Science.gov

Sample records for area generating function

  1. Gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharova, Nadezhda; Lebed-Sharlevich, Iana; Kulachkova, Svetlana

    2014-05-01

    Rapid urbanization and expansion of city borders lead to development of new areas, often following with relief changes, covering of gully-ravine systems and river beds with technogenic grounds containing construction and municipal waste. Decomposition of organic matter in these grounds is a source of methane and carbon dioxide. Intensive generation and accumulation of CO2 and CH4 into grounds may cause a fire and explosion risk for constructed objects. Gases emission to the atmosphere changes the global balance of GHGs and negatively influences on human health. The aim of this investigation is to study gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds. Studied areas are the gully-ravine systems or river beds, covered with technogenic grounds during land development. Stratigraphic columns of these grounds are 5-17 meters of man-made loamy material with inclusion of construction waste. Gas generating layer with increased content of organic matter, reductive conditions and high methanogenic activity (up to 1.0 ng*g-1*h-1) is situated at the certain depth. Maximum CH4 and CO2 concentrations in this layer reach dangerous values (2-10% and 11%, respectively) in the current standards. In case of disturbance of ground layer (e.g. well-drilling) methane is rapidly transferred by convective flux to atmosphere. The rate of CH4 emission reaches 100 mg*m-2*h-1 resulting in its atmospheric concentration growth by an order of magnitude compared with background. In normal occurrence of grounds methane gradually diffuses into the upper layers by pore space, consuming on different processes (e.g. formation of organic matter, nitrogen compounds or specific particles of magnetite), and emits to atmosphere. CH4 emission rate varies from 1 to 40 mg*m-2*h-1 increasing with depth of grounds. Carbon dioxide emission is about 100 mg*m-2*h-1. During soil formation on gas generating grounds bacterial oxidation of methane, one of the most

  2. SOME BILINEAR GENERATING FUNCTIONS*

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, H. M.

    1969-01-01

    In the present paper, the author applies some of his earlier results which extend the well-known Hille-Hardy formula for the Laguerre polynomials to certain classes of generalized hypergeometric polynomials in order to derive various generalizations of a bilinear generating function for the Jacobi polynomials proved recently by Carlitz. The corresponding results for the polynomials of Legendre, Gegenbauer (or ultraspherical), Laguerre, etc., can be obtained fairly easily as the specialized or limiting cases of the generating functions presented here. It is also shown how the formula of Carlitz follows rather rapidly from a result of Weisner involving the Gaussian hypergeometric functions. PMID:16591787

  3. Some bilinear generating functions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, H M

    1969-10-01

    In the present paper, the author applies some of his earlier results which extend the well-known Hille-Hardy formula for the Laguerre polynomials to certain classes of generalized hypergeometric polynomials in order to derive various generalizations of a bilinear generating function for the Jacobi polynomials proved recently by Carlitz. The corresponding results for the polynomials of Legendre, Gegenbauer (or ultraspherical), Laguerre, etc., can be obtained fairly easily as the specialized or limiting cases of the generating functions presented here. It is also shown how the formula of Carlitz follows rather rapidly from a result of Weisner involving the Gaussian hypergeometric functions. PMID:16591787

  4. The terminal area automated path generation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsin, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The automated terminal area path generation problem in the advanced Air Traffic Control System (ATC), has been studied. Definitions, input, output and the interrelationships with other ATC functions have been discussed. Alternatives in modeling the problem have been identified. Problem formulations and solution techniques are presented. In particular, the solution of a minimum effort path stretching problem (path generation on a given schedule) has been carried out using the Newton-Raphson trajectory optimization method. Discussions are presented on the effect of different delivery time, aircraft entry position, initial guess on the boundary conditions, etc. Recommendations are made on real-world implementations.

  5. Three-function signal generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopp, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    Variable-frequency circuit develops sine square and triangular waveforms. Three-function generator used variable-rate integrator to generate triangular wave and zero-crossing detector to develop square wave. Sine wave generator uses diode matrix to operate on triangular wave, thus with design harmonic distortion in output is less then one percent. By changing values of outboard resistors and capacitors, same design can be used at higher frequencies.

  6. Workshop on Grid Generation and Related Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A collection of papers given at the Workshop on Grid Generation and Related Areas is presented. The purpose of this workshop was to assemble engineers and scientists who are currently working on grid generation for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), surface modeling, and related areas. The objectives were to provide an informal forum on grid generation and related topics, to assess user experience, to identify needs, and to help promote synergy among engineers and scientists working in this area. The workshop consisted of four sessions representative of grid generation and surface modeling research and application within NASA LeRC. Each session contained presentations and an open discussion period.

  7. CAMAC modular programmable function generator

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G.W.; Suehiro, S.; Hendricks, R.W.

    1980-12-01

    A CAMAC modular programmable function generator has been developed. The device contains a 1024 word by 12-bit memory, a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter with a 600 ns settling time, an 18-bit programmable frequency register, and two programmable trigger output registers. The trigger registers can produce programmed output logic transitions at various (binary) points in the output function curve, and are used to synchronize various other data acquisition devices with the function curve.

  8. Uncountably Generated Ideals of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sury, B.

    2011-01-01

    Maximal ideals in the ring of continuous functions on the closed interval [0, 1] are not finitely generated. This is well-known. What is not as well-known, but perhaps should be, is the fact that these ideals are not countably generated although the proof is not harder! We prove this here and use the result to produce some non-prime ideals in the…

  9. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  10. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W. Bruce; McNeilly, David R.; Thacker, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  11. Computation of generating functions for biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Smith, T.F.; Waterman, M.S.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this paper is to give algorithms and techniques for computing generating functions of certain RNA configurations. Combinatorics and symbolic computation are utilized to calculate the generating functions for small RNA molecules. From these generating functions, it is possible to obtain information about the bonding and structure of the molecules. Specific examples of interest to biology are given and discussed.

  12. 10 CFR 851.24 - Functional areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Functional areas. 851.24 Section 851.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 851.24 Functional areas... minimum, include provisions for the following applicable functional areas in their worker safety...

  13. 10 CFR 851.24 - Functional areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functional areas. 851.24 Section 851.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 851.24 Functional areas... minimum, include provisions for the following applicable functional areas in their worker safety...

  14. 10 CFR 851.24 - Functional areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional areas. 851.24 Section 851.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 851.24 Functional areas... minimum, include provisions for the following applicable functional areas in their worker safety...

  15. 10 CFR 851.24 - Functional areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Functional areas. 851.24 Section 851.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 851.24 Functional areas... minimum, include provisions for the following applicable functional areas in their worker safety...

  16. Three brainstem areas involved in respiratory rhythm generation in bullfrogs

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadwala, Mufaddal I; Duchcherer, Maryana; Paramonov, Jenny; Wilson, Richard J A

    2015-01-01

    Key points For most multiphasic motor patterns, rhythm and pattern are produced by the same circuit elements. For respiration, however, these functions have long been assumed to occur separately. In frogs, the ventilatory motor pattern produced by the isolated brainstem consists of buccal and biphasic lung bursts. Previously, two discrete necessary and sufficient sites for lung and buccal bursts were identified. Here we identify a third site, the Priming Area, important for and having neuronal activity correlated with the first phase of biphasic lung bursts. As each site is important for burst generation of a separate phase, we suggest each major phase of ventilation is produced by an anatomically distinct part of an extensive brainstem network. Embedding of discrete circuit elements producing major phases of respiration within an extensive rhythmogenic brainstem network may be a shared architectural characteristic of vertebrates. Abstract Ventilation in mammals consists of at least three distinct phases: inspiration, post-inspiration and late-expiration. While distinct brainstem rhythm generating and pattern forming networks have long been assumed, recent data suggest the mammalian brainstem contains two coupled neuronal oscillators: one for inspiration and the other for active expiration. However, whether additional burst generating ability is required for generating other phases of ventilation in mammals is controversial. To investigate brainstem circuit architectures capable of producing multiphasic ventilatory rhythms, we utilized the isolated frog brainstem. This preparation produces two types of ventilatory motor patterns, buccal and lung bursts. Lung bursts can be divided into two phases, priming and powerstroke. Previously we identified two putative oscillators, the Buccal and Lung Areas. The Lung Area produces the lung powerstroke and the Buccal Area produces buccal bursts and – we assumed – the priming phase of lung bursts. However, here we identify

  17. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  18. [Generation and functions of dreams].

    PubMed

    Medrano-Martínez, Pablo; Ramos-Platón, M José

    2014-10-16

    Introduccion. En la ultima decada han aumentado considerablemente las publicaciones sobre los ensueños, lo que refleja el interes de varios campos de la neurociencia por el tema. En este trabajo se revisan las principales teorias cientificas que han contribuido al conocimiento de como se producen y cual es su funcion. Desarrollo. Se expone la evolucion de su estudio cientifico, siguiendo el enfoque neurofisiologico y el neurocognitivo. El primero busca determinar los mecanismos neurobiologicos que los generan y las estructuras cerebrales implicadas; el segundo considera los ensueños un tipo de cognicion en interaccion con el de vigilia. Se examinan diversas hipotesis sobre la funcion de los ensueños, en particular las que les atribuyen un papel en la consolidacion de la memoria y la regulacion del estado emocional. Conclusiones. Aunque no se ha determinado con exactitud como se generan los ensueños, los datos neurobiologicos resaltan la importancia de los nucleos pontinos del tronco cerebral, diversos sistemas de memoria, el sistema limbico y el sistema de recompensa cerebral y diversas areas neocorticales. Los datos neurocognitivos subrayan la relacion entre el procesamiento cognitivo y emocional que ocurre durante la vigilia y durante el sueño, asi como la influencia del entorno en el contenido de los ensueños. Respecto a su funcion, cabe destacar su valor adaptativo, al contribuir al reprocesamiento de la informacion adquirida en vigilia y al control de las emociones. Esto sugiere que los ensueños participan en el desarrollo de las capacidades cognitivas.

  19. Speech and Language Functions that Require a Functioning Broca's Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cameron; Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Gingis, Leila; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Hillis, Argye E.

    2008-01-01

    A number of previous studies have indicated that Broca's area has an important role in understanding and producing syntactically complex sentences and other language functions. If Broca's area is critical for these functions, then either infarction of Broca's area or temporary hypoperfusion within this region should cause impairment of these…

  20. 10 CFR 851.24 - Functional areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 851.24 Functional areas. (a) Contractors must have a structured approach to their worker safety and health program which at a minimum, include provisions for the following applicable functional areas in their worker safety...

  1. Generating functionals for Green's functions in gauge field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Kaschlun, L.; Matveev, V.A.; Robaschik, D.

    1987-09-01

    The structure of the generating functional of the one-particle-irreducible Green's functions in gauge field theories is investigated. Both axial as well as covariant gauge conditions are considered. For both cases, the general structure of the functionals is obtained, and a functional expansion with respect to nonlocal operators is given. The appearance of gauge-dependent operators in the case of the covariant gauge follows in a natural manner from the structure of the corresponding functional.

  2. Speech and language functions that require a functioning Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cameron; Kleinman, Jonathan T; Newhart, Melissa; Gingis, Leila; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Hillis, Argye E

    2008-04-01

    A number of previous studies have indicated that Broca's area has an important role in understanding and producing syntactically complex sentences and other language functions. If Broca's area is critical for these functions, then either infarction of Broca's area or temporary hypoperfusion within this region should cause impairment of these functions, at least while the neural tissue is dysfunctional. The opportunity to identify the language functions that depend on Broca's area in a particular individual was provided by a patient with hyperacute stroke who showed selective hypoperfusion, with minimal infarct, in Broca's area, and acutely impaired production of grammatical sentences, comprehension of semantically reversible (but not non-reversible) sentences, spelling, and motor planning of speech articulation. When blood flow was restored to Broca's area, as demonstrated by repeat perfusion weighted imaging, he showed immediate recovery of these language functions. The identification of language functions that were impaired when Broca's area was dysfunctional (due to low blood flow) and recovered when Broca's area was functional again, provides evidence for the critical role of Broca's area in these language functions, at least in this individual. PMID:18325581

  3. 17. Control Area, Frequency Changer and Generator Building VIEW NORTHWEST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Control Area, Frequency Changer and Generator Building VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATION - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  4. 18. Control Area, Frequency Changer and Generator Building, interior view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Control Area, Frequency Changer and Generator Building, interior view of remaining control panels VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  5. 14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator Building, general view VIEW SOUTHWEST, NORTH ELEVATION - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  6. 30. Launch Area, Generator Building, interior view showing diesel fuel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Launch Area, Generator Building, interior view showing diesel fuel tank, fuel pump (foreground) and fuel lines leading to power-generating units (removed) VIEW NORTHWEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  7. Generating functionals and Lagrangian partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Vankerschaver, Joris; Liao, Cuicui; Leok, Melvin

    2013-08-15

    The main goal of this paper is to derive an alternative characterization of the multisymplectic form formula for classical field theories using the geometry of the space of boundary values. We review the concept of Type-I/II generating functionals defined on the space of boundary data of a Lagrangian field theory. On the Lagrangian side, we define an analogue of Jacobi's solution to the Hamilton–Jacobi equation for field theories, and we show that by taking variational derivatives of this functional, we obtain an isotropic submanifold of the space of Cauchy data, described by the so-called multisymplectic form formula. As an example of the latter, we show that Lorentz's reciprocity principle in electromagnetism is a particular instance of the multisymplectic form formula. We also define a Hamiltonian analogue of Jacobi's solution, and we show that this functional is a Type-II generating functional. We finish the paper by defining a similar framework of generating functions for discrete field theories, and we show that for the linear wave equation, we recover the multisymplectic conservation law of Bridges.

  8. Generating fracture networks using iterated function systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrlok, U.; Liedl, R.

    In order to model flow and transport in fractured rocks it is important to know the geometry of the fracture network. A stochastic approach is commonly used to generate a synthetic fracture network from the statistics measured at a natural fracture network. The approach presented herein is able to incorporate the structures found in a natural fracture network into the synthetic fracture network. These synthetic fracture networks are the images generated by Iterated Function Systems (IFS) as introduced by Barnsley (1988). The conditions these IFS have to fulfil to determine images resembling fracture networks and the effects of their parameters on the images are discussed. It is possible to define the parameters of the IFS in order to generate some properties of a fracture network. The image of an IFS consists of many single points and has to be suitably processed for further use.

  9. Generating fracture networks using iterated function systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrlok, U.; Liedl, R.

    1996-03-01

    In order to model flow and transport in fractured rocks it is important to know the geometry of the fracture network. A stochastic approach is commonly used to generate a synthetic fracture network from the statistics measured at a natural fracture network. The approach presented herein is able to incorporate the structures found in a natural fracture network into the synthetic fracture network. These synthetic fracture networks are the images generated by Iterated Function Systems (IFS) as introduced by Barnsley (1988). The conditions these IFS have to fulfil to determine images resembling fracture networks and the effects of their parameters on the images are discussed. It is possible to define the parameters of the IFS in order to generate some properties of a fracture network. The image of an IFS consists of many single points and has to be suitably processed for further use.

  10. Generation of free radicals and messenger function.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J C; Sawada, M

    1995-09-01

    Free radicals are toxic agents that are produced as by-products of metabolic activity. A number of antioxidant mechanisms work to protect cells from damage. Recent evidence indicates, however, that free radicals and related oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide may also have a beneficial role, working as messengers to control cell function. These agents are generated in response to agonists, production is regulated by intracellular signal pathways, and they appear to be used to control particular cellular processes. Free radicals may perform these functions in a number of cell types. Also, they are produced in muscles and there is evidence that they may work as messengers in smooth muscle cells.

  11. Unstructured grid generation using the distance function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Barna L.; Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.

    1991-01-01

    A new class of methods for obtaining level sets to generate unstructured grids is presented. The consecutive grid levels are computed using the distance functions, which corresponds to solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equations representing the equations of motion of fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed. The relationship between the distance function and the governing equations will be discussed as well as its application to generating grids. Multi-ply connected domains and complex geometries are handled naturally, with a straightforward generalization to several space dimensions. The grid points for the unstructured grid are obtained simultaneously with the grid levels. The search involved in checking for overlapping triangles is minimized by triangulating the entire domain one level at a time.

  12. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  17. Generating functions for canonical systems of fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Jean-Christophe; Gilleron, Franck; Porcherot, Quentin

    2011-06-01

    The method proposed by Pratt to derive recursion relations for systems of degenerate fermions [S. Pratt, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4255 84, 4255 (2000)] relies on diagrammatic techniques. This efficient formalism assumes no explicit two-body interactions, makes possible the inclusion of conservation laws, and requires low computational time. In this Brief Report, we show that such recursion relations can be obtained from generating functions, without any restriction in relation to the number of conservation laws (e.g., total energy or angular momentum).

  18. Spanning tree generating functions and Mahler measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.; Rogers, Mathew D.

    2012-12-01

    We define the notion of a spanning tree generating function (STGF) ∑anzn, which gives the spanning tree constant when evaluated at z = 1, and gives the lattice Green function (LGF) when differentiated. By making use of known results for logarithmic Mahler measures of certain Laurent polynomials, and proving new results, we express the STGFs as hypergeometric functions for all regular two and three dimensional lattices (and one higher-dimensional lattice). This gives closed form expressions for the spanning tree constants for all such lattices, which were previously largely unknown in all but one three-dimensional case. We show for all lattices that these can also be represented as Dirichlet L-series. Making the connection between STGFs and LGFs produces integral identities and hypergeometric connections, some of which appear to be new. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  19. Sound representation in higher language areas during language generation

    PubMed Central

    Magrassi, Lorenzo; Aromataris, Giuseppe; Cabrini, Alessandro; Annovazzi-Lodi, Valerio; Moro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    How language is encoded by neural activity in the higher-level language areas of humans is still largely unknown. We investigated whether the electrophysiological activity of Broca’s area correlates with the sound of the utterances produced. During speech perception, the electric cortical activity of the auditory areas correlates with the sound envelope of the utterances. In our experiment, we compared the electrocorticogram recorded during awake neurosurgical operations in Broca’s area and in the dominant temporal lobe with the sound envelope of single words versus sentences read aloud or mentally by the patients. Our results indicate that the electrocorticogram correlates with the sound envelope of the utterances, starting before any sound is produced and even in the absence of speech, when the patient is reading mentally. No correlations were found when the electrocorticogram was recorded in the superior parietal gyrus, an area not directly involved in language generation, or in Broca’s area when the participants were executing a repetitive motor task, which did not include any linguistic content, with their dominant hand. The distribution of suprathreshold correlations across frequencies of cortical activities varied whether the sound envelope derived from words or sentences. Our results suggest the activity of language areas is organized by sound when language is generated before any utterance is produced or heard. PMID:25624479

  20. SAR interferometry for DEM generation: wide-area error assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Daniel; Broquetas, Antoni; Pena, Ramon; Arbiol, Roman; Castillo, Manuel; Pala, Vincenc

    1998-11-01

    The present work consists on the generation of a DEM using ERS satellites interferometric data over a wide area (50 X 50 Km) with an error study using a high accuracy reference DEM, focusing on the atmosphere induced errors. The area is heterogeneous with flat and rough topography ranging from sea level up to 1200 m in the inland ranges. The ERS image has a 100 X 100 Km2 area and has been divided in four quarters to ease the processing. The phase unwrapping algorithm, which is a combination of region growing and least squares techniques, worked out successfully the rough topography areas. One quarter of the full scene was geocoded over a local datum ellipsoid to a UTM grid. The resulting DEM was compared to a reference one provided by the Institut Cartografic de Catalunya. Two types of atmospheric error or artifacts were found: a set of very localized spots, up to one phase cycle, which generated ghost hills up to 100, and a slow trend effect which added up to 50 m to some areas in the image. Besides of the atmospheric errors, the quality of the DEM was assessed. The quantitative error study was carried out locally at several areas with different topography.

  1. Compensation payments for downsides generated by protected areas.

    PubMed

    Pechacek, Peter; Li, Guo; Li, Junsheng; Wang, Wei; Wu, Xiaopu; Xu, Jing

    2013-02-01

    Protected areas are powerful instruments to tackle the biodiversity crises. However, local communities believe that protected areas generate downsides for which they should be compensated. We reviewed (1) problem evolution, (2) the idea of compensation schemes, and (3) practical considerations. We found that compensations for conservation-related losses are insufficiently considered when protected areas are established. Schemes include controversial resettlements of human populations, traditional reimbursements, and recently favored incentive payments to encourage local communities to conserve biodiversity on their lands. The compensation process is typically composed of the verification of losses/facts, estimation of costs, and delivery of payments. Compensation schemes promote tolerance and awareness, and responsibility of the broader society while minimizing confrontations. They have the power to mainstream concern about human welfare in protected area management, and are therefore a key to successful conservation. Verifying the impact of compensations on achievement of conservation goals remains, however, difficult to prove.

  2. Numerical simulation of flow generated in a closed water areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Narisu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Katayama, Yuki; Watanabe, Masaji

    2016-02-01

    Techniques to analyze the bottom topography in a closed water area are described. Positioning data are recorded with a global positioning system, and depth data are recorded with an echo sounder. Positioning data and depth data are synchronized to generate three-dimensional topographical data. Errors due to ship's movement are corrected using outputs from a clinometer and a compass. The change due to sedimentation is investigated for the bottom topography of Kojima Lake. We describe numerical techniques based on a finite-element method and an explicit time integration method to analyze flow generated in Kojima Lake.

  3. A method for obtaining coefficients of compositional inverse generating functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruchinin, Dmitry V.; Shablya, Yuriy V.; Kruchinin, Vladimir V.; Shelupanov, Alexander A.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how to obtain expressions for coefficients of compositional inverse generating functions in explicit way. The method is based on the Lagrange inversion theorem and composita of generating functions. Also we give a method of obtaining expressions for coefficients of reciprocal generating functions and consider some examples.

  4. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  5. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  6. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those Bureau...

  7. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  8. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  9. Generation of evolutionary novelty by functional shift.

    PubMed

    Ganfornina, M D; Sánchez, D

    1999-05-01

    That biological features may change their function during evolution has long been recognized. Particularly, the acquisition of new functions by molecules involved in developmental pathways is suspected to cause important morphologic novelties. However, the current terminology describing functional changes during evolution (co-option or recruitment) fails to recognize important biologic distinctions between diverse evolutionary routes involving functional shifts. The main goal of our work is to stress the importance of an apparently trivial distinction: Whether or not the element that adopts a new function (anything from a morphologic structure to a protein domain) is a single or a duplicated element. We propose that natural selection must act in a radically different way, depending on the historic succession of co-option and duplication events; that is, co-option may provide the selective pressure for a subsequent gene duplication or could be a stabilizing factor that helps maintain redundancy after gene duplication. We review the evidence available on functional changes, focusing whenever possible on developmental molecules, and we propose a conceptual framework for the study of functional shifts during evolution with a level of resolution appropriate to the power of our current methodologies.

  10. A broad area electrospray generated by a piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshani, Zeinab; Johnson, Michael J.; Atashbar, Massood Z.; Go, David B.

    2016-07-01

    Electrosprays are typically formed by the application of a high (kilovolt) voltage to the flow exiting a small diameter capillary, and they have been used in applications ranging from material synthesis to spray coating because of the finely controlled plume of micron-sized droplets they produce. In this work, we report a similar but distinct spray directly off the surface of a piezoelectric transformer. Using a paper wick to deliver liquid to the surface of the piezoelectric crystal, a continuous, broad area spray is generated from the wick in contact with the transformer surface, only requiring input voltages on the order of 20 Vamp. Systematic variation of critical parameters indicate that this piezoelectric transformer-generated spray is similar to a conventional electrospray, with the spray current exhibiting a non-linear dependence on the solution conductivity, but distinct, as the spray exhibits little dependence on the solution surface tension. This innovative spray could potentially lead to uniform, large area spray coverage from a single device for a wide variety of applications.

  11. Generating Text from Functional Brain Images

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco; Detre, Greg; Botvinick, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Recent work has shown that it is possible to take brain images acquired during viewing of a scene and reconstruct an approximation of the scene from those images. Here we show that it is also possible to generate text about the mental content reflected in brain images. We began with images collected as participants read names of concrete items (e.g., “Apartment’’) while also seeing line drawings of the item named. We built a model of the mental semantic representation of concrete concepts from text data and learned to map aspects of such representation to patterns of activation in the corresponding brain image. In order to validate this mapping, without accessing information about the items viewed for left-out individual brain images, we were able to generate from each one a collection of semantically pertinent words (e.g., “door,” “window” for “Apartment’’). Furthermore, we show that the ability to generate such words allows us to perform a classification task and thus validate our method quantitatively. PMID:21927602

  12. Piecewise Linear Membership Function Generator-Divider Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Ron; Martinez, Gene; Yuan, Bo; Zrilic, Djuro; Ramirez, Jaime

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a simple, inexpensive, membership function circuit for fuzzy controllers is presented. The proposed circuit may be used to generate a general trapezoidal membership function. The slope and horizontal shift are fully programmable parameters.

  13. An EPROM-based function generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, L.; Mcneil, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A circuit is described to produce arbitrary time-dependent voltage functions derived from digital information stored in EPROMs. While this circuit is designed to be used as a modulator of the microwave pump source or a solid state low noise maser, it can be readily adapted for other applications.

  14. An EPROM-based function generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, L.; McNeil, J. A.

    1983-11-01

    A circuit is described to produce arbitrary time-dependent voltage functions derived from digital information stored in EPROMs. While this circuit is designed to be used as a modulator of the microwave pump source or a solid state low noise maser, it can be readily adapted for other applications.

  15. 24 CFR 901.120 - State/Area Office functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM § 901.120 State/Area Office functions. (a... PHA's grade and the grade of the RMC (if any) assuming management functions at any of the PHA's... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State/Area Office functions....

  16. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Gorbatkin, Steven M.; Berry, Lee A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  17. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  18. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  3. Generating Functions for the Powers of Fibonacci Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrana, D.; Chen, H.

    2007-01-01

    In this note, based on the Binet formulas and the power-reducing techniques, closed forms of generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences are presented. The corresponding results are extended to some other famous sequences as well.

  4. Generating functions for modular graphs and Burgers's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamkin, I. V.

    2005-12-01

    It is shown that the generating functions of modular graphs satisfy Burgers's equations, which enable one to obtain in a unified way the generating functions for the virtual Euler characteristic and the Poincaré polynomial of the moduli space of punctured curves \\overline M_{g,n} and for the number (with weights 1/\\vert{\\operatorname{Aut} G}\\vert) of modular graphs G of a definite type.

  5. Retirement Function and Community Growth in Michigan Nonmetropolitan Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ching-li; Beegle, J. Allan

    In an effort to determine the extent to which the development of the retirement function can contribute to growth and development of rural communities, 42 counties not adjacent to Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in Michigan were studied. The retirement function was treated as a specialized community function, parallel to specialization…

  6. Generating functionals for quantum field theories with random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Mudit; Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    We consider generating functionals for computing correlators in quantum field theories with random potentials. Examples of such theories include cosmological systems in context of the string theory landscape (e.g. cosmic inflation) or condensed matter systems with quenched disorder (e.g. spin glass). We use the so-called replica trick to define two different generating functionals for calculating correlators of the quantum fields averaged over a given distribution of random potentials. The first generating functional is appropriate for calculating averaged (in-out) amplitudes and involves a single replica of fields, but the replica limit is taken to an (unphysical) negative one number of fields outside of the path integral. When the number of replicas is doubled the generating functional can also be used for calculating averaged probabilities (squared amplitudes) using the in-in construction. The second generating functional involves an infinite number of replicas, but can be used for calculating both in-out and in-in correlators and the replica limits are taken to only a zero number of fields. We discuss the formalism in details for a single real scalar field, but the generalization to more fields or to different types of fields is straightforward. We work out three examples: one where the mass of scalar field is treated as a random variable and two where the functional form of interactions is random, one described by a Gaussian random field and the other by a Euclidean action in the field configuration space.

  7. Controlled generation of disorder on functionalized solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Joanna

    2000-03-01

    Fabrication of surfaces with complex patterns and small features are important in fields ranging from cell biology to electronics. One of the methods used for controlling surface properties is the functionalization of a solid substrate with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Using methods of conventional or soft lithography, these SAMs can be patterned on a micron scale into ORDERED regions formed from DIFFERENT molecules. The strategy described here is based on a conceptually new approach - controlled generation of DISORDERED regions in a SAM of a SINGLE molecule formed on a substrate micropatterned with different materials. Patterned substrates were fabricated by evaporating one metal (Au, Ag, Si, Al) onto the surface of a second through a stencil mask or photoresist and were immersed in a solution of X(CH_2)_nCH3 (X = SH, SiCl3 or PO(OH)_2). It has been shown that SAMs of the same alkanethiol formed on different metals differ in structure. The SAM at the transition region between the two metals will, therefore, have a distinct and disordered character. The size of the disordered region can be regulated over scales of below 20 nm to microns. We show that the increased reactivity of the surface at the transition region can be used for patterning various area-selective processes, such as wetting, crystallization and fabrication of structures with sub-100-nm features in different materials.

  8. Inverse solution of ear-canal area function from reflectance.

    PubMed

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M; Neely, Stephen T

    2011-12-01

    A number of acoustical applications require the transformation of acoustical quantities, such as impedance and pressure that are measured at the entrance of the ear canal, to quantities at the eardrum. This transformation often requires knowledge of the shape of the ear canal. Previous attempts to measure ear-canal area functions were either invasive, non-reproducible, or could only measure the area function up to a point mid-way along the canal. A method to determine the area function of the ear canal from measurements of acoustic impedance at the entrance of the ear canal is described. The method is based on a solution to the inverse problem in which measurements of impedance are used to calculate reflectance, which is then used to determine the area function of the canal. The mean ear-canal area function determined using this method is similar to mean ear-canal area functions measured by other researchers using different techniques. The advantage of the proposed method over previous methods is that it is non- invasive, fast, and reproducible.

  9. Molecular alterations in areas generating fast ripples in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Winden, Kellen D; Bragin, Anatol; Engel, Jerome; Geschwind, Dan H

    2015-06-01

    The molecular basis of epileptogenesis is poorly characterized. Studies in humans and animal models have identified an electrophysiological signature that precedes the onset of epilepsy, which has been termed fast ripples (FRs) based on its frequency. Multiple lines of evidence implicate regions generating FRs in epileptogenesis, and FRs appear to demarcate the seizure onset zone, suggesting a role in ictogenesis as well. We performed gene expression analysis comparing areas of the dentate gyrus that generate FRs to those that do not generate FRs in a well-characterized rat model of epilepsy. We identified a small cohort of genes that are differentially expressed in FR versus non-FR brain tissue and used quantitative PCR to validate some of those that modulate neuronal excitability. Gene expression network analysis demonstrated conservation of gene co-expression between non-FR and FR samples, but examination of gene connectivity revealed changes that were most pronounced in the cm-40 module, which contains several genes associated with synaptic function and the differentially expressed genes Kcna4, Kcnv1, and Npy1r that are down-regulated in FRs. We then demonstrate that the genes within the cm-40 module are regulated by seizure activity and enriched for the targets of the RNA binding protein Elavl4. Our data suggest that seizure activity induces co-expression of genes associated with synaptic transmission and that this pattern is attenuated in areas displaying FRs, implicating the failure of this mechanism in the generation of FRs. PMID:25818007

  10. Automated Testcase Generation for Numerical Support Functions in Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Schnieder, Stefan-Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present a tool for the automatic generation of test stimuli for small numerical support functions, e.g., code for trigonometric functions, quaternions, filters, or table lookup. Our tool is based on KLEE to produce a set of test stimuli for full path coverage. We use a method of iterative deepening over abstractions to deal with floating-point values. During actual testing the stimuli exercise the code against a reference implementation. We illustrate our approach with results of experiments with low-level trigonometric functions, interpolation routines, and mathematical support functions from an open source UAS autopilot.

  11. Generating functions for effective hamiltonians. Symmetry, topology, combinatorics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhilinskii, B. I.

    2012-01-15

    Recent developments associated with old technique of generating functions and invariant theory which I have started to apply to molecular problems due to my collaboration with Yu.F. Smirnov about 25 years ago are discussed. Three aspects are presented: the construction of diagonal in polyad quantum number effective resonant vibrational Hamiltonians using the symmetrized Hadamard product; the decomposition of the number of state generating function into regular and oscillatory contributions and its relation with Todd polynomials and topological characterization of energy bands; qualitative aspects of resonant oscillators and fractional monodromy as one of new generalizations of Hamiltonian monodromy.

  12. Geometrical modulation transfer function for different pixel active area shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2000-04-01

    In this work we consider the effect of the pixel active area geometrical shape on the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an image sensor. When designing a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor, or a CCD or CID sensor for this matter, the active area of the pixel would have a certain geometrical shape which might not cover the whole pixel area. To improve the device performance, it is important to understand the effect this has on the pixel sensitivity and on the resulting MTF. We perform a theoretical analysis of the MTF for the active area shape and derive explicit formulas for the transfer function for pixel arrays with a square, a rectangular and an L shaped active area (most commonly used), and generalize for any connected active area shape. Preliminary experimental results of subpixel scanning sensitivity maps and the corresponding MTFs have also bee obtained, which confirm the theoretical derivations. Both the simulation results and the MTF calculated from the point spread function measurements of the actual pixel arrays show that the active area shape contributes significantly to the behavior of the overall MTF. The results also indicate that for any potential pixel active area shape, the effect of its diversion from the square pixel could be calculated, so that tradeoff between the conflicting requirements, such as SNR and MTF, could be compared per each pixel design for better overall sensor performance.

  13. Asymptotics of bivariate generating functions with algebraic singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Torin

    Flajolet and Odlyzko (1990) derived asymptotic formulae the coefficients of a class of uni- variate generating functions with algebraic singularities. Gao and Richmond (1992) and Hwang (1996, 1998) extended these results to classes of multivariate generating functions, in both cases by reducing to the univariate case. Pemantle and Wilson (2013) outlined new multivariate ana- lytic techniques and used them to analyze the coefficients of rational generating functions. After overviewing these methods, we use them to find asymptotic formulae for the coefficients of a broad class of bivariate generating functions with algebraic singularities. Beginning with the Cauchy integral formula, we explicity deform the contour of integration so that it hugs a set of critical points. The asymptotic contribution to the integral comes from analyzing the integrand near these points, leading to explicit asymptotic formulae. Next, we use this formula to analyze an example from current research. In the following chapter, we apply multivariate analytic techniques to quan- tum walks. Bressler and Pemantle (2007) found a (d + 1)-dimensional rational generating function whose coefficients described the amplitude of a particle at a position in the integer lattice after n steps. Here, the minimal critical points form a curve on the (d + 1)-dimensional unit torus. We find asymptotic formulae for the amplitude of a particle in a given position, normalized by the number of steps n, as n approaches infinity. Each critical point contributes to the asymptotics for a specific normalized position. Using Groebner bases in Maple again, we compute the explicit locations of peak amplitudes. In a scaling window of size the square root of n near the peaks, each amplitude is asymptotic to an Airy function.

  14. Using a Function Generator to Produce Auditory and Visual Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Charles B.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies a function generator as an instrument that produces time-varying electrical signals of frequency, wavelength, and amplitude. Sending these signals to a speaker or a light-emitting diode can demonstrate how specific characteristics of auditory or visual stimuli relate to perceptual experiences. Provides specific instructions for using…

  15. SNAP: A computer program for generating symbolic network functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, P. M.; Alderson, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    The computer program SNAP (symbolic network analysis program) generates symbolic network functions for networks containing R, L, and C type elements and all four types of controlled sources. The program is efficient with respect to program storage and execution time. A discussion of the basic algorithms is presented, together with user's and programmer's guides.

  16. Precision medicine for cancer with next-generation functional diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam A.; Letai, Anthony; Fisher, David E.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine is about matching the right drugs to the right patients. Although this approach is technology agnostic, in cancer there is a tendency to make precision medicine synonymous with genomics. However, genome-based cancer therapeutic matching is limited by incomplete biological understanding of the relationship between phenotype and cancer genotype. This limitation can be addressed by functional testing of live patient tumour cells exposed to potential therapies. Recently, several ‘next-generation’ functional diagnostic technologies have been reported, including novel methods for tumour manipulation, molecularly precise assays of tumour responses and device-based in situ approaches; these address the limitations of the older generation of chemosensitivity tests. The promise of these new technologies suggests a future diagnostic strategy that integrates functional testing with next-generation sequencing and immunoprofiling to precisely match combination therapies to individual cancer patients. PMID:26536825

  17. Sustainable electricity generation by solar pv/diesel hybrid system without storage for off grids areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoumah, Y.; Yamegueu, D.; Py, X.

    2012-02-01

    Access to energy is known as a key issue for poverty reduction. The electrification rate of sub Saharan countries is one of the lowest among the developing countries. However this part of the world has natural energy resources that could help raising its access to energy, then its economic development. An original "flexy energy" concept of hybrid solar pv/diesel/biofuel power plant, without battery storage, is developed in order to not only make access to energy possible for rural and peri-urban populations in Africa (by reducing the electricity generation cost) but also to make the electricity production sustainable in these areas. Some experimental results conducted on this concept prototype show that the sizing of a pv/diesel hybrid system by taking into account the solar radiation and the load/demand profile of a typical area may lead the diesel generator to operate near its optimal point (70-90 % of its nominal power). Results also show that for a reliability of a PV/diesel hybrid system, the rated power of the diesel generator should be equal to the peak load. By the way, it has been verified through this study that the functioning of a pv/Diesel hybrid system is efficient for higher load and higher solar radiation.

  18. [Development of multi-function ECG signal generator].

    PubMed

    Cheng, F; Wei, Y X

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a portable multi-function ECG signal generator, which is based on micro-controller. It uses technique of LCD screen, and realizes man-machine interaction by keyboard. In constructing and disposing data module of the ECG signal, Eigen-heartbeat Code mapping method gets ROM saved greatly. Therefore it can generate all kinds of user-defined ECG signal sequence with no extension of on-board memory chips. This system can also simulate kinds of ECG signals, which have various heart rates and symptoms. It can meet the needs of researching and maintenance of kinds of ECG instruments. PMID:12583134

  19. Arbitrary function generator for APS injector synchrotron correction magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Despe, O.D.

    1990-11-07

    The APS injector synchrotron ring measures about 368 m in circumference. In order to obtain the precision of the magnetic field required for the positron acceleration from 450 Mev to 7.7 Gev with low beam loss, eighty correction magnets are distributed around its circumference. These magnets provide the vernier field changes required for beam orbit correction during the acceleration phase of the injector synchrotron cycle. Because of mechanical imperfections in the construction, as well as installation of real dipole and multi-pole magnets, the exact field correction required at each correction magnet location is not known until a beam is actually accelerated. It is therefore essential that a means is provided to generate a correction field that is a function of the beam energy from injection until extraction for each correction magnet. The fairly large number of correction magnets in the system requires that the arbitrary function generator design be as simple as possible yet provide the required performance. An important, required performance feature is that the function can be changed or modified ``on the fly``, to provide the operator with a real-time feel during the tune up process. The arbitrary function generator described in this report satisfies these requirements.

  20. Surface area-dependent second harmonic generation from silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoang Minh; Luong, Thanh Tuyen; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle

    2016-08-17

    The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of metallic nanoparticles strongly depend on their size and shape. Metallic gold nanorods have already been widely investigated, but other noble metals could also be used for nanorod fabrication towards applications in photonics. Here we report on the synthesis and NLO characterization of silver nanorods (AgNRs) with controllable localized surface plasmon resonance. We have implemented an original, one-step and seedless synthesis method, based on a spontaneous particle growth technique in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent. Colloidal solutions of AgNRs with various aspect ratios (5.0; 6.3; 7.5; 8.2 and 9.7) have been obtained and characterized using Harmonic light scattering (HLS) at 1064 nm, in order to investigate their quadratic NLO properties. From HLS experiments, we demonstrate that hyperpolarizability (β) values of AgNRs display a strong dependence on their surface area.

  1. Surface area-dependent second harmonic generation from silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoang Minh; Luong, Thanh Tuyen; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle

    2016-08-17

    The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of metallic nanoparticles strongly depend on their size and shape. Metallic gold nanorods have already been widely investigated, but other noble metals could also be used for nanorod fabrication towards applications in photonics. Here we report on the synthesis and NLO characterization of silver nanorods (AgNRs) with controllable localized surface plasmon resonance. We have implemented an original, one-step and seedless synthesis method, based on a spontaneous particle growth technique in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent. Colloidal solutions of AgNRs with various aspect ratios (5.0; 6.3; 7.5; 8.2 and 9.7) have been obtained and characterized using Harmonic light scattering (HLS) at 1064 nm, in order to investigate their quadratic NLO properties. From HLS experiments, we demonstrate that hyperpolarizability (β) values of AgNRs display a strong dependence on their surface area. PMID:27498825

  2. Generation of functional hepatocytes from human spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    To generate functional human hepatocytes from stem cells and/or extra-hepatic tissues could provide an important source of cells for treating liver diseases. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have an unlimited plasticity since they can dedifferentiate and transdifferentiate to other cell lineages. However, generation of mature and functional hepatocytes from human SSCs has not yet been achieved. Here we have for the first time reported direct transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature and functional hepatocytes by three-step induction using the defined condition medium. Human SSCs were first transdifferentiated to hepatic stem cells, as evidenced by their morphology and biopotential nature of co-expressing hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers but not hallmarks for embryonic stem cells. Hepatic stem cells were further induced to differentiate into mature hepatocytes identified by their morphological traits and strong expression of CK8, CK18, ALB, AAT, TF, TAT, and cytochrome enzymes rather than CK7 or CK19. Significantly, mature hepatocytes derived from human SSCs assumed functional attributes of human hepatocytes, because they could produce albumin, remove ammonia, and uptake and release indocyanine green. Moreover, expression of β-CATENIN, HNF4A, FOXA1 and GATA4 was upregulated during the transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature hepatocytes. Collectively, human SSCs could directly transdifferentiate to mature and functional hepatocytes. This study could offer an invaluable source of human hepatocytes for curing liver disorders and drug toxicology screening and provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying human liver regeneration. PMID:26840458

  3. Some reference formulas for the generating functions of canonical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-02-01

    We study some properties of the canonical transformations in classical mechanics and quantum field theory and give a number of practical formulas concerning their generating functions. First, we give a diagrammatic formula for the perturbative expansion of the composition law around the identity map. Then we propose a standard way to express the generating function of a canonical transformation by means of a certain "componential" map, which obeys the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. We derive the diagrammatic interpretation of the componential map, work out its relation with the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and derive its time-ordered version. Finally, we generalize the results to the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, where the conjugate variables may have both bosonic and fermionic statistics, and describe applications to quantum field theory.

  4. Recombination between defective tombusvirus RNAs generates functional hybrid genomes

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.A.; Morris, T.J.

    1994-04-26

    The tombusviruses represent a group of small icosahedral plant viruses that contain monopartite positive-sense RNA genomes. Tombusviruses are able to generate small replicating deletion mutants of their genomes (i.e., defective interfering RNAs) during infections via RNA recombination and/or rearrangement. To further study the process of RNA recombination and to determine whether tombusviruses were capable of trans-recombination, protoplasts were coinoculated with in vitro-generated transcripts of a nonreplicating 3{prime}-truncated genomic RNA of cucumber necrosis tombusvirus and either replicative or replication-defective DI RNAs of tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus. After 48-hr incubation, two dominant replicative chimeric recombinant viral RNA populations were detected that contained various large contiguous 5{prime} segments of the cucumber necrosis tombusvirus genomic RNA fused to 3{prime}-terminal regions of the tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus defective interfering RNA. Some of the larger chimeric recombinants formed in protoplasts were able to systemically infect plants and induce wild-type symptoms. In addition, a functional chimeric genome was generated in planta after direct coinoculation of whole plants with the defective RNA components. These results indicate that (i) RNA recombination can occur relatively efficiently in single-cell infections, (ii) trans-recombination can occur with nonreplicating viral RNA components, and (iii) functional chimeric genomes can be generated via recombination. Possible mechanisms for the formation of the recombinants are proposed, and evolutionary implications are discussed.

  5. [Generation of functional organs from pluripotent stem cells].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuyuki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have played a major role in stem cell biology, providing many conceptual ideas and models. Among them is the concept of the "niche", a special bone-marrow microenvironment that by exchanging cues regulates stem-cell fate. The HSC niche also plays an important role in HSC transplantation. Successful engraftment of donor HSCs depends on myeloablative pretreatment to empty the niche. The concept of the stem-cell niche has now been extended to the generation of organs. We postulated that an empty "organ niche" exists in a developing animal when development of an organ is genetically disabled. This organ niche should be developmentally compensated by blastocyst complementation using wild-type primary stem cells (PSCs). We proved the principle of organogenesis from xenogeneic PSCs in an embryo unable to form a specific organ, demonstrating the generation of functionally normal rat pancreas by injecting rat PSCs into pancreatogenesis-disabled mouse embryos. This principle has held in pigs. When pancreatogenesis-disabled pig embryos underwent complementation with blastomeres from wild-type pig embryos to produce chimeric pigs, the chimeras had normal pancreata and survived to adulthood. Demonstration of the generation of a functional organ from PSCs in pigs is a very important step toward generation of human cells, tissues, and organs from individual patients' own PSCs in large animals. PMID:26458462

  6. Delineating potential epileptogenic areas utilizing resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Nair, Veena; Meier, Timothy; Holdsworth, Ryan; Tunnell, Evelyn; Rutecki, Paul; Sillay, Karl; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-08-01

    Seizure localization includes neuroimaging like electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with limited ability to characterize the epileptogenic network. Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) characterizes epileptogenic network congruent with interictal epileptiform discharges by clustering together voxels with transient signals. We generated epileptogenic areas for 12 of 13 epilepsy patients with TCA, congruent with different areas of seizure onset. Resting functional MRI (fMRI) scans are noninvasive, and can be acquired quickly, in patients with different levels of severity and function. Analyzing resting fMRI data using TCA is quick and can complement clinical methods to characterize the epileptogenic network. PMID:27362339

  7. Area-efficient physically unclonable function circuit architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrieri, Thomas; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2015-04-28

    Generating a physically a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit value includes comparing each of first identification components in a first bank to each of second identification components in a second bank. A given first identification component in the first bank is not compared to another first identification component in the first bank and a given second identification component in the second bank is not compared to another second identification component in the second bank. A digital bit value is generated for each comparison made while comparing each of the first identification components to each of the second identification components. A PUF circuit value is generated from the digital bit values from each comparison made.

  8. [Progress of clinical application of functional MRI in the localization of brain language area].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Lu, Junfeng; Wu, Jinsong

    2016-02-01

    For surgical operation in the functional area in the brain, it's commonly demanded to resect the lesion to the maximal extent on the basis of preserve the normal neural function, thus the precise localization of functional area is extremely important. As for the advantages of being widely available, easy to grasp and non-invasive, the functional MRI (fMRI) has come into wide use, while the application of language fMRI is still in the initial stage. It's important to choose appropriate fMRI task according to the individual condition of the subject, the commonly-adopted tasks include verb generation, picture naming, word recognition, word generation, etc. However, the effectiveness of using fMRI to localize language area is not totally satisfactory, adopting multiple task is an effective approach to improve the sensitivity of this technique. The application of resting state fMRI in the localization of language area and the further research of the role of fMRI in localizing the Chinese language area are the important future directions.

  9. Finite difference grid generation by multivariate blending function interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Spradley, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    The General Interpolants Method (GIM) code which solves the multidimensional Navier-Stokes equations for arbitrary geometric domains is described. The geometry module in the GIM code generates two and three dimensional grids over specified flow regimes, establishes boundary condition information and computes finite difference analogs for use in the GIM code numerical solution module. The technique can be classified as an algebraic equation approach. The geometry package uses multivariate blending function interpolation of vector-values functions which define the shapes of the edges and surfaces bounding the flow domain. By employing blending functions which conform to the cardinality conditions the flow domain may be mapped onto a unit square (2-D) or unit cube (3-D), thus producing an intrinsic coordinate system for the region of interest. The intrinsic coordinate system facilitates grid spacing control to allow for optimum distribution of nodes in the flow domain.

  10. Some families of generating functions and associated hypergeometric transformation and reduction formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Summation, transformation and reduction formulas for various families of hypergeometric functions in one, two and more variables are potentially useful in many diverse areas of applications. The main object of this paper is to derive several substantially more general results on this subject than those considered recently by Neethu et al. [7] in connection with Bailey's transformation involving the Gauss hypergeometrc function 2 F 1 (see [1]). The methodology used here is based essentially on some families of hypergeometric generating functions. Relevant connections of the results presented in this paper with those in the earlier works are also pointed out.

  11. Generation of saturation functions for simulation models of carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingfeng

    A rock type is the unit of rock deposited under similar conditions, which went through similar diagenetic processes, producing analogous rock fabric, with distinct set of pore types, and pore throat size distribution, having specific range of porosity and permeability. Rock typing can generally be used as a guide to assign petrophysical characteristics to different zones for detailed reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, which provide valid frames for reservoir development. It is often assumed that conventional rock types are capable of assigning multiphase flow characteristics, such as capillary pressure and relative permeability to the cells of dynamic simulation models. However, these conventional rock types, or static reservoir rock types (SRRT) fail to capture the actual variability of capillary pressure and relative permeability, due to lack of representation of wettability difference at different elevation above the free water level (FWL) in carbonate reservoirs, especially in the highly heterogeneous reservoirs. This should be resolved through dynamic reservoir rock types (DRRT), in which wettability effect is imposed on the SRRTs to generate saturation functions for simulation models. This research studies Ghedan's comprehensive DRRT model7, and proposes a modified Ghedan's model. First, the defined static rock types are sub-divided into sub-static rock types based on porosity frequency. Second, three curve-fitting programs are coded to generate the related saturation-height functions. These are the modified Ghedan-Okuyiga equation, Cuddy function and Power Law function. Developed from Ghedan-Okuyiga function113, the recommended modified Ghedan-Okuyiga function has been proposed with saturation and implicit porosity as a function of height above FWL in the transition zone. Third, each sub-static rock type is divided into a number of DRRTs by determining the capillary pressure and relative permeability curves in the oil zone from gas

  12. Alternative Splicing and Subfunctionalization Generates Functional Diversity in Fungal Proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-López, Claudia; Lorenz, Michael C.; van Hoof, Ambro

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is commonly used by the Metazoa to generate more than one protein from a gene. However, such diversification of the proteome by alternative splicing is much rarer in fungi. We describe here an ancient fungal alternative splicing event in which these two proteins are generated from a single alternatively spliced ancestral SKI7/HBS1 gene retained in many species in both the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. While the ability to express two proteins from a single SKI7/HBS1 gene is conserved in many fungi, the exact mechanism by which they achieve this varies. The alternative splicing was lost in Saccharomyces cerevisiae following the whole-genome duplication event as these two genes subfunctionalized into the present functionally distinct HBS1 and SKI7 genes. When expressed in yeast, the single gene from Lachancea kluyveri generates two functionally distinct proteins. Expression of one of these proteins complements hbs1, but not ski7 mutations, while the other protein complements ski7, but not hbs1. This is the first known case of subfunctionalization by loss of alternative splicing in yeast. By coincidence, the ancestral alternatively spliced gene was also duplicated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe with subsequent subfunctionalization and loss of splicing. Similar subfunctionalization by loss of alternative splicing in fungi also explains the presence of two PTC7 genes in the budding yeast Tetrapisispora blattae, suggesting that this is a common mechanism to preserve duplicate alternatively spliced genes. PMID:23516382

  13. A probability generating function method for stochastic reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilwon; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we present a probability generating function (PGF) approach for analyzing stochastic reaction networks. The master equation of the network can be converted to a partial differential equation for PGF. Using power series expansion of PGF and Padé approximation, we develop numerical schemes for finding probability distributions as well as first and second moments. We show numerical accuracy of the method by simulating chemical reaction examples such as a binding-unbinding reaction, an enzyme-substrate model, Goldbeter-Koshland ultrasensitive switch model, and G2/M transition model.

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  15. Generation of functional podocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Osele; Iacone, Roberto; Longaretti, Lorena; Benedetti, Valentina; Graf, Martin; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Patsch, Christoph; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela; Tomasoni, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Generating human podocytes in vitro could offer a unique opportunity to study human diseases. Here, we describe a simple and efficient protocol for obtaining functional podocytes in vitro from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Cells were exposed to a three-step protocol, which induced their differentiation into intermediate mesoderm, then into nephron progenitors and, finally, into mature podocytes. After differentiation, cells expressed the main podocyte markers, such as synaptopodin, WT1, α-Actinin-4, P-cadherin and nephrin at the protein and mRNA level, and showed the low proliferation rate typical of mature podocytes. Exposure to Angiotensin II significantly decreased the expression of podocyte genes and cells underwent cytoskeleton rearrangement. Cells were able to internalize albumin and self-assembled into chimeric 3D structures in combination with dissociated embryonic mouse kidney cells. Overall, these findings demonstrate the establishment of a robust protocol that, mimicking developmental stages, makes it possible to derive functional podocytes in vitro.

  16. Atlas generated generalized ROIs for use in functional neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thurfjell, L. . Dept. of Neuroradiology and Clinical Neurophysiology); Bohm, C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-08-01

    The interpretation of functional neuroimaging data can, in many cases, be facilitated by comparison with simulated data corresponding to the measuring situation. A computerized brain atlas is used to provide information regarding the spatial extent of the object being imaged. This knowledge combined with information about the resolution of the imaging device expressed as point spread functions is used to calculate a simulated image of the object. The simulated image can be regarded as a generalized region of interest (ROI) containing information of the object as viewed by the specific instrument. Generalized ROIs are used to automatically determine boundaries or ordinary ROIs and to provide recovery coefficients to compensate for partial volume effects. Simulations can also be used to generate three-dimensional data sets where different activity levels have been assigned to different anatomical structures. These methods are presented in this paper and some experimental results are shown.

  17. Low work function, stable compound clusters and generation process

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; Balooch, Mehdi; Schildbach, Marcus A.; Hamza, Alex V.; McLean, II, William

    2000-01-01

    Low work function, stable compound clusters are generated by co-evaporation of a solid semiconductor (i.e., Si) and alkali metal (i.e., Cs) elements in an oxygen environment. The compound clusters are easily patterned during deposition on substrate surfaces using a conventional photo-resist technique. The cluster size distribution is narrow, with a peak range of angstroms to nanometers depending on the oxygen pressure and the Si source temperature. Tests have shown that compound clusters when deposited on a carbon substrate contain the desired low work function property and are stable up to 600.degree. C. Using the patterned cluster containing plate as a cathode baseplate and a faceplate covered with phosphor as an anode, one can apply a positive bias to the faceplate to easily extract electrons and obtain illumination.

  18. 10 CFR 1045.18 - Newly generated information in a previously declassified subject area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Identification of Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data Information § 1045.18 Newly generated information in a previously declassified subject area. (a) The Director of... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Newly generated information in a previously...

  19. Precise Time-Tag Generator For A Local-Area-Network Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, David R.; Tran, Khoa Duy

    1995-01-01

    Time-tag-generating circuit designed for use in LAN monitor, monitors frames of data transmitted among computers on local-area network (LAN). To each frame of data that LAN monitor receives from LAN, time-tag generator appends ancillary data on time of arrival of frame, precise to within 1 microsecond of centrally generated time signal. Inserts ancillary time data in place of already used frame-check data before frames of data stored in memory of LAN monitor.

  20. Generation of functional thyroid from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Antonica, Francesco; Kasprzyk, Dominika Figini; Opitz, Robert; Iacovino, Michelina; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Dumitrescu, Alexandra Mihaela; Refetoff, Samuel; Peremans, Kathelijne; Manto, Mario; Kyba, Michael; Costagliola, Sabine

    2012-11-01

    The primary function of the thyroid gland is to metabolize iodide by synthesizing thyroid hormones, which are critical regulators of growth, development and metabolism in almost all tissues. So far, research on thyroid morphogenesis has been missing an efficient stem-cell model system that allows for the in vitro recapitulation of the molecular and morphogenic events regulating thyroid follicular-cell differentiation and subsequent assembly into functional thyroid follicles. Here we report that a transient overexpression of the transcription factors NKX2-1 and PAX8 is sufficient to direct mouse embryonic stem-cell differentiation into thyroid follicular cells that organize into three-dimensional follicular structures when treated with thyrotropin. These in vitro-derived follicles showed appreciable iodide organification activity. Importantly, when grafted in vivo into athyroid mice, these follicles rescued thyroid hormone plasma levels and promoted subsequent symptomatic recovery. Thus, mouse embryonic stem cells can be induced to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells in vitro and generate functional thyroid tissue.

  1. Functional anatomy of the Drosophila microRNA-generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuecheng; Paroo, Zain; Liu, Qinghua

    2007-09-28

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the multidomain RNase III Dicer-1 (Dcr-1) functions in tandem with the double-stranded (ds)RNA-binding protein Loquacious (Loqs) to catalyze the maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs) from precursor (pre)-miRNAs. Here we dissect the molecular mechanism of pre-miRNA processing by the Dcr-1-Loqs complex. The tandem RNase III (RIII) domains of Dcr-1 form an intramolecular dimer such that one RIII domain cleaves the 3' strand, whereas the other cuts the 5' strand of pre-miRNA. We show that the functional core of Dcr-1 consists of a DUF283 domain, a PAZ domain, and two RIII domains. Dcr-1 preferentially associates with the Loqs-PB splice isoform. Loqs-PB uses the second dsRNA-binding domain to bind pre-miRNA and the third dsRNA-binding domain to interact with Dcr-1. Both domains of Loqs-PB are required for efficient miRNA production by enhancing the affinity of Dcr-1 for pre-miRNA. Thus, our results provide further insights into the functional anatomy of the Drosophila miRNA-generating enzyme.

  2. Testing and Functions of the J2X Gas Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I, NASA s new solid rocket based crew launch vehicle, is a two stage in line rocket that has made its waytothe forefront of NASA s endeavors. The Ares I s Upper Stage (US) will be propelled by a J-2X engine which is fueled by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. The J-2X is a variation based on two of its predecessor s, the J-2 and J-2S engines. ET50 is providing the design support for hardware required to run tests on the J-2X Gas Generator (GG) that increases the delivery pressure of the supplied combustion fuels that the engine burns. The test area will be running a series of tests using different lengths and curved segments of pipe and different sized nozzles to determine the configuration that best satisfies the thrust, heat, and stability requirements for the engine. I have had to research the configurations that are being tested and gain an understanding of the purpose of the tests. I then had to research the parts that would be used in the test configurations. I was taken to see parts similar to the ones used in the test configurations and was allowed to review drawings and dimensions used for those parts. My job over this summer has been to use the knowledge I have gained to design, model, and create drawings for the un-fabricated parts that are necessary for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator Phase IIcTest.

  3. Functional diversity among seed dispersal kernels generated by carnivorous mammals.

    PubMed

    González-Varo, Juan P; López-Bao, José V; Guitián, José

    2013-05-01

    1. Knowledge of the spatial scale of the dispersal service provided by important seed dispersers (i.e. common and/or keystone species) is essential to our understanding of their role on plant ecology, ecosystem functioning and, ultimately, biodiversity conservation. 2. Carnivores are the main mammalian frugivores and seed dispersers in temperate climate regions. However, information on the seed dispersal distances they generate is still very limited. We focused on two common temperate carnivores differing in body size and spatial ecology - red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and European pine marten (Martes martes) - for evaluating possible functional diversity in their seed dispersal kernels. 3. We measured dispersal distances using colour-coded seed mimics embedded in experimental fruits that were offered to the carnivores in feeding stations (simulating source trees). The exclusive colour code of each simulated tree allowed us to assign the exact origin of seed mimics found later in carnivore faeces. We further designed an explicit sampling strategy aiming to detect the longest dispersal events; as far we know, the most robust sampling scheme followed for tracking carnivore-dispersed seeds. 4. We found a marked functional heterogeneity among both species in their seed dispersal kernels according to their home range size: multimodality and long-distance dispersal in the case of the fox and unimodality and short-distance dispersal in the case of the marten (maximum distances = 2846 and 1233 m, respectively). As a consequence, emergent kernels at the guild level (overall and in two different years) were highly dependent on the relative contribution of each carnivore species. 5. Our results provide the first empirical evidence of functional diversity among seed dispersal kernels generated by carnivorous mammals. Moreover, they illustrate for the first time how seed dispersal kernels strongly depend on the relative contribution of different disperser species, thus on the

  4. Generating functionals and Gaussian approximations for interruptible delay reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, Tobias; Galla, Tobias

    2015-10-01

    We develop a generating functional description of the dynamics of non-Markovian individual-based systems in which delay reactions can be terminated before completion. This generalizes previous work in which a path-integral approach was applied to dynamics in which delay reactions complete with certainty. We construct a more widely applicable theory, and from it we derive Gaussian approximations of the dynamics, valid in the limit of large, but finite, population sizes. As an application of our theory we study predator-prey models with delay dynamics due to gestation or lag periods to reach the reproductive age. In particular, we focus on the effects of delay on noise-induced cycles.

  5. Functional Human Vascular Network Generated in Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Methacrylate Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Qi, Hao; Yang, Yunzhi; Bae, Hojae; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-05-23

    The generation of functional, 3D vascular networks is a fundamental prerequisite for the development of many future tissue engineering-based therapies. Current approaches in vascular network bioengineering are largely carried out using natural hydrogels as embedding scaffolds. However, most natural hydrogels present a poor mechanical stability and a suboptimal durability, which are critical limitations that hamper their widespread applicability. The search for improved hydrogels has become a priority in tissue engineering research. Here, the suitability of a photopolymerizable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel to support human progenitor cell-based formation of vascular networks is demonstrated. Using GelMA as the embedding scaffold, it is shown that 3D constructs containing human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) generate extensive capillary-like networks in vitro. These vascular structures contain distinct lumens that are formed by the fusion of ECFC intracellular vacuoles in a process of vascular morphogenesis. The process of vascular network formation is dependent on the presence of MSCs, which differentiate into perivascular cells occupying abluminal positions within the network. Importantly, it is shown that implantation of cell-laden GelMA hydrogels into immunodeficient mice results in a rapid formation of functional anastomoses between the bioengineered human vascular network and the mouse vasculature. Furthermore, it is shown that the degree of methacrylation of the GelMA can be used to modulate the cellular behavior and the extent of vascular network formation both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that GelMA hydrogels can be used for biomedical applications that require the formation of microvascular networks, including the development of complex engineered tissues.

  6. Identifying Landscape Areas Prone to Generating Storm Runoff in Central New York Agricultural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, K.; Walter, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution continues to be a leading cause of surface water degradation, especially in agricultural areas. In humid regions where variable source area (VSA) hydrology dominates storm runoff, NPS pollution is generated where VSAs coincide with polluting activities. Mapping storm runoff risks could allow for more precise and informed targeting of NPS pollution mitigation practices in agricultural landscapes. Topographic wetness indices (TWI) provide good approximations of relative soil moisture patterns and relative storm runoff risks. Simulation models are typically used in conjunction with TWIs to quantify VSA behavior. In this study we use empirically derived relationships between TWI values, volumetric water content (VWC) and rainfall frequencies to develop runoff probability maps. Rainfall and soil VWC were measured across regionally representative agricultural areas in central New York over three years (2012-2015) to determine the volume of runoff generated from agricultural fields in the area. We assumed the threshold for storm runoff occurs when the combination of antecedent soil water and rainfall are sufficient to saturate the soil. We determined that approximately 50% of the storm runoff volume is generated from 10% of the land area during spring, summer, and autumn seasons, while the risk of storm runoff generation is higher in the spring and autumn seasons than in the summer for the same area of land.

  7. Surface functionalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Photo-stability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Kacie M.

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly prevalent in society for applications of sunscreens, cosmetics, paints, biomedical imaging, and photovoltaics. Due to the increased surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles compared to bulk materials, it is important to know the health and safety impacts of these materials. One mechanism of toxicity of nominally "safe" materials such as TiO 2 is through the photocatalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production and ligand degradation can affect the bioavailability of these particles in aqueous organisms. We have investigated ROS generation by functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles and its influence on aggregation and bioavailability and toxicity to zebrafish embryos/larvae. For these studies we investigated anatase TiO2 nanoparticles. For application purposes and solution stability, the TiO2 nanoparticles were functionalized with a variety of ligands such as citrate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, and ascorbate. We quantitatively examined the amount of ROS produced in aqueous solution using fluorescent probes and see that more ROS is produced under UV light than in the dark control. Our measurements show that TiO2 toxicity reaches a maximum for nanoparticles with smaller diameters, and is correlated with surface area dependent changes in ROS generation. In an effort to reduce toxicity through control of the surface and surface ligands, we synthesized anatase nanoparticles of different sizes, functionalized them with different ligands, and examined the resulting ROS generation and ligand stability. Using a modular ligand containing a hydrophobic inner region and a hydrophilic outer region, we synthesized water-stable nanoparticles, via two different chemical reactions, having much-reduced ROS generation and thus reduced toxicity. These results suggest new strategies for making safer nanoparticles while still retaining their desired properties. We also examine the degradation of the different ligands

  8. Semiautomatic transfer function initialization for abdominal visualization using self-generating hierarchical radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Selver, M Alper; Güzeliş, Cüneyt

    2009-01-01

    As being a tool that assigns optical parameters used in interactive visualization, Transfer Functions (TF) have important effects on the quality of volume rendered medical images. Unfortunately, finding accurate TFs is a tedious and time consuming task because of the trade off between using extensive search spaces and fulfilling the physician's expectations with interactive data exploration tools and interfaces. By addressing this problem, we introduce a semi-automatic method for initial generation of TFs. The proposed method uses a Self Generating Hierarchical Radial Basis Function Network to determine the lobes of a Volume Histogram Stack (VHS) which is introduced as a new domain by aligning the histograms of slices of a image series. The new self generating hierarchical design strategy allows the recognition of suppressed lobes corresponding to suppressed tissues and representation of the overlapping regions which are parts of the lobes but can not be represented by the Gaussian bases in VHS. Moreover, approximation with a minimum set of basis functions provides the possibility of selecting and adjusting suitable units to optimize the TF. Applications on different CT and MR data sets show enhanced rendering quality and reduced optimization time in abdominal studies.

  9. Generation of RCAS vectors useful for functional genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Loftus, S K; Larson, D M; Watkins-Chow, D; Church, D M; Pavan, W J

    2001-10-31

    Avian leukosis type A virus-derived retroviral vectors have been used to introduce genes into cells expressing the corresponding avian receptor tv-a. This includes the use of Replication-Competent Avian sarcoma-leukosis virus (ASLV) long terminal repeat (LTR) with Splice acceptor (RCAS) vectors in the analysis of avian development, human and murine cell cultures, murine cell lineage studies and cancer biology. Previously, cloning of genes into this virus was difficult due to the large size of the vector and sparse cloning sites. To overcome some of the disadvantages of traditional cloning using the RCASBP-Y vector, we have modified the RCASBP-Y to incorporate "Gateway" site-specific recombination cloning of genes into the construct, either with or without HA epitope tags. We have found the repetitive "att" sequences, which are the targets for site-specific recombination, do not impair the production of infectious viral particles or the expression of the gene of interest. This is the first instance of site-specific recombination being used to generate retroviral gene constructs. These viral constructs will allow for the efficient transfer and expression of cDNAs needed for functional genomic analyses. PMID:11759842

  10. Fine tuning points of generating function construction for linear recursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolcu, Bahar; Demiralp, Metin

    2014-10-01

    Recursions are quite important mathematical tools since many systems are mathematically modelled to ultimately take us to these equations because of their rather easy algebraic natures. They fit computer programming needs quite well in many circumstances to produce solutions. However, it is generally desired to find the asymptotic behaviour of the general term in the relevant sequence for convergence and therefore practicality issues. One of the general tendencies to find the general term asymptotic behaviour, when its ordering number grows unboundedly, is the integral representation over a generating function which does not depend on individual sequence elements. This is tried to be done almost for all types of recursions, even though the linear cases gain more importance than the others because they can be more effectively investigated by using many linear algebraic tools. Despite this may seem somehow to be rather trivial, there are a lot of theoretical fine tuning issues in the construction of true integral representations over true intervals on real axis or paths in complex domains. This work is devoted to focus on this issue starting from scratch for better understanding of the matter. The example cases are chosen to best illuminate the situations to get information for future generalization even though the work can be considered at somehow introductory level.

  11. The Area of a Surface Generated by Revolving a Graph about Any Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, Edray Herber; Washington, Talitha M.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a general formula for the area of the surface that is generated by a graph [t[subscript 0], t[subscript 1] [right arrow] [the set of real numbers][superscript 2] sending t [maps to] (x(t), y(t)) revolved around a general line L : Ax + By = C. As a corollary, we obtain a formula for the area of the surface formed by revolving y = f(x)…

  12. Tunable narrowband THz pulse generation in scalable large area photoconductive antennas.

    PubMed

    Krause, Johannes; Wagner, Martin; Winnerl, Stephan; Helm, Manfred; Stehr, Dominik

    2011-09-26

    The generation and characterization of narrowband THz pulses by means of chirped pulse difference frequency generation in Auston-switch type photoconductive antennas is reported. Using optical pulses with energies in the range from 1 nJ to 1 µJ, we generate THz pulses with up to 50 pJ in energy and electric field strengths on the order of 1 kV/cm. Two emitter concepts are investigated and circumvention of the fast saturation for small area excitation by scaling of the THz emitter is demonstrated. PMID:21996852

  13. Bioactive peptides from meat muscle and by-products: generation, functionality and application as functional ingredients.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; Hayes, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Bioactive peptides are sequences of between 2-30 amino acids in length that impart a positive health effect to the consumer when ingested. They have been identified from a range of foods, including milk and muscle sources including beef, chicken, pork and marine muscles. The myriad of peptides identified from these sources have known antihypertensive, opioid, antioxidant, antithrombotic and other bioactivities. Indeed, bioactive peptides could play a role in the prevention of diseases associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and mental health diseases. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the bioactive peptides identified in muscle proteins and by-products generated during the processing of meat. The paper looks at the isolation, enrichment and characterisation strategies that have been employed to date to generate bioactive peptides and the potential future applications of these peptides in functional foods for the prevention of heart and mental health problems and obesity.

  14. Altered functional connectivity of the language network in ASD: role of classical language areas and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Verly, Marjolein; Verhoeven, Judith; Zink, Inge; Mantini, Dante; Peeters, Ronald; Deprez, Sabine; Emsell, Louise; Boets, Bart; Noens, Ilse; Steyaert, Jean; Lagae, Lieven; De Cock, Paul; Rommel, Nathalie; Sunaert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The development of language, social interaction and communicative skills is remarkably different in the child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Atypical brain connectivity has frequently been reported in this patient population. However, the neural correlates underlying their disrupted language development and functioning are still poorly understood. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated the functional connectivity properties of the language network in a group of ASD patients with clear comorbid language impairment (ASD-LI; N = 19) and compared them to the language related connectivity properties of 23 age-matched typically developing children. A verb generation task was used to determine language components commonly active in both groups. Eight joint language components were identified and subsequently used as seeds in a resting state analysis. Interestingly, both the interregional and the seed-based whole brain connectivity analysis showed preserved connectivity between the classical intrahemispheric language centers, Wernicke's and Broca's areas. In contrast however, a marked loss of functional connectivity was found between the right cerebellar region and the supratentorial regulatory language areas. Also, the connectivity between the interhemispheric Broca regions and modulatory control dorsolateral prefrontal region was found to be decreased. This disruption of normal modulatory control and automation function by the cerebellum may underlie the abnormal language function in children with ASD-LI.

  15. VennMaster: Area-proportional Euler diagrams for functional GO analysis of microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kestler, Hans A; Müller, André; Kraus, Johann M; Buchholz, Malte; Gress, Thomas M; Liu, Hongfang; Kane, David W; Zeeberg, Barry R; Weinstein, John N

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarray experiments generate vast amounts of data. The functional context of differentially expressed genes can be assessed by querying the Gene Ontology (GO) database via GoMiner. Directed acyclic graph representations, which are used to depict GO categories enriched with differentially expressed genes, are difficult to interpret and, depending on the particular analysis, may not be well suited for formulating new hypotheses. Additional graphical methods are therefore needed to augment the GO graphical representation. Results We present an alternative visualization approach, area-proportional Euler diagrams, showing set relationships with semi-quantitative size information in a single diagram to support biological hypothesis formulation. The cardinalities of sets and intersection sets are represented by area-proportional Euler diagrams and their corresponding graphical (circular or polygonal) intersection areas. Optimally proportional representations are obtained using swarm and evolutionary optimization algorithms. Conclusion VennMaster's area-proportional Euler diagrams effectively structure and visualize the results of a GO analysis by indicating to what extent flagged genes are shared by different categories. In addition to reducing the complexity of the output, the visualizations facilitate generation of novel hypotheses from the analysis of seemingly unrelated categories that share differentially expressed genes. PMID:18230172

  16. Emergent Public Spaces: Generative Activities on Function Interpolation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona, Guadalupe; Dominguez, Angeles; Krause, Gladys; Duran, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    This study highlights ways in which generative activities may be coupled with network-based technologies in the context of teacher preparation to enhance preservice teachers' cognizance of how their own experience as students provides a blueprint for the learning environments they may need to generate in their future classrooms. In this study, the…

  17. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  18. Application of the functionally generated path technique to restore mandibular molars in bilateral group function occlusion.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Nicholas B; Rogers, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    The functionally generated path (FGP) is a static representation of the opposing cusps' dynamic eccentric movements from a centric position to achieve optimal articulation and occlusal harmony. When understood and appreciated, use of the FGP technique is a straightforward and practical method to achieve harmonious occlusal anatomy of restorations with the anterior determinant/anterior guidance, the posterior determinant/condylar guidance, existing occlusal and cuspal anatomy, and the neuromuscular system. Although the FGP technique is normally used in the fabrication of maxillary posterior indirect restorations, it is described and applied here in the fabrication of mandibular posterior restorations that maintained the patient's bilateral group function occlusion while eliminating the nonworking side and protrusive interferences. This novel procedure involved the use of a stone crib to intraorally construct a stone core that captured the FGP recording while simultaneously indexing to the contralateral and ipsilateral mandibular dentition. This technique lends additional stability to the stone core to minimize error during the mounting process.

  19. Accuracy assessment of photogrammetric digital elevation models generated for the Schultz Fire burn area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muise, Danna K.

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of two digital photogrammetric software programs (ERDAS Imagine LPS and PCI Geomatica OrthoEngine) with respect to high-resolution terrain modeling in a complex topographic setting affected by fire and flooding. The site investigated is the 2010 Schultz Fire burn area, situated on the eastern edge of the San Francisco Peaks approximately 10 km northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona. Here, the fire coupled with monsoon rains typical of northern Arizona drastically altered the terrain of the steep mountainous slopes and residential areas below the burn area. To quantify these changes, high resolution (1 m and 3 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) were generated of the burn area using color stereoscopic aerial photographs taken at a scale of approximately 1:12000. Using a combination of pre-marked and post-marked ground control points (GCPs), I first used ERDAS Imagine LPS to generate a 3 m DEM covering 8365 ha of the affected area. This data was then compared to a reference DEM (USGS 10 m) to evaluate the accuracy of the resultant DEM. Findings were then divided into blunders (errors) and bias (slight differences) and further analyzed to determine if different factors (elevation, slope, aspect and burn severity) affected the accuracy of the DEM. Results indicated that both blunders and bias increased with an increase in slope, elevation and burn severity. It was also found that southern facing slopes contained the highest amount of bias while northern facing slopes contained the highest proportion of blunders. Further investigations compared a 1 m DEM generated using ERDAS Imagine LPS with a 1 m DEM generated using PCI Geomatica OrthoEngine for a specific region of the burn area. This area was limited to the overlap of two images due to OrthoEngine requiring at least three GCPs to be located in the overlap of the imagery. Results indicated that although LPS produced a less accurate DEM, it was much more flexible than OrthoEngine. It was also

  20. Solid images generated from UAVs to analyze areas affected by rock falls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordan, Daniele; Manconi, Andrea; Allasia, Paolo; Baldo, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The study of rock fall affected areas is usually based on the recognition of principal joints families and the localization of potential instable sectors. This requires the acquisition of field data, although as the areas are barely accessible and field inspections are often very dangerous. For this reason, remote sensing systems can be considered as suitable alternative. Recently, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have been proposed as platform to acquire the necessary information. Indeed, mini UAVs (in particular in the multi-rotors configuration) provide versatility for the acquisition from different points of view a large number of high resolution optical images, which can be used to generate high resolution digital models relevant to the study area. By considering the recent development of powerful user-friendly software and algorithms to process images acquired from UAVs, there is now a need to establish robust methodologies and best-practice guidelines for correct use of 3D models generated in the context of rock fall scenarios. In this work, we show how multi-rotor UAVs can be used to survey areas by rock fall during real emergency contexts. We present two examples of application located in northwestern Italy: the San Germano rock fall (Piemonte region) and the Moneglia rock fall (Liguria region). We acquired data from both terrestrial LiDAR and UAV, in order to compare digital elevation models generated with different remote sensing approaches. We evaluate the volume of the rock falls, identify the areas potentially unstable, and recognize the main joints families. The use on is not so developed but probably this approach can be considered the better solution for a structural investigation of large rock walls. We propose a methodology that jointly considers the Structure from Motion (SfM) approach for the generation of 3D solid images, and a geotechnical analysis for the identification of joint families and potential failure planes.

  1. Survey of solid waste generation and composition in a rapidly growing urban area in Central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sha'Ato, R; Aboho, S Y; Oketunde, F O; Eneji, I S; Unazi, G; Agwa, S

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to carry out a field survey of the solid waste generation profile in parts of Makurdi, a rapidly growing urban city in north central Nigeria. The areas surveyed covered low, medium and high-density residential quarters, representing high/medium/low income groups in the area. Results of the survey show that the bulk ( approximately 82%) of the solid waste generated in the area originates from households, rather than from commercial, institutional or industrial premises. Of the waste from households, a substantial proportion consists of various putrescible materials (36-57%), with ash, dust and sand (combined) forming another significant proportion (21-41%). From the non-household sources, putrescible matter is also significant (23-45%), as is the combined ash/dust/sand fraction (32-36%). The quantity of plastics/cellophane materials from household and non-household sources was, however, comparable (6-10%). There was more paper from commercial and institutional premises (9-12%) than from household or small/medium scale industrial premises (2-4%). Glass (0.1-6.9%), metals (mostly cans and bottle corks, 0.7-3.4%) and textiles (0.3-6%) form only a minor proportion of the waste across generators. Waste generation rates were for households, 0.54kg/cap/day; for commercial, 0.018kg/m(2)/day; institutional, 0.015kg/m(2)/day while for small and medium scale industries, the rate was 0.47kg/m(2)/day. As there is no previous study of this kind in the Makurdi urban area, what is reported here may be taken as baseline for the entire area. The implications of the findings for solid waste management planning are discussed.

  2. Generating Vegetation Leaf Area Index Earth System Data Record from Multiple Sensors. Part 1; Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Sangram; Schull, Mitchell A.; Samanta, Arindam; Shabanov, Nikolay V.; Milesi, Cristina; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    The generation of multi-decade long Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) from remote sensing measurements of multiple sensors is key to monitoring long-term changes in vegetation due to natural and anthropogenic influences. Challenges in developing such ESDRs include problems in remote sensing science (modeling of variability in global vegetation, scaling, atmospheric correction) and sensor hardware (differences in spatial resolution, spectral bands, calibration, and information content). In this paper, we develop a physically based approach for deriving LAI and FPAR products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data that are of comparable quality to the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI and FPAR products, thus realizing the objective of producing a long (multi-decadal) time series of these products. The approach is based on the radiative transfer theory of canopy spectral invariants which facilitates parameterization of the canopy spectral bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). The methodology permits decoupling of the structural and radiometric components and obeys the energy conservation law. The approach is applicable to any optical sensor, however, it requires selection of sensor-specific values of configurable parameters, namely, the single scattering albedo and data uncertainty. According to the theory of spectral invariants, the single scattering albedo is a function of the spatial scale, and thus, accounts for the variation in BRF with sensor spatial resolution. Likewise, the single scattering albedo accounts for the variation in spectral BRF with sensor bandwidths. The second adjustable parameter is data uncertainty, which accounts for varying information content of the remote sensing measurements, i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, low information content), vs. spectral BRF (higher

  3. Long life electrodes for large-area x-ray generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothe, Dietmar E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention is directed to rugged, reliable, and long-life electrodes for use in large-area, high-current-density electron gun and x-ray generators which are employed as contamination-free preionizers for high-energy pulsed gas lasers. The electron source at the cathode is a corona plasma formed at the interface between a conductor, or semiconductor, and a high-permittivity dielectric. Detailed descriptions are provided of a reliable cold plasma cathode, as well as an efficient liquid-cooled electron beam target (anode) and x-ray generator which concentrates the x-ray flux in the direction of an x-ray window.

  4. Broca’s area network in language function: a pooling-data connectivity study

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Byron; Ardila, Alfredo; Rosselli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Modern neuroimaging developments have demonstrated that cognitive functions correlate with brain networks rather than specific areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of Broca’s area based on language tasks. Methods: A connectivity modeling study was performed by pooling data of Broca’s activation in language tasks. Fifty-seven papers that included 883 subjects in 84 experiments were analyzed. Analysis of Likelihood Estimates of pooled data was utilized to generate the map; thresholds at p < 0.01 were corrected for multiple comparisons and false discovery rate. Resulting images were co-registered into MNI standard space. Results: A network consisting of 16 clusters of activation was obtained. Main clusters were located in the frontal operculum, left posterior temporal region, supplementary motor area, and the parietal lobe. Less common clusters were seen in the sub-cortical structures including the left thalamus, left putamen, secondary visual areas, and the right cerebellum. Conclusion: Broca’s area-44-related networks involved in language processing were demonstrated utilizing a pooling-data connectivity study. Significance, interpretation, and limitations of the results are discussed. PMID:26074842

  5. The functionalization of graphene using electron-beam generated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baraket, M.; Walton, S. G.; Lock, E. H.; Robinson, J. T.; Perkins, F. K.

    2010-06-07

    A plasmas-based, reversible functionalization of graphene is discussed. Using electron-beam produced plasmas, oxygen and fluorine functionalities have been added by changing the processing gas mixtures from Ar/O{sub 2} to Ar/SF{sub 6}, respectively. The reversibility of the functionalization was investigated by annealing the samples. The chemical composition and structural changes were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  7. Interface-Free Area-Scalable Self-Powered Electroluminescent System Driven by Triboelectric Generator

    PubMed Central

    Yan Wei, Xiao; Kuang, Shuang Yang; Yang Li, Hua; Pan, Caofeng; Zhu, Guang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Self-powered system that is interface-free is greatly desired for area-scalable application. Here we report a self-powered electroluminescent system that consists of a triboelectric generator (TEG) and a thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) lamp. The TEG provides high-voltage alternating electric output, which fits in well with the needs of the TFEL lamp. Induced charges pumped onto the lamp by the TEG generate an electric field that is sufficient to excite luminescence without an electrical interface circuit. Through rational serial connection of multiple TFEL lamps, effective and area-scalable luminescence is realized. It is demonstrated that multiple types of TEGs are applicable to the self-powered system, indicating that the system can make use of diverse mechanical sources and thus has potentially broad applications in illumination, display, entertainment, indication, surveillance and many others. PMID:26338365

  8. [The language area of the brain: a functional reassessment].

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Introduccion. Hacia finales del siglo XIX y comienzos del siglo XX, y basandose en observaciones clinicas, se propuso que existe un 'area del lenguaje' en el cerebro que corresponde, en general, a la region perisilviana del hemisferio izquierdo. Tal idea ha continuado existiendo desde entonces. Objetivo. Partiendo de los estudios contemporaneos de imagenes cerebrales, reanalizar la localizacion y extension del area del lenguaje con relacion a las diferentes areas de Brodmann. Materiales y metodos. Utilizando la metodologia conocida como metaanalytic connectivity modeling, se revisan varios estudios metaanaliticos en los cuales se analizan las imagenes de resonancia magnetica funcional durante la realizacion de tareas linguisticas. Resultados. Se encontro que existen dos sistemas linguisticos diferentes en el cerebro: un sistema lexico/semantico, relacionado con el area de Wernicke, y que incluye un area de Wernicke central (reconocimiento de palabras) y un area de Wernicke extendida (asociaciones linguisticas); y un sistema gramatical, dependiente del complejo de Broca (produccion del lenguaje y gramatica), en el lobulo frontal, y que se extiende subcorticalmente. Se propone tambien que la insula desempeña un papel de coordinacion de estos dos sistemas linguisticos cerebrales. Conclusion. Los estudios contemporaneos de neuroimagen sugieren que el area del lenguaje en el cerebro es notoriamente mas amplia de lo que se supuso hace un siglo basandose en observaciones clinicas. Tal como se consideraba durante el siglo XIX, la insula parece desempeñar un papel critico en el lenguaje.

  9. Implementation Alternatives to Analog Graphic Function Generation: Some Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karayanakis, Nicholas M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanization of mathematical functions by means of analog electronics. Five different approaches are described which demonstrate the versatility of the analog technique by using parabolic function, exponential decay technique, projectile trajectory, trigonometry, and piecewise linear approximation techniques. (YP)

  10. Generation of large-area and glow-like surface discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying; Xia, Yang; Bi, Zhenhua; Wang, Xueyang; Qi, Zhihua; Ji, Longfei; Li, Bin; Liu, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    A large-area (6 cm × 6 cm) air surface dielectric barrier discharge has been generated at atmospheric pressure by using well-aligned and micron-sized dielectric tubes with tungsten wire electrodes. Intensified CCD images with an exposure time of 5 ns show that the uniform surface air discharge can be generated during the rising and falling time of pulsed DC voltage. Current and voltage and optical measurements confirm the formation of glow-like air discharges on the surface of micron-sized dielectric tubes. Simulation results indicate that the microelectrode configuration contributes to the formation of strong surface electric field and plays an important role in the generation of uniform surface air discharge.

  11. Generation of Parametric Equivalent-Area Targets for Design of Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood

    2011-01-01

    A tool with an Excel visual interface is developed to generate equivalent-area (A(sub e)) targets that satisfy the volume constraints for a low-boom supersonic configuration. The new parametric Ae target explorer allows users to interactively study the tradeoffs between the aircraft volume constraints and the low-boom characteristics (e.g., loudness) of the ground signature. Moreover, numerical optimization can be used to generate the optimal A(sub e) target for given A(sub e) volume constraints. A case study is used to demonstrate how a generated low-boom Ae target can be matched by a supersonic configuration that includes a fuselage, wing, nacelle, pylon, aft pod, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. The low-boom configuration is verified by sonic-boom analysis with an off-body pressure distribution at three body lengths below the configuration

  12. A functional on-chip pressure generator using solid chemical propellant for disposable lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chien-Chong; Murugesan, Suresh; Kim, Sanghyo; Beaucage, Gregory; Choi, Jin-Woo; Ahn, Chong H

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents a functional on-chip pressure generator that utilizes chemical energy from a solid chemical propellant to perform fluidic delivery in applications of plastic-based disposable biochips or lab-on-a-chip systems. In this functional on-chip pressure generator, azobis-isobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the solid chemical propellant is deposited on a microheater using a screen-printing technique, which can heat the AIBN at 70 degrees C to produce nitrogen gas. The output pressure of nitrogen gas, generated from the solid chemical propellant, is adjustable to a desired pressure by controlling the input power of the heater. Using this chemical energy source, the generated pressure depends on the deposited amount of the solid chemical propellant and the temperature of the microheater. Experimental measurements show that this functional on-chip pressure generator can achieve around 3 000 Pa pressure when 189 mJ of energy is applied to heat the 100 microg of AIBN. This pressure can drive 50 nl of water through a microfluidic channel of 70 mm and cross-sectional area of 100 microm x 50 microm. Due to its compact size, ease of fabrication and integration, high reliability (no moving parts), biologically inert gas output along with functionality of gas generation, this pressure generator will be an excellent pressure source for handling the fluids of disposable lab-on-a-chip, biochemical analysis systems or drug delivery systems.

  13. Investigation of thermal plasma generator of technological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshakov, A. S.; Urbakh, E. K.; Cherednichenko, V. S.; Kuzmin, M. G.; Urbakh, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results on energy characteristics of electric-arc plasma generator for heating technical nitrogen with the power of up to 500 kW are presented. The features of arc discharge glow, thermal efficiency, and service life of the electrodes were determined under the regime of melting the metallurgical raw material in the test plasma electric furnace.

  14. Computer Corner: Spreadsheets, Power Series, Generating Functions, and Integers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    Implements a table algorithm on a spreadsheet program and obtains functions for several number sequences such as the Fibonacci and Catalan numbers. Considers other applications of the table algorithm to integers represented in various number bases. (YP)

  15. Neutron generators with size scalability, ease of fabrication and multiple ion source functionalities

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-11-18

    A neutron generator is provided with a flat, rectilinear geometry and surface mounted metallizations. This construction provides scalability and ease of fabrication, and permits multiple ion source functionalities.

  16. Standardized Pearson type 3 density function area tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A. C.; Helm, F. R.; Sugg, M.

    1971-01-01

    Tables constituting extension of similar tables published in 1936 are presented in report form. Single and triple parameter gamma functions are discussed. Report tables should interest persons concerned with development and use of numerical analysis and evaluation methods.

  17. Rediscovering area CA2: unique properties and functions

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Serena M.; Alexander, Georgia M.; Farris, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA2 has several features that distinguish it from CA1 and CA3, including a unique gene expression profile, failure to display long-term potentiation and relative resistance to cell death. A recent increase in interest in the CA2 region, combined with the development of new methods to define and manipulate its neurons, has led to some exciting new discoveries on the properties of CA2 neurons and their role in behaviour. Here, we review these findings and call attention to the idea that the definition of area CA2 ought to be revised in light of gene expression data. PMID:26806628

  18. Highest weight generating functions for hyperKähler T ⋆( G/H) spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego

    2016-10-01

    We develop an efficient procedure for counting holomorphic functions on a hyperKahler cone that has a resolution as a cotangent bundle of a homogeneous space by providing a formula for computing the corresponding Highest Weight Generating function.

  19. Deficient topological measures and functionals generated by them

    SciTech Connect

    Svistula, Marina G

    2013-05-31

    This paper looks at the properties of deficient topological measures, which are a generalization of topological measures. Integration of a real function that is continuous on a compact set with respect to a deficient topological measure is also investigated. The notions of r- and l-functionals are introduced and an analogue of the Riesz representation theorem is obtained for them. As corollaries, both well-known and new results for quasi-integrals and topological measures are presented (for example, a new version of the definition of a quasi-integral). Bibliography: 16 titles.

  20. Neurotensin in the lateral hypothalamic area: origin and function.

    PubMed

    Allen, G V; Cechetto, D F

    1995-11-01

    The origin of neurotensin in the lateral hypothalamus was investigated by means of fluorescent retrograde tract tracing and neurotensin-like immunoreactivity. Following fluorescent retrograde tract tracing with FluoroGold combined with neurotensin immunohistochemistry in the rat brain, numerous neurotensin-immunoreactive neurons with projections to the posterior lateral hypothalamic area were identified in the central nucleus of the amygdala, perifornical area and the parabrachial nucleus. Fewer numbers of neurotensin-positive neurons with projections to the lateral hypothalamic area were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptic area, peri- and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, anterior lateral hypothalamic area and dorsal raphe nucleus. In addition, the role of neurotensin in the modulation of autonomic regulatory input from the insula was investigated. The lateral hypothalamic area was surveyed for single units responding to electrical stimulation (500-900 microA, 0.5 Hz) of sites in the insular cortex from which cardiovascular pressor or depressor responses could be elicited. These units were tested for the influence of neurotensin on responses to stimulation of the insular cortex. Of 60 spontaneously firing neurons, 27 units responded to electrical stimulation of cardiovascular sites in the insula. Of the units responding to stimulation of cardiovascular sites in the insula, 14 units showed excitation only, 10 units showed excitation followed by inhibition and three units showed inhibition. Iontophoresis of 0.1-1.0 mM neurotensin (25-100 nA, pH 5.0-6.0) potentiated six of the excitatory responses and showed no effect on the inhibitory responses. In addition, nine neurons showed an increase in spontaneous activity with iontophoresis of neurotensin. Of these neurons, three were excited by insular stimulation and six did not respond. These findings indicate the likely origin of neurotensin in the

  1. Large-area functionalized CVD graphene for work function matched transparent electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Bointon, Thomas H.; Jones, Gareth F.; De Sanctis, Adolfo; Hill-Pearce, Ruth; Craciun, Monica F.; Russo, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of flexible photovoltaic and organic light emitting devices is heavily dependent on the availability of flexible and transparent conductors with at least a similar workfunction to that of Indium Tin Oxide. Here we present the first study of the work function of large area (up to 9 cm2) FeCl3 intercalated graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on Nickel, and demonstrate values as large as 5.1 eV. Upon intercalation, a charge density per graphene layer of 5 ⋅ 1013 ± 5 ⋅ 1012 cm−2 is attained, making this material an attractive platform for the study of plasmonic excitations in the infrared wavelength spectrum of interest to the telecommunication industry. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of this material for flexible electronics in a transparent circuit on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate. PMID:26548711

  2. 23 CFR 470.105 - Urban area boundaries and highway functional classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urban area boundaries and highway functional... PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems § 470.105 Urban area boundaries and highway functional classification. (a) Urban area boundaries. Routes on the Federal-aid highway...

  3. Nonanalytic function generation routines for 16-bit microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, J. F.; Shaufl, M.

    1980-01-01

    Interpolation techniques for three types (univariate, bivariate, and map) of nonanalytic functions are described. These interpolation techniques are then implemented in scaled fraction arithmetic on a representative 16 bit microprocessor. A FORTRAN program is described that facilitates the scaling, documentation, and organization of data for use by these routines. Listings of all these programs are included in an appendix.

  4. Functional Requirements for the Next Generation of Mass Notification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumbo, Berkly

    2012-01-01

    While the latest update to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) redefines mass notification as "emergency communications systems" (ECS), the end user community is formulating expectations related to the future functionality of today's alerting solutions. Numerous best practices have surfaced since alerting technology began its rapid,…

  5. Generating Accurate Urban Area Maps from Nighttime Satellite (DMSP/OLS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc; Lawrence, William; Elvidge, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest by the international research community to use the nighttime acquired "city-lights" data sets collected by the US Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan system to study issues relative to urbanization. Many researchers are interested in using these data to estimate human demographic parameters over large areas and then characterize the interactions between urban development , natural ecosystems, and other aspects of the human enterprise. Many of these attempts rely on an ability to accurately identify urbanized area. However, beyond the simple determination of the loci of human activity, using these data to generate accurate estimates of urbanized area can be problematic. Sensor blooming and registration error can cause large overestimates of urban land based on a simple measure of lit area from the raw data. We discuss these issues, show results of an attempt to do a historical urban growth model in Egypt, and then describe a few basic processing techniques that use geo-spatial analysis to threshold the DMSP data to accurately estimate urbanized areas. Algorithm results are shown for the United States and an application to use the data to estimate the impact of urban sprawl on sustainable agriculture in the US and China is described.

  6. Design and implementation of timing generator of frame transfer area-array CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-kang; Chen, Xin-hua; Zhou, Wang; Shen, Wei-min

    2008-03-01

    Frame transfer area-array CCD camera is the perfect solution for high-end real-time medical, scientific and industrial applications because it has characteristics of high fill factor, low dark current, high resolving power, high sensitivity, high linear dynamic range and electronic shutter capability. Time sequences of frame transfer area-array CCD camera have two compact segments: CCD driving sequences and CCD signal processing sequences. Proper working of CCD sensor lies on good driving sequences while accurate CCD signal processing sequences ensures high quality of CCD image. The relationship among CCD camera time sequences is complex and precise. The conventional methods are uneasy to implement time sequences of Frame transfer area-array CCD. Embedded designing method is introduced in this paper and field programmable gate array device is chosen as the hardware design platform. Phase-locked loops are used for precise phase shifting and embedded logic analyzer for waveform verification. CCD driving clocks, electronic shutter signal, A/D and black pixels clamp clocks and double correlation sampling clocks have been attained on the hardware platform and this timing generator can control exposure time flexibly. High quality images have been acquired through using this timing generator on the CCD circuit system board which has been designed by our team.

  7. Generation of functional hepatic cells from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songyan; Bourdon, Alice; Hamou, Wissam; Dziedzic, Noelle; Goldman, Orit; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Liver diseases affect millions of people worldwide, especially in developing country. According to the American Liver Foundation, nearly 1 in every 10 Americans suffers from some form of liver disease. Even though, the liver has great ability to self-repair, in end-stage liver diseases including fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer induced by viral hepatitis and drugs, the liver regenerative capacity is exhausted. The only successful treatment for chronic liver failure is the whole liver transplantation. More recently, some clinical trials using hepatocyte transplantation have shown some clinical improvement for metabolic liver diseases and acute liver failure. However, the shortage of donor livers remains a life-threatening challenge in liver disease patients. To overcome the scarcity of donor livers, hepatocytes generated from embryonic stem cell or induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation cultures could provide an unlimited supply of such cells for transplantation. This review provides an updated summary of hepatic differentiation protocols published so far, with a characterization of the hepatic cells generated in vitro and their ability to regenerate damaged livers in vivo following transplantation in pre-clinical liver deficient mouse models. PMID:25364624

  8. The Interfacial-Area-Based Relative Permeability Function

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Khaleel, Raziuddin

    2009-09-25

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the services of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical support for the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) activity within the Soil & Groundwater Remediation Project. A portion of the support provided in FY2009, was to extend the soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using an alternative approach. This alternative approach incorporates the Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980), and a modified van Genuchten water-retention models into the interfacial-area-based relative permeability model presented by Embid (1997). The general performance of the incorporated models is shown using typical hydraulic parameters. The relative permeability models for the wetting phase were further examined using data from literature. Results indicate that the interfacial-area-based model can describe the relative permeability of the wetting phase reasonably well.

  9. Nano-hetero functional materials for photocatalytic hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongying, Pornthip

    This dissertation focuses on designing nanomaterials and investigating their photocatalytic response for H2 generation. Hydrogen has gained a lot of attention as a new source of sustainable energy. It can be used to directly generate power in fuel cells and to produce liquid fuels such as methanol. Water splitting is an ideal (clean) way of producing H2 because it uses water and sunlight, two renewable resources. To explore the use of nanostructures and particularly nanostructure heterojunctions for photocatalytic H2 generation, four different systems have been synthesized: (i) CdSe nanowires (NWs), (ii) CdSe/CdS core/shell NWs, (iii) CdSe NWs decorated with Au or Pt nanoparticles, and (iv) CdSe/CdS NWs decorated with Au or Pt nanoparticles. This is motivated by (a) the fact that CdSe NWs absorb light from the UV to the near infrared (b) the NW morphology simultaneously enables us to explore the role of nanoscale dimensionality in photocatalytic processes (c) a CdS coating can enhance photogenerated carrier lifetimes, and (d) metal nanoparticles are catalytically active and can also enhance charge separation efficiencies. Charge separation and charge transfer across interfaces are key aspects in the design of efficient photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. Femtosecond transient differential absorption (TDA) spectroscopy has been used as a tool to reveal how semiconductor/semiconductor and metal/semiconductor heterojunctions affect the charge separation and hydrogen generation efficiencies of these hybrid photocatalysts. The use of this technique in concert with hydrogen evolution tests also reveal how CdS, CdSe and metal NP interact within metal NP decorated CdSe and CdSe/CdS NWs during photocatalytic hydrogen generation reactions. Electron transfer events across both semiconductor/semiconductor and metal/semiconductor heterojunctions are followed to identify where H 2 is evolved and the role each heterojunction plays in determining a system's overall

  10. Boundary emphasis transfer function generation based on HSL color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Wu, Jianhuang; Luo, Shengzhou; Ma, Xin

    2011-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been received much attention since it need not to extract geometric primitives for visualization and its performance is generally better than surface rendering. Transfer functions, which are used for mapping scalar field to optical properties, are of vital importance in obtaining a sensible rendering result from volume data. Though traditional color transfer functions are in RGB color space, HSL color space that conveys semantic meanings is more intuitive and user-friendly. In this paper, we present a novel approach aims to emphasize and distinguish strong boundaries between different materials. We achieve it by using data value, gradient magnitude and dimension of the volumetric data to set opacity. Then, through a linear map from data value, gradient magnitude and second derivative to hue, saturation and lightness respectively, a color transfer function is obtained in HSL color space. Experimental tests on real-world datasets indicate that our method could achieve desirable rendering results with revealing important boundaries between different structures and indicating data value's distribution in the volume by using different colors.

  11. Interspecies activity correlations reveal functional correspondence between monkey and human brain areas.

    PubMed

    Mantini, Dante; Hasson, Uri; Betti, Viviana; Perrucci, Mauro G; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio; Orban, Guy A; Vanduffel, Wim

    2012-02-05

    Evolution-driven functional changes in the primate brain are typically assessed by aligning monkey and human activation maps using cortical surface expansion models. These models use putative homologous areas as registration landmarks, assuming they are functionally correspondent. For cases in which functional changes have occurred in an area, this assumption prohibits to reveal whether other areas may have assumed lost functions. Here we describe a method to examine functional correspondences across species. Without making spatial assumptions, we assessed similarities in sensory-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging responses between monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human brain areas by temporal correlation. Using natural vision data, we revealed regions for which functional processing has shifted to topologically divergent locations during evolution. We conclude that substantial evolution-driven functional reorganizations have occurred, not always consistent with cortical expansion processes. This framework for evaluating changes in functional architecture is crucial to building more accurate evolutionary models.

  12. Generating functions and multiplicity formulas: The case of rank two simple Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Núñez, José; García Fuertes, Wifredo; Perelomov, Askold M.

    2015-09-01

    A procedure is described that makes use of the generating function of characters to obtain a new generating function H giving the multiplicities of each weight in all the representations of a simple Lie algebra. The way to extract from H explicit multiplicity formulas for particular weights is explained and the results corresponding to rank two simple Lie algebras are shown.

  13. Native Generations: A campaign addressing infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Rutman, Shira; Loughran, Julie; Tanner, Leah; Randall, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality (IM) among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in urban areas. Campaign development included reviews of literature and previous campaigns, an advisory council, and focus groups. Campaign messages are strength-based, encouraging AI/AN caregivers to utilize available Native-specific resources, including health care, support services, and programming as IM protective factors. The primary campaign material is an 11-minute video. Pilot survey data indicate the video may help increase awareness of IM and Native-specific resources, and increase connection to Native identity, culture, and community.

  14. Native Generations: A campaign addressing infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Rutman, Shira; Loughran, Julie; Tanner, Leah; Randall, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality (IM) among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in urban areas. Campaign development included reviews of literature and previous campaigns, an advisory council, and focus groups. Campaign messages are strength-based, encouraging AI/AN caregivers to utilize available Native-specific resources, including health care, support services, and programming as IM protective factors. The primary campaign material is an 11-minute video. Pilot survey data indicate the video may help increase awareness of IM and Native-specific resources, and increase connection to Native identity, culture, and community. PMID:27668594

  15. Comparison of functional MRI image realignment tools using a computer-generated phantom.

    PubMed

    Morgan, V L; Pickens, D R; Hartmann, S L; Price, R R

    2001-09-01

    This study discusses the development of a computer-generated phantom to compare the effects of image realignment programs on functional MRI (fMRI) pixel activation. The phantom is a whole-head MRI volume with added random noise, activation, and motion. It allows simulation of realistic head motions with controlled areas of activation. Without motion, the phantom shows the effects of realignment on motion-free data sets. Prior to realignment, the phantom illustrates some activation corruption due to motion. Finally, three widely used realignment packages are examined. The results showed that the most accurate algorithms are able to increase specificity through accurate realignment while maintaining sensitivity through effective resampling techniques. In fact, accurate realignment alone is not a powerful indicator of the most effective algorithm in terms of true activation.

  16. Floating-point function generation routines for 16-bit microcomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, M. A.; Soeder, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Several computer subroutines have been developed that interpolate three types of nonanalytic functions: univariate, bivariate, and map. The routines use data in floating-point form. However, because they are written for use on a 16-bit Intel 8086 system with an 8087 mathematical coprocessor, they execute as fast as routines using data in scaled integer form. Although all of the routines are written in assembly language, they have been implemented in a modular fashion so as to facilitate their use with high-level languages.

  17. Source segregation of food waste in office areas: Factors affecting waste generation rates and quality.

    PubMed

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Boldrin, Alessio; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-12-01

    Existing legislation mandates that the amount of waste being recycled should be increased. Among others, in its Resource Strategy Plan, the Danish Government decided that at least 60% of food waste generated by the service sector, including in office areas, should be source-sorted and collected separately by 2018. To assess the achievability of these targets, source-sorted food waste and residual waste from office areas was collected and weighed on a daily basis during 133 working days. Waste composition analyses were conducted every week to investigate the efficiency of the source-sorting campaign and the purity of the source-sorted food waste. The moisture content of source-sorted food waste and residual waste fractions, and potential methane production from source-sorted food waste, was also investigated. Food waste generation equated to 23 ± 5 kg/employee/year, of which 20 ± 5 kg/employee/year was source-sorted, with a considerably high purity of 99%. Residual waste amounted to 10 ± 5 kg/employee/year and consisted mainly of paper (29 ± 13%), plastic (23 ± 9%) and missorted food waste (24 ± 16%). The moisture content of source-sorted food waste was significantly higher (8%) than missorted food waste, and the methane potential of source-sorted food waste was 463 ± 42 mL CH4/g VS. These results show that food waste in office areas offers promising potential for relatively easily collectable and pure source-sorted food waste, suggesting that recycling targets for food waste could be achieved with reasonable logistical ease in office areas.

  18. Source segregation of food waste in office areas: Factors affecting waste generation rates and quality.

    PubMed

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Boldrin, Alessio; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-12-01

    Existing legislation mandates that the amount of waste being recycled should be increased. Among others, in its Resource Strategy Plan, the Danish Government decided that at least 60% of food waste generated by the service sector, including in office areas, should be source-sorted and collected separately by 2018. To assess the achievability of these targets, source-sorted food waste and residual waste from office areas was collected and weighed on a daily basis during 133 working days. Waste composition analyses were conducted every week to investigate the efficiency of the source-sorting campaign and the purity of the source-sorted food waste. The moisture content of source-sorted food waste and residual waste fractions, and potential methane production from source-sorted food waste, was also investigated. Food waste generation equated to 23 ± 5 kg/employee/year, of which 20 ± 5 kg/employee/year was source-sorted, with a considerably high purity of 99%. Residual waste amounted to 10 ± 5 kg/employee/year and consisted mainly of paper (29 ± 13%), plastic (23 ± 9%) and missorted food waste (24 ± 16%). The moisture content of source-sorted food waste was significantly higher (8%) than missorted food waste, and the methane potential of source-sorted food waste was 463 ± 42 mL CH4/g VS. These results show that food waste in office areas offers promising potential for relatively easily collectable and pure source-sorted food waste, suggesting that recycling targets for food waste could be achieved with reasonable logistical ease in office areas. PMID:26260965

  19. Estimation of municipal solid waste generation and landfill area in Asian developing countries.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Anupam; Yamamoto, Yugo; Morioka, Tohru

    2010-09-01

    In developing Asian countries, the municipal cooperations are unable to handle the increasing amount of municipal solid waste, which into the uncollected waste being spread on roads and in other public areas leading to tremendous pollution and destruction of land and negative impact on human health. Generation of municipal solid waste increases with the rapid urbanization and accelerated economic development with in the rapidly growing advanced technological societies. The nature of municipal solid waste is a term usually applied to a heterogeneous collection group of waste produced in urban areas, the nature of which varies from region to region. The common problem faced by all developing Asian countries, is the disposal of municipal solid waste and availability of land fill site area. Present study explains the correlation analysis of among different factors of municipal solid waste and the objective is to assess the future municipal solid waste stream in Asian developing countries. The other goal of this study was to calculate the future land area that would be required for landfill site disposal in Asian developing countries. PMID:21387916

  20. Estimation of municipal solid waste generation and landfill area in Asian developing countries.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Anupam; Yamamoto, Yugo; Morioka, Tohru

    2010-09-01

    In developing Asian countries, the municipal cooperations are unable to handle the increasing amount of municipal solid waste, which into the uncollected waste being spread on roads and in other public areas leading to tremendous pollution and destruction of land and negative impact on human health. Generation of municipal solid waste increases with the rapid urbanization and accelerated economic development with in the rapidly growing advanced technological societies. The nature of municipal solid waste is a term usually applied to a heterogeneous collection group of waste produced in urban areas, the nature of which varies from region to region. The common problem faced by all developing Asian countries, is the disposal of municipal solid waste and availability of land fill site area. Present study explains the correlation analysis of among different factors of municipal solid waste and the objective is to assess the future municipal solid waste stream in Asian developing countries. The other goal of this study was to calculate the future land area that would be required for landfill site disposal in Asian developing countries.

  1. Functional properties of ultrasonically generated flaxseed oil-dairy emulsions.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Akalya; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on the functional properties of 7% flaxseed oil/milk emulsion obtained by sonication (OM) using 20 kHz ultrasound (US) at 176 W for 1-8 min in two different delivery formulae, viz., ready-to-drink (RTD) and lactic acid gel. The RTD emulsions showed no change in viscosity after sonication for up to 8 min followed by storage up to a minimum of 9 days at 4±2 °C. Similarly, the oxidative stability of the RTD emulsion was studied by measuring the conjugated diene hydroperoxides (CD). The CD was unaffected after 8 min of ultrasonic processing. The safety aspect of US processing was evaluated by measuring the formation of CD at different power levels. The functional properties of OM gels were evaluated by small and large scale deformation studies. The sonication process improved the gelation characteristics, viz., decreased gelation time, increased elastic nature, decreased syneresis and increased gel strength. The presence of finer sono-emulsified oil globules, stabilized by partially denatured whey proteins, contributed to the improvements in the gel structure in comparison to sonicated and unsonicated pasteurized homogenized skim milk (PHSM) gels. A sono-emulsification process of 5 min followed by gelation for about 11 min can produce gels of highest textural attibutes.

  2. Functional properties of ultrasonically generated flaxseed oil-dairy emulsions.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Akalya; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on the functional properties of 7% flaxseed oil/milk emulsion obtained by sonication (OM) using 20 kHz ultrasound (US) at 176 W for 1-8 min in two different delivery formulae, viz., ready-to-drink (RTD) and lactic acid gel. The RTD emulsions showed no change in viscosity after sonication for up to 8 min followed by storage up to a minimum of 9 days at 4±2 °C. Similarly, the oxidative stability of the RTD emulsion was studied by measuring the conjugated diene hydroperoxides (CD). The CD was unaffected after 8 min of ultrasonic processing. The safety aspect of US processing was evaluated by measuring the formation of CD at different power levels. The functional properties of OM gels were evaluated by small and large scale deformation studies. The sonication process improved the gelation characteristics, viz., decreased gelation time, increased elastic nature, decreased syneresis and increased gel strength. The presence of finer sono-emulsified oil globules, stabilized by partially denatured whey proteins, contributed to the improvements in the gel structure in comparison to sonicated and unsonicated pasteurized homogenized skim milk (PHSM) gels. A sono-emulsification process of 5 min followed by gelation for about 11 min can produce gels of highest textural attibutes. PMID:24713146

  3. Functional breadth and home-field advantage generate functional differences among soil microbial decomposers.

    PubMed

    Fanin, Nicolas; Fromin, Nathalie; Bertrand, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    In addition to the effect of litter quality (LQ) on decomposition, increasing evidence is demonstrating that carbon mineralization can be influenced by the past resource history, mainly through following two processes: (1) decomposer communities from recalcitrant litter environments may have a wider functional ability to decompose a wide range of litter species than those originating from richer environments, i.e., the functional breadth (FB) hypothesis; and/or (2) decomposer communities may be specialized towards the litter they most frequently encounter, i.e., the home-field advantage (HFA) hypothesis. Nevertheless, the functional dissimilarities among contrasting microbial communities, which are generated by the FB and the HFA, have rarely been simultaneously quantified in the same experiment, and their relative contributions over time have never been assessed. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a reciprocal transplant decomposition experiment under controlled conditions using litter and soil originating from four ecosystems along a land-use gradient (forest, plantation, grassland, and cropland) and one additional treatment using 13C-labelled flax litter allowing us to assess the priming effect (PE) in each ecosystem. We found substantial effects of LQ on carbon mineralization (more than two-thirds of the explained variance), whereas the contribution of the soil type was fairly low (less than one-tenth), suggesting that the contrasting soil microbial communities play only a minor role in regulating decomposition rates. Although the results on PE showed that we overestimated litter-derived CO2 fluxes, litter-microbe interactions contributed significantly to the unexplained variance observed in carbon mineralization models. The magnitudes of FB and HFA were relatively similar, but the directions of these mechanisms were sometimes opposite depending on the litter and soil types. FB and HFA estimates calculated on parietal sugar mass loss were positively

  4. Next generation sequencing in predicting gene function in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Joaquim V; Kim, Kye-Won; Lee, Choonseok; Costa, Michael A; May, Gregory D; Crow, John A; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2013-01-01

    Podophyllum species are sources of (-)-podophyllotoxin, an aryltetralin lignan used for semi-synthesis of various powerful and extensively employed cancer-treating drugs. Its biosynthetic pathway, however, remains largely unknown, with the last unequivocally demonstrated intermediate being (-)-matairesinol. Herein, massively parallel sequencing of Podophyllum hexandrum and Podophyllum peltatum transcriptomes and subsequent bioinformatics analyses of the corresponding assemblies were carried out. Validation of the assembly process was first achieved through confirmation of assembled sequences with those of various genes previously established as involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis as well as other candidate biosynthetic pathway genes. This contribution describes characterization of two of the latter, namely the cytochrome P450s, CYP719A23 from P. hexandrum and CYP719A24 from P. peltatum. Both enzymes were capable of converting (-)-matairesinol into (-)-pluviatolide by catalyzing methylenedioxy bridge formation and did not act on other possible substrates tested. Interestingly, the enzymes described herein were highly similar to methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes from alkaloid biosynthesis, whereas candidates more similar to lignan biosynthetic enzymes were catalytically inactive with the substrates employed. This overall strategy has thus enabled facile further identification of enzymes putatively involved in (-)-podophyllotoxin biosynthesis and underscores the deductive power of next generation sequencing and bioinformatics to probe and deduce medicinal plant biosynthetic pathways.

  5. Next Generation Sequencing in Predicting Gene Function in Podophyllotoxin Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Joaquim V.; Kim, Kye-Won; Lee, Choonseok; Costa, Michael A.; May, Gregory D.; Crow, John A.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2013-01-01

    Podophyllum species are sources of (−)-podophyllotoxin, an aryltetralin lignan used for semi-synthesis of various powerful and extensively employed cancer-treating drugs. Its biosynthetic pathway, however, remains largely unknown, with the last unequivocally demonstrated intermediate being (−)-matairesinol. Herein, massively parallel sequencing of Podophyllum hexandrum and Podophyllum peltatum transcriptomes and subsequent bioinformatics analyses of the corresponding assemblies were carried out. Validation of the assembly process was first achieved through confirmation of assembled sequences with those of various genes previously established as involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis as well as other candidate biosynthetic pathway genes. This contribution describes characterization of two of the latter, namely the cytochrome P450s, CYP719A23 from P. hexandrum and CYP719A24 from P. peltatum. Both enzymes were capable of converting (−)-matairesinol into (−)-pluviatolide by catalyzing methylenedioxy bridge formation and did not act on other possible substrates tested. Interestingly, the enzymes described herein were highly similar to methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes from alkaloid biosynthesis, whereas candidates more similar to lignan biosynthetic enzymes were catalytically inactive with the substrates employed. This overall strategy has thus enabled facile further identification of enzymes putatively involved in (−)-podophyllotoxin biosynthesis and underscores the deductive power of next generation sequencing and bioinformatics to probe and deduce medicinal plant biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23161544

  6. Generation of functional structures by laser pyrolysis of polysilazane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Hans-Joachim; Otto, Andreas

    2002-06-01

    The pyrolysis of polysilazanes by laser power represents an innovative technique for the generation of ceramic-like coatings and structures. The dissolved polysilazanes can be easily applied by painting techniques such as dipping or spraying. In the following pyrolysis the polysilazane layer transforms into an amorphous ceramic-like coating. The laser power is absorbed in the precursor layer, which leads to the latter's ceramization without damaging the substrate by thermal load. While plane laser pyrolysis creates a protective coating, selective pyrolysis creates a raised and adherent ceramic-like structure that remains after the unexposed polymer layer has been removed. The flexibility of a writing laser system in conjunction with a suitable handling system makes it possible to inscribe any kind of 2D structure on nearly any complexly shaped part. Some of the chemical, magnetic, and electrical structure properties can be adjusted by the pyrolysis parameters and special types of filler particles. Especially the possibility to control electric conductivity should make it possible to create structure dielectric films or planar resistors, inductors or capacitors, which are basically written on the surface of the part. Because of their ceramic nature of the structures are resistant against high temperatures and corrosive media. Thus, this new additive structuring technique could finally strike a new path in creating corrosion resistant high- temperature sensors and control systems.

  7. Functional viral metagenomics and the next generation of molecular tools

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Thomas; Liles, Mark; Wommack, K. Eric; Polson, Shawn W.; Godiska, Ronald; Mead, David

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes of bacteriophages and other viruses have been essential research tools since the first days of molecular biology. However, the current repertoire of viral enzymes only hints at their overall potential. The most commonly used enzymes are derived from a surprisingly small number of cultivated viruses, which is remarkable considering the extreme abundance and diversity of viruses revealed over the past decade by metagenomic analysis. To access the treasure trove of enzymes hidden in the global virosphere and develop them for research, therapeutic and diagnostic uses, improvements are needed in our ability to rapidly and efficiently discover, express and characterize viral genes to produce useful proteins. We discuss improvements to sampling and cloning methods, functional and genomics-based screens and expression systems that should accelerate discovery of new enzymes and other viral proteins for use in research and medicine. PMID:19896852

  8. The impact of runoff generation mechanisms on the location of critical source areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyon, S.W.; McHale, M.R.; Walter, M.T.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Identifying phosphorus (P) source areas and transport pathways is a key step in decreasing P loading to natural water systems. This study compared the effects of two modeled runoff generation processes - saturation excess and infiltration excess - on total phosphorus (TP) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations in 10 catchment streams of a Catskill mountain watershed in southeastern New York. The spatial distribution of runoff from forested land and agricultural land was generated for both runoff processes; results of both distributions were consistent with Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) theory. These spatial runoff distributions were then used to simulate stream concentrations of TP and SRP through a simple equation derived from an observed relation between P concentration and land use; empirical results indicate that TP and SRP concentrations increased with increasing percentage of agricultural land. Simulated TP and SRP stream concentrations predicted for the 10 catchments were strongly affected by the assumed runoff mechanism. The modeled TP and SRP concentrations produced by saturation excess distribution averaged 31 percent higher and 42 percent higher, respectively, than those produced by the infiltration excess distribution. Misrepresenting the primary runoff mechanism could not only produce erroneous concentrations, it could fail to correctly locate critical source areas for implementation of best management practices. Thus, identification of the primary runoff mechanism is critical in selection of appropriate models in the mitigation of nonpoint source pollution. Correct representation of runoff processes is also critical in the future development of biogeochemical transport models, especially those that address nutrient fluxes.

  9. Second harmonic generation imaging microscopy of cellular structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Andrew C.; Jin, Lei; Loew, Leslie M.

    2005-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy is an important emerging technique for biological research, with many advantages over existing one- or two-photon fluorescence techniques. A non-linear phenomenon employing mode-locked Ti:sapphire or fiber-based lasers, SHG results in intrinsic optical sectioning without the need for a confocal aperture. Furthermore, as a second-order process SHG is confined to loci lacking a center of symmetry. Many important structural proteins such as collagen and cellulose show intrinsic SHG, thus providing access to sub-resolution information on symmetry. However, we are particularly interested here in "resonance-enhanced" SHG from styryl dyes. In general SHG is a combination of a true second-order process and a third-order process dependent on a static electric field, such that SHG from membrane-bound dyes depends on a cell's trans-membrane potential. With simultaneous patch-clamping and non-linear imaging of cells, we have found that SHG is a sensitive probe of trans-membrane potential with sensitivities that are up to four times better than those obtained under optimal conditions using one-photon fluorescence imaging. With the sensitivity of SHG to local electric fields from other sources such as the membrane dipole potential as well as the quadratic dependence of SHG on concentration, we have found that SHG imaging of styryl dyes is also a powerful technique for the investigation of lipid phases and rafts and for the visualization of the dynamics of membrane-vesicle fusion following fertilization of an ovum.

  10. Drainage Area-Dependent Knickpoint Generation Mechanisms, Smith River, northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, D. J.; Kelsey, H. M.

    2011-12-01

    Knickpoints and knickzones (reaches of relatively high gradient located immediately downstream of a knickpoint) are a prominent characteristic of the channel slopes of both mainstem and tributary channels of the 1,575 km2 Smith River drainage in northern California. We have investigated these knickpoints using aerial photos, 10 m and 1 m digital elevation models (DEM's), and NAIP images supplemented by Schmidt hammer rock strength measurements and field verification of channel and terrace elevations using real time kinematic GPS surveys. Two types of knickpoints occur. At higher drainage areas (threshold of greater than ~250 km2), knickpoints occur within rock types with no significant difference in rock strength. There is a distinct upstream convergence of the modern channel with the lowest elevated strath surface along these knickzones, resulting in elevated strath surfaces downstream of the knickzones. We infer that the knickpoints are transient and that the straths are more vertically separated from the modern channel only after the knickpoint has migrated upstream. The causative baselevel fall that generates migrating knickpoints in the Smith River may be eustatic sea level fall following Quaternary highstands. For instance, fluvial terraces are cut into stage 5 marine terraces at the coast and these fluvial terraces likely are generated in the wake of knickpoints migrating upstream. In contrast, at drainage areas less than ~250 km2, the only knickpoints present in channels are those associated with large landslides that mobilize entire hillslopes into the channel, forcing a channel response. Notably absent along the Smith River are any knickpoints associated with changes in rock strength, as measured by Schmidt hammer values. From these observations, we infer that, first, major knickpoints along channels above a threshold drainage area of about 250 km2 are generated by baselevel fall that propagates upstream through channels of varying rock type; and second

  11. Generation of 2D Land Cover Maps for Urban Areas Using Decision Tree Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2014-09-01

    A 2D land cover map can automatically and efficiently be generated from high-resolution multispectral aerial images. First, a digital surface model is produced and each cell of the elevation model is then supplemented with attributes. A decision tree classification is applied to extract map objects like buildings, roads, grassland, trees, hedges, and walls from such an "intelligent" point cloud. The decision tree is derived from training areas which borders are digitized on top of a false-colour orthoimage. The produced 2D land cover map with six classes is then subsequently refined by using image analysis techniques. The proposed methodology is described step by step. The classification, assessment, and refinement is carried out by the open source software "R"; the generation of the dense and accurate digital surface model by the "Match-T DSM" program of the Trimble Company. A practical example of a 2D land cover map generation is carried out. Images of a multispectral medium-format aerial camera covering an urban area in Switzerland are used. The assessment of the produced land cover map is based on class-wise stratified sampling where reference values of samples are determined by means of stereo-observations of false-colour stereopairs. The stratified statistical assessment of the produced land cover map with six classes and based on 91 points per class reveals a high thematic accuracy for classes "building" (99 %, 95 % CI: 95 %-100 %) and "road and parking lot" (90 %, 95 % CI: 83 %-95 %). Some other accuracy measures (overall accuracy, kappa value) and their 95 % confidence intervals are derived as well. The proposed methodology has a high potential for automation and fast processing and may be applied to other scenes and sensors.

  12. Generation of the relationship between glacier area and volume for a tropical glacier in Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Kinouchi, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Tsuda, M.; Iwami, Y.; Asaoka, Y.; Mendoza, J.

    2015-12-01

    In Andes, retreat of tropical glaciers is rapid, thus water resources currently available from glacierized catchments would be changed in its volume and temporal variations due to climate change and glacier shrinkage. The relationship between glacier area and volume is difficult to define however which is important to monitor glaciers especially those are remote or inaccessible. Water resources in La Paz and El Alto in Bolivia, strongly depend on the runoff from glacierized headwater catchments in the Cordillera Real, Andes, which is therefore selected as our study region.To predict annual glacier mass balances, PWRI-Distributed Hydrological Model (PWRI-DHM) was applied to simulate runoff from the partially glacierized catchments in high mountains (i.e. Condoriri-Huayna West headwater catchment located in the Cordillera Real, Bolivian Andes). PWRI-DHM is based on tank model concept in a distributed and 4-tank configuration including surface, unsaturated, aquifer, and river course tanks. The model was calibrated and validated with observed meteorological and hydrological data from 2011 to 2014 by considering different phases of precipitation, various runoff components from glacierized and non-glacierized areas, and the retarding effect by glacial lakes and wetlands. The model is then applied with MRI-AGCM outputs from 1987 to 2003 considering the shrinkage of glacier outlines since 1980s derived from Landsat data. Annual glacier mass balance in each 100m-grid was reproduced, with which the glacier area-volume relationship was generated with reasonable initial volume setting. Out study established a method to define the relationship between glacier area and volume by remote sensing information and glacier mass balances simulated by distributed hydrological model. Our results demonstrated that the changing trend of local glacier had a consistency the previous observed glacier area-volume relationship in the Cordillera Real.

  13. New generation of hydraulic pedotransfer functions for Europe

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, B; Weynants, M; Nemes, A; Makó, A; Bilas, G; Tóth, G

    2015-01-01

    A range of continental-scale soil datasets exists in Europe with different spatial representation and based on different principles. We developed comprehensive pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for applications principally on spatial datasets with continental coverage. The PTF development included the prediction of soil water retention at various matric potentials and prediction of parameters to characterize soil moisture retention and the hydraulic conductivity curve (MRC and HCC) of European soils. We developed PTFs with a hierarchical approach, determined by the input requirements. The PTFs were derived by using three statistical methods: (i) linear regression where there were quantitative input variables, (ii) a regression tree for qualitative, quantitative and mixed types of information and (iii) mean statistics of developer-defined soil groups (class PTF) when only qualitative input parameters were available. Data of the recently established European Hydropedological Data Inventory (EU-HYDI), which holds the most comprehensive geographical and thematic coverage of hydro-pedological data in Europe, were used to train and test the PTFs. The applied modelling techniques and the EU-HYDI allowed the development of hydraulic PTFs that are more reliable and applicable for a greater variety of input parameters than those previously available for Europe. Therefore the new set of PTFs offers tailored advanced tools for a wide range of applications in the continent. PMID:25866465

  14. Comparing the effects of the second-and third-generation oral contraceptives on sexual functioning

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Bayatipayan, Somaye; Khalili, Azizeh Farshbaf; Kochaksaraei, Fatemeh Ranjbar; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Banoi, Kamala Gaza; Nahaee, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the second- and third-generation oral contraceptives on women's reproductive sexual function. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 82 married women of reproductive age in Tehran. Samples were randomized into the groups receiving second- and third-generation oral contraceptive pills. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) tool was used before the intervention and 2 and 4 months after the intervention. Data analysis was carried out using analysis of variance (ANOVA) within repeated measures and P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the positive and negative moods between the experimental and control groups before the intervention in the second and fourth months. The second-generation pills caused a decrease in sexual function in the second month and an increase in sexual function in the fourth month, but the third-generation pills led to an increase in sexual function in the second and fourth months. The increase in sexual function that resulted from using the third-generation pills was significantly higher than that resulted on using the second-generation pills. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, sexual functioning decreased in the second month of using the second-generation pills and sexual performance was significantly more on using the third-generation pills compared to second-generation pills. The most common type of oral contraceptive used in Iran is the second-generation oral contraceptive LD™ (low-dose estrogen), which is freely distributed in health centers. Therefore, it is necessary for women who wish to use these contraceptive methods to be educated and consulted before they start using them. The third-generation contraceptive pills can be recommended to women who wish to use oral contraceptives. PMID:25709690

  15. 23 CFR 470.105 - Urban area boundaries and highway functional classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 49 CFR part 7, Appendix D. (b) Highway Functional Classification. (1) The State transportation agency... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urban area boundaries and highway functional... PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems § 470.105 Urban area boundaries...

  16. 23 CFR 470.105 - Urban area boundaries and highway functional classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... may be designated in both rural and urban areas. Guidance for determining the boundaries of urbanized... developing and updating a statewide highway functional classification in rural and urban areas to determine functional usage of the existing roads and streets. Guidance criteria and procedures are provided in the...

  17. 23 CFR 470.105 - Urban area boundaries and highway functional classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... may be designated in both rural and urban areas. Guidance for determining the boundaries of urbanized... developing and updating a statewide highway functional classification in rural and urban areas to determine functional usage of the existing roads and streets. Guidance criteria and procedures are provided in the...

  18. 23 CFR 470.105 - Urban area boundaries and highway functional classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... may be designated in both rural and urban areas. Guidance for determining the boundaries of urbanized... developing and updating a statewide highway functional classification in rural and urban areas to determine functional usage of the existing roads and streets. Guidance criteria and procedures are provided in the...

  19. Precision calibration procedure for magnetic loss testers using a digital two-channel function generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, H.

    1994-05-01

    For the precision calibration of power meters used for magnetic loss measurements, a two-channel precision generator developed at the PTB is used. The staircase functions of the generator matched to the wattmeters by a current and voltage amplifier are smoothed by low-pass Bessel filters. The complex transfer functions of the filters have been measured for different ranges of voltage, current and frequency. The waveforms to be generated are corrected by means of fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and by multiplying the Fourier coefficients by the inverse complex transfer function. The accuracy of this calibration procedure was estimated to be 0.1%.

  20. Path Loss Prediction Formula in Urban Area for the Fourth-Generation Mobile Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitao, Koshiro; Ichitsubo, Shinichi

    A site-general type prediction formula is created based on the measurement results in an urban area in Japan assuming that the prediction frequency range required for Fourth-Generation (4G) Mobile Communication Systems is from 3 to 6GHz, the distance range is 0.1 to 3km, and the base station (BS) height range is from 10 to 100m. Based on the measurement results, the path loss (dB) is found to be proportional to the logarithm of the distance (m), the logarithm of the BS height (m), and the logarithm of the frequency (GHz). Furthermore, we examine the extension of existing formulae such as the Okumura-Hata, Walfisch-Ikegami, and Sakagami formulae for 4G systems and propose a prediction formula based on the Extended Sakagami formula.

  1. Demand generation activities and modern contraceptive use in urban areas of four countries: a longitudinal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan; Calhoun, Lisa; Lance, Peter; Montana, Livia; Nanda, Priya; Guilkey, David

    2014-12-01

    Family planning is crucial for preventing unintended pregnancies and for improving maternal and child health and well-being. In urban areas where there are large inequities in family planning use, particularly among the urban poor, programs are needed to increase access to and use of contraception among those most in need. This paper presents the midterm evaluation findings of the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (Urban RH Initiative) programs, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, that are being implemented in 4 countries: India (Uttar Pradesh), Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. Between 2010 and 2013, the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) project collected baseline and 2-year longitudinal follow-up data from women in target study cities to examine the role of demand generation activities undertaken as part of the Urban RH Initiative programs. Evaluation results demonstrate that, in each country where it was measured, outreach by community health or family planning workers as well as local radio programs were significantly associated with increased use of modern contraceptive methods. In addition, in India and Nigeria, television programs had a significant effect on modern contraceptive use, and in Kenya and Nigeria, the program slogans and materials that were blanketed across the cities (eg, leaflets/brochures distributed at health clinics and the program logo placed on all forms of materials, from market umbrellas to health facility signs and television programs) were also significantly associated with modern method use. Our results show that targeted, multilevel demand generation activities can make an important contribution to increasing modern contraceptive use in urban areas and could impact Millennium Development Goals for improved maternal and child health and access to reproductive health for all. PMID:25611476

  2. Demand generation activities and modern contraceptive use in urban areas of four countries: a longitudinal evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan; Calhoun, Lisa; Lance, Peter; Montana, Livia; Nanda, Priya; Guilkey, David

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Family planning is crucial for preventing unintended pregnancies and for improving maternal and child health and well-being. In urban areas where there are large inequities in family planning use, particularly among the urban poor, programs are needed to increase access to and use of contraception among those most in need. This paper presents the midterm evaluation findings of the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (Urban RH Initiative) programs, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, that are being implemented in 4 countries: India (Uttar Pradesh), Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. Between 2010 and 2013, the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) project collected baseline and 2-year longitudinal follow-up data from women in target study cities to examine the role of demand generation activities undertaken as part of the Urban RH Initiative programs. Evaluation results demonstrate that, in each country where it was measured, outreach by community health or family planning workers as well as local radio programs were significantly associated with increased use of modern contraceptive methods. In addition, in India and Nigeria, television programs had a significant effect on modern contraceptive use, and in Kenya and Nigeria, the program slogans and materials that were blanketed across the cities (eg, leaflets/brochures distributed at health clinics and the program logo placed on all forms of materials, from market umbrellas to health facility signs and television programs) were also significantly associated with modern method use. Our results show that targeted, multilevel demand generation activities can make an important contribution to increasing modern contraceptive use in urban areas and could impact Millennium Development Goals for improved maternal and child health and access to reproductive health for all. PMID:25611476

  3. Optimizing Wind Power Generation while Minimizing Wildlife Impacts in an Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Bohrer, Gil; Zhu, Kunpeng; Jones, Robert L.; Curtis, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    The location of a wind turbine is critical to its power output, which is strongly affected by the local wind field. Turbine operators typically seek locations with the best wind at the lowest level above ground since turbine height affects installation costs. In many urban applications, such as small-scale turbines owned by local communities or organizations, turbine placement is challenging because of limited available space and because the turbine often must be added without removing existing infrastructure, including buildings and trees. The need to minimize turbine hazard to wildlife compounds the challenge. We used an exclusion zone approach for turbine-placement optimization that incorporates spatially detailed maps of wind distribution and wildlife densities with power output predictions for the Ohio State University campus. We processed public GIS records and airborne lidar point-cloud data to develop a 3D map of all campus buildings and trees. High resolution large-eddy simulations and long-term wind climatology were combined to provide land-surface-affected 3D wind fields and the corresponding wind-power generation potential. This power prediction map was then combined with bird survey data. Our assessment predicts that exclusion of areas where bird numbers are highest will have modest effects on the availability of locations for power generation. The exclusion zone approach allows the incorporation of wildlife hazard in wind turbine siting and power output considerations in complex urban environments even when the quantitative interaction between wildlife behavior and turbine activity is unknown. PMID:23409117

  4. Optimizing wind power generation while minimizing wildlife impacts in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Gil; Zhu, Kunpeng; Jones, Robert L; Curtis, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    The location of a wind turbine is critical to its power output, which is strongly affected by the local wind field. Turbine operators typically seek locations with the best wind at the lowest level above ground since turbine height affects installation costs. In many urban applications, such as small-scale turbines owned by local communities or organizations, turbine placement is challenging because of limited available space and because the turbine often must be added without removing existing infrastructure, including buildings and trees. The need to minimize turbine hazard to wildlife compounds the challenge. We used an exclusion zone approach for turbine-placement optimization that incorporates spatially detailed maps of wind distribution and wildlife densities with power output predictions for the Ohio State University campus. We processed public GIS records and airborne lidar point-cloud data to develop a 3D map of all campus buildings and trees. High resolution large-eddy simulations and long-term wind climatology were combined to provide land-surface-affected 3D wind fields and the corresponding wind-power generation potential. This power prediction map was then combined with bird survey data. Our assessment predicts that exclusion of areas where bird numbers are highest will have modest effects on the availability of locations for power generation. The exclusion zone approach allows the incorporation of wildlife hazard in wind turbine siting and power output considerations in complex urban environments even when the quantitative interaction between wildlife behavior and turbine activity is unknown.

  5. Future's operation areas: new-generation suppression enemy air defence (SEAD) elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazinedar, Ä.°lker

    2015-05-01

    Since air vehicles took place in the theater of operations, they have become the indispensable elements and the strongest attack power of armed forces. In the following period, with technological development, supersonic aircrafts took place in the operation area and this increased effectiveness of air vehicles much more. Air forces have used these aircrafts during important missions like strategic attack and air defense operations. On the other hand, decision makers understood that it was not feasible to intercept fighter aircrafts by executing combat air patrol flight missions. Since there is not enough reaction time to intercept the high speed aircrafts, ground stationed Surface to Air Missiles (SAM) system requirement has emerged. Therefore, SAM systems took place in the operation scene as well. Due to the fact that SAM systems emerged against the attack power, the attack aircrafts are to keep away from the fire of the ground stationed SAM systems. Hence, the requirement of Suppression Enemy Air Defense (SEAD) arose. SEAD elements take under suppression the radar of the SAM systems. In this way, attack aircrafts are able to attack without the risk of SAM systems. The purpose of this study is to find new methods or concepts in order to protect friendly attack aircrafts against ground based surface to air missiles' fires. Modernization of SAM systems and new generation SAM system producing activities have proceeded with positive acceleration. So, current SEAD elements and concepts are not able to cover the requirements due to the increased SAM system ranges. According to the concepts, SEAD weapons` ranges must be longer than the SAM weapons' ranges to protect friendly aircrafts. In this study, new concept was offered to overcome the deficiencies of current SEAD concept. The elements of new concepts were put forward. Classic SEAD concept and new generation concepts were assessed by using SWOT analysis technique. As a result, this study has revealed that, air forces

  6. Controlling surface functionality through generation of thiol groups in a self-assembled monolayer.

    SciTech Connect

    Lud, S. Q.; Neppl, S.; Richter, G.; Bruno, P.; Gruen, D. M.; Jordan, R.; Feulner, P.; Stutzmann, M.; Garrido, J. A.; Materials Science Division; Technische Univ. Munchen

    2010-01-01

    A lithographic method to generate reactive thiol groups on functionalized synthetic diamond for biosensor and molecular electronic applications is developed. We demonstrate that ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films covalently functionalized with surface-generated thiol groups allow controlled thiol-disulfide exchange surface hybridization processes. The generation of the thiol functional head groups was obtained by irradiating phenylsulfonic acid (PSA) monolayers on UNCD surfaces. The conversion of the functional headgroup of the self-assembled monolayer was verified by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and fluorescence microscopy. Our findings indicate the selective generation of reactive thiol surface groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate the grafting of yeast cytochrome c to the thiol-modified diamond surface and the electron transfer between protein and electrode.

  7. On Wiener-Masani's algorithm for finding the generating function of multivariate stochastic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the algorithms for determining the generating function and prediction error matrix of multivariate stationary stochastic processes developed by Wiener and Masani (1957), and later by Masani (1960) will work in some more general setting.

  8. [Tourism function zoning of Jinyintan Grassland Scenic Area in Qinghai Province based on ecological sensitivity analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lin-sheng; Tang, Cheng-cai; Guo, Hua

    2010-07-01

    Based on the statistical data of natural ecology and social economy in Jinyintan Grassland Scenic Area in Qinghai Province in 2008, an evaluation index system for the ecological sensitivity of this area was established from the aspects of protected area rank, vegetation type, slope, and land use type. The ecological sensitivity of the sub-areas with higher tourism value and ecological function in the area was evaluated, and the tourism function zoning of these sub-areas was made by the technology of GIS and according to the analysis of eco-environmental characteristics and ecological sensitivity of each sensitive sub-area. It was suggested that the Jinyintan Grassland Scenic Area could be divided into three ecological sensitivity sub-areas (high, moderate, and low), three tourism functional sub-areas (restricted development ecotourism, moderate development ecotourism, and mass tourism), and six tourism functional sub-areas (wetland protection, primitive ecological sightseeing, agriculture and pasture tourism, grassland tourism, town tourism, and rural tourism).

  9. A functional glutamatergic neurone network in the medial septum and diagonal band area.

    PubMed

    Manseau, F; Danik, M; Williams, S

    2005-08-01

    The medial septum and diagonal band complex (MS/DB) is important for learning and memory and is known to contain cholinergic and GABAergic neurones. Glutamatergic neurones have also been recently described in this area but their function remains unknown. Here we show that local glutamatergic neurones can be activated using 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline in regular MS/DB slices, or mini-MS/DB slices. The spontaneous glutamatergic responses were mediated by AMPA receptors and, to a lesser extend, NMDA receptors, and were characterized by large, sometimes repetitive activity that elicited bursts of action potentials postsynaptically. Similar repetitive AMPA receptor-mediated bursts were generated by glutamatergic neurone activation within the MS/DB in disinhibited organotypic MS/DB slices, suggesting that the glutamatergic responses did not originate from extrinsic glutamatergic synapses. It is interesting that glutamatergic neurones were part of a synchronously active network as large repetitive AMPA receptor-mediated bursts were generated concomitantly with extracellular field potentials in intact half-septum preparations in vitro. Glutamatergic neurones appeared important to MS/DB activation as strong glutamatergic responses were present in electrophysiologically identified putative cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurones. In agreement with this, we found immunohistochemical evidence that vesicular glutamate-2 (VGLUT2)-positive puncta were in proximity to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-, glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)- and VGLUT2-positive neurones. Finally, MS/DB glutamatergic neurones could be activated under more physiological conditions as a cholinergic agonist was found to elicit rhythmic AMPA receptor-mediated EPSPs at a theta relevant frequency of 6-10 Hz. We propose that glutamatergic neurones within the MS/DB can excite cholinergic and GABAergic neurones, and that they are part of a connected

  10. A functional glutamatergic neurone network in the medial septum and diagonal band area

    PubMed Central

    Manseau, F; Danik, M; Williams, S

    2005-01-01

    The medial septum and diagonal band complex (MS/DB) is important for learning and memory and is known to contain cholinergic and GABAergic neurones. Glutamatergic neurones have also been recently described in this area but their function remains unknown. Here we show that local glutamatergic neurones can be activated using 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline in regular MS/DB slices, or mini-MS/DB slices. The spontaneous glutamatergic responses were mediated by AMPA receptors and, to a lesser extend, NMDA receptors, and were characterized by large, sometimes repetitive activity that elicited bursts of action potentials postsynaptically. Similar repetitive AMPA receptor-mediated bursts were generated by glutamatergic neurone activation within the MS/DB in disinhibited organotypic MS/DB slices, suggesting that the glutamatergic responses did not originate from extrinsic glutamatergic synapses. It is interesting that glutamatergic neurones were part of a synchronously active network as large repetitive AMPA receptor-mediated bursts were generated concomitantly with extracellular field potentials in intact half-septum preparations in vitro. Glutamatergic neurones appeared important to MS/DB activation as strong glutamatergic responses were present in electrophysiologically identified putative cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurones. In agreement with this, we found immunohistochemical evidence that vesicular glutamate-2 (VGLUT2)-positive puncta were in proximity to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-, glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)- and VGLUT2-positive neurones. Finally, MS/DB glutamatergic neurones could be activated under more physiological conditions as a cholinergic agonist was found to elicit rhythmic AMPA receptor-mediated EPSPs at a theta relevant frequency of 6–10 Hz. We propose that glutamatergic neurones within the MS/DB can excite cholinergic and GABAergic neurones, and that they are part of a connected

  11. Data-Oriented Algorithm for Route Choice Set Generation in a Metropolitan Area with Mobile Phone GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Sekimoto, Y.; Usui, T.; Shibasaki, R.

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, for the estimation of traffic demand or people flow, modelling route choice activity in road networks is an important task and many algorithms have been developed to generate route choice sets. However, developing an algorithm based on a small amount of data that can be applied generally within a metropolitan area is difficult. This is because the characteristics of road networks vary widely. On the other hand, recently, the collection of people movement data has lately become much easier, especially through mobile phones. Lately, most mobile phones include GPS functionality. Given this background, we propose a data-oriented algorithm to generate route choice sets using mobile phone GPS data. GPS data contain a number of measurement errors; hence, they must be adjusted to account for these errors before use in advanced people movement analysis. However, this is time-consuming and expensive, because an enormous amount of daily data can be obtained. Hence, the objective of this study is to develop an algorithm that can easily manage GPS data. Specifically, at first movement data from all GPS data are selected by calculating the speed. Next, the nearest roads in the road network are selected from the GPS location and count such data for each road. Then An algorithm based on the GSP (Gateway Shortest Path) algorithm is proposed, which searches the shortest path through a given gateway. In the proposed algorithm, the road for which the utilization volume calculated by GPS data is large is selected as the gateway. Thus, route choice sets that are based on trends in real GPS data are generated. To evaluate the proposed method, GPS data from 0.7 million people a year in Japan and DRM (Digital Road Map) as the road network are used. DRM is one of the most detailed road networks in Japan. Route choice sets using the proposed algorithm are generated and the cover rate of the utilization volume of each road under evaluation is calculated. As a result, the proposed

  12. The perimeter generating functions of three-choice, imperfect, and one-punctured staircase polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, M.; van Hoeij, M.; Maillard, J.-M.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the isotropic perimeter generating functions of three-choice, imperfect, and one-punctured staircase polygons, whose 8th order linear Fuchsian ODEs are previously known. We derive simple relationships between the three generating functions, and show that all three generating functions are joint solutions of a common 12th order Fuchsian linear ODE. We find that the 8th order differential operators can each be rewritten as a direct sum of a direct product, with operators no larger than 3rd order. We give closed-form expressions for all the solutions of these operators in terms of 2 F 1 hypergeometric functions with rational and algebraic arguments. The solutions of these linear differential operators can in fact be expressed in terms of two modular forms, since these 2 F 1 hypergeometric functions can be expressed with two, rational or algebraic, pullbacks. Dedicated to A J Guttmann on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  13. Optimal Capacity and Location Assessment of Natural Gas Fired Distributed Generation in Residential Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Sarah My

    With ever increasing use of natural gas to generate electricity, installed natural gas fired microturbines are found in residential areas to generate electricity locally. This research work discusses a generalized methodology for assessing optimal capacity and locations for installing natural gas fired microturbines in a distribution residential network. The overall objective is to place microturbines to minimize the system power loss occurring in the electrical distribution network; in such a way that the electric feeder does not need any up-gradation. The IEEE 123 Node Test Feeder is selected as the test bed for validating the developed methodology. Three-phase unbalanced electric power flow is run in OpenDSS through COM server, and the gas distribution network is analyzed using GASWorkS. The continual sensitivity analysis methodology is developed to select multiple DG locations and annual simulation is run to minimize annual average losses. The proposed placement of microturbines must be feasible in the gas distribution network and should not result into gas pipeline reinforcement. The corresponding gas distribution network is developed in GASWorkS software, and nodal pressures of the gas system are checked for various cases to investigate if the existing gas distribution network can accommodate the penetration of selected microturbines. The results indicate the optimal locations suitable to place microturbines and capacity that can be accommodated by the system, based on the consideration of overall minimum annual average losses as well as the guarantee of nodal pressure provided by the gas distribution network. The proposed method is generalized and can be used for any IEEE test feeder or an actual residential distribution network.

  14. An improved nearly-orthogonal structured mesh generation system with smoothness control functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an improved nearly-orthogonal structured mesh generation system with a set of smoothness control functions, which were derived based on the ratio between the Jacobian of the transformation matrix and the Jacobian of the metric tensor. The proposed smoothness control functions are...

  15. First-generation students’ underperformance at university: the impact of the function of selection

    PubMed Central

    Jury, Mickaël; Smeding, Annique; Darnon, Céline

    2015-01-01

    According to recent research, university not only has the role to educate and train students, it also has the role to select the best students. We argue that this function of selection disadvantages first-generation students, in comparison with continuing-generation students. Thus, the mere activation of the function of selection should be sufficient to produce achievement differences between first-generation and continuing-generation students in a novel academic task. Furthermore, we propose that when the function of selection is salient, first-generation students would be more vigilant to a cue that may confirm their inferiority, which should explain their underperformance. In the present experiment, participants were asked to complete an arithmetic modular task under two conditions, which either made the function of selection salient or reduced its importance. Participants’ vigilance to a threatening cue (i.e., their performance relative to others) was measured through an eye-tracking technique. The results confirmed that first-generation students performed more poorly compared to continuing-generation students only when the function of selection was salient while no differences appeared in the no-selection condition. Regarding vigilance, the results did not confirm our hypothesis; thus, mediation path could not be tested. However, results indicated that at a high level of initial performance, first-generation students looked more often at the threatening cue. In others words, these students seemed more concerned about whether they were performing more poorly than others compared to their continuing-generation counterparts. Some methodological issues are discussed, notably regarding the measure of vigilance. PMID:26074854

  16. Applications of large-area nanopatterning to energy generation and storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Eric N.

    This dissertation encompasses the creation and testing of nanostructured, electrochemically-active energy generation and storage devices, and development of the associated fabrication techniques. The fabricated devices include nanopatterned, plasmonically-active, TiO2+Au thin films for Photocatalytic Water Splitting (PCW), TiO2-based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) incorporating nanopatterned, plasmonically-active metallic front electrodes, and Si nanopillar anodes for Li-ion batteries. Techniques were also developed for encapsulation and removal of wet-etched Si nanowires from their mother substrates. TiO2 was the first material to be widely used for PCW. Its use is hampered by its large bandgap (~3.2eV), and poor recombination lifetimes. Au nanoparticles (NPs) have been previously used to improve recombination lifetimes in TiO2 by separating photogenerated carriers near the NP edges, and to increase photocurrents by injecting plasmonically-excited hot electrons into the TiO2 conduction band. Using nanostructured TiO 2+Au electrodes, we aim to increase the PCW efficiency of TiO2 -based electrodes. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) employ visible-absorbing dyes anchored to a high-surface-area semiconducting scaffold. The front transparent conducting electrode (TCE) is typically ITO, a scarce and expensive material. We aim to increase the efficiency of thin-film DSSCs and eliminate the use of ITO by using a metallic subwavelength array (MESH) of nanoholes as the front TCE. Silicon holds promise as a high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, as it can store ~10x the Li of graphite, the current leading anode material (3569 vs. 372 mAh/g). However, Si undergoes dramatic (>300%) volume expansion upon "lithiation", pulverizing any structure with non-nanoscopic dimensions (>250nm). We created large-area arrays of "nanopillars" with sub-100nm diameters, using roll-to-roll-compatible flexible-mold NIL on commercially-available metal substrates. Ordered

  17. In vivo optogenetic tracing of functional corticocortical connections between motor forelimb areas

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Riichiro; Ohkubo, Fuki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro R.; Masamizu, Yoshito; Augustine, George J.; Kasai, Haruo; Matsuzaki, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between distinct motor cortical areas are essential for coordinated motor behaviors. In rodents, the motor cortical forelimb areas are divided into at least two distinct areas: the rostral forelimb area (RFA) and the caudal forelimb area (CFA). The RFA is thought to be an equivalent of the premotor cortex (PM) in primates, whereas the CFA is believed to be an equivalent of the primary motor cortex. Although reciprocal connections between the RFA and the CFA have been anatomically identified in rats, it is unknown whether there are functional connections between these areas that can induce postsynaptic spikes. In this study, we used an in vivo Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) photostimulation method to trace the functional connections between the mouse RFA and CFA. Simultaneous electrical recordings were utilized to detect spiking activities induced by synaptic inputs originating from photostimulated areas. This method, in combination with anatomical tracing, demonstrated that the RFA receives strong functional projections from layer 2/3 and/or layer 5a, but not from layer 5b (L5b), of the CFA. Further, the CFA receives strong projections from L5b neurons of the RFA. The onset latency of electrical responses evoked in remote areas upon photostimulation of the other areas was approximately 10 ms, which is consistent with the synaptic connectivity between these areas. Our results suggest that neuronal activities in the RFA and the CFA during movements are formed through asymmetric reciprocal connections. PMID:23554588

  18. Plasmonic nano-comb structures for efficient large-area second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Hongchul; Lim, Hee-Jin; Song, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Myung-Ki; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2014-07-14

    We propose and demonstrate plasmonic nano-comb (PNC) structures for efficient large-area second-harmonic generation (SHG). The PNCs are made of 250 nm-thick gold film and have equally-spaced 30 nm-slits filled with ployvinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)). The PNC with 1.0 μm-spacing couples resonantly with 1.56 μm 100-fs laser beams. For the 1.0 μm-spacing PNCs under the fixed-pump-power condition, the nonlinear SHG power remains almost independent of the pump diameter ranging from 2 μm to 6 μm. The SHG power from the resonant PNC is measured to be 8 times larger than that of the single-nano-gap metallic structure, when the pump beam is tightly-focused to 2 μm in diameter in both cases. This relative enhancement of the total nonlinear SHG signal power reaches up to >200 when the pump beam diameter is increased to 6 μm. We attribute this unusual phenomenon to the resonant coupling of the finite-size pump wave with the finite-size one-dimensional plasmonic mode.

  19. Older Adults and the Fear of Death: The Protective Function of Generativity.

    PubMed

    Major, Rochelle J; Whelton, William J; Schimel, Jeff; Sharpe, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Terror management theory (TMT) posits that cultural worldviews function to allay concerns about human mortality. Preliminary research with older adults has indicated that seniors do not respond to death reminders in the same way as their younger counterparts. The purpose of the current study was to test a developmentally relevant construct that may buffer death anxiety in later life. It was hypothesized that Erikson's concept of generativity may encompass death-denying properties for older adults. One hundred and seventy-nine seniors were recruited to determine if subtle mortality salience inductions would lead participants to rate their own generativity as higher than after a blatant induction, or no induction, after controlling for pre-induction generativity. As expected, participants exposed to subtle death primes rated themselves as having higher levels of generativity than the other two groups after co-varying pre-induction generativity. Explanations are discussed in light of the literatures on TMT and generativity. PMID:27118066

  20. Older Adults and the Fear of Death: The Protective Function of Generativity.

    PubMed

    Major, Rochelle J; Whelton, William J; Schimel, Jeff; Sharpe, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Terror management theory (TMT) posits that cultural worldviews function to allay concerns about human mortality. Preliminary research with older adults has indicated that seniors do not respond to death reminders in the same way as their younger counterparts. The purpose of the current study was to test a developmentally relevant construct that may buffer death anxiety in later life. It was hypothesized that Erikson's concept of generativity may encompass death-denying properties for older adults. One hundred and seventy-nine seniors were recruited to determine if subtle mortality salience inductions would lead participants to rate their own generativity as higher than after a blatant induction, or no induction, after controlling for pre-induction generativity. As expected, participants exposed to subtle death primes rated themselves as having higher levels of generativity than the other two groups after co-varying pre-induction generativity. Explanations are discussed in light of the literatures on TMT and generativity.

  1. Design of wide-area time-delay supplementary controller for interconnected Network based on Hamilton function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailati, G.; Hu, Z. H.

    2016-08-01

    The transient stability of interconnected network with supplementary time-delay controller for generator excitations and static var compensator (SVC) has been investigated in this paper. Firstly, a delay-dependent stability criterion based on Hamilton function method is derived, and the criterion is in term of matrix inequalities. Secondly, a nonlinear time-delay Hamilton function model of interconnected network with SVCs is constructed. Thirdly, the wide-area time-delay supplementary controller (WATSC) for the interconnected network is designed and converted into the form of Hamiltonian system. The delay-dependent stability of the closed-loop power system is analysed. The gains of the WATSC are determined by using the theoretical analysis results. It is effective for the designed WATSC installed in the 16- machine, 68-bus power system for damping the inter-area modes. Then simulation results show that the method of the controller is effective.

  2. Network asymmetry of motor areas revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Rong; Wu, Yi-Bo; Hu, De-Wen; Qin, Shang-Zhen; Xu, Guo-Zheng; Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Song, Hua

    2012-02-01

    There are ample functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on functional brain asymmetries, and the asymmetry of cerebral network in the resting state may be crucial to brain function organization. In this paper, a unified schema of voxel-wise functional connectivity and asymmetry analysis was presented and the network asymmetry of motor areas was studied. Twelve healthy male subjects with mean age 29.8 ± 6.4 were studied. Functional network in the resting state was described by using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis. Motor areas were selected as regions of interest (ROIs). Network asymmetry, including intra- and inter-network asymmetries, was formulated and analyzed. The intra-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the left and right part of a particular functional network. The inter-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the networks for a specific ROI in the left hemisphere and its homotopic ROI in the right hemisphere. Primary motor area (M1), primary sensory area (S1) and premotor area (PMA) exhibited higher functional correlation with the right parietal-temporal-occipital circuit and the middle frontal gyrus than they did with the left hemisphere. Right S1 and right PMA exhibited higher functional correlation with the ipsilateral precentral and supramarginal areas. There exist the large-scale hierarchical network asymmetries of the motor areas in the resting state. These asymmetries imply the right hemisphere dominance for predictive motor coding based on spatial attention and higher sensory processing load for the motor performance of non-dominant hemisphere.

  3. Incorporating Religiosity into a Developmental Model of Positive Family Functioning across Generations

    PubMed Central

    Spilman, Sarah K.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Schofield, Thomas J.; Conger, Rand D.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated a developmental model of intergenerational continuity in religiosity and its association with observed competency in romantic and parent-child relationships across two generations. Using multi-informant data from the Family Transitions Project, a 20-year longitudinal study of families that began during early adolescence (N = 451), we found that parental religiosity assessed during the youth’s adolescence was positively related to the youth’s own religiosity during adolescence which, in turn, predicted their religiosity after the transition to adulthood. The findings also supported the theoretical model guiding the study, which proposes that religiosity acts as a personal resource that will be uniquely and positively associated with the quality of family relationships. Especially important, the findings demonstrate support for the role of religiosity in a developmental process that promotes positive family functioning after addressing earlier methodological limitations in this area of study, such as cross-sectional research designs, single informant measurement, retrospective reports, and the failure to control for other individual differences. PMID:22545832

  4. ADM. Service Building (TAN603). Floor plan. Names of functional areas. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADM. Service Building (TAN-603). Floor plan. Names of functional areas. Ralph M. Parsons 902-2-ANY-603-A 43. Date: December 1952. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 033-0603-00-693-106718 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Tooth development in a model reptile: functional and null generation teeth in the gecko Paroedura picta.

    PubMed

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Horacek, Ivan; Tucker, Abigail S

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes tooth development in a basal squamate, Paroedura picta. Due to its reproductive strategy, mode of development and position within the reptiles, this gecko represents an excellent model organism for the study of reptile development. Here we document the dental pattern and development of non-functional (null generation) and functional generations of teeth during embryonic development. Tooth development is followed from initiation to cytodifferentiation and ankylosis, as the tooth germs develop from bud, through cap to bell stages. The fate of the single generation of non-functional (null generation) teeth is shown to be variable, with some teeth being expelled from the oral cavity, while others are incorporated into the functional bone and teeth, or are absorbed. Fate appears to depend on the initiation site within the oral cavity, with the first null generation teeth forming before formation of the dental lamina. We show evidence for a stratum intermedium layer in the enamel epithelium of functional teeth and show that the bicuspid shape of the teeth is created by asymmetrical deposition of enamel, and not by folding of the inner dental epithelium as observed in mammals.

  6. Next-Generation High-Throughput Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Baric, Ralph S.; Damania, Blossom; Miller, Samuel I.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host infection by microbial pathogens cues global changes in microbial and host cell biology that facilitate microbial replication and disease. The complete maps of thousands of bacterial and viral genomes have recently been defined; however, the rate at which physiological or biochemical functions have been assigned to genes has greatly lagged. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) addressed this gap by creating functional genomics centers dedicated to developing high-throughput approaches to assign gene function. These centers require broad-based and collaborative research programs to generate and integrate diverse data to achieve a comprehensive understanding of microbial pathogenesis. High-throughput functional genomics can lead to new therapeutics and better understanding of the next generation of emerging pathogens by rapidly defining new general mechanisms by which organisms cause disease and replicate in host tissues and by facilitating the rate at which functional data reach the scientific community. PMID:27703071

  7. Visual language and handwriting movement: functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 tesla during generation of ideographic characters.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, K; Kato, C; Tanaka, S; Sugio, T; Matsuzawa, M; Inui, T; Moriya, T; Glover, G H; Nakai, T

    2001-07-01

    A functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment at 3 tesla was performed to investigate the collaborative mechanism between visuospatial processing and motor execution in performing visual language generation tasks. Japanese Kanji, ideographic characters, were utilized to design tasks. The bilateral border portions between the inferior parietal lobule and the occipital lobe were involved during a Kanji puzzle task, which required subjects to combine several parts into a Kanji. The higher motor areas, such as the premotor areas and the pre-supplementary motor areas, were also activated bilaterally during the puzzle task. The parieto-occipital activation may be related to analysis of configuration or segmentation/integration of Kanji figures. Activation in the higher motor areas may be induced by cognitive components related to motor function to perform the visuospatial language task, such as intense reference for displayed characters and finding a proper character for puzzle solution. A collaborative mechanism in these areas may explain the effectiveness of tactile reading in letter recognition by patients with pure alexia or kinesthetic facilitation by Kanji users when recalling difficult Kanji.

  8. Generation of Functional Cardiomyocytes from Efficiently Generated Human iPSCs and a Novel Method of Measuring Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingh, Sheeja; Thangavel, Jayakumar; Czirok, Andras; Samanta, Saheli; Roby, Katherine F.; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Rajasingh, Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived cardiomyocytes (iCMCs) would provide an unlimited cell source for regenerative medicine and drug discoveries. The objective of our study is to generate functional cardiomyocytes from human iPSCs and to develop a novel method of measuring contractility of CMCs. In a series of experiments, adult human skin fibroblasts (HSF) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with a combination of pluripotent gene DNA and mRNA under specific conditions. The iPSC colonies were identified and differentiated into various cell lineages, including CMCs. The contractile activity of CMCs was measured by a novel method of frame-by-frame cross correlation (particle image velocimetry-PIV) analysis. Our treatment regimen transformed 4% of HSFs into iPSC colonies at passage 0, a significantly improved efficiency compared with use of either DNA or mRNA alone. The iPSCs were capable of differentiating both in vitro and in vivo into endodermal, ectodermal and mesodermal cells, including CMCs with >88% of cells being positive for troponin T (CTT) and Gata4 by flow cytometry. We report a highly efficient combination of DNA and mRNA to generate iPSCs and functional iCMCs from adult human cells. We also report a novel approach to measure contractility of iCMCs. PMID:26237415

  9. Functional test generation of digital LSI/VLSI systems using machine symbolic execution technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.

    1985-01-01

    Functional testing is among the promising solutions proposed in recent years for the challenging problems of testing modern digital LSI/VLSI systems. It is aimed at validating the correct operation of a digital system with respect to its functional specification. Functional test generation is performed before functional testing. In this dissertation, a functional test pattern generation algorithm is developed. This algorithm is explicit, systematic, and practical. The whole research work consists of five related topics including theoretical development and computer experiment. First, a register transfer language specially designed for the functional description of a general digital system is defined. Second, a register-transfer (RT) level fault model quite different from the conventional gate-level stuck-at fault model is established and the fault collapsing analysis is performed for better test generation efficiency. Third, the technique of register-transfer-level symbolic execution is explored. The major problems are defined, analyzed, and solved. A register-transfer-level symbolic execution system is designed and implemented. Fourth, an overall RT-level test pattern generation algorithm is developed based on the RT-level fault model and the RT-level symbolic execution technique. The symbolic executions are performed on both fault-free and fault-injected machines for symbolic results. By comparing the symbolic results and path constraints obtained from fault-free and fault-injected machines, an input test pattern which distinguishes each bad machine from the good machine is derived.

  10. Photon wave function formalism for analysis of Mach-Zehnder interferometer and sum-frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritboon, Atirach; Daengngam, Chalongrat; Pengpan, Teparksorn

    2016-08-01

    Biakynicki-Birula introduced a photon wave function similar to the matter wave function that satisfies the Schrödinger equation. Its second quantization form can be applied to investigate nonlinear optics at nearly full quantum level. In this paper, we applied the photon wave function formalism to analyze both linear optical processes in the well-known Mach-Zehnder interferometer and nonlinear optical processes for sum-frequency generation in dispersive and lossless medium. Results by photon wave function formalism agree with the well-established Maxwell treatments and existing experimental verifications.

  11. Functional diversity exhibits a diverse relationship with area, even a decreasing one

    PubMed Central

    Karadimou, Elpida K.; Kallimanis, Athanasios S.; Tsiripidis, Ioannis; Dimopoulos, Panayotis

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between species richness and area is one of the few well-established laws in ecology, and one might expect a similar relationship with functional diversity (FD). However, only a few studies investigate the relationship between trait-based FD and area, the Functional Diversity - Area Relationship (FDAR). To examine FDAR, we constructed the species accumulation curve and the corresponding FD curve. We used plant diversity data from nested plots (1–128 m2), recorded on the Volcanic islands of Santorini Archipelagos, Greece. Six multidimensional FD indices were calculated using 26 traits. We identified a typology of FDARs depending on the facet of FD analyzed: (A) strongly positive for indices quantifying the range of functional traits in the community, (B) negative correlation for indices quantifying the evenness in the distribution of abundance in the trait space, (C) no clear pattern for indices reflecting the functional similarity of species and (D) idiosyncratic patterns with area for functional divergence. As area increases, the range of traits observed in the community increases, but the abundance of traits does not increase proportionally and some traits become dominant, implying a reliance on some functions that may be located in either the center or the periphery of the trait space. PMID:27752086

  12. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: structure, function, and culture (Part II).

    PubMed

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Larrabee, Hollynn; Dyne, Pamela L; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Strategies for approaching generational issues that affect teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology in emergency medicine (EM) have been reported. Tactics to address generational influences involving the structure and function of the academic emergency department (ED), organizational culture, and EM schedule have not been published. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic EM. Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can address some common issues encountered in academic EM. By understanding the differences and strengths of each of the cohorts in academic EM departments and considering simple mitigating strategies, faculty leaders can maximize their cooperative effectiveness and face the challenges of a new millennium.

  13. Statistically generated weighted curve fit of residual functions for modal analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookout, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    A statistically generated weighting function for a second-order polynomial curve fit of residual functions has been developed. The residual flexibility test method, from which a residual function is generated, is a procedure for modal testing large structures in an external constraint-free environment to measure the effects of higher order modes and interface stiffness. This test method is applicable to structures with distinct degree-of-freedom interfaces to other system components. A theoretical residual function in the displacement/force domain has the characteristics of a relatively flat line in the lower frequencies and a slight upward curvature in the higher frequency range. In the test residual function, the above-mentioned characteristics can be seen in the data, but due to the present limitations in the modal parameter evaluation (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of test data, the residual function has regions of ragged data. A second order polynomial curve fit is required to obtain the residual flexibility term. A weighting function of the data is generated by examining the variances between neighboring data points. From a weighted second-order polynomial curve fit, an accurate residual flexibility value can be obtained. The residual flexibility value and free-free modes from testing are used to improve a mathematical model of the structure. The residual flexibility modal test method is applied to a straight beam with a trunnion appendage and a space shuttle payload pallet simulator.

  14. Functional test generation for digital circuits described with a declarative language: LUSTRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahrous, Mazen

    1990-08-01

    A functional approach to the test generation problem starting from a high level description is proposed. The circuit tested is modeled, using the LUSTRE high level data flow description language. The different LUSTRE primitives are translated to a SATAN format graph in order to evaluate the testability of the circuit and to generate test sequences. Another method of testing the complex circuits comprising an operative part and a control part is defined. It consists of checking experiments for the control part observed through the operative part. It was applied to the automata generated from a LUSTRE description of the circuit.

  15. Linking structure and function in food webs: maximization of different ecological functions generates distinct food web structures.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jian D L; Cabral, Reniel B; Cantor, Mauricio; Hatton, Ian; Kortsch, Susanne; Patrício, Joana; Yamamichi, Masato

    2016-03-01

    Trophic interactions are central to ecosystem functioning, but the link between food web structure and ecosystem functioning remains obscure. Regularities (i.e. consistent patterns) in food web structure suggest the possibility of regularities in ecosystem functioning, which might be used to relate structure to function. We introduce a novel, genetic algorithm approach to simulate food webs with maximized throughput (a proxy for ecosystem functioning) and compare the structure of these simulated food webs to real empirical food webs using common metrics of food web structure. We repeat this analysis using robustness to secondary extinctions (a proxy for ecosystem resilience) instead of throughput to determine the relative contributions of ecosystem functioning and ecosystem resilience to food web structure. Simulated food webs that maximized robustness were similar to real food webs when connectance (i.e. levels of interaction across the food web) was high, but this result did not extend to food webs with low connectance. Simulated food webs that maximized throughput or a combination of throughput and robustness were not similar to any real food webs. Simulated maximum-throughput food webs differed markedly from maximum-robustness food webs, which suggests that maximizing different ecological functions can generate distinct food web structures. Based on our results, food web structure would appear to have a stronger relationship with ecosystem resilience than with ecosystem throughput. Our genetic algorithm approach is general and is well suited to large, realistically complex food webs. Genetic algorithms can incorporate constraints on structure and can generate outputs that can be compared directly to empirical data. Our method can be used to explore a range of maximization or minimization hypotheses, providing new perspectives on the links between structure and function in ecological systems.

  16. Newly generated neurons at 2 months post-status epilepticus are functionally integrated into neuronal circuitry in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming; Zhu, Kun; Chen, Xin-Lin; Zhang, Yao-Jie; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Xiao, Xin-Li; Liu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Emerging evidence has linked chronic temporal lobe epilepsy to dramatically reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. However, the profile of different components of neurogenesis in the chronically epileptic hippocampus is still unclear, especially the incorporation of newly generated cells. To address the issue, newly generated cells in the sub-granular zone of the dentate gyrus were labeled by the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) or retroviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. The newly generated neurons that extended axons to CA3 area or integrated into memory circuits were visualized by cholera toxin B subunit retrograde tracing, and detecting activation of BrdU(+) cells following a recall of spatial memory test at the chronic stage of TLE. We found that the microenvironment was still able to sustain significant neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells at 2 months post-status epilepticus time-point, and newly added neurons into granular cell layer were still able to integrate into neuronal circuitry, both anatomically and functionally. Quantified analyses of BrdU(+) or Ki-67(+) cells demonstrated that there was a reduced proliferation of progenitor cells and diminished survival of newly generated cells in the epileptic hippocampus. Both decreased levels of neurotrophic factors in the surrounding milieu and cell loss in the CA3 area might contribute the decreased production of new cells and their survival following chronic epilepsy. These results suggest that decreased neurogenesis in the chronically epileptic hippocampus 2 months post status epilepticus is not associated with altered integration of newly generated neurons, and that developing strategies to augment hippocampal neurogenesis in chronic epilepsy might be protective.

  17. The Krigifier: A Procedure for Generating Pseudorandom Nonlinear Objective Functions for Computational Experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Comprehensive computational experiments to assess the performance of algorithms for numerical optimization require (among other things) a practical procedure for generating pseudorandom nonlinear objective functions. We propose a procedure that is based on the convenient fiction that objective functions are realizations of stochastic processes. This report details the calculations necessary to implement our procedure for the case of certain stationary Gaussian processes and presents a specific implementation in the statistical programming language S-PLUS.

  18. Species, trophic, and functional diversity in marine protected and non-protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamor, Adriana; Becerro, Mikel A.

    2012-10-01

    The number of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) has grown exponentially in the last decades as marine environments steadily deteriorate. The success of MPAs stems from the overall positive benefits attributed to the "reserve effect," the totality of the consequences of protecting marine systems. The reserve effect includes but is beyond the goal of protecting particular species or areas with economical or cultural value. However, most data on the effects of MPAs focus on target species and there is limited evidence for the consequences of protection at larger levels of organization. Quantitative information on the reserve effect remains elusive partly because of its complex nature. Data on biodiversity can be used to quantify the reserve effect if not restricted to specific taxonomic groups. In our study, we quantified species diversity, trophic diversity, and an approach to functional diversity in five MPAs and adjacent non-protected areas along the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Our three measures of diversity were based on the abundance of algae, fish, sessile and mobile invertebrates in shallow water rocky communities and could be used to estimate the reserve effect based on species, trophic levels, or functional roles. We tested the hypothesis that species, trophic, and functional diversity were higher in protected areas than in adjacent non-protected areas. Species diversity varied with geographic area but not with protection status. However, we found higher functional diversity inside MPAs. Also, the effect of protection on functional diversity varied as a function of the geographic area. Our results support the uniqueness of MPAs at a species level and the universality of the reserve effect at the level of the trophic groups' composition. This type of comprehensive ecological approach may broaden our understanding of MPAs and their efficiency as management tools.

  19. Functional Gene Networks: R/Bioc package to generate and analyse gene networks derived from functional enrichment and clustering

    PubMed Central

    Aibar, Sara; Fontanillo, Celia; Droste, Conrad; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Functional Gene Networks (FGNet) is an R/Bioconductor package that generates gene networks derived from the results of functional enrichment analysis (FEA) and annotation clustering. The sets of genes enriched with specific biological terms (obtained from a FEA platform) are transformed into a network by establishing links between genes based on common functional annotations and common clusters. The network provides a new view of FEA results revealing gene modules with similar functions and genes that are related to multiple functions. In addition to building the functional network, FGNet analyses the similarity between the groups of genes and provides a distance heatmap and a bipartite network of functionally overlapping genes. The application includes an interface to directly perform FEA queries using different external tools: DAVID, GeneTerm Linker, TopGO or GAGE; and a graphical interface to facilitate the use. Availability and implementation: FGNet is available in Bioconductor, including a tutorial. URL: http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/FGNet.html Contact: jrivas@usal.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25600944

  20. Generating Global Leaf Area Index from Landsat: Algorithm Formulation and Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Sangram; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Zhang, Gong; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Milesi, Cristina; Michaelis, Andrew; Wang, Weile; Votava, Petr; Samanta, Arindam; Melton, Forrest; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Vermote, Eric; Gao, Feng; Knyazaikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the implementation of a physically based algorithm for the retrieval of vegetation green Leaf Area Index (LAI) from Landsat surface reflectance data. The algorithm is based on the canopy spectral invariants theory and provides a computationally efficient way of parameterizing the Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) as a function of spatial resolution and wavelength. LAI retrievals from the application of this algorithm to aggregated Landsat surface reflectances are consistent with those of MODIS for homogeneous sites represented by different herbaceous and forest cover types. Example results illustrating the physics and performance of the algorithm suggest three key factors that influence the LAI retrieval process: 1) the atmospheric correction procedures to estimate surface reflectances; 2) the proximity of Landsatobserved surface reflectance and corresponding reflectances as characterized by the model simulation; and 3) the quality of the input land cover type in accurately delineating pure vegetated components as opposed to mixed pixels. Accounting for these factors, a pilot implementation of the LAI retrieval algorithm was demonstrated for the state of California utilizing the Global Land Survey (GLS) 2005 Landsat data archive. In a separate exercise, the performance of the LAI algorithm over California was evaluated by using the short-wave infrared band in addition to the red and near-infrared bands. Results show that the algorithm, while ingesting the short-wave infrared band, has the ability to delineate open canopies with understory effects and may provide useful information compared to a more traditional two-band retrieval. Future research will involve implementation of this algorithm at continental scales and a validation exercise will be performed in evaluating the accuracy of the 30-m LAI products at several field sites. ©

  1. Functional definitions of parietal areas in human and non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing homologies between cortical areas in animal models and humans lies at the heart of translational neuroscience, as it demonstrates how knowledge obtained from these models can be applied to the human brain. Here, we review progress in using parallel functional imaging to ascertain homologies between parietal areas of human and non-human primates, species sharing similar behavioural repertoires. The human homologues of several areas along monkey IPS involved in action planning and observation, such as AIP, LIP and CIP, as well as those of opercular areas (SII complex), have been defined. In addition, uniquely human areas, such as the tool-use area in left anterior supramarginal gyrus, have also been identified. PMID:27053755

  2. Event mean concentration and first flush effect from different drainage systems and functional areas during storms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai-Qin; Liu, Yan; Wang, Hong-Wu; Gao, Xue-Long; Ma, Lu-Ming

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of the event mean concentration (EMC) and first flush effect (FFE) during typical rainfall events in outfalls from different drainage systems and functional areas. Stormwater outfall quality data were collected from five outfalls throughout Fuzhou City (China) during 2011-2012. Samples were analyzed for water quality parameters, such as COD, NH3-N, TP, and SS. Analysis of values indicated that the order of the event mean concentrations (EMCs) in outfalls was intercepting combined system > direct emission combined system > separated system. Most of the rainfall events showed the FFE in all outfalls. The order of strength of the FFE was residential area of direct emission combined system > commercial area of separated system > residential area of intercepting combined system > office area of separated system > residential area of separated system. Results will serve as guide in managing water quality to reduce pollution from drainage systems. PMID:26564194

  3. Radiomic Texture Analysis Mapping Predicts Areas of True Functional MRI Activity.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Islam; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Bakhtiari, Ali Shojaee; Thomas, Ginu A; Weinberg, Jeffrey S; Kumar, Ashok J; Sawaya, Raymond; Luedi, Markus M; Zinn, Pascal O; Colen, Rivka R

    2016-01-01

    Individual analysis of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans requires user-adjustment of the statistical threshold in order to maximize true functional activity and eliminate false positives. In this study, we propose a novel technique that uses radiomic texture analysis (TA) features associated with heterogeneity to predict areas of true functional activity. Scans of 15 right-handed healthy volunteers were analyzed using SPM8. The resulting functional maps were thresholded to optimize visualization of language areas, resulting in 116 regions of interests (ROIs). A board-certified neuroradiologist classified different ROIs into Expected (E) and Non-Expected (NE) based on their anatomical locations. TA was performed using the mean Echo-Planner Imaging (EPI) volume, and 20 rotation-invariant texture features were obtained for each ROI. Using forward stepwise logistic regression, we built a predictive model that discriminated between E and NE areas of functional activity, with a cross-validation AUC and success rate of 79.84% and 80.19% respectively (specificity/sensitivity of 78.34%/82.61%). This study found that radiomic TA of fMRI scans may allow for determination of areas of true functional activity, and thus eliminate clinician bias. PMID:27151623

  4. Radiomic Texture Analysis Mapping Predicts Areas of True Functional MRI Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Islam; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Bakhtiari, Ali Shojaee; Thomas, Ginu A.; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Kumar, Ashok J.; Sawaya, Raymond; Luedi, Markus M.; Zinn, Pascal O.; Colen, Rivka R.

    2016-01-01

    Individual analysis of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans requires user-adjustment of the statistical threshold in order to maximize true functional activity and eliminate false positives. In this study, we propose a novel technique that uses radiomic texture analysis (TA) features associated with heterogeneity to predict areas of true functional activity. Scans of 15 right-handed healthy volunteers were analyzed using SPM8. The resulting functional maps were thresholded to optimize visualization of language areas, resulting in 116 regions of interests (ROIs). A board-certified neuroradiologist classified different ROIs into Expected (E) and Non-Expected (NE) based on their anatomical locations. TA was performed using the mean Echo-Planner Imaging (EPI) volume, and 20 rotation-invariant texture features were obtained for each ROI. Using forward stepwise logistic regression, we built a predictive model that discriminated between E and NE areas of functional activity, with a cross-validation AUC and success rate of 79.84% and 80.19% respectively (specificity/sensitivity of 78.34%/82.61%). This study found that radiomic TA of fMRI scans may allow for determination of areas of true functional activity, and thus eliminate clinician bias. PMID:27151623

  5. Identification of multi-attribute functional urban areas under a perspective of community detection: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Jiao, Pengfei; Yuan, Ning; Wang, Wenjun

    2016-11-01

    Identifying functional urban areas is a significant research of considerable interest in many important fields such as city planning and facility location problem. Traditionally, we identify the function of urban areas from the macro-level perspective. With the availability of human digital footprints, investigation of functional urban areas from a micro-level perspective becomes possible. In this paper, we identified the functional urban areas of a metropolitan city in China by some metrics of community detection based on the social network of mobile phone users. The result shows that there are close relations between urban area and individual communication network, which can help us identify the function of areas more conveniently.

  6. Landscape functionality of plant communities in the Impala Platinum mining area, Rustenburg.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Tongway, D; van Rensburg, L

    2012-12-30

    The tremendous growth of the platinum mining industry in South Africa has affected the natural environment adversely. The waste produced by platinum mineral processing is alkaline, biologically sterile and has a low water-holding capacity. These properties in the environment may constitute dysfunctional areas that will create 'leaky' and dysfunctional landscapes, limiting biological development. Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) is a monitoring procedure that assesses the degradation of landscapes, as brought about by human, animal and natural activities, through rapidly assessing certain soil surface indicators which indicate the biophysical functionality of the system. The "Trigger-Transfer-Reserve-Pulse" (TTRP) conceptual framework forms the foundation for assessing landscape function when using LFA. The two main aspects of this framework are the loss of resources from the system and the utilisation of resources by the system. After a survey of landscape heterogeneity to reflect the spatial organisation of the landscape, soil surface indicators are assessed within different patch types (identifiable units that retains resources that pass through the system) and interpatches (units between patches where vital resources are not retained, but lost) to assess the capacity of patches with various physical properties in regulating the effectiveness of resource control in the landscape. Indices describing landscape organisation are computed by a spreadsheet analysis, as well as soil surface quality indices. When assembled in different combinations, three indices emerge that reflect soil productive potential, namely: the (1) surface stability, (2) infiltration capacity, and (3) the nutrient cycling potential of the landscape. In this study we compared the landscape functionality of natural thornveld areas, rehabilitated opencast mines and rehabilitated slopes of tailings dams in the area leased for mining in the Rustenburg area. Our results show that the rehabilitated

  7. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  8. Cognitive-Perceptual Distortion in Depression as a Function of Generational Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehouwer, R. Scott; Bultsma, Craig A.

    Since adolescent depression has become more frequently recognized, its manifestations need to be identified. To explore cognitive-perceptual distortions in depression as a function of generational (adolescent vs. adult) differences, 25 adult and 25 adolescent female inpatients diagnosed as depressed were administered the Beck Depression Inventory…

  9. On an approach for computing the generating functions of the characters of simple Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Núñez, José; García Fuertes, Wifredo; Perelomov, Askold M.

    2014-04-01

    We describe a general approach to obtain the generating functions of the characters of simple Lie algebras which is based on the theory of the quantum trigonometric Calogero-Sutherland model. We show how the method works in practice by means of a few examples involving some low rank classical algebras.

  10. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  11. PreSurgMapp: a MATLAB Toolbox for Presurgical Mapping of Eloquent Functional Areas Based on Task-Related and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiyuan; Ding, Zhongxiang; Mao, Dewang; Yuan, Jianhua; Zhu, Fangmei; Chen, Shuda; Xu, Yan; Lou, Lin; Feng, Xiaoyan; Qi, Le; Qiu, Wusi; Zhang, Han; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2016-10-01

    The main goal of brain tumor surgery is to maximize tumor resection while minimizing the risk of irreversible postoperative functional sequelae. Eloquent functional areas should be delineated preoperatively, particularly for patients with tumors near eloquent areas. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a noninvasive technique that demonstrates great promise for presurgical planning. However, specialized data processing toolkits for presurgical planning remain lacking. Based on several functions in open-source software such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), Resting-State fMRI Data Analysis Toolkit (REST), Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF) and Multiple Independent Component Analysis (MICA), here, we introduce an open-source MATLAB toolbox named PreSurgMapp. This toolbox can reveal eloquent areas using comprehensive methods and various complementary fMRI modalities. For example, PreSurgMapp supports both model-based (general linear model, GLM, and seed correlation) and data-driven (independent component analysis, ICA) methods and processes both task-based and resting-state fMRI data. PreSurgMapp is designed for highly automatic and individualized functional mapping with a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) for time-saving pipeline processing. For example, sensorimotor and language-related components can be automatically identified without human input interference using an effective, accurate component identification algorithm using discriminability index. All the results generated can be further evaluated and compared by neuro-radiologists or neurosurgeons. This software has substantial value for clinical neuro-radiology and neuro-oncology, including application to patients with low- and high-grade brain tumors and those with epilepsy foci in the dominant language hemisphere who are planning to undergo a temporal lobectomy.

  12. PreSurgMapp: a MATLAB Toolbox for Presurgical Mapping of Eloquent Functional Areas Based on Task-Related and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiyuan; Ding, Zhongxiang; Mao, Dewang; Yuan, Jianhua; Zhu, Fangmei; Chen, Shuda; Xu, Yan; Lou, Lin; Feng, Xiaoyan; Qi, Le; Qiu, Wusi; Zhang, Han; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2016-10-01

    The main goal of brain tumor surgery is to maximize tumor resection while minimizing the risk of irreversible postoperative functional sequelae. Eloquent functional areas should be delineated preoperatively, particularly for patients with tumors near eloquent areas. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a noninvasive technique that demonstrates great promise for presurgical planning. However, specialized data processing toolkits for presurgical planning remain lacking. Based on several functions in open-source software such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), Resting-State fMRI Data Analysis Toolkit (REST), Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF) and Multiple Independent Component Analysis (MICA), here, we introduce an open-source MATLAB toolbox named PreSurgMapp. This toolbox can reveal eloquent areas using comprehensive methods and various complementary fMRI modalities. For example, PreSurgMapp supports both model-based (general linear model, GLM, and seed correlation) and data-driven (independent component analysis, ICA) methods and processes both task-based and resting-state fMRI data. PreSurgMapp is designed for highly automatic and individualized functional mapping with a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) for time-saving pipeline processing. For example, sensorimotor and language-related components can be automatically identified without human input interference using an effective, accurate component identification algorithm using discriminability index. All the results generated can be further evaluated and compared by neuro-radiologists or neurosurgeons. This software has substantial value for clinical neuro-radiology and neuro-oncology, including application to patients with low- and high-grade brain tumors and those with epilepsy foci in the dominant language hemisphere who are planning to undergo a temporal lobectomy. PMID:27221107

  13. Functional approach to exploring climatic and landscape controls on runoff generation. 2. Timing of runoff storm response

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongyi; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-12-09

    Hortonian overland flow, Dunne overland flow and subsurface stormflow are the three dominant mechanisms contributing to both the volume and timing of streamflow. A previous study quantified the climatic and landscape controls on the relative dominance of the volumes of the different runoff components. In this paper we explore the impacts of climate, soil and topography on the timing of these runoff components in small catchments within the framework of the Connected Instantaneous Response Functions (CIRF). The CIRF here is viewed as a probability density function of travel times of water droplets associated with a given runoff generation mechanism (from the locations where they are generated to the catchment outlet). CIRF is a refinement of the traditional catchment IRF in that it explicitly accounts for variable contributing areas: only those partial areas of runoff generation which are hydrologically connected to the outlet are regarded as contributing areas. The CIRFs are derived for each runoff mechanism through the numerical simulations with a spatially distributed hydrological model which accounts for spatially distributed runoff generation and routing, involving all three mechanisms, under multiple combinations of climate, soil and topographic properties. The advective and dispersive aspects of catchment’s runoff routing response are captured through the use of, respectively, the mean travel times and dimensionless forms of the CIRFs (i.e., scaled by their respective mean travel times). It was found that the CIRFs, upon non-dimensionalization, collapsed to common characteristic shapes, which could be explained in terms of the relative contributions of hillslope and channel network flows, and especially of the size of the runoff contributing areas. The contributing areas are themselves governed by the competition between drainage and recharge to the water table, and could be explained by a dimensionless drainage index which quantifies this competition. On

  14. Characterizing Urban Household Waste Generation and Metabolism Considering Community Stratification in a Rapid Urbanizing Area of China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lishan; Lin, Tao; Chen, Shaohua; Zhang, Guoqin; Ye, Zhilong; Yu, Zhaowu

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between social stratification and municipal solid waste generation remains uncertain under current rapid urbanization. Based on a multi-object spatial sampling technique, we selected 191 households in a rapidly urbanizing area of Xiamen, China. The selected communities were classified into three types: work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities in the context of housing policy reform in China. Field survey data were used to characterize household waste generation patterns considering community stratification. Our results revealed a disparity in waste generation profiles among different households. The three community types differed with respect to family income, living area, religious affiliation, and homeowner occupation. Income, family structure, and lifestyle caused significant differences in waste generation among work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities, respectively. Urban waste generation patterns are expected to evolve due to accelerating urbanization and associated community transition. A multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism approach was applied to waste metabolism linking it to particular socioeconomic conditions that influence material flows and their evolution. Waste metabolism, both pace and density, was highest for family structure driven patterns, followed by lifestyle and income driven. The results will guide community-specific management policies in rapidly urbanizing areas. PMID:26690056

  15. Characterizing Urban Household Waste Generation and Metabolism Considering Community Stratification in a Rapid Urbanizing Area of China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lishan; Lin, Tao; Chen, Shaohua; Zhang, Guoqin; Ye, Zhilong; Yu, Zhaowu

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between social stratification and municipal solid waste generation remains uncertain under current rapid urbanization. Based on a multi-object spatial sampling technique, we selected 191 households in a rapidly urbanizing area of Xiamen, China. The selected communities were classified into three types: work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities in the context of housing policy reform in China. Field survey data were used to characterize household waste generation patterns considering community stratification. Our results revealed a disparity in waste generation profiles among different households. The three community types differed with respect to family income, living area, religious affiliation, and homeowner occupation. Income, family structure, and lifestyle caused significant differences in waste generation among work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities, respectively. Urban waste generation patterns are expected to evolve due to accelerating urbanization and associated community transition. A multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism approach was applied to waste metabolism linking it to particular socioeconomic conditions that influence material flows and their evolution. Waste metabolism, both pace and density, was highest for family structure driven patterns, followed by lifestyle and income driven. The results will guide community-specific management policies in rapidly urbanizing areas.

  16. Characterizing Urban Household Waste Generation and Metabolism Considering Community Stratification in a Rapid Urbanizing Area of China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lishan; Lin, Tao; Chen, Shaohua; Zhang, Guoqin; Ye, Zhilong; Yu, Zhaowu

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between social stratification and municipal solid waste generation remains uncertain under current rapid urbanization. Based on a multi-object spatial sampling technique, we selected 191 households in a rapidly urbanizing area of Xiamen, China. The selected communities were classified into three types: work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities in the context of housing policy reform in China. Field survey data were used to characterize household waste generation patterns considering community stratification. Our results revealed a disparity in waste generation profiles among different households. The three community types differed with respect to family income, living area, religious affiliation, and homeowner occupation. Income, family structure, and lifestyle caused significant differences in waste generation among work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities, respectively. Urban waste generation patterns are expected to evolve due to accelerating urbanization and associated community transition. A multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism approach was applied to waste metabolism linking it to particular socioeconomic conditions that influence material flows and their evolution. Waste metabolism, both pace and density, was highest for family structure driven patterns, followed by lifestyle and income driven. The results will guide community-specific management policies in rapidly urbanizing areas. PMID:26690056

  17. The Road Less Travelled: Tracing the Path of First-Generation Students from Rural Areas to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodsdon, Michelle Caron

    2012-01-01

    Narrative inquiry was used to trace the educational journeys of 11 first-generation university students from rural areas of Colorado in an effort to identify the experiences, beliefs, and people that impacted their decision to attend a 4-year institution. Students were asked to convey their experiences growing up within the contexts of their…

  18. Generating artificially mastered motions for an upper limb in baseball pitching from several objective functions.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Y; Inokuchi, S; Omura, K

    2000-01-01

    It is possible to consider a mastered skill to be an optimal skill under some conditions, especially in the field of sports, We call an ideal skill generated in an artificial environment like a computer, an "artificially mastered skill". There must exist an objective function which represents the objective of the optimization for the skill. The objective function plays the most important role in defining the meaning of the mastered skill. In this paper, we propose a computer simulation method of generating artificially mastered motions for an upper limb during baseball pitching by using a three-dimensional mathematical model and an optimizing method. We report the consequences of simulation experiments for several objective functions that define the mastered skill in the meaning of "nonwasteful" and/or "smooth". From the consequences, we also investigate the property of an "artificially mastered skill motion" generated from each objective function, paying attention to differences among the consequent motions for each objective function from the viewpoints of kinematics and dynamics.

  19. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-Chen; Liu, Han-Qiu; Hua, Xu-Yun; Shen, Yun-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  20. Radiation and hygienic principles for substantiation of sizes and functioning of observation areas of NPPs.

    PubMed

    Bonchuk, Iu V

    2015-12-01

    The article analyzes the requirements of legislative and regulatory documents of Ukraine regarding purposes of observation areas of nuclear power plants, radiation and hygienic principles for substantiation of their sizes and other aspects of their functioning. It was considered in detail the layering of requirements for observation areas, which combine their "monitoring" purposes and "emergency" functionality. The proposals for changes in legislative and regulatory documents of Ukraine are given. Their implementation will not only solve the problem of zoning around NPPs and other radiation and nuclear facilities, but also to harmonize the legislation of Ukraine with the reg ulatory requirements of the European Union.

  1. Radiation and hygienic principles for substantiation of sizes and functioning of observation areas of NPPs.

    PubMed

    Bonchuk, Iu V

    2015-12-01

    The article analyzes the requirements of legislative and regulatory documents of Ukraine regarding purposes of observation areas of nuclear power plants, radiation and hygienic principles for substantiation of their sizes and other aspects of their functioning. It was considered in detail the layering of requirements for observation areas, which combine their "monitoring" purposes and "emergency" functionality. The proposals for changes in legislative and regulatory documents of Ukraine are given. Their implementation will not only solve the problem of zoning around NPPs and other radiation and nuclear facilities, but also to harmonize the legislation of Ukraine with the reg ulatory requirements of the European Union. PMID:26695892

  2. Next Generation Air Measurements for Fugitive, Area Source, and Fence Line Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Next generation air measurements (NGAM) is an EPA term for the advancing field of air pollutant sensor technologies, data integration concepts, and geospatial modeling strategies. Ranging from personal sensors to satellite remote sensing, NGAM systems may provide revolutionary n...

  3. Next Generation Emission Measurements for Fugitive, Area Source, and Fence Line Applications?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Next generation emissions measurements (NGEM) is an EPA term for the rapidly advancing field of air pollutant sensor technologies, data integration concepts, and associated geospatial modeling strategies for source emissions measurements. Ranging from low coat sensors to satelli...

  4. Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Fehring, Jr., Edward J.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2001-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  5. Study of production functions for modeling forest biomass: An area for research

    SciTech Connect

    Nautiyal, J.C. ); Belli, K.L. )

    1989-09-01

    The usefulness of production functions, mathematical descriptions of production processes, has long been recognized by economists in manufacturing industries, and more recently by agricultural scientists in the field of biological production. As increasing emphasis in forestry is placed on short-rotation, intensive crop management it would seem that foresters would also require production functions for rational timber management planning. These functions could be useful in a number of areas such as: crop tree growth prediction, control of stand development, economic analysis for decision-making purposes, and for determining the so-called elasticities of inputs and outputs. A very general functional form that may be appropriate for the development of forestry models is the transcendental logarithmic, or translog, function. Unfortunately, at this time, sufficiently detailed data do not seem to be available for any tree species to estimate a production function that could make sophisticated intensive forest management possible.

  6. Connectivity precedes function in the development of the visual word form area.

    PubMed

    Saygin, Zeynep M; Osher, David E; Norton, Elizabeth S; Youssoufian, Deanna A; Beach, Sara D; Feather, Jenelle; Gaab, Nadine; Gabrieli, John D E; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2016-09-01

    What determines the cortical location at which a given functionally specific region will arise in development? We tested the hypothesis that functionally specific regions develop in their characteristic locations because of pre-existing differences in the extrinsic connectivity of that region to the rest of the brain. We exploited the visual word form area (VWFA) as a test case, scanning children with diffusion and functional imaging at age 5, before they learned to read, and at age 8, after they learned to read. We found the VWFA developed functionally in this interval and that its location in a particular child at age 8 could be predicted from that child's connectivity fingerprints (but not functional responses) at age 5. These results suggest that early connectivity instructs the functional development of the VWFA, possibly reflecting a general mechanism of cortical development. PMID:27500407

  7. Explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions for charged particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruili; Qin, Hong; Tang, Yifa; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of a charged particle in the canonical coordinates is a Hamiltonian system, and the well-known symplectic algorithm has been regarded as the de facto method for numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems due to its long-term accuracy and fidelity. For long-term simulations with high efficiency, explicit symplectic algorithms are desirable. However, it is generally believed that explicit symplectic algorithms are only available for sum-separable Hamiltonians, and this restriction limits the application of explicit symplectic algorithms to charged particle dynamics. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the familiar sum-split method and a generating function method to construct second- and third-order explicit symplectic algorithms for dynamics of charged particle. The generating function method is designed to generate explicit symplectic algorithms for product-separable Hamiltonian with form of H(x,p)=p_{i}f(x) or H(x,p)=x_{i}g(p). Applied to the simulations of charged particle dynamics, the explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions demonstrate superiorities in conservation and efficiency. PMID:27575228

  8. A multi-function IEC 61850 packet generator based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Li, Hong-bin; Cheng, Han-miao

    2016-07-01

    An IEC 61850 packet generator is used to produce IEC 61850-9-2 packets by simulating the merging unit and testing the IEC 61850 digital device. While the existing IEC packet generator can produce ideal digital without any noise, it does not take into account the fact that the merging unit output signal packets will be inevitably superimposed with noise. Since the International Electrical Commission standard of the electronic current transformer specifies the minimum output signal-to-noise ratio of the merging unit to be 30 dB, and the signal superimposed with noise will influence the operation performance of the digital device, it is necessary to design a multi-function IEC 61850-9-2 packet generator for a digital device test. Therefore, in this paper, a multi-function IEC 61850 packet generator has been developed, which not only can output various IEC 61850-9-2 packets, but also can add white Gaussian noise to the signal for digital device testing. By testing three digital electricity meters from different manufacturers, we showed that the error of the digital electricity meter is significantly larger when the signal packet is superimposed with noise. Also when the signal-to-noise ration is 30 dB, the error of one of the meters exceeds the allowed range of the accuracy class. This indicates that the noise testing and the noise setting function of the system has an important role in the testing of a digital device.

  9. Explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions for charged particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruili; Qin, Hong; Tang, Yifa; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of a charged particle in the canonical coordinates is a Hamiltonian system, and the well-known symplectic algorithm has been regarded as the de facto method for numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems due to its long-term accuracy and fidelity. For long-term simulations with high efficiency, explicit symplectic algorithms are desirable. However, it is generally believed that explicit symplectic algorithms are only available for sum-separable Hamiltonians, and this restriction limits the application of explicit symplectic algorithms to charged particle dynamics. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the familiar sum-split method and a generating function method to construct second- and third-order explicit symplectic algorithms for dynamics of charged particle. The generating function method is designed to generate explicit symplectic algorithms for product-separable Hamiltonian with form of H (x ,p ) =pif (x ) or H (x ,p ) =xig (p ) . Applied to the simulations of charged particle dynamics, the explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions demonstrate superiorities in conservation and efficiency.

  10. Generation and functional assessment of 3D multicellular spheroids in droplet based microfluidics platform.

    PubMed

    Sabhachandani, P; Motwani, V; Cohen, N; Sarkar, S; Torchilin, V; Konry, T

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe a robust, microfluidic technique to generate and analyze 3D tumor spheroids, which resembles tumor microenvironment and can be used as a more effective preclinical drug testing and screening model. Monodisperse cell-laden alginate droplets were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices that combine T-junction droplet generation and external gelation for spheroid formation. The proposed approach has the capability to incorporate multiple cell types. For the purposes of our study, we generated spheroids with breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 drug sensitive and resistant) and co-culture spheroids of MCF-7 together with a fibroblast cell line (HS-5). The device has the capability to house 1000 spheroids on chip for drug screening and other functional analysis. Cellular viability of spheroids in the array part of the device was maintained for two weeks by continuous perfusion of complete media into the device. The functional performance of our 3D tumor models and a dose dependent response of standard chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (Dox) and standard drug combination Dox and paclitaxel (PCT) was analyzed on our chip-based platform. Altogether, our work provides a simple and novel, in vitro platform to generate, image and analyze uniform, 3D monodisperse alginate hydrogel tumors for various omic studies and therapeutic efficiency screening, an important translational step before in vivo studies. PMID:26686985

  11. Modelling contrast sensitivity as a function of retinal illuminance and grating area.

    PubMed

    Rovamo, J; Mustonen, J; Näsänen, R

    1994-05-01

    We extended the contrast detection model of human vision [Rovamo, Luntinen & Näsänen (1993b) Vision Research, 33, 2773-2788] to low light levels by taking into account the effect of light-dependent quantal noise. The extended model comprises (i) low-pass filtering due to the optical modulation transfer function of the eye, (ii) addition of light-dependent noise at the event of quantal absorption, (iii) high-pass filtering of neural origin (lateral inhibition), (iv) addition of internal neural noise, and (v) detection by a local matched filter whose efficiency decreases with increasing grating area. To test the model we measured foveal contrast sensitivity as a function of retinal illuminance and grating area at spatial frequencies of 0.125-32 c/deg. In agreement with the model, monocular contrast sensitivity at all grating areas increased in proportion to I when retinal illuminance (I) was smaller than critical illuminance. Thereafter the increase saturated and contrast sensitivity became independent of retinal illuminance. Similarly, at all levels of retinal illuminance contrast sensitivity increased in proportion to A when grating area (A) was smaller than critical area. Thereafter the increase saturated and contrast sensitivity became independent of area. Critical level of retinal illuminance increased in proportion to the spatial frequency squared. Critical area marking the saturation of spatial integration was constant at low spatial frequencies but decreased in inverse proportion to spatial frequency squared at medium and high spatial frequencies. The maximum contrast sensitivity obtainable by spatial integration in bright light increased at low spatial frequencies in proportion to spatial frequency, was constant at medium spatial frequencies, and decreased in inverse proportion to spatial frequency cubed at high spatial frequencies. The increase was due to the neural modulation transfer function of the visual pathways whereas the decrease was due to the

  12. pfSNP: An integrated potentially functional SNP resource that facilitates hypotheses generation through knowledge syntheses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Chong, Samuel S; Lee, Caroline G L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, >14,000,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are reported. Identifying phenotype-affecting SNPs among these many SNPs pose significant challenges. Although several Web resources are available that can inform about the functionality of SNPs, these resources are mainly annotation databases and are not very comprehensive. In this article, we present a comprehensive, well-annotated, integrated pfSNP (potentially functional SNPs) Web resource (http://pfs.nus.edu.sg/), which is aimed to facilitate better hypothesis generation through knowledge syntheses mediated by better data integration and a user-friendly Web interface. pfSNP integrates >40 different algorithms/resources to interrogate >14,000,000 SNPs from the dbSNP database for SNPs of potential functional significance based on previous published reports, inferred potential functionality from genetic approaches as well as predicted potential functionality from sequence motifs. Its query interface has the user-friendly "auto-complete, prompt-as-you-type" feature and is highly customizable, facilitating different combination of queries using Boolean-logic. Additionally, to facilitate better understanding of the results and aid in hypotheses generation, gene/pathway-level information with text clouds highlighting enriched tissues/pathways as well as detailed-related information are also provided on the results page. Hence, the pfSNP resource will be of great interest to scientists focusing on association studies as well as those interested to experimentally address the functionality of SNPs.

  13. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  14. Channel based generating function approach to the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Anqi; Huang, Yandong; Shuai, Jianwei; Lan, Yueheng

    2016-03-01

    Internal and external fluctuations, such as channel noise and synaptic noise, contribute to the generation of spontaneous action potentials in neurons. Many different Langevin approaches have been proposed to speed up the computation but with waning accuracy especially at small channel numbers. We apply a generating function approach to the master equation for the ion channel dynamics and further propose two accelerating algorithms, with an accuracy close to the Gillespie algorithm but with much higher efficiency, opening the door for expedited simulation of noisy action potential propagating along axons or other types of noisy signal transduction.

  15. Requirement for CD4 T Cell Help in Generating Functional CD8 T Cell Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Shen, Hao

    2003-04-01

    Although primary CD8 responses to acute infections are independent of CD4 help, it is unknown whether a similar situation applies to secondary responses. We show that depletion of CD4 cells during the recall response has minimal effect, whereas depletion during the priming phase leads to reduced responses by memory CD8 cells to reinfection. Memory CD8 cells generated in CD4+/+ mice responded normally when transferred into CD4-/- hosts, whereas memory CD8 cells generated in CD4-/- mice mounted defective recall responses in CD4+/+ adoptive hosts. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in the development of functional CD8 memory.

  16. Channel based generating function approach to the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal system

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Anqi; Huang, Yandong; Shuai, Jianwei; Lan, Yueheng

    2016-01-01

    Internal and external fluctuations, such as channel noise and synaptic noise, contribute to the generation of spontaneous action potentials in neurons. Many different Langevin approaches have been proposed to speed up the computation but with waning accuracy especially at small channel numbers. We apply a generating function approach to the master equation for the ion channel dynamics and further propose two accelerating algorithms, with an accuracy close to the Gillespie algorithm but with much higher efficiency, opening the door for expedited simulation of noisy action potential propagating along axons or other types of noisy signal transduction. PMID:26940002

  17. Automotive Radar and Lidar Systems for Next Generation Driver Assistance Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasshofer, R. H.; Gresser, K.

    2005-05-01

    Automotive radar and lidar sensors represent key components for next generation driver assistance functions (Jones, 2001). Today, their use is limited to comfort applications in premium segment vehicles although an evolution process towards more safety-oriented functions is taking place. Radar sensors available on the market today suffer from low angular resolution and poor target detection in medium ranges (30 to 60m) over azimuth angles larger than ±30°. In contrast, Lidar sensors show large sensitivity towards environmental influences (e.g. snow, fog, dirt). Both sensor technologies today have a rather high cost level, forbidding their wide-spread usage on mass markets. A common approach to overcome individual sensor drawbacks is the employment of data fusion techniques (Bar-Shalom, 2001). Raw data fusion requires a common, standardized data interface to easily integrate a variety of asynchronous sensor data into a fusion network. Moreover, next generation sensors should be able to dynamically adopt to new situations and should have the ability to work in cooperative sensor environments. As vehicular function development today is being shifted more and more towards virtual prototyping, mathematical sensor models should be available. These models should take into account the sensor's functional principle as well as all typical measurement errors generated by the sensor.

  18. New methodology to determine air quality in urban areas based on runs rules for functional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, J.; Martínez, J.; Pastor, J. J.; Taboada, J.; Piñeiro, J. I.; García-Nieto, P. J.

    2014-02-01

    Functional data appear in a multitude of industrial applications and processes. However, in many cases at present, such data continue to be studied from the conventional standpoint based on Statistical Process Control (SPC), losing the capacity of analysing different aspects over the time. In this study, the well-known runs rules for Shewhart Type Control Charts are adapted to the case of functional data. Also, in the application of this functional approach, a number of advantages over the classical one are described. Furthermore, the results of applying this new methodology are analysed to determine the air quality of urban areas from the gas emissions at different weather stations.

  19. Prevalence of increases in functional connectivity in visual, somatosensory and language areas in congenital blindness

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Lizette; Bahri, Mohamed A.; Cavaliere, Carlo; Soddu, Andrea; Laureys, Steven; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    There is ample evidence that congenitally blind individuals rely more strongly on non-visual information compared to sighted controls when interacting with the outside world. Although brain imaging studies indicate that congenitally blind individuals recruit occipital areas when performing various non-visual and cognitive tasks, it remains unclear through which pathways this is accomplished. To address this question, we compared resting state functional connectivity in a group of congenital blind and matched sighted control subjects. We used a seed-based analysis with a priori specified regions-of-interest (ROIs) within visual, somato-sensory, auditory and language areas. Between-group comparisons revealed increased functional connectivity within both the ventral and the dorsal visual streams in blind participants, whereas connectivity between the two streams was reduced. In addition, our data revealed stronger functional connectivity in blind participants between the visual ROIs and areas implicated in language and tactile (Braille) processing such as the inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area), thalamus, supramarginal gyrus and cerebellum. The observed group differences underscore the extent of the cross-modal reorganization in the brain and the supra-modal function of the occipital cortex in congenitally blind individuals. PMID:26190978

  20. Prevalence of increases in functional connectivity in visual, somatosensory and language areas in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Heine, Lizette; Bahri, Mohamed A; Cavaliere, Carlo; Soddu, Andrea; Laureys, Steven; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    There is ample evidence that congenitally blind individuals rely more strongly on non-visual information compared to sighted controls when interacting with the outside world. Although brain imaging studies indicate that congenitally blind individuals recruit occipital areas when performing various non-visual and cognitive tasks, it remains unclear through which pathways this is accomplished. To address this question, we compared resting state functional connectivity in a group of congenital blind and matched sighted control subjects. We used a seed-based analysis with a priori specified regions-of-interest (ROIs) within visual, somato-sensory, auditory and language areas. Between-group comparisons revealed increased functional connectivity within both the ventral and the dorsal visual streams in blind participants, whereas connectivity between the two streams was reduced. In addition, our data revealed stronger functional connectivity in blind participants between the visual ROIs and areas implicated in language and tactile (Braille) processing such as the inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area), thalamus, supramarginal gyrus and cerebellum. The observed group differences underscore the extent of the cross-modal reorganization in the brain and the supra-modal function of the occipital cortex in congenitally blind individuals. PMID:26190978

  1. 43 CFR 3137.81 - What is the function of a participating area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What is the function of a participating area? 3137.81 Section 3137.81 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND GAS LEASING: NATIONAL PETROLEUM RESERVE, ALASKA...

  2. Increased functional connectivity between language and visually deprived areas in late and partial blindness.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Norman; Authié, Colas N; Sanda, Nicolae; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Safran, Avinoam B; Habas, Christophe; Amedi, Amir

    2016-08-01

    In the congenitally blind, language processing involves visual areas. In the case of normal visual development however, it remains unclear whether later visual loss induces interactions between the language and visual areas. This study compared the resting-state functional connectivity (FC) of retinotopic and language areas in two unique groups of late visually deprived subjects: (1) blind individuals suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP), (2) RP subjects without a visual periphery but with preserved central "tunnel vision", both of whom were contrasted with sighted controls. The results showed increased FC between Broca's area and the visually deprived areas in the peripheral V1 for individuals with tunnel vision, and both the peripheral and central V1 for blind individuals. These findings suggest that FC can develop in the adult brain between the visual and language systems in the completely and partially blind. These changes start in the deprived areas and increase in size (involving both foveal and peripheral V1) and strength (from negative to positive FC) as the disease and sensory deprivation progress. These observations support the claim that functional connectivity between remote systems that perform completely different tasks can change in the adult brain in cases of total and even partial visual deprivation. PMID:27143090

  3. Increased functional connectivity between language and visually deprived areas in late and partial blindness.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Norman; Authié, Colas N; Sanda, Nicolae; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Safran, Avinoam B; Habas, Christophe; Amedi, Amir

    2016-08-01

    In the congenitally blind, language processing involves visual areas. In the case of normal visual development however, it remains unclear whether later visual loss induces interactions between the language and visual areas. This study compared the resting-state functional connectivity (FC) of retinotopic and language areas in two unique groups of late visually deprived subjects: (1) blind individuals suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP), (2) RP subjects without a visual periphery but with preserved central "tunnel vision", both of whom were contrasted with sighted controls. The results showed increased FC between Broca's area and the visually deprived areas in the peripheral V1 for individuals with tunnel vision, and both the peripheral and central V1 for blind individuals. These findings suggest that FC can develop in the adult brain between the visual and language systems in the completely and partially blind. These changes start in the deprived areas and increase in size (involving both foveal and peripheral V1) and strength (from negative to positive FC) as the disease and sensory deprivation progress. These observations support the claim that functional connectivity between remote systems that perform completely different tasks can change in the adult brain in cases of total and even partial visual deprivation.

  4. Learner-Generated Drawing as a Strategy for Learning from Content Area Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meter, Peggy; Aleksic, Maja; Schwartz, Ana; Garner, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Learner-generated drawing is a strategy that can improve learning from expository text. In this paper, a model of drawing construction is proposed and the experimental design tests hypotheses derived from this model. Fourth and sixth grade participants used drawing under three experimental conditions with two conditions including varying degrees…

  5. The neural substrates underlying word generation: a bilingual functional-imaging study.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, D; Milner, B; Zatorre, R J; Meyer, E; Evans, A C

    1995-01-01

    We used positron emission tomography to investigate word generation in subjects whose first language was English but who were also proficient in French. These subjects performed three types of lexical search: rhyme generation based on phonological cues, synonym generation requiring a semantic search, and translation involving access to a semantic representation in the other language. Two control tasks required word repetition in each language. We investigated whether phonological and semantic word-generation activate similar regions and whether the same neural substrates subserve the second language as subserve the first. A series of cerebral blood flow increases, corresponding to Brodmann's areas 47, 46, 45, and 8, were observed in the left frontal cortex when the baseline repetition task was subtracted from each of the respective generation tasks. The results suggest that common neural substrates are involved in within- and across-language searches and that the left inferior frontal region is activated irrespective of whether the search is guided by phonological or semantic cues. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7708745

  6. Generating functions and stability study of multivariate self-excited epidemic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, A. I.; Sornette, D.

    2011-09-01

    We present a stability study of the class of multivariate self-excited Hawkes point processes, that can model natural and social systems, including earthquakes, epileptic seizures and the dynamics of neuron assemblies, bursts of exchanges in social communities, interactions between Internet bloggers, bank network fragility and cascading of failures, national sovereign default contagion, and so on. We present the general theory of multivariate generating functions to derive the number of events over all generations of various types that are triggered by a mother event of a given type. We obtain the stability domains of various systems, as a function of the topological structure of the mutual excitations across different event types. We find that mutual triggering tends to provide a significant extension of the stability (or subcritical) domain compared with the case where event types are decoupled, that is, when an event of a given type can only trigger events of the same type.

  7. Dual representation for the generating functional of the Feynman path-integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matone, Marco

    2016-09-01

    The generating functional for scalar theories admits a representation which is dual with respect to the one introduced by Schwinger, interchanging the role of the free and interacting terms. It maps ∫ V (δJ) and JΔJ to δϕc Δδϕc and ∫ V (ϕc), respectively, with ϕc = ∫ JΔ and Δ the Feynman propagator. Comparing the Schwinger representation with its dual version one gets a little known relation that we prove to be a particular case of a more general operatorial relation. We then derive a new representation of the generating functional T [ϕc ] = W [ J ] expressed in terms of covariant derivatives acting on 1

  8. Regional structural differences across functionally parcellated Brodmann areas of human primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa-María; Besle, Julien; Mougin, Olivier; Gowland, Penny; Bowtell, Richard; Schluppeck, Denis; Francis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    Ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI is ideally suited for structural and functional imaging of the brain. High-resolution structural MRI can be used to map the anatomical boundaries between functional domains of the brain by identifying changes related to the pattern of myelination within cortical gray matter, opening up the possibility to study the relationship between functional domains and underlying structure in vivo. In a recent study, we demonstrated the correspondence between functional (based on retinotopic mapping) and structural (based on changes in T2(⁎)-weighted images linked to myelination) parcellations of the primary visual cortex (V1) in vivo at 7T (Sanchez-Panchuelo et al., 2012b). Here, we take advantage of the improved BOLD CNR and high spatial resolution achievable at 7T to study regional structural variations across the functionally defined areas within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in individual subjects. Using a traveling wave fMRI paradigm to map the internal somatotopic representation of the index, middle, and ring fingers in S1, we were able to identify multiple map reversals at the tip and base, corresponding to the boundaries between Brodmann areas 3a, 3b, 1 and 2. Based on high resolution structural MRI data acquired in the same subjects, we inspected these functionally-parcellated Brodmann areas for differences in cortical thickness and MR contrast measures (magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and signal intensity in phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images) that are sensitive to myelination. Consistent area-related differences in cortical thickness and MTR/PSIR measurements were found across subjects. However these measures did not have sufficient sensitivity to allow definition of areal boundaries.

  9. Comparison of deposited surface area of airborne ultrafine particles generated from two welding processes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C; Miranda, Rosa M; Santos, Telmo G; Vieira, M T

    2012-09-01

    This article describes work performed on the assessment of the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in two welding processes metal-active gas (MAG) of carbon steel and friction-stir welding (FSW) of aluminium in terms of deposited area in alveolar tract of the lung using a nanoparticle surface area monitor analyser. The obtained results showed the dependence from process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and clearly demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles, when compared with background levels. The obtained results showed that the process that results on the lower levels of alveolar-deposited surface area is FSW, unlike MAG. Nevertheless, all the tested processes resulted in important doses of ultrafine particles that are to be deposited in the human lung of exposed workers.

  10. Porous polymer monoliths with large surface area and functional groups prepared via copolymerization of protected functional monomers and hypercrosslinking.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Svec, Frantisek

    2013-11-22

    A new approach to the preparation of porous polymer monoliths possessing both large surface area and functional groups has been developed. The chloromethyl groups of poly(styrene-co-4-acetoxystyrene-co-vinylbenzyl chloride-co-divinylbenzene) monolith enable post-polymerization hypercrosslinking catalyzed by ferric chloride in dichloroethane leading to a multitude of small pores thus enhancing the surface area. The acetoxy functionalities are easily deprotected using hydrazine to produce polar phenolic hydroxyl groups, which would be difficult to obtain by direct copolymerization of hydroxyl-containing monomers. The hypercrosslinking and deprotection reactions as well as their sequence were studied in detail with bulk polymer monoliths containing up to 50% 4-acetoxystyrene and its progress monitored by infrared spectrometry and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. No significant difference was found for both possible successions. All monoliths were also prepared in a capillary column format, then deprotected and hypercrosslinked. Capillary columns were tested for the separation of small molecules using reversed phase and normal phase chromatographic modes. For polymer monoliths containing 50% deprotected 4-acetoxystyrene, column efficiencies of 40,000 plates/m for benzene in reversed phase mode and 31,800 plates/m for nitrobenzene in normal phase mode, were obtained. The percentage of hydroxyl groups in the monoliths enables modulation of polarity of the stationary phase. They also represent functionalities that are potentially suitable for further modifications and formation of new types of stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

  11. Functionally Diverse Nucleophilic Trapping of Iminium Intermediates Generated Utilizing Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, David B.; Furst, Laura; Condie, Allison G.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies into visible light-mediated aza-Henry reactions demonstrated that molecular oxygen played a vital role in catalyst turnover as well as the production of base to facilitate the nucleophilic addition of nitroalkanes. Herein, improved conditions for the generation of iminium ions from tetrahydroisoquinolines that allow for versatile nucleophilic trapping are reported. The new conditions provide access to a diverse range of functionality under mild, anaerobic reaction conditions as well as mechanistic insights into the photoredox cycle. PMID:22148974

  12. Graphene oxide functionalized with methylene blue and its performance in singlet oxygen generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtoniszak, M.; Rogińska, D.; Machaliński, B.; Drozdzik, M.; Mijowska, E.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on graphene oxide (GO). • Characterization of graphene oxide–methylene blue nanocomposite (MB–GO). • Examination of MB–GO efficiency in singlet oxygen generation (SOG). • MB–GO performs higher SOG efficiency than pristine MB. - Abstract: Due to unique electronic, mechanical, optical and structural properties, graphene has shown promising applications in many fields, including biomedicine. One of them is noninvasive anticancer therapy – photodynamic therapy (PDT), where singlet oxygen (SO), generated under the irradiation of light with appropriate wavelengths, kills cancer cells. In this study, authors report graphene oxide (GO) noncovalent functionalization with methylene blue (MB). MB molecules underwent adsorption on the surface of GO. Detailed characterization of the obtained material was carried out with UV–vis spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, its performance in singlet oxygen generation (SOG) under irradiation of laser with excitation wavelengths of 785 nm was investigated. Interestingly, GO functionalized with MB (MB–GO) showed enhanced efficiency in singlet oxygen generation compared to pristine MB. The efficiency in SOG was detected by photobleaching of 9,10-anthracenediyl-bis(methylene)dimalonic acid (ABMDMA). These results indicate the material is promising in PDT anticancer therapy and further in vitro and in vivo studies are required.

  13. Generation of Functional CLL-Specific Cord Blood CTL Using CD40-Ligated CLL APC

    PubMed Central

    Decker, William K.; Shah, Nina; Xing, Dongxia; Lapushin, Ruth; Li, Sufang; Robinson, Simon N.; Yang, Hong; Parmar, Simrit; Halpert, Matthew M.; Keating, Michael J.; Gribben, John G.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Wierda, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Though remissions have been observed following allo-HSCT for the treatment of CLL, many CLL patients are ineligible for transplant due to the lack of HLA-compatible donors. The use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) permits transplantation of many patients who lack HLA-compatible donors due to reduced requirements for stringent HLA matching between graft and recipient; however, disease relapse remains a concern with this modality. The generation of CLL-specific CTL from UCB T-cells, primed and expanded against the leukemic clone, might enhance the GVL effect and improve outcomes with UCB transplantation. Here we report the generation of functional, CLL-specific CTL using CD40-ligated CLL cells to prime partially-HLA matched UCB T-cells. Functionality and specificity were demonstrated by immune synapse assay, IFN-γ ELISpot, multi-parametric intracellular cytokine flow cytometry, and 51Cr release assay. The use of patient-specific, non-CLL controls demonstrated the generation of both alloantigen and CLL-specific responses. Subsequently, we developed a clinically-applicable procedure permitting separation of alloreactive CTL from leukemia-specific CTL. Leukemia-specific CTL were able to mediate in vivo killing of CLL in humanized mice without concurrent or subsequent development of xenoGVHD. Our results demonstrate that generation of CLL-specific effectors from UCB is feasible and practical, and the results support further exploration of this strategy as a treatment modality for CLL. PMID:23284688

  14. Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 18 Controls Both Platelet Generation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Delesque-Touchard, Nathalie; Pendaries, Caroline; Volle-Challier, Cécile; Millet, Laurence; Salel, Véronique; Hervé, Caroline; Pflieger, Anne-Marie; Berthou-Soulie, Laurence; Prades, Catherine; Sorg, Tania; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Savi, Pierre; Bono, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    RGS18 is a myeloerythroid lineage-specific regulator of G-protein signaling, highly expressed in megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelets. In the present study, we describe the first generation of a RGS18 knockout mouse model (RGS18-/-). Interesting phenotypic differences between RGS18-/- and wild-type (WT) mice were identified, and show that RGS18 plays a significant role in both platelet generation and function. RGS18 deficiency produced a gain of function phenotype in platelets. In resting platelets, the level of CD62P expression was increased in RGS18-/- mice. This increase correlated with a higher level of plasmatic serotonin concentration. RGS18-/- platelets displayed a higher sensitivity to activation in vitro. RGS18 deficiency markedly increased thrombus formation in vivo. In addition, RGS18-/- mice presented a mild thrombocytopenia, accompanied with a marked deficit in MK number in the bone marrow. Analysis of MK maturation in vitro and in vivo revealed a defective megakaryopoiesis in RGS18-/- mice, with a lower bone marrow content of only the most committed MK precursors. Finally, RGS18 deficiency was correlated to a defect of platelet recovery in vivo under acute conditions of thrombocytopenia. Thus, we highlight a role for RGS18 in platelet generation and function, and provide additional insights into the physiology of RGS18. PMID:25405900

  15. The Area Coverage of Geophysical Fields as a Function of Sensor Field-of View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeffrey R.

    1994-01-01

    In many remote sensing studies of geophysical fields such as clouds, land cover, or sea ice characteristics, the fractional area coverage of the field in an image is estimated as the proportion of pixels that have the characteristic of interest (i.e., are part of the field) as determined by some thresholding operation. The effect of sensor field-of-view on this estimate is examined by modeling the unknown distribution of subpixel area fraction with the beta distribution, whose two parameters depend upon the true fractional area coverage, the pixel size, and the spatial structure of the geophysical field. Since it is often not possible to relate digital number, reflectance, or temperature to subpixel area fraction, the statistical models described are used to determine the effect of pixel size and thresholding operations on the estimate of area fraction for hypothetical geophysical fields. Examples are given for simulated cumuliform clouds and linear openings in sea ice, whose spatial structures are described by an exponential autocovariance function. It is shown that the rate and direction of change in total area fraction with changing pixel size depends on the true area fraction, the spatial structure, and the thresholding operation used.

  16. Design of Hanford Site 4th Generation Multi Function Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-08-30

    This document describes the design of the fourth-generation corrosion monitoring system scheduled to be installed in DST 241-AN-104 early in fiscal year 2001. A fourth-generation multi-function corrosion monitoring system has been designed for installation into a DST in the 241-AN farm at the Hanford Site in FY 2001. Improvements and upgrades from the third-generation system (installed in 241-AN-105) that have been incorporated into the fourth-generation system include: Addition of a built-in water lance to assist installation of probe into tanks with a hard crust layer at the surface of the waste; and Improvement of the electrode mounting apparatus used to attach the corrosion monitoring electrodes to the stainless steel probe body (new design simplifies probe assembly/wiring). These new features improve on the third-generation design and yield a system that is easier to fabricate and install, provides for a better understanding of the relationship between corrosion and other tank operating parameters, and optimizes the use of the riser that houses the probe in the tank.

  17. Automated protein motif generation in the structure-based protein function prediction tool ProMOL.

    PubMed

    Osipovitch, Mikhail; Lambrecht, Mitchell; Baker, Cameron; Madha, Shariq; Mills, Jeffrey L; Craig, Paul A; Bernstein, Herbert J

    2015-12-01

    ProMOL, a plugin for the PyMOL molecular graphics system, is a structure-based protein function prediction tool. ProMOL includes a set of routines for building motif templates that are used for screening query structures for enzyme active sites. Previously, each motif template was generated manually and required supervision in the optimization of parameters for sensitivity and selectivity. We developed an algorithm and workflow for the automation of motif building and testing routines in ProMOL. The algorithm uses a set of empirically derived parameters for optimization and requires little user intervention. The automated motif generation algorithm was first tested in a performance comparison with a set of manually generated motifs based on identical active sites from the same 112 PDB entries. The two sets of motifs were equally effective in identifying alignments with homologs and in rejecting alignments with unrelated structures. A second set of 296 active site motifs were generated automatically, based on Catalytic Site Atlas entries with literature citations, as an expansion of the library of existing manually generated motif templates. The new motif templates exhibited comparable performance to the existing ones in terms of hit rates against native structures, homologs with the same EC and Pfam designations, and randomly selected unrelated structures with a different EC designation at the first EC digit, as well as in terms of RMSD values obtained from local structural alignments of motifs and query structures. This research is supported by NIH grant GM078077. PMID:26573864

  18. On hydrologic similarity: A dimensionless flood frequency model using a generalized geomorphologic unit hydrograph and partial area runoff generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Wood, Eric F.; Beven, Keith J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the shortcomings of the original theory of the geomorphologic unit hydrograph (GUH) is that it assumes that runoff is generated uniformly from the entire catchment area. It is now recognized that in many catchments much of the runoff during storm events is produced on partial areas which usually form on narrow bands along the stream network. A storm response model that includes runoff generation on partial areas by both Hortonian and Dunne mechanisms was recently developed by the authors. In this paper a methodology for integrating this partial area runoff generation model with the GUH-based runoff routing model is presented; this leads to a generalized GUH. The generalized GUH and the storm response model are then used to estimate physically based flood frequency distributions. In most previous work the initial moisture state of the catchment had been assumed to be constant for all the storms. In this paper we relax this assumption and allow the initial moisture conditions to vary between storms. The resulting flood frequency distributions are cast in a scaled dimensionless framework where issues such as catchment scale and similarity can be conveniently addressed. A number of experiments are performed to study the sensitivity of the flood frequency response to some of the 'similarity' parameters identified in this formulation. The results indicate that one of the most important components of the derived flood frequency model relates to the specification of processes within the runoff generation model; specifically the inclusion of both saturation excess and Horton infiltration excess runoff production mechanisms. The dominance of these mechanisms over different return periods of the flood frequency distribution can significantly affect the distributional shape and confidence limits about the distribution. Comparisons with observed flood distributions seem to indicate that such mixed runoff production mechanisms influence flood distribution shape. The

  19. Establishing a quantitative functional relationship between capillary pressure, saturation and interfacial area. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Montemagno, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    'There is a fundamental knowledge gap associated with the in situ remediation of non-aqueous phase pollutants. Currently it is not possible to accurately determine the interfacial surface area of non-aqueous contaminants. As a result it is impossible to (1) accurately establish the health and environmental risk associated with the pollution: (2) precisely quantify and evaluate the potential efficacy of various in situ treatment technologies; and (3) conduct reliable performance assessments of the applied remediation technology during and after the clean-up. The global goal of this investigation is to try to remedy these shortcomings through the development of a formalized functional relationship between interfacial area (a), phase saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). The development of this relationship will allow the direct determination of the fluid-fluid interfacial area from field measurements. Quantitative knowledge of the surface area of the non-aqueous phase pollutant facilitates accurate predictions of both the rate of dissolution and the contact area available for treatment. In addition. if saturation and capillary pressure measurements are made during the remediation process. both the spatial and temporal effectiveness of the remediation technology can be quantified. This information can then be used to optimize the restoration program. The project objective will be achieved through an integrated and focused research program that is comprised of theoretical computational and experimental efforts. These efforts are organized into a framework of four tasks: (1) improve on newly developed laboratory techniques to quantify and directly measure the functional relationship between phase interfacial area (a), saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). (2) Develop new computational algorithms in conjunction with laboratory measurements to predict P, S and a. (3) Test existing theory and develop new theory to describe the relationship between P, S and a at

  20. Parceling of mesial frontal motor areas during ideation and movement using functional magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 tesla.

    PubMed

    Tyszka, J M; Grafton, S T; Chew, W; Woods, R P; Colletti, P M

    1994-06-01

    Finger movement-related responses were identified in three discrete sites of mesial frontal cortex in 7 normal subjects using high resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging. During imagination of the same movements there was a differential response with rostral areas more active than caudal areas. Humans have multiple motor areas in mesial frontal cortex that subserve different functions in motor planning and execution.

  1. 39 CFR 254.2 - Definition of primary function area and criteria used to determine whether an alteration has an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... participating federal agencies. In the U.S. Access Board's 36 CFR part 1191, Appendix C, ABA chapter 2, section... ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS ACT § 254.2 Definition of primary function area and criteria used to determine whether an... Barriers Act, two primary function areas are identified: Customer Lobbies and Workroom Areas....

  2. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  3. Probabilistic map of critical functional regions of the human cerebral cortex: Broca's area revisited.

    PubMed

    Tate, Matthew C; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Tate, Joseph E; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-10-01

    The organization of basic functions of the human brain, particularly in the right hemisphere, remains poorly understood. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have improved our understanding of cortical organization but do not allow for direct interrogation or determination of essential (versus participatory) cortical regions. Direct cortical stimulation represents a unique opportunity to provide novel insights into the functional distribution of critical epicentres. Direct cortical stimulation (bipolar, 60 Hz, 1-ms pulse) was performed in 165 consecutive patients undergoing awake mapping for resection of low-grade gliomas. Tasks included motor, sensory, counting, and picture naming. Stimulation sites eliciting positive (sensory/motor) or negative (speech arrest, dysarthria, anomia, phonological and semantic paraphasias) findings were recorded and mapped onto a standard Montreal Neurological Institute brain atlas. Montreal Neurological Institute-space functional data were subjected to cluster analysis algorithms (K-means, partition around medioids, hierarchical Ward) to elucidate crucial network epicentres. Sensorimotor function was observed in the pre/post-central gyri as expected. Articulation epicentres were also found within the pre/post-central gyri. However, speech arrest localized to ventral premotor cortex, not the classical Broca's area. Anomia/paraphasia data demonstrated foci not only within classical Wernicke's area but also within the middle and inferior frontal gyri. We report the first bilateral probabilistic map for crucial cortical epicentres of human brain functions in the right and left hemispheres, including sensory, motor, and language (speech, articulation, phonology and semantics). These data challenge classical theories of brain organization (e.g. Broca's area as speech output region) and provide a distributed framework for future studies of neural networks. PMID:24970097

  4. Probabilistic map of critical functional regions of the human cerebral cortex: Broca's area revisited.

    PubMed

    Tate, Matthew C; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Tate, Joseph E; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-10-01

    The organization of basic functions of the human brain, particularly in the right hemisphere, remains poorly understood. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have improved our understanding of cortical organization but do not allow for direct interrogation or determination of essential (versus participatory) cortical regions. Direct cortical stimulation represents a unique opportunity to provide novel insights into the functional distribution of critical epicentres. Direct cortical stimulation (bipolar, 60 Hz, 1-ms pulse) was performed in 165 consecutive patients undergoing awake mapping for resection of low-grade gliomas. Tasks included motor, sensory, counting, and picture naming. Stimulation sites eliciting positive (sensory/motor) or negative (speech arrest, dysarthria, anomia, phonological and semantic paraphasias) findings were recorded and mapped onto a standard Montreal Neurological Institute brain atlas. Montreal Neurological Institute-space functional data were subjected to cluster analysis algorithms (K-means, partition around medioids, hierarchical Ward) to elucidate crucial network epicentres. Sensorimotor function was observed in the pre/post-central gyri as expected. Articulation epicentres were also found within the pre/post-central gyri. However, speech arrest localized to ventral premotor cortex, not the classical Broca's area. Anomia/paraphasia data demonstrated foci not only within classical Wernicke's area but also within the middle and inferior frontal gyri. We report the first bilateral probabilistic map for crucial cortical epicentres of human brain functions in the right and left hemispheres, including sensory, motor, and language (speech, articulation, phonology and semantics). These data challenge classical theories of brain organization (e.g. Broca's area as speech output region) and provide a distributed framework for future studies of neural networks.

  5. Generation of functional neurons from feeder-free, keratinocyte-derived equine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchi; Livesey, Matthew Robert; Wyllie, David J A; Proudfoot, Christopher; Whitelaw, Christopher Bruce Alexander; Hay, David Christopher; Donadeu, Francesc Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer unprecedented biomedical potential not only in relation to humans but also companion animals, particularly the horse. Despite this, attempts to generate bona fide equine embryonic stem cells have been unsuccessful. A very limited number of induced PSC lines have so far been generated from equine fibroblasts but their potential for directed differentiation into clinically relevant tissues has not been explored. In this study, we used retroviral vectors to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with comparatively high efficiency from equine keratinocytes. Expression of endogenous PSC markers (OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, NANOG, DNMT3B, and REX1) was effectively restored in these cells, which could also form in vivo several tissue derivatives of the three germ layers, including functional neurons, keratinized epithelium, cartilage, bone, muscle, and respiratory and gastric epithelia. Comparative analysis of different reprogrammed cell lines revealed an association between the ability of iPSCs to form well-differentiated teratomas and the distinct endogenous expression of OCT4 and REX1 and reduced expression of viral transgenes. Importantly, unlike in previous studies, equine iPSCs were successfully expanded using simplified feeder-free culture conditions, constituting significant progress toward future biomedical applications. Further, under appropriate conditions equine iPSCs generated cells with features of cholinergic motor neurons including the ability to generate action potentials, providing the first report of functional cells derived from equine iPSCs. The ability to derive electrically active neurons in vitro from a large animal reveals highly conserved pathways of differentiation across species and opens the way for new and exciting applications in veterinary regenerative medicine. PMID:24548115

  6. Generating and analyzing constrained dark energy equations of state and systematics functions

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; Linder, Eric V.

    2010-02-15

    Some functions entering cosmological analysis, such as the dark energy equation of state or systematic uncertainties, are unknown functions of redshift. To include them without assuming a particular form, we derive an efficient method for generating realizations of all possible functions subject to certain bounds or physical conditions, e.g. w is an element of [-1,+1] as for quintessence. The method is optimal in the sense that it is both pure and complete in filling the allowed space of principal components. The technique is applied to propagation of systematic uncertainties in supernova population drift and dust corrections and calibration through to cosmology parameter estimation and bias in the magnitude-redshift Hubble diagram. We identify specific ranges of redshift and wavelength bands where the greatest improvements in supernova systematics due to population evolution and dust correction can be achieved.

  7. Generating functional Z/sub 0/ for the one-wormhole sector

    SciTech Connect

    Hajicek, P.

    1982-12-15

    We proceed in constructing a quantum theory of wormholes by adapting the method of Gervais, Jevicki, and Sakita. We calculate the transition amplitude for one-wormhole processes and separate the motion of the wormhole in the tree approximation: it is the motion of a free relativistic particle with the mass m/G, the classical mass of the wormhole. The quantum corrections can be calculated from the generating functional Z for the Green's functions. We derive a formula for the zero approximation Z/sub 0/ to this functional, find a suitable gauge which simplifies the formula, and show that this gauge is compatible with our boundary conditions. The problem of zero modes is solved and a regular propagator shown to exist. Finally, we estimate the cross section for the capture of photons and gravitons by a wormhole and find that it increases with energy reaching the value (4m)/sup 2/ asymptotically.

  8. CAP: A Computer Code for Generating Tabular Thermodynamic Functions from NASA Lewis Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    2001-01-01

    For several decades the NASA Glenn Research Center has been providing a file of thermodynamic data for use in several computer programs. These data are in the form of least-squares coefficients that have been calculated from tabular thermodynamic data by means of the NASA Properties and Coefficients (PAC) program. The source thermodynamic data are obtained from the literature or from standard compilations. Most gas-phase thermodynamic functions are calculated by the authors from molecular constant data using ideal gas partition functions. The Coefficients and Properties (CAP) program described in this report permits the generation of tabulated thermodynamic functions from the NASA least-squares coefficients. CAP provides considerable flexibility in the output format, the number of temperatures to be tabulated, and the energy units of the calculated properties. This report provides a detailed description of input preparation, examples of input and output for several species, and a listing of all species in the current NASA Glenn thermodynamic data file.

  9. CAP: A Computer Code for Generating Tabular Thermodynamic Functions from NASA Lewis Coefficients. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    2002-01-01

    For several decades the NASA Glenn Research Center has been providing a file of thermodynamic data for use in several computer programs. These data are in the form of least-squares coefficients that have been calculated from tabular thermodynamic data by means of the NASA Properties and Coefficients (PAC) program. The source thermodynamic data are obtained from the literature or from standard compilations. Most gas-phase thermodynamic functions are calculated by the authors from molecular constant data using ideal gas partition functions. The Coefficients and Properties (CAP) program described in this report permits the generation of tabulated thermodynamic functions from the NASA least-squares coefficients. CAP provides considerable flexibility in the output format, the number of temperatures to be tabulated, and the energy units of the calculated properties. This report provides a detailed description of input preparation, examples of input and output for several species, and a listing of all species in the current NASA Glenn thermodynamic data file.

  10. Overlap functions, spectroscopic factors, and asymptotic normalization coefficients generated by a shell-model source term

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeyuk, N. K.

    2010-06-15

    Overlap functions for one-nucleon removal are calculated as solutions of the inhomogeneous equation. The source term for this equation is generated by the 0(Planck constant/2pi)omega no-core shell-model wave functions and the effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions that fit oscillator matrix elements derived from the NN scattering data. For the lightest A<=4 nuclei this method gives reasonable agreement with exact ab initio calculations. For 4functions and spectroscopic factors obtained in the variational Monte Carlo method is presented and discussed.

  11. Functional second harmonic generation microscopy probes molecular dynamics with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Förderer, Moritz; Georgiev, Tihomir; Mosqueira, Matias; Fink, Rainer H. A.; Vogel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for label free ex vivo or in vivo imaging, widely used to investigate structure and organization of endogenous SHG emitting proteins such as myosin or collagen. Polarization resolved SHG microscopy renders supplementary information and is used to probe different molecular states. This development towards functional SHG microscopy is calling for new methods for high speed functional imaging of dynamic processes. In this work we present two approaches with linear polarized light and demonstrate high speed line scan measurements of the molecular dynamics of the motor protein myosin with a time resolution of 1 ms in mammalian muscle cells. Such a high speed functional SHG microscopy has high potential to deliver new insights into structural and temporal molecular dynamics under ex vivo or in vivo conditions. PMID:26977360

  12. Influence of Early Stress on Social Abilities and Serotonergic Functions across Generations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Tamara B.; Linder, Natacha; Russig, Holger; Thöny, Beat; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to adverse environments during early development is a known risk factor for several psychiatric conditions including antisocial behavior and personality disorders. Here, we induced social anxiety and altered social recognition memory in adult mice using unpredictable maternal separation and maternal stress during early postnatal life. We show that these social defects are not only pronounced in the animals directly subjected to stress, but are also transmitted to their offspring across two generations. The defects are associated with impaired serotonergic signaling, in particular, reduced 5HT1A receptor expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, and increased serotonin level in a dorsal raphe projection area. These findings underscore the susceptibility of social behaviors and serotonergic pathways to early stress, and the persistence of their perturbation across generations. PMID:21799751

  13. Coexistence via resource partitioning fails to generate an increase in community function.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Vasseur, David A

    2012-01-01

    Classic ecological theory suggests that resource partitioning facilitates the coexistence of species by reducing inter-specific competition. A byproduct of this process is an increase in overall community function, because a greater spectrum of resources can be used. In contrast, coexistence facilitated by neutral mechanisms is not expected to increase function. We studied coexistence in laboratory microcosms of the bactivorous ciliates Paramecium aurelia and Colpidium striatum to understand the relationship between function and coexistence mechanism. We quantified population and community-level function (biomass and oxygen consumption), competitive interactions, and resource partitioning. The two ciliates partitioned their bacterial resource along a size axis, with the larger ciliate consuming larger bacteria than the smaller ciliate. Despite this, there was no gain in function at the community level for either biomass or oxygen consumption, and competitive effects were symmetrical within and between species. Because other potential coexistence mechanisms can be ruled out, it is likely that inter-specific interference competition diminished the expected gain in function generated by resource partitioning, leading to a system that appeared competitively neutral even when structured by niche partitioning. We also analyzed several previous studies where two species of protists coexisted and found that the two-species communities showed a broad range of biomass levels relative to the single-species states.

  14. Coexistence via Resource Partitioning Fails to Generate an Increase in Community Function

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, John P.; Vasseur, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Classic ecological theory suggests that resource partitioning facilitates the coexistence of species by reducing inter-specific competition. A byproduct of this process is an increase in overall community function, because a greater spectrum of resources can be used. In contrast, coexistence facilitated by neutral mechanisms is not expected to increase function. We studied coexistence in laboratory microcosms of the bactivorous ciliates Paramecium aurelia and Colpidium striatum to understand the relationship between function and coexistence mechanism. We quantified population and community-level function (biomass and oxygen consumption), competitive interactions, and resource partitioning. The two ciliates partitioned their bacterial resource along a size axis, with the larger ciliate consuming larger bacteria than the smaller ciliate. Despite this, there was no gain in function at the community level for either biomass or oxygen consumption, and competitive effects were symmetrical within and between species. Because other potential coexistence mechanisms can be ruled out, it is likely that inter-specific interference competition diminished the expected gain in function generated by resource partitioning, leading to a system that appeared competitively neutral even when structured by niche partitioning. We also analyzed several previous studies where two species of protists coexisted and found that the two-species communities showed a broad range of biomass levels relative to the single-species states. PMID:22253888

  15. Next-generation biomarkers based on 100-parameter functional super-resolution microscopy TIS.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Walter; Gieseler, Anne; Krusche, Andreas; Serocka, Peter; Hillert, Reyk

    2012-06-15

    Functional super-resolution (fSR) microscopy is based on the automated toponome imaging system (TIS). fSR-TIS provides insight into the myriad of different cellular functionalities by direct imaging of large subcellular protein networks in morphologically intact cells and tissues, referred to as the toponome. By cyclical fluorescence imaging of at least 100 molecular cell components, fSR-TIS overcomes the spectral limitations of fluorescence microscopy, which is the essential condition for the detection of protein network structures in situ/in vivo. The resulting data sets precisely discriminate between cell types, subcellular structures, cell states and diseases (fSR). With up to 16 bits per protein, the power of combinatorial molecular discrimination (PCMD) is at least 2(100) per subcellular data point. It provides the dimensionality necessary to uncover thousands of distinct protein clusters including their subcellular hierarchies controlling protein network topology and function in the one cell or tissue section. Here we review the technology and findings showing that functional protein networks of the cell surface in different cancers encompass the same hierarchical and spatial coding principle, but express cancer-specific toponome codes within that scheme (referred to as TIS codes). Findings suggest that TIS codes, extracted from large-scale toponome data, have the potential to be next-generation biomarkers because of their cell type and disease specificity. This is functionally substantiated by the observation that blocking toponome-specific lead proteins results in disassembly of molecular networks and loss of function.

  16. Estimation of subsurface formation temperature in the Yangtze area, South China: implications for shale gas generation and preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Hao, C.; Li, X.; Xu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is one key parameter for hydrocarbon generation and preservation, also playing important role in geothermal energy assessment;however, accurate regional temperature pattern is still challenging, owing to a lack of data coverage and data quality as well. The Yangtze area, located in the South China, is considered as the most favorable target for shale gas resource exploration in China, and attracts more and more attention recently. Here we used the newly acquired steady-state temperature loggings, reliable Drilling Stem Test temperature data available and thermal properties, estimated the subsurface temperature-at-depth for the Yangtze area. Results show that the geothermal gradient ranges between 17 K/m and 74K/m, mainly falling into 20~30K/m, with a mean of 24 K/m; heat flow varies from 25 mW/m2 to 92 mW/m2, with a mean of 65 mW/m2. For the estimated temperature-at-depth, it is about 20~50 ℃ at the depth of 1000m, 50~80℃ for that at 2000m; while the highest temperature can be up to 110℃ at 3000m depth. Generally, the present-day geothermal regime of the Yangtze area is characterized by high in the northeast, low in the middle and localized high again in the southwest, and this pattern is well consistent with the tectono-thermal processes occurred in the area. Due to Cenozoic crustal extension in the northeastern Yangtze area, magmatism is prevailed, accounting for the high heat flow observed. Precambrian basement exists in the middle Yangtze area, such as the Xuefeng and Wuling Mountains, heat flow and subsurface temperature accordingly show relatively low as well. While for the southwestern Yangtze area, especially Yunnan and western Sichuan provinces, localized Cenozoic magmatism and tectonic activities are available, which is attributed to the high geothermal regime there. Considering the Paleozoic intensive tectonic deformation in the Yangtze area, tectonically stable area is prerequisite for shale gas preservation. Geothermal regime analysis

  17. Understanding the Cellular Function of TRPV2 Channel through Generation of Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Huynh, Kevin W.; Cawley, Daniel; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel proposed to play a critical role in a wide array of cellular processes. Although TRPV2 surface expression was originally determined to be sensitive to growth factor signaling, regulated trafficking of TRPV2 has remained controversial. TRPV2 has proven difficult to study due to the lack of specific pharmacological tools to modulate channel activity; therefore, most studies of the cellular function of TRPV2 rely on immuno-detection techniques. Polyclonal antibodies against TRPV2 have not been properly validated and characterized, which may contribute to conflicting results regarding its function in the cell. Here, we developed monoclonal antibodies using full-length TRPV2 as an antigen. Extensive characterization of these antibodies and comparison to commonly used commercially available TRPV2 antibodies revealed that while monoclonal antibodies generated in our laboratory were suitable for detection of endogenous TRPV2 by western blot, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry, the commercially available polyclonal antibodies we tested were not able to recognize endogenous TRPV2. We used our newly generated and validated TRPV2 antibodies to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on TRPV2 surface expression in heterologous and endogenous expression systems. We found that IGF-1 had little to no effect on trafficking and plasma membrane expression of TRPV2. Overall, these new TRPV2 monoclonal antibodies served to dispel the controversy of the effects of IGF-1 on TRPV2 plasma membrane expression and will clarify the role TRPV2 plays in cellular function. Furthermore, our strategy of using full-length tetrameric TRP channels may allow for the generation of antibodies against other TRP channels of unclear function. PMID:24392006

  18. Area functional relation for 5D-Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-08-01

    We present area (or entropy) functional relation for multi-horizons five dimensional (5D) Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole. It has been observed by exact and explicit calculation that some complicated function of two or three horizons area is mass-independent whereas the entropy product relation is not mass-independent. We also study the local thermodynamic stability of this black hole. The phase transition occurs at certain condition. Smarr mass formula and first law of thermodynamics have been derived. This mass-independent relation suggests they could turn out to be an universal quantity and further helps us to understanding the nature of black hole entropy (both interior and exterior) at the microscopic level. In the "Appendix", we have derived the thermodynamic products for 5D Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet black hole with vanishing cosmological constant.

  19. A study of the feasibility of directly applying gas generator systems to space shuttle mechanical functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    This study examined the current status and potential application of pyrotechnic gas generators and energy convertors for the space shuttle program. While most pyrotechnic devices utilize some form of linear actuation, only limited use of rotary actuators has been observed. This latter form of energy conversion, using a vane-type actuator as optimum, offers considerable potential in the area of servo, as well as non-servo systems, and capitalizes on a means of providing prolonged operating times. Pyrotechnic devices can often be shown to provide the optimum means of attaining a truly redundant back-up to a primary, non-pyrotechnic system.

  20. Can the Charon-forming giant impact generate elongated dark areas on Pluto?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Y.; Genda, H.; Funatsu, T.

    2015-12-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft has found elongated dark areas in the equatorial region of Pluto, which were informally called "the Whale". Here we examine the possibility that the dark areas on Pluto were formed by thermal alterations and subsequent polymerization of interstellar volatiles by a Charon-forming giant impact. Based on the satellite-to-planet mass ratio, the Pluto-Charon system is suggested to be of a giant impact origin [Canup, 2005]. However, the occurrence of the giant impact has been poorly constrained by factual evidence. On the other hand, Pluto is one of the largest Kuiper belt objects, which is highly likely to contain various interstellar volatiles, including aldehyde and ammonia. The previous studies show that these soluble volatiles are thermally polymerized in solutions at high temperatures, leading to a formation of complex insoluble organic solids [Cody et al., 2011; Kebukawa et al., 2013]. Thus, impact-induced heating could have melted the icy crust and converted the interstellar volatile into complex organic solids near the impact site. In the present study, we produce complex organic solids by thermal polymerization of formaldehyde and ammonia in solutions for various temperatures. By comparing the colors (in UV-VIS range) of the produced organic solids, we constrain possible temperatures achieved in the dark areas on Pluto, assuming that they were formed by thermal alterations of interstellar volatiles. In addition, we perform hydrodynamic simulations of a giant impact onto Pluto in order to examine whether both the formations of a Charon-sized moon and the spatial distribution and achieved temperatures of heated materials can be reproduced. Based on the combination of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, we will examine the giant-impact hypothesis for the origin of the Pluto-Charon system.

  1. Conditions for Multi-functionality in a Rhythm Generating Network Inspired by Turtle Scratching.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Abigail C; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic behaviors such as breathing, walking, and scratching are vital to many species. Such behaviors can emerge from groups of neurons, called central pattern generators, in the absence of rhythmic inputs. In vertebrates, the identification of the cells that constitute the central pattern generator for particular rhythmic behaviors is difficult, and often, its existence has only been inferred. For example, under experimental conditions, intact turtles generate several rhythmic scratch motor patterns corresponding to non-rhythmic stimulation of different body regions. These patterns feature alternating phases of motoneuron activation that occur repeatedly, with different patterns distinguished by the relative timing and duration of activity of hip extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor motoneurons. While the central pattern generator network responsible for these outputs has not been located, there is hope to use motoneuron recordings to deduce its properties. To this end, this work presents a model of a previously proposed central pattern generator network and analyzes its capability to produce two distinct scratch rhythms from a single neuron pool, selected by different combinations of tonic drive parameters but with fixed strengths of connections within the network. We show through simulation that the proposed network can achieve the desired multi-functionality, even though it relies on hip unit generators to recruit appropriately timed knee extensor motoneuron activity, including a delay relative to hip activation in rostral scratch. Furthermore, we develop a phase space representation, focusing on the inputs to and the intrinsic slow variable of the knee extensor motoneuron, which we use to derive sufficient conditions for the network to realize each rhythm and which illustrates the role of a saddle-node bifurcation in achieving the knee extensor delay. This framework is harnessed to consider bistability and to make predictions about the responses of the

  2. Conditions for Multi-functionality in a Rhythm Generating Network Inspired by Turtle Scratching.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Abigail C; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic behaviors such as breathing, walking, and scratching are vital to many species. Such behaviors can emerge from groups of neurons, called central pattern generators, in the absence of rhythmic inputs. In vertebrates, the identification of the cells that constitute the central pattern generator for particular rhythmic behaviors is difficult, and often, its existence has only been inferred. For example, under experimental conditions, intact turtles generate several rhythmic scratch motor patterns corresponding to non-rhythmic stimulation of different body regions. These patterns feature alternating phases of motoneuron activation that occur repeatedly, with different patterns distinguished by the relative timing and duration of activity of hip extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor motoneurons. While the central pattern generator network responsible for these outputs has not been located, there is hope to use motoneuron recordings to deduce its properties. To this end, this work presents a model of a previously proposed central pattern generator network and analyzes its capability to produce two distinct scratch rhythms from a single neuron pool, selected by different combinations of tonic drive parameters but with fixed strengths of connections within the network. We show through simulation that the proposed network can achieve the desired multi-functionality, even though it relies on hip unit generators to recruit appropriately timed knee extensor motoneuron activity, including a delay relative to hip activation in rostral scratch. Furthermore, we develop a phase space representation, focusing on the inputs to and the intrinsic slow variable of the knee extensor motoneuron, which we use to derive sufficient conditions for the network to realize each rhythm and which illustrates the role of a saddle-node bifurcation in achieving the knee extensor delay. This framework is harnessed to consider bistability and to make predictions about the responses of the

  3. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Spindelboeck, Walter; Horvath, Angela; Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. PMID:26938078

  4. "Small axonless neurons": postnatally generated neocortical interneurons with delayed functional maturation.

    PubMed

    Le Magueresse, Corentin; Alfonso, Julieta; Khodosevich, Konstantin; Arroyo Martín, Angel A; Bark, Christine; Monyer, Hannah

    2011-11-16

    GABAergic interneurons of the mouse cortex are generated embryonically in the ventral telencephalon. Recent evidence, however, indicated that a subset of cortical cells expressing interneuronal markers originate in the neonatal subventricular zone. This has raised interest in the functional development and incorporation of these postnatally generated cells into cortical circuits. Here we demonstrate that these cells integrate in the cortex, and that they constitute two distinct GABAergic interneuronal classes. Whereas one class reflects the tail end of embryonic interneuron genesis, the other class comprises interneurons that are exclusively generated perinatally and postnatally. The latter constitute a novel subclass of interneurons. They are preferentially located in the deeper layers of the olfactory and orbital cortices, exhibit a unique firing pattern and slow functional maturation. Based on their distinct morphology we termed them "small axonless neurons" and indeed, unlike other cortical neurons, they communicate with their neuronal partners via dendrodendritic synapses. Finally, we provide evidence that the number of small axonless neurons is enhanced by odor enrichment, a further indication that they integrate into neural circuits and participate to olfactory processing.

  5. EBIC study of electron generation function in a-Si:H.

    PubMed

    Najar, S; Equer, B

    1994-08-15

    The electron beam induced current technique was used to study electron energy loss in amorphous hydrogenated silicon a-Si:H. This study leads to the determination of the electron generation function which is needed when using the variable energy electron beam induced current technique (EBIC) analysis of a-Si:H device. A series of identical n-i-p a-Si:H diodes with a thin aluminium top electrodes were fabricated and varying thicknesses of a-Si:H layer were deposited on it. In EBIC measurements, the n-i-p diode was reverse biased at maximum potential. The electron range of a-Si:H was determined directly by measuring the energy at which the electron beam is completely stopped in the top layer and no carrier generation is possible in the n-i-p diode. The generation function is then deduced from EBIC contrast measurements between the aluminium electrode and the top a-Si:H layer.

  6. Cognitive avionics and watching spaceflight crews think: generation-after-next research tools in functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Genik, Richard J; Green, Christopher C; Graydon, Francis X; Armstrong, Robert E

    2005-06-01

    Confinement and isolation have always confounded the extraordinary endeavor of human spaceflight. Psychosocial health is at the forefront in considering risk factors that imperil missions of 1- to 2-yr duration. Current crewmember selection metrics restricted to behavioral observation by definition observe rather than prevent performance degradation and are thus inadequate when preflight training cannot simulate an entire journey. Nascent techniques to monitor functional and task-related cortical neural activity show promise and can be extended to include whole-brain monitoring. Watching spaceflight crews think can reveal the efficiency of training procedures. Moreover, observing subcortical emotion centers may provide early detection of developing neuropsychiatric disorders. The non-invasive functional neuroimaging modalities electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and highlights of how they may be engineered for spacecraft are detailed. Preflight and in-flight applications to crewmember behavioral health from current generation, next generation, and generation-after-next neuroscience research studies are also described. The emphasis is on preventing the onset of neuropsychiatric dysfunctions, thus reducing the risk of mission failure due to human error.

  7. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E.; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545400 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545335 PMID:26938078

  8. Functional MRI evaluation of supplementary motor area language dominance in right- and left-handed subjects.

    PubMed

    Dalacorte, Amauri; Portuguez, Mirna Wetters; Maurer das Neves, Carlos Magno; Anes, Maurício; Dacosta, Jaderson Costa

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive brain imaging technique widely used in the evaluation of the brain function that provides images with high temporal and spatial resolution. Investigation of the supplementary motor area (SMA) function is critical in the pre-surgical evaluation of neurological patients, since marked individual differences and complex overlapping with adjacent cortical areas exist, and it is important to spare the SMA from lesions when adjacent cortical tissue is surgically removed. We used fMRI to assess the activity of SMA in six right-handed and six left-handed healthy volunteers when a task requiring silent repetition of a series of words was given. Brain activation areas in each of the subjects were localized according to the standard Talairach coordinate space, and the individual voxels for each map were compared after 3D sagittal images were created and SMA was delimited. Quantitative analysis of hemispheric and bilateral SMA activation was described as mean ± standard deviation of hot points/total points. The results show that the language task induced bilateral SMA activation. Left SMA activation was significantly higher than right SMA activation in both right-handed and left-handed subjects.

  9. Better-Than-Visual Technologies for Next Generation Air Transportation System Terminal Maneuvering Area Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Jones, Denise R.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Williams, Steve P.; Barmore, Bryan E.; Ellis, Kyle E.; Rehfeld, Sherri A.

    2011-01-01

    A consortium of industry, academia and government agencies are devising new concepts for future U.S. aviation operations under the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Many key capabilities are being identified to enable NextGen, including the concept of Equivalent Visual Operations (EVO) replicating the capacity and safety of today's visual flight rules (VFR) in all-weather conditions. NASA is striving to develop the technologies and knowledge to enable EVO and to extend EVO towards a Better-Than-Visual (BTV) operational concept. The BTV operational concept uses an electronic means to provide sufficient visual references of the external world and other required flight references on flight deck displays that enable VFR-like operational tempos and maintain and improve the safety of VFR while using VFR-like procedures in all-weather conditions. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) research on technologies to enable the concept of BTV is described.

  10. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sarada Devi; Schirmer, Katharina; Münst, Bernhard; Heinz, Stefan; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Wölfl, Stefan; Simon-Keller, Katja; Marx, Alexander; Øie, Cristina Ionica; Ebert, Matthias P.; Walles, Heike

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte® cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte® cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacity (upcyte® process). Proliferating upcyte® cells undergo a finite number of cell divisions, i.e., 20 to 40 population doublings, but upon withdrawal of proliferation stimulating factors, they regain most of the cell specific characteristics of primary cells. When a defined mixture of differentiated human upcyte® cells (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) was cultured in vitro on a thick layer of Matrigel™, they self-organized to form liver organoid-like structures within 24 hours. When further cultured for 10 days in a bioreactor, these liver organoids show typical functional characteristics of liver parenchyma including activity of cytochromes P450, CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP2C9 as well as mRNA expression of several marker genes and other enzymes. In summary, we hereby describe that 3D functional hepatic structures composed of primary human cell strains can be generated in vitro. They can be cultured for a prolonged period of time and are potentially useful ex vivo models to study liver functions. PMID:26488607

  11. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sarada Devi; Schirmer, Katharina; Münst, Bernhard; Heinz, Stefan; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Wölfl, Stefan; Simon-Keller, Katja; Marx, Alexander; Øie, Cristina Ionica; Ebert, Matthias P; Walles, Heike; Braspenning, Joris; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte® cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte® cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacity (upcyte® process). Proliferating upcyte® cells undergo a finite number of cell divisions, i.e., 20 to 40 population doublings, but upon withdrawal of proliferation stimulating factors, they regain most of the cell specific characteristics of primary cells. When a defined mixture of differentiated human upcyte® cells (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) was cultured in vitro on a thick layer of Matrigel™, they self-organized to form liver organoid-like structures within 24 hours. When further cultured for 10 days in a bioreactor, these liver organoids show typical functional characteristics of liver parenchyma including activity of cytochromes P450, CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP2C9 as well as mRNA expression of several marker genes and other enzymes. In summary, we hereby describe that 3D functional hepatic structures composed of primary human cell strains can be generated in vitro. They can be cultured for a prolonged period of time and are potentially useful ex vivo models to study liver functions.

  12. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse with a functional human TSPY.

    PubMed

    Schubert, S; Skawran, B; Dechend, F; Nayernia, K; Meinhardt, A; Nanda, I; Schmid, M; Engel, W; Schmidtke, J

    2003-09-01

    To generate an animal model that is suitable for the analysis of regulation and expression of human testis-specific protein, Y-encoded TSPY, a transgenic mouse line, TgTSPY9, harboring a complete structural human TSPY gene was generated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and Southern analyses show that approximately 50 copies of the human TSPY transgene are integrated at a single chromosomal site that maps to the distal long arm of the Y chromosome. The transgene is correctly transcribed and spliced according to the human pattern and is mainly expressed in testicular tissue, with spermatogonia and early primary spermatocytes (leptotene and zygotene) as expressing germ cells. TSPY transgenic mice are phenotypically normal, and spermatogenesis is neither impaired nor enhanced by the human transgene. The present study shows that a human TSPY gene integrated into the mouse genome follows the human expression pattern although murine tspy had lost its function in rodent evolution millions of years ago. PMID:12773407

  13. Ionic photoacid generators containing functionalized semifluorinated sulfonates for high-resolution lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yi; Ayothi, Ramakrishnan; Ober, Christopher K.; Yueh, Wang; Cao, Heidi

    2008-03-01

    To meet the challenges for resist materials raised by high resolution lithography technologies, tailor-made photoacid generators (PAGs) with controlled acid diffusion and improved miscibility with polymers are very important. We have developed new ionic PAGs containing functionalized semifluorinated sulfonates. These PAGs have excellent solubility in polymer matrices and common organic solvents, high thermal stability, high acid strength and low volatility of the generated acids, and make them attractive PAGs for high resolution lithography. In this contribution, the preparation and characterization of several new ionic PAGs, the influence of the host matrix on PAG properties, and a comparison of their lithographic performance are presented. Specifically their lithographic performance at EUV wavelength is discussed.

  14. Ripple structure-generated hybrid electrokinetics for on-chip mixing and separating of functionalized beads.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I-Fang; Chiang, Sheng-Chuan; Chung, Cheng-Che; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2014-11-01

    We present an electrokinetics-based microfluidic platform that is capable of on-chip manipulating, mixing, and separating microparticles through adjusting the interrelated magnitudes of dielectrophoresis and AC electroosmosis. Hybrid electrokinetic phenomenon is generated from an electric field-induced micro-ripple structure made of ultraviolet-curable glue. Size-dependent particle separation and selective removal over the ripple structure is demonstrated successfully. Varying the waveform from sine-wave to square-wave allows generating a fluid convection at specific positions to mix the antibody-functionalized beads and antigen. Potential application in the bead-based immunoassay was also demonstrated for immuno-reaction and subsequently separating the bead-bead aggregate and non-binding beads on-chip.

  15. Dosage effects of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on cortical surface area and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Yuanchao; Liu, Bing; Long, Haixia; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2014-02-12

    The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that leads to a valine-to-methionine substitution at codon 66 (Val66Met) in BDNF is correlated with differences in cognitive and memory functions, as well as with several neurological and psychiatric disorders. MRI studies have already shown that this genetic variant contributes to changes in cortical thickness and volume, but whether the Val66Met polymorphism affects the cortical surface area of healthy subjects remains unclear. Here, we used multimodal MRI to study whether this polymorphism would affect the cortical morphology and resting-state functional connectivity of a large sample of healthy Han Chinese human subjects. An SNP-wise general linear model analysis revealed a "dosage effect" of the Met allele, specifically a stepwise increase in cortical surface area of the right anterior insular cortex with increasing numbers of the Met allele. Moreover, we found enhanced functional connectivity between the anterior insular and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices that was linked with the dosage of the Met allele. In conclusion, these data demonstrated a "dosage effect" of BDNF Val66Met on normal cortical structure and function, suggesting a new path for exploring the mechanisms underlying the effects of genotype on cognition. PMID:24523553

  16. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  17. A functional and perceptual signature of the second visual area in primates.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy; Ziemba, Corey M; Heeger, David J; Simoncelli, Eero P; Movshon, J Anthony

    2013-07-01

    There is no generally accepted account of the function of the second visual cortical area (V2), partly because no simple response properties robustly distinguish V2 neurons from those in primary visual cortex (V1). We constructed synthetic stimuli replicating the higher-order statistical dependencies found in natural texture images and used them to stimulate macaque V1 and V2 neurons. Most V2 cells responded more vigorously to these textures than to control stimuli lacking naturalistic structure; V1 cells did not. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements in humans revealed differences between V1 and V2 that paralleled the neuronal measurements. The ability of human observers to detect naturalistic structure in different types of texture was well predicted by the strength of neuronal and fMRI responses in V2 but not in V1. Together, these results reveal a particular functional role for V2 in the representation of natural image structure.

  18. Noise monitoring and adverse health effects in residents in different functional areas of Luzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-Xia; Lei, Zhang-Heng; Zhang, Chun-Lian; Xiong, Wei; Gan, Zhong-Lin; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Qing-Bi

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the noise pollution situation and the resulting adverse effect on residents' health in Luzhou, China, to provide data for noise pollution prevention policies and interventions. Four different functional areas (commercial, construction, residential, and transportation hub areas) were chosen to monitor noise level for 3 months. The survey was performed by questionnaire on the spot on randomly selected individuals; it collected data on the impact of noise on residents' health (quality of sleep, high blood pressure, subjective feeling of nervous system damage, and attention) as well as the knowledge of noise-induced health damage, the degree of adaptation to noise, and their solutions. The noise levels of residential, commercial, transportation, and construction areas exceeded the national standards (P < .001). Sleep quality, prevalence of hypertension, and attention in transportation hub areas were significantly different from those in the other 3 areas (P < .05); only 24.46% of people knew the health hazards associated with noise; 64.57% of residents have adapted to the current noise environment. Most of them have to close the doors and windows to reduce noise. The noise pollution situation in Luzhou, China, is serious, especially the traffic noise pollution. Residents pay less attention to it and adopt single measures to reduce the noise. We should work toward the prevention and control of traffic noise and improve the residents' awareness to reduce the adverse health effects of noise.

  19. Insights into the Mechanisms of Absence Seizure Generation Provided by EEG with Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patrick W.; Jackson, Graeme D.

    2014-01-01

    Absence seizures (AS) are brief epileptic events characterized by loss of awareness with subtle motor features. They may be very frequent, and impact on attention, learning, and memory. A number of pathophysiological models have been developed to explain the mechanism of absence seizure generation, which relies heavily on observations from animal studies. Studying the structural and functional relationships between large-scale brain networks in humans is only practical with non-invasive whole brain techniques. EEG with functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) is one such technique that provides an opportunity to explore the interactions between brain structures involved in AS generation. A number of fMRI techniques including event-related analysis, time-course analysis, and functional connectivity (FC) have identified a common network of structures involved in AS. This network comprises the thalamus, midline, and lateral parietal cortex [the default mode network (DMN)], caudate nuclei, and the reticular structures of the pons. The main component displaying an increase in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal relative to the resting state, in group studies, is the thalamus while the most consistent cortical change is reduced BOLD signal in the DMN. Time-course analysis shows that, rather than some structures being activated or inactivated during AS, there appears to be increase in activity across components of the network preceding or following the electro-clinical onset of the seizure. The earliest change in BOLD signal occurs in the DMN, prior to the onset of epileptiform events. This region also shows altered FC in patients with AS. Hence, it appears that engagement of this network is central to AS. In this review, we will explore the insights of EEG-fMRI studies into the mechanisms of AS and consider how the DMN is likely to be the major large-scale brain network central to both seizure generation and seizure manifestations. PMID:25225491

  20. Thioredoxin-2 Inhibits Mitochondrial ROS Generation and ASK1 Activity to Maintain Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qunhua; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Zhang, Haifeng; Huang, Yan; Hinojosa-Kirschenbaum, Ford; Fan, Peidong; Yao, Lina; Belardinelli, Luiz; Tellides, George; Giordano, Frank J.; Budas, Grant R.; Min, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2) is a key mitochondrial protein which regulates cellular redox and survival by suppressing mitochondrial ROS generation and by inhibiting apoptosis stress kinase-1 (ASK1)-dependent apoptotic signaling. To date, the role of the mitochondrial Trx2 system in heart failure pathogenesis has not been investigated. Methods and Results Western blot and histological analysis revealed that Trx2 protein expression levels were reduced in hearts from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), with a concomitant increase in increased ASK1 phosphorylation/activity. Cardiac-specific Trx2 knockout mice (Trx2-cKO). Trx2-cKO mice develop spontaneous DCM at 1 month of age with increased heart size, reduced ventricular wall thickness, and a progressive decline in left ventricular (LV) contractile function, resulting in mortality due to heart failure by ~4 months of age. The progressive decline in cardiac function observed in Trx2-cKO mice was accompanied by disruption of mitochondrial ultrastructure, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, increased mitochondrial ROS generation and reduced ATP production, correlating with increased ASK1 signaling and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Chronic administration of a highly selective ASK1 inhibitor improved cardiac phenotype and reduced maladaptive LV remodeling with significant reductions in oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and cardiac failure. Cellular data from Trx2-deficient cardiomyocytes demonstrated that ASK1 inhibition reduced apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial ROS generation. Conclusions Our data support an essential role for mitochondrial Trx2 in preserving cardiac function by suppressing mitochondrial ROS production and ASK1-dependent apoptosis. Inhibition of ASK1 represents a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:25628390

  1. True Ortho Generation of Urban Area Using High Resolution Aerial Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong; Stanley, David; Xin, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    The pros and cons of existing methods for true ortho generation are analyzed based on a critical literature review for its two major processing stages: visibility analysis and occlusion compensation. They process frame and pushbroom images using different algorithms for visibility analysis due to the need of perspective centers used by the z-buffer (or alike) techniques. For occlusion compensation, the pixel-based approach likely results in excessive seamlines in the ortho-rectified images due to the use of a quality measure on the pixel-by-pixel rating basis. In this paper, we proposed innovative solutions to tackle the aforementioned problems. For visibility analysis, an elevation buffer technique is introduced to employ the plain elevations instead of the distances from perspective centers by z-buffer, and has the advantage of sensor independency. A segment oriented strategy is developed to evaluate a plain cost measure per segment for occlusion compensation instead of the tedious quality rating per pixel. The cost measure directly evaluates the imaging geometry characteristics in ground space, and is also sensor independent. Experimental results are demonstrated using aerial photos acquired by UltraCam camera.

  2. On the Wiener-Masani algorithm for finding the generating function of multivariate stochastic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The algorithms developed by Wiener and Masani (1957 and 1958) and Masani (1960) for the characterization of a class of multivariate stationary stochastic processes are investigated analytically. The algorithms permit the determination of (1) the generating function, (2) the prediction-error matrix, and (3) an autoregressive representation of the linear least-squares predictor. A number of theorems and lemmas are proved, and it is shown that the range of validity of the algorithms can be extended significantly beyond that given by Wiener and Masani.

  3. Generation of Benzyne Species from Diphenylphosphoryl Derivatives: Simultaneous Exchange of Three Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Gorobets, Evgueni; Parvez, Masood; Derksen, Darren J; Keay, Brian A

    2016-06-13

    Interaction of (2-diphenylphosphoryl-3-iodo-4-methoxy-phenyl) methanol with NaH in DMF at ambient temperature results in the generation of benzyne intermediates that can be trapped by furan or DMF. Trapping with DMF forms 3-(dimethylaminomethyl)-2-hydroxy-6-methoxybenzaldehyde demonstrating the simultaneous exchange of three functionalities in a single step. The presence of the alkoxy substituent adjacent to iodine is critical for high regioselectivity addition of DMF. The corresponding bromide or triflate can be used in place of the iodide with equal efficiency. This methodology was used to synthesize the reported structure of gigasol and leading to a structural reassignment of this biscoumarin natural product.

  4. Designing financial-incentive programmes for return of medical service in underserved areas: seven management functions

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E

    2009-01-01

    In many countries worldwide, health worker shortages are one of the main constraints in achieving population health goals. Financial-incentive programmes for return of service, whereby participants receive payments in return for a commitment to practise for a period of time in a medically underserved area, can alleviate local and regional health worker shortages through a number of mechanisms. First, they can redirect the flow of those health workers who would have been educated without financial incentives from well-served to underserved areas. Second, they can add health workers to the pool of workers who would have been educated without financial incentives and place them in underserved areas. Third, financial-incentive programmes may improve the retention in underserved areas of those health workers who participate in a programme, but who would have worked in an underserved area without any financial incentives. Fourth, the programmes may increase the retention of all health workers in underserved areas by reducing the strength of some of the reasons why health workers leave such areas, including social isolation, lack of contact with colleagues, lack of support from medical specialists and heavy workload. We draw on studies of financial-incentive programmes and other initiatives with similar objectives to discuss seven management functions that are essential for the long-term success of financial-incentive programmes: financing (programmes may benefit from innovative donor financing schemes, such as endowment funds, international financing facilities or compensation payments); promotion (programmes should use tested communication channels in order to reach secondary school graduates and health workers); selection (programmes may use selection criteria to ensure programme success and to achieve supplementary policy goals); placement (programmes should match participants to areas in order to maximize participant satisfaction and retention); support (programmes

  5. Laser interference lithography for large area patterning and the fabrication of functional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wathuthanthri, Ishan

    Nature-inspired phenomena such as the "moth eye" and "lotus leaf" effects have gained a lot of interest in recent years due to potential applications in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines. To practically achieve a majority of these biomimetic applications it is necessary to fabricate such nano-featured surfaces in a low-cost and high-throughput manner. To this end, this dissertation focuses on developing and using the Interference Lithography (IL) technologies to achieve large-area nanopatterning. IL is a parallel-type nanolithography technique that shares many of the advantages of other parallel-type techniques such as deep-UV photolithography while alleviating a majority of concerns such as cost and complexity. IL relies on the interference of two or more beams of light where the resulting interference fringes are generally recorded on a light sensitive polymeric material such as photoresist. In simple two-beam IL systems, the periodicity of the interference fringes is simply a function of wavelength and the angle of separation of the two beams, while the maximum coverage area is a constrained by the optical path and the exposed area. To this extent, in the design of interferometers for nanopatterning, the challenge remains in designing systems where a simple mechanism exists for varying the angle of separation of the interfering beams and in turn periodicity of the interference fringes while also enabling large-area exposures. To this end, the first half of this dissertation demonstrates three different IL systems (Lloyd-mirror, two-degree-of freedom Lloyd-mirror, and the tunable two-mirror systems) designed and established at Stevens capable of fast tuning of periodicities while also achieving wafer-scale (4") large-area nanopatterning. Using the large-area nanopatterns of photoresist, various pattern transfer techniques have also been investigated where the photoresist film is used as a template layer to transfer the large-area periodic

  6. Disrupted functional connectivity of cerebellar default network areas in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kucyi, Aaron; Hove, Michael J; Biederman, Joseph; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Valera, Eve M

    2015-09-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasingly understood as a disorder of spontaneous brain-network interactions. The default mode network (DMN), implicated in ADHD-linked behaviors including mind-wandering and attentional fluctuations, has been shown to exhibit abnormal spontaneous functional connectivity (FC) within-network and with other networks (salience, dorsal attention and frontoparietal) in ADHD. Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ADHD, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas of the DMN (CerDMN) exhibit altered FC with cortical networks in ADHD. Here, 23 adults with ADHD and 23 age-, IQ-, and sex-matched controls underwent resting state fMRI. The mean time series of CerDMN areas was extracted, and FC with the whole brain was calculated. Whole-brain between-group differences in FC were assessed. Additionally, relationships between inattention and individual differences in FC were assessed for between-group interactions. In ADHD, CerDMN areas showed positive FC (in contrast to average FC in the negative direction in controls) with widespread regions of salience, dorsal attention and sensorimotor networks. ADHD individuals also exhibited higher FC (more positive correlation) of CerDMN areas with frontoparietal and visual network regions. Within the control group, but not in ADHD, participants with higher inattention had higher FC between CerDMN and regions in the visual and dorsal attention networks. This work provides novel evidence of impaired CerDMN coupling with cortical networks in ADHD and highlights a role of cerebro-cerebellar interactions in cognitive function. These data provide support for the potential targeting of CerDMN areas for therapeutic interventions in ADHD. PMID:26109476

  7. Disrupted functional connectivity of cerebellar default network areas in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kucyi, Aaron; Hove, Michael J.; Biederman, Joseph; Van Dijk, Koene R.A.; Valera, Eve M.

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasingly understood as a disorder of spontaneous brain-network interactions. The default mode network (DMN), implicated in ADHD-linked behaviors including mind-wandering and attentional fluctuations, has been shown to exhibit abnormal spontaneous functional connectivity (FC) within-network and with other networks (salience, dorsal attention and frontoparietal) in ADHD. Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ADHD, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas of the DMN (CerDMN) exhibit altered FC with cortical networks in ADHD. Here, 23 adults with ADHD and 23 age-, IQ-, and sex-matched controls underwent resting state fMRI. The mean time series of CerDMN areas was extracted, and FC with the whole brain was calculated. Whole-brain between-group differences in FC were assessed. Additionally, relationships between inattention and individual differences in FC were assessed for between-group interactions. In ADHD, CerDMN areas showed positive FC (in contrast to average FC in the negative direction in controls) with widespread regions of salience, dorsal attention and sensorimotor networks. ADHD individuals also exhibited higher FC (more positive correlation) of CerDMN areas with frontoparietal and visual network regions. Within the control group, but not in ADHD, participants with higher inattention had higher FC between CerDMN and regions in the visual and dorsal attention networks. This work provides novel evidence of impaired CerDMN coupling with cortical networks in ADHD and highlights a role of the cerebro-cerebellar interactions in cognitive function. These data provide support for the potential targeting of CerDMN areas for therapeutic interventions in ADHD. PMID:26109476

  8. Disrupted functional connectivity of cerebellar default network areas in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kucyi, Aaron; Hove, Michael J; Biederman, Joseph; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Valera, Eve M

    2015-09-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasingly understood as a disorder of spontaneous brain-network interactions. The default mode network (DMN), implicated in ADHD-linked behaviors including mind-wandering and attentional fluctuations, has been shown to exhibit abnormal spontaneous functional connectivity (FC) within-network and with other networks (salience, dorsal attention and frontoparietal) in ADHD. Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ADHD, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas of the DMN (CerDMN) exhibit altered FC with cortical networks in ADHD. Here, 23 adults with ADHD and 23 age-, IQ-, and sex-matched controls underwent resting state fMRI. The mean time series of CerDMN areas was extracted, and FC with the whole brain was calculated. Whole-brain between-group differences in FC were assessed. Additionally, relationships between inattention and individual differences in FC were assessed for between-group interactions. In ADHD, CerDMN areas showed positive FC (in contrast to average FC in the negative direction in controls) with widespread regions of salience, dorsal attention and sensorimotor networks. ADHD individuals also exhibited higher FC (more positive correlation) of CerDMN areas with frontoparietal and visual network regions. Within the control group, but not in ADHD, participants with higher inattention had higher FC between CerDMN and regions in the visual and dorsal attention networks. This work provides novel evidence of impaired CerDMN coupling with cortical networks in ADHD and highlights a role of cerebro-cerebellar interactions in cognitive function. These data provide support for the potential targeting of CerDMN areas for therapeutic interventions in ADHD.

  9. Generation of novel functional metalloproteins via hybrids of cytochrome c and peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tianlei; Zhong, Fangfang; Wang, Zhong-Hua; Xie, Jin; Tan, Xiangshi; Huang, Zhong-Xian

    2013-06-01

    The continued interest in protein engineering has led to intense efforts in developing novel stable enzymes, which could not only give boost to industrial and biomedical applications, but also enhance our understanding of the structure-function relationships of proteins. We present here the generation of three hybrid proteins of cytochrome c (cyt c) and peroxidase via structure-based rational mutagenesis of cyt c. Several residues (positions 67, 70, 71 and 80) in the distal heme region of cyt c were mutated to the highly conserved amino acids in the heme pocket of peroxidases. The multiple mutants were found to exhibit high peroxidase activity and conserve the impressive stability of cyt c. We expect that this strategy could be extended to other cases of metalloprotein engineering, and lead to the development of stable and active biocatalysts for industrial uses. Besides, this study also provides insight into the structure-function relationships of hemoproteins.

  10. Generation of a Functionally Distinct Rhizopus oryzae Lipase through Protein Folding Memory

    PubMed Central

    Satomura, Atsushi; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) has a propeptide at its N-terminus that functions as an intramolecular chaperone and facilitates the folding of mature ROL (mROL). In this study, we successfully generated a functionally distinct imprinted mROL (mROLimp) through protein folding memory using a mutated propeptide. The mutated propeptide left its structural memory on mROL and produced mROLimp that exhibited different substrate specificities compared with mROLWT (prepared from the wild type propeptide), although the amino acid sequences of both mROLs were the same. mROLimp showed a preference for substrates with medium chain-length acyl groups and, noticeably, recognized a peptidase-specific substrate. In addition, ROLimp was more stable than mROLWT. These results strongly suggest that proteins with identical amino acid sequences can fold into different conformations and that mutations in intramolecular chaperones can dynamically induce changes in enzymatic activity. PMID:25970342

  11. In vivo generation of a mature and functional artificial skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fuoco, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Biondo, Antonella; Longa, Emanuela; Mascaro, Anna; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Kossovar, Olga; Benedetti, Sara; Salvatori, Maria L; Santoleri, Sabrina; Testa, Stefano; Bernardini, Sergio; Bottinelli, Roberto; Bearzi, Claudia; Cannata, Stefano M; Seliktar, Dror; Cossu, Giulio; Gargioli, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Extensive loss of skeletal muscle tissue results in mutilations and severe loss of function. In vitro-generated artificial muscles undergo necrosis when transplanted in vivo before host angiogenesis may provide oxygen for fibre survival. Here, we report a novel strategy based upon the use of mouse or human mesoangioblasts encapsulated inside PEG-fibrinogen hydrogel. Once engineered to express placental-derived growth factor, mesoangioblasts attract host vessels and nerves, contributing to in vivo survival and maturation of newly formed myofibres. When the graft was implanted underneath the skin on the surface of the tibialis anterior, mature and aligned myofibres formed within several weeks as a complete and functional extra muscle. Moreover, replacing the ablated tibialis anterior with PEG-fibrinogen-embedded mesoangioblasts also resulted in an artificial muscle very similar to a normal tibialis anterior. This strategy opens the possibility for patient-specific muscle creation for a large number of pathological conditions involving muscle tissue wasting. PMID:25715804

  12. Barren area evapotranspiration estimates generated from energy budget measurements in the Gila River valley of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leppanen, O.E.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates of evapotranspiration for 479 successive days were created by using energy budget measurements. The measurement point was on the 2-kilometer wide flood plain of the Gila River in east-central Arizona, about 18 kilometers above Coolidge Dam. The flood plain had been cleared of all tall vegetation for distances of about 20 kilometers upstream and 5 kilometers downstream from the measurement site. Chaining, raking, and burning had been used to clear the area immediately surrounding the measurement site about 6 months before measurements began. Ground cover was sparse volunteer Bermudagrass and scattered seepwillow for a distance of at least 1 kilometer in all directions from the measurement point . The water table was deep , so most of the evaporated water came from rainfall, but some came from soil moisture deeper than 2 meters. The March to March water loss (evapotranspiration less rain) was about 47 millimeters, evapotranspiration demand was 377 millimeters. Daily rates varied from very small amounts of condensation to almost 5 millimeters of evapotranspiration. (USGS)

  13. Siting landfills and incinerators in areas of historic unpopularity: Surveying the views of the next generation

    SciTech Connect

    De Feo, Giovanni; Williams, Ian D.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Opinions and knowledge of young people in Italy about waste were studied. • Historic opposition to construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome. • Awareness of waste management develops with knowledge of environmental issues. • Many stakeholders’ views are needed when siting a new waste management facility. • Respondents’ opinions were influenced by their level of environmental knowledge. - Abstract: The Campania Region in Southern Italy has suffered many problems with municipal solid waste management since the mid-1990s, leading to significant public disturbances and subsequent media coverage. This paper reports on the current views and knowledge of young people (university students) in this region about waste management operations and facilities, specifically the siting of landfills and incinerators. By means of a structured questionnaire, opinion and knowledge were systematically examined by degree type and course year. The study took place in 2011 at the University of Salerno campus. A sample of 900 students, comprising 100 students for each of the nine considered faculties, and 20 students for every academic course year, was randomly selected. Only about a quarter of respondents were not opposed to the siting of a landfill or an incinerator in their city. This clearly highlights that historic opposition to the construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome and that distrust for previous poor management or indiscretions is long-lived and transcends generations. Students from technical faculties expressed the most reasonable opinion; opinion and knowledge were statistically related (Chi-square test, p < 0.05) to the attended faculty, and the knowledge grew linearly with progression through the university. This suggests that awareness of waste management practices develops with experience and understanding of environmental issues. There is general acceptance that many stakeholders – technicians, politicians

  14. Linking trade-offs in habitat selection with the occurrence of functional responses for moose living in two nearby study areas.

    PubMed

    Mabille, Géraldine; Dussault, Christian; Ouellet, Jean-Pierre; Laurian, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    A species may modify its relative habitat use with changing availability, generating functional responses in habitat selection. Functional responses in habitat selection are expected to occur when animals experience trade-offs influencing their habitat selection, but only a few studies to date have explicitly linked functional responses to the underlying trade-offs faced by the animals. We used data from 39 female moose fitted with GPS telemetry collars in two nearby study areas in Canada to investigate if moose (1) were faced with a food/cover trade-off in habitat selection, as typically acknowledged in the literature, and (2) showed a functional response in their use of food/cover-rich habitats. We also examined how habitat selection patterns varied seasonally, and between study areas. The occurrence of functional responses varied strongly between study areas, and could not always be related to a measurable food/cover trade-off. Functional responses were observed more often in the study area where the environmental conditions were more severe (colder temperatures, higher precipitations, and lower food availability). Selection coefficients were also less variable among individuals in that study area, suggesting that severe environmental conditions may constrain individuals to a few selection tactics and promote the development of functional responses. Moose reacted to the availability of different habitat types in different seasons, reflecting the changing trade-offs faced by the animals. We found considerable behavioral differences between individuals from two adjacent study areas, and therefore recommend caution when extrapolating habitat selection results. We advocate for the wider use of functional responses to identify critical habitats for a species from a management or conservation perspective.

  15. CLMSZ, Garnet Mountain area, southern California: A collisionally generated contractional shear zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bracchi, K.A.; Girty, G.H.; Girty, M.S. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Harper Creek gneiss (HCg) and Oriflamme Canyon unit (OCu) underlie the central portion of the Cuyamaca Laguna Mountains shear zone (CLMSZ) in and around Garnet Mountain, Peninsular Ranges, California, and may have been deformed during Cretaceous arc-continent collision. U-Pb zircon work and petrological and geochemical analyses suggest that in the Garnet Mountain area, the 140 Ma HCg is derived from granite and granodiorite, whereas the 122 [+-] 1 Ma OCu is a protomylonite derived from a granite. Both units appear to be per aluminous calc-alkaline magmatic arc granitoids. Mineral assemblages suggest uppermost greenschist to lower amphibolite grade conditions during deformation. In the HCg, S-1hc is a mylonitic gneissosity with a mean attitude of N11W, 60 NE. A mineral streaking lineation lies within the plane of S-1hc and has a mean attitude of 61[degree] N76E. In the OCu, S-1oc strikes about N13W and dips 52 NE and contains a mineral streaking lineation with an attitude of 49 N52E. Dextral and sinistral shear bands, S-2d and S-2s (looking NW), transect S-1hc and S-1oc. S-2d and S-2s strike subparallel to S-1. In the HCg S-2s is weakly developed and dips about 32 NE, whereas S-2d is more dominant and dips about 76 NE. On the OCu these relationships are reversed. S-2d does not cross cut S-2s: hence, the two sets of shear bands are interpreted to be conjugates reflecting NE-SW contraction and subvertical extension during collisional development of the CLMSZ.

  16. Wild mushroom- an underutilized healthy food resource and income generator: experience from Tanzania rural areas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study documents the use of a wild edible mushroom (WEM) in Tanzania rural areas and assesses its significance as a source of healthy food and income for the disadvantaged rural dwellers. Methodology The data was gathered through local market surveys in order to conventionally identify different common WEM taxa using a semi-structured interview and it involved 160 people comprised of WEM hunters, traders and consumers. The collected data covered the information on where, how, when and who was the principal transmitter of the mycological knowledge learned and the general information on their market and values. Results Results show that mushroom gathering is gender oriented, dominated by women (76.25%) whereas men account for 23.75%. Women possess vast knowledge of mushroom folk taxonomy, biology and ecology and are therefore the principal knowledge transmitters. It was also found that learning about WEM began at an early age and is family tradition based. The knowledge is acquired and imparted by practices and is mostly transmitted vertically through family dissemination. The results also revealed that 75 WEM species belong to 14 families sold in fresh or dry form. The common sold species belonged to the family Cantharellaceae (19) followed by Rusullaceae (16) and Lyophyllaceae (13), respectively. Collectors residing near miombo woodland may harvest 20–30 buckets (capacity 20 liters) and the business may earn a person about $400–900 annually. Conclusion This finding envisages the purposeful strengthening of WEM exploitation, which would contribute significantly in boosting the rural income/economy and reduce conflicts between community and forest conservers. The activity would also provide alternative employment, improve food security to rural disadvantaged groups especially women and old people hence improve their livelihood. PMID:23841964

  17. Structural and functional evaluation of cortical motor areas in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cosottini, Mirco; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Piazza, Selina; Diciotti, Stefano; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Carlesi, Cecilia; Mascalchi, Mario; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-03-01

    The structural and functional data gathered with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques about the brain cortical motor damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are controversial. In fact some structural MRI studies showed foci of gray matter (GM) atrophy in the precentral gyrus, even in the early stage, while others did not. Most functional MRI (fMRI) studies in ALS reported hyperactivation of extra-primary motor cortices, while contradictory results were obtained on the activation of the primary motor cortex. We aimed to investigate the cortical motor circuitries in ALS patients by a combined structural and functional approach. Twenty patients with definite ALS and 16 healthy subjects underwent a structural examination with acquisition of a 3D T1-weighted sequence and fMRI examination during a maximal force handgrip task executed with the right-hand, the left-hand and with both hands simultaneously. The T1-weighted images were analyzed with Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) that showed several clusters of reduced cortical GM in ALS patients compared to controls including the pre and postcentral gyri, the superior, middle and inferior frontal gyri, the supplementary motor area, the superior and inferior parietal cortices and the temporal lobe, bilaterally but more extensive on the right side. In ALS patients a significant hypoactivation of the primary sensory motor cortex and frontal dorsal premotor areas as compared to controls was observed. The hypoactivated areas matched with foci of cortical atrophy demonstrated by VBM. The fMRI analysis also showed an enhanced activation in the ventral premotor frontal areas and in the parietal cortex pertaining to the fronto-parietal motor circuit which paralleled with disease progression rate and matched with cortical regions of atrophy. The hyperactivation of the fronto-parietal circuit was asymmetric and prevalent in the left hemisphere. VBM and fMRI identified structural and functional markers of an extended

  18. Generation of Functional RNAs from Inactive Oligonucleotide Complexes by Non-enzymatic Primer Extension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The earliest genomic RNAs had to be short enough for efficient replication, while simultaneously serving as unfolded templates and effective ribozymes. A partial solution to this paradox may lie in the fact that many functional RNAs can self-assemble from multiple fragments. Therefore, in early evolution, genomic RNA fragments could have been significantly shorter than unimolecular functional RNAs. Here, we show that unstable, nonfunctional complexes assembled from even shorter 3′-truncated oligonucleotides can be stabilized and gain function via non-enzymatic primer extension. Such short RNAs could act as good templates due to their minimal length and complex-forming capacity, while their minimal length would facilitate replication by relatively inefficient polymerization reactions. These RNAs could also assemble into nascent functional RNAs and undergo conversion to catalytically active forms, by the same polymerization chemistry used for replication that generated the original short RNAs. Such phenomena could have substantially relaxed requirements for copying efficiency in early nonenzymatic replication systems. PMID:25521912

  19. Are Protected Areas Required to Maintain Functional Diversity in Human-Modified Landscapes?

    PubMed Central

    Cottee-Jones, H. Eden W.; Matthews, Thomas J.; Bregman, Tom P.; Barua, Maan; Tamuly, Jatin; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of forest to agriculture across the world’s tropics, and the limited space for protected areas, has increased the need to identify effective conservation strategies in human-modified landscapes. Isolated trees are believed to conserve elements of ecological structure, providing micro-sites for conservation in matrix landscapes, and facilitating seed dispersal and forest restoration. Here we investigate the role of isolated Ficus trees, which are of critical importance to tropical forest ecosystems, in conserving frugivore composition and function in a human-modified landscape in Assam, India. We surveyed the frugivorous birds feeding at 122 isolated Ficus trees, 33 fruit trees, and 31 other large trees across a range of 32 km from the nearest intact forest. We found that Ficus trees attracted richer and more abundant assemblages of frugivores than the other tree categories. However, incidence function estimates revealed that forest specialist species decreased dramatically within the first kilometre of the forest edge. Despite this, species richness and functional diversity remained consistent across the human-modified landscape, as habitat generalists replaced forest-dependent frugivores, and accounted for most of the ecological function found in Ficus trees near the forest edge. We recommend that isolated Ficus trees are awarded greater conservation status, and suggest that their conservation can support ecologically functional networks of frugivorous bird communities. PMID:25946032

  20. Are protected areas required to maintain functional diversity in human-modified landscapes?

    PubMed

    Cottee-Jones, H Eden W; Matthews, Thomas J; Bregman, Tom P; Barua, Maan; Tamuly, Jatin; Whittaker, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of forest to agriculture across the world's tropics, and the limited space for protected areas, has increased the need to identify effective conservation strategies in human-modified landscapes. Isolated trees are believed to conserve elements of ecological structure, providing micro-sites for conservation in matrix landscapes, and facilitating seed dispersal and forest restoration. Here we investigate the role of isolated Ficus trees, which are of critical importance to tropical forest ecosystems, in conserving frugivore composition and function in a human-modified landscape in Assam, India. We surveyed the frugivorous birds feeding at 122 isolated Ficus trees, 33 fruit trees, and 31 other large trees across a range of 32 km from the nearest intact forest. We found that Ficus trees attracted richer and more abundant assemblages of frugivores than the other tree categories. However, incidence function estimates revealed that forest specialist species decreased dramatically within the first kilometre of the forest edge. Despite this, species richness and functional diversity remained consistent across the human-modified landscape, as habitat generalists replaced forest-dependent frugivores, and accounted for most of the ecological function found in Ficus trees near the forest edge. We recommend that isolated Ficus trees are awarded greater conservation status, and suggest that their conservation can support ecologically functional networks of frugivorous bird communities. PMID:25946032

  1. Potential Reductions in Variability with Alternative Approaches to Balancing Area Cooperation with High Penetrations of Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Beuning, S.

    2010-08-01

    The work described in this report was performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (EERE DOE). This project is a joint project with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report evaluates the physical characteristics that improve the ability of the power system to absorb variable generation. It then uses evidence from electricity markets in the Eastern Interconnection of the United States to show how large, fast energy markets can help with integration. The concept of Virtual Balancing Area is introduced, a concept that covers a broad range of cooperative measures that can be undertaken by balancing areas to help manage variability.

  2. Second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotics in schizophrenia: patient functioning and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Montemagni, Cristiana; Frieri, Tiziana; Rocca, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs) were developed to make treatment easier, improve adherence, and/or signal the clinician when nonadherence occurs. Second-generation antipsychotic LAIs (SGA-LAIs) combine the advantages of SGA with a long-acting formulation. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the available literature concerning the impact of SGA-LAIs on patient functioning and quality of life (QOL). Although several studies regarding schizophrenia patients’ functioning and QOL have been performed, the quantity of available data still varies greatly depending on the SGA-LAI under investigation. After reviewing the literature, it seems that SGA-LAIs are effective in ameliorating patient functioning and/or QOL of patients with schizophrenia, as compared with placebo. However, while methodological design controversy exists regarding the superiority of risperidone LAI versus oral antipsychotics, the significant amount of evidence in recently published research demonstrates the beneficial influence of risperidone LAI on patient functioning and QOL in stable patients and no benefit over oral treatment in unstable patients. However, the status of the research on SGA-LAIs is lacking in several aspects that may help physicians in choosing the correct drug therapy. Meaningful differences have been observed between SGA-LAIs in the onset of their clinical efficacy and in the relationships between symptoms and functioning scores. Moreover, head-to-head studies comparing the effects of SGA-LAIs on classical measures of psychopathology and functioning are available mainly on risperidone LAI, while those comparing olanzapine LAI with other SGA-LAIs are still lacking. Lastly, some data on their use, especially in first-episode or recent-onset schizophrenia and in refractory or treatment-resistant schizophrenia, is available. PMID:27143893

  3. Functional MRI evidence for the decline of word retrieval and generation during normal aging.

    PubMed

    Baciu, M; Boudiaf, N; Cousin, E; Perrone-Bertolotti, M; Pichat, C; Fournet, N; Chainay, H; Lamalle, L; Krainik, A

    2016-02-01

    This fMRI study aimed to explore the effect of normal aging on word retrieval and generation. The question addressed is whether lexical production decline is determined by a direct mechanism, which concerns the language operations or is rather indirectly induced by a decline of executive functions. Indeed, the main hypothesis was that normal aging does not induce loss of lexical knowledge, but there is only a general slowdown in retrieval mechanisms involved in lexical processing, due to possible decline of the executive functions. We used three tasks (verbal fluency, object naming, and semantic categorization). Two groups of participants were tested (Young, Y and Aged, A), without cognitive and psychiatric impairment and showing similar levels of vocabulary. Neuropsychological testing revealed that older participants had lower executive function scores, longer processing speeds, and tended to have lower verbal fluency scores. Additionally, older participants showed higher scores for verbal automatisms and overlearned information. In terms of behavioral data, older participants performed as accurate as younger adults, but they were significantly slower for the semantic categorization and were less fluent for verbal fluency task. Functional MRI analyses suggested that older adults did not simply activate fewer brain regions involved in word production, but they actually showed an atypical pattern of activation. Significant correlations between the BOLD (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent) signal of aging-related (A > Y) regions and cognitive scores suggested that this atypical pattern of the activation may reveal several compensatory mechanisms (a) to overcome the slowdown in retrieval, due to the decline of executive functions and processing speed and (b) to inhibit verbal automatic processes. The BOLD signal measured in some other aging-dependent regions did not correlate with the behavioral and neuropsychological scores, and the overactivation of these uncorrelated

  4. Functional MRI evidence for the decline of word retrieval and generation during normal aging.

    PubMed

    Baciu, M; Boudiaf, N; Cousin, E; Perrone-Bertolotti, M; Pichat, C; Fournet, N; Chainay, H; Lamalle, L; Krainik, A

    2016-02-01

    This fMRI study aimed to explore the effect of normal aging on word retrieval and generation. The question addressed is whether lexical production decline is determined by a direct mechanism, which concerns the language operations or is rather indirectly induced by a decline of executive functions. Indeed, the main hypothesis was that normal aging does not induce loss of lexical knowledge, but there is only a general slowdown in retrieval mechanisms involved in lexical processing, due to possible decline of the executive functions. We used three tasks (verbal fluency, object naming, and semantic categorization). Two groups of participants were tested (Young, Y and Aged, A), without cognitive and psychiatric impairment and showing similar levels of vocabulary. Neuropsychological testing revealed that older participants had lower executive function scores, longer processing speeds, and tended to have lower verbal fluency scores. Additionally, older participants showed higher scores for verbal automatisms and overlearned information. In terms of behavioral data, older participants performed as accurate as younger adults, but they were significantly slower for the semantic categorization and were less fluent for verbal fluency task. Functional MRI analyses suggested that older adults did not simply activate fewer brain regions involved in word production, but they actually showed an atypical pattern of activation. Significant correlations between the BOLD (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent) signal of aging-related (A > Y) regions and cognitive scores suggested that this atypical pattern of the activation may reveal several compensatory mechanisms (a) to overcome the slowdown in retrieval, due to the decline of executive functions and processing speed and (b) to inhibit verbal automatic processes. The BOLD signal measured in some other aging-dependent regions did not correlate with the behavioral and neuropsychological scores, and the overactivation of these uncorrelated

  5. Changes in lung function and airway inflammation among asthmatic children residing in a woodsmoke-impacted urban area.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ryan W; Mar, Therese; Koenig, Jane; Liu, L-J Sally; Gould, Timothy; Simpson, Christopher; Larson, Timothy

    2008-02-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) is associated with respiratory effects, and asthmatic children are especially sensitive. Preliminary evidence suggests that combustion-derived particles play an important role. Our objective was to evaluate effect estimates from different PM(2.5) exposure metrics in relation to airway inflammation and lung function among children residing in woodsmoke-impacted areas of Seattle. Nineteen children (ages 6-13 yr) with asthma were monitored during the heating season. We measured 24-h outdoor and personal concentrations of PM(2.5) and light-absorbing carbon (LAC). Levoglucosan (LG), a marker of woodsmoke, was also measured outdoors. We partitioned PM(2.5) exposure into its ambient-generated (E(ag)) and nonambient (E(na)) components. These exposure metrics were evaluated in relation to daily changes in exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)), a marker of airway inflammation, and four lung function measures: midexpiratory flow (MEF), peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV(1)), and forced vital capacity (FVC). E(ag), but not E(na), was correlated with combustion markers. Significant associations with respiratory health were seen only among participants not using inhaled corticosteroids. Increases in FE(NO) were associated with personal PM(2.5), personal LAC, and E(ag) but not with ambient PM(2.5) or its combustion markers. In contrast, MEF and PEF decrements were associated with ambient PM(2.5), its combustion markers, and E(ag), but not with personal PM(2.5) or personal LAC. FEV(1) was associated only with ambient LG. Our results suggest that lung function may be especially sensitive to the combustion-generated component of ambient PM(2.5), whereas airway inflammation may be more closely related to some other constituent of the ambient PM(2.5) mixture. PMID:18302050

  6. The relationship between naming reaction time and functional MRI parameters in Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Cummine, Jacqueline; Borowsky, Ron; Vakorin, Vasily; Bird, Jeff; Sarty, Gordon

    2008-07-01

    We examined the correlation between behavioural reaction time and functional imaging parameters of the blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD) response in Broca's Area during a word identification task, and whether the correlation [Magnetic Resonance Imaging 22 (2004) 451-455] varies as a function of four stimulus types: regular words (REGs) (e.g., hint), irregular words (IRRs) (e.g., pint), nonwords (NWs) (e.g., bint), and pseudohomophones (PHs) (e.g., pynt). Participants named letter strings aloud during a functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Naming reaction times were recorded during regular gaps in image acquisition, and BOLD parameters were extracted via a Tikhonov regularized BOLD analysis technique. The results revealed that only PH reaction times were correlated with BOLD width, providing evidence that Broca's area supports phonetic decoding accompanied with phonological lexical access. In addition, we advanced the development of equation-based models of cognitive behaviour and neurophysiology, whereby we showed that the relationship of mathematical independence that exists for predicting REG accuracy, given IRR and NW or PH naming accuracy, was present for naming reaction time, BOLD width, BOLD time to peak, and BOLD intensity. Therefore, we provide converging behavioural and neuroanatomical evidence for a mathematically independent relationship between sight vocabulary and phonetic decoding systems, consistent with a dual-route model of reading.

  7. Next generation PhotoCORMs: polynuclear tricarbonylmanganese(I)-functionalized polypyridyl metallodendrimers.

    PubMed

    Govender, Preshendren; Pai, Sandesh; Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Smith, Gregory S

    2013-05-01

    The first CO-releasing metallodendrimers, based on polypyridyl dendritic scaffolds functionalized with Mn(CO)3 moieties, of the general formula [DAB-PPI-{MnBr(bpy(CH3,CH═N))(CO)3}n], where DAB = 1,4-diaminobutane, PPI = poly(propyleneimine), bpy = bipyridyl, and n = 4 for first- or n = 8 for second-generation dendrimers, were synthesized and comprehensively characterized by analytical (HR-ESI mass spectrometry and elemental analysis) and spectroscopic ((1)H, (13)C{(1)H}-NMR, infrared, and UV/vis spectroscopy) methods. The CO-release properties of these compounds were investigated in pure buffer and using the myoglobin assay. Both metallodendrimer generations are stable in the dark in aqueous buffer for up to 16 h but show photoactivated CO release upon excitation at 410 nm, representing a novel class of macromolecular photoactivatable CO-releasing molecules (PhotoCORMs). No scaling effects were observed since both metallodendrimers release ∼65% of the total number of CO ligands per molecule, regardless of the generation number. In addition, the mononuclear model complex [MnBr(bpy(CH3,CH═NCH2CH2CH3))(CO)3] was prepared and comprehensively studied, including DFT/TDDFT calculations. These metallodendrimer-based PhotoCORMs afford new methods of targeted delivery of large amounts of carbon monoxide to cellular systems.

  8. Generation of Recombinant Capripoxvirus Vectors for Vaccines and Gene Knockout Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Cao, Jingxin; Babiuk, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate capripoxvirus through gene knockouts and gene insertions has become an increasingly valuable research tool in elucidating the function of individual genes of capripoxvirus, as well as in the development of capripoxvirus-based recombinant vaccines. The homologous recombination technique is used to generate capripoxvirus knockout viruses (KO), and is based on the targeting a particular viral gene of interest. This technique can also be used to insert a gene of interest. A protocol for the generation of a viral gene knockout is described. This technique involves the use of a plasmid which encodes the flanking sequences of the regions where the homologous recombination will occur, and will result in the insertion of an EGFP reporter gene for visualization of recombinant virus, as well as the E. coli gpt gene as a positive selection marker. If an additional gene is to be incorporated, this can be achieved by inserting a gene of interest for expression under a poxvirus promoter into the plasmid between the flanking regions for insertion. This chapter describes a protocol for generating such recombinant capripoxviruses.

  9. Generation of Recombinant Capripoxvirus Vectors for Vaccines and Gene Knockout Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Cao, Jingxin; Babiuk, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate capripoxvirus through gene knockouts and gene insertions has become an increasingly valuable research tool in elucidating the function of individual genes of capripoxvirus, as well as in the development of capripoxvirus-based recombinant vaccines. The homologous recombination technique is used to generate capripoxvirus knockout viruses (KO), and is based on the targeting a particular viral gene of interest. This technique can also be used to insert a gene of interest. A protocol for the generation of a viral gene knockout is described. This technique involves the use of a plasmid which encodes the flanking sequences of the regions where the homologous recombination will occur, and will result in the insertion of an EGFP reporter gene for visualization of recombinant virus, as well as the E. coli gpt gene as a positive selection marker. If an additional gene is to be incorporated, this can be achieved by inserting a gene of interest for expression under a poxvirus promoter into the plasmid between the flanking regions for insertion. This chapter describes a protocol for generating such recombinant capripoxviruses. PMID:26458835

  10. Functional Human Podocytes Generated in Organoids from Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, Christodoulos; Benedetti, Valentina; Novelli, Rubina; Abbate, Mauro; Rizzo, Paola; Conti, Sara; Tomasoni, Susanna; Corna, Daniela; Pozzobon, Michela; Cavallotti, Daniela; Yokoo, Takashi; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Generating kidney organoids using human stem cells could offer promising prospects for research and therapeutic purposes. However, no cell-based strategy has generated nephrons displaying an intact three-dimensional epithelial filtering barrier. Here, we generated organoids using murine embryonic kidney cells, and documented that these tissues recapitulated the complex three-dimensional filtering structure of glomerular slits in vivo and accomplished selective glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. Exploiting this technology, we mixed human amniotic fluid stem cells with mouse embryonic kidney cells to establish three-dimensional chimeric organoids that engrafted in vivo and grew to form vascularized glomeruli and tubular structures. Human cells contributed to the formation of glomerular structures, differentiated into podocytes with slit diaphragms, and internalized exogenously infused BSA, thus attaining in vivo degrees of specialization and function unprecedented for donor stem cells. In conclusion, human amniotic fluid stem cell chimeric organoids may offer new paths for studying renal development and human podocyte disease, and for facilitating drug discovery and translational research.

  11. Scalable and enhanced triboelectric output power generation by surface functionalized nanoimprint patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeog Kwon, Yang; Shin, Sung-Ho; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-05-01

    We report nanoimprint lithographic submicron surface patterning for scalable output power generation and performance enhancement in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). Specifically, one contact surface of a TENG is nanoimprinted with polyurethane acrylate (PUA) lines in different pitches and the counter contact surface is coated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The results show that a TENG with 200 nm pitch PUA lines exhibits voltage and current up to ˜430 V and ˜55 μA cm-2, generating about a sixfold higher output power than that with a flat PUA surface at an applied force of 0.3 MPa. In addition, scalable output power was obtained by adjusting line pitches. Further enhancement in output power was also demonstrated by chemically functionalizing the PUA line patterns with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The PDDA functionalization boosted voltage and current up to ˜500 V and ˜100 μA cm-2, respectively, which corresponds to ˜50% power density enhancement. The approach introduced here is a simple, effective, scalable and reproducible way to fabricate TENGs.

  12. Overcoming the hurdles for a reproducible generation of human functionally mature reprogrammed neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Alicia; Taverna, Stefano; Yekhlef, Latefa

    2015-01-01

    The advent of cell reprogramming technologies has widely disclosed the possibility to have direct access to human neurons for experimental and biomedical applications. Human pluripotent stem cells can be instructed in vitro to generate specific neuronal cell types as well as different glial cells. Moreover, new approaches of direct neuronal cell reprogramming can strongly accelerate the generation of different neuronal lineages. However, genetic heterogeneity, reprogramming fidelity, and time in culture of the starting cells can still significantly bias their differentiation efficiency and quality of the neuronal progenies. In addition, reprogrammed human neurons exhibit a very slow pace in gaining a full spectrum of functional properties including physiological levels of membrane excitability, sustained and prolonged action potential firing, mature synaptic currents and synaptic plasticity. This delay poses serious limitations for their significance as biological experimental model and screening platform. We will discuss new approaches of neuronal cell differentiation and reprogramming as well as methods to accelerate the maturation and functional activity of the converted human neurons. PMID:25790823

  13. Dopaminergic neurons generated from monkey embryonic stem cells function in a Parkinson primate model.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yasushi; Takahashi, Jun; Saiki, Hidemoto; Morizane, Asuka; Hayashi, Takuya; Kishi, Yo; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Yo; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Ideguchi, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideki; Imazato, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Suemori, Hirofumi; Omachi, Shigeki; Iida, Hidehiko; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuji, Norio; Sasai, Yoshiki; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. ES cells are currently the most promising donor cell source for cell-replacement therapy in PD. We previously described a strong neuralizing activity present on the surface of stromal cells, named stromal cell-derived inducing activity (SDIA). In this study, we generated neurospheres composed of neural progenitors from monkey ES cells, which are capable of producing large numbers of DA neurons. We demonstrated that FGF20, preferentially expressed in the substantia nigra, acts synergistically with FGF2 to increase the number of DA neurons in ES cell-derived neurospheres. We also analyzed the effect of transplantation of DA neurons generated from monkey ES cells into 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated (MPTP-treated) monkeys, a primate model for PD. Behavioral studies and functional imaging revealed that the transplanted cells functioned as DA neurons and attenuated MPTP-induced neurological symptoms.

  14. Generating functionals for harmonic expectation values of paths with fixed end points: Feynman diagrams for nonpolynomial interactions.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, H; Pelster, A; Bachmann, M

    1999-09-01

    We introduce a general class of generating functionals for the calculation of quantum-mechanical expectation values of arbitrary functionals of fluctuating paths with fixed end points in configuration or momentum space. The generating functionals are calculated explicitly for the harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency, and used to derive a smearing formula for correlation functions of polynomial and nonpolynomial functions of time-dependent positions and momenta. This formula summarizes the effect of quantum fluctuations, and serves to derive generalized Wick rules and Feynman diagrams for perturbation expansions of nonpolynomial interactions.

  15. Generation of functional CD8+ T Cells by human dendritic cells expressing glypican-3 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glypican 3 (GPC-3) is an oncofoetal protein that is expressed in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Since it is a potential target for T cell immunotherapy, we investigated the generation of functional, GPC-3 specific T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Dendritic cells (DC) were derived from adherent PBMC cultured at 37°C for 7 days in X-Vivo, 1% autologous plasma, and 800 u/ml GM-CSF plus 500 u/ml IL-4. Immature DC were transfected with 20 μg of in vitro synthesised GPC-3 mRNA by electroporation using the Easy-ject plus system (Equibio, UK) (300 V, 150 μF and 4 ms pulse time), or pulsed with peptide, and subsequently matured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six predicted GPC-3 peptide epitopes were synthesized using standard f-moc technology and tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A2.1 molecules using the cell line T2. Results DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA but not control DC demonstrated strong intracellular staining for GPC-3 and in vitro generated interferon-gamma expressing T cells from autologous PBMC harvested from normal subjects. One peptide, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, fulfilled our criteria as a naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope: i) it showed high affinity binding to HLA-A2, in T2 cell binding assay; ii) it was generated by the MHC class I processing pathway in DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA, and iii) HLA-A2 positive DC loaded with the peptide stimulated proliferation in autologous T cells and generated CTL that lysed HLA-A2 and GPC-3 positive target cells. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that electroporation of GPC-3 mRNA is an efficient method to load human monocyte-derived DC with antigen because in vitro they generated GPC-3-reactive T cells that were functional, as shown by interferon-gamma production. Furthermore, this study identified a novel naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, which can be used to monitor HLA-A2

  16. Generation and immunosuppressive functions of p53-induced human adaptive regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mandapathil, Magis; Visus, Carmen; Finn, Olivera J; Lang, Stephan; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2013-01-01

    Inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs, also called Tr1 cells) are generated in the periphery (circulation or tissue) of cancer patients upon the encounter of naïve CD4+ T cells with tumor-associated antigens. As p53 is often inactivated by genetic or epigenetic events during oncogenesis, p53-induced Tr1 cells might play a key role in establishing immunosuppressive networks in cancer patients. Tr1 cells were generated by co-culturing circulating CD4+CD25− T cells with autologous immature dendritic cells pulsed with a wild-type (WT) p53-derived peptide or an unrelated peptide derived from mucin 1 (MUC1). The Tr1 phenotype and the specificity for p53 of these cells were confirmed by multicolor flow cytometry. Moreover, the Tr1 cell-mediated suppression of T-cell proliferation was evaluated by CFSE-based flow cytometry, while their ability to alter the T-cell cytokine profile by ELISA and Luminex assays. The capacity of p53-induced Tr1 cells to suppress the generation and function of cytotoxic T lymphcoytes (CTLs) was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISPOT. Of note, low doses of the p53-derived peptide (p53low) induced greater numbers of Tr1 cells than the same peptide employed at high doses (p53high). Moreover, Tr1/p53low cells not secreted higher levels of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor β1, but also mediated more robust suppressive effects on CTL proliferation than Tr1/p53high cells. Tr1/p53low cells, Tr1/p53high cells, as well as Tr1 cells generated with low doses of an unrelated MUC1-derived peptide were equally effective in suppressing the expansion and antitumor activity of p53-reactive CTLs. p53low induced the expansion of highly suppressive p53-reactive Tr1 cells. However, the capacity of these Tr1 cells to suppress the generation and function of p53-reactive CTLs was independent of their antigen-specificity. PMID:24073385

  17. In vivo functional and myeloarchitectonic mapping of human primary auditory areas

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Frederic; Tierney, Adam Taylor; Lutti, Antoine; Josephs, Oliver; Sereno, Martin I.; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to vision, where retinotopic mapping alone can define areal borders, primary auditory areas such as A1 are best delineated by combining in vivo tonotopic mapping with post mortem cyto- or myelo-architectonics from the same individual. We combined high-resolution (800 μm) quantitative T1 mapping with phase-encoded tonotopic methods to map primary auditory areas (A1 and R) within the ‘auditory core’ of human volunteers. We first quantitatively characterize the highly myelinated auditory core in terms of shape, area, cortical depth profile, and position, with our data showing considerable correspondence to post-mortem myeloarchitectonic studies, both in cross-participant averages and in individuals. The core region contains two ‘mirror-image‘ tonotopic maps oriented along the same axis as observed in macaque and owl monkey. We suggest that thee two maps within the core are the human analogues of primate auditory areas A1 and R. The core occupies a much smaller portion of tonotopically organized cortex on the superior temporal plane and gyrus than is generally supposed. The multi-modal approach to defining the auditory core will facilitate investigations of structure-function relationships, comparative neuroanatomical studies, and promises new biomarkers for diagnosis and clinical studies. PMID:23152594

  18. Pedotransfer functions for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity: implications for modeling storm flow generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobieraj, J. A.; Elsenbeer, H.; Vertessy, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    We evaluated the performance of nine published pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity ( Ks) in modeling the stormflow generated in a rainforest catchment. Using available input data consisting of particle size distribution, bulk density, and saturated moisture content information, these empirically-based PTFs were found to be inadequate in estimating Ks for this catchment. At shallow depths (0-0.1 m), PTFs commonly underestimated Ks by variable amounts with the exception of the Jabro PTF, which either overestimated Ks or was not significantly different from measured values. At subsequent depths (0.1-0.4 m), PTFs typically overestimated Ks by variable amounts, the exception being the Campbell and Shiozawa PTF, which typically underestimated Ks. We used TOPOG_SBM to model storm flow generation by replacing measured Ks values from the 0 to 0.1 m depth interval with PTF-estimated Ks values. The simulation set using Rosetta SSC (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay) Ks values overestimated runoff for all events, and overland flow occurred across the entire catchment for all events. Simulations using Rosetta SSC-BD (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay, and bulk density) Ks values predicted hydrograph attributes as well as the simulations using measured Ks values, but the Rosetta SSC-BD simulation set predicted a much larger spatial frequency of overland flow across the catchment than the measured Ks simulation set. Model simulations using the Jabro PTF, which generated large estimates of Ks, produced hydrographs that overestimated total runoff and time of rise but underestimated peak runoff. This model predicted much less overland flow than other models. Currently published PTFs used in this study are inadequate in estimating Ks for the La Cuenca catchment, which in turn make them inadequate for modeling storm flow generation. Enhanced model performance could likely be achieved by utilizing PTFs that better account for the

  19. Direct measurement of the spatial Wigner function with area-integrated detection.

    PubMed

    Mukamel, Eran; Banaszek, Konrad; Walmsley, Ian A; Dorrer, Christophe

    2003-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a novel technique for characterizing transverse spatial coherence by using the Wigner distribution function. The method is based on the measurement of interference between a pair of rotated and displaced replicas of the input beam with an area-integrating detector, and it provides an optimal signal-to-noise ratio in regimes when array detectors are not available. We analyze the quantum-optical picture of the presented measurement for single-photon signals and discuss possible applications in quantum information processing. PMID:12906075

  20. Large-area graphene films by simple solution casting of edge-selectively functionalized graphite.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seo-Yoon; Jeon, In-Yup; Yang, Jieun; Park, Noejung; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Park, Sungjin; Ruoff, Rodney S; Dai, Liming; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2011-06-28

    We report edge-selective functionalization of graphite (EFG) for the production of large-area uniform graphene films by simply solution-casting EFG dispersions in dichloromethane on silicon oxide substrates, followed by annealing. The resultant graphene films show ambipolar transport properties with sheet resistances of 0.52-3.11 kΩ/sq at 63-90% optical transmittance. EFG allows solution processing methods for the scalable production of electrically conductive, optically transparent, and mechanically robust flexible graphene films for use in practice.

  1. Revised Estimates of Hikurangi Slow Slip Using FEM-Generated Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Wallace, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) occur along nearly the entire Hikurangi subduction margin adjacent to the North Island, New Zealand. The occurrence of both shallow and deep SSEs and the change in locking behavior observed along the Hikurangi Margin provide a unique opportunity to examine the factors controlling both seismic and aseismic behavior. It is therefore critical that our slip estimates are as accurate as possible. Existing SSE slip estimates use geodetic data in conjunction with an elastic half-space dislocation model to infer the slip distributions for these events. Two recent developments provide the potential to obtain more accurate estimates for these events, however. First, a New Zealand-wide seismic velocity model (Eberhart-Phillips et al., 2010) allows us to accurately represent the effects of complex variations in elastic properties. Second, a revised interface geometry has just been developed (Williams et al., 2013), allowing us to represent more accurately the interface on which the events are assumed to occur. We use the finite element code PyLith to generate Green's functions for the entire Hikurangi interface, and we then use these in place of the elastic half-space Green's functions used previously. We do our work in two stages. In the first stage, we replace the existing geometry for the Hikurangi interface with the new geometry, thus allowing us to isolate the changes due purely to the revised geometry. In the second phase, we use the FEM-generated Green's functions in the DEFNODE inversion program, which allows us to isolate the changes that are due to changes in the assumed elastic properties. In this initial work, we apply the method to two Hikurangi SSEs: one deep event and one shallow one. The differences observed for these two events will allow us to evaluate the relative importance of interface geometry and assumed elastic structure for future SSE slip inversions.

  2. Functionality in Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Based on Fiber's Size, Surface Area, and Molecular Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Tanioka, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers based on an electrohydrodynamic process. This method has the following advantages: (i) the ability to produce thin fibers with diameters in the micrometer and nanometer ranges; (ii) one-step forming of the two- or three-dimensional nanofiber network assemblies (nanofibrous membranes); and (iii) applicability for a broad spectrum of molecules, such as synthetic and biological polymers and polymerless sol-gel systems. Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have received significant attention in terms of their practical applications. The major advantages of nanofibers or nanofibrous membranes are the functionalities based on their nanoscaled-size, highly specific surface area, and highly molecular orientation. These functionalities of the nanofibrous membranes can be controlled by their fiber diameter, surface chemistry and topology, and internal structure of the nanofibers. This report focuses on our studies and describes fundamental aspects and applications of electrospun nanofibrous membranes. PMID:24957735

  3. The point-spread function of fiber-coupled area detectors

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James M.; Nielsen, Chris; Frankel, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The point-spread function (PSF) of a fiber-optic taper-coupled CCD area detector was measured over five decades of intensity using a 20 µm X-ray beam and ∼2000-fold averaging. The ‘tails’ of the PSF clearly revealed that it is neither Gaussian nor Lorentzian, but instead resembles the solid angle subtended by a pixel at a point source of light held a small distance (∼27 µm) above the pixel plane. This converges to an inverse cube law far from the beam impact point. Further analysis revealed that the tails are dominated by the fiber-optic taper, with negligible contribution from the phosphor, suggesting that the PSF of all fiber-coupled CCD-type detectors is best described as a Moffat function. PMID:23093762

  4. Functional connections between optic flow areas and navigationally responsive brain regions during goal-directed navigation.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Katherine R; Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Ross, Robert S; Erdem, Uğur M; Hasselmo, Michael E; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-09-01

    Recent computational models suggest that visual input from optic flow provides information about egocentric (navigator-centered) motion and influences firing patterns in spatially tuned cells during navigation. Computationally, self-motion cues can be extracted from optic flow during navigation. Despite the importance of optic flow to navigation, a functional link between brain regions sensitive to optic flow and brain regions important for navigation has not been established in either humans or animals. Here, we used a beta-series correlation methodology coupled with two fMRI tasks to establish this functional link during goal-directed navigation in humans. Functionally defined optic flow sensitive cortical areas V3A, V6, and hMT+ were used as seed regions. fMRI data was collected during a navigation task in which participants updated position and orientation based on self-motion cues to successfully navigate to an encoded goal location. The results demonstrate that goal-directed navigation requiring updating of position and orientation in the first person perspective involves a cooperative interaction between optic flow sensitive regions V3A, V6, and hMT+ and the hippocampus, retrosplenial cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. These functional connections suggest a dynamic interaction between these systems to support goal-directed navigation.

  5. Design of new generation femoral prostheses using functionally graded materials: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Oshkour, A A; Abu Osman, N A; Yau, Y H; Tarlochan, F; Abas, W A B Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a three-dimensional finite element model of a functionally graded femoral prosthesis. The model consisted of a femoral prosthesis created from functionally graded materials (FGMs), cement, and femur. The hip prosthesis was composed of FGMs made of titanium alloy, chrome-cobalt, and hydroxyapatite at volume fraction gradient exponents of 0, 1, and 5, respectively. The stress was measured on the femoral prosthesis, cement, and femur. Stress on the neck of the femoral prosthesis was not sensitive to the properties of the constituent material. However, stress on the stem and cement decreased proportionally as the volume fraction gradient exponent of the FGM increased. Meanwhile, stress became uniform on the cement mantle layer. In addition, stress on the femur in the proximal part increased and a high surface area of the femoral part was involved in absorbing the stress. As such, the stress-shielding area decreased. The results obtained in this study are significant in the design and longevity of new prosthetic devices because FGMs offer the potential to achieve stress distribution that more closely resembles that of the natural bone in the femur.

  6. Design of new generation femoral prostheses using functionally graded materials: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Oshkour, A A; Abu Osman, N A; Yau, Y H; Tarlochan, F; Abas, W A B Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a three-dimensional finite element model of a functionally graded femoral prosthesis. The model consisted of a femoral prosthesis created from functionally graded materials (FGMs), cement, and femur. The hip prosthesis was composed of FGMs made of titanium alloy, chrome-cobalt, and hydroxyapatite at volume fraction gradient exponents of 0, 1, and 5, respectively. The stress was measured on the femoral prosthesis, cement, and femur. Stress on the neck of the femoral prosthesis was not sensitive to the properties of the constituent material. However, stress on the stem and cement decreased proportionally as the volume fraction gradient exponent of the FGM increased. Meanwhile, stress became uniform on the cement mantle layer. In addition, stress on the femur in the proximal part increased and a high surface area of the femoral part was involved in absorbing the stress. As such, the stress-shielding area decreased. The results obtained in this study are significant in the design and longevity of new prosthetic devices because FGMs offer the potential to achieve stress distribution that more closely resembles that of the natural bone in the femur. PMID:23516951

  7. Functional layer-by-layer design of xerogel-based first-generation amperometric glucose biosensors.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Nicholas G; Hall, Jackson R; Leopold, Michael C

    2015-02-01

    Xerogel-based first-generation amperometric glucose biosensors, constructed through specific layer-by-layer assembly of films featuring glucose oxidase doped xerogel, a diffusion-limiting xerogel layer, and capped with both electropolymerized polyphenol and blended polyurethane semipermeable membranes, are presented. The specific combination of xerogels formed from specific silane precursors, including propyl-trimethoxysilane, isobutyl-trimethoxysilane, octyl-trimethoxysilane, and hydroxymethyl-triethoxysilane, exhibit impressive dynamic and linear ranges of detection (e.g., ≥24-28 mM glucose) and low response times, as well as significant discrimination against common interferent species such as acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, sodium nitrite, oxalic acid, and uric acid as determined by selectivity coefficients. Additionally, systematic electrochemical and contact angle studies of different xerogel silane precursors, varying in structure, chain length, and/or functional group, reveal that sensor performance is more dependent on the tunable porosity/permeability of the layered interfaces rather than the hydrophobic character or functional groups within the films. While the sensing performance largely exceeds that of existing electrochemical glucose sensing schemes in the literature, the presented layered approach establishes the specific functionality of each layer working in concert with each other and suggests that the strategy may be readily adaptable to other clinically relevant targets and is amenable to miniaturization for eventual in situ or in vivo sensing. PMID:25562760

  8. Directed functional connectivity matures with motor learning in a cortical pattern generator

    PubMed Central

    Day, Nancy F.; Terleski, Kyle L.; Nykamp, Duane Q.

    2013-01-01

    Sequential motor skills may be encoded by feedforward networks that consist of groups of neurons that fire in sequence (Abeles 1991; Long et al. 2010). However, there has been no evidence of an anatomic map of activation sequence in motor control circuits, which would be potentially detectable as directed functional connectivity of coactive neuron groups. The proposed pattern generator for birdsong, the HVC (Long and Fee 2008; Vu et al. 1994), contains axons that are preferentially oriented in the rostrocaudal axis (Nottebohm et al. 1982; Stauffer et al. 2012). We used four-tetrode recordings to assess the activity of ensembles of single neurons along the rostrocaudal HVC axis in anesthetized zebra finches. We found an axial, polarized neural network in which sequential activity is directionally organized along the rostrocaudal axis in adult males, who produce a stereotyped song. Principal neurons fired in rostrocaudal order and with interneurons that were rostral to them, suggesting that groups of excitatory neurons fire at the leading edge of travelling waves of inhibition. Consistent with the synchronization of neurons by caudally travelling waves of inhibition, the activity of interneurons was more coherent in the orthogonal mediolateral axis than in the rostrocaudal axis. If directed functional connectivity within the HVC is important for stereotyped, learned song, then it may be lacking in juveniles, which sing a highly variable song. Indeed, we found little evidence for network directionality in juveniles. These data indicate that a functionally directed network within the HVC matures during sensorimotor learning and may underlie vocal patterning. PMID:23175804

  9. Triboelectric charging sequence induced by surface functionalization as a method to fabricate high performance triboelectric generators.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Ho; Kwon, Yang Hyeog; Kim, Young-Hwan; Jung, Joo-Yun; Lee, Min Hyung; Nah, Junghyo

    2015-04-28

    Two different materials, apart from each other in a triboelectric series, are required to fabricate high performance triboelectric generators (TEGs). Thus, it often limits the choices of materials and causes related processing issues for TEGs. To address this issue, we report a simple surface functionalization method that can effectively change the triboelectric charging sequence of the materials, broadening material choices and enhancing the performance of TEGs. Specifically, we functionalized the surfaces of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films either with poly-l-lysine solution or trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl) silane (FOTS). Consequently, the PET surfaces were modified to have different triboelectric polarities in a triboelectric series. The TEGs, fabricated using this approach, demonstrated the maximum Vopen-circuit (Voc) of ∼330 V and Jshort-circuit (Jsc) of ∼270 mA/m(2), respectively, at an applied force of 0.5 MPa. Furthermore, the functionalized surfaces of TEGs demonstrated superior stability during cyclic measurement over 7200 cycles, maintaining the performance even after a month. The approach introduced here is a simple, effective, and cost-competitive way to fabricate TEGs, which can also be easily adopted for various surface patterns and device structures.

  10. Homology Modeling: Generating Structural Models to Understand Protein Function and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Geneticists and molecular and cell biologists routinely uncover new proteins important in specific biological processes/pathways. However, either the molecular functions or the functional mechanisms of many of these proteins are unclear due to a lack of knowledge of their atomic structures. Yet, determining experimental structures of many proteins presents technical challenges. The current methods for obtaining atomic-resolution structures of biomolecules (X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy) require pure preparations of proteins at concentrations much higher than those at which the proteins exist in a physiological environment. Additionally, NMR has size limitations, with current technology limited to the determination of structures of proteins with masses of up to 15 kDa. Due to these reasons, atomic structures of many medically and biologically important proteins do not exist. However, the structures of these proteins are essential for several purposes, including in silico drug design [1], understanding the effects of disease mutations [2], and designing experiments to probe the functional mechanisms of proteins. Comparative modeling has gained importance as a tool for bridging the gap between sequence and structure space, allowing researchers to build structural models of proteins that are difficult to crystallize or for which structure determination by NMR spectroscopy is not tractable. Comparative modeling, or homology modeling, exploits the fact that two proteins whose sequences are evolutionarily connected display similar structural features [3]. Thus, the known structure of a protein (template) can be used to generate a molecular model of the protein (query) whose experimental structure is notknown.

  11. Differences in Parental Involvement Typologies among Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y Parents: A Study of Select Bay Area Region of Houston Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloz, Elizabeth Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences existed among generations (Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y) regarding the levels of parental involvement within each of these generations. Also examined were additional factors such as the parents. socioeconomic status, educational level, marital status, and ethnicity. The…

  12. Functional convergence of developmentally and adult-generated granule cells in dentate gyrus circuits supporting hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Stone, Scellig S D; Teixeira, Cátia M; Zaslavsky, Kirill; Wheeler, Anne L; Martinez-Canabal, Alonso; Wang, Afra H; Sakaguchi, Masanori; Lozano, Andres M; Frankland, Paul W

    2011-12-01

    In the hippocampus, the production of dentate granule cells (DGCs) persists into adulthood. As adult-generated neurons are thought to contribute to hippocampal memory processing, promoting adult neurogenesis therefore offers the potential for restoring mnemonic function in the aged or diseased brain. Within this regenerative context, one key issue is whether developmentally generated and adult-generated DGCs represent functionally equivalent or distinct neuronal populations. To address this, we labeled separate cohorts of developmentally generated and adult-generated DGCs and used immunohistochemical approaches to compare their integration into circuits supporting hippocampus-dependent memory in intact mice. First, in the water maze task, rates of integration of adult-generated DGCs were regulated by maturation, with maximal integration not occurring until DGCs were five or more weeks in age. Second, these rates of integration were equivalent for embryonically, postnatally, and adult-generated DGCs. Third, these findings generalized to another hippocampus-dependent task, contextual fear conditioning. Together, these experiments indicate that developmentally generated and adult-generated DGCs are integrated into hippocampal memory networks at similar rates, and suggest a functional equivalence between DGCs generated at different developmental stages. PMID:20824726

  13. Clonally related forebrain interneurons disperse broadly across both, functional areas and structural boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian; Jaglin, Xavier H.; Cobbs, Lucy V.; Bandler, Rachel C.; Streicher, Carmen; Cepko, Constance L.; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Fishell, Gord

    2015-01-01

    The medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) gives rise to the majority of mouse forebrain interneurons. Here, we examine the lineage relationship among MGE-derived interneurons using a replication-defective retroviral library containing a highly diverse set of DNA barcodes. Recovering the barcodes from the mature progeny of infected progenitor cells enabled us to unambiguously determine their respective lineal relationship. We found that clonal dispersion occurs across large areas of the brain and is not restricted by anatomical divisions. As such, sibling interneurons can populate the cortex, hippocampus striatum and globus pallidus. The majority of interneurons appeared to be generated from asymmetric divisions of MGE progenitor cells, followed by symmetric divisions within the subventricular zone. Altogether, our findings uncover that lineage relationships do not appear to determine interneuron allocation to particular regions. As such, it is likely that clonally-related interneurons have considerable flexibility as to the particular forebrain circuits to which they can contribute. PMID:26299473

  14. Somatosensory areas of manatee cerebral cortex: histochemical characterization and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Sarko, D K; Reep, R L

    2007-01-01

    A histochemical and cytoarchitectural analysis was completed for the neocortex of the Florida manatee in order to localize primary sensory areas and particularly primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Based on the location of cytochrome oxidase-dense staining in flattened cortex preparations, preliminary functional divisions were assigned for SI with the face represented laterally followed by the flipper, body and tail representations proceeding medially. The neonate exhibited four distinct patches in the frontoparietal cortex (presumptive SI), whereas juvenile and adult specimens demonstrated a distinct pattern in which cytochrome oxidase-dense staining appeared to be blended into one large patch extending dorsomedially. This differential staining between younger versus older more developed animals was also seen on coronal sections stained for cytochrome oxidase, myelin, or Nissl bodies. These were systematically analyzed in order to accurately localize the laminar and cytoarchitectural extent of cytochrome oxidase staining. Overall, SI appears to span seven cytoarchitectural areas to which we have assigned presumptive functional representations based on the relative locations of cytochrome oxidase-dense staining. PMID:16912474

  15. Functional columns in superior temporal sulcus areas of the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wataru; Tani, Toshiki; Banno, Taku; Miyakawa, Naohisa; Abe, Hiroshi; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2015-12-16

    Cortical areas in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) of primates have been recognized as a part of the 'social brain'. In particular, biological motion stimuli elicit neuronal responses in the STS, indicating their roles in the ability to understand others' actions. However, the spatial organization of functionally identified STS cells is not well understood because it is difficult to identify the precise locations of cells in sulcal regions. Here, using a small New World monkey, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) that has a lissencephalic brain, we investigated the spatial organization of the cells responsive to other's actions in STS. The neural responses to movies showing several types of other's actions were recorded with multicontact linear-array electrodes that had four shanks (0.4 mm spacing), with eight electrode contacts (0.2 mm spacing) for each shank. The four shanks were penetrated perpendicular to the cortical surface. We found that STS cells significantly responded to other's goal-directed actions, such as when an actor marmoset was reaching for and grasping a piece of food. The response profiles to the movies were more similar between the vertically positioned electrodes than horizontally positioned electrodes when the distances between electrodes were matched. This indicates that there are functional columns in the higher-order visual areas in STS of the common marmoset. PMID:26512934

  16. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging in the determination of dominant language cerebral area].

    PubMed

    Meneses, Murilo S; Rocha, Samanta F Blattes; Blood, Marcelo R Young; Trentin, Alcides; Benites Filho, Paulo Roberto; Kowacs, Pedro André; Oliveira, Nelson de Andrade; Simão, Cristiane A; Awamura, Yumi; Vítola, Maria L A

    2004-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique for detecting minimal changes in brain perfusion and oxygenation secondary to neuronal activation. Its application in the pre-surgical evaluation of epileptic patients with temporal mesial sclerosis is currently being under investigation in several centers. This study aims to describe an activation paradigm for the evaluation of language and memory functions, as an alternative to the worldwide used Wada test, which is an invasive procedure. In order to propose a paradigm adapted to the Portuguese language, we report our experience in determining the dominant cerebral area for language through fMRI with a verbal fluency task. The results of the fMRI from 19 patients studied in Curitiba in a period of approximately two years were studied. Sixteen of them presented with left hemispheric cerebral language dominance. In five patients, results from fMRI and Wada test could be compared and agreed in localization. Our results reinforce the view that fMRI may become an essential tool for medical practice, perhaps for the determination of eloquent areas in the evaluation of candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  17. Valganciclovir dosing according to body surface area and renal function in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vaudry, W; Ettenger, R; Jara, P; Varela-Fascinetto, G; Bouw, M R; Ives, J; Walker, R

    2009-03-01

    Oral valganciclovir is effective prophylaxis for cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in adults receiving solid organ transplantation (SOT). However, data in pediatrics are limited. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics and safety of valganciclovir oral solution or tablets in 63 pediatric SOT recipients at risk of CMV disease, including 17 recipients < or =2 years old. Patients received up to 100 days' valganciclovir prophylaxis; dosage was calculated using the algorithm: dose (mg) = 7 x body surface area x creatinine clearance (Schwartz method; CrCLS). Ganciclovir pharmacokinetics were described using a population pharmacokinetic approach. Safety endpoints were measured up to week 26. Mean estimated ganciclovir exposures showed no clear relationship to either body size or renal function, indicating that the dosing algorithm adequately accounted for both these variables. Mean ganciclovir exposures, across age groups and organ recipient groups were: kidney 51.8 +/- 11.9 microg * h/mL; liver 61.7 +/- 29.5 microg * h/mL; heart 58.0 +/- 21.8 microg * h/mL. Treatment was well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to that in adults. Seven serious treatment-related adverse events (AEs) occurred in five patients. Two patients had CMV viremia during treatment but none experienced CMV disease. In conclusion, a valganciclovir-dosing algorithm that adjusted for body surface area and renal function provides ganciclovir exposures similar to those established as safe and effective in adults. PMID:19260840

  18. Depth estimation via parallel coevolution of disparity functions for area-based stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liatsis, Panos; Goulermas, John Y.

    2001-02-01

    12 A novel system for depth estimation is proposed with the use of Symbiotic Genetic Algorithms for the continuous problem of disparity surface approximation. The approach is based on the decomposition of the entire surface to very small non- overlapping patches described by low order bivariate polynomials and the use of symbiotic optimization to enforce smoothness at the boundaries of these patches, so that the entire surface can be approximated in a smooth piecewise fashion by functionals of local support. Such optimization is amenable to a massive parallel implementation, since each patch is optimized by a different execution unit and each unit communicates through its cost function only with its four-connected neighbors. The method makes use of various existing crossover and mutation schemes for real-valued chromosome representations and a new problem-specific mechanism for generating and hybridizing the initial populations. The proposed multi-objective cost function enforces photometric similarity and smoothness between the patch boundaries at a local scale, which in the long term give rise to a globally smooth disparity surface.

  19. Data Management Plan and Functional System Design for the Information Management System of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation and Waste Area Grouping 6

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, T.; Brandt, C.; Calfee, J.; Garland, M.; Holladay, S.; Nickle, B.; Schmoyer, D.; Serbin, C.; Ward, M.

    1994-03-01

    The Data Management Plan and Functional System Design supports the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) and Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 Environmental Monitoring Program. The objective of the Data Management Plan and Functional System Design is to provide organization, integrity, security, traceability, and consistency of the data generated during the CRRI and WAG 6 projects. Proper organization will ensure that the data are consistent with the procedures and requirements of the projects. The Information Management Groups (IMGs) for these two programs face similar challenges and share many common objectives. By teaming together, the IMGs have expedited the development and implementation of a common information management strategy that benefits each program.

  20. Piecemeal recruitment of left-lateralized brain areas during reading: a spatio-functional account.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan; Pernet, Cyril; Treserras, Sebastien; Boulanouar, Kader; Berry, Isabelle; Aubry, Florent; Demonet, Jean-Francois; Celsis, Pierre

    2008-11-15

    Neuroimaging studies of reading converge to suggest that linguistically elementary stimuli are confined to the activation of bilateral posterior regions, whereas linguistically complex stimuli additionally recruit left hemispheric anterior regions, raising the hypotheses of a gradual bilateral-to-left and a posterior-to-anterior recruitment of reading related areas. Here, we tested these two hypotheses by contrasting a repertoire of eight categories of stimuli ranging from simple orthographic-like characters to words and pseudowords in a single experiment, and by measuring BOLD signal changes and connectivity while 16 fluent readers passively viewed the stimuli. Our results confirm the existence of a bilateral-to-left and posterior-to-anterior recruitment of reading related areas, straightforwardly resulting from the increase in stimuli's linguistic processing load, which reflects reading processes: visual analysis, orthographic encoding and phonological decoding. Connectivity analyses strengthened the validity of these observations and additionally revealed an enhancement of the left parieto-frontal information trafficking for higher linguistic processing. Our findings clearly establish the notion of a gradual spatio-functional recruitment of reading areas and demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first evidence of a robust and staged link between the level of linguistic processing, the spatial distribution of brain activity and its information trafficking. PMID:18778780

  1. Receiver Function Analysis of Strong-motion Stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Che-Min; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Kuo, Chun-Hsiang; Huang, Jyun-Yan

    2016-04-01

    The Kaohsiung City and Pingtung County are located in southern Taiwan and bounded on the west side by several active faults. The shallow velocity structure of thick alluvium basin in this area should be delineated to understand the seismic site effect of strong ground motion. Receiver Function (RF) is a conventional technique for studying the structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the seismometer. But, the RF analysis of high-frequency acceleration seismograms is also proved to be feasible for estimating shallow structures recently. This study applied the RF technique on the Strong-motion records of almost one-hundred TSMIP stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area to estimate the shallow shear-wave velocity structures. The averaged RFs of all stations exhibit the obvious variation because of the different geologies and site conditions. After the forward modeling of RFs based on the Genetic Algorithms (GA) searching, the shallow shear-wave velocity structures beneath all the strong-motion stations in the Kaohsiung-Pingtung area were estimated to delineate the iso-depth contour maps of the main formation interfaces and a preliminary shallow 3D velocity model.

  2. Laser microprocessing and nanoengineering of large-area functional micro/nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Xie, X. Z.; Yang, J.; Chen, Z. C.; Xu, L.; Choo, Y. S.; Hong, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Laser microprocessing and nanoengineering are of great interest to both scientists and engineers, since the inspired properties of functional micro/nanostructures over large areas can lead to numerous unique applications. Currently laser processing systems combined with high speed automation ensure the focused laser beam to process various materials at a high throughput and a high accuracy over large working areas. UV lasers are widely used in both laser microprocessing and nanoengineering. However by improving the processing methods, green pulsed laser is capable of replacing UV lasers to make high aspect ratio micro-grooves on fragile and transparent sapphire substrates. Laser micro-texturing can also tune the wetting property of metal surfaces from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic at a contact angle of 161° without chemical coating. Laser microlens array (MLA) can split a laser beam into multiple laser beams and reduce the laser spot size down to sub-microns. It can be applied to fabricate split ring resonator (SRR) meta-materials for THz sensing, surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) structures for NIR and molding tools for soft lithography. Furthermore, laser interference lithography combined with thermal annealing can obtain a large area of sub-50nm nano-dot clusters used for SPR applications.

  3. II. Apples to apples A2: cluster selection functions for next-generation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Mei, S.; Bartlett, J. G.; Benítez, N.

    2016-10-01

    We present the cluster selection function for three of the largest next-generation stage-IV surveys in the optical and infrared: Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). To simulate these surveys, we use the realistic mock catalogues introduced in the first paper of this series. We detected galaxy clusters using the Bayesian Cluster Finder (BCF) in the mock catalogues. We then modeled and calibrated the total cluster stellar mass observable-theoretical mass (M^*_CL-M_h) relation using a power law model, including a possible redshift evolution term. We find a moderate scatter of σ _{M^*_CL | M_h} of 0.124, 0.135 and 0.136 dex for Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and LSST, respectively, comparable to other work over more limited ranges of redshift. Moreover, the three datasets are consistent with negligible evolution with redshift, in agreement with observational and simulation results in the literature. We find that Euclid-Optimistic will be able to detect clusters with >80% completeness and purity down to 8 × 1013h-1M⊙ up to z < 1. At higher redshifts, the same completeness and purity are obtained with the larger mass threshold of 2 × 1014h-1M⊙ up to z = 2. The Euclid-Pessimistic selection function has a similar shape with ˜10% higher mass limit. LSST shows ˜5% higher mass limit than Euclid-Optimistic up to z < 0.7 and increases afterwards, reaching values of 2 × 1014h-1M⊙ at z = 1.4. Similar selection functions with only 80% completeness threshold have been also computed. The complementarity of these results with selection functions for surveys in other bands is discussed.

  4. Generation of Internal-Image Functional Aptamers of Okadaic Acid via Magnetic-Bead SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Wang, Dong-Xu; Li, Lin; Hu, Pan; Gong, Sheng; Li, Yan-Song; Cui, Cheng; Wu, Zong-Cheng; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin; Lu, Shi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is produced by Dinophysis and Prorocentrum dinoflagellates and primarily accumulates in bivalves, and this toxin has harmful effects on consumers and operators. In this work, we first report the use of aptamers as novel non-toxic probes capable of binding to a monoclonal antibody against OA (OA-mAb). Aptamers that mimic the OA toxin with high affinity and selectivity were generated by the magnetic bead-assisted systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) strategy. After 12 selection rounds, cloning, sequencing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis, four candidate aptamers (O24, O31, O39, O40) were selected that showed high affinity and specificity for OA-mAb. The affinity constants of O24, O31, O39 and O40 were 8.3 × 108 M−1, 1.47 × 109 M−1, 1.23 × 109 M−1 and 1.05 × 109 M−1, respectively. Indirect competitive ELISA was employed to determine the internal-image function of the aptamers. The results reveal that O31 has a similar competitive function as free OA toxin, whereas the other three aptamers did not bear the necessary internal-image function. Based on the derivation of the curvilinear equation for OA/O31, the equation that defined the relationship between the OA toxin content and O31 was Y = 2.185X − 1.78. The IC50 of O31 was 3.39 ng·mL−1, which was close to the value predicted by the OA ELISA (IC50 = 4.4 ng·mL−1); the IC10 was 0.33 ng·mL−1. The above data provides strong evidence that internal-image functional aptamers could be applicable as novel probes in a non-toxic assay. PMID:26694424

  5. Redox-fibrosis: Impact of TGFβ1 on ROS generators, mediators and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Richter, Kati; Konzack, Anja; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Fibrosis is one of the most prevalent features of age-related diseases like obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic kidney disease, or cardiomyopathy and affects millions of people in all countries. Although the understanding about the pathophysiology of fibrosis has improved a lot during the recent years, a number of mechanisms still remain unknown. Although TGF-β1 signaling, loss of metabolic homeostasis and chronic low-grade inflammation appear to play important roles in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, recent evidence indicates that oxidative stress and the antioxidant system may also be crucial for fibrosis development and persistence. These findings point to a concept of a redox-fibrosis where the cellular oxidant and antioxidant system could be potential therapeutic targets. The current review aims to summarize the existing links between TGF-β1 signaling, generation and action of reactive oxygen species, expression of antioxidative enzymes, and functional consequences including epigenetic redox-mediated responses during fibrosis.

  6. Generating functional analysis of minority games with inner product strategy definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, A. C. C.; Shayeghi, N.

    2008-08-01

    We use generating functional methods to solve the so-called inner product versions of the minority game (MG), with fake and/or real market histories, by generalizing the theory developed recently for look-up table MGs with real histories. The phase diagrams of the look-up table and inner product MG versions are generally found to be identical, with the exception of inner product MGs where histories are sampled linearly, which are found to be structurally critical. However, we encounter interesting differences both in the theory (where the role of the history frequency distribution in look-up table MGs is taken over by the eigenvalue spectrum of a history covariance matrix in inner product MGs) and in the static and dynamic phenomenology of the models. Our theoretical predictions are supported by numerical simulations.

  7. A Proton-Cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O’Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    We use audification of 0.092 seconds cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes greater than 0.1 nanoteslas near the ion gyrofrequency (approximately 0.1 hertz) with duration longer than 1 hour during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  8. Generating saddle points in the merit function landscape of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bociort, Florian; van Turnhout, Maarten

    2005-09-01

    Finding multiple local minima in the merit function landscape of optical system optimization is a difficult task, especially for complex designs that have a large number of variables. We discuss here a method that enables a rapid generation of new local minima for optical systems of arbitrary complexity. We have recently shown that saddle points known in mathematics as Morse index 1 saddle points can be useful for global optical system optimization. In this work we show that by inserting a thin meniscus lens (or two mirror surfaces) into an optical design with N surfaces that is a local minimum, we obtain a system with N+2 surfaces that is a Morse index 1 saddle point. A simple method to compute the required meniscus curvatures will be discussed. Then, letting the optimization roll down on both sides of the saddle leads to two different local minima. Often, one of them has interesting special properties.

  9. Symplectic tracking through straight three dimensional fields by a method of generating functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, M.; Bahrdt, J.; Wüstefeld, G.

    2016-01-01

    For simulating single-particle trajectories, the derivation of final coordinates from known initial coordinates through arbitrary electromagnetic fields is of key interest in accelerator physics. We address this task in the case of straight stationary magnetic fields, using generating functions via a perturbative ansatz for the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Such an approach is always symplectic, independent of the expansion order. We set up the Hamiltonian by static fields, represented by Fourier series, and outline this approach for the correct and complete set of 3D-multipole fields. Different types of multipoles can be treated with the same formalism, combining them with a specific table of Fourier coefficients characterizing their fields. The resulting particle-tracking routine maps the multipole in a single step. Results are compared with analytical estimations and high-resolution integration methods.

  10. A generating function approach to HIV transmission with dynamic contact rates

    DOE PAGES

    Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Meadors, Grant D.; Volz, Erik M.

    2014-04-24

    The basic reproduction number, R0, is often defined as the average number of infections generated by a newly infected individual in a fully susceptible population. The interpretation, meaning, and derivation of R0 are controversial. However, in the context of mean field models, R0 demarcates the epidemic threshold below which the infected population approaches zero in the limit of time. In this manner, R0 has been proposed as a method for understanding the relative impact of public health interventions with respect to disease eliminations from a theoretical perspective. The use of R0 is made more complex by both the strong dependencymore » of R0 on the model form and the stochastic nature of transmission. A common assumption in models of HIV transmission that have closed form expressions for R0 is that a single individual’s behavior is constant over time. For this research, we derive expressions for both R0 and probability of an epidemic in a finite population under the assumption that people periodically change their sexual behavior over time. We illustrate the use of generating functions as a general framework to model the effects of potentially complex assumptions on the number of transmissions generated by a newly infected person in a susceptible population. In conclusion, we find that the relationship between the probability of an epidemic and R0 is not straightforward, but, that as the rate of change in sexual behavior increases both R0 and the probability of an epidemic also decrease.« less

  11. Generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Lawrence, Anthony; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu

    2016-08-01

    Human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells have been introduced for as an easily accessible source of stem cells from dental origin. Although recent studies have revealed the ability of these stem cells in multipotential attribute, their efficiency of hepatic lineage differentiation has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study is to investigate hepatic lineage fate competence of periodontal ligament stem cells through direct media induction. Differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells was conducted by the exposure of two phase media induction. First phase was performed in the presence of hepatocyte growth factors to induce a definitive endoderm formation. In the subsequent phase, the cells were treated with oncostatin M and dexamethosone followed by insulin and transferrin to generate hepatocyte-like cells. Hepatic-related characters of the generated hepatocyte-like cells were determined at both mRNA and protein level followed by functional assays. Foremost changes observed in the generation of hepatocyte-like cells were the morphological features in which these cells were transformed from fibroblastic shape to polygonal shape. Temporal expression of hepatic markers ranging from early endodermal up to late markers were detected in the hepatocyte-like cells. Crucial hepatic markers such as glycogen storage, albumin, and urea secretion were also shown. These findings exhibited the ability of periodontal ligament stem cells of dental origin to be directed into hepatic lineage fate. These cells can be regarded as an alternative autologous source in the usage of stem cell-based treatment for liver diseases.

  12. A generating function approach to HIV transmission with dynamic contact rates

    SciTech Connect

    Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Meadors, Grant D.; Volz, Erik M.

    2014-04-24

    The basic reproduction number, R0, is often defined as the average number of infections generated by a newly infected individual in a fully susceptible population. The interpretation, meaning, and derivation of R0 are controversial. However, in the context of mean field models, R0 demarcates the epidemic threshold below which the infected population approaches zero in the limit of time. In this manner, R0 has been proposed as a method for understanding the relative impact of public health interventions with respect to disease eliminations from a theoretical perspective. The use of R0 is made more complex by both the strong dependency of R0 on the model form and the stochastic nature of transmission. A common assumption in models of HIV transmission that have closed form expressions for R0 is that a single individual’s behavior is constant over time. For this research, we derive expressions for both R0 and probability of an epidemic in a finite population under the assumption that people periodically change their sexual behavior over time. We illustrate the use of generating functions as a general framework to model the effects of potentially complex assumptions on the number of transmissions generated by a newly infected person in a susceptible population. In conclusion, we find that the relationship between the probability of an epidemic and R0 is not straightforward, but, that as the rate of change in sexual behavior increases both R0 and the probability of an epidemic also decrease.

  13. Generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Lawrence, Anthony; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu

    2016-08-01

    Human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells have been introduced for as an easily accessible source of stem cells from dental origin. Although recent studies have revealed the ability of these stem cells in multipotential attribute, their efficiency of hepatic lineage differentiation has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study is to investigate hepatic lineage fate competence of periodontal ligament stem cells through direct media induction. Differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells was conducted by the exposure of two phase media induction. First phase was performed in the presence of hepatocyte growth factors to induce a definitive endoderm formation. In the subsequent phase, the cells were treated with oncostatin M and dexamethosone followed by insulin and transferrin to generate hepatocyte-like cells. Hepatic-related characters of the generated hepatocyte-like cells were determined at both mRNA and protein level followed by functional assays. Foremost changes observed in the generation of hepatocyte-like cells were the morphological features in which these cells were transformed from fibroblastic shape to polygonal shape. Temporal expression of hepatic markers ranging from early endodermal up to late markers were detected in the hepatocyte-like cells. Crucial hepatic markers such as glycogen storage, albumin, and urea secretion were also shown. These findings exhibited the ability of periodontal ligament stem cells of dental origin to be directed into hepatic lineage fate. These cells can be regarded as an alternative autologous source in the usage of stem cell-based treatment for liver diseases. PMID:27379400

  14. Monitoring the Photocleaving Dynamics of Colloidal MicroRNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Kumal, Raju R; Landry, Corey R; Abu-Laban, Mohammad; Hayes, Daniel J; Haber, Louis H

    2015-09-15

    Photoactivated drug delivery systems using gold nanoparticles provide the promise of spatiotemporal control of delivery that is crucial for applications ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In this study, we use second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy to monitor the light-activated controlled release of oligonucleotides from the surface of colloidal gold nanoparticles. MicroRNA is functionalized to spherical gold nanoparticles using a nitrobenzyl linker that undergoes photocleaving upon ultraviolet irradiation. The SHG signal generated from the colloidal nanoparticle sample is shown to be a sensitive probe for monitoring the photocleaving dynamics in real time. The photocleaving irradiation wavelength is scanned to show maximum efficiency on resonance at 365 nm, and the kinetics are investigated at varying irradiation powers to demonstrate that the nitrobenzyl photocleaving is a one-photon process. Additional characterization methods including electrophoretic mobility measurements, extinction spectroscopy, and fluorimetry are used to verify the SHG results, leading to a better understanding of the photocleaving dynamics for this model oligonucleotide therapeutic delivery system.

  15. Synchrotron-Generated Microbeam Sensorimotor Cortex Transections Induce Seizure Control without Disruption of Neurological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Pantaleo; Fardone, Erminia; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Prezado, Yolanda; Requardt, Herwig; Le Duc, Geraldine; Nemoz, Christian; Anschel, David J.; Spiga, Jenny; Bravin, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-generated X-ray microplanar beams (microbeams) are characterized by the ability to deliver extremely high doses of radiation to spatially restricted volumes of tissue. Minimal dose spreading outside the beam path provides an exceptional degree of protection from radio-induced damage to the neurons and glia adjacent to the microscopic slices of tissue irradiated. The preservation of cortical architecture following high-dose microbeam irradiation and the ability to induce non-invasively the equivalent of a surgical cut over the cortex is of great interest for the development of novel experimental models in neurobiology and new treatment avenues for a variety of brain disorders. Microbeams (size 100 µm/600 µm, center-to-center distance of 400 µm/1200 µm, peak entrance doses of 360-240 Gy/150-100 Gy) delivered to the sensorimotor cortex of six 2-month-old naïve rats generated histologically evident cortical transections, without modifying motor behavior and weight gain up to 7 months. Microbeam transections of the sensorimotor cortex dramatically reduced convulsive seizure duration in a further group of 12 rats receiving local infusion of kainic acid. No subsequent neurological deficit was associated with the treatment. These data provide a novel tool to study the functions of the cortex and pave the way for the development of new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy and other neurological diseases. PMID:23341950

  16. Immune function across generations: integrating mechanism and evolutionary process in maternal antibody transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Grindstaff, Jennifer L; Brodie, Edmund D; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2003-01-01

    The past 30 years of immunological research have revealed much about the proximate mechanisms of maternal antibody transmission and utilization, but have not adequately addressed how these issues are related to evolutionary and ecological theory. Much remains to be learned about individual differences within a species in maternal antibody transmission as well as differences among species in transmission or utilization of antibodies. Similarly, maternal-effects theory has generally neglected the mechanisms by which mothers influence offspring phenotype. Although the environmental cues that generate maternal effects and the consequent effects for offspring phenotype are often well characterized, the intermediary physiological and developmental steps through which the maternal effect is transmitted are generally unknown. Integration of the proximate mechanisms of maternal antibody transmission with evolutionary theory on maternal effects affords an important opportunity to unite mechanism and process by focusing on the links between genetics, environment and physiology, with the ultimate goal of explaining differences among individuals and species in the transfer of immune function from one generation to the next. PMID:14667346

  17. Monitoring the Photocleaving Dynamics of Colloidal MicroRNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Kumal, Raju R; Landry, Corey R; Abu-Laban, Mohammad; Hayes, Daniel J; Haber, Louis H

    2015-09-15

    Photoactivated drug delivery systems using gold nanoparticles provide the promise of spatiotemporal control of delivery that is crucial for applications ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In this study, we use second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy to monitor the light-activated controlled release of oligonucleotides from the surface of colloidal gold nanoparticles. MicroRNA is functionalized to spherical gold nanoparticles using a nitrobenzyl linker that undergoes photocleaving upon ultraviolet irradiation. The SHG signal generated from the colloidal nanoparticle sample is shown to be a sensitive probe for monitoring the photocleaving dynamics in real time. The photocleaving irradiation wavelength is scanned to show maximum efficiency on resonance at 365 nm, and the kinetics are investigated at varying irradiation powers to demonstrate that the nitrobenzyl photocleaving is a one-photon process. Additional characterization methods including electrophoretic mobility measurements, extinction spectroscopy, and fluorimetry are used to verify the SHG results, leading to a better understanding of the photocleaving dynamics for this model oligonucleotide therapeutic delivery system. PMID:26313536

  18. Scattering and the Point Spread Function of the New Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreur, Julian J.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary design work on the New Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is currently under way. This telescope is envisioned as a lightweight, deployable Cassegrain reflector with an aperture of 8 meters, and an effective focal length of 80 meters. It is to be folded into a small-diameter package for launch by an Atlas booster, and unfolded in orbit. The primary is to consist of an octagon with a hole at the center, and with eight segments arranged in a flower petal configuration about the octagon. The comers of the petal-shaped segments are to be trimmed so that the package will fit atop the Atlas booster. This mirror, along with its secondary will focus the light from a point source into an image which is spread from a point by diffraction effects, figure errors, and scattering of light from the surface. The distribution of light in the image of a point source is called a point spread function (PSF). The obstruction of the incident light by the secondary mirror and its support structure, the trimmed corners of the petals, and the grooves between the segments all cause the diffraction pattern characterizing an ideal point spread function to be changed, with the trimmed comers causing the rings of the Airy pattern to become broken up, and the linear grooves causing diffraction spikes running radially away from the central spot, or Airy disk. Any figure errors the mirror segments may have, or any errors in aligning the petals with the central octagon will also spread the light out from the ideal point spread function. A point spread function for a mirror the size of the NGST and having an incident wavelength of 900 nm is considered. Most of the light is confined in a circle with a diameter of 0.05 arc seconds. The ring pattern ranges in intensity from 10(exp -2) near the center to 10(exp -6) near the edge of the plotted field, and can be clearly discerned in a log plot of the intensity. The total fraction of the light scattered from this point spread function is called

  19. Realization of Large-Area Wrinkle-Free Monolayer Graphene Films Transferred to Functional Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byeong-Ju; Choi, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hyun-You; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Choi, Hyung-Jin; Jung, Hyun-June; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Structural inhomogeneities, such as the wrinkles and ripples within a graphene film after transferring the free-standing graphene layer to a functional substrate, degrade the physical and electrical properties of the corresponding electronic devices. Here, we introduced titanium as a superior adhesion layer for fabricating wrinkle-free graphene films that is highly applicable to flexible and transparent electronic devices. The Ti layer does not influence the electronic performance of the functional substrates. Experimental and theoretical investigations confirm that the strong chemical interactions between Ti and any oxygen atoms unintentionally introduced on/within the graphene are responsible for forming the clean, defect-free graphene layer. Our results accelerate the practical application of graphene-related electronic devices with enhanced functionality. The large-area monolayer graphenes were prepared by a simple attachment of the Ti layer with the multi-layer wrinkle-free graphene films. For the first time, the graphene films were addressed for applications of superior bottom electrode for flexible capacitors instead of the novel metals. PMID:26043868

  20. The Putative Visual Word Form Area Is Functionally Connected to the Dorsal Attention Network

    PubMed Central

    Miezin, Fran M.; Petersen, Steven E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2012-01-01

    The putative visual word form area (pVWFA) is the most consistently activated region in single word reading studies (i.e., Vigneau et al. 2006), yet its function remains a matter of debate. The pVWFA may be predominantly used in reading or it could be a more general visual processor used in reading but also in other visual tasks. Here, resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) is used to characterize the functional relationships of the pVWFA to help adjudicate between these possibilities. rs-fcMRI defines relationships based on correlations in slow fluctuations of blood oxygen level–dependent activity occurring at rest. In this study, rs-fcMRI correlations show little relationship between the pVWFA and reading-related regions but a strong relationship between the pVWFA and dorsal attention regions thought to be related to spatial and feature attention. The rs-fcMRI correlations between the pVWFA and regions of the dorsal attention network increase with age and reading skill, while the correlations between the pVWFA and reading-related regions do not. These results argue the pVWFA is not used predominantly in reading but is a more general visual processor used in other visual tasks, as well as reading. PMID:21690259

  1. Anthropogenic disturbance on nursery function of estuarine areas for marine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrat, A.; Lobry, J.; Nicolas, D.; Laffargue, P.; Amara, R.; Lepage, M.; Girardin, M.; Le Pape, O.

    2009-01-01

    Estuaries serve as nursery grounds for many marine fish species. However increasing human activities within estuaries and surrounding areas lead to significant habitat loss for the juveniles and decrease the quality of the remaining habitats. This study is based on the data of 470 beam trawls from surveys that were conducted in 13 French estuaries for the purpose of the European Water Framework Directive. It aimed at testing the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on the nursery function of estuaries. With a multispecific approach based on ecological guilds, two fish metrics, abundance and species richness of Marine Juvenile migrant fishes, were used as proxies for the estuarine nursery function. Indices of heavy metal and organic contaminations were used to estimate anthropogenic disturbances impacting these estuaries. Fish metrics were described with statistical models that took into account: (a) sampling protocol, (b) estuarine features and (c) contamination. The results of these models showed that the fish metrics highly depend on the sampling protocol, and especially type of gear, depth and salinity, which highlights the necessity of considering such metrics at the sampling (trawl haul) scale. Densities and species richness of Marine Juvenile fishes appeared to be strongly and negatively correlated to contamination indices. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that human disturbances impact the nursery function of estuaries. Finally, the densities of Marine Juvenile migrant species appeared as a potential robust and useful fish indicator for the assessment of the ecological status of estuaries within the Water Framework Directive.

  2. Functional deficits in the extrastriate body area during observation of sports-related actions in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidehiko; Kato, Motoichiro; Sassa, Takeshi; Shibuya, Tomohisa; Koeda, Michihiko; Yahata, Noriaki; Matsuura, Masato; Asai, Kunihiko; Suhara, Tetsuya; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2010-05-01

    Exercise and sports are increasingly being implemented in the management of schizophrenia. The process of action perception is as important as that of motor execution for learning and acquiring new skills. Recent studies have suggested that body-selective extrastriate body area (EBA) in the posterior temporal-occipital cortex is involved not only in static visual perception of body parts but also in the planning, imagination, and execution of actions. However, functional abnormality of the EBA in schizophrenia has yet to be investigated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a task designed to activate the EBA by sports-related actions, we aimed to elucidate functional abnormality of the EBA during observation of sports-related actions in patients with schizophrenia. Twelve schizophrenia patients and 12 age-sex-matched control participants participated in the study. Using sports-related motions as visual stimuli, we examined brain activations during observation of context-congruent actions relative to context-incongruent actions by fMRI. Compared with controls, the patients with schizophrenia demonstrated diminished activation in the EBA during observation of sports-related context-congruent actions. Furthermore, the EBA activation in patients was negatively correlated with the severity of negative and general psychopathology symptoms measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Dysfunction of the EBA might reflect a difficulty in representing dynamic aspects of human actions and possibly lead to impairments of simulation, learning, and execution of actions in schizophrenia.

  3. Generating local scale land use/cover change scenarios: case studies of high-risk mountain areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Žiga; Glade, Thomas; Boerboom, Luc

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between land use/cover changes and consequences to human well-being is well acknowledged and has led to higher interest of both researchers and decision makers in driving forces and consequences of such changes. For example, removal of natural vegetation cover or urban expansion resulting in new elements at risk can increase hydro-meteorological risk. This is why it is necessary to study how the land use/cover could evolve in the future. Emphasis should especially be given to areas experiencing, or expecting, high rates of socio-economic change. A suitable approach to address these changes is scenario development; it offers exploring possible futures and the corresponding environmental consequences, and aids decision-making, as it enables to analyse possible options. Scenarios provide a creative methodology to depict possible futures, resulting from existing decisions, based on different assumptions of future socio-economic development. They have been used in various disciplines and on various scales, such as flood risk and soil erosion. Several studies have simulated future scenarios of land use/cover changes at a very high success rate, however usually these approaches are tailor made for specific case study areas and fit to available data. This study presents a multi-step scenario generation framework, which can be transferable to other local scale case study areas, taking into account the case study specific consequences of land use/cover changes. Through the use of experts' and decision-makers' knowledge, we aimed to develop a framework with the following characteristics: (1) it enables development of scenarios that are plausible, (2) it can overcome data inaccessibility, (3) it can address intangible and external driving forces of land use/cover change, and (4) it ensures transferability to other local scale case study areas with different land use/cover change processes and consequences. To achieve this, a set of different methods is applied

  4. Generation of a functional liver tissue mimic using adipose stromal vascular fraction cell-derived vasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, S. S.; Maijub, J. G.; Krishnan, L.; Ramakrishnan, V. M.; Clayton, L. R.; Williams, S. K.; Hoying, J. B.; Boyd, N. L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cell implantation therapies is to promote integration of the microcirculation between the implanted cells and the host. We used adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to vascularize a human liver cell (HepG2) implant. We hypothesized that the SVF cells would form a functional microcirculation via vascular assembly and inosculation with the host vasculature. Initially, we assessed the extent and character of neovasculatures formed by freshly isolated and cultured SVF cells and found that freshly isolated cells have a higher vascularization potential. Generation of a 3D implant containing fresh SVF and HepG2 cells formed a tissue in which HepG2 cells were entwined with a network of microvessels. Implanted HepG2 cells sequestered labeled LDL delivered by systemic intravascular injection only in SVF-vascularized implants demonstrating that SVF cell-derived vasculatures can effectively integrate with host vessels and interface with parenchymal cells to form a functional tissue mimic. PMID:23828203

  5. Functional salivary gland regeneration as the next generation of organ replacement regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Miho; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Oral health is maintained by the coordinated function of many organs including the teeth and salivary glands. Dysfunction of these organs causes many problems, such as dental caries, swallowing dysfunction and periodontal disease. Regenerative therapy for salivary gland tissue repair and whole-salivary gland replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept that may have potential for the full recovery of salivary gland function. Salivary gland tissue stem cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for salivary gland tissue repair therapies. In addition, whole-salivary gland replacement therapy may become a novel next-generation organ regenerative therapy. Almost all organs arise from reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions of the germ layers. We developed a novel bioengineering method, an organ germ method that can reproduce organogenesis through the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. A bioengineered salivary gland germ can regenerate a structurally correct salivary gland in vitro, and bioengineered salivary glands successfully secrete saliva into the oral cavity from ducts in the recipient through the reestablishment of the afferent-efferent neural network. The bioengineered salivary gland can also improve the symptoms of xerostomia, such as bacterial infection and swallowing dysfunction. In this review, we describe recent findings and technological developments of salivary gland regenerative therapy.

  6. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug‐free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus‐free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell‐recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off‐the‐shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up‐scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact‐ and marker‐free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted. PMID:25778713

  7. Generation of Soluble Interleukin-11 and Interleukin-6 Receptors: A Crucial Function for Proteases during Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lokau, Juliane; Agthe, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The cytokines interleukin-11 (IL-11) and IL-6 are important proteins with well-defined pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. They activate intracellular signaling cascades through a homodimer of the ubiquitously expressed signal-transducing β-receptor glycoprotein 130 (gp130). Specificity is gained through the cell- and tissue-specific expression of the nonsignaling IL-11 and IL-6 α-receptors (IL-11R and IL-6R), which determine the responsiveness of the cell to these two cytokines. IL-6 is a rare example, where its soluble receptor (sIL-6R) has agonistic properties, so that the IL-6/sIL-6R complex is able to activate cells that are usually not responsive to IL-6 alone (trans-signaling). Recent evidence suggests that IL-11 can signal via a similar trans-signaling mechanism. In this review, we highlight similarities and differences in the functions of IL-11 and IL-6. We summarize current knowledge about the generation of the sIL-6R and sIL-11R by different proteases and discuss possible roles during inflammatory processes. Finally, we focus on the selective and/or combined inhibition of IL-6 and IL-11 signaling and how this might translate into the clinics. PMID:27493449

  8. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-11-18

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug-free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus-free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell-recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off-the-shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up-scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact- and marker-free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted. PMID:25778713

  9. Babelomics 5.0: functional interpretation for new generations of genomic data

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Roberto; Salavert, Francisco; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Bleda, Marta; Garcia-Alonso, Luz; Sanchis-Juan, Alba; Perez-Gil, Daniel; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Sanchez, Ruben; Cubuk, Cankut; Hidalgo, Marta R.; Amadoz, Alicia; Hernansaiz-Ballesteros, Rosa D.; Alemán, Alejandro; Tarraga, Joaquin; Montaner, David; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Babelomics has been running for more than one decade offering a user-friendly interface for the functional analysis of gene expression and genomic data. Here we present its fifth release, which includes support for Next Generation Sequencing data including gene expression (RNA-seq), exome or genome resequencing. Babelomics has simplified its interface, being now more intuitive. Improved visualization options, such as a genome viewer as well as an interactive network viewer, have been implemented. New technical enhancements at both, client and server sides, makes the user experience faster and more dynamic. Babelomics offers user-friendly access to a full range of methods that cover: (i) primary data analysis, (ii) a variety of tests for different experimental designs and (iii) different enrichment and network analysis algorithms for the interpretation of the results of such tests in the proper functional context. In addition to the public server, local copies of Babelomics can be downloaded and installed. Babelomics is freely available at: http://www.babelomics.org. PMID:25897133

  10. Using Prediction Markets to Generate Probability Density Functions for Climate Change Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boslough, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate-related uncertainty is traditionally presented as an error bar, but it is becoming increasingly common to express it in terms of a probability density function (PDF). PDFs are a necessary component of probabilistic risk assessments, for which simple "best estimate" values are insufficient. Many groups have generated PDFs for climate sensitivity using a variety of methods. These PDFs are broadly consistent, but vary significantly in their details. One axiom of the verification and validation community is, "codes don't make predictions, people make predictions." This is a statement of the fact that subject domain experts generate results using assumptions within a range of epistemic uncertainty and interpret them according to their expert opinion. Different experts with different methods will arrive at different PDFs. For effective decision support, a single consensus PDF would be useful. We suggest that market methods can be used to aggregate an ensemble of opinions into a single distribution that expresses the consensus. Prediction markets have been shown to be highly successful at forecasting the outcome of events ranging from elections to box office returns. In prediction markets, traders can take a position on whether some future event will or will not occur. These positions are expressed as contracts that are traded in a double-action market that aggregates price, which can be interpreted as a consensus probability that the event will take place. Since climate sensitivity cannot directly be measured, it cannot be predicted. However, the changes in global mean surface temperature are a direct consequence of climate sensitivity, changes in forcing, and internal variability. Viable prediction markets require an undisputed event outcome on a specific date. Climate-related markets exist on Intrade.com, an online trading exchange. One such contract is titled "Global Temperature Anomaly for Dec 2011 to be greater than 0.65 Degrees C." Settlement is based

  11. Global Propagation of Gravity Waves Generated with the Whole Atmosphere Transfer Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Wolven, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere, accounting for a significant fraction of its observed variability. These waves, with periods ranging from minutes to hours, are thought to be a major means for exchange of momentum and energy between atmospheric regions. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) describes acoustic gravity waves (AGW) that propagate across the globe in a dissipative static background atmosphere extending from the ground to 700 km. The model is limited to waves with periods << 12 hr where the Coriolis force is not important. Formulated in terms of zonal vector spherical harmonics and oscillation frequencies, the linearized equations of energy, mass, and momentum conservation are solved to generate the transfer function (TF) for a chosen height distribution of the excitation source. The model accounts for momentum exchange between atmospheric species (He, O, N2, O2, Ar), which affects significantly the wave amplitudes and phases of thermospheric temperature, densities, and wind fields. Covering a broad range of frequencies and spherical harmonic wave numbers (wavelengths), without limitations, the assembled TF captures the physics that controls the propagation of AGW, and the computational effort is considerable. For a chosen horizontal geometry and impulsive time dependence of the source, however, the global wave response is then obtained in short order. The model is computationally efficient and well suited to serve as an experimental and educational tool for simulating propagating wave patterns on the globe. The model is also semi-analytical and therefore well suited to explore the different wave modes that can be generated under varying dynamical conditions. The TFM has been applied to simulate the AGW, which are generated in the auroral region of the thermosphere by joule heating and momentum coupling due to solar wind induced electric fields [e.g., Mayr et al., Space Science Reviews, 1990]. The auroral source generates

  12. [Preoperative direct cortical and sub-cortical electric stimulation during cerebral surgery in functional areas].

    PubMed

    Duffau, H; Capelle, L; Sichez, J P; Bitar, A; Faillot, T; Arthuis, F; Van Effenterre, R; Fohanno, D

    1999-09-01

    Indications of surgical treatment for lesions in functional cerebral areas depend on the ratio between the definitive neurological deficit and the beneficial effect of resection. Detection of eloquent cortex is difficult because of important individual variability. Peroperative direct cortical and subcortical electrical stimulations (DCS) provide the most precise and reliable method currently available allowing identification and preservation of neurons essential for motricity, sensitivity++ and language. We report our preliminary experience with DCS in surgery of intracerebral infiltrative tumors with a consecutive series of 15 patients operated from November 96 through September 97 in our institution. Presenting symptoms in the 15 patients (8 males, 7 females, mean age 43 years) were seizures in 11 cases (73%) and neurological deficit in 4 cases (27%). Clinical examination was normal in 11 patients and revealed hemiparesia in 4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-dimensional reconstruction showed a precentral tumor in 10 cases, central lesion in one patient, postcentral lesion in two cases, right insular tumor (non-dominant hemisphere) in one case. All patients underwent surgical resection using DCS with detection in 13 cases of motor cortex and subcortical pathways under genera anesthesia, in one case of somatosensory area under local anesthesia, and in one case of language areas also under local anesthesia. The tumor was recurrent in two patients had been operated earlier but without DCS. Resection, verified by postoperative MRI, was total in 12 cases (80%) and estimated at 80% in 3 patients. Histological examination revealed an infiltrative glioma in 12 cases (8 low grade astrocytomas, 3 low grade oligodendrogliomas, and one anaplastic oligodendroglioma), and metastases in 3 cases. Eight patients had no postoperative deficit, while the other 7 patients were impaired, with, in all cases except one, complete recovery in 15 days to 2 months. Direct

  13. Coregistering functional near-infrared spectroscopy with underlying cortical areas in infants

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Richards, John E.; Blasi, Anna; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Elwell, Clare E.; Johnson, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is becoming a popular tool in developmental neuroscience for mapping functional localized brain responses. However, as it cannot provide information about underlying anatomy, researchers have begun to conduct spatial registration of fNIRS channels to cortical anatomy in adults. The current work investigated this issue with infants by coregistering fNIRS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 55 individuals. Our findings suggest that fNIRS channels can be reliably registered with regions in the frontal and temporal cortex of infants from 4 to 7 months of age. Although some macro-anatomical regions are difficult to consistently define, others are more stable and fNIRS channels on an age-appropriate MRI template are often consistent with individual infant MRIs. We have generated a standardized scalp surface map of fNIRS channel locators to reliably locate cortical regions for fNIRS developmental researchers. This new map can be used to identify the inferior frontal gyrus, superior temporal sulcus (STS) region [which includes the superior and middle temporal gyri (MTG) nearest to the STS], and MTG and temporal-parietal regions in 4- to 7-month-old infants. Future work will model data for the whole head, taking into account the properties of light transport in tissue, and expanding to different ages across development. PMID:25558463

  14. Asperity generating upper crustal sources revealed by b value and isostatic residual anomaly grids in the area of Antofagasta, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Meyer, U.; Schmidt, S.; GöTze, H.-J.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    In our study we show that the locations of largest coseismic slip (asperities) on the fault plane of the Mw = 8.0 1995 Antofagasta earthquake in Northern Chile can be mapped by the spatial distribution of the seismic b value obtained from the aftershock sequence of the megathrust earthquake. These areas of high seismic moment release and concurrent high-b values are congruent with anomalies of the gravity isostatic residual (IR) field in the Antofagasta region. They are superimposed on the seismogenic part of the north Chilean subduction zone where the strongest coupling of the upper and lower plate is expected. The IR anomalies are interpreted to be caused by large Jurassic-Early Cretaceous batholiths which intruded into the upper crust. The observed positive correlations between high seismic b values, IR anomalies, and geologic structures enable us to propose a mechanical model for the generation of the asperities in the Antofagasta region. We suggest that the batholiths in conjunction with buoyant forces acting on the subducted slab of the Nazca plate are responsible for locking the interface where the asperities are located. This implies long-term conditions for the existence of the asperity generating tectonic situation. Concequently, the asperities around Antofagasta could be stationary features, at least for several seismic cycles. Hence we propose that the IR anomalies along the north Chilean convergent margin can be used as an indicator for high moment release and slip in future large earthquakes.

  15. Estimation of daily global solar radiation as a function of routine meteorological data in Mediterranean areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Francisco Javier; Yebra, María Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Solar radiation is the main responsible of many processes of the biophysical environment. Temperature changes, snow melt dynamics, carbon sequestration, evaporation from soils, plants, and open water bodies are explained by the amount of radiation received in a surface. Lack of direct observations and insufficient record length limit the ability to use global solar radiation information for resource use management and planning. Based on the general equation of Bristow and Campbell, we propose a modification that allows us to better represent atmospheric transmissivity as a function of routine meteorological variables and improve estimates of global solar radiation in Mediterranean and semi arid areas. The improved Bristow-Campbell model (IBC) is easy to use in any location where measurements of temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity are available, and present a simple solution that can be used as proxy for relative humidity in case that variable is not been measured.

  16. Evidence for a functional subdivision of Premotor Ear-Eye Field (Area 8B)

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotto, Marco; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Lucchetti, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The Supplementary Eye Field (SEF) and the Frontal Eye Field (FEF) have been described as participating in gaze shift control. Recent evidence suggests, however, that other areas of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex also influence gaze shift. Herein, we have investigated electrically evoked ear- and eye movements from the Premotor Ear-Eye Field, or PEEF (area 8B) of macaque monkeys. We stimulated PEEF during spontaneous condition (outside the task performance) and during the execution of a visual fixation task (VFT). In the first case, we functionally identified two regions within the PEEF: a core and a belt. In the core region, stimulation elicited forward ear movements; regarding the evoked eye movements, in some penetrations, stimulation elicited contraversive fixed-vectors with a mean amplitude of 5.14°; while in other penetrations, we observed prevalently contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell within 15° in respect to the primary eye position. On the contrary, in the belt region, stimulation elicited backward ear movements; regarding the eye movements, in some penetrations stimulation elicited prevalently contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell within 15° in respect to the primary eye position, while in the lateral edge of the investigated region, stimulation elicited contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell beyond 15° in respect to the primary eye position. Stimulation during VFT either did not elicit eye movements or evoked saccades of only a few degrees. Finally, even though no head rotation movements were observed during the stimulation period, we viewed a relationship between the duration of stimulation and the neck forces exerted by the monkey's head. We propose an updated vision of the PEEF composed of two functional regions, core and belt, which may be involved in integrating auditory and visual information important to the programming of gaze orienting

  17. [Thyroid function in organic lesions of the hypothalamo-pituitary area].

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Jadwiga; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Gratyna; Bidzińska, Bozena; Dunajska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our work was the retrospective evaluation of thyroid function in patients with organic lesions of hypothalamo-pituitary system. In the group of 57 examined patients (31 females and 26 males), 43 were affected by pituitary adenomas, in the other patients organic lesions were caused by other tumors of central nervous system (2), tuberculosis (3) developmental or vascular disorders (5), nonspecific inflammation (1). Pituitary tumors (predominantly macroadenomas) were the cause of acromegaly in 14 cases, Cushing's disease in 9 and hyperprolactinaemia in 5. Next 14 subjects, were affected by nonsecreting pituitary tumors with a visual-field defects or different level of hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus hypothalamo-hypophyseal. In 6 persons clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism with a low level of free thyroxin and normal TSH were observed. Surgical cure with transsphenoidal or transcranial operation was performed in 54 patients. Next 23 of the patients had lowered thyroxine level as a consequence of surgery. Considering the whole 57 person group with organic lesions of the hypothalamo-pituitary system, 29 patients (50.8%) were affected by secondary or tertiary hypothyroidism as a result of sellar and parasellar area illness or their surgical treatment. We didn't observe any correlation between TSH and FT4 in the patients with normal or low plasma FT4 levels. (1) secondary or tertiary hypothyroidism is a common consequence of organic lesions of the sellar and parasellar area or is due by their surgical treatment; (2) laboratory examination of thyroid function in these patients can not be evaluated only by TSH assessment, but also by thyroid hormone plasma level estimation because of the disturbances in thyroid an hypothalamo-pituitary system feedback. PMID:16238121

  18. Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of the Western Interconnection with Wind and Solar Generation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation describes the analysis of the impact of balancing area cooperation on the operation of the Western Interconnection with wind and solar generation, including a discussion of operating reserves, ramping, production simulation, and conclusions.

  19. Taxa-area Relationship (TAR) of Microbial Functional Genes with Long-TGerm Fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian; Xue, Kai; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Hirsch, Penny; Mcgrath, Steve; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Diversity and spatial patterns in plant and animal communities are well documented as a positive-power law of a taxa-area relationship (TAR). At present little is known whether this also applies to soil microbial communities and whether long-term fertilization has an influence on the underlying microbial diversity. To test the effects of long-term fertilization on above-ground botanical diversity and below-ground microbial diversity, a nested sampling approach on Park Grass plots (12d& 11/2c) of Rothamsted Reseach in United Kingdom, both at ~;; pH 5 but with plant diversities of between 42 and 13 respectively were used. GeoChip 3.0, covering approximately 57, 000 gene sequences of 292 gene families involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance, and organic contaminant degradation, was used to determine the gene area relationships for both functional and phylogenetic groups and the relationship to plant diversity. Our analysis indicated that the microbial communities were separated by different plant diversity based on DCA. The soil microbial diversity was in accord with plant diversity. Soil microbial community exhibited different z value with different plant diversity, z = 0.0449 with higher plant diversity and z = 0.0583 with lower plant diversity (P< 0.0001). These results suggest that the turnover in space of microorganisms may be higher with long-term fertilization.

  20. Investigation on large-area fabrication of vivid shark skin with superior surface functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Lingxi; Che, Da; Zhang, Deyuan; Sudarshan, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Shark skin has attracted worldwide attention because of its superior drag reduction, antifouling performance induced from its unique surface morphology. Although the vivid shark skin has been fabricated by a bio-replicated micro-imprinting approach in previous studies and superior drag reduction effect has been validated in water tunnel, continuous large-area fabrication is still an obstacle to wide apply. In this paper, one novel bio-replication coating technology is proposed for large-area transfer of shark skin based on rapid UV curable paint. Apart from design of coating system, bio-replication accuracy of surface morphology was validated about 97% by comparison between shark skin template and coating surface morphology. Finally, the drag reduction and anti-fouling function of coating surface were tested in water tunnel and open algae pond respectively. Drag reduction rate of coating surface was validated about 12% higher and anti-fouling was proved to about hundred times ameliorate, all of which are more excellent than simple 2D riblet surface.

  1. Brain functional network changes following Prelimbic area inactivation in a spatial memory extinction task.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; Conejo, Nélida M; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest a prefrontal cortex involvement during the acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory, suggesting an active modulating role at late stages of acquisition processes. Recently, we have reported that the prelimbic and infralimbic areas of the prefrontal cortex, among other structures, are also specifically involved in the late phases of spatial memory extinction. This study aimed to evaluate whether the inactivation of the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex impaired spatial memory extinction. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae into the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex. Animals were trained during 5 consecutive days in a hidden platform task and tested for reference spatial memory immediately after the last training session. One day after completing the training task, bilateral infusion of the GABAA receptor agonist Muscimol was performed before the extinction protocol was carried out. Additionally, cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied to map the metabolic brain activity related to the spatial memory extinction under prelimbic cortex inactivation. Results show that animals acquired the reference memory task in the water maze, and the extinction task was successfully completed without significant impairment. However, analysis of the functional brain networks involved by cytochrome oxidase activity interregional correlations showed changes in brain networks between the group treated with Muscimol as compared to the saline-treated group, supporting the involvement of the mammillary bodies at a the late stage in the memory extinction process.

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity analyses reveal efference-copy to primary somatosensory area, BA2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fang; Arnstein, Dan; Thomas, Rajat Mani; Maurits, Natasha M; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Some theories of motor control suggest efference-copies of motor commands reach somatosensory cortices. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test these models. We varied the amount of efference-copy signal by making participants squeeze a soft material either actively or passively. We found electromyographical recordings, an efference-copy proxy, to predict activity in primary somatosensory regions, in particular Brodmann Area (BA) 2. Partial correlation analyses confirmed that brain activity in cortical structures associated with motor control (premotor and supplementary motor cortices, the parietal area PF and the cerebellum) predicts brain activity in BA2 without being entirely mediated by activity in early somatosensory (BA3b) cortex. Our study therefore provides valuable empirical evidence for efference-copy models of motor control, and shows that signals in BA2 can indeed reflect an input from motor cortices and suggests that we should interpret activations in BA2 as evidence for somatosensory-motor rather than somatosensory coding alone.

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Connectivity Analyses Reveal Efference-Copy to Primary Somatosensory Area, BA2

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fang; Arnstein, Dan; Thomas, Rajat Mani; Maurits, Natasha M.; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Some theories of motor control suggest efference-copies of motor commands reach somatosensory cortices. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test these models. We varied the amount of efference-copy signal by making participants squeeze a soft material either actively or passively. We found electromyographical recordings, an efference-copy proxy, to predict activity in primary somatosensory regions, in particular Brodmann Area (BA) 2. Partial correlation analyses confirmed that brain activity in cortical structures associated with motor control (premotor and supplementary motor cortices, the parietal area PF and the cerebellum) predicts brain activity in BA2 without being entirely mediated by activity in early somatosensory (BA3b) cortex. Our study therefore provides valuable empirical evidence for efference-copy models of motor control, and shows that signals in BA2 can indeed reflect an input from motor cortices and suggests that we should interpret activations in BA2 as evidence for somatosensory-motor rather than somatosensory coding alone. PMID:24416222

  4. Brain functional network changes following Prelimbic area inactivation in a spatial memory extinction task.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; Conejo, Nélida M; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest a prefrontal cortex involvement during the acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory, suggesting an active modulating role at late stages of acquisition processes. Recently, we have reported that the prelimbic and infralimbic areas of the prefrontal cortex, among other structures, are also specifically involved in the late phases of spatial memory extinction. This study aimed to evaluate whether the inactivation of the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex impaired spatial memory extinction. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae into the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex. Animals were trained during 5 consecutive days in a hidden platform task and tested for reference spatial memory immediately after the last training session. One day after completing the training task, bilateral infusion of the GABAA receptor agonist Muscimol was performed before the extinction protocol was carried out. Additionally, cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied to map the metabolic brain activity related to the spatial memory extinction under prelimbic cortex inactivation. Results show that animals acquired the reference memory task in the water maze, and the extinction task was successfully completed without significant impairment. However, analysis of the functional brain networks involved by cytochrome oxidase activity interregional correlations showed changes in brain networks between the group treated with Muscimol as compared to the saline-treated group, supporting the involvement of the mammillary bodies at a the late stage in the memory extinction process. PMID:25813749

  5. Application of computer graphics to generate coal resources of the Cache coal bed, Recluse geologic model area, Campbell County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, G.B.; Crowley, S.S.; Carey, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Low-sulfur subbituminous coal resources have been calculated, using both manual and computer methods, for the Cache coal bed in the Recluse Model Area, which covers the White Tail Butte, Pitch Draw, Recluse, and Homestead Draw SW 7 1/2 minute quadrangles, Campbell County, Wyoming. Approximately 275 coal thickness measurements obtained from drill hole data are evenly distributed throughout the area. The Cache coal and associated beds are in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation. The depth from the surface to the Cache bed ranges from 269 to 1,257 feet. The thickness of the coal is as much as 31 feet, but in places the Cache coal bed is absent. Comparisons between hand-drawn and computer-generated isopach maps show minimal differences. Total coal resources calculated by computer show the bed to contain 2,316 million short tons or about 6.7 percent more than the hand-calculated figure of 2,160 million short tons.

  6. Optimal design of an atmospheric water generator (AWG) based on thermo-electric cooler (TEC) for drought in rural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaningsih, Sri; Nurhilal, Otong

    2016-02-01

    Drinking water availability is a major issue in some rural area in Indonesia during the summer season due to lack of rainfall, which peoples in this area have to fetch the water a few kilometers away from home. The Atmospheric Water Generator (AWG) is one of the alternative solution for fresh water recovery from atmosphere which is directly condensed the moisture content of water vapor from the air. This paper presents the method to develop a prototype of an AWG based on Thermo-electric cooler (TEC) that used 12 Volt DC, hence its suitability for using renewable energy resource. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is utilized to optimize the design process in the flow region only, it's not suitable for recent CFD software to use in Multi physics, because inaccuracy, cost and time saving. Some parameters such as temperature, moisture content, air flow, pressure, form of air flow channel and the water productivity per unit input of energy are to be considered. The result is presented as an experimental prototype of an AWG based on TEC and compared with other conventional commercial products.

  7. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  8. The effects of caffeine ingestion on cortical areas: functional imaging study.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-A; Kang, Chang-Ki; Son, Young-Don; Choi, Eun-Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Oh, Seung-Taek; Kim, Young-Bo; Park, Chan-Woong; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2014-05-01

    The effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is well known; however, caffeine-induced changes in the cortical regions are still not very clear. Therefore, in this study, we conducted an investigation of the activation and deactivation with blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and of metabolic activity change with positron emission tomography (PET) in the human brain. Fourteen healthy subjects performed a visuomotor task inducing attention with 3T MRI, and PET imaging was also carried out in seven subjects to determine the cerebral glucose metabolic changes of caffeine at rest. The result by fMRI showed increased BOLD activation in the left cerebellum, putamen, insula, thalamus and the right primary motor cortex, and decreased BOLD deactivation in the posterior medial and the left posterior lateral cortex. Also, the resting state PET data showed reduced metabolic activity in the putamen, caudate nucleus, insula, pallidum and posterior medial cortex. The common cortical regions between fMRI and PET, such as putamen, insula and posterior medial cortex, where significant changes occurred after caffeine ingestion, are well known to play an important role in cognitive function like attention. This result suggests that the effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is derived by modulating the attentional areas.

  9. Modulation transfer function for a large-area amorphous silicon image receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnhart, Jonathan R. D.; Chaney, Edward L.

    1997-12-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) of an amorphous silicon (aSi) sensor array was measured using proper sampling techniques to determine the edge spread function (ESF). The detector under study was a area detector (EG&G Heimann, RTM128) consisting of aSi photodiodes arranged in a square array. Two independent methods for calculating the presampling MTF were implemented, based on finely sampling the ESF measurements produced using 40 kV x-rays from a Faxitron microfocal spot x-ray tube. The two calculations of the detector's presampling MTF are in excellent agreement, and are within 20% at the Nyquist frequency when compared with the ideal MTF based only on the size of the detector elements. ESF measurements were also made at 6 MV on a Siemens MD-2 linear accelerator. A calculation of the system presampling MTF was performed which included effects from the linear accelerator source, the lead block used to create the high contrast edge, and the aSi detector response.

  10. Brain structure-function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I; Glahn, David C; Thompson, Paul M; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-07-01

    Recent theories regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggest contributions of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes. While structural neuroimaging studies indicate disease-associated neuroanatomical alterations, the behavioural correlates of these alterations have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder to: (i) characterize neurobehavioural correlates of neuroanatomical measures implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder; (ii) identify brain-behaviour associations that differ between diagnostic groups; (iii) identify neurocognitive traits that show evidence of accelerated ageing specifically in subjects with bipolar disorder; and (iv) identify brain-behaviour correlations that differ across the age span. Structural neuroimages and multi-dimensional assessments of temperament and neurocognition were acquired from 527 (153 bipolar disorder and 374 non-bipolar disorder) adults aged 18-87 years in 26 families with heavy genetic loading for bipolar disorder. We used linear regression models to identify significant brain-behaviour associations and test whether brain-behaviour relationships differed: (i) between diagnostic groups; and (ii) as a function of age. We found that total cortical and ventricular volume had the greatest number of significant behavioural associations, and included correlations with measures from multiple cognitive domains, particularly declarative and working memory and executive function. Cortical thickness measures, in contrast, showed more specific associations with declarative memory, letter fluency and processing speed tasks. While the majority of brain-behaviour relationships were similar across diagnostic groups, increased cortical thickness in ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortical regions was associated with better declarative memory only in bipolar disorder subjects, and not in non-bipolar disorder family

  11. Brain structure–function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K.; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C.; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M.; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B.; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A.; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I.; Glahn, David C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I.; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent theories regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggest contributions of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes. While structural neuroimaging studies indicate disease-associated neuroanatomical alterations, the behavioural correlates of these alterations have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder to: (i) characterize neurobehavioural correlates of neuroanatomical measures implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder; (ii) identify brain–behaviour associations that differ between diagnostic groups; (iii) identify neurocognitive traits that show evidence of accelerated ageing specifically in subjects with bipolar disorder; and (iv) identify brain–behaviour correlations that differ across the age span. Structural neuroimages and multi-dimensional assessments of temperament and neurocognition were acquired from 527 (153 bipolar disorder and 374 non-bipolar disorder) adults aged 18–87 years in 26 families with heavy genetic loading for bipolar disorder. We used linear regression models to identify significant brain–behaviour associations and test whether brain–behaviour relationships differed: (i) between diagnostic groups; and (ii) as a function of age. We found that total cortical and ventricular volume had the greatest number of significant behavioural associations, and included correlations with measures from multiple cognitive domains, particularly declarative and working memory and executive function. Cortical thickness measures, in contrast, showed more specific associations with declarative memory, letter fluency and processing speed tasks. While the majority of brain–behaviour relationships were similar across diagnostic groups, increased cortical thickness in ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortical regions was associated with better declarative memory only in bipolar disorder subjects, and not in non

  12. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-01

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co-stimulation.

  13. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-01

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co

  14. Chemical function based pharmacophore generation of endothelin-A selective receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Funk, Oliver F; Kettmann, Viktor; Drimal, Jan; Langer, Thierry

    2004-05-20

    Both quantitative and qualitative chemical function based pharmacophore models of endothelin-A (ET(A)) selective receptor antagonists were generated by using the two algorithms HypoGen and HipHop, respectively, which are implemented in the Catalyst molecular modeling software. The input for HypoGen is a training set of 18 ET(A) antagonists exhibiting IC(50) values ranging between 0.19 nM and 67 microM. The best output hypothesis consists of five features: two hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI) function. The highest scoring Hip Hop model consists of six features: three hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI). It is the result of an input of three highly active, selective, and structurally diverse ET(A) antagonists. The predictive power of the quantitative model could be approved by using a test set of 30 compounds, whose activity values spread over 6 orders of magnitude. The two pharmacophores were tested according to their ability to extract known endothelin antagonists from the 3D molecular structure database of Derwent's World Drug Index. Thereby the main part of selective ET(A) antagonistic entries was detected by the two hypotheses. Furthermore, the pharmacophores were used to screen the Maybridge database. Six compounds were chosen from the output hit lists for in vitro testing of their ability to displace endothelin-1 from its receptor. Two of these are new potential lead compounds because they are structurally novel and exhibit satisfactory activity in the binding assay. PMID:15139753

  15. Chemical function based pharmacophore generation of endothelin-A selective receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Funk, Oliver F; Kettmann, Viktor; Drimal, Jan; Langer, Thierry

    2004-05-20

    Both quantitative and qualitative chemical function based pharmacophore models of endothelin-A (ET(A)) selective receptor antagonists were generated by using the two algorithms HypoGen and HipHop, respectively, which are implemented in the Catalyst molecular modeling software. The input for HypoGen is a training set of 18 ET(A) antagonists exhibiting IC(50) values ranging between 0.19 nM and 67 microM. The best output hypothesis consists of five features: two hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI) function. The highest scoring Hip Hop model consists of six features: three hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI). It is the result of an input of three highly active, selective, and structurally diverse ET(A) antagonists. The predictive power of the quantitative model could be approved by using a test set of 30 compounds, whose activity values spread over 6 orders of magnitude. The two pharmacophores were tested according to their ability to extract known endothelin antagonists from the 3D molecular structure database of Derwent's World Drug Index. Thereby the main part of selective ET(A) antagonistic entries was detected by the two hypotheses. Furthermore, the pharmacophores were used to screen the Maybridge database. Six compounds were chosen from the output hit lists for in vitro testing of their ability to displace endothelin-1 from its receptor. Two of these are new potential lead compounds because they are structurally novel and exhibit satisfactory activity in the binding assay.

  16. Functional Specificity of the Visual Word Form Area: General Activation for Words and Symbols but Specific Network Activation for Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Karen; Fernandes, Myra; Schwindt, Graeme; O'Craven, Kathleen; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    The functional specificity of the brain region known as the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) was examined using fMRI. We explored whether this area serves a general role in processing symbolic stimuli, rather than being selective for the processing of words. Brain activity was measured during a visual 1-back task to English words, meaningful symbols…

  17. A study on rational function model generation for TerraSAR-X imagery.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Akram; Saadatseresht, Mohammad; Motagh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    The Rational Function Model (RFM) has been widely used as an alternative to rigorous sensor models of high-resolution optical imagery in photogrammetry and remote sensing geometric processing. However, not much work has been done to evaluate the applicability of the RF model for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image processing. This paper investigates how to generate a Rational Polynomial Coefficient (RPC) for high-resolution TerraSAR-X imagery using an independent approach. The experimental results demonstrate that the RFM obtained using the independent approach fits the Range-Doppler physical sensor model with an accuracy of greater than 10-3 pixel. Because independent RPCs indicate absolute errors in geolocation, two methods can be used to improve the geometric accuracy of the RFM. In the first method, Ground Control Points (GCPs) are used to update SAR sensor orientation parameters, and the RPCs are calculated using the updated parameters. Our experiment demonstrates that by using three control points in the corners of the image, an accuracy of 0.69 pixels in range and 0.88 pixels in the azimuth direction is achieved. For the second method, we tested the use of an affine model for refining RPCs. In this case, by applying four GCPs in the corners of the image, the accuracy reached 0.75 pixels in range and 0.82 pixels in the azimuth direction. PMID:24021971

  18. A study on rational function model generation for TerraSAR-X imagery.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Akram; Saadatseresht, Mohammad; Motagh, Mahdi

    2013-09-09

    The Rational Function Model (RFM) has been widely used as an alternative to rigorous sensor models of high-resolution optical imagery in photogrammetry and remote sensing geometric processing. However, not much work has been done to evaluate the applicability of the RF model for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image processing. This paper investigates how to generate a Rational Polynomial Coefficient (RPC) for high-resolution TerraSAR-X imagery using an independent approach. The experimental results demonstrate that the RFM obtained using the independent approach fits the Range-Doppler physical sensor model with an accuracy of greater than 10-3 pixel. Because independent RPCs indicate absolute errors in geolocation, two methods can be used to improve the geometric accuracy of the RFM. In the first method, Ground Control Points (GCPs) are used to update SAR sensor orientation parameters, and the RPCs are calculated using the updated parameters. Our experiment demonstrates that by using three control points in the corners of the image, an accuracy of 0.69 pixels in range and 0.88 pixels in the azimuth direction is achieved. For the second method, we tested the use of an affine model for refining RPCs. In this case, by applying four GCPs in the corners of the image, the accuracy reached 0.75 pixels in range and 0.82 pixels in the azimuth direction.

  19. Generation of Functional Inhibitory Synapses Incorporating Defined Combinations of GABA(A) or Glycine Receptor Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Christine L.; Zhang, Yan; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain is mediated by wide range of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and glycine receptor (GlyR) isoforms, each with different physiological and pharmacological properties. Because multiple isoforms are expressed simultaneously in most neurons, it is difficult to define the properties of individual isoforms under synaptic stimulation conditions in vivo. Although recombinant expression systems permit the expression of individual isoforms in isolation, they require exogenous agonist application which cannot mimic the dynamic neurotransmitter profile characteristic of native synapses. We describe a neuron-HEK293 cell co-culture technique for generating inhibitory synapses incorporating defined combinations of GABAAR or GlyR subunits. Primary neuronal cultures, prepared from embryonic rat cerebral cortex or spinal cord, are used to provide presynaptic GABAergic and glycinergic terminals, respectively. When the cultures are mature, HEK293 cells expressing the subunits of interest plus neuroligin 2A are plated onto the neurons, which rapidly form synapses onto HEK293 cells. Patch clamp electrophysiology is then used to analyze the physiological and pharmacological properties of the inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by the recombinant receptors. The method is suitable for investigating the kinetic properties or the effects of drugs on inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by defined GABAAR or GlyR isoforms of interest, the effects of hereditary disease mutations on the formation and function of both types of synapses, and synaptogenesis and synaptic clustering mechanisms. The entire cell preparation procedure takes 2–5 weeks. PMID:26778954

  20. A general organocatalyzed Michael-Michael cascade reaction generates functionalized cyclohexenes.

    PubMed

    McGarraugh, Patrick G; Jones, Joshua H; Brenner-Moyer, Stacey E

    2011-08-01

    Although β-dicarbonyl compounds are regularly employed as Michael donors, intermediates arising from the Michael addition of unsaturated β-ketoesters to α,β-unsaturated aldehydes are susceptible to multiple subsequent reaction pathways. We designed cyclic unsaturated β-ketoester substrates that enabled the development of the first diphenyl prolinol silyl ether catalyzed Michael-Michael cascade reaction initiated by a β-dicarbonyl Michael donor to form cyclohexene products. The reaction conditions we developed for this Michael-Michael cascade reaction were also amenable to a variety of linear unsaturated β-ketoester substrates, including some of the same linear unsaturated β-ketoester substrates that were previously ineffective in Michael-Michael cascade reactions. These studies thus revealed that a change in simple reaction conditions, such as solvent and additives, enables the same substrate to undergo different cascade reactions, thereby accessing different molecular scaffolds. These studies also culminated in the development of a general organocatalyzed Michael-Michael cascade reaction that generates highly functionalized cyclohexenes with up to four stereocenters, in up to 97% yield, 32:1 dr, and 99% ee, in a single step from a variety of unsaturated β-ketoesters.

  1. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  2. What Students Want: Generation Y and the Changing Function of the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan; Eng, Susanna

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the results of a 2003 undergraduate library user survey as a case study of Generation Y. Survey data support four main traits attributed to Generation Y, which are discussed within the context of library use and satisfaction. Implications for future directions in academic library services based on the new ways Generation Y…

  3. Mission Study for Generation-X: A Large Area and High Angular Observatory to Study the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissenden, Roger

    2005-01-01

    In this report we provide a summary of the technical progress achieved during the last year Generation-X Vision Mission Study. In addition, we provide a brief programmatic status. The Generation-X (Gen-X) Vision Mission Study investigates the science requirements, mission concepts and technology drivers for an X-ray telescope designed to study the new frontier of astrophysics: the birth and evolution of the first stars, galaxies and black holes in the early Universe. X-ray astronomy offers an opportunity to detect these via the activity of the black holes, and the supernova explosions and gamma-ray burst afterglows of the massive stars. However, such objects are beyond the grasp of current missions which are operating or even under development. Our team has conceived a Gen-X Vision Mission based on an X-ray observatory with 100 m2 collecting area at 1 keV (1000 times larger than Chandra) and 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution (several times better than Chandra and 50 times better than the Constellation-X resolution goal). Such a high energy observatory will be capable of detecting the earliest black holes and galaxies in the Universe, and will also study extremes of density, gravity, magnetic fields, and kinetic energy which cannot be created in laboratories. In our study we develop the mission concept and define candidate technologies and performance requirements for Gen-X. The baseline Gen-X mission involves four 8 m diameter X-ray telescopes operating at Sun-Earth L2. We trade against an alternate concept of a single 26 m diameter telescope with focal plane instruments on a separate spacecraft. A telescope of this size will require either robotic or human-assisted in-flight assembly. The required effective area implies that extremely lightweight grazing incidence X-ray optics must be developed. To achieve the required areal density of at least 100 times lower than for Chandra, we study 0.2 mm thick mirrors which have active on-orbit figure control. We also study

  4. Are Nonlinguistic Functions in ''Broca's Area'' Prerequisites for Language Acquisition? fMRI Findings from an Ontogenetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ralph-Axel; Basho, Surina

    2004-01-01

    There is incomplete consensus on the anatomical demarcation of Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus and its functional characterization remains a matter of debate. Exclusive syntactic specialization has been proposed, but is overall inconsistent with the neuroimaging literature. We examined three functional MRI (fMRI) datasets on…

  5. Thermal and petroleum-generation history of the Mississippian Eleana Formation and Tertiary source rocks, Yucca Mountain Area, Southern Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A geochemical and geologic assessment of petroleum potential in the Yucca Mountain area indicates little remaining potential for significant oil and gas generation in the Mississippian Eleana Formation or related Paleozoic rocks, and good but a really restricted potential in Tertiary rocks in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site. Mesozoic source rocks are not present in the Yucca Mountain area. The Tertiary source rocks in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site are typically carbon-rich, and where hydrogen-rich, they are good oil-prone source rocks that are immature to marginally mature with respect to oil and gas generation. A geologically similar occurrence of hydrothermally altered Tertiary source rocks at north Bare Mountain retains little hydrocarbon generation capacity. The implication is that hydrocarbons were generated during hydrothermal alteration and have since migrated out of the source rocks or alive been lost during exhumation. A reconstructed thermal history of the Yucca Mountain area, based on the Eleana Formation, indicates petroleum was generated in the Late Paleozoic and possibly Early Mesozoic and that the oil was lost or metamorphosed to pyrobitumen during later heating, probably related to igneous activity. The Tertiary rocks are still capable of generating oil and gas, but little potential exists for a major hydrocarbon discovery due to the restricted occurrence of good source rocks and their marginal thermal maturity when situated away from intrusions.

  6. Designing, building, and testing a solar thermoelectric generation, STEG, for energy delivery to remote residential areas in developing regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moumouni, Yacouba

    New alternatives and inventive renewable energy techniques which encompass both generation and power management solutions are fundamental for meeting remote residential energy supply and demand today, especially if the grid is quasi-inexistent. Solar thermoelectric generators can be a cost-effective alternative to photovoltaics for a remote residential household power supply. A complete solar thermoelectric energy harvesting system is presented for energy delivery to remote residential areas in developing regions. To this end, the entire system was built, modeled, and then validated with LTspice simulator software via thermal-to-electrical analogy schemes. Valuable data in conjunction with two novel LTspice circuits were obtained, showing the achievability of analyzing transient heat transfer with the Spice simulator. Hence, the proposed study begins with a comprehensive method of extracting thermal parameters that appear in thermoelectric modules. A step-by-step procedure was developed and followed to succinctly extract parameters, such as the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal resistance, and thermal conductivity needed to model the system. Data extracted from datasheet, material properties, and geometries were successfully utilized to compute the thermal capacities and resistances necessary to perform the analogy. In addition, temperature variations of the intrinsic internal parameters were accounted for in this process for accuracy purposes. The steps that it takes to simulate any thermo-electrical system with the LTspice simulator are thoroughly explained in this work. As a consequence, an improved Spice model for a thermoelectric generator is proposed. Experimental results were compiled in the form of a lookup table and then fed into the Spice simulator using the piecewise linear (PWL) command in order to validate the model. Experimental results show that a temperature differential of 13.43°C was achievable whereas the simulation indicates

  7. Ex vivo generation of a functional and regenerative wound epithelium from axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) skin.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Donald R; Satoh, Akira; Mandefro, Berhan; Cummings, Gillian M; Gardiner, David M; Rugg, Elizabeth L

    2010-10-01

    Urodele amphibians (salamanders) are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate structurally complete and fully functional limbs. Regeneration is a stepwise process that requires interactions between keratinocytes, nerves and fibroblasts. The formation of a wound epithelium covering the amputation site is an early and necessary event in the process but the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of the wound epithelium in regeneration remain unclear. We have developed an ex vivo model that recapitulates many features of in vivo wound healing. The model comprises a circular explant of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) limb skin with a central circular, full thickness wound. Re-epithelialization of the wound area is rapid (typically <11 h) and is dependent on metalloproteinase activity. The ex vivo wound epithelium is viable, responds to neuronal signals and is able to participate in ectopic blastema formation and limb regeneration. This ex vivo model provides a reproducible and tractable system in which to study the cellular and molecular events that underlie wound healing and regeneration.

  8. New class of filter functions generated most directly by the Christoffel-Darboux formula for classical orthonormal Jacobi polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, Vlastimir D.; Ilić, Aleksandar D.

    2011-12-01

    The new originally capital general solution of determining the prototype filter function as the response that satisfies the specifications of all pole low-pass continual time filter functions of odd and even order is presented in this article. In this article, two new classes of filter functions are proposed using orthogonal and orthonormal Jacobi polynomials. The approximation problem of filter function was solved mathematically, most directly applying the summed Christoffel-Darboux formula for the orthogonal polynomials. The starting point in solving the approximation problem is a direct application of the Christoffel-Darboux formula for the initial set of continual Jacobi orthogonal polynomials in the finite interval ? in full respect to the weighting function with two free real parameters. General solution of the filter functions is obtained in a compact explicit form, which is shown to enable generation the Jacobi filter functions in a simple way by choosing the numerical values of the free real parameters. For particular specifications of free parameters, the proposed solution is used with the same criterion of approximation to generate the appropriate particular filter functions as are: the Gegenbauer, Legendre and Chebyshev filter functions of the first and second kind as well. The examples of proposed filter functions of even and odd order are illustrated and compared with classical solutions.

  9. THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON ORBIT: EVENT CLASSIFICATION, INSTRUMENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS, AND CALIBRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Bouvier, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: luca.baldini@pi.infn.it; and others

    2012-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission, the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the instrument response functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper, we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  10. Fluid Phase Lipid Areas and Bilayer Thicknesses of Commonly Used Phosphatidylcholines as a Function of Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kucerka, Norbert; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Katsaras, John

    2011-01-01

    The structural parameters of fluid phase bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholines with fully saturated, mixed, and branched fatty acid chains, at several temperatures, have been determined by simultaneously analyzing small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. Bilayer parameters, such as area per lipid and overall bilayer thickness have been obtained in conjunction with intrabilayer structural parameters (e.g. hydrocarbon region thickness). The results have allowed us to assess the effect of temperature and hydrocarbon chain composition on bilayer structure. For example, we found that for all lipids there is, not surprisingly, an increase in fatty acid chain trans-gauche isomerization with increasing temperature. Moreover, this increase in trans-gauche isomerization scales with fatty acid chain length in mixed chain lipids. However, in the case of lipids with saturated fatty acid chains, trans-gauche isomerization is increasingly tempered by attractive chain-chain van der Waals interactions with increasing chain length. Finally, our results confirm a strong dependence of lipid chain dynamics as a function of double bond position along fatty acid chains.

  11. Longitudinal associations between executive functioning and academic skills across content areas.

    PubMed

    Fuhs, Mary Wagner; Nesbitt, Kimberly Turner; Farran, Dale Clark; Dong, Nianbo

    2014-06-01

    This study assessed 562 four-year-old children at the beginning and end of their prekindergarten (pre-k) year and followed them to the end of kindergarten. At each time point children were assessed on 6 measures of executive function (EF) and 5 subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson III academic achievement battery. Exploratory factor analyses yielded EF and achievement factor scores. We examined the longitudinal bidirectional associations between these domains as well as the bidirectional associations among the separate content areas and the EF factor. In the pre-k year, strong bidirectional associations were found for EF skills and mathematics and oral comprehension skills but not for literacy skills. After controlling for pre-k gains in both EF and achievement, EF skills continued to be strong predictors of gains in mathematics in kindergarten and a more moderate predictor of kindergarten language gains. These results provide important information on the interrelationship of the developmental domains of EF and achievement as well as support for efforts to determine effective pre-k activities and/or curricula that can improve children's EF skills. They also suggest that mathematics activities may be a possible avenue for improving EF skills in young children. PMID:24749550

  12. Voice Morphing Using 3D Waveform Interpolation Surfaces and Lossless Tube Area Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavner, Yizhar; Porat, Gidon

    2005-12-01

    Voice morphing is the process of producing intermediate or hybrid voices between the utterances of two speakers. It can also be defined as the process of gradually transforming the voice of one speaker to that of another. The ability to change the speaker's individual characteristics and to produce high-quality voices can be used in many applications. Examples include multimedia and video entertainment, as well as enrichment of speech databases in text-to-speech systems. In this study we present a new technique which enables production of a given number of intermediate voices or of utterances which gradually change from one voice to another. This technique is based on two components: (1) creation of a 3D prototype waveform interpolation (PWI) surface from the LPC residual signal, to produce an intermediate excitation signal; (2) a representation of the vocal tract by a lossless tube area function, and an interpolation of the parameters of the two speakers. The resulting synthesized signal sounds like a natural voice lying between the two original voices.

  13. The Fermi Large Area Telescope on Orbit: Event Classification, Instrument Response Functions, and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Celik, Q.; Cobet, R.; Davis, D. S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy -ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the Instrument Response Functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  14. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Markov processes and a multiple generating function of product of generalized Laguerre polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Poh-Aun

    1997-06-01

    From the spectral representation of the transition probability of birth-and-death processes, Karlin and McGregor show that the transition probability for the infinite server Markovian queue is in the form of a diagonal sum involving a product of Charlier polynomials. By using Meixner's bilinear generating formula for the Charlier polynomials and the Markov property, a multiple generating for the Charlier polynomials is deduced from the Chapman - Kolmogorov equation. The resulting formula possesses the same genre of a multiple generating function for the generalized Laguerre polynomials discussed by Messina and Paladimo, the explicit solution of which is recently given by the present author.

  15. Generation of Functional Neuromuscular Junctions from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Puttonen, Katja A.; Ruponen, Marika; Naumenko, Nikolay; Hovatta, Outi H.; Tavi, Pasi; Koistinaho, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Several neuromuscular diseases involve dysfunction of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), yet there are no patient-specific human models for electrophysiological characterization of NMJ. We seeded cells of neurally-induced embryoid body-like spheres derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) or embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines as monolayers without basic fibroblast factor (bFGF) and observed differentiation of neuronal as well as spontaneously contracting, multinucleated skeletal myotubes. The myotubes showed striation, immunoreactivity for myosin heavy chain, actin bundles typical for myo-oriented cells, and generated spontaneous and evoked action potentials (APs). The myogenic differentiation was associated with expression of MyoD1, myogenin and type I ryanodine receptor. Neurons formed end plate like structures with strong binding of α-bungarotoxin, a marker of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors highly expressed in the postsynaptic membrane of NMJs, and expressed SMI-32, a motoneuron marker, as well as SV2, a marker for synapses. Pharmacological stimulation of cholinergic receptors resulted in strong depolarization of myotube membrane and raised Ca2+ concentration in sarcoplasm, while electrical stimulation evoked Ca2+ transients in myotubes. Stimulation of motoneurons with N-Methyl-D-aspartate resulted in reproducible APs in myotubes and end plates displayed typical mEPPs and tonic activity depolarizing myotubes of about 10 mV. We conclude that simultaneous differentiation of neurons and myotubes from patient-specific iPSCs or ESCs results also in the development of functional NMJs. Our human model of NMJ may serve as an important tool to investigate normal development, mechanisms of diseases and novel drug targets involving NMJ dysfunction and degeneration. PMID:26696831

  16. Functional Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Generated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Tommy S; Alvarez, Frances J D; Reinert, Nathan J; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Peijun; Tang, Pei

    2016-08-26

    Human Cys-loop receptors are important therapeutic targets. High-resolution structures are essential for rational drug design, but only a few are available due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of protein suitable for structural studies. Although expression of proteins in E. coli offers advantages of high yield, low cost, and fast turnover, this approach has not been thoroughly explored for full-length human Cys-loop receptors because of the conventional wisdom that E. coli lacks the specific chaperones and post-translational modifications potentially required for expression of human Cys-loop receptors. Here we report the successful production of full-length wild type human α7nAChR from E. coli Chemically induced chaperones promote high expression levels of well-folded proteins. The choice of detergents, lipids, and ligands during purification determines the final protein quality. The purified α7nAChR not only forms pentamers as imaged by negative-stain electron microscopy, but also retains pharmacological characteristics of native α7nAChR, including binding to bungarotoxin and positive allosteric modulators specific to α7nAChR. Moreover, the purified α7nAChR injected into Xenopus oocytes can be activated by acetylcholine, choline, and nicotine, inhibited by the channel blockers QX-222 and phencyclidine, and potentiated by the α7nAChR specific modulators PNU-120596 and TQS. The successful generation of functional human α7nAChR from E. coli opens a new avenue for producing mammalian Cys-loop receptors to facilitate structure-based rational drug design. PMID:27385587

  17. Spectral library generating function for assessing spectrum-spectrum match significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxun; Bandeira, Nuno

    2013-09-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) continues to be the technology of choice for high-throughput analysis of complex proteomics samples. While MS/MS spectra are commonly identified by matching against a database of known protein sequences, the complementary approach of spectral library searching against collections of reference spectra consistently outperforms sequence-based searches by resulting in significantly more identified spectra. However, while spectral library searches benefit from the advance knowledge of the expected peptide fragmentation patterns recorded in library spectra, estimation of the statistical significance of spectrum-spectrum matches (SSMs) continues to be hindered by difficulties in finding an appropriate definition of "random" SSMs to use as a null model when estimating the significance of true SSMs. We propose to avoid this problem by changing the null hypothesis: instead of determining the probability of observing a high SSM score between randomly matched spectra, we estimate the probability of observing a low SSM score between replicate spectra of the same molecule. To this end, we explicitly model the variation in instrument measurements of MS/MS peak intensities and show how these models can be used to determine a theoretical distribution of SSM scores between reference and query spectra of the same molecule. While the proposed spectral library generating function (SLGF) approach can be used to calculate theoretical distributions for any additive SSM score (e.g., any dot product), we further show how it can be used to calculate the distribution of expected cosines between reference and query spectra. We developed a spectral library search tool, Tremolo, and demonstrate that this SLGF-based search tool significantly outperforms current state-of-the-art spectral library search tools and provide a detailed discussion of the multiple reasons behind the observed differences in the sets of identified MS/MS spectra.

  18. Generation and Analysis of Large-Scale Data-Driven Mycobacterium tuberculosis Functional Networks for Drug Target Identification.

    PubMed

    Mazandu, Gaston K; Mulder, Nicola J

    2011-01-01

    Technological developments in large-scale biological experiments, coupled with bioinformatics tools, have opened the doors to computational approaches for the global analysis of whole genomes. This has provided the opportunity to look at genes within their context in the cell. The integration of vast amounts of data generated by these technologies provides a strategy for identifying potential drug targets within microbial pathogens, the causative agents of infectious diseases. As proteins are druggable targets, functional interaction networks between proteins are used to identify proteins essential to the survival, growth, and virulence of these microbial pathogens. Here we have integrated functional genomics data to generate functional interaction networks between Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins and carried out computational analyses to dissect the functional interaction network produced for identifying drug targets using network topological properties. This study has provided the opportunity to expand the range of potential drug targets and to move towards optimal target-based strategies.

  19. Arthropods on plants in a fragmented Neotropical dry forest: a functional analysis of area loss and edge effects.

    PubMed

    González, Ezequiel; Salvo, Adriana; Valladares, Graciela

    2015-02-01

    Loss and fragmentation of natural ecosystems are widely recognized as the most important threats to biodiversity conservation, with Neotropical dry forests among the most endangered ecosystems. Area and edge effects are major factors in fragmented landscapes. Here, we examine area and edge effects and their interaction, on ensembles of arthropods associated to native vegetation in a fragmented Chaco Serrano forest. We analyzed family richness and community composition of herbivores, predators, and parasitoids on three native plant species in 12 fragments of varying size and at edge/interior positions. We also looked for indicator families by using Indicator Species Analysis. Loss of family richness with the reduction of forest fragment area was observed for the three functional groups, with similar magnitude. Herbivores were richer at the edges without interaction between edge and area effects, whereas predators were not affected by edge/interior position and parasitoid richness showed an interaction between area and position, with a steeper area slope at the edges. Family composition of herbivore, predator, and parasitoid assemblages was also affected by forest area and/or edge/interior situation. We found three indicator families for large remnants and five for edges. Our results support the key role of forest area for conservation of arthropods taxonomic and functional diversity in a highly threatened region, and emphasize the need to understand the interactions between area and edge effects on such diversity.

  20. Impacts of different plant functional types on ambient ozone predictions in the Seoul Metropolitan Areas (SMAs), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-K.; Woo, J.-H.; Park, R. S.; Song, C. H.; Kim, J.-H.; Ban, S.-J.; Park, J.-H.

    2014-07-01

    Plant functional type (PFT) distributions affect the results of biogenic emission modeling as well as O3 and particulate matter (PM) simulations using chemistry-transport models (CTMs). This paper analyzes the variations of both surface biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions and O3 concentrations due to changes in the PFT distributions in the Seoul Metropolitan Areas, Korea. The Fifth-Generation NCAR/Pennsylvania State Meso-scale Model (MM5)/the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN)/the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE)/the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations were implemented over the Seoul Metropolitan Areas in Korea to predict surface O3 concentrations for the period of 1 May to 31 June 2008. Starting from a performance check of CTM predictions, we consecutively assessed the effects of PFT area deviations on the MEGAN BVOC and CTM O3 predictions, and we further considered the basis of geospatial and statistical analyses. The three PFT data sets considered were (1) the Korean PFT, developed with Korea-specific vegetation database; (2) the CDP PFT, adopted from the community data portal (CDP) of US National Center for Atmospheric Research in the United States (NCAR); (3) MODIS PFT, reclassified from the NASA Terra and Aqua combined land cover products. Although the CMAQ performance check reveals that all of the three different PFT data sets are applicable choices for regulatory modeling practice, noticeable primary data (i.e., PFT and Leaf Area Index (LAI)) was observed to be missing in many geographic locations. Based on the assessed effect of such missing data on CMAQ O3 predictions, we found that this missing data can cause spatially increased bias in CMAQ O3. Thus, it must be resolved in the near future to obtain more accurate biogenic emission and chemistry transport modeling results. Comparisons of MEGAN biogenic emission results with the three different PFT data showed that broadleaf

  1. Application of CryoSat-2 data product for DEM generation in Dome-A summit area, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    fang, W.; Cheng, X.; Hui, F.

    2012-12-01

    Currently available Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Dome A were originally derived from radar altimetry data (ERS-1/2, GLAS/ICESat), and later improved by GPS measurements. The relatively low resolution and coverage poses a problem, especially for the regional research. CryoSat-2 with SIRAL (SAR/Interferometric Altimeter) was launched on 8 April 2010, providing an alternative for high-density and high-accuracy acquisition of terrain point data. The inclination of the satellite's orbit is 92°, and the orbit can approach latitude of 88°. The repeat period of 369 days provides a high orbit crossover density (10 crossovers km-2 year-1 at 87°) with a 30-day sub-cycle. In this study, we collected ten months (March to December 2011) of successive CryoSat-2 Low Rate Mode level 2 (LRM L2) datasets. Two types of filters were applied to remove additional elevation outliers. These filtering procedures excluded 5.95% of the original data. According to the distribution of the point data, terrain modeling of grid DEM, interpolation method of Kriging (ordinary Kriging), and a grid resolution of 200m is chosen for DEM generation in this study. Finally, we used the satellite's monthly revisits with non-repeated coverage and present a novel DEM of 900 km2 in the Dome A region centered at Kunlun Station (80°25‧01″S, 77°06‧58″E). It shows that the topography of the Dome A region is saddle-shaped, with a northern peak and a southern peak. We used a subtraction method to compare the novel DEM with the previous DEM of GPS measurements. The elevation differences exhibit a positive average elevation bias. It may be due to the penetration of the Ku-band radar wave into the soft snow. As a first approximation based on the statistics of the height differences, we estimate that the average penetration depth of the CryoSat-2 Ku-band wave in this area is 1 m. Map of surface topography over the Dome A region generated from CryoSat-2 data. Contours are smoothed. The contour interval

  2. Generating and Evaluation Leaf Area Index (LAI) from MODIS MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) Surface Reflectance Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Park, T.; Yan, K.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; CHOI, S.; Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Myneni, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    This study generates and evaluates prototype Leaf Area Index (LAI) product based on MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF, commonly known as surface reflectance) which is a product of MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) package. LAI is a key parameter of vegetation in characterizing interactions of energy and mass between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. On the other hand, MAIAC BRF is retrieved from a new atmospheric correction algorithm, which has higher spatial resolution and is believed to have more reliable cloud/aerosol detection technique than standard MODIS BRF product. Two main objectives of this study are: 1). Maintaining the radiative transfer theory based LAI algorithm's look up table (LUT) unchanged, to compare LAI product retrieved from different versions of BRF products (MODIS collection 5, collection 6 and MAIAC); 2). To adjust the LUT to resolve LAI's possible systematic discrepancies resulting from atmospheric correction methods within the input BRF other than our LAI algorithm. Before the LUT adjusting, comparing to standard MODIS products shows that MAIAC LAI product will overestimate among herbaceous biome types which have low LAI values, while underestimate among woody biome types which have relatively higher values. Based on the theory of radiative transfer of canopy spectral invariants, two biome and MAIAC specific configurable parameters (Single Scattering Albedo and Uncertainty) in the LUT are adjusted to minimize the inconsistency due to input BRFs. Experiments shows that our new result: 1). has good agreement with field measured data (e.g. DIRECT); 2) is consistent with standard MODIS LAI product.

  3. The Contributions of Working Memory and Executive Functioning to Problem Representation and Solution Generation in Algebraic Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kerry; Ng, Ee Lynn; Ng, Swee Fong

    2009-01-01

    Solving algebraic word problems involves multiple cognitive phases. The authors used a multitask approach to examine the extent to which working memory and executive functioning are associated with generating problem models and producing solutions. They tested 255 11-year-olds on working memory (Counting Recall, Letter Memory, and Keep Track),…

  4. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  5. Two-point generating function of the free energy for a directed polymer in a random medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prolhac, Sylvain; Spohn, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    We consider a (1 + 1)-dimensional directed continuum polymer in a Gaussian delta-correlated spacetime random potential. For this model the moments (= replica) of the partition function, Z(x, t), can be expressed in terms of the attractive δ-Bose gas on the line. Based on a recent study of the structure of the eigenfunctions, we compute the generating function for Z(x1, t), Z(x2, t) under a particular decoupling assumption and thereby extend recent results on the one-point generating function of the free energy to two points. It is established that in the long-time limit the fluctuations of the free energy are governed by the two-point distribution of the Airy process, which further supports that the long-time behavior of the KPZ equation is the same as derived previously for lattice growth models.

  6. Activity and function recognition for moving and static objects in urban environments from wide-area persistent surveillance inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, Georgiy; Bobick, Aaron; Jones, Eric

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we describe results from experimental analysis of a model designed to recognize activities and functions of moving and static objects from low-resolution wide-area video inputs. Our model is based on representing the activities and functions using three variables: (i) time; (ii) space; and (iii) structures. The activity and function recognition is achieved by imposing lexical, syntactic, and semantic constraints on the lower-level event sequences. In the reported research, we have evaluated the utility and sensitivity of several algorithms derived from natural language processing and pattern recognition domains. We achieved high recognition accuracy for a wide range of activity and function types in the experiments using Electro-Optical (EO) imagery collected by Wide Area Airborne Surveillance (WAAS) platform.

  7. New class of filter functions generated most directly by Christoffel-Darboux formula for Gegenbauer orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilić, Aleksandar D.; Pavlović, Vlastimir D.

    2011-01-01

    A new original formulation of all pole low-pass filter functions is proposed in this article. The starting point in solving the approximation problem is a direct application of the Christoffel-Darboux formula for the set of orthogonal polynomials, including Gegenbauer orthogonal polynomials in the finite interval [-1, +1] with the application of a weighting function with a single free parameter. A general solution for the filter functions is obtained in a compact explicit form, which is shown to enable generation of the Gegenbauer filter functions in a simple way by choosing the value of the free parameter. Moreover, the proposed solution with the same criterion of approximation could be used to generate Legendre and Chebyshev filter functions of the first and second kind as well. The examples of proposed filter functions of even (10th) and odd (11th) order are illustrated. The approximation is shown to yield a good compromise solution with respect to the filter frequency characteristics (magnitude as well as phase characteristics). The influence of tolerance of the filter critical component (inductor) on the proposed magnitude and group delay characteristics of a resistively terminated LC lossless ladder filter is analysed as well. The proposed filter functions are superior in terms of the excellent magnitude characteristic, which approximates an ideal filter almost perfectly over the entire pass-band range and exhibits the summed sensitivity function better than that of a Butterworth filter. In the article, we present the filter function solution that exhibits optimum amplitude as well as optimum group delay characteristics that are of crucial importance for implementation of digital processing as well as RF analogue parts of communication networks. Derivation of the other band range filter functions, which could be realised either by continuous or digital filters, is also generally possible with the procedure proposed in this article.

  8. Lagged Associations of Metropolitan Statistical Area- and State-Level Income Inequality with Cognitive Function: The Health and Retirement Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Griffin, Beth Ann; Kabeto, Mohammed; Escarce, José; Langa, Kenneth M.; Shih, Regina A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Much variation in individual-level cognitive function in late life remains unexplained, with little exploration of area-level/contextual factors to date. Income inequality is a contextual factor that may plausibly influence cognitive function. Methods In a nationally-representative cohort of older Americans from the Health and Retirement Study, we examined state- and metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level income inequality as predictors of individual-level cognitive function measured by the 27-point Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS-m) scale. We modeled latency periods of 8–20 years, and controlled for state-/metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level and individual-level factors. Results Higher MSA-level income inequality predicted lower cognitive function 16–18 years later. Using a 16-year lag, living in a MSA in the highest income inequality quartile predicted a 0.9-point lower TICS-m score (β = -0.86; 95% CI = -1.41, -0.31), roughly equivalent to the magnitude associated with five years of aging. We observed no associations for state-level income inequality. The findings were robust to sensitivity analyses using propensity score methods. Conclusions Among older Americans, MSA-level income inequality appears to influence cognitive function nearly two decades later. Policies reducing income inequality levels within cities may help address the growing burden of declining cognitive function among older populations within the United States. PMID:27332986

  9. Assessment of soil GHG emission in different functional zones of Moscow urbanized areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizirskaya, Maria; Epikhina, Anna; Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo; Mazirov, Il'ya

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations are increasing rapidly, causing global climate changes. Growing concentrations of CO2, CH4 and N2O are occurring not only as a result of industry activity, but also from changes in land use and type of land management due to urbanization. Up to now there were not so many studies in Russia that dealt with urbanization effects (functional zoning, land-use type, soil contamination etc.) on GHG emission from the soil in spatial-temporal variability at the local and regional scale. The aim of our study is to provide the analysis of soil CO2, N2O and CH4 efflux's response to different biotic and abiotic factors, as well as to management activities and anthropogenic impact in different functional zones of the city. The principal objects of our study are representative urban landscapes with different land-use practices, typical for urbanized area. The varieties of urban ecosystems are represented by urban forest, green lawns with different functional subzoning and agro landscapes (16 sites in total). Forest sites have been studied during 7 years and they are differing in mezorelief (small hill summit and two slopes). Green lawns vary in level of human impact (normal, medium and high) and are represented by managed and non-managed lawns. Agro landscapes are represented by two crop types: barley and grass mixture (oats and vetch) with till and no-till cultivation. In each plot we measured: soil respiration in field conditions using system based on IR-gas analyzer Li- COR 820, CH4 and N2O emission using the method of exposition chamber. Samples were taken from soil exposition chamber by syringe, and then analyzed on gas chromatograph. The measurements with Li-COR have been done on 10 days base since June till October 2013, and till September by exposition chamber in 5 replicas per plot. The conducted research have shown high spatial and temporal variability of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes due to functional zoning, slope, vegetation type

  10. Amphiphilic block copolymers as flexible membrane materials generating structural and functional mimics of green bacterial antenna complexes.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Timlin, J A; Anthony, S M; Montaño, G A

    2016-08-11

    We describe the ability of a short-chain amphiphilic block copolymer to self-assemble to form an artificial supramolecular light-harvesting system. Specifically, we demonstrate that the 2.5 kDa, poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(butadiene) (PEO-b-PBD), exhibits sufficient morphological flexibility as a membrane material and enables generation of mimics of three-dimensional chlorosomes as well as supported membrane bilayers containing energy acceptors. This overall architecture replicates green bacterial light-harvesting function whereby these assemblies exhibit long-range order and three-dimensional morphology similar to native chlorosomes and are capable of energy transfer internally and to external acceptors, located in a supporting biomimetic polymer membrane. Unlike native green bacterial systems that use multiple lipids as a matrix to generate the appropriate environment for chlorosome assembly and function, the described system matrix is comprised entirely of a single polymer amphiphile. This work demonstrates the potential of short-chain amphiphilic block copolymers in generating self-assembled, bio-mimetic membrane architectures, and in doing so, generates scalable, spatial-energetic landscapes for photonic applications. Finally, the results presented provide evidence of minimal requirements to induce chlorosome-like organization and function. PMID:27481550

  11. A hybrid WDM/OCDMA ring with a dynamic add/drop function based on Fourier code for local area networks.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Kyu; Hosoya, Kenta; Lee, Chung Ghiu; Hanawa, Masanori; Park, Chang-Soo

    2011-03-28

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a hybrid WDM/OCDMA ring with a dynamic add/drop function based on Fourier code for local area networks. Dynamic function is implemented by mechanically tuning the Fourier encoder/decoder for optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) encoding/decoding. Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) is utilized for node assignment and 4-chip Fourier code recovers the matched signal from the codes. For an optical source well adapted to WDM channels and its short optical pulse generation, reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers (RSOAs) are used with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and gain-switched. To demonstrate we experimentally investigated a two-node hybrid WDM/OCDMA ring with a 4-chip Fourier encoder/decoder fabricated by cascading four FBGs with the bit error rate (BER) of <10(-9) for the node span of 10.64 km at 1.25 Gb/s.

  12. A cytoplasmic RNA virus generates functional viral small RNAs and regulates viral IRES activity in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Kuo-Feng; Hung, Chuan-Tien; Hsieh, Po-Ting; Li, Mei-Ling; Chen, Guang-Wu; Kung, Yu-An; Huang, Peng-Nien; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chen, Li-Lien; Lin, Jing-Yi; Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Chen, Shu-Jen; Tang, Petrus; Horng, Jim-Tong; Huang, Hsing-I; Wang, Jen-Ren; Ojcius, David M.; Brewer, Gary; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2014-01-01

    The roles of virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) have been studied in plants and insects. However, the generation and function of small RNAs from cytoplasmic RNA viruses in mammalian cells remain unexplored. This study describes four vsRNAs that were detected in enterovirus 71-infected cells using next-generation sequencing and northern blots. Viral infection produced substantial levels (>105 copy numbers per cell) of vsRNA1, one of the four vsRNAs. We also demonstrated that Dicer is involved in vsRNA1 generation in infected cells. vsRNA1 overexpression inhibited viral translation and internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) activity in infected cells. Conversely, blocking vsRNA1 enhanced viral yield and viral protein synthesis. We also present evidence that vsRNA1 targets stem-loop II of the viral 5′ untranslated region and inhibits the activity of the IRES through this sequence-specific targeting. Our study demonstrates the ability of a cytoplasmic RNA virus to generate functional vsRNA in mammalian cells. In addition, we also demonstrate a potential novel mechanism for a positive-stranded RNA virus to regulate viral translation: generating a vsRNA that targets the IRES. PMID:25352551

  13. Accuracy of fuzzy burned area mapping as a function of the aerosol parameterization of atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Ramin; Stroppiana, Daniela; Bresciani, Mariano; Giardino, Claudia; Boschetti, Mirco; Brivio, Pietro A.

    2013-10-01

    Mediterranean forests are every year affected by wildfires which have a significant effect on the ecosystem. Mapping burned areas is an important field of application for optical remote sensing techniques and several methodologies have been developed in order to improve mapping accuracy. We developed an automated procedure based on spectral indices and fuzzy theory for mapping burned areas from atmospherically corrected Landsat TM images. The algorithm proved to provide consistent accuracy over Mediterranean areas. We further tested algorithm's performance to assess the influence of the atmospheric correction on the accuracy of burned areas. In particular, we ran the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) code with different Atmospheric Optical Thickness (AOT) levels and two aerosol models (continental and maritime) on one TM image acquired over Portugal (12/08/2003). Burned area maps derived from atmospherically corrected images and from the non corrected image (Top Of Atmosphere, TOA) have been analyzed. In the output burned areas maps the omission error varies in the range 4.6-6.5% and the commission error fluctuates between 11.9 and 22.2%; the highest omission (commission) errors occur with the continental (maritime) model. The accuracy of burned area maps derived from non corrected image is very low, with omission error greater than 90%. These results show that, although atmospheric correction is needed for the application of the algorithm, the AOT value does not significantly affect the performance.

  14. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Jantine; Pescatore, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the

  15. Neuronal functional connection graphs among multiple areas of the rat somatosensory system during spontaneous and evoked activities.

    PubMed

    Zippo, Antonio G; Storchi, Riccardo; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele Eliseo M

    2013-01-01

    Small-World Networks (SWNs) represent a fundamental model for the comprehension of many complex man-made and biological networks. In the central nervous system, SWN models have been shown to fit well both anatomical and functional maps at the macroscopic level. However, the functional microscopic level, where the nodes of a network are represented by single neurons, is still poorly understood. At this level, although recent evidences suggest that functional connection graphs exhibit small-world organization, it is not known whether and how these maps, potentially distributed in multiple brain regions, change across different conditions, such as spontaneous and stimulus-evoked activities. We addressed these questions by analyzing the data from simultaneous multi-array extracellular recordings in three brain regions of rats, diversely involved in somatosensory information processing: the ventropostero-lateral thalamic nuclei, the primary somatosensory cortex and the centro-median thalamic nuclei. From both spike and Local Field Potential (LFP) recordings, we estimated the functional connection graphs by using the Normalized Compression Similarity for spikes and the Phase Synchrony for LFPs. Then, by using graph-theoretical statistics, we characterized the functional topology both during spontaneous activity and sensory stimulation. Our main results show that: (i) spikes and LFPs show SWN organization during spontaneous activity; (ii) after stimulation onset, while substantial functional graph reconfigurations occur both in spike and LFPs, small-worldness is nonetheless preserved; (iii) the stimulus triggers a significant increase of inter-area LFP connections without modifying the topology of intra-area functional connections. Finally, investigating computationally the functional substrate that supports the observed phenomena, we found that (iv) the fundamental concept of cell assemblies, transient groups of activating neurons, can be described by small

  16. Neuronal Functional Connection Graphs among Multiple Areas of the Rat Somatosensory System during Spontaneous and Evoked Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zippo, Antonio G.; Storchi, Riccardo; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele Eliseo M.

    2013-01-01

    Small-World Networks (SWNs) represent a fundamental model for the comprehension of many complex man-made and biological networks. In the central nervous system, SWN models have been shown to fit well both anatomical and functional maps at the macroscopic level. However, the functional microscopic level, where the nodes of a network are represented by single neurons, is still poorly understood. At this level, although recent evidences suggest that functional connection graphs exhibit small-world organization, it is not known whether and how these maps, potentially distributed in multiple brain regions, change across different conditions, such as spontaneous and stimulus-evoked activities. We addressed these questions by analyzing the data from simultaneous multi-array extracellular recordings in three brain regions of rats, diversely involved in somatosensory information processing: the ventropostero-lateral thalamic nuclei, the primary somatosensory cortex and the centro-median thalamic nuclei. From both spike and Local Field Potential (LFP) recordings, we estimated the functional connection graphs by using the Normalized Compression Similarity for spikes and the Phase Synchrony for LFPs. Then, by using graph-theoretical statistics, we characterized the functional topology both during spontaneous activity and sensory stimulation. Our main results show that: (i) spikes and LFPs show SWN organization during spontaneous activity; (ii) after stimulation onset, while substantial functional graph reconfigurations occur both in spike and LFPs, small-worldness is nonetheless preserved; (iii) the stimulus triggers a significant increase of inter-area LFP connections without modifying the topology of intra-area functional connections. Finally, investigating computationally the functional substrate that supports the observed phenomena, we found that (iv) the fundamental concept of cell assemblies, transient groups of activating neurons, can be described by small

  17. Alloantibody Generation and Effector Function Following Sensitization to Human Leukocyte Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Allorecognition is the activation of the adaptive immune system to foreign human leukocyte antigen (HLA) resulting in the generation of alloantibodies. Due to a high polymorphism, foreign HLA is recognized by the immune system following transplant, transfusion, or pregnancy resulting in the formation of the germinal center and the generation of long-lived alloantibody-producing memory B cells. Alloantibodies recognize antigenic epitopes displayed by the HLA molecule on the transplanted allograft and contribute to graft damage through multiple mechanisms, including (1) activation of the complement cascade resulting in the formation of the MAC complex and inflammatory anaphylatoxins, (2) transduction of intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal rearrangement, growth, and proliferation of graft vasculature, and (3) immune cell infiltration into the allograft via FcγR interactions with the FC portion of the antibody. This review focuses on the generation of HLA alloantibody, routes of sensitization, alloantibody specificity, and mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft damage. PMID:26870045

  18. Mesh generation/refinement using fractal concepts and iterated function systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bova, S. W.; Carey, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of mesh generation is proposed which is based on the use of fractal concepts to derive contractive, affine transformations. The transformations are constructed in such a manner that the attractors of the resulting maps are a union of the points, lines and surfaces in the domain. In particular, the mesh nodes may be generated recursively as a sequence of points which are obtained by applying the transformations to a coarse background mesh constructed from the given boundary data. A Delaunay triangulation or similar edge connection approach can then be performed on the resulting set of nodes in order to generate the mesh. Local refinement of an existing mesh can also be performed using the procedure. The method is easily extended to three dimensions, in which case the Delaunay triangulation is replaced by an analogous 3D tesselation.

  19. Supersymmetry-generated jost functions and nucleon–nucleon scattering phase shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Bhoi, J. Laha, U.

    2015-10-15

    By exploiting the supersymmetry-inspired factorization method higher partial wave Jost solutions and functions for nuclear Hulthen potential are constructed from the knowledge of the ground state wave function. As a case study the nucleon–nucleon scattering phase shifts are computed for partial waves ℓ = 0, 1, and 2.

  20. Meixner Class of Non-commutative Generalized Stochastic Processes with Freely Independent Values II. The Generating Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożejko, Marek; Lytvynov, Eugene

    2011-03-01

    Let T be an underlying space with a non-atomic measure σ on it. In [ Comm. Math. Phys. 292, 99-129 (2009)] the Meixner class of non-commutative generalized stochastic processes with freely independent values, {ω=(ω(t))_{tin T}} , was characterized through the continuity of the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. In this paper, we derive a generating function for these orthogonal polynomials. The first question we have to answer is: What should serve as a generating function for a system of polynomials of infinitely many non-commuting variables? We construct a class of operator-valued functions {Z=(Z(t))_{tin T}} such that Z( t) commutes with ω( s) for any {s,tin T}. Then a generating function can be understood as {G(Z,ω)=sum_{n=0}^infty int_{T^n}P^{(n)}(ω(t_1),dots,ω(t_n))Z(t_1)dots Z(t_n)} {σ(dt_1) dots σ(dt_n)} , where {P^{(n)}(ω(t_1),dots,ω(t_n))} is (the kernel of the) n th orthogonal polynomial. We derive an explicit form of G( Z, ω), which has a resolvent form and resembles the generating function in the classical case, albeit it involves integrals of non-commuting operators. We finally discuss a related problem of the action of the annihilation operators {partial_t,t in T} . In contrast to the classical case, we prove that the operators ∂ t related to the free Gaussian and Poisson processes have a property of globality. This result is genuinely infinite-dimensional, since in one dimension one loses the notion of globality.

  1. High-surface-area, dual-function oxygen electrocatalysts for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, David O.; Moniz, Gary; Taylor, E. Jennings

    1987-01-01

    The processes of hydration/dehydration and carbonation/decarbonation are investigated as an approach to provide higher surface area mixed metal oxides that are more active electrochemically. These materials are candidates for use as electrocatalysts and electrocatalyst supports for alkaline electrolyzers and fuel cells. For the case of the perovskite, LaCoO3 , higher surface areas were achieved with no change in structure and a more active oxygen electrocatalyst.

  2. Functional Characterisation of the Extrastriate Body Area Based on the N1 ERP Component

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John C.; Roberts, Mark V.; Downing, Paul E.; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    Electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging evidence points to the existence of neural populations that respond strongly and selectively to the appearance of the human body and its parts. However, the relationship between ERP and fMRI markers of these populations remains unclear. Here we used a previously identified functional dissociation…

  3. Metallic elements in PM2.5 in different functional areas of Korea: Concentrations and source identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Ji; Kim, Hyun-Woong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Pyung-Rae; Kim, Woo-Jin

    2015-02-01

    Both PM2.5 mass concentration and its chemical composition are a great concern to human health. In this study, the concentrations of PM2.5 and their metallic elements were measured to identify the characteristics and to trace sources at two different functional areas, a residential and a cement industrial area. The average PM2.5 concentrations were not significantly different between the two sites, but their chemical compositions were clearly different. Crustal elements in PM2.5 were significantly higher in the residential area, while the concentrations of metals typically emitted from anthropogenic sources were generally higher in the cement industrial area. Crustal elements often increased during spring in the residential area due to the blustery weather with high wind speeds; however, most metallic elements were enhanced during winter in the cement industrial area. Principal component analysis was used to trace the sources. Soil re-suspension, traffic-related sources, and asphalt concrete production were identified as the main sources of PM2.5 in the residential area, while the cement industry, Ni-Cr plating industry, and other industrial activities were identified in the cement industrial area.

  4. Income and Employment Generation in Rural Areas in Relation to Alternative Farm Programs (with Special Emphasis on the North Central Region).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heady, Earl O.; Sonka, Steven T.

    Four alternative government farm policies were analyzed to determine their effect upon farm income and employment generation in rural areas and agriculturally related industries. A linear programming model of interregional competition was used to determine the impact of alternative farm policies on the quantity of major commodities produced, the…

  5. From FASTQ to Function: In Silico Methods for Processing Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Preston, Mark D; Stabler, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a method to process C. difficile whole-genome next-generation sequencing data straight from the sequencer. Quality control processing and de novo assembly of these data enable downstream analyses such as gene annotation and in silico multi-locus strain-type identification. PMID:27507331

  6. A Simple and Inexpensive Function Generator and a Four-Electrode Cell for Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albahadily, F. N.; Mottola, Horacio A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes construction and operation of an inexpensive signal generator and a four-electrode electrochemical cell for use in voltammetric experiments. Also describes construction and operation of a four-electrode electrochemical cell used to illustrate elimination (or minimization) of background currents due to electrochemical reactions by species…

  7. From FASTQ to Function: In Silico Methods for Processing Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Preston, Mark D; Stabler, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a method to process C. difficile whole-genome next-generation sequencing data straight from the sequencer. Quality control processing and de novo assembly of these data enable downstream analyses such as gene annotation and in silico multi-locus strain-type identification.

  8. MODULATING EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC GENERATING UNITS AS A FUNCTION OF METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electric Generating Units (EGUs) are an important source of emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), which react with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of sunlight to form ozone. Emissions from EGUs are believed to vary depending on short-term demands for electricity;...

  9. Computer generation of symbolic network functions - A new theory and implementation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alderson, G. E.; Lin, P.-M.

    1972-01-01

    A new method is presented for obtaining network functions in which some, none, or all of the network elements are represented by symbolic parameters (i.e., symbolic network functions). Unlike the topological tree enumeration or signal flow graph methods generally used to derive symbolic network functions, the proposed procedure employs fast, efficient, numerical-type algorithms to determine the contribution of those network branches that are not represented by symbolic parameters. A computer program called NAPPE (for Network Analysis Program using Parameter Extractions) and incorporating all of the concepts discussed has been written. Several examples illustrating the usefulness and efficiency of NAPPE are presented.

  10. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures with different functions strongly suggest that additional molecular complexes with unknown properties may exist in fungal pathogens. Moreover, the identification of these novel complexes has stimulated the search of new immunogens with potential to protect human and animal hosts against systemic mycoses. PMID:22787459

  11. Generation and tooth contact analysis of spiral bevel gears with predesigned parabolic functions of transmission errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Lee, Hong-Tao

    1989-01-01

    A new approach for determination of machine-tool settings for spiral bevel gears is proposed. The proposed settings provide a predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors and the desired location and orientation of the bearing contact. The predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors is able to absorb piece-wise linear functions of transmission errors that are caused by the gear misalignment and reduce gear noise. The gears are face-milled by head cutters with conical surfaces or surfaces of revolution. A computer program for simulation of meshing, bearing contact and determination of transmission errors for misaligned gear has been developed.

  12. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures with different functions strongly suggest that additional molecular complexes with unknown properties may exist in fungal pathogens. Moreover, the identification of these novel complexes has stimulated the search of new immunogens with potential to protect human and animal hosts against systemic mycoses.

  13. A Robust High Throughput Platform to Generate Functional Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Using Rabbit B Cells from Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Seeber, Stefan; Ros, Francesca; Thorey, Irmgard; Tiefenthaler, Georg; Kaluza, Klaus; Lifke, Valeria; Fischer, Jens André Alexander; Klostermann, Stefan; Endl, Josef; Kopetzki, Erhard; Pashine, Achal; Siewe, Basile; Kaluza, Brigitte; Platzer, Josef; Offner, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust platform to generate and functionally characterize rabbit-derived antibodies using B cells from peripheral blood. The rapid high throughput procedure generates a diverse set of antibodies, yet requires only few animals to be immunized without the need to sacrifice them. The workflow includes (i) the identification and isolation of single B cells from rabbit blood expressing IgG antibodies, (ii) an elaborate short term B-cell cultivation to produce sufficient monoclonal antigen specific IgG for comprehensive phenotype screens, (iii) the isolation of VH and VL coding regions via PCR from B-cell clones producing antigen specific and functional antibodies followed by the sequence determination, and (iv) the recombinant expression and purification of IgG antibodies. The fully integrated and to a large degree automated platform (demonstrated in this paper using IL1RL1 immunized rabbits) yielded clonal and very diverse IL1RL1-specific and functional IL1RL1-inhibiting rabbit antibodies. These functional IgGs from individual animals were obtained at a short time range after immunization and could be identified already during primary screening, thus substantially lowering the workload for the subsequent B-cell PCR workflow. Early availability of sequence information permits one to select early-on function- and sequence-diverse antibodies for further characterization. In summary, this powerful technology platform has proven to be an efficient and robust method for the rapid generation of antigen specific and functional monoclonal rabbit antibodies without sacrificing the immunized animal. PMID:24503933

  14. A robust high throughput platform to generate functional recombinant monoclonal antibodies using rabbit B cells from peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Stefan; Ros, Francesca; Thorey, Irmgard; Tiefenthaler, Georg; Kaluza, Klaus; Lifke, Valeria; Fischer, Jens André Alexander; Klostermann, Stefan; Endl, Josef; Kopetzki, Erhard; Pashine, Achal; Siewe, Basile; Kaluza, Brigitte; Platzer, Josef; Offner, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust platform to generate and functionally characterize rabbit-derived antibodies using B cells from peripheral blood. The rapid high throughput procedure generates a diverse set of antibodies, yet requires only few animals to be immunized without the need to sacrifice them. The workflow includes (i) the identification and isolation of single B cells from rabbit blood expressing IgG antibodies, (ii) an elaborate short term B-cell cultivation to produce sufficient monoclonal antigen specific IgG for comprehensive phenotype screens, (iii) the isolation of VH and VL coding regions via PCR from B-cell clones producing antigen specific and functional antibodies followed by the sequence determination, and (iv) the recombinant expression and purification of IgG antibodies. The fully integrated and to a large degree automated platform (demonstrated in this paper using IL1RL1 immunized rabbits) yielded clonal and very diverse IL1RL1-specific and functional IL1RL1-inhibiting rabbit antibodies. These functional IgGs from individual animals were obtained at a short time range after immunization and could be identified already during primary screening, thus substantially lowering the workload for the subsequent B-cell PCR workflow. Early availability of sequence information permits one to select early-on function- and sequence-diverse antibodies for further characterization. In summary, this powerful technology platform has proven to be an efficient and robust method for the rapid generation of antigen specific and functional monoclonal rabbit antibodies without sacrificing the immunized animal.

  15. The origins of metamodality in visual object area LO: Bodily topographical biases and increased functional connectivity to S1

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Zohar; Geva, Ran; Amedi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence from blind participants suggests that visual areas are task-oriented and sensory modality input independent rather than sensory-specific to vision. Specifically, visual areas are thought to retain their functional selectivity when using non-visual inputs (touch or sound) even without having any visual experience. However, this theory is still controversial since it is not clear whether this also characterizes the sighted brain, and whether the reported results in the sighted reflect basic fundamental a-modal processes or are an epiphenomenon to a large extent. In the current study, we addressed these questions using a series of fMRI experiments aimed to explore visual cortex responses to passive touch on various body parts and the coupling between the parietal and visual cortices as manifested by functional connectivity. We show that passive touch robustly activated the object selective parts of the lateral–occipital (LO) cortex while deactivating almost all other occipital–retinotopic-areas. Furthermore, passive touch responses in the visual cortex were specific to hand and upper trunk stimulations. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis suggests that LO is functionally connected to the hand area in the primary somatosensory homunculus (S1), during hand and shoulder stimulations but not to any of the other body parts. We suggest that LO is a fundamental hub that serves as a node between visual-object selective areas and S1 hand representation, probably due to the critical evolutionary role of touch in object recognition and manipulation. These results might also point to a more general principle suggesting that recruitment or deactivation of the visual cortex by other sensory input depends on the ecological relevance of the information conveyed by this input to the task/computations carried out by each area or network. This is likely to rely on the unique and differential pattern of connectivity for each visual area with the rest of the

  16. The origins of metamodality in visual object area LO: Bodily topographical biases and increased functional connectivity to S1.

    PubMed

    Tal, Zohar; Geva, Ran; Amedi, Amir

    2016-02-15

    Recent evidence from blind participants suggests that visual areas are task-oriented and sensory modality input independent rather than sensory-specific to vision. Specifically, visual areas are thought to retain their functional selectivity when using non-visual inputs (touch or sound) even without having any visual experience. However, this theory is still controversial since it is not clear whether this also characterizes the sighted brain, and whether the reported results in the sighted reflect basic fundamental a-modal processes or are an epiphenomenon to a large extent. In the current study, we addressed these questions using a series of fMRI experiments aimed to explore visual cortex responses to passive touch on various body parts and the coupling between the parietal and visual cortices as manifested by functional connectivity. We show that passive touch robustly activated the object selective parts of the lateral-occipital (LO) cortex while deactivating almost all other occipital-retinotopic-areas. Furthermore, passive touch responses in the visual cortex were specific to hand and upper trunk stimulations. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis suggests that LO is functionally connected to the hand area in the primary somatosensory homunculus (S1), during hand and shoulder stimulations but not to any of the other body parts. We suggest that LO is a fundamental hub that serves as a node between visual-object selective areas and S1 hand representation, probably due to the critical evolutionary role of touch in object recognition and manipulation. These results might also point to a more general principle suggesting that recruitment or deactivation of the visual cortex by other sensory input depends on the ecological relevance of the information conveyed by this input to the task/computations carried out by each area or network. This is likely to rely on the unique and differential pattern of connectivity for each visual area with the rest of the

  17. Functional connectivity associated with hand shape generation: Imitating novel hand postures and pantomiming tool grips challenge different nodes of a shared neural network.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Clauwaert, Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that imitating meaningless hand postures and pantomiming tool-related hand shapes rely on different neuroanatomical substrates. We investigated the BOLD responses to different tasks of hand posture generation in 14 right handed volunteers. Conjunction and contrast analyses were applied to select regions that were either common or sensitive to imitation and/or pantomime tasks. The selection included bilateral areas of medial and lateral extrastriate cortex, superior and inferior regions of the lateral and medial parietal lobe, primary motor and somatosensory cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral and dorsal premotor cortices. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during hand shape generation the BOLD-response of every region correlated significantly with every other area regardless of the hand posture task performed, although some regions were more involved in some hand postures tasks than others. Based on between-task differences in functional connectivity we predict that imitation of novel hand postures would suffer most from left superior parietal disruption and that pantomiming hand postures for tools would be impaired following left frontal damage, whereas both tasks would be sensitive to inferior parietal dysfunction. We also unveiled that posterior temporal cortex is committed to pantomiming tool grips, but that the involvement of this region to the execution of hand postures in general appears limited. We conclude that the generation of hand postures is subserved by a highly interconnected task-general neural network. Depending on task requirements some nodes/connections will be more engaged than others and these task-sensitive findings are in general agreement with recent lesion studies. PMID:26095674

  18. Functional connectivity associated with hand shape generation: Imitating novel hand postures and pantomiming tool grips challenge different nodes of a shared neural network.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Clauwaert, Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that imitating meaningless hand postures and pantomiming tool-related hand shapes rely on different neuroanatomical substrates. We investigated the BOLD responses to different tasks of hand posture generation in 14 right handed volunteers. Conjunction and contrast analyses were applied to select regions that were either common or sensitive to imitation and/or pantomime tasks. The selection included bilateral areas of medial and lateral extrastriate cortex, superior and inferior regions of the lateral and medial parietal lobe, primary motor and somatosensory cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral and dorsal premotor cortices. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during hand shape generation the BOLD-response of every region correlated significantly with every other area regardless of the hand posture task performed, although some regions were more involved in some hand postures tasks than others. Based on between-task differences in functional connectivity we predict that imitation of novel hand postures would suffer most from left superior parietal disruption and that pantomiming hand postures for tools would be impaired following left frontal damage, whereas both tasks would be sensitive to inferior parietal dysfunction. We also unveiled that posterior temporal cortex is committed to pantomiming tool grips, but that the involvement of this region to the execution of hand postures in general appears limited. We conclude that the generation of hand postures is subserved by a highly interconnected task-general neural network. Depending on task requirements some nodes/connections will be more engaged than others and these task-sensitive findings are in general agreement with recent lesion studies.

  19. Probability function of breaking-limited surface elevation. [wind generated waves of ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, C. C.; Huang, N. E.; Yuan, Y.; Long, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of wave breaking on the probability function of surface elevation is examined. The surface elevation limited by wave breaking zeta sub b(t) is first related to the original wave elevation zeta(t) and its second derivative. An approximate, second-order, nonlinear, non-Gaussian model for zeta(t) of arbitrary but moderate bandwidth is presented, and an expression for the probability density function zeta sub b(t) is derived. The results show clearly that the effect of wave breaking on the probability density function of surface elevation is to introduce a secondary hump on the positive side of the probability density function, a phenomenon also observed in wind wave tank experiments.

  20. GESTATIONAL ATRAZINE EXPOSURE IN THE RAT: EFFECTS ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION IN MULTIPLE GENERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorotriazine herbicides currently represent the most heavily used of all agricultural pesticides, with atrazine being the most common of these chemicals. Rodent toxicology studies indicate that atrazine can disrupt endocrine function and among its effects is an increased in...