), after 7 days, after the second laser treatment (14 days) (t=7.085, p=0.000), as well as after 14 days and the third laser treatment (t=5.517, p=0.000), which confirms the effectiveness of this therapeutic procedure. The results showed a reduction of hypersensitivity in response to tactile stimulus with a probe after the third treatment, even with teeth whose value on the VAS was very high at the beginning of treatment (baseline). Conclusion: Within the scope of the conducted study, laser therapy has provided extremely safe and effective results in the treatment of cervical dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:28210023

  15. Room-temperature-operation visible-emission semiconductor diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Kressel, H.; Nuese, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    There were two main approaches taken to develop shorter wavelength lasers. (1) Based on (AlGa)As and liquid-phase epitaxy, significant new results were obtained: Properties of these laser diodes (power output, spectra, and beam patterns), materials considerations, laser theory, and growth problems are discussed. The design of (AlGa)As layers is discussed from the vertical point of view, and various design curves are given. Horizontal structural requirements are also discussed. Experimental results from measurements done as a function of hydrostatic pressure are correlated with other results. (2) The first heterojunction laser structures using GaAs sub l-x P sub x and In sub y Ga sub l-y P at compositions, where the lattice constants are matched, were grown using vapor-phase growth technology and are described in detail, including experimental device results. Threshold current densities from 3,000 to 5,000 A per sq cm. and emission wavelengths from 6,520 A to 6,640 A were obtained at 77 K. The limiting factor in these devices is nonradiative recombination at the heterojunctions. Life tests on facet-coated (AlGa)As CW diodes are reported.

  16. Diode-Laser-Based Spectrometer for Sensing Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.

    2005-01-01

    A diode-laser-based spectrometer has been developed for measuring concentrations of gases and is intended particularly for use in analyzing and monitoring combustion processes under microgravitational conditions in a drop tower or a spacecraft. This instrument is also well suited for use on Earth in combustion experiments and for such related purposes as fire-safety monitoring and monitoring toxic and flammable gases in industrial settings. Of the gas-sensing spectrometers available prior to the development of this instrument, those that were sensitive enough for measuring the combustion gases of interest were too large, required critical optical alignments, used far too much electrical power, and were insufficiently rugged for use under the severe conditions of spacecraft launch and space flight. In contrast, the present instrument is compact, consumes relatively little power, and is rugged enough to withstand launch vibrations and space flight. In addition, this instrument is characterized by long-term stability, accuracy, and reliability. The diode laser in this spectrometer is operated in a wavelength-modulation mode. Different gases to be measured can be selected by changing modular laser units. The operation of the laser is controlled by customized, low-power electronic circuitry built around a digital signal-processor board. This customized circuitry also performs acquisition and analysis of data, controls communications, and manages errors.

  17. Tunable laser diode system for noninvasive blood glucose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesberg, Jonathon T.; Arnold, Mark A.; Mermelstein, Carmen; Schmitz, Johannes; Wagner, Joachim

    2005-03-01

    Tight control of blood glucose levels has been shown to dramatically reduce the long-term complications of diabetes. Current invasive technology for monitoring glucose levels is effective but underutilized by people with diabetes because of the pain of repeated finger-sticks and the cost of reagent strips. Optical sensing of glucose could potentially allow more frequent monitoring and tighter glucose control for people with diabetes. The key to a successful optical non-invasive measurement of glucose is the collection of an optical spectrum with a very high signal-to-noise-ratio in a spectral region with significant glucose absorption. Unfortunately, the optical throughput of skin is very small due to absorption and scattering. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed a high-brightness tunable laser system for measurements in the 2.0-2.5 μm wavelength range. The system is based on a 2.3 micron wavelength, strained quantum-well laser diode incorporating GaInAsSb wells and AlGaAsSb barrier and cladding layers. Wavelength control is provided by coupling the laser diode to an external cavity that includes an acousto-optic tunable filter. Tuning ranges of greater than 110 nm have been obtained. Because the tunable filter has no moving parts, scans can be completed very quickly, typically in less than 10 ms. We describe the performance of the laser system and its potential for use in a non-invasive glucose sensor.

  18. Deciduous teeth occlusal caries detection with 655-nm diode laser confirmed by surface scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Danilo; Fonseca, Yara P. C.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.

    2000-03-01

    The morphological complexity of the occlusal surface of deciduous molar teeth is considered as a factor to increase vulnerability to caries lesion. Occlusal surface of these teeth shows sulcus, pits and fissures which allow retention of both micro-organisms and food debris which make them more susceptible to caries. In the last decades there was a significant reduction on caries of smooth surface but not on the occlusal surface where dentinal caries develops under fissures which are apparently caries-free under eye observation. This is known as a hidden caries. The occlusal surface of sound extracted deciduous molar teeth were examined using a 655 nm diode laser (DIAGNOdent - KaVo) in order to detect hidden caries. When there was indication of a hidden caries, the area was examined using SEM and confirm or not the diagnosis. The authors concludes that the diagnosis of caries using 655 diode laser is reliable and precise method.

  19. Scaling the spectral beam combining channel by multiple diode laser stacks in an external cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Huicheng; Ruan, Xu; Du, Weichuan; Wang, Zhao; Lei, Fuchuan; Yu, Junhong; Tan, Hao

    2017-04-01

    Spectral beam combining of a broad area diode laser is a promising technique for direct diode laser applications. We present an experimental study of three mini-bar stacks in an external cavity on spectral beam combining in conjunction with spatial beam combining. At the pump current of 70 A, a CW output power of 579 W, spectral bandwidth of 18.8 nm and electro-optical conversion efficiency of 47% are achieved. The measured M 2 values of spectral beam combining are 18.4 and 14.7 for the fast and the slow axis, respectively. The brightness of the spectral beam combining output is 232 MW · cm‑2 · sr‑1.

  20. Construction of a Visible Diode Laser Source for Free Radical Photochemistry and Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Bronjelyn; Halpern, Joshua B.

    1997-01-01

    Tunable diode lasers are reliable sources of narrow-band light and comparatively cheap. Optical feedback simplifies frequency tuning of the laser diodes. We are building an inexpensive diode laser system incorporating optical feedback from a diffraction grating. The external optical cavity can be used with lasers that emit between 2 and 100 mW, and will also work if they are pulsed, although this will significantly degrade the bandwidth. The diode laser output power and bandwidth are comparable to CW dye lasers used in kinetics and dynamics experiments. However, their cost and maintenance will be much less as will alignment time. We intend to use the diode lasers to investigate CN and C2 kinetics as well as to study dissociation dynamics of atmospherically important molecules.

  1. Component validation of direct diode 488nm lasers in BD Accuri C6 flow cytometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei P.; Luo, Ningyi D.

    2016-03-01

    The 488nm laser is the most important excitation light source of flow cytometry. The indirect diode (frequency-doubled diode) 488nm lasers are used in the excitation of Becton Dickinson (BD) AccuriTM C6. For using cost effective lasers, we have validated direct diode 488nm lasers as the replacement component of frequency-doubled diode laser. BD Bioscience issued the protocols to cover wavelength, power, noise, and polarization at the operation temperature range of cytometer. Pavilion Integration Corporation (PIC) tested 6 samples as the component validation of direct diode 488nm lasers based on the protocols from BD Biosciences. BD Bioscience also tested one of laser samples to further validate the test results of power, noise, and polarization from PIC.

  2. Efficient femtosecond Yb:YAG laser pumped by a single-mode laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Antonio; Greborio, Alessandro; Pirzio, Federico; Reali, Giancarlo

    2011-08-01

    Single-mode diodes enable a particularly simple, compact and effective pumping of solid-state laser devices for many specialized applications. We investigated a single-mode, 300-mW laser diode for pumping at 935 nm a Yb:YAG laser passively mode-locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber. Relatively short pulse generation (156 fs), tunable across 1033-1059 nm has been demonstrated. An optical-to-optical efficiency of about 28% has been obtained with 320 fs long pulses. Therefore, contrarily to what previously believed, compact diode-pumped ultrafast Yb:YAG oscillators can reliably and efficiently deliver pulses in the range of ≈ 100-200 fs with few tens of mW, which are very appealing for bio-diagnostics and amplifier seeding applications.

  3. Long pulse compact and high-brightness near 1-kW QCW diode laser stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stewart; Altshuler, Gregory; Erofeev, Andrey; Inochkin, Mikhail; Khloponin, Leonid; Khramov, Valery; Feldchtein, Felix

    2012-03-01

    A custom designed compact, high brightness diode laser array stack was designed and manufactured using proprietary methods that are robust and suitable for low cost manufacturing. The diode laser stack consisted of four 10 mm-wide diode laser bars having lasing wavelength of 970 - 980 nm mounted onto high performance submounts separated by approximately 1mm. Each diode laser bar had a 50% fill factor. The cooling methodology employed used a combined passive and active scheme and not the traditional more expensive and more complicated standard microchannel coolers used for high duty cycle applications. The total combined optical power attained from the diode array stack was close to 1 kW for current levels up to 220 A, limited only by the capability of the power supply. In this paper, we summarize the performance results for this diode laser array and analyze the maximum expected optical performance as a function of operating current and pulse width and junction temperature limit.

  4. Clinical comparison between the bleaching efficacy of light-emitting diode and diode laser with sodium perborate.

    PubMed

    Koçak, Sibel; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Sağlam, Baran Can

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to test the efficacy of a light-emitting diode (LED) light and a diode laser, when bleaching with sodium perborate. Thirty volunteers were selected to participate in the study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. The initial colour of each tooth to be bleached was quantified with a spectrophotometer. In group A, sodium perborate and distilled water were mixed and placed into the pulp chamber, and the LED light was source applied. In group B, the same mixture was used, and the 810 nm diode laser was applied. The final colour of each tooth was quantified with the same spectrophotometer. Initial and final spectrophotometer values were recorded. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wicoxon tests were used to test differences between both groups. Both devices successfully whitened the teeth. No statistical difference was found between the efficacy of the LED light and the diode laser.

  5. Real-time power measurement and control for high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wen-bin; Liu, You-qiang; Cao, Yin-hua; Wang, Zhi-yong

    2011-06-01

    As the continual improvement of technology and beam quality, diode laser, with poor beam quality, no longer just apply to pump solid-state laser. As a kind of implement of laser materials processing, high-power diode laser has been used in manufacture, as a brand new means of laser processing. Due to the influence of inevitable unstable factors, for example, the temperature of water-cooler, the current of power supply, etc, the output power of diode laser will be unstable. And laser output power, as an important parameter, frequently affects the performance of the laser beam and the experimental results of processing, especially in the laser materials processing. Therefore, researching the real-time power measurement and control of high power diode laser has great significance, and for diode laser, it would improve performance of itself. To achieve the purpose of real-time detection, traditional measuring method, placing a power sensor behind the total-reflection mirror of laser resonant cavity, is mainly applied in the system of gas laser and solid-state laser. However, Owing to the high integration level of diode laser, traditional measuring method can't be adopted. A technique for real-time measure output power of high power diode laser is developed to improve quality of the laser in this paper. A lens placed at an angle of 45° in the system was used to sample output light of laser, and a piece of ground glass was used to uniform the beam power density, then the photoelectric detector received an optic signal and converted it into electric signal. This feeble signal was processed by amplification circuit with a filter. Finally, this detected electric signal was applied to accomplish the closed-loop control of power. The performance of power measurement and control system was tested with the 300W diode laser, and the measuring inaccuracy achieved was less than +/-1%.

  6. Endoluminal sclerosis with diode laser in the treatment of orofacial venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Camino, Juan C.; España-Tost, Antonio J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The appearance of vascular anomalies in the orofacial area is a common condition, which represents about 50% of these malformations. Traditional treatment approach, such as surgery and chemical sclerosis has been given way to a few less-invasive options, as the use of the 810nm diode laser to induce the sclerosis of the venous malformation by intralesional photocoagulation. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of the diode laser in the intralesional treatment of the orofacial venous malformations (OFVM), describing the recommended surgical approach, as well as to report the main associated complications. Patients and Methods: 10 cases of OFVM, diagnosed and treated at the Oral Surgery Department of the Dental Clinic of the University of Barcelona, between January, 2009 and April, 2011. Every case was treated under local anesthesia, performing at least one intralesional session of diode laser, applying an 1W active optic fiber, in continuous mode, inserted into the interior of the lesion through an intramuscular needle, from the deepest portion to the surface of the lesion. Postoperative medication was indicated and follow-up visits were perform during a period of at least 6 months. Results: Of a total of 10 cases of OFVM, mean age of 25.4 years, 8 required just a single session with intralesional laser diode, before the clinical verification of a total reduction of size of the lesion. In 2 of these cases, were needed at least 2 sessions of intralesional photocoagulation to reach a satisfactory cosmetic result. No complications of any kind occurred. After a follow-up period of at least 6 months only a case of recurrence was described. Discussion and Conclusions: The advantages associated to the use of non-invasive techniques in the treatment of OVM, along with the success rate and low number of relapses, shows the use of the diode laser as a therapy to be considered in the treatment of these lesions. A higher case mix

  7. Laser thermokeratoplasty by means of a continuously emitting laser diode in the mid IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Koop, Norbert; Kamm, Katharina; Geerling, Gerd; Kampmeier, Juergen; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-12-01

    Laser thermokeratoplasty (LTK) has been performed with a continuously emitting, tunable laser diode at 1.86 micrometers . A study on enucleated porcine eyes was conducted in order to demonstrate the feasibility of this laser source for LTK and to determine the useful irradiation modalities. Refractive changes achieved with different application systems and a standard coagulation pattern, consisting of 8 coagulation spots on a 6 mm ring, were measured. The most promising sets of parameters were carried out in a first animal study with mini pigs. Initial refractive changes up to 6 D could be achieved in vitro and in vivo with laser powers between 120 mW and 200 mW and irradiation times of several seconds. In conclusion, the mid-IR laser diode operated at a wavelength of 1.86 micrometers seems to be the optimal source for a clinical LTK system.

  8. GaN-based green laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingrong, Jiang; Jianping, Liu; Aiqin, Tian; Yang, Cheng; Zengcheng, Li; Liqun, Zhang; Shuming, Zhang; Deyao, Li; Ikeda, M.; Hui, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Recently, many groups have focused on the development of GaN-based green LDs to meet the demand for laser display. Great progresses have been achieved in the past few years even that many challenges exist. In this article, we analysis the challenges to develop GaN-based green LDs, and then the approaches to improve the green LD structure in the aspect of crystalline quality, electrical properties, and epitaxial layer structure are reviewed, especially the work we have done. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Progress of China (Nos. 2016YFB0401803, 2016YFB0402002), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61574160, 61334005), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Science (No. XDA09020401), and the Science and Technology Support Project of Jiangsu Province (No. BE2013007).

  9. Wound treatment on a diabetic rat model by a 808 nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Pik Suan; Bidin, Noriah; Krishnan, Ganesan; AnaybBaleg, Sana Mohammed; Marsin, Faridah M.; Sum, Mohamad Bin Md; Baktiar, Harzi; Nassir, Zaleha; Lian Chong, Pek; Hamid, Asmah

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a study on the effect of laser irradiation on wound healing. 808 nm diode laser was employed to facilitate the healing of impaired wounds in experimental diabetes using a rat model. Diabetes was induced in male rats by a streptozotocin injection with a dose of 60 mg kg-1. The disease was verified via measurement of the blood glucose level, which was set having 20 mmol L-1 stability. The rats were randomly distributed into two groups; one served as a control group and the other group was treated with the laser. The power density of the laser used was 0.5 W cm-2 and the wounds were treated for 8 d with the contact time of one second daily. The energy density used was 0.5 J cm-2. The healing progress was recorded via a digital camera. The recorded images were then transferred into Inspector Matrox and image J programs for the accurate measurement of the healing area. The tissue details of the wound were studied through histology. The wound contraction rate of laser therapy group was found to be two times faster than control group. This indicates that the 808 nm diode laser can accelerate the wound healing process.

  10. Deep ultraviolet light-emitting and laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif; Asif, Fatima; Muhtadi, Sakib

    2016-02-01

    Nearly all the air-water purification/polymer curing systems and bio-medical instruments require 250-300 nm wavelength ultraviolet light for which mercury lamps are primarily used. As a potential replacement for these hazardous mercury lamps, several global research teams are developing AlGaN based Deep Ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and DUV LED Lamps and Laser Diodes over Sapphire and AlN substrates. In this paper, we review the current research focus and the latest device results. In addition to the current results we also discuss a new quasipseudomorphic device design approach. This approach which is much easier to integrate in a commercial production setting was successfully used to demonstrate UVC devices on Sapphire substrates with performance levels equal to or better than the conventional relaxed device designs.

  11. Spatially resolved argon microplasma diagnostics by diode laser absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Naoto; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Microplasmas were diagnosed by spatially resolved diode laser absorption using the Ar 801.4 nm transition (1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 8}). A 900 MHz microstrip split ring resonator was used to excite the microplasma which was operated between 100-760 Torr (13-101 kPa). The gas temperatures and the Ar 1s{sub 5} line-integrated densities were obtained from the atomic absorption lineshape. Spatially resolved data were obtained by focusing the laser to a 30 {mu}m spot and translating the laser path through the plasma with an xyz microdrive. At 1 atm, the microplasma has a warm core (850 K) that spans 0.2 mm and a steep gradient to room temperature at the edge of the discharge. At lower pressure, the gas temperature decreases and the spatial profiles become more diffuse.

  12. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, Richard A.; Esch, Victor C.; Papademetriou, Stephanos

    1999-06-01

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the stimulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to-patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  13. Coherent communication link using diode-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Work toward developing a diffraction limited, single frequency, modulated transmitter suitable for coherent optical communication or direct detection communication is discussed. Diode pumped, monolithic Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillators were used as the carrier beam. An external modulation technique which can handle high optical powers, has moderate modulation voltage, and which can reach modulation rates of 1 GHz was invented. Semiconductor laser pumped solid-state lasers which have high output power (0.5 Watt) and which oscillate at a single frequency, in a diffraction limited beam, at the wavelength of 1.06 microns were built. A technique for phase modulating the laser output by 180 degrees with a 40-volt peak to peak driving voltage is demonstrated. This technique can be adapted for amplitude modulation of 100 percent with the same voltage. This technique makes use of a resonant bulk modulator, so it does not have the power handling limitations of guided wave modulators.

  14. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, V; London, R A; Papademetriou, S

    1999-02-23

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the simulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to- patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  15. Diode laser supported partial nephrectomy in laparoscopic surgery: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Hennig, Georg; Zillinberg, Katja; Khoder, Wael Y.

    2011-07-01

    Introduction: Warm ischemia and bleeding during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy place technical constraints on surgeons. Therefore it was the aim to develop a safe and effective laser assisted partial nephrectomy technique without need for ischemia. Patients and methods: A diode laser emitting light at 1318nm in cw mode was coupled into a bare fibre (core diameter 600 μm) thus able to transfer up to 100W to the tissue. After dry lab experience, a total of 8 patients suffering from kidney malformations underwent laparoscopic/retroperitoneoscopic partial nephrectomy. Clinically, postoperative renal function and serum c-reactive protein (CRP) were monitored. Laser induced coagulation depth and effects on resection margins were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and follow-up data are presented. Results: Overall interventions, the mean operative time was 116,5 minutes (range 60-175min) with mean blood loss of 238ml (range 50-600ml) while laser assisted resection of the kidney tissue took max 15min. After extirpation of the tumours all patients showed clinical favourable outcome during follow up period. The tumour size was measured to be 1.8 to 5cm. With respect to clinical safety and due to blood loos, two warm ischemia (19 and 24min) must be performed. Immediate postoperative serum creatinine and CRP were elevated within 0.1 to 0.6 mg/dl (mean 0.18 mg/dl) and 2.1-10 mg/dl (mean 6.24 mg/dl), respectively. The depth of the coagulation on the removed tissue ranged between <1 to 2mm without effect on histopathological evaluation of tumours or resection margin. As the surface of the remaining kidney surface was laser assisted coagulated after removal. The sealing of the surface was induced by a slightly larger coagulation margin, but could not measured so far. Conclusion: This prospective in-vivo feasibility study shows that 1318nm-diode laser assisted partial nephrectomy seems to be a safe and promising medical technique which could be provided either during open surgery

  16. Thin planar package for cooling an array of edge-emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar assemblies and active cooling of each assembly. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar assembly having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar assemblies are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink proximate to the laser diode bar to absorb heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar assembly comprises passageways that connect the microchannels to inlet and outlet corridors. Each inlet passageway may comprise a narrow slot that directs coolant into the microchannels and increases the velocity of flow therethrough. The corridors comprises holes extending through each of the assemblies in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has applications as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers, or by mating the diodes with fiber optic lenses. Further, the arrays can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations, and in military and space applications. The arrays can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors.

  17. Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity by Diode Laser: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25–60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5 W PW (T on 100 m and T off 100 ms), fluence 62.2 J/cm2 in defocused mode with a 320 μ fiber. Each tooth received three 1′ applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel. PMID:22792109

  18. Blue diode laser: a new approach in oral surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Selleri, Stefano; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry had several advantages, principally consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibbers. Up today two diode wavelengths, 810 and 980 nm, were the most utilized in oral surgery but recently a new wavelength emitting in the blue had been proposed. The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the efficacy of five laser wavelengths (450, 532, 808, 1064 and 1340 nm) for the ablation of soft tissues. Specimens were surgically collected from the dorsal surface of four bovine tongues and irradiated by the five different wavelengths. Thermal increase was measured by two thermocouples, the first at a depth of 0.5 mm, and the second at a depth of 2 mm while initial and final surface temperatures were recorded by IR thermometer. The quality of the incision was histologically evaluated by a pathologist by giving a score from 0 to 5. The time necessary to perform the excision varied between 215 seconds (1340 nm, 5W) and 292 seconds (808 nm, 3W). Surface temperature increase was highest for 1340 nm, 5W and lowest for 405 nm, 4 W. The most significant deep temperature increase was recorded by 1340 nm, 5 W and the lowest by 450 nm, 2 W. The quality of incision was better and the thermal elevation lower in the specimens obtained with shortest laser wavelength (450 nm).

  19. Coagulative and ablative characteristics of a novel diode laser system (1470nm) for endonasal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, C. S.; Havel, M.; Janda, P.; Leunig, A.; Sroka, R.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Being practical, efficient and inexpensive, fibre guided diode laser systems are preferable over others for endonasal applications. A new medical 1470 nm diode laser system is expected to offer good ablative and coagulative tissue effects. Methods: The new 1470 nm diode laser system was compared to a conventional 940 nm system with regards to laser tissue effects (ablation, coagulation, carbonization zones) in an ex vivo setup using fresh liver and muscle tissue. The laser fibres were fixed to a computer controlled stepper motor, and the light was applied using comparable power settings and a reproducible procedure under constant conditions. Clinical efficacy and postoperative morbidity was evaluated in two groups of 10 patients undergoing laser coagulation therapy of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. Results: In the experimental setup, the 1470 nm laser diode system proved to be more efficient in inducing tissue effects with an energy factor of 2-3 for highly perfused hepatic tissue to 30 for muscular tissue. In the clinical case series, the higher efficacy of the 1470 nm diode laser system led to reduced energy settings as compared to the conventional system with comparable clinical results. Postoperative crusting was less pronounced in the 1470 nm laser group. Conclusion: The 1470 nm diode laser system offers a highly efficient alternative to conventional diode laser systems for the coagulation of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. According to the experimental results it can be furthermore expected that it disposes of an excellent surgical potential with regards to its cutting abilities.

  20. Diode laser harmonic spectroscopy applied to in situ measurements of atmospheric trace molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Max

    1988-01-01

    With the emergence of lead-salt diode laser technology, a broad and important IR spectral region, roughly 3-30 microns, became accessible to tunable laser spectroscopy. More recent advances in fabrication techniques have provided experimenters with relatively high power quasi-single-mode high-temperature lasers that are readily adapted to compact automated instruments for field experiments. An especially attractive capability of diode lasers is the ease of using them for simultaneous multiconstituent sampling in the atmosphere. This paper presents a summary description of field instruments for atmospheric research which employ diode lasers and second-harmonic detection. Representative results obtained with some of these instruments are presented.

  1. Heterodyne interferometry with a frequency-modulated laser diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Ishii, Y; Murata, K

    1988-01-01

    A digital phase measuring interferometer with a frequency-modulated laser diode using the integratedbucket technique is described. The injection current is continuously changed to introduce a time- varying phase difference between the two beams of an unbalanced Twyman-Green interferometer. The intensity of the interference patterns is integrated with a CCD array sensor for intervals of one-quarter period of the fringe. Using the intensity data a microcomputer calculates the phase to be detected. Some experimental results with the interferometer are presented; the rms repeatability obtained was lambda/80.

  2. Theory of the laser diode interaction in scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarid, D.; Iams, D.A.; Ingle, J.T.; Weissenberger, V.

    1989-08-01

    The theory of interaction of a vibrating cantilever and a laser diode used in a scanning force microscope is given in terms of a feedback-dependent parameter C, which determines the gain associated with this interaction. It is shown that both C and the amplitude of vibrations can be determined experimentally from the measurement of the first and second harmonics. Experimental results, which are in good agreement with the theory, yield a value for C which is 0.045. Under these weak feedback conditions, it is found that the interaction can be modeled approximately as a simple homodyne process.

  3. Early fire sensing using near-IR diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomse, David S.; Hovde, D. Christian; Chen, Shin-Juh; Silver, Joel A.

    2002-09-01

    We describe research leading to a trace gas detection system based on optical absorption using near-IR diode lasers that is intended to provide early warning of incipient fires. Applications include "high loss" structures such as office buildings, hospitals, hotels and shopping malls as well as airplanes and manned spacecraft where convention smoke detectors generate unacceptably high false alarm rates. Simultaneous or near-simultaneous detection of several gases (typically carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, acetylene and hydrogen cyanide) provides high sensitivity while reducing the chance of false alarms. Continuous measurement of carbon dioxide concentrations also provides an internal check of instrument performance because ambient levels will not drop below ~350 ppm.

  4. Diode pumped alkali laser kinetics: comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Charleton D.; Weeks, David E.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-06-01

    The performance of Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPAL) depends critically on both collisionally broadened linehapes and rates for fine structure mixing. The first four potential surfaces for K, Rb, and Cs interactions with rare gases have been computed at the MCSCF/MR SOCI level. These surfaces are then used to compute scattering matrix elements for the spin-orbit relaxation, yielding temperature dependent cross-sections. Theoretical predictions are compared to recent experimental results. The observed fine structure mixing rates for rare gas collisions are interpreted in terms of collision adiabaticity. For molecular partners, ro-vibrational energy appears to dominate the mechanism.

  5. Laser ignition of elastomer-modified cast double-base (EMCDB) propellant using a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreros, Dulcie N.; Fang, Xiao

    2017-03-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate laser ignition using a diode laser for elastomer-modified cast double-base (EMCDB) propellant in order to develop more liable and greener laser ignitors for direct initiation of the propellant. Samples of the propellant were ignited using a 974 nm near-infrared diode laser. Laser beam parameters including laser power, beam width and pulse width were investigated to determine their effects on the ignition performance in terms of delay time, rise time and burn time of the propellant which was arranged in several different configurations. The results have shown that the smaller beam widths, longer pulse widths and higher laser powers resulted in shorter ignition delay times and overall burn times, however, there came a point at which increasing the amount of laser energy transferred to the material resulted in no significant reduction in either delay time or overall burn time. The propellant tested responded well to laser ignition, a discovery which supports continued research into the development of laser-based propellant ignitors.

  6. Laser diode end-pumped ND:YAG laser. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, I.F.

    1992-01-01

    100 Hz operation of a Nd:YAG laser longitudinally pumped by a 1 W peak power quasi-cw laser diode was investigated theoretically and experimentally. An optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 33%, indicating a wall-plug efficiency of 7%, was exhibited, but the threshold optical power of 330 mW was high due to poor antireflection coatings on the laser rod giving a round-trip intracavity loss of 3.1 %. The 1.064 micrometer output was observed to be diffraction-limited. The theoretical modelling of the laser's input/ output characteristics agreed well with the experimentally obtained results.

  7. Continuously tunable solution-processed organic semiconductor DFB lasers pumped by laser diode.

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer, Sönke; Liu, Xin; Huska, Klaus; Shen, Yuxin; Vanderheiden, Sylvia; Valouch, Sebastian; Vannahme, Christoph; Bräse, Stefan; Mappes, Timo; Lemmer, Uli

    2012-03-12

    The fabrication and characterization of continuously tunable, solution-processed distributed feedback (DFB) lasers in the visible regime is reported. Continuous thin film thickness gradients were achieved by means of horizontal dipping of several conjugated polymer and blended small molecule solutions on cm-scale surface gratings of different periods. We report optically pumped continuously tunable laser emission of 13 nm in the blue, 16 nm in the green and 19 nm in the red spectral region on a single chip respectively. Tuning behavior can be described with the Bragg-equation and the measured thickness profile. The laser threshold is low enough that inexpensive laser diodes can be used as pump sources.

  8. Asymmetric, nonbroadened waveguide structures for double QW high-power 808nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, S. P.; Mahdieh, M. H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an asymmetric epitaxial layer structre for designing 808nm diode laser. In this asymmetric sructure, the p-waveguide is reduced in thickness and the p-cladding is doped for increasing the thermal conductivity and consequently better heat extraction. The main purpose of using such design is enhancing the laser gain by reduction of loss in laser cavity, and reduction of electrical and thermal resistivity of the diode laser.

  9. Diode-laser frequency stabilization based on the resonant Faraday effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the results of a method for frequency stabilizing laser diodes based on the resonant Faraday effects. A Faraday cell in conjunction with a polarizer crossed with respect to the polarization of the laser diode comprises the intracavity frequency selective element. In this arrangement, a laser pull-in range of 9 A was measured, and the laser operated at a single frequency with a linewidth less than 6 MHz.

  10. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  11. Optical signal inverter of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet with red shift of laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y

    1994-08-10

    An optical signal inverter was demonstrated in a simple structure that combined a laser diode with Er-doped YAG crystal. The optical signal inversion occurred at a response time of 7 ns and was caused by the decrease of transmission of Er:YAG against the red shift of the wavelength of the laser diode.

  12. Trend of High-Power Laser Diodes for Recordable Optical Disc Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Tetsuya

    Historical development trend of high-power laser diodes for recordable optical disc as CD-R and DVD-R is explained in a view point of not only how to realize highly reliable high-power operation but also how to adopt laser diodes into optical disc drives.

  13. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Medical instruments based on high-power diode and fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapontsev, V. P.; Minaev, V. P.; Savin, V. I.; Samartsev, I. E.

    2002-11-01

    The characteristics and possible applications of scalpels based on diode and fibre lasers emitting at 0.97, 1.06, 1.56, and 1.9 μm, which are produced and developed by the IRE-Polyus Co., are presented. The advantages of such devices and the possibilities for increasing their output power and extending their spectral range are shown.

  14. 635nm diode laser biostimulation on cutaneous wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmaz, Hakan; Gülsoy, Murat; Ülgen, Yekta

    2014-05-01

    Biostimulation is still a controversial subject in wound healing studies. The effect of laser depends of not only laser parameters applied but also the physiological state of the target tissue. The aim of this project is to investigate the biostimulation effects of 635nm laser irradiation on the healing processes of cutaneous wounds by means of morphological and histological examinations. 3-4 months old male Wistar Albino rats weighing 330 to 350 gr were used throughout this study. Low-level laser therapy was applied through local irradiation of red light on open skin excision wounds of 5mm in diameter prepared via punch biopsy. Each animal had three identical wounds on their right dorsal part, at which two of them were irradiated with continuous diode laser of 635nm in wavelength, 30mW of power output and two different energy densities of 1 J/cm2 and 3 J/cm2. The third wound was kept as control group and had no irradiation. In order to find out the biostimulation consequences during each step of wound healing, which are inflammation, proliferation and remodeling, wound tissues removed at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 following the laser irradiation are morphologically examined and than prepared for histological examination. Fragments of skin including the margin and neighboring healthy tissue were embedded in paraffin and 6 to 9 um thick sections cut are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histological examinations show that 635nm laser irradiation accelerated the healing process of cutaneous wounds while considering the changes of tissue morphology, inflammatory reaction, proliferation of newly formed fibroblasts and formation and deposition of collagen fibers. The data obtained gives rise to examine the effects of two distinct power densities of low-level laser irradiation and compare both with the non-treatment groups at different stages of healing process.

  15. Portable multiwavelength laser diode source for handheld photoacoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Celine; Laugustin, Arnaud; Kohl, Andreas; Rabot, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The ageing population faces today an increase of chronic diseases such as rheumatism/arthritis, cancer and cardio vascular diseases for which appropriate treatments based on a diagnosis at an early-stage of the disease are required. Some imaging techniques are already available in order to get structural information. Within the non-invasive group, ultrasound images are common in these fields of medicine. However, there is a need for a point-of-care device for imaging smaller structures such as blood vessels that cannot be observed with purely ultrasound based devices. Photoacoustics proved to be an attractive candidate. This novel imaging technique combines pulsed laser light for excitation of tissues and an ultrasound transducer as a receptor. Introduction of this technique into the clinic requires to drastically shrink the size and cost of the expensive and bulky nanosecond lasers generally used for light emission. In that context, demonstration of ultra-short pulse emission with highly efficient laser diodes in the near-infrared range has been performed by Quantel, France. A multi-wavelength laser source as small as a hand emitted more than 1 mJ per wavelength with four different wavelengths available in pulses of about 90 ns. Such a laser source can be integrated into high sensitivity photoacoustic handheld systems due to their outstanding electrical-to-optical efficiency of about 25 %. Further work continues to decrease the pulse length as low as 40 ns while increasing the pulse energy to 2 mJ.

  16. High power visible diode laser for the treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Arne; Hagen, Clemens; Harlander, Maximilian; Nussbaumer, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    We present a high power visible diode laser enabling a low-cost treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation, including the two leading causes of blindness worldwide (diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration) as well as retinopathy of prematurely born children, intraocular tumors and retinal detachment. Laser coagulation requires the exposure of the eye to visible laser light and relies on the high absorption of the retina. The need for treatment is constantly increasing, due to the demographic trend, the increasing average life expectancy and medical care demand in developing countries. The World Health Organization reacts to this demand with global programs like the VISION 2020 "The right to sight" and the following Universal Eye Health within their Global Action Plan (2014-2019). One major point is to motivate companies and research institutes to make eye treatment cheaper and easily accessible. Therefore it becomes capital providing the ophthalmology market with cost competitive, simple and reliable technologies. Our laser is based on the direct second harmonic generation of the light emitted from a tapered laser diode and has already shown reliable optical performance. All components are produced in wafer scale processes and the resulting strong economy of scale results in a price competitive laser. In a broader perspective the technology behind our laser has a huge potential in non-medical applications like welding, cutting, marking and finally laser-illuminated projection.

  17. High performance diode lasers emitting at 780-820 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, L.; DeVito, M.; Grimshaw, M.; Leisher, P.; Zhou, H.; Dong, W.; Guan, X.; Zhang, S.; Martinsen, R.; Haden, J.

    2012-03-01

    High power 780-820 nm diode lasers have been developed for pumping and material processing systems. This paper presents recent progress in the development of such devices for use in high performance industrial applications. A newly released laser design in this wavelength range demonstrates thermally limited >25W CW power without catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), with peak wallplug efficiency ~65%. Ongoing accelerated lifetesting projects a time to 5% failure of ~10 years at 5 and 8 W operating powers for 95 and 200 μm emitter widths, respectively. Preliminary results indicate the presence and competition of a random and wear-out failure mode. Fiber-coupled modules based on arrays of these devices support >100W reliable operation, with a high 56% peak efficiency (ex-fiber) and improved brightness/reliability.

  18. Multiple Isotope Magneto Optical Trap from a single diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Victor; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Gutierrez, Monica

    2013-05-01

    We present a simple design for a Dual Isotope Magneto Optical Trap. The system requires a single diode laser, a fiber modulator and a tapered amplifier to trap and completely control both 85Rb and 87Rb. We generate all the frequencies needed for trapping both species using the fiber intensity modulator. All the frequencies are amplified simultaneously with the tapered amplifier. The position and power of each frequency is now controlled independently on the RF rather than on the optical side. This introduces an enormous simplification for laser cooling that often requires an acousto-optic modulator for each frequency. The range of frequency changes is much bigger than what is available with acousto-optic modulators since in our case is determined by the modulator bandwidth (10 GHz). Additional isotopes can be simply added by including additional RF frequencies to the modulator and extra beams for other uses can be produced the same way. Support from CONACYT, PROMEP and UASLP.

  19. The case for inelastic reflection of photons in laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacskaylo, M.

    1983-12-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of single-heterojunction, close-confinement-type GaAlAs laser diodes operating at 8175.25 A are reported and analyzed. The diode (with cavity size 300 x 150 x 2.5 microns) was mounted on a windowless low-impedance header and pulsed with a laser modulator mounted on a goniometer; the spectra were scanned in both lateral and transverse directions with a Czerny-Turner scanning spectrometer. Diagrams of the setup and sample spectra are provided. The wavelength of the stimulated emission is found to increase with emission angle by 0.42 + or - 0.08 A/deg in the lateral direction and 0.01 A/deg in the transverse direction. The wavelength increase is attributed to photon momentum loss due to inelastic reflection at the Fabry-Perot surfaces, and this optical model is developed to estimate the per-photon changes in essential parameters and the momentum-loss-induced pressure and energy per pulse affecting the cavity wall: pressure estimates range from 6.28 to 6.94 Gdyn/sq cm and surface-heating estimates from 4.09 to 4.52 kcal/mol for the 70-nsec, 19-21-W pulses required to cause catastrophic facet damage. These values are in reasonable agreement with the Knoop hardness and heat of fusion, respectively, of GaAs.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: InGaN-based violet laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.

    1999-06-01

    High-efficiency light-emitting diodes emitting amber, green, blue and ultraviolet light have been obtained through the use of InGaN active layers instead of GaN active layers. The localized energy states caused by In composition fluctuation in the InGaN active layer seem to be related to the high efficiency of the InGaN-based emitting devices. Long-lifetime violet InGaN multi-quantum-well/GaN/AlGaN separate-confinement heterostructure laser diodes (LDs) were successfully fabricated using epitaxially laterally overgrown GaN by reducing a large number of threading dislocations originating from the interface between GaN and sapphire substrate. The threading dislocations shorten the lifetime of the LDs through an increase of the threshold current density. The LDs with cleaved mirror facets showed an output power as high as 30 mW under room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation with a stable fundamental transverse mode. The lifetime of the LDs at a constant output power of 5 mW was estimated to be approximately 3000 h under CW operation at an ambient temperature of 50 °C. These results indicate that these LDs already can be used for many real applications, such as digital versatile disks, laser printers, sensors and exciting light sources as a commercial product with a high output power and a high reliability.

  1. Laser-induced electron source in a vacuum diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghera, U.; Boxman, R. L.; Kleinman, H.; Ruschin, S.

    1989-11-01

    Experiments were conducted in which a high-power CO2 TEA laser interacted with metallic cathode in a high-vacuum (10 to the -8th Torr) diode. For power densities lower than 5 x 10 to the 7th W/sq cm, no current was detected. For power densities in the range of 5 x 10 to the 7th to 5 x 10 to the 8th W/sq cm, the Cu cathode emitted a maximum current of 40 mA. At a higher power density level, a circuit-limited current of 8 A was detected. The jump of a few orders of magnitude in the current is attributed to breakdown of the diode gap. The experimental results are similar to those of a triggered vacuum gap, and a thorough comparison is presented in this paper. The influence of the pressure in the vacuum chamber on the current magnitude shows the active role that adsorbed gas molecules have in the initial breakdown. When the cathode material was changed from metal to metal oxide, much lower laser power densities were required to reach the breakdown current region.

  2. New material options for high-power diode laser packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweben, Carl H.

    2004-06-01

    Traditional materials have serious deficiencies in meeting requirements for thermal management and minimization of thermal stresses in high-power laser diode packaging. Copper, the standard material for applications requiring high thermal conductivity, has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) that is much larger than those of ceramics and laser diodes, giving rise to thermal stresses when packages are subjected to thermal excursions. Traditional materials with low CTEs have thermal conductivities that are little or no better than that of aluminum. There are an increasing number of new packaging materials with low, tailorable CTEs and thermal conductivities up to four times those of copper that overcome these limitations. The ability to tailor material CTE has been used to solve critical warping problems in manufacturing, increasing yield from 5% to over 99%. Advanced materials fall into six categories: monolithic carbonaceous materials, metal matrix composites, carbon/carbon composites, ceramic matrix composites, polymer matrix composites, and advanced metallic alloys. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art of advanced packaging materials, including their key properties, state of maturity, using composites to fix manufacturing problems, cost and applications.

  3. New Submount Requirement of Conductively Cooled Laser Diodes for Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, S. Y.; Cutler, A. D.; Choi, S. H.; Lee, M. H.; Singh, U. N.

    2000-01-01

    New submount technology is essential for the development of conductively cooled high power diode laser. The simulation and experimental results indicate that thermal conductivity of submount for high power laser-diode must be at least 600 W/m/k or higher for stable operation. We have simulated several theoretical thermal model based on new submount designs and characterized high power diode lasers to determine temperature effects on the performances of laser diodes. The characterization system measures the beam power, output beam profile, temperature distribution, and spectroscopic property of high power diode laser. The characterization system is composed of four main parts: an infrared imaging camera, a CCD camera, a monochromator, and a power meter. Thermal characteristics of two commercial-grade CW 20-W diode laser bars with open heat-sink type were determined with respect to the line shift of emission spectra and beam power stability. The center wavelength of laser emission has a tendency to shift toward longer wavelength as the driving current and heat sink temperature are increased. The increase of heat sink temperature decreases the output power of the laser bar too. Such results lay the guidelines for the design of new submount for high power laser-diodes.

  4. Combining femtosecond laser ablation and diode laser welding in lamellar and endothelial corneal transplants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Roberto; Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Ratto, Fulvio; Menabuoni, Luca; Lenzetti, Ivo; Yoo, Sonia H.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2008-02-01

    Based on our previous clinical experiences in minimally invasive diode laser-induced welding of corneal tissue in penetrating keratoplasty (PK), i.e. full-thickness transplant of the cornea, we combined this technique with the use of a femtosecond laser for applications in lamellar (LK) and endothelial (EK) keratoplasty. In LK, the femtosecond laser was used to prepare donor button and recipient corneal bed; the wound edges were stained with a water solution of Indocyanine Green (ICG) and then irradiated with a diode laser emitting in CW mode to induce stromal welding. Intraoperatory observations and follow-up results up to 6 months indicated the formation of a smooth stromal interface, total absence of edema as well as inflammation, and reduction of post-operative astigmatism, as compared with conventional suturing procedures. In EK the femtosecond laser was used for the preparation of a 100 μm thick, 8.5mm diameter donor corneal endothelium flap. The flap stromal side was stained with ICG. After stripping the recipient Descemet's membrane and endothelium, the donor flap was positioned in the anterior chamber on the inner face of the cornea by an air bubble and secured to the recipient cornea by diode laser pulses delivered by means of a fiberoptic contact probe introduced in the anterior chamber, which produced welding spots of 200 μm diameter. Femtosecond laser sculpturing of the donor cornea provided lamellar and endothelial flaps of preset and constant thickness. Diode laserinduced welding showed a unique potential to permanently secure the donor flap in place, avoiding postoperative displacement and inflammation reaction.

  5. Microscopic analysis of structural changes in diode-laser-welded corneal stroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Menabuoni, Luca; Pini, Roberto

    2007-02-01

    Diode laser welding of the cornea is a technique used to provide immediate sealing of corneal wounds: the cut is stained with a water solution of Indocyanine Green and is then irradiated with an 810 nm laser at low power densities (12-16 W/cm2), which induces a localized heating of the stroma in the range 55-66 °C range. In this study, we present a microscopic analysis aimed at evaluating the structural modifications induced in the stromal collagen of pig eyes during the laser welding of corneal wounds. Cornea samples obtained from twenty freshly-enucleated eyes were cut with a pre-calibrated knife and subjected to the laser welding procedure. Histological slices of the laser-welded stroma were examined by means of optical and transmission electron microscopy. These analyses indicated that bridges of lamellar structures crossed the wound edges with no presence of a coagulation effect. After laser welding, collagen fibrils appeared differently oriented among themselves in comparison with those of the control samples, but with similar mean fibril diameters. The laser-induced effect appeared to be confined to the ICG stained area of the cut walls, and no heat damage was observed at the operative power levels of laser corneal welding.

  6. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.; Mills, S.T.

    1997-04-01

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a ``rack and stack`` configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber. 3 figs.

  7. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Benett, William J.; Mills, Steven T.

    1997-01-01

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a "rack and stack" configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber.

  8. Hydrazine Detection with a Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, John; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Anderson, M. S.; Margolis, J. S.; Jackson, Julie R.; Brown, Pamela R.

    1999-01-01

    Several instruments have been developed to measure low concentrations of hydrazine but none completely meet the sensitivity requirements while satisfying additional criteria such as quick response, stable calibration, interference free operation, online operation, reasonable cost, etc. A brief review is presented of the current technology including the electrochemical cell, the ion mobility spectrometer, the mass spectrometer, and the gas chromatograph. A review of the advantages and disadvantages of these instruments are presented here. The review also includes commercially unavailable technology such as the electronic nose and the Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) IR Spectrometer. It was found that the TDL could meet the majority of these criteria including fast response, minimum maintenance, portability, and reasonable cost. An experiment was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of such a system using an existing (non-portable) instrument. A lead-salt tunable diode laser, cooled to 85 degrees Kelvin was used to record direct absorption and second-derivative spectra of Hydrazine at several pressures to study the sensitivity to low levels of Hydrazine. Spectra of NH3 and CO2 were used for wavelength identification of the scanned region. With a pathlength of 80 m, detection sensitivities of about 1 ppb were achieved for hydrazine in dry nitrogen at a cell pressure of 100 mbar. For spectroscopic detection of Hydrazine, spectral regions including strong Ammonia or Carbon Dioxide lines must be avoided. Strong Hydrazine absorption features were identified at 940/cm showing minimal contribution from Ammonia interferences as suitable candidates for Hydrazine gas detection. For the studies reported here, the particular laser diode could only cover the narrow regions near 962/cm and 965/cm where strong Ammonia interferences were expected. However, the high resolution (0.001/cm) of the TDL spectrometer allowed individual lines of Hydrazine to be identified away from

  9. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  10. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  11. Diode-pumped actively Q-switched thulium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabczynski, J. K.; Zendzian, W.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Jelinkova, H.; Sulc, J.; Nemec, M.

    2007-06-01

    The properties of several Tm doped crystals regarding application in Q-switched tunable laser were analyzed theoretically. The acousto-optically Q-switched Tm:YLF laser is described in experimental part. The fiber coupled (0.4-mm core diameter) laser diode bar at 792-nm wavelength was deployed for pumping. The uncoated, with 3.5% dopant of thulium YLF rod of ø3x8mm size wrapped with indium foil was mounted in copper heat-sink maintaining 293 K temperature of coolant water. Above 6 W of output power and near 50% slope efficiency with respect to absorbed pump power was demonstrated in free-running mode for a short, 40-mm long resonator. The quartz acousto-optic modulator with above 80% diffraction efficiency for 25-W power of RF was taken as the Q-switch for such a laser. In the best case of Q-switching mode up to 2-mJ output energy with 15-ns pulse duration corresponding to 100-kW peak power was demonstrated for rep. rate of a few Hz. Emission wavelength was around 1904 nm for both free-running and Q-switching regimes

  12. Functional possibilities for forming different inverse population distributions in diode-side-pumped laser heads

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, S G; Nikolaev, P P; Sharandin, E A

    2014-10-31

    The functional possibilities of diode-side-pumped laser heads of solid-state lasers for forming inverse population distributions of different types are analysed. The invariants determining the relationship between the laser head parameters upon scaling are found. The results of comparative experimental studies are presented. (lasers)

  13. Low-threshold short-cavity diode laser for a miniature atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kargapol'tsev, Sergei V; Velichansky, Vladimir L; Vasil'ev, V V; Kobyakova, M Sh; Morozyuk, A V; Shiryaeva, N V; Konyaev, V P

    2009-06-30

    Short-cavity diode lasers (SCDLs) emitting at the 894-nm D{sub 1} line of caesium are developed. Low threshold currents and power consumption will make it possible to use these lasers in chip-size atomic clocks (CSACs) and magnetometers. The SCDL parameters are comparable with the parameters of surface-emitting lasers. (lasers)

  14. High power 2 {mu}m diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Honea, E.C.; Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using a scaleable diode end-pumping technology developed at LLNL, we have demonstrated a compact Tm:YAG laser capable of generating more than 50 W of cw 2 {mu}m laser output power. The design and operational characteristics of this laser, which was built originally for use in assessing laser surgical techniques, are discussed.

  15. Laser-diode pumped 40-W Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qiang; Li, Wenxue; Pan, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Benxue; Pan, Yubai; Zeng, Heping

    2009-09-28

    We demonstrated a high-power continuous-wave (CW) polycrystalline Yb:YAG ceramic laser pumped by fiber-pigtailed laser diode at 968 nm with 400 mum fiber core. The Yb:YAG ceramic laser performance was compared for different Yb(3+) ion concentrations in the ceramics by using a conventional end-pump laser cavity consisting of two flat mirrors with output couplers of different transmissions. A CW laser output of 40 W average power with M(2) factor of 5.8 was obtained with 5 mol% Yb concentration under 120 W incident pump power. This is to the best of our knowledge the highest output power in end-pumped bulk Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  16. High-power diode lasers between 1.8µm and 3.0µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilzensauer, S.; Gilly, J.; Friedmann, P.; Werner, M.; Traub, M.; Patterson, S.; Neukum, J.; Kelemen, M. T.

    2013-03-01

    High-power diode lasers in the mid-infrared wavelength range between 1.8μm and 3.0μm have emerged new possibilities for solid-state pumping and direct material applications based on water absorption with favoured wavelengths at 1.94μm and 2.9μm. GaSb based diode lasers are naturally predestined for this wavelength range. We will present results on MBE grown (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode laser single emitters and laser arrays at different wavelengths between 1.8μm and 3.0μm. At 1.94μm different epitaxial designs have been investigated in order to optimize the GaSb based diode lasers for higher wall-plug efficiency and higher brightness. More than 30% maximum wall-plug efficiency in cw operation for single emitters could be demonstrated for resonator lengths of 1mm. At 2.25μm a high wall-plug efficiency of 24% has been measured. For 2mm resonator length by using asymmetric waveguide structures the wall-plug efficiency could be doubled. Fast axis far field widths of 70 degree (95% power included) have been demonstrated. At 2.9μm emitting wavelength broad-area lasers with 2mm resonator length with 360mW at 10°C heat sink temperature are presented. We have also started to transfer the concepts for higher brightness to this wavelength regime. 19-emitter laser arrays emitting at 1.94μm have been packaged on actively cooled heat sinks. Comparable high wallplug efficiencies have been measured with p-side down and p-side up packaging. In all configurations far field widths are well below 90 degree (95% power included). Finally a record value of 140W have been measured for a stack built of 10x 20% fill factor bars emitting at 1.91μm.

  17. Microchip solid-state cylindrical vector lasers with orthogonally polarized dual laser-diode end pumping.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kenju; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-05-01

    We report a simple method for generating cylindrical vector beams directly from laser-diode (LD)-pumped microchip solid-state lasers by using dual end-pumping beams. Radially as well as azimuthally polarized vector field emissions have been generated from the common c-cut Nd:GdVO4 laser cavity merely by controlling the focus positions of orthogonally polarized LD off-axis pump beams. Hyperbolically polarized vector fields have also been observed, in which the cylindrical symmetry of vector fields is broken. Experimental results have been well reproduced by numerical simulations.

  18. Investigation of the Atmospheric Propagation of Alkali Lasers in a Maritime Environment Using Tunable Diode Laser Atmospheric Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    regions surrounding the cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) DPAL emission lines, 890 to 910 nanometers and 790 to 800 nanometers respectively, were examined...development of Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPAL’s) began in 2003 with Krupke’s demonstration of the first 3 level rubidium (Rb) laser [1]. After this...Bibliography 1. W. F. Krupke, R. J. Beach, V. K. Kanz, and S. A. Payne, “Diode Pumpable Rubidium Laser,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics, J

  19. Multi-kW cw fiber oscillator pumped by wavelength stabilized fiber coupled diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Winkelmann, Lutz; Belke, Steffen; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich; Köhler, Bernd; Wolf, Paul; Biesenbach, Jens

    2013-02-01

    High power Yb doped fiber laser sources are beside CO2- and disk lasers one of the working horses of industrial laser applications. Due to their inherently given robustness, scalability and high efficiency, fiber laser sources are best suited to fulfill the requirements of modern industrial laser applications in terms of power and beam quality. Pumping Yb doped single-mode fiber lasers at 976nm is very efficient. Thus, high power levels can be realized avoiding limiting nonlinear effects like SRS. However the absorption band of Yb doped glass around 976nm is very narrow. Therefore, one has to consider the wavelength shift of the diode lasers used for pumping. The output spectrum of passively cooled diode lasers is mainly defined by the applied current and by the heat sink temperature. Furthermore the overall emission line width of a high power pump source is dominated by the large number of needed diode laser emitters, each producing an individual spectrum. Even though it is possible to operate multi-kW cw single-mode fiber lasers with free running diode laser pumps, wavelength stabilizing techniques for diode lasers (e.g. volume holographic gratings, VHG) can be utilized in future fiber laser sources to increase the output power level while keeping the energy consumption constant. To clarify the benefits of wavelength stabilized diode lasers with integrated VHG for wavelength locking the performance of a dual side pumped fiber oscillator is discussed in this article. For comparison, different pumping configurations consisting of stabilized and free-running diode lasers are presented.

  20. Corrosion resistant nickel superalloy coatings laser-clad with a 6 kW high power diode laser (HPDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuominen, Jari; Honkanen, Mari; Hovikorpi, Jari; Vihinen, Jorma; Vuoristo, Petri; Maentylae, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    A series of exerpiments were performed to investigate the one-step laser cladding of Inconel 625 powder, injected off-axially onto Fe37 and 42CrMo4 substrates. The experiments were carried out using a 6 kW high power diode laser (HPDL) mounted to a 6 axis robot system. The rectangular shape of the delivering beam was focused to a spot size of 22 x 5 mm on the work piece. The coating samples were produced using different levels of powder feed rate (77 - 113 g/min), traveling speed (300 - 400 mm/min) and laser power (4.8 - 6 kW). Hot corrosion resistance of laser-clad Inconel 625 coatings were tested in Na2SO4 - V2O5 at 650°C for 1000 hours. Wet corrosion properties of the obtained coatings were tested in immersion tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Diode laser power of 6 kW (808 and 940 nm) was high enough to produce 20 mm wide laser-clad tracks with a thickness of 2.5 mm in a single pass, when powder feed rate was more than 6 kg/h and traverse speed was 400 mm/min. Wet corrosion properties of laser-clad Inconel 625 coatings were found to be superior to sprayed and welded coatings. Hot corrosion resistance was even slightly better than corresponding wrought alloy. Finally, one-step HPDL cladding was demonstrated in coating of shaft for hydraulic cylinder with Inconel 625 powder. Due to high coating quality, high deposition rate and traverse speed HPDL devices are very promising for large area cladding applications.

  1. The Effect of Diode Laser With Different Parameters on Root Fracture During Irrigation Procedure.

    PubMed

    Karataş, Ertuğrul; Arslan, Hakan; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Yılmaz, Cenk Burak; Yeter, Kübra Yesildal; Ayrancı, Leyla Benan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effect of a single diode laser application and agitation of EDTA with diode laser with different parameters at different time intervals on root fracture. Ninety mandibular incisors were instrumented except the negative control group. The specimens were divided randomly into 10 groups according to final irrigation procedure: (G1) non-instrumented; (G2) distilled water; (G3) 15% EDTA; (G4) ultrasonically agitated EDTA; (G5) single 1.5W/100 Hz Diode laser; (G6) single 3W/100 Hz Diode laser; (G7) 1.5W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 20 s; (G8) 1.5W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 40 s; (G9) 3W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 20 s; and (G10) 3W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 40 s. The specimens were filled, mounted in acrylic resin, and compression strength test was performed on each specimen. Statistical analysis was carried out using one way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (P = 0.05). The statistical analysis revealed that there were statistically significant differences among the groups (P < 0.05). Laser-agitated irrigation with a 3W/100 Hz Diode laser for both 20 s and 40 s decreased the fracture resistance of teeth.

  2. Inadvertent sclerostomy with encysted bleb following trans-scleral contact diode laser cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Viney; Sony, Parul; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2006-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman underwent 360 degrees trans-scleral contact diode laser cyclophotocoagulation for refractory glaucoma. Conjunctival burns and scleral thinning were noticed inferonasally at the last laser application. Intraocular pressure in the first week was normal. Six months later the patient presented with encysted filtering bleb and high intraocular pressure. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed a full thickness sclerostomy. This report suggests that inadvertent sclerostomy may present with encysted bleb months after trans-scleral contact diode laser cyclophotocoagulation.

  3. Wide-aperture laser diode array in the external V-shaped cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Svetikov, V V; Nurligareev, D Kh

    2014-09-30

    The operation of a wide-aperture laser diode array with the radiation wavelength 980 nm in external V-shaped symmetric and asymmetric cavities is experimentally studied. The regimes of stable oscillation are studied as functions of the feedback beam direction. The spectra and the intensity distribution of radiation in the far zone are presented for the laser diode in symmetric and asymmetric cavities. Tuning of the radiation wavelength is demonstrated using the Littman geometry in the asymmetric cavity. (lasers)

  4. An experimental study of low-frequency amplitude noise in a fibre Bragg grating laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Zholnerov, V S; Ivanov, A V; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Romantsevich, V I; Chernov, R V

    2013-09-30

    We have studied the amplitude noise in a fibre Bragg grating laser diode. It has been shown that discontinuities in noise characteristics correlate with those in the power – current and spectral characteristics of the laser diode, whereas the noise characteristics of the pump source have no such discontinuities. The highest noise level has been observed at pump currents corresponding to concurrent generation of two longitudinal modes. (lasers)

  5. One joule per Q-switched pulse diode-pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holder, Lonnie E.; Kennedy, Chandler; Long, Larry; Dube, George

    1992-01-01

    Q-switched 1-J output has been achieved from diode-pumped zig-zag Nd:YAG slabs in an oscillator-amplifier configuration. The oscillator was single transverse and longitudinal model. This laser set records for Q-switched energy per pulse, and for average power from a diode-pumped laser. The laser was constructed in a rugged configuration suitable for routine laboratory use.

  6. High Power Diode Pumped 1.06 Micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvind, Mukundarajan A.; Martin, Dan W.; Osterhage, R. J.

    1989-07-01

    Diode pumped solid state lasers have been attracting significant interest in recent years due to advances in high power semiconductor diode lasers. They offer considerable advantages over flashlamp pumped lasers such as compact size, high efficiency, lower heat dissipation and solid-state reliability. In this paper, we report on the results of a Nd:YAG laser, transverse pumped by diode laser arrays. We have measured an output power of 1.14 Watts at 1.06 microns with a laser diode power consumption of 40 Watts. This represents the highest reported electrical efficiency (2.85%) for a transverse pumped, CW, TEM00 laser. The diode arrays were selected and tuned to emit at wavelengths close to the peak neodymium absorption line at 0.808 microns with Peltier coolers. Two diode laser bars side pumped a 20 mm long, 1.5 mm diameter Nd:YAG laser rod. The optical cavity is 13.8 cm long consisting of a high reflectivity mirror and a 95% reflectivity output mirror. The output beam divergence was measured to be near diffraction limited at 1.4 milliradians, and the beam diameter was 1 mm.

  7. 2.1 μm high-power laser diode beam combining(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrou, Antoine P. C.; Elder, Ian F.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Laser power and brightness scaling, in "eye safe" atmospheric transmission windows, is driving laser system research and development. High power lasers with good beam quality, at wavelength around 2.1 µm, are necessary for optical countermeasure applications. For such applications, focusing on efficiency and compactness of the system is mandatory. In order to cope with these requirements, one must consider the use of laser diodes which emit directly in the desired spectral region. The challenge for these diodes is to maintain a good beam quality factor as the output power increases. 2 µm diodes with excellent beam quality in both axes are available with output powers of 100 mW. Therefore, in order to reach multi-watt of average output power, broad-area single emitters and beam combining becomes relevant. Different solutions have been implemented in the 1.9 to 2 µm wavelength range, one of which is to stack multiple emitter bars reaching more than one hundred watt, while another is a fibre coupled diode module. The beam propagation factor of these systems is too high for long atmospheric propagation applications. Here we describe preliminary results on non-coherent beam combining of 2.1 µm high power Fabry-Perot GaSb laser diodes supplied by Brolis Semiconductors Ltd. First we evaluated single mode diodes (143 mW) with good beam quality (M2 < 1.5 for slow axis and < 1.1 for fast axis). Then we characterized broad-area single emitter diodes (808 mW) with an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 19 %. The emitter width was 90 µm with a cavity length of 1.5 mm. In our experiments we found that the slow axis multimode output beam consisted of two symmetric lobes with a total full width at half maximum (FWHM) divergence angle of 25 degrees, corresponding to a calculated beam quality factor of M2 = 25. The fast axis divergence was specified to be 44 degrees, with an expected beam quality factor close to the diffraction limit, which informed our selection of collimation

  8. Improved performance of high average power semiconductor arrays for applications in diode pumped solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Emanuel, M.; Benett, W.; Freitas, B.; Ciarlo, D.; Carlson, N.; Sutton, S.; Skidmore, J.; Solarz, R.

    1994-01-01

    The average power performance capability of semiconductor diode laser arrays has improved dramatically over the past several years. These performance improvements, combined with cost reductions pursued by LLNL and others in the fabrication and packaging of diode lasers, have continued to reduce the price per average watt of laser diode radiation. Presently, we are at the point where the manufacturers of commercial high average power solid state laser systems used in material processing applications can now seriously consider the replacement of their flashlamp pumps with laser diode pump sources. Additionally, a low cost technique developed and demonstrated at LLNL for optically conditioning the output radiation of diode laser arrays has enabled a new and scalable average power diode-end-pumping architecture that can be simply implemented in diode pumped solid state laser systems (DPSSL`s). This development allows the high average power DPSSL designer to look beyond the Nd ion for the first time. Along with high average power DPSSL`s which are appropriate for material processing applications, low and intermediate average power DPSSL`s are now realizable at low enough costs to be attractive for use in many medical, electronic, and lithographic applications.

  9. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Metastable Atoms in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Tung Do; Hippler, Rainer

    2008-09-07

    Spatial density profile of neon metastable produced in dusty plasma was investigated by means of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The line averaged measured density drops about 30% with the presence of dust particles. The observations provide evidence for a significant interaction between atoms and powder particles which are important for energy transfer from plasma to particles. The power per unit area absorbed by dust particles due to the collision of metastable atoms with dust particle surface is about some tens of mW/m{sup 2}.

  10. Laser diode technology and applications V; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Daniel

    Various papers on laser diode technology and its applications are presented. The general topics addressed include: high-power coherent large-aperture sources, vertical-cavity lasers, quantum-well lasers, semiconductor laser reliability, high-power semiconductor lasers, surface-emitting lasers, laser dynamics, and visible and midinfrared semiconductor lasers.

  11. Unveiling laser diode “fossil” and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser “fossil” buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser “fossil” is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates.

  12. Unveiling laser diode “fossil” and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser “fossil” buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser “fossil” is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates. PMID:26740303

  13. Continuous Wave 30 W Laser-Diode Bar with 10 Ghz Linewidth for Rb Laser Pumping (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-15

    ABSTRACT A laser -diode bar incorporated into an external cavity with a volume Bragg mirror produced 30 W of cw output power within a 20 pm (10 GHz...radiation at wavelength of 779.92 nm. In summary, a diode laser bar with a volume Bragg output coupler emitting at 780 nm produced up to 30 W cw output...AFRL-RD-PS-TP- AFRL-RD-PS-TP- 2009-1017 2009-1017 Continuous Wave 30 W Laser -Diode Bar with 10 GHz Linewidth

  14. Aluminium surface treatment with ceramic phases using diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labisz, K.; Tański, T.; Brytan, Z.; Pakieła, W.; Wiśniowski, M.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic particles powder feeding into surface layer of engineering metal alloy is a well-known and widely used technique. New approach into the topic is to obtain finely distributed nano-sized particles involved in the aluminium matrix using the traditional laser technology. In this paper are presented results of microstructure investigation of cast aluminium-silicon-copper alloys surface layer after heat treatment and alloying with ceramic carbides of WC and ZrO2 using high-power diode laser. The surface layer was specially prepared for the reason of reducing the reflectivity, which is the main problem in the up-to-date metal matrix composites production. With scanning electron microscopy, it was possible to determine the deformation process and distribution of WC and ZrO2 ceramic powder phase. Structure of the surface after laser treatment changes, revealing three zones—remelting zone, heat-affected zone and transition zone placed over the Al substrate. The structural changes of ceramic powder, its distribution and morphology as well as microstructure of the matrix material influence on functional properties, especially wear resistance and hardness of the achieved layer, were investigated.

  15. High peak power diode stacks for high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, Viorel C.; Vethake, Thilo; Jiang, John; Roff, Robert; Shih, Ming; Duck, Richard; Bauer, Marc; Mite, Roberto; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2015-02-01

    High energy solid state lasers are being developed for fusion experiments and other research applications where high energy per pulse is required but the repetition rate is rather low, around 10Hz. We report our results on high peak power diode laser stacks used as optical pumps for these lasers. The stacks are based on 10 mm bars with 4 mm cavity length and 55% fill factor, with peak power exceeding 500 W per bar. These bars are stacked and mounted on a cooler which provides backside cooling and electrical insulation. Currently we mount 25 bars per cooler for a nominal peak power of 12.5 kW, but in principle the mounting scheme can be scaled to a different number of devices depending on the application. Pretesting of these bars before soldering on the cooler enables us to select devices with similar wavelength and thus we maintain tight control of the spectral width (FWHM less than 6 nm). Fine adjustments of the centroid wavelength can be done by means of temperature of the cooling fluid or bias current. The available wavelength range spans from 880 nm to 1000 nm, and the wavelength of the entire assembly of stacks can be controlled to within 0.5 nm of the target value, which makes these stacks suitable for pumping a variety of gain media. The devices are fast axis collimated, with over 95% power being collimated in 6 mrad (full angle). The slow axis divergence is 9° (full angle) for 95% power content.

  16. Effects of Different Polarization Strategies on Laser Cutting with Direct Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G. Costa; Duflou, J. R.

    As Direct Diode Lasers are introduced as an emerging technology for laser cutting of metal sheets, new challenges arise. The relatively low beam quality remains a limitation to the maximum cutting speed. One way to balance this may be a strategic use of laser polarization in order to influence laser material interaction in the cutting kerf. In this paper the effects of cross-, linear-, radial- and azimuthal- laser beam polarization arrangements are studied with both Fusion and Flame cutting at an output power of approximately 750W. Different combinations of materials and thicknesses were cut and the maximum cutting speed and edge quality analyzed. It is found that at similar cutting edge quality, improvements in cutting speed can go up to 40% with an inert gas, such as Nitrogen, and up to 20% with a reactive gas, such as Oxygen, in agreement with analytical models for absorption previously developed by the authors.

  17. Laser remelting of Ti6AL4V using high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Vázquez, M. R.; Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; Boukha, Z.; El Amrani, K.; Botana, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Titanium alloys present excellent mechanical and corrosion properties, being widely employed in different industries such as medical, aerospace, automotive, petrochemical, nuclear and power generation, etc. Ti6Al4V is the α-β alloy most employed in industry. The modification of its properties can be achieved with convectional heat treatments and/or with laser processing. Laser remelting (LR) is a technology applied to Ti6Al4V by other authors with excimer and Nd-Yag laser with pure argon shielding gas to prevent risk of oxidation. In the present contribution, laser remelting has been applied for the first time to Ti6Al4V with a high power diode laser (with pure argon as shielding gas). Results showed that remelted samples (with medium energy densities) have higher microhardness and better corrosion resistance than Ti6Al4V base metal.

  18. A low-temperature external cavity diode laser for broad wavelength tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, William G.; Rosenberg, Jason S.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design and characterization of a low-temperature external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system for broad wavelength tuning. The performance achieved with multiple diode models addresses the scarcity of commercial red laser diodes below 633 nm, which is a wavelength range relevant to the spectroscopy of many molecules and ions. Using a combination of multiple-stage thermoelectric cooling and water cooling, the operating temperature of a laser diode is lowered to -64 °C, more than 85 °C below the ambient temperature. The laser system integrates temperature and diffraction grating feedback tunability for coarse and fine wavelength adjustments, respectively. For two different diode models, single-mode operation is achieved with 38 mW output power at 616.8 nm and 69 mW at 622.6 nm, more than 15 nm below their ambient temperature free-running wavelengths. The ECDL design can be used for diodes of any available wavelength, allowing individual diodes to be tuned continuously over tens of nanometers and extending the wavelength coverage of commercial laser diodes.

  19. Temperature issues with white laser diodes, calculation and approach for new packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmayer, Roland; Kloppenburg, Gerolf; Stephan, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Bright white light sources are of significant importance for automotive front lighting systems. Today's upper class systems mainly use HID or LED light sources. As a further step laser diode based systems offer a high luminance, efficiency and allow the realization of new dynamic and adaptive light functions and styling concepts. The use of white laser diode systems in automotive applications is still limited to laboratories and prototypes even though announcements of laser based front lighting systems have been made. But the environment conditions for vehicles and other industry sectors differ from laboratory conditions. Therefor a model of the system's thermal behavior is set up. The power loss of a laser diode is transported as thermal flux from the junction layer to the diode's case and on to the environment. Therefor its optical power is limited by the maximum junction temperature (for blue diodes typically 125 - 150 °C), the environment temperature and the diode's packaging with its thermal resistances. In a car's headlamp the environment temperature can reach up to 80 °C. While the difference between allowed case temperature and environment temperature is getting small or negative the relevant heat flux also becomes small or negative. In early stages of LED development similar challenges had to be solved. Adapting LED packages to the conditions in a vehicle environment lead to today's efficient and bright headlights. In this paper the need to transfer these results to laser diodes is shown by calculating the diodes lifetimes based on the presented model.

  20. Tunable Diode Laser Applications To Cigarette Smoke Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilcins, Gunars; Harward, Charles N.; Parrish, Milton E.; Forrest, Gary T.

    1983-11-01

    High resolution infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDL) has been applied to the study of cigarette smoke for qualitative and quantitative determinations involved in tobacco blend and cigarette filter developments. As examples of the different types of application of this work, several TDL studies are presented. The measurements of smoke components on a puff-by-puff basis in confined sample chambers and flowing streams were used to study the smoke component deliveries and the effects of filter dilution. The study of isotopes generated during combustion of chemically treated tobaccos was another application of the TDL system to complex gas mixtures without prior separation of compo-nents. The application of the TDL to the study of cigarette filters and smoke delivery simultaneously was demonstrated by using two well resolved absorption lines of two different gases which occur on a single TDL wavelength scan.

  1. High average power diode pumped solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yue; Wang, Yanjie; Chan, Amy; Dawson, Murray; Greene, Ben

    2017-03-01

    A new generation of high average power pulsed multi-joule solid state laser system has been developed at EOS Space Systems for various space related tracking applications. It is a completely diode pumped, fully automated multi-stage system consisting of a pulsed single longitudinal mode oscillator, three stages of pre-amplifiers, two stages of power amplifiers, completely sealed phase conjugate mirror or stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) cell and imaging relay optics with spatial filters in vacuum cells. It is capable of generating pulse energy up to 4.7 J, a beam quality M 2 ~ 3, pulse width between 10–20 ns, and a pulse repetition rate between 100–200 Hz. The system has been in service for more than two years with excellent performance and reliability.

  2. Diagnostics of an argon arcjet plume with a diode laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F Y; Komurasaki, K; Iida, T; Fujiwara, T

    1999-03-20

    The diode-laser absorption technique was applied for simultaneous velocity and temperature measurements of an argon plume exhausted by an arcjet. The Ar I absorption line at 811.531 nm was taken as the center absorption line. The velocity and the temperature were derived from the Doppler shift in the absorption profiles and the full width at half-maximum of the plume absorption profile, respectively. From the measured plume velocity and temperature, the total enthalpy of the exhausted plume, the thrust efficiency, and the thermal efficiency of the arcjet were derived, and the performance of the arcjet was examined. The results are demonstrated to agree with results derived by other methods, and the technique can be applied to the measurement of other arcjet systems without much modification.

  3. Pulsed diode laser-based monitor for singlet molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonkyung; Zhu, Leyun; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Hinds, Michael F.; Vu, Danthu H.; Rosen, David I.; Davis, Steven J.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising cancer treatment. PDT uses the affinity of photosensitizers to be selectively retained in malignant tumors. When tumors, pretreated with the photosensitizer, are irradiated with visible light, a photochemical reaction occurs and tumor cells are destroyed. Oxygen molecules in the metastable singlet delta state O2(1Δ) are believed to be the species that destroys cancerous cells during PDT. Monitoring singlet oxygen produced by PDT may lead to more precise and effective PDT treatments. Our approach uses a pulsed diode laser-based monitor with optical fibers and a fast data acquisition system to monitor singlet oxygen during PDT. We present results of in vitro singlet oxygen detection in solutions and in a rat prostate cancer cell line as well as PDT mechanism modeling. PMID:18601555

  4. Measurements of Trace Gases Using a Tunable Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Hans-Juerg

    2005-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Measurements of Trace Gases Using a Tunable Diode Laser." The tasks outlined in the proposal are listed below with a brief comment. The publications and the conference presentations are listed. Finally, the important publications are attached. The Cooperative Agreement made possible a research effort to produce high- precision and high-accuracy in-situ measurements of carbon monoxide, methane and nitrous oxide on the WB-57 during the CRYSTAL-FACE and pre-AVE field campaigns and to analyze these measurements. These measurements of CO and CH4 were of utmost importance to studies of the radiative effects of clouds. Some important results of the CRYSTAL-FACE program were contained in two scientific papers (attached). This Cooperative Agreement allowed the participation of the Argus instrument in the program and the analysis of the data.

  5. Linear laser diode arrays for improvement in optical disk recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphonse, G. A.; Carlin, D. B.; Connolly, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The development of individually addressable laser diode arrays for multitrack magneto-optic recorders for space stations is discussed. Three multi-element channeled substrate planar (CSP) arrays with output power greater than 30 mW with linear light vs current characteristics and stable single mode spectra were delivered to NASA. These devices have been used to demonstrate for the first time the simultaneous recording of eight data tracks on a 14-inch magneto-optic erasable disk. The yield of these devices is low, mainly due to non-uniformities inherent to the LPE growth that was used to fabricate them. The authors have recently developed the inverted CSP, based on the much more uniform MOCVD growth techniques, and have made low threshold quantum well arrays requiring about three times less current than the CSP to deliver 30 mW CW in a single spatial mode. The inverted CSP is very promising for use in space flight recorder applications.

  6. Higher brightness laser diodes with smaller slow axis divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenyang; Pathak, Rajiv; Campbell, Geoff; Eppich, Henry; Jacob, J. H.; Chin, Aland; Fryer, Jack

    2013-02-01

    The slow axis (SA) divergence of 20% fill-factor, 980nm, laser diodes (LDs) have been investigated under short pulsed (SP) and continuous (CW) operation. By analyzing the data collected under these two modes of operation, one finds that the SA divergence can be separated into two components: an intrinsic divergence and a thermally induced divergence. At low injected current and power, the intrinsic SA divergence is dominant while at high power their magnitudes are approximately equal. The thermal gradient across the broad stripe is negligible under SP operation and, the SA divergence increased at a much slower rate as a function of injected current, thereby increasing the brightness of the LD by 2X. SRL has redesigned microchannel coolers that remove the thermal gradient under CW operation thereby eliminating the thermally induced SA divergence resulting in LDs that are 2X brighter at 300W/bar.

  7. Liquid metal heat sink for high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John; Litt, Amardeep S.; Copeland, Drew A.; Junghans, Jeremy; Durkee, Roger

    2013-02-01

    We report on the development of a novel, ultra-low thermal resistance active heat sink (AHS) for thermal management of high-power laser diodes (HPLD) and other electronic and photonic components. AHS uses a liquid metal coolant flowing at high speed in a miniature closed and sealed loop. The liquid metal coolant receives waste heat from an HPLD at high flux and transfers it at much reduced flux to environment, primary coolant fluid, heat pipe, or structure. Liquid metal flow is maintained electromagnetically without any moving parts. Velocity of liquid metal flow can be controlled electronically, thus allowing for temperature control of HPLD wavelength. This feature also enables operation at a stable wavelength over a broad range of ambient conditions. Results from testing an HPLD cooled by AHS are presented.

  8. Microgravity Diode Laser Spectroscopy Measurements in a Reacting Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.; VanderWal, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The technique of Diode Laser Spectroscopy (DLS) with wavelength modulation is utilized to measure the concentration of methane in reacting vortex rings under microgravity conditions. From the measured concentration of methane, other major species such as water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen can be easily computed under the assumption of equilibrium chemistry with an iterative method called ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry). The conserved scalar approach in modelling the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion is utilized to represent the unknown variables in terms of the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate in conjunction with ITAC. Post-processing of the DLS and the method used to compute the species concentration are discussed. From the flame luminosity results, ring circulation appears to increase the fuel consumption rate inside the reacting vortex ring and the flame height for cases with similar fuel volumes but different ring circulations. The concentrations of methane, water, and carbon dioxide agree well with available results from numerical simulations.

  9. Optical phase dynamics in mutually coupled diode laser systems exhibiting power synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Vishwa; Prasad, Awadhesh; Ghosh, R.

    2011-12-01

    We probe the physical mechanism behind the known phenomenon of power synchronization of two diode lasers that are mutually coupled via their delayed optical fields. In a diode laser, the amplitude and the phase of the optical field are coupled by the so-called linewidth enhancement factor, α. In this work, we explore the role of optical phases of the electric fields in amplitude (and hence power) synchronization through α in such mutually delay-coupled diode laser systems. Our numerical results show that the synchronization of optical phases drives the powers of lasers to synchronized death regimes. We also find that as α varies for different diode lasers, the system goes through a sequence of in-phase amplitude-death states. Within the windows between successive amplitude-death regions, the cross-correlation between the field amplitudes exhibits a universal power-law behaviour with respect to α.

  10. Reliability of high power diode laser systems based on single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisher, Paul; Reynolds, Mitch; Brown, Aaron; Kennedy, Keith; Bao, Ling; Wang, Jun; Grimshaw, Mike; DeVito, Mark; Karlsen, Scott; Small, Jay; Ebert, Chris; Martinsen, Rob; Haden, Jim

    2011-03-01

    Diode laser modules based on arrays of single emitters offer a number of advantages over bar-based solutions including enhanced reliability, higher brightness, and lower cost per bright watt. This approach has enabled a rapid proliferation of commercially available high-brightness fiber-coupled diode laser modules. Incorporating ever-greater numbers of emitters within a single module offers a direct path for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining high brightness and minimizing overall cost. While reports of long lifetimes for single emitter diode laser technology are widespread, the complex relationship between the standalone chip reliability and package-induced failure modes, as well as the impact of built-in redundancy offered by multiple emitters, are not often discussed. In this work, we present our approach to the modeling of fiber-coupled laser systems based on single-emitter laser diodes.

  11. Noninvasive blood glucose measurement using multiple laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, E. T.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, J. H.; Soh, P. H.; Ng, K.; Yeo, J. H.

    2007-02-01

    In the event of diabetes clinicians have advocated that frequent monitoring of a diabetic's blood glucose level is the key to avoid future complications (kidney failure, blindness, amputations, premature death, etc.,) associated with the disease. While the test-strip glucose meters available in current consumer markets allow for frequent monitoring, a more convenient technique that is accurate, painless and sample-free is preferable in a diabetic's daily routine. This paper presents a non-invasive blood glucose measurement technique using diffuse reflectance near infrared (NIR) signals. This technique uses a set of laser diodes, each operating at fixed wavelengths in the first overtone region. The NIR signals from the laser diodes are channeled to the measurement site viz., the nail-bed by means of optical fibers. A series of in vivo experiments have been performed on eight normal human subjects using a standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) protocol. The reflected NIR signals are inputs to a Partial Least Squares (PLS) algorithm for calibration and future predictions. The calibration models used are developed using in vivo datasets and are unique to a particular individual. The 1218 paired points collected from the eight test subjects plotted on the Clarke Error Grid, revealed that 87.3% of these points fall within the A zone while the remainder, within the B zone, both of which, are clinically accepted. The standard error of prediction was +/-13.14mg/dL for the best calibration model. A Bland-Altman analysis of the 1218 paired points yields a 76.3% confidence level for a measurement accuracy of +/-20mg/dL. These results demonstrate the initial potential of the technique for non-invasive blood glucose measurements in vivo.

  12. Remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases by diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Kan, Ruifeng; He, Yabai; He, Ying; Zhang, Yujun; Xie, Pinhua; liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous ammonia is the most abundant alkaline trace gas in the atmosphere. In order to study its role in acid deposition and aerosol formation, as well as its influence on the regional air quality and atmospheric visibility, several instruments has been developed based on TDLAS (Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy) techniques. In this paper, a long open path TDLAS system and a continuous-wave CRDS (Cavity-Ring down Spectroscopy) system are presented. The long open path system has been developed for NH3 in-situ monitoring by combining wavelength modulation with harmonic detection techniques to obtain the necessary detection sensitivity. The prototype instrument has been used to monitor atmospheric NH3 concentration at an urban site near Beijing National Stadium during Beijing Olympics in 2008, and recently used to measure the fluxes of NH3 from farm fields by flux-gradient method. The detection limit for ammonia is proved approximately 3ppb for a total path length of 456m. The continuous-wave, rapidly swept CRDS system has been developed for localized atmospheric sensing of trace gases at remote sites. Passive open-path optical sensor units could be coupled by optical fiber over distances of >1 km to a single transmitter/receiver console incorporating a photodetector and a swept-frequency diode laser tuned to molecule-specific near-infrared wavelengths. A noise-limited minimum detectable mixing ratio of ~11 ppbv is attained for ammonia at atmospheric pressure. The developed instruments are deployable in agricultural, industrial, and natural atmospheric environments.

  13. Frequency-comb-assisted broadband precision spectroscopy with cascaded diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junqiu; Brasch, Victor; Pfeiffer, Martin H P; Kordts, Arne; Kamel, Ayman N; Guo, Hairun; Geiselmann, Michael; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2016-07-01

    Frequency-comb-assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this Letter, we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers, which allows us to extend the measurement bandwidth to 37.4 THz (1355-1630 nm) at megahertz resolution with scanning speeds above 1 THz/s. It is demonstrated as a useful tool to characterize a broadband spectrum for molecular spectroscopy, and in particular it enables us to characterize the dispersion of integrated microresonators up to the 4th-order.

  14. Frequency-comb-assisted broadband precision spectroscopy with cascaded diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junqiu; Brasch, Victor; Pfeiffer, Martin H. P.; Kordts, Arne; Kamel, Ayman N.; Guo, Hairun; Geiselmann, Michael; Kippenberg, Tobias J.

    2016-07-01

    Frequency comb assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this letter we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers, which allows extending the measurement bandwidth to 37.4 THz (1355 to 1630 nm) at MHz resolution with scanning speeds above 1 THz/s. It is demonstrated as a useful tool to characterize a broadband spectrum for molecular spectroscopy and in particular it enables to characterize the dispersion of integrated microresonators up to the fourth order.

  15. Design and optimization of the combination film in 10kW diode laser cladding source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong-bo; Lin, Xing-chen; Hao, Ming-ming; Zhang, Jin-sheng; Ning, Yong-qiang

    2015-08-01

    According to the special requirements of combination film in 10kW diode laser cladding source, the polarization combination film at 915nm was designed and grew. Film system is designed at different film materials based on the design theory. The non-QWOT film is optimized using the needle optimization and double sided coating by Optilayer software. The film was used in the 10kW diode laser source after high temperature aging testing. The film formed by Ta2O5 is very stable under IBAD, which can meet the reliability of 10kW diode laser cladding source in industry

  16. High pulse repetition frequency fiber-coupled laser-diode module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-12-01

    A practical and simple approach of achieving a high pulse repetition frequency fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and TRACEPRO software simulation, which is obtained by beam collimating, spatial beam combining, and polarization beam combining based on multiple cycle-emitting pulsed laser-diode emitters. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output pulse repetition frequency from the multimode fiber with 200-μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture can reach 300 kHz, and the coupling efficiency is beyond 72%. This technique has superiors of great flexibility, low cost, and high reliability for wide applications.

  17. Optical bistability in erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystal combined with a laser diode.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y

    1994-01-10

    Optical bistability was observed in a simple structure of an injection laser diode combined with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystal. Since a hysteresis characteristic exists in the relationship between the wavelength and the injection current of a laser diode, an optical memory function capable of holding the output status is confirmed. In addition, an optical signal inversion was caused by the decrease of transmission of the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystal against the red shift (principally mode hopping) of the laser diode. It is suggested that the switching time of this phenomenon is the time necessary for a mode hopping by current injection.

  18. The Resonantly Diode Pumped, Cryogenic Ho3+:YVO4 2.05-Micrometers Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    code) (301) 394-2007 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii Contents List of Figures iv 1. The Diode-pumped Holmium ...The Diode-pumped Holmium -doped Solid-state Laser Holmium (Ho) as a rare earth laser ion continues to gain the interest of the laser community as it...emits at eye-safe wavelengths around 2 µm and is useful for atmospheric sensing and medical applications. Diode-pumped holmium co-doped thulium (Tm

  19. Wavelength-multiplexed pumping with 478- and 520-nm indium gallium nitride laser diodes for Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Ryota; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Naoto; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2017-02-20

    We experimentally reveal the pump-induced loss in a Ti:sapphire laser crystal with 451-nm indium gallium nitride (InGaN) laser diode pumping and show that 478-nm pumping can reduce such loss. The influence of the pump-induced loss at 451-nm pumping is significant even for a crystal that exhibits higher effective figure-of-merit and excellent laser performance at 520-nm pumping. We demonstrate the power scaling of a Ti:sapphire laser by combining 478- and 520-nm InGaN laser diodes and obtain CW output power of 593 mW.

  20. Comparison between sequentional treatment with diode and alexandrite lasers versus alexandrite laser alone in the treatment of hirsutism.

    PubMed

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Naieni, Farahnaz Fatemi; Siadat, Amir Hossein; Rad, Leila

    2011-11-01

    Laser systems that are commonly used for the treatment of hirsutism include the ruby laser (694 nm), the diode laser (800 nm), the alexandrite laser (755 nm) and the Nd:YAG laser (1084 nm). The diode laser and alexandrite laser are considered effective in treatment of hirsutism in dark-skinned patients. The response of hairs to these laser systems is variable and not complete. In this study, we compared the efficacy of these two laser systems for permanent hair removal. This was a randomized, controlled clinical trial that was performed with women of the age range 15-45 years old. After obtaining informed consent, the samples were randomized into two groups using random allocation software. The first group was treated with alexandrite laser alone (four sessions, two months apart). The second group was treated sequentially with diode laser for the first two sessions and alexandrite laser for the next two sessions. Overall, 111 patients (57 patients in the alexandrite laser group and 54 patients in the sequential diode-alexandrite laser group) were evaluated. There was no significant difference regarding mean of hair reduction between the two groups during the courses of treatment. Except for the first session, there was no significant difference regarding percent of patient satisfaction between the two groups (P value >0.05). Comparison between the two groups showed no significant difference one month, three months and six months after the last treatment (P value >0.05). Regarding the results of our study, there is no significant difference between sequential treatment with diode and alexandrite lasers versus alexandrite laser alone in the treatment of hirsutism. We suggest that in further studies, the efficacy of sequential treatment with other laser systems is evaluated against single treatment methods.

  1. Advances in high-power 9XXnm laser diodes for pumping fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jay; Peters, Matthew; Rossin, Victor; Guo, James; Xiao, Yan; Cheng, Jane; Shieh, Allen; Srinivasan, Raman; Singh, Jaspreet; Wei, Cailin; Duesterberg, Richard; Morehead, James J.; Zucker, Erik

    2016-03-01

    A multi-mode 9XXnm-wavelength laser diode was developed to optimize the divergence angle and reliable ex-facet power. Lasers diodes were assembled into a multi-emitter pump package that is fiber coupled via spatial and polarization multiplexing. The pump package has a 135μm diameter output fiber that leverages the same optical train and mechanical design qualified previously. Up to ~ 270W CW power at 22A is achieved at a case temperature ~ 30ºC. Power conversion efficiency is 60% (peak) that drops to 53% at 22A with little thermal roll over. Greater than 90% of the light is collected at < 0.12NA at 16A drive current that produces 3.0W/(mm-mr)2 radiance from the output fiber.

  2. The Use of Soft Tissue Diode Laser in the Treatment of Oral Hyper Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mahitab M.; Al Thomali, Youssef; Al Shammrani, Ammar; El Gazaerly, Hanaa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and patients’ acceptance of soft tissue diode laser, for the elimination of hyper pigmented areas of the gingivae and buccal mucosa. Subjects and methods Twenty patients complaining of dark localized areas in their gingivae of upper and lower jaws, or in cheek mucosa were included in this study. All are females ages ranged from 18–37 with average of 27.5 years. The patients were all not pregnant, and free from any systemic diseases, and had no other areas of hyperpigmentation. Results Most of the patients (18 Pts.) required two treatment sessions to remove the melanotic lesions satisfactorily. The patients were seen after one, two, and three weeks respectively. Eight patients (40%) had a good response after one week, Ten patients (50%) had a very good response after two weeks, while only two patients (10%) had a bad result and required a third treatment session after two weeks. At the third week postoperatively in the successful cases, restoration of the normal gingival and mucosal texture and color was achieved with optimal esthetic results. Most of the patients had no postoperative discomfort including: pain, edema and disfigurement. Conclusion The soft tissue diode laser can be considered as a reliable mean for elimination of melanotic lesions of the gingivae or buccal mucosa, and is well tolerated by the patients. PMID:25246880

  3. Wavelength beam combining of a 980-nm tapered diode laser bar in an external cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup, Birgitte

    2010-04-01

    High power diode lasers are used in a large number of applications. A limiting factor for more widespread use of broad area lasers is the poor beam quality. Gain guided tapered diode lasers are ideal candidates for industrial applications that demands watt level output power with good beam quality. By adapting a bar geometry, the output power could be scaled even up to several tens of watts. Unfortunately, the high divergence which is a characteristic feature of the bar geometry could lead to a degradation of the overall beam quality of the laser bar. However, spectral beam combining is an effective solution for preserving the beam quality of the bar in the range of that of a single emitter and at the same time, enabling the power scaling. We report spectral beam combining applied to a 12 emitter tapered laser bar at 980 nm. The external cavity has been designed for a wavelength separation of 4.0 nm between the emitters. An output power of 9 W has been achieved at an operating current of 30 A. The combined beam had an M2 value (1/e2) of 5.3 along the slow axis which is comparable to that of a single tapered emitter on the laser bar. The overall beam combining efficiency was measured to be 63%. The output spectrum of the individual emitters was narrowed considerably. In the free running mode, the individual emitters displayed a broad spectrum of the order of 0.5-1.0 nm while the spectral width has been reduced to 30-100 pm in the spectral beam combining mode.

  4. Theoretical model for frequency locking a diode laser with a Faraday cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    A new method was developed for frequency locking a diode lasers, called 'the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical transmitter (FADOT) laser locking', which is much simpler than other known locking schemes. The FADOT laser locking method uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. The FADOT method is vibration insensitive and exhibits minimal thermal expansion effects. The system has a frequency pull in the range of 443.2 GHz (9 A). The method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters.

  5. Effect of thermal processes on critical operation conditions of high-power laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Parashchuk, V V; Vu Doan Mien

    2013-10-31

    Using numerical and analytical techniques in a threedimensional approximation, we have modelled the effect of spatial thermoelastic stress nonuniformity in a laser diode – heat sink system on the output characteristics of the device in different operation modes. We have studied the influence of the pulse duration, the geometry of the laser system and its thermophysical parameters on the critical pump current density, in particular for state-of-the-art heat conductive substrate materials. The proposed approach has been used to optimise the laser diode assembly process in terms of the quality of laser crystal positioning (bonding) on a heat sink. (lasers)

  6. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Transient heat conduction in laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, P.; Galley, J.

    1988-11-01

    The dynamics of heat transfer in stripe GaAlAs laser diodes is investigated by solving the linear diffusion equation for a quasitwo-dimensional multilayer structure. The calculations are rationalized drastically by the transfer matrix method and also using for the first time the asymptotes of the decay constants. Special attention is given to the convergence of the Fourier series. A comparison with experimental results reveals however that this is essentially the Stefan problem (with moving boundary conditions).

  7. Tunable frequency stabilized diode-laser-pumped Tm,Ho:YLiF4 laser at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguckin, Brendan T.; Menzies, Robert T.; Esproles, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A diode-laser-pumped single-frequency thulium holmium yttrium lithium fluoride laser that exhibits a closed-loop stability of a few megahertz and a continuous single-mode tuning range of 800 MHz is described. The laser output power is 25 mW, and is tunable over about 8/cm at 25 C.

  8. Compact and smart laser diode systems for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirin, Viatcheslav N.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Solovieva, Tatiana I.

    2003-04-01

    To win the cancer is one of the most important mankind task to be decided in III Millenium. New technology of treatment is to recognize and kill cancer cells with the laser light not by surgery operation, but by soft painless therapy. Even though from the beginning of the 80s of the last century this technology, so-called photodynamic therapy (PDT) has received acceptance in America, Europe and Asia it is still considered in the medical circles to be a new method with the little-known approaches of cancer treatment. Recently the next step was done, and the unique method of PDT combined with laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was developed. Compact and smart diode laser apparatus "Modul-GF" for its realization was designed. In this report the concept of this method, experimental materials on clinical trials and ways of optimization of technical decisions and software of apparatus "Modul-GF", including the autotuning of laser power dependently on tissue temperature measured with thermosensors are discussed. The special instruments such as fiber cables and special sensors are described to permit application of "Modul-GF" for the treatment of the tumors of the different localizations, both surface and deeply located with using of the endoscopy method. The examples of the oncological and nononcological pathologies" treatment by the developed method and apparatus in urology, gynecology, gastroenterology, dermatology, cosmetology, bronchology, pulmonology are observed. The results of clinical approval the developed combination of PDT&LITT realized with "Modul-GF" leads to essentially increasing of the treatment effectiveness.

  9. A shock isolator for diode laser operation on a closed-cycle refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. F.; Hillman, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A device developed to isolate the diode laser from impact shocks delivered during the expansion phase of the Solvay cycle of a helium refrigerator is briefly described. The device uses intermediate cold stations in the stand-off, which permit the stand-off to be short and rigid while minimizing the thermal load at the diode mount.

  10. High-power pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Larry R.; Hays, A. D.; Kaz, Alex; Kasinski, Jeff; Burnham, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of both pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers are presented. The pulsed laser produced 1.0 mJ with pulsewidths of 90 psec at 20 Hz. The CW pumped laser produced 6 W output at 1.064 microns and 3 W output at 532 nm.

  11. High-Efficiency Diode-Pumped Rubidium Laser: Experimental Results (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-29

    Beach, V.K. Kanz, S.A. Payne, J.T. Early, “New Class of CW High-Power Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs),” SPIE High-Power Laser Ablation V......2006). 7. Y. Wang, T. Kasamatsu, Y.Zheng, H. Miyajima, H. Fukuoka, S. Matsuoka, M. Niigaki, H. Kubomura, and H. Kan, “ Cesium Vapor Laser Pumped by

  12. Low-Cost, Single-Frequency Sources for Spectroscopy Using Conventional Fabry-Perot Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Duerksen, Gary L.

    1999-01-01

    Commercial (uncoated) Fabry-Perot laser diodes are converted to single-frequency spectroscopy sources by passively locking the laser frequency to the band edge of a fiber Bragg grating, which phase-locks the laser oscillations through self-injection seeding.

  13. Low-Cost, Single-Frequency Sources for Spectroscopy using Conventional Fabry-Perot Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Gary L.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Commercial (uncoated) Fabry-Perot laser diodes are converted to single-frequency spectroscopy sources by passively locking the laser frequency to the band edge of a fiber Bragg grating, which phase-locks the laser oscillations through self-injection seeding.

  14. Monitoring of catalyst performance in CO2 lasers using frequency modulation spectroscopy with diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Liang-Guo; Sachse, Glen

    1990-01-01

    Closed-cycle CO2 laser operation with removal of O2 and regeneration of CO2 can be achieved by catalytic CO-O2 recombination. Both parametric studies of the optimum catalyst formulation and long-term performance tests require on line monitoring of CO, O2 and CO2 concentrations. There are several existing methods for molecular oxygen detection. These methods are either intrusive (such as electrochemical method or mass spectrometry) or very expensive (such as CARS, UV laser absorption). Researchers demonstrated a high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of O2 using the two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) technique with a near infrared GaAlAs diode laser. Besides its inexpensive cost, fast response time, nonintrusive measurements and high sensitivity, this technique may also be used to differentiate between isotopes due to its high spectroscopic resolution. This frequency modulation spectroscopy technique could also be applied for the on-line monitoring of CO and CO2 using InGaAsP diode lasers operation in the 1.55 microns region and H2O in the 1.3 microns region. The existence of single mode optical fibers at the near infrared region makes it possible to combine FMS with optical fiber technology. Optical fiber FMS is particularly suitable for making point-measurements at one or more locations in the CO2 laser/catalyst system.

  15. New class of compact diode pumped sub 10-fs lasers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T.; Müller, A.; Sumpf, B.; Jensen, O. B.; Hansen, A. K.; Andersen, P. E.

    2016-03-01

    Diode-pumping Ti:sapphire lasers promises a new approach to low-cost femtosecond light sources. Thus in recent years much effort has been taken just to overcome the quite low power and low beam qualities of available green diodes to obtain output powers of several hundred milliwatts from a fs-laser. In this work we present an alternative method by deploying frequency-doubled IR diodes with good beam qualities to pump fs-lasers. The revolutionary approach allows choosing any pump wavelengths in the green region and avoids complicated relay optics for the diodes. For the first time we show results of a diode-pumped 10 fs-laser and how a single diode setup can be integrated into a 30 x 30 cm2 fs-laser system generating sub 20 fs laser pulses with output power towards half a Watt. This technology paves the way for a new class of very compact and cost-efficient fs-lasers for life science and industrial applications.

  16. Characterization of Stainless Steel and Refractory Metal Welds Made using a Diode-Pumped, Continuous Wave Nd: Yag Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Wood, B; Elmer, J W; Westrich, C; Milewski, J O; Piltch, M; Barbe, M; Carpenter, R

    2001-10-19

    A series of laser welds have been made on several materials using a Rofin-Sinar DY-033, 3.3 kW, Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser system, located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Materials welded in these experiments include 21-6-9 stainless steel, 304L stainless steel, vanadium, and tantalum. The effects of changes in the power input at a constant travel speed on the depth, width, aspect ratio, and total melted area of the welds have been analyzed. Increases in the measured weld pool dimensions as a function of power input are compared for each of the base metals investigated. These results provide a basis for further examining the characteristics of diode pumped CW Nd:YAG laser systems in welding applications.

  17. Random fiber laser directly pumped by a high-power laser diode.

    PubMed

    Babin, S A; Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I

    2013-09-01

    A random lasing based on Rayleigh scattering (RS) in a passive fiber directly pumped by a high-power laser diode (LD) has been demonstrated. Owing to the RS-based random distributed feedback (RDFB) the low-quality LD beam (938 nm) is converted into the high-quality laser output (980 nm). Because of the relatively low excess above the threshold with the available LD, the RDFB laser output is not stationary and limited in power at the 0.5 W level. In the used gradient-index fiber, the output beam has 4.5 lower divergence as compared with the pump beam thus demonstrating a new way for development of high-power fiber lasers with high-quality output.

  18. LASERS Dual-wavelength laser diodes based on epitaxially stacked heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Evgeniya I.; Konyaev, V. P.; Ladugin, M. A.; Lebedeva, E. I.; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A.; Padalitsa, A. A.; Petrov, S. V.; Sapozhnikov, S. M.; Simakov, V. A.; Uspenskii, Mikhail B.; Yarotskaya, I. V.

    2010-10-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs double laser heterostructures containing two different active regions have been grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy in a single growth process, and their properties have been studied. A typical slope of their power — current curves is 2.3 W A-1, which is almost twice that for a laser diode (1.2 W A-1). We demonstrate lasing of the emitter regions of the dual-wavelength lasers in the range 800 — 815 nm, with a separation between the peaks of ~7 nm. The observed effect of pump current on the lasing wavelength of the active regions in the dual-wavelength and single lasers indicates that the emitter region farther away from the heat sink is more sensitive to pump current variations.

  19. 954 nm Raman fiber laser with multimode laser diode pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobina, E. A.; Kablukov, S. I.; Skvortsov, M. I.; Nemov, I. N.; Babin, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    CW Raman fiber laser emitting at 954 nm under direct pumping by a high-power multimode laser diode at 915 nm is demonstrated. A cavity of the laser is formed with 2.5 km-long multimode graded-index fiber and two mirrors: highly reflective fiber Bragg grating (FBG) at one side and normally cleaved fiber end at the other side. The laser generates low-index transverse modes at the Stokes wavelength with output power above 4 W at a slope efficiency above 40%. It is shown that utilization of a narrowband FBG mirror with low reflectivity instead of the cleaved fiber end with Fresnel reflection leads to stronger spectral mode selection, but the generated power is reduced in this case.

  20. Extending the continuous tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Hawthorne, Justin T.; Switzer, Gregg W.; Carlsten, John L.

    2006-12-01

    The continuous tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser can be extended by making small corrections to the external-cavity length through an electronic feedback loop so that the cavity resonance condition is maintained as the laser wavelength is tuned. By maintaining the cavity resonance condition as the laser is tuned, the mode hops that typically limit the continuous tuning range of the external-cavity diode laser are eliminated. We present the design of a simple external-cavity diode laser based on the Littman-Metcalf external-cavity configuration that has a measured continuous tuning range of 1 GHz without an electronic feedback loop. To include the electronic feedback loop, a small sinusoidal signal is added to the drive current of the laser diode creating a small oscillation of the laser power. By comparing the phase of the modulated optical power with the phase of the sinusoidal drive signal using a lock-in amplifier, an error signal is created and used in an electronic feedback loop to control the external-cavity length. With electronic feedback, we find that the continuous tuning range can be extended to over 65 GHz. This occurs because the electronic feedback maintains the cavity resonance condition as the laser is tuned. An experimental demonstration of this extended tuning range is presented in which the external-cavity diode laser is tuned through an absorption feature of diatomic oxygen near 760 nm.