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Sample records for area history volume

  1. Archaeology and History of Lake Ray Roberts. Volume 2. Construction Area Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-09

    twenty years old that were born in Texas, thereby making this area slightly older than tract 109. Out of a total of 1,284 adults and children in...34more than 37,000 years old " (1957:8) suggest an early date for the site although a number of questions have been raised (Skinner et al. 1982). Better... excercise , the distributional patterns of the tools and of the non- artifactual remains from Test Unit 2 also were examined (Figures 3-7d and 3-7e). Only

  2. Dinetah: Navajo History. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessel, Robert A., Jr.

    Using archaeological data, written chronicles of Spanish explorers and missionaries, and oral narratives and legends, the book traces the history of the Navajo people to their original homeland, Dinetah, located primarily off the present reservation in an area south and east of Farmington, New Mexico. The book discusses various theories on Navajo…

  3. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, R.

    1998-07-01

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  4. Command History, 1970. Volume 1. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    Lo REGSTR____ LL) 0ý10 COMANIS TORY & ...,.<VOLUME I copy Nio, 86_-OF 150 COPIES ~tL~ D FT~ ’~ LMACV S 000 570-71 hip ~mdsm mewk ast;* HEADQUARTERS...programs, or the reader has been referred to the applicable volume of previous MACV Command Histories. Additional information on subjects discussed in the...VII.3Z2 UNCLASSIFIED xlv Bak ru d . . . . . . . .. .NI• UNCLASSIFIED Chapter Page TRAINING ....................... ....................... VII-33

  5. Indonesian Basic Course: Volume XIV. Outline of History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This 10-unit volume dealing with historical events in Indonesia is used in the advanced phase of the Indonesian Basic Course for United States military personnel. The objectives of the course are: (1) to relate the significant history of the area, (2) to expand the student's vocabulary, and (3) to develop the student's linguistic skills. The ten…

  6. Contemporary Navajo Affairs: Navajo History Volume III, Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, Norman K.

    Written specifically for Navajo junior high through college students, but also serving those interested in modern reservation developments and processs, the third volume of a curricular series on Navajo history provides a synthesis of data and pictorial records on current events in the areas of Navajo government, economic development, and health.…

  7. Command History 1970. Volume 3. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    the government. The last and most serious attempt occurred at the National Congress meeting held 27-29 Dec 69. At that meeting strong political...to SECSTATE, 12211130016Z Jun 70, Subj, Meeting with Three Nation Task Force on Ccmbodia (C), Gp.-3. / 81. Meg (C), MACJ213-1 to AMG 70S4...Command History iWTOP SECRET - NOT RELEASABLE TO FOREIGN NATIONALS . The Security classification of this volume is SECRET -,NOT RELEASABLE TO FOREIGN

  8. History of 100-B Area

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1989-10-01

    The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

  9. Library History Revisited: Research Areas and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byberg, Lis

    This paper discusses research areas and methods related to library history. The first section outlines research areas, including activities such as services to children in public libraries, mobile libraries, cataloging rules and practice, classification rules and practices, development of bibliographies, organization models, literature offered to…

  10. Early volcanic history of the Rabaul area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Chris O.; Duncan, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    We conducted an extensive program of 40Ar-39Ar age determinations on a suite of 27 volcanic rock samples from key stratigraphic units at Rabaul, Papua New Guinea in order to improve understanding of the early eruption history of the multiple volcanic systems present in the area. Analyses of whole rock, plagioclase and groundmass separates yielded statistically significant ages for 24 samples. Replicate analyses (groundmass, plagioclase) for 17 of the samples provided concordant ages. The oldest systems in the Rabaul area (>1 Ma to ≈300 ka) are in the south, associated with the caldera-like Varzin Depression, and in the north, at the stratovolcanoes Watom and Tovanumbatir. The earliest known activity of the Rabaul system occurred between about 330 and 200 ka and involved emplacement of lava flows and scoria deposits. Major explosive activity at the Rabaul system commenced at about 200 ka and produced a sequence of dacitic ignimbrites that culminated with the emplacement of the large-volume Malaguna Pyroclastics at about 160 ka. Calderas may have been formed as a consequence of the large volumes of tephra produced during some of these eruptions. Products of the early activity are found in the northern and northeastern walls of Rabaul Caldera and on the northeastern flank of Tovanumbatir. This leads to the conclusion that the source of the early activity at Rabaul probably was located in the northern part of the present caldera complex. A shift in the focus of activity at the Rabaul system took place between about 160 and 125 ka. All of the younger (<125 ka) major pyroclastic formations, including the Karavia Welded Tuff, the Barge Tunnel Ignimbrite and the Latlat Pyroclastics, which make up the bulk of the exposure in the southern and western walls of Rabaul Caldera, were erupted from a source or sources in the south-central part of the complex. The stratovolcanoes Palangiangia and Kabiu, which flank the northeastern part of the complex, had commenced activity by

  11. Vignettes of Military History. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    inch thick with the dough , and a fire built under the oven when the. .* dough has become sufficiently hardened, the vessel is to be launched and .,-•. l...not leave to history whether the Germans .. continued trading with the deceitful York State boys. Submitted by Michael J. Winey VI SOURE :. Winey Call

  12. Command History. 1967. Volume 1. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-01-01

    militated against employment of the g-,",al reserve as a true national reserve force and did not permit full flexibility of employment to meet the ever...KOREA 63 COMUSMACTHAI 64 CINCUSARPAC 65 CINCPACFL’r 66 CINCPACAF 67 CC FMFPAC 68 COMSEVENTHFLT 69 NATIONAL WAR COLLEGE 70 INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE OF THE...insuf- ficient coverage to meet their requirements are invited to forward recommendations to this headquarters (Attention: Military History Branch). 6RW

  13. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  14. Command History, 1971. Volume 1. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    AME A AODRESS0’ i different from ControlInj Office) 15. SECURITY CLASS. (of... areas during 1971 is desrribed below. [ I S PAGE REGPADED UNCLASSIFIED Order Sec Army By ipAkM per :..s- - 841424 ;,, A - ~Ban Raving *~ I A ’ Shau V alley...gVal R- Ada96 Road .44~~l _1 fta 1 , 614U044 . 2 eotsBseAmi( A 4.? L- -6097 III- 5 Z ’PL91 Base Areas in MR I (C) Base Area 112 was reconfigured

  15. Command History. 1968. Volume 1. Sanitized.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    thousands of homeless refugees created by the Tet attacks, Project Recovery was instituted to provide emergency assistance in the form of food ...population, and most of its territory. Thus, there will be no attacks around the principal populated areas, or in the food - - producing areas of North...With control of the people, the enemy would have most of the ingredients for success: food , supplies, money, manpower, concealment, and intelligence

  16. Volumes and surface areas of pendular rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.

    1958-01-01

    A packing of spheres is taken as a suitable model of porous media. The packing may be regular and the sphere size may be uniform, but in general, both should be random. Approximations are developed to give the volumes and surface areas of pendular rings that exist at points of sphere contact. From these, the total free volume and interfacial specific surface area are derived as expressive of the textural character of the packing. It was found that the log-log plot of volumes and surface areas of pendular rings vary linearly with the angle made by the line joining the sphere centers and the line from the center of the largest sphere to the closest edge of the pendular ring. The relationship, moreover, was found not to be very sensitive to variation in the size ratio of the spheres in contact. It also was found that the addition of pendular ring material to various sphere packings results in an unexpected decrease in the surface area of the boundaries that confine the resulting pore space. ?? 1958 The American Institute of Physics.

  17. Command History. 1969. Volume 1. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-01-01

    VN was not all fought in RVN. In L.aos, for eNample, the UJS-supported detern itton of the R1,,0 to resist NVN’s invasion kept NVA troops octucpied...significant, but not one to her primary priorities which were the aftermath of the invasion of Czechoslavakia and her conflict with Communist China...Central Highlands. 5. Lying eitirely belov.-the Tropic of Cancer , the area had a hot and humid climate. The monthly ’neon temperature was about 800 -F

  18. History and status of the area postrema.

    PubMed

    Borison, H L

    1984-12-01

    The history of morphological and functional studies on the area postrema (AP) is traced for significant landmarks from 1896, when its name was conferred by Retzius, to 1960 when the foundation of inquiry had become firmly set. A comparative anatomical survey of the medulla oblongata identifies the AP in mammals and birds but not in amphibians and lower phyla even though other members of the so-called circumventricular organ system are represented in the more ancient creatures. Existence of the AP in reptiles is insufficiently documented. The transition from water- to land-dwelling animal life affords propitious neural remodeling for the emergence of the AP in evolving species. No vital role is known to be served by the AP. Nonetheless, its physical interposition between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid and its shared functions with the nucleus tractus solitarii indicate a capability for widespread somatovisceral influence in response to particular perturbations. It is suggested that the diverse systemic expressions of postremal activation are encompassed in the general syndrome of nausea and vomiting.

  19. SRP engineering and design history, Vol III, 200 F and H Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Banick, C.J.

    2000-04-17

    This volume combines the record of events relating to the development of design for both the 200-F and H Areas. Chronologically, the definition of plant facilities was first established for the 200-F Area. The second area, 200-H, was projected initially to be a supplementary plutonium separations facility. This history explains the differences in character and capacity of the manufacturing facilities in both areas as production requirements and experience with separations processes advanced.

  20. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 9: Portland Area, 1966-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The ninth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Portland Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) The Context (early history of the Oregon Territory, geography and tribal…

  1. The physical basis of glacier volume-area scaling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, D.B.; Meier, M.F.; Peckham, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Ice volumes are known for only a few of the roughly 160,000 glaciers worldwide but are important components of many climate and sea level studies which require water flux estimates. A scaling analysis of the mass and momentum conservation equations shows that glacier volumes can be related by a power law to more easily observed glacier surface areas. The relationship requires four closure choices for the scaling behavior of glacier widths, slopes, side drag and mass balance. Reasonable closures predict a volume-area scaling exponent which is consistent with observations, giving a physical and practical basis for estimating ice volumes. Glacier volume is insensitive to perturbations in the mass balance scaling, but changes in average accumulation area ratios reflect significant changes in the scaling of both mass balance and ice volume. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. ISABELLE. Volume 3. Experimental areas, large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This section presents the papers which resulted from work in the Experimental Areas portion of the Workshop. The immediate task of the group was to address three topics. The topics were dictated by the present state of ISABELLE experimental areas construction, the possibility of a phased ISABELLE and trends in physics and detectors.

  3. Volume 3 - Area Sources and Area Source Method Abstracts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nonpoint (area) source emission reference materials from the EIIP. Provides nonpoint source guidance on planning, emissions estimation, data collection, inventory documentation and reporting, and quality assurance/quality control.

  4. Reduced olfactory bulb volume in adults with a history of childhood maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Negoias, Simona; Symmank, Anja; Schellong, Julia; Joraschky, Peter; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The human olfactory bulb (OB) is the first relay station of the olfactory pathway and may have the potential for postnatal neurogenesis in early childhood. In animals, chronic stress affects the OB and olfactory functioning. For humans, it has been shown that major depressive disorder is accompanied by reduced OB volume and reduced olfactory function. However, it is not clear if major stress in childhood development also affects olfactory functioning and OB volume in humans. OB volume was measured and olfactory function was tested in 17 depressive patients with and 10 without a history of severe childhood maltreatment (CM). CM patients exhibited a significantly reduced olfactory threshold and identification ability. The OB volume of the CM patients was significantly reduced to 80% of the non-CM patients. In conclusion, postnatal neurogenesis might be by reduced in CM, which may affect olfactory function of the brain in later life. Alternatively, a reduced OB volume may enhance psychological vulnerability in the presence of adverse childhood conditions although other areas not analyzed in this study may also be involved.

  5. Oral History Interview Transcripts Tombigbee Historic Townsites Project. Volume 5 (Interview Numbers 123-128).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Of STANDARDS-1963-A AL HISTORY INTERVIEW TRANSCR TOMBIGBEE HISTOMRIC TOWNSITES PROJECT AD ,Id4 3 5 Volume 5 (Interview Numbers 123 -128) Compiled by...HISTORY INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS TOMBIGBEE HISTORIC TOWNSITES PROJECT Volume 5 (Interview Nos. 123 -128) Compiled byJames N. McClurken and Peggy Uland...OH 123 Robert Adair. .. ......... ............. 761 OH 124 Jennie Mae Lenioir. .. ................... 788 OH 125

  6. Creative Ways to Teach the Mysteries of History, Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Ronald Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book is developed to make the teaching and learning of history a powerful and enjoyable experience in the classroom through the study of historical mysteries. What better place to snoop around and dig through mysterious graves than in history class? This book takes ten mysterious events in history from ancient Egypt to the 21st century for…

  7. Creative Ways to Teach the Mysteries of History, Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Ron H.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to make the teaching and learning of history a powerful and enjoyable experience in the classroom, changing the often-cited boring image of history for students and offering teachers an opportunity to go beyond the regular textbook. The book focuses on: (1) Varied active teaching ideas; (2) Ideas on how to get students…

  8. Effect of annealing history on free volume in thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St.clair, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two different types of thermoplastic glassy polymers have been investigated for the effects of thermal annealing on their free volumes. It has been observed that free volumes in glassy polymers decrease asymptotically to a steady level after about four thermal anneals lasting for 24 hours at a temperature about 50 C below their glass transition temperatures. These results indicate that composites incorporating properly annealed thermoplastic matrices may not experience any additional internal stresses due to subsequent thermal excursions experienced while in service.

  9. Calculus Students' Understanding of Area and Volume Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Units of measure are critical in many scientific fields. While instructors often note that students struggle with units, little research has been conducted about the nature and extent of these difficulties or why they exist. We investigated calculus students' unit use in area and volume computations. Seventy-three percent of students gave…

  10. The Cambridge History of the English Language. Volume VI: English in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algeo, John, Ed.

    This book is one volume in a series that examines the history of English. It traces the history of English in North America during the past 400 years, from its British background to its present position among the varieties of English used worldwide. Influences that have formed American English include political, social, and cultural changes in…

  11. World History. Volumes I and II. [Sahuarita High School Career Curriculum Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Judy

    Volumes I and II of a world history course, part of a high school career curriculum project, are outlined. Objectives are listed by course title. Course titles include: Early Communication - Languages and Writing; World History; Law and Order in Ancient Times; Early Transportation; Women in Ancient Times; Art and Literature in Ancient Times;…

  12. Using History of Mathematics to Teach Volume Formula of Frustum Pyramids: Dissection Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butuner, Suphi Onder

    2015-01-01

    Within recent years, history of mathematics (HoM) has become an increasingly popular topic. Studies have shown that student reactions to it depend on the ways they use history of mathematics. The present action research study aimed to make students deduce volume rules of frustum pyramids using the dissection method. Participants were 24 grade…

  13. Science in History, Volume 1: The Emergence of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, J. D.

    This volume, the first of four, includes the first three of the eight parts in the series. Part One states the major problems and includes some general discussion on the nature and method of science and on the place of science in society. Part Two deals with the emergence of science from the centers of Babylonia, Egypt and India to its full…

  14. Science in History, Volume 2: The Scientific and Industrial Revolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, J. D.

    This volume, the second of four, includes parts four and five of the eight parts in the series. Part Four deals with what is called the Scientific Revolution from 1440-1690. This "revolution" is divided into three phases: Phase 1 (1440-1540) includes the Renaissance and the Reformation, during which the world-picture adopted from classical times…

  15. A review of volume-area scaling of glaciers.

    PubMed

    Bahr, David B; Pfeffer, W Tad; Kaser, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Volume-area power law scaling, one of a set of analytical scaling techniques based on principals of dimensional analysis, has become an increasingly important and widely used method for estimating the future response of the world's glaciers and ice caps to environmental change. Over 60 papers since 1988 have been published in the glaciological and environmental change literature containing applications of volume-area scaling, mostly for the purpose of estimating total global glacier and ice cap volume and modeling future contributions to sea level rise from glaciers and ice caps. The application of the theory is not entirely straightforward, however, and many of the recently published results contain analyses that are in conflict with the theory as originally described by Bahr et al. (1997). In this review we describe the general theory of scaling for glaciers in full three-dimensional detail without simplifications, including an improved derivation of both the volume-area scaling exponent γ and a new derivation of the multiplicative scaling parameter c. We discuss some common misconceptions of the theory, presenting examples of both appropriate and inappropriate applications. We also discuss potential future developments in power law scaling beyond its present uses, the relationship between power law scaling and other modeling approaches, and some of the advantages and limitations of scaling techniques.

  16. A History of Satellite Reconnaissance. Volume 3A - GAMBIT (REDACTED)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-01

    characteristics, numbers, and placement of operational BYE 17017-74 ii handle via Byeman/ Talen Keyhole C.7..rtrois Only -TOP-SECRET NRO APPROVED FOR...contract between the Director, Special Projects, National Reconnaissance Office (Director, Program A), and Technology Service Corporation, of Santa Monica...flight histories in 1972, in association with Robert A . Butler, a consultant to Technology Service Corporation. At various times, parts of the

  17. Interrupting History: Rethinking History Curriculum after "The End of History". Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 404

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Robert John

    2011-01-01

    Since the emergence of postmodern social theory, history has been haunted by predictions of its imminent end. Postmodernism has been accused of making historical research and writing untenable, encouraging the proliferation of revisionist histories, providing fertile ground for historical denial, and promoting the adoption of a mournful view of…

  18. Brain volumes and neuropsychological performance are related to current smoking and alcoholism history

    PubMed Central

    Luhar, Riya B; Sawyer, Kayle S; Gravitz, Zoe; Ruiz, Susan Mosher; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Background Dual dependence on alcohol and nicotine is common, with many reports suggesting that more than 80% of alcoholics also smoke cigarettes. Even after cessation of alcohol consumption, many recovering alcoholics continue to smoke. In this exploratory study, we examined how current smoking and a history of alcoholism interacted in relation to brain volumes and neuropsychological performance. Methods Participants were 14 abstinent long-term alcoholics (seven current smokers and seven nonsmokers), and 13 nonalcoholics (six current smokers and seven nonsmokers). The groups were equivalent in age, gender, education, and intelligence quotient. Two multiecho magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MP-RAGE) scans were collected for all participants using a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a 32 channel head coil. Brain volumes for each gray and white matter region of interest were derived using FreeSurfer. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests measuring intelligence quotient, memory, executive functions, personality variables, and affect. Results Compared to nonsmoking nonalcoholics, alcoholics who smoke (the comorbid group) had volumetric abnormalities in: pre- and para-central frontal cortical areas and rostral middle frontal white matter; parahippocampal and temporal pole regions; the amygdala; the pallidum; the ventral diencephalic region; and the lateral ventricle. The comorbid group performed worse than nonsmoking nonalcoholics on tests of executive functioning and on visually-based memory tests. History of alcoholism was associated with higher neuroticism scores among smokers, and current smoking was associated with higher sensation seeking scores and lower extraversion scores among nonalcoholics. Conclusion Results from this exploratory study support and extend prior reports showing that alcoholism and smoking, alone and in combination, are associated with structural brain abnormalities and poorer

  19. Regular Topologies for Gigabit Wide-Area Networks. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shacham, Nachum; Denny, Barbara A.; Lee, Diane S.; Khan, Irfan H.; Lee, Danny Y. C.; McKenney, Paul

    1994-01-01

    In general terms, this project aimed at the analysis and design of techniques for very high-speed networking. The formal objectives of the project were to: (1) Identify switch and network technologies for wide-area networks that interconnect a large number of users and can provide individual data paths at gigabit/s rates; (2) Quantitatively evaluate and compare existing and proposed architectures and protocols, identify their strength and growth potentials, and ascertain the compatibility of competing technologies; and (3) Propose new approaches to existing architectures and protocols, and identify opportunities for research to overcome deficiencies and enhance performance. The project was organized into two parts: 1. The design, analysis, and specification of techniques and protocols for very-high-speed network environments. In this part, SRI has focused on several key high-speed networking areas, including Forward Error Control (FEC) for high-speed networks in which data distortion is the result of packet loss, and the distribution of broadband, real-time traffic in multiple user sessions. 2. Congestion Avoidance Testbed Experiment (CATE). This part of the project was done within the framework of the DARTnet experimental T1 national network. The aim of the work was to advance the state of the art in benchmarking DARTnet's performance and traffic control by developing support tools for network experimentation, by designing benchmarks that allow various algorithms to be meaningfully compared, and by investigating new queueing techniques that better satisfy the needs of best-effort and reserved-resource traffic. This document is the final technical report describing the results obtained by SRI under this project. The report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 contains a technical description of the network techniques developed by SRI in the areas of FEC and multicast of real-time traffic. Volume 2 describes the work performed under CATE. Volume 3 contains the source

  20. Teaching Tennessee History: Lesson Plans for the Classroom. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Lisa, Ed.

    These teacher developed lessons focus on the Civil War's impact on east Tennessee. The forum for develop ling the lessons includes a series of inservice lectures by experts in the areas of Civil War scholarship and interpretation, tours, and hands-on experiences at historic sites in the region. During the week-long program, teachers traveled…

  1. Teaching the History of Innovation: A History Institute for Teachers. Footnotes. Volume 13, Number 26

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy

    2008-01-01

    On October 18-19, 2008, FPRI's Wachman Center hosted 40 teachers from 21 states across the country for a weekend of discussion on teaching the history of innovation. The Institute was hosted by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. In his opening remarks, Walter A. McDougall noted that while Americans take for granted a frantic pace of change in…

  2. Rain volume estimation over areas using satellite and radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doneaud, Andre A.; Vonderhaar, T. H.; Johnson, L. R.; Laybe, P.; Reinke, D.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of 18 convective clusters demonstrates that the extension of the Area-Time-Integral (ATI) technique to the use of satellite data is possible. The differences of the internal structures of the radar reflectivity features, and of the satellite features, give rise to differences in estimating rain volumes by delineating area; however, by focusing upon the area integrated over the lifetime of the storm, it is suggested that some of the errors produced by the differences in the cloud geometries as viewed by radar or satellite are minimized. The results are good and future developments should consider data from different climatic regions and should allow for implementation of the technique in a general circulation model.

  3. Rain volume estimation over areas using satellite and radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doneaud, A. A.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of rain volume estimation over fixed and floating areas was investigated using rapid scan satellite data following a technique recently developed with radar data, called the Area Time Integral (ATI) technique. The radar and rapid scan GOES satellite data were collected during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) and North Dakota Cloud Modification Project (NDCMP). Six multicell clusters and cells were analyzed to the present time. A two-cycle oscillation emphasizing the multicell character of the clusters is demonstrated. Three clusters were selected on each day, 12 June and 2 July. The 12 June clusters occurred during the daytime, while the 2 July clusters during the nighttime. A total of 86 time steps of radar and 79 time steps of satellite images were analyzed. There were approximately 12-min time intervals between radar scans on the average.

  4. Rain volume estimation over areas using satellite and radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doneaud, A. A.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of the feasibility of rain volume estimation using satellite data following a technique recently developed with radar data called the Arera Time Integral was undertaken. Case studies were selected on the basis of existing radar and satellite data sets which match in space and time. Four multicell clusters were analyzed. Routines for navigation remapping amd smoothing of satellite images were performed. Visible counts were normalized for solar zenith angle. A radar sector of interest was defined to delineate specific radar echo clusters for each radar time throughout the radar echo cluster lifetime. A satellite sector of interest was defined by applying small adjustments to the radar sector using a manual processing technique. The radar echo area, the IR maximum counts and the IR counts matching radar echo areas were found to evolve similarly, except for the decaying phase of the cluster where the cirrus debris keeps the IR counts high.

  5. The Image Empire; A History of Broadcasting in the United States; From 1953. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnouw, Erik

    The year 1953 marks the point at which television in America began its dramatic expansion, and it also marks the starting point of the third and final volume of a history of broadcasting in the United States. The patterns of programing through this period are reviewed and summarized with attention to trends, but special consideration is given…

  6. SER-LARS, Volume 3. Learning Objective History II. 1975-76 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Intermediate Unit 23, Blue Bell, PA.

    The third of nine volumes in the SER-LARS (Special Education Resources Location Analysis and Retrieval System) series, a diagnostic-prescriptive instructional data bank for teachers of handicapped children, presents learning objectives organized by content descriptions. Entries give a history of the use of each objective along with information on…

  7. SER-LARS, Volume 4. Learning Objective History III. 1975-76 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Intermediate Unit 23, Blue Bell, PA.

    The fourth volume in the SER-LARS (Special Education Resources Location Analysis and Retrieval System) series, a diagnostic-prescriptive instructional data bank for teachers of handicapped children, presents a continuation of learning objectives organized by content descriptions. Entrees give a history of the use of each objective along with…

  8. Indian Education Confronts the Seventies. Five Volumes; Volume I: History and Background of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deloria, Vine, Jr., Ed.

    Presenting three position papers, this publication is the first in a series of five volumes on American Indian education. Papers are titled and authored as follows: (1) "Reflections on Contemporary Indian Education" (an introduction to this series, calling for reform via "Indianization" of Indian education) by Vine Deloria,…

  9. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 1, The ecosystem: Environments, biotas, and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. The history of the laboratory and the reasons for its support by the United States Department of Energy are described in Chapter 1 of Volume 1. Volume 1 provides a synthesis of the research carried out under the subject headings of the respective chapters. Certain of the chapters, e.g., those on geology, subtidal and intertidal environments and ecology, and those on reef processes and trophic relationships, summarize a great diversity of research carried out by many scientists for many years. In contrast, the chapters on meteorology and oceanography summarize research carried out under one integrated program involving fewer scientists working over a shorter period. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  10. Time history solution program, L225 (TEV126). Volume 1: Engineering and usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, R. I.; Tornallyay, A.; Clemmons, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Volume 1 of a two volume document is presented. The usage of the convolution program L225 (TEV 126) is described. The program calculates the time response of a linear system by convoluting the impulsive response function with the time-dependent excitation function. The convolution is performed as a multiplication in the frequency domain. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used to transform the product back into the time domain to obtain response time histories. A brief description of the analysis used is presented.

  11. World History (Volume Two): Upper Middle School Textbook for the Full-time Ten Year School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Contains a translation of the second volume of a two-volume world history textbook for senior secondary students published in China in 1978. This volume covers the period from 1848 to World War II. Particular attention is given to uprisings, rebellions, revolutions, and the development of the Communist movement. (AM)

  12. Vital capacities in acute and chronic airway obstruction: dependence on flow and volume histories.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, V; Pellegrino, R; Rodarte, J R

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether measurements of vital capacity (VC) are affected by the direction of the manoeuvre (inspiratory vs expiratory) and by the rate of expiratory flow. The study was performed on 25 individuals with chronic airway obstruction (CAO) and a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (expressed in standardized residuals (SR)) of -2.0+/-1.4 SD (CAO group), and 10 asthmatic subjects with methacholine (MCh)-induced bronchoconstriction (FEV1 -23+/-1.02 SR) (MCh group). VCs were measured during fast inspiration following both slow (FIVCse) and forced (FIVCfe) expiration from end-tidal inspiration to residual volume (RV), and during slow (EVC) or forced (FVC) expiration from total lung capacity (TLC). In the CAO group, FVC was the smallest volume (3.75+/-1.03 L) and significantly different from the other three estimates of VC; FIVCse (4.03+/-0.91 L) was the largest volume and significantly different from FVC and FIVCfe (3.83+/-0.98 L). In the MCh group, FVC (4.16+/-0.94 L) and EVC (4.19+/-0.89 L) were the largest volumes, although only the difference between FVC and FIVCfe (3.76+/-0.81 L) reached statistical significance. These data suggest that both flow and volume histories contribute to decreased vital capacities during bronchoconstriction. However, whereas increasing expiratory flow always tends to decrease vital capacity, the volume history of full inflation has different effects in chronic and acute bronchoconstriction, probably due to different effects on airway calibre. These results stress the importance of using standardized manoeuvres in order to obtain comparable values of vital capacity.

  13. STAGE 64: OUTPUT PROCESSOR PROGRAMMING SPECIFICATIONS MANUAL, VOLUME I. HISTORY PROGRAMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This volume contains a detailed description of the history programs used in the STAGE 64 Output Processor Programming Specifications. The STAGE ...Output Processor sorts, compiles tallies, and presents the output of the STAGE model in printed form. The complete program presently consists of 38...processes for each side, but in view of the fact that the processes are run under an executive control , new tasks can be added to the model as they are

  14. Multiple missions: The 300 Area in Hanford Site history

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides an historical overview of the role of the 300 Area buildings at the Hanford Reservation. Topics covered are: Early fuel fabrication at the Hanford site (313 and 314 Buildings); N reactor fuel fabrication in the 300 Area; 305 test pile was Hanford`s first operating reactor; Early process improvement chemical research (321 and 3706 Buildings); Major 1952 and 1953 expansions in the 300 area (325 and 329 Buildings); Early 300 area facilities constructed to support reactor development (326 and 327 Buildings); Hanford site ventures with the peaceful atom (309, 308 and 318 Buildings); Modern 300 Area Buildings; Significant miscellaneous buildings in the 300 area; 300 Area process waste handling and disposal.

  15. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 2, Biogeography and systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. Volume 2 of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll provides information on the taxonomy of animals and plants known to occur at Enewetak Atoll. The collections on which the checklists in each chapter are based are housed at the Bernice P. Bishop Museum in Honolulu and the US National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. In addition to the species checklists, each chapter in Volume 2 provides a succinct summary of the biota with respect to endemism, range extensions, and other features that set the Enewetak biota apart from those one might expect to find on equivalent Indo-Pacific islands. This compendium of taxonomic information for an atoll should prove of immense value to scientists interested in biogeography and evolutionary biology of island ecosystems for years to come. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  16. Family History Density of Alcoholism Relates to Left Nucleus Accumbens Volume in Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Cservenka, Anita; Gillespie, Alicia J; Michael, Paul G; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A family history of alcoholism is a significant risk factor for the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Because common structural abnormalities are present in reward and affective brain regions in alcoholics and those with familial alcoholism, the current study examined the relationship between familial loading of AUDs and volumes of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in largely alcohol-naive adolescents, ages 12–16 years (N = 140). Method: The amygdala and NAcc were delineated on each participant’s T1-weighted anatomical scan, using FMRIB Software Library’s FMRIB Integrated Registration & Segmentation Tool, and visually inspected for accuracy and volume outliers. In the 140 participants with accurate segmentation (75 male/65 female), subcortical volumes were represented as a ratio to intracranial volume (ICV). A family history density (FHD) score was calculated for each adolescent based on the presence of AUDs in first- and second-degree relatives (range: 0.03–1.50; higher scores represent a greater prevalence of familial AUDs). Multiple regressions, with age and sex controlled for, examined the association between FHD and left and right amygdala and NAcc volume/ICV. Results: There was a significant positive relationship between FHD and left NAcc volume/ICV (ΔR2 = .04, p = .02). Post hoc regressions indicated that this effect was only significant in females (ΔR2 = .11, p = .006). Conclusions: This finding suggests that the degree of familial alcoholism, genetic or otherwise, is associated with alterations in reward-related brain structure. Further work will be necessary to examine whether FHD is related to future alcohol-related problems and reward-related behaviors. PMID:25486393

  17. Comparison of Mammographic Density Assessed as Volumes and Areas among Women Undergoing Diagnostic Image-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gierach, Gretchen L.; Geller, Berta M.; Shepherd, John A.; Patel, Deesha A.; Vacek, Pamela M.; Weaver, Donald L.; Chicoine, Rachael E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fan, Bo; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Johnson, Jason M.; Herschorn, Sally D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD), the area of non-fatty appearing tissue divided by total breast area, is a strong breast cancer risk factor. Most MD analyses have employed visual categorizations or computer-assisted quantification, which ignore breast thickness. We explored MD volume and area, using a volumetric approach previously validated as predictive of breast cancer risk, in relation to risk factors among women undergoing breast biopsy. Methods Among 413 primarily white women, ages 40–65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies between 2007–2010 at an academic facility in Vermont, MD volume (cm3) was quantified in cranio-caudal views of the breast contralateral to the biopsy target using a density phantom, while MD area (cm2) was measured on the same digital mammograms using thresholding software. Risk factor associations with continuous MD measurements were evaluated using linear regression. Results Percent MD volume and area were correlated (r=0.81) and strongly and inversely associated with age, body mass index (BMI), and menopause. Both measures were inversely associated with smoking and positively associated with breast biopsy history. Absolute MD measures were correlated (r=0.46) and inversely related to age and menopause. Whereas absolute dense area was inversely associated with BMI, absolute dense volume was positively associated. Conclusions Volume and area MD measures exhibit some overlap in risk factor associations, but divergence as well, particularly for BMI. Impact Findings suggest that volume and area density measures differ in subsets of women; notably, among obese women, absolute density was higher with volumetric methods, suggesting that breast cancer risk assessments may vary for these techniques. PMID:25139935

  18. [Inspection of gas cylinders in storage at TA-54, Area L]. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-23

    ERC sampled, analyzed, and rcontainerized when necessary gas cylinders containing various chemicals in storage at LANL TA-54 Area L. This report summarizes the operation. This is Volume 2 of five volumes.

  19. The History of the Establishment and Management Philosophies of the Portuguese Protected Areas: Combining Written Records and Oral History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Bruno; Partidário, Maria

    2012-04-01

    The history of the establishment and management philosophies of the mainland Portuguese Protected Areas was reconstructed through the use of written records and oral history interviews. The objectives were to review the main philosophies in the creation and management of these areas, to assess the influence of international PA models, to compare the Portuguese case with other European and international literature concerning PAs and to discuss the value of the oral history in this research. As main results, it was found that the initial management model of "Wilderness (or Yellowstone)" was replaced by the "new paradigm" of PAs when the democracy was re-established. Changes in the management philosophies within this "new paradigm" were also identified, which resulted in the transition of a "Landscape" to a "Nature conservation" model. After the establishment of the Natura 2000 network, the "Biodiversity conservation" model prevailed. It was also found that the initiative for the establishment of most PAs came from the government, although there were few cases of creation due to the action of NGOs and municipalities. Finally, oral history interviews enabled the addition of information to the literature review, but also provided more insight and detail to this history.

  20. F-Area Northeast Expansion Report, Volumes 1

    SciTech Connect

    Syms, F.H.

    1999-08-23

    A geotechnical program has been complexed in F-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as the ''northeast expansion'' located in the F-Area.

  1. A Distillation of Subject-Matter Content for the Subject Areas of Geography and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, John S.; Schoch-Roberts, Lisa; Young-Reynolds, Sara

    This study was designed to provide schools, districts, and states with a means for identifying the knowledge and skills that are most important for students to learn for the subject areas of geography and history. Five state standards documents were selected to represent the exemplary content in geography and history. These documents were selected…

  2. Oral History Interview Transcripts Tombigbee Historic Townsites Project. Volume 1 (Interview Numbers 100-102).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    our project’s behalf. Don Dickerson and Chet Trout of the MSU Museum created the cover design for these volumes. The oral history program benefited ...remedies often. Well, she’d make up concoctions of bought stuff. I’ve seen her take honey, and ginger , and alum and mix it up and make a cough syrup out...taken it to town and got it ground. I don’t remember. U: Would she keep spices? A: Yes, she kept all kinds of allspice, cloves, cinnamon , nutmeg, and

  3. The history of aggregate development in the denver, Co area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    At the start of the 20th century Denver's population was 203,795. Most streets were unpaved. Buildings were constructed of wood frame or masonry. Transport was by horse-drawn-wagon or rail. Statewide, aggregate consumption was less than 0.25 metric tons per person per year. One hundred years later Denver had a population of 2,365,345. Today Denver is a major metropolitan area at the crossroads of two interstates, home to a new international airport, and in the process of expanding its light rail transit system. The skyline is punctuated with skyscrapers. The urban center is surrounded with edge cities. These changes required huge amounts of aggregate. Statewide, aggregate consumption increased 50 fold to over 13 metric tons per person per year. Denver has a large potential supply of aggregate, but sand and gravel quality decreases downstream from the mountain front and potential sources of crushed stone occur in areas prized for their scenic beauty. These issues, along with urban encroachment and citizen opposition, have complicated aggregate development and have paved a new path for future aggregate development including sustainable resource management and reclamation techniques.

  4. Late Tectonic history of Beaufort Sea - North Pacific area

    SciTech Connect

    McWhae, J.R.H.

    1985-02-01

    The Kaltag fault (and its northern associated splay, the Rapid fault array) is the sheared suture between the Eurasian-Alaskan plate and the North American plate in the area between the Mackenzie Delta and the Alaskan Border. This condition has been maintained throughout considerable additional phases of faulting and folding from mid-Cretaceous to the present. Previously, the Alaskan plate had been the northwestern nose of the North America plate. The interplate suture was deflected to the north as the Canadian Shield was approached. The Kaltag fault continued northeastward 2000 km seaward of the Sverdrup rim, northwest of the Canadian Arctic Island, and north of Greenland. The driving force was directed from the southwest by the Eurasian plate after its collision in Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) with the North American plate and the docking of north-moving exotic terranes from the Pacific. During the early Tertiary, perhaps in concert with the accretion of the Okhotsk block to the Asian plate north of Japan, the northern Pacific subduction zone jumped southward to the Aleutian Arc where it has persisted until today. A distance of 800 km separates the stable shelf of the Canadian craton, at the Alberta Foothills thrust belt, from the subduction zone off Vancouver Island. The foreland thrust belt and the accretion of exotic terranes in Mesozoic and Tertiary times extended the continental crust of the North American plate westward to the present active transform margin with the Pacific plate along the Queen Charlotte fault zone.

  5. Early Mesozoic history of the Black-Sea - Caucasus area

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmin, V.G. )

    1988-08-01

    Marginal basins with ocean crust existed in the Black Sea area in Triassic time behind a volcanic arc built on top of the Hercynian basement of Pontides. The eastern extension of the arc was in the fore-Caucasus. Triassic sediments and volcanics, formed in forearc basins, can be traced from the southern slope of the Great Caucasus (Svanetia) to the Karakaya belt of Turkey. These sediments were deformed at the end of the Triassic when terranes derived from Gondwana collided with the active margin of Paleotethys. In Svanetia a succession of middle Paleozoic clastics (the Dizi series) deposited at the base of the north-facing continental slope, presumably on the passive margin of Gondwana. The Dizi series is either an independent terrane or forms a western extension of Iran, which collided with Eurasia at the same time. Displacement of the subduction zone to the south of the accreted terranes was accompanied by a major episode of extension on the active margin in Early Jurassic time; the marginal sea of the Great Caucasus and the intra-Pontide basin in Turkey were opened. In the late Middle Jurassic, Pontides collided with Crimea, closing the Triassic proto-Black Sea. Immediately after collision, continental rifting commenced, once again separating Pontides from Eurasia and manifesting the birth of the Black Sea basin. Oceanic crust began to grow in the latter in Senonian time.

  6. Volume 3a - Area Source Methods - Additional Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nonpoint (area) source emission reference materials from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides nonpoint source guidance on ammonia emissions from natural landscapes, fertilized soils, and nonagricultural sources.

  7. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area and volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chengfeng; Lehrter, John C.; Hu, Chuanmin; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L-1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and volume were related to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived monthly estimates of river plume area (km2) and average, inner shelf chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a, mg m-3). River plume area in June was negatively related with midsummer hypoxic area (km2) and volume (km3), while July inner shelf Chl a was positively related to hypoxic area and volume. Multiple regression models using river plume area and Chl a as independent variables accounted for most of the variability in hypoxic area (R2 = 0.92) or volume (R2 = 0.89). These models explain more variation in hypoxic area than models using Mississippi River nutrient loads as independent variables. The results here also support a hypothesis that confinement of the river plume to the inner shelf is an important mechanism controlling hypoxia area and volume in this region.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II.

  9. The origin and history of alteration and carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain ignimbrites. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    This document contains Volume I of the report entitled The Origin and History of Alteration and Carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain Ignimbrites by Jerry S. Szymanski and a related correspondence with comments by Donald E. Livingston. In the Great Basin, the flow of terrestrial heat through the crust is affected in part by the flow of fluids. At Yucca Mountain, the role of fluids in crustal heat transport is manifested at the surface by youthful calcretes, sinters, bedrock veins, hydrothermal eruption breccias and hydrothermal alteration. This report discusses evidence for recent metasomatism high in the stratigraphic section at Yucca Mountain. Over the last several hundred years, episodes of calcite emplacement contemporaneous with local mafic volcanism have occurred at intervals that are not long in comparison with the isolation time required for a High-Level Radioactive Waste repository.

  10. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

  11. Path integral for stochastic inflation: Nonperturbative volume weighting, complex histories, initial conditions, and the end of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Steven

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we present a path integral formulation of stochastic inflation. Volume weighting can be naturally implemented from this new perspective in a very straightforward way when compared to conventional Langevin approaches. With an in-depth study of inflation in a quartic potential, we investigate how the inflaton evolves and how inflation typically ends both with and without volume weighting. The calculation can be carried to times beyond those accessible to conventional Fokker-Planck approaches. Perhaps unexpectedly, complex histories sometimes emerge with volume weighting. The reward for this excursion into the complex plane is an insight into how volume-weighted inflation both loses memory of initial conditions and ends via slow roll. The slow-roll end of inflation mitigates certain “Youngness Paradox”-type criticisms of the volume-weighted paradigm. Thus it is perhaps time to rehabilitate proper-time volume weighting as a viable measure for answering at least some interesting cosmological questions.

  12. Relationship between body size, fill volume, and mass transfer area coefficient in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Keshaviah, P; Emerson, P F; Vonesh, E F; Brandes, J C

    1994-04-01

    A peritoneal dialysate fill volume of 2 L has become the standard of clinical practice, but the relationships between body size, fill volume, and mass transfer area coefficient (KoA) have not been well established. These relationships were studied in 10 stable peritoneal dialysis patients who underwent six peritoneal equilibration studies (2 h each) at fill volumes of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3 L. The concentration-time profiles for urea, creatinine, and glucose were measured at each fill volume, and residual volumes were calculated from the preceding dwell period. A modified Henderson equation was used to calculate the KoA for the three solutes as a function of fill volume. By normalizing the KoA for each solute to the value at 2 L, the data for all three solutes collapsed onto the same trend line when plotting the normalized KoA versus dialysate volume. Between 0.5- and 2-L fill volumes, the average normalized KoA increases in an almost linear fashion, its value almost doubling over this range. Between 2- and 3-L fill volumes, there is less than a 10% change in the normalized KoA. However, fill volumes for peak urea KoA were found to increase with increasing body surface area (R = 0.76), being around 2.5 L for an average-sized patient and increasing to between 3 and 3.5 L for body surface areas > 2 m2. To maximize solute transport, these relationships between body size, volume, and KoA should be considered when choosing fill volumes for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and automated peritoneal dialysis and when deciding reserve and tidal volumes for tidal peritoneal dialysis.

  13. Exploring the unknown: Selected documents in the history of the US Civil Space Program. Volume 1; Organizing for exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Lear, Linda J. (Editor); Warren--Findley, Jannelle (Editor); Williamson, Ray A. (Editor); Day, Dwayne A. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    A selection of key documents in the history of the U.S. civil space program is presented. This volume deals with organizational developments of the space program. More than 200 documents are printed. Each is introduced by a headnote providing context, bibliographical information, and background information necessary to understanding the document. These are organized into four major sections, each beginning with an introductory essay that keys the documents to major events in the history of the space program.

  14. [Inspection of gas cylinders in storage at TA-54, Area L]. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-23

    ERC sampled, analyzed, and recontainerized when necessary gas cylinders containing various chemicals in storage at Los Alamos TA-54 Area L. A vapor containment structure was erected. A total of 179 cylinders was processed; 39 were repackaged; and 55 were decommissioned. This report summarizes the operation; this is Volume 1 of five volumes.

  15. A Pictorial History of the Code 717 Unmanned Systems Group: Air, Land, and Sea. Volume 1: 1970-1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-28

    including a drill press, band saw, sheet-metal sheer, and forming brake. To provide heat during the winter and protect the Unmanned Systems Branch’s...TECHNICAL DOCUMENT 3289 April 2016 A Pictorial History of the Code 717 Unmanned Systems Group: Air, Land, and Sea Volume 1: 1970–1999 H. R...the Code 717 Unmanned Systems Group: Air, Land, and Sea Volume 1: 1970–1999 H. R. Everett Approved for public release

  16. Cardiac output assessment using oxygen consumption estimated from the left ventricular pressure-volume area.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C; Bertolotti, Alejandro M; Gómez, Carmen B; Rodríguez Correa, Carlos A; Favaloro, Roberto R

    2010-01-01

    Use of a majority of structural variables (age, sex, height) to estimate oxygen consumption in the calculation of cardiac output (CO) by the Fick principle does not account for changes in physiological conditions. To improve this limitation, oxygen consumption was estimated based on the left ventricular pressure-volume area. A pilot study with 10 patients undergoing right cardiac catheterization showed that this approach was successful to estimate CO (r=0,73, vs. thermodilution measured CO). Further essays changing end-diastolic-volume in the pressure-volume area formula by body weight or body surface area showed that this last yielded the best correlation with the thermodilution measured CO (slope=1, ordinate =0.01 and r=0.93). These preliminary results indicate that use of a formula originated from the pressure-volume-area concept is a good alternative to estimate oxygen consumption for CO calculation.

  17. Positive pressure ventilation during anesthesia in dogs: Assessment of surface area derived tidal volume.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Doris H

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of surface area derived tidal volume in anesthetized ventilated dogs (n = 71, random assignment) compared to settings by experienced personnel. There was no significant difference (P = 0.1030) between methods (p(a)CO(2) of 43.1 ± 7 mmHg and 39.8 ± 7 mmHg, respectively). Surface area derived tidal volume can achieve satisfactory ventilation.

  18. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

  19. Mobile radio alternative systems study. Volume 2: Terrestrial. [rural areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, N.; Lester, H. L.; Anderson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Terrestrial systems for satisfying the markets for mobile radio services in non-urban areas of the United States in the years from 185 to 2000 were investigated. Present day mobile communication technologies, systems and equipment are described for background in evaluating the concepts generated. Average propagation ranges are calculated for terrestrial installations in each of seven physiographic areas of the contiguous states to determine the number of installations that would be required for nationwide coverage. Four system concepts are defined and analyzed to determine how well terrestrial systems can fulfill the requirements at acceptable costs. Nationwide dispatch, telephone and data services would require terrestrial installations in many locations where they would be used infrequently and would not recover their investment. Access to a roaming vehicle requires that the vehicle location be known within the range limit of the terrestrial installation in which the vehicle is present at the time of the call. Access to that installation must be made through the public switched telephone network, usually involving a long-distance toll charge, and requiring costly means to track or locate the vehicle as it moved through the network of installations.

  20. Subsurface contamination focus area technical requirements. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This is our vision, a vision that replaces the ad hoc or {open_quotes}delphi{close_quotes} method which is to get a group of {open_quotes}experts{close_quotes} together and make decisions based upon opinion. To fulfill our vision for the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), it is necessary to generate technical requirements or performance measures which are quantitative or measurable. Decisions can be supported if they are based upon requirements or performance measures which can be traced to the origin (documented) and are verifiable, i.e., prove that requirements are satisfied by inspection (show me), demonstration, analysis, monitoring, or test. The data from which these requirements are derived must also reflect the characteristics of individual landfills or plumes so that technologies that meet these requirements will necessarily work at specific sites. Other subjective factors, such as stakeholder concerns, do influence decisions. Using the requirements as a basic approach, the SCFA can depend upon objective criteria to help influence the areas of subjectivity, like the stakeholders. In the past, traceable requirements were not generated, probably because it seemed too difficult to do so. There are risks that the requirements approach will not be accepted because it is new and represents a departure from the historical paradigm.

  1. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 2: Papers and presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and panels. This volume contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.). Individual papers in this volume were abstracted and indexed for the database.

  2. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 1, Introduction and summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies or exercise. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. This volume, Volume 1, contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  3. Agricultural area impacts within a natural area: Cades cove, a case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratton, Susan Power; Mathews, Raymond C.; White, Peter S.

    1980-09-01

    Agricultural management in Cades Cove, an historic district in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, has affected natural resources both within the district and in the adjoining natural areas. Aquatic impacts of haying and cattle grazing included increases in water temperatures, turbidity, nutrient loading, and bacterial counts and decreases in benthic macroinvertebrate density and fish biomass. Wildlife populations, including groundhogs, wild turkeys, and white-tailed deer, have increased in the open fields and around the periphery of the historic district. Intensive deer foraging has removed deciduous seedlings and saplings from woodlots, lowering species diversity and favoring coniferous reproduction. Cades Cove has limestone habitats unique in the park, and both deer browse and cattle grazing may have disturbed populations of rare plant species. Effects on water quality are detectable at a campground 15 stream km from the agricultural area, and the effects of deer foraging extend about 1 km beyond the open fields. Since “historic landscape” preservation is presently a goal of the park, managing for open vistas in Cades Cove will require some sort of continuing disturbance. Conversion of cattle pastures to hayfields would reduce aquatic impacts but the deer herd might increase as a result of reduced competition for forage. Retarding old field succession would increase populations of native plant species dependent on sunlight, but would require government-funded mowing. Other options are discussed. Completely eliminating the effects of the historic district on adjoining areas may be impossible, at least under present economic constraints.

  4. Foundations of Education, Volume I: History and Theory of Teaching Children and Youths with Visual Impairments. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, M. Cay, Ed.; Koenig, Alan J., Ed.

    This text, one of two volumes on the instruction of students with visual impairments, focuses on the history and theory of teaching such students. The following chapters are included: (1) "Historical Perspectives" (Phil Hatlen) with emphasis on the last 50 years; (2) "Visual Impairment" (Kathleen M. Huebner) which provides general information…

  5. The terminal area simulation system. Volume 2: Verification cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, F. H.

    1987-01-01

    The numerical simulation of five case studies are presented and are compared with available data in order to verify the three-dimensional version of the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS). A spectrum of convective storm types are selected for the case studies. Included are: a High-Plains supercell hailstorm, a small and relatively short-lived High-Plains cumulonimbus, a convective storm which produced the 2 August 1985 DFW microburst, a South Florida convective complex, and a tornadic Oklahoma thunderstorm. For each of the cases the model results compared reasonably well with observed data. In the simulations of the supercell storms many of their characteristic features were modeled, such as the hook echo, BWER, mesocyclone, gust fronts, giant persistent updraft, wall cloud, flanking-line towers, anvil and radar reflectivity overhang, and rightward veering in the storm propagation. In the simulation of the tornadic storm a horseshoe-shaped updraft configuration and cyclic changes in storm intensity and structure were noted. The simulation of the DFW microburst agreed remarkably well with sparse observed data. The simulated outflow rapidly expanded in a nearly symmetrical pattern and was associated with a ringvortex. A South Florida convective complex was simulated and contained updrafts and downdrafts in the form of discrete bubbles. The numerical simulations, in all cases, always remained stable and bounded with no anomalous trends.

  6. Mi Carrera. Volume II: Exploring Five Vocational Areas = Explorando Cinco Areas Vocacionales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Sally; Douglas, Denise

    This curriculum guide is the second of a four-volume set that is intended to improve career and vocational guidance services to Spanish-speaking students in grades 9 through 12. The first section, an introduction to the teacher, includes a discussion of why students need vocational guidance, the goals and organization of the materials, a note on…

  7. An insight into the role of hydraulic history on the volume changes of anisotropic clayey soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Enrique; Jommi, Cristina

    2008-05-01

    Volume changes of natural and compacted soils induced by changes in their water content have many practical implications in the service life of earth dams, river and canal embankments, and waste disposal facilities. An insight into the overall strain response of a clayey soil upon gradual wetting and drying is provided here. Experimental data coming from oedometer and isotropic tests under suction and net stress control are presented for a compacted clay with an initial anisotropic fabric, highlighting the relevant role played by the hydraulic path on collapse, swelling, and shrinkage strains. Irreversible strains could be observed after wetting-drying paths and the subsequent drying-wetting cycle. Both stress and hydraulic histories play a role in the evolution of the directional fabric of clayey soils. The experimental data could be reproduced with a rather simple elastic-plastic constitutive model with a mixed isotropic-rotational hardening, previously conceived for saturated soils. The model is extended to unsaturated conditions by substituting the saturated effective stress with a measure of the average stress acting on the soil skeleton and by introducing generalized hardening rules governed by both plastic strains and degree of saturation. Coupling between the mechanical and the hydraulic behavior is provided by the water retention curve, in which degree of saturation is adopted as a useful measure of the soil water content.

  8. Teaching Military History--Why and How: A History Institute for Teachers. Footnotes. Volume 12, Number 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy

    2007-01-01

    On September 29-30, 2007, FPRI's Marvin Wachman Fund for International Education presented a weekend of discussion on "Teaching Military History: Why and How" for 35 teachers from 22 states across the country. The institute was held at the First Division Museum in Wheaton, Illinois and co-sponsored by the Cantigny First Division Foundation.…

  9. Teaching About the Military in American History: A History Institute for Teachers. Footnotes. Volume 12, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy

    2007-01-01

    On March 24-25, 2007 FPRI's Marvin Wachman Fund for International Education hosted 44 teachers from 23 states across the country for a weekend of discussion on teaching about the Military in U.S. history. The Institute was held at and co-sponsored by the Cantigny First Division Museum. Sessions included: (1) War and the Military in American…

  10. Essays on the History of Rocketry and Astronautics: Proceedings of the Third through the Sixth History Symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. C. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    This two volume publication presents the proceedings of the third through sixth history symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics. Thirty-nine papers are divided into four categories: (1) Early Solid Propellant Rocketry; (2) Rocketry and Astronautics: Concepts, Theory, and Analyses after 1880; (3) The Development of Liquid and Solid Propellant Rockets from 1880 to 1945; and (4) Rocketry and Astronautics after 1945. Categories 1 and 2 will be found in volume 1 and the remainder in volume 2. Among other diciplines, Rocketry and Astronautics encompasses the physical and engineering sciences including fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, vibration theory, structural mechanics, and celestial mechanics. Papers presented in these two volumes range from those of empirical experimenters who used the time-honored cut and try methods to scientists wielding theoretical principles. The work traces the coupling of the physical and engineering sciences, industrial advances, and state support that produced the awesome progress in rocketry and astronautics for the most part within living memory. The proceedings of the four symposia present in these two volumes contain information on the work of leading investigators and their associates carried out in the first two-thirds of the twentieth century.

  11. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI). Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI) were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p < 0.05); significantly lower condylar volume was observed in class II subjects, respect to class I and class III (p < 0.05). In the whole sample condylar volume (699.8 ± 63.07 mm3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p < 0.01) as well as condylar surface (423.24 ± 63.03 mm2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p < 0.01) were significantly higher in males than in females. Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population. PMID:23241136

  12. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds: An interim report: Volume 2, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.; Wallace, D.W.; Newcomer, D.R.; Schramke, J.A.; Chamness, M.A.; Cline, C.S.; Airhart, S.P.; Wilbur, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents information derived form the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the main text. This Volume contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text.

  13. Variation in the measurement of cranial volume and surface area using 3D laser scanning technology.

    PubMed

    Sholts, Sabrina B; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Flores, Louise M; Miller, Kevin W P; Walker, Phillip L

    2010-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) laser scanner models of human crania can be used for forensic facial reconstruction, and for obtaining craniometric data useful for estimating age, sex, and population affinity of unidentified human remains. However, the use of computer-generated measurements in a casework setting requires the measurement precision to be known. Here, we assess the repeatability and precision of cranial volume and surface area measurements using 3D laser scanner models created by different operators using different protocols for collecting and processing data. We report intraobserver measurement errors of 0.2% and interobserver errors of 2% of the total area and volume values, suggesting that observer-related errors do not pose major obstacles for sharing, combining, or comparing such measurements. Nevertheless, as no standardized procedure exists for area or volume measurements from 3D models, it is imperative to report the scanning and postscanning protocols employed when such measurements are conducted in a forensic setting.

  14. Soil volume estimation in debris flow areas using lidar data in the 2014 Hiroshima, Japan rainstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.

    2015-10-01

    Debris flows triggered by the rainstorm in Hiroshima, Japan on August 20th, 2014 produced extensive damage to the built-up areas in the northern part of Hiroshima city. In order to consider various emergency response activities and early-stage recovery planning, it is important to evaluate the distribution of the soil volumes in the debris flow areas immediately after the disaster. In this study, automated nonlinear mapping technique is applied to light detection and ranging (LiDAR)-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) observed before and after the disaster to quickly and accurately correct geometric locational errors of the data. The soil volumes generated from the debris flows are estimated by subtracting the pre- and post-event DEMs. The geomorphologic characteristics in the debris flow areas are discussed from the distribution of the estimated soil volumes.

  15. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 2: Aberdeen Area, 1965-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The second volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Aberdeen Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) Description of the Area (geography of the Area's Western Portion and…

  16. Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 52

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beineke, John A.

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance" is an exploration of research, ideas, trends, and practices for educators who teach American history to adolescents from the middle grades through high school. Higher education faculty in history and professional education will also find the book germane to their work. Topics within the…

  17. Hispanics in U.S. History. Volume 1: Through 1865. Volume 2: 1865 to the Present. The Newcomers Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Varona, Frank; And Others

    Each of these two textbooks on Hispanic-American history contains 4 units divided into 20 chapters. Each chapter includes an overarching question; text; reading comprehension questions; study tips; an activity involving geography skills, links between past and present, or daily life; an activity involving arts and technology or using primary…

  18. A seismologically consistent expression for the total area and volume of earthquake-triggered landsliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc, Odin; Hovius, Niels; Meunier, Patrick; Gorum, Tolga; Uchida, Taro

    2016-04-01

    We present a new, seismologically consistent expression for the total area and volume of populations of earthquake-triggered landslides. This model builds on a set of scaling relationships between key parameters, such as landslide spatial density, seismic ground acceleration, fault length, earthquake source depth, and seismic moment. To assess the model we have assembled and normalized a catalog of landslide inventories for 40 shallow, continental earthquakes. Low landscape steepness causes systematic overprediction of the total area and volume of landslides. When this effect is accounted for, the model predicts the total landslide volume of 63% of 40 cases to within a factor 2 of the volume estimated from observations (R2=0.76). The prediction of total landslide area is also sensitive to the landscape steepness, but less so than the total volume, and it appears to be sensitive to controls on the landslide size-frequency distribution, and possibly the shaking duration. Some outliers are likely associated with exceptionally strong rock mass in the epicentral area, while others may be related to seismic source complexities ignored by the model. However, the close match between prediction and estimate for about two thirds of cases in our database suggests that rock mass strength is similar in many cases and that our simple seismic model is often adequate, despite the variety of lithologies and tectonic settings covered. This makes our expression suitable for integration into landscape evolution models and application to the anticipation or rapid assessment of secondary hazards associated with earthquakes.

  19. Increased Training Volume Improves Bone Density and Cortical Area in Adolescent Football Players.

    PubMed

    Varley, Ian; Hughes, David C; Greeves, Julie P; Fraser, William D; Sale, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Habitual football participation has been shown to be osteogenic, although the specific volume of football participation required to cause bone adaptations are not well established. The aim of the present study is to investigate tibial bone adaptations in response to 12 weeks of increased training volume in elite adolescents who are already accustomed to irregular impact training. 99 male adolescent elite footballers participated (age 16±0 y; height 1.76±0.66 m; body mass 70.2±8.3 kg). Tibial scans were performed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography immediately before and 12 weeks after an increase in football training volume. Scans were obtained at 4, 14, 38 and 66% of tibial length. Trabecular density (mg/cm(3)), cortical density (mg/cm(3)), cross-sectional area, cortical area (mm(2)), cortical thickness (mm) and strength strain index (mm(3)) were assessed. Trabecular (4%) and cortical density (14, 38%), cortical cross-sectional area (14, 38%), total cross-sectional area (66%), cortical thickness (14, 38%) and strength strain index (14, 38%) increased following 12 weeks of augmented volume training (P<0.05). Increased density of trabecular and cortical compartments and cortical thickening were shown following an increased volume of training. These adaptive responses may have been enhanced by the adolescent status of the cohort, supporting the role of early exercise intervention in improving bone strength.

  20. An assessment of Landsat data acquisition history on identification and area estimation of corn and soybeans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixson, M. M.; Bauer, M. E.; Scholz, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    During the past decade, numerous studies have demonstrated the potential of satellite remote sensing for providing accurate and timely crop area information. This study assessed the impact of Landsat data acquisition history on classification and area estimation accuracy of corn and soybeans. Multitemporally registered Landsat MSS data from four acquisitions during the 1978 growing season were used in classification of eight sample segments in the U.S. Corn Belt. The results illustrate the importance of selecting Landsat acquisitions based on spectral differences in crops at certain growth stages.

  1. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  2. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  3. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  4. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  5. NEWE: A Western Shoshone History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Reno.

    One in a series of four histories of native Nevadans, this volume relates the history of the Western Shoshone, or Newe, whose territory included parts of the Great Basin area which extends from southern California to Idaho. Based on the spoken word of tribal elders and research conducted at numerous archives, the history begins with ancient…

  6. Generation of the relationship between glacier area and volume for a tropical glacier in Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Kinouchi, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Tsuda, M.; Iwami, Y.; Asaoka, Y.; Mendoza, J.

    2015-12-01

    In Andes, retreat of tropical glaciers is rapid, thus water resources currently available from glacierized catchments would be changed in its volume and temporal variations due to climate change and glacier shrinkage. The relationship between glacier area and volume is difficult to define however which is important to monitor glaciers especially those are remote or inaccessible. Water resources in La Paz and El Alto in Bolivia, strongly depend on the runoff from glacierized headwater catchments in the Cordillera Real, Andes, which is therefore selected as our study region.To predict annual glacier mass balances, PWRI-Distributed Hydrological Model (PWRI-DHM) was applied to simulate runoff from the partially glacierized catchments in high mountains (i.e. Condoriri-Huayna West headwater catchment located in the Cordillera Real, Bolivian Andes). PWRI-DHM is based on tank model concept in a distributed and 4-tank configuration including surface, unsaturated, aquifer, and river course tanks. The model was calibrated and validated with observed meteorological and hydrological data from 2011 to 2014 by considering different phases of precipitation, various runoff components from glacierized and non-glacierized areas, and the retarding effect by glacial lakes and wetlands. The model is then applied with MRI-AGCM outputs from 1987 to 2003 considering the shrinkage of glacier outlines since 1980s derived from Landsat data. Annual glacier mass balance in each 100m-grid was reproduced, with which the glacier area-volume relationship was generated with reasonable initial volume setting. Out study established a method to define the relationship between glacier area and volume by remote sensing information and glacier mass balances simulated by distributed hydrological model. Our results demonstrated that the changing trend of local glacier had a consistency the previous observed glacier area-volume relationship in the Cordillera Real.

  7. Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the US Civilian Space Program. Volume 3; Using Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Launius, Roger D. (Editor); Onkst, David H. (Editor); Garber, Stephen J. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important developments of the twentieth century has been the movement of humanity into space with machines and people. The underpinnings of that movement -why it took the shape it did; which individuals and organizations were involved; what factors drove a particular choice of scientific objectives and technologies to be used; and the political, economic, managerial, and international contexts in which the events of the space age unfolded- are all important ingredients of this epoch transition from an earthbound to spacefaring people. This desire to understand the development of spaceflight in the United States sparked this documentary history series. 'Exploring the Unknown' is a multi-volume series containing a selection of key documents in history of the U.S. civil space program. This current volume, Volume III, focusing on the use of space for practical applications, prints 112 key documents on the history of satellite communications, remote sensing of earth, and space as an investment in economic growth, edited for ease of use. Each is introduced by a headnote providing context, bibliographical information, and background information necessary to understanding the document.

  8. A Study on Sixth Grade Students' Misconceptions and Errors in Spatial Measurement: Length, Area, and Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan Sisman, Gulcin; Aksu, Meral

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to portray students' misconceptions and errors while solving conceptually and procedurally oriented tasks involving length, area, and volume measurement. The data were collected from 445 sixth grade students attending public primary schools in Ankara, Türkiye via a test composed of 16 constructed-response…

  9. Inducing Conservation of Number, Weight, Volume, Area, and Mass in Pre-School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Beverly S.

    The major question this study attempted to answer was, "Can conservation of number, area, weight, mass, and volume to be induced and retained by 3- and 4-year-old children by structured instruction with a multivariate approach? Three nursery schools in Iowa City supplied subjects for this study. The Institute of Child Behavior and Development…

  10. Supplementary motor area (SMA) volume is associated with psychotic aberrant motor behaviour of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stegmayer, Katharina; Horn, Helge; Federspiel, Andrea; Razavi, Nadja; Bracht, Tobias; Laimböck, Karin; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Wiest, Roland; Müller, Thomas J; Walther, Sebastian

    2014-07-30

    We aimed to investigate whether aberrant motor behavior in schizophrenia was associated with structural alterations in the motor system. Whole brain voxel based morphometry of patients with different severity of motor symptoms identified altered gray matter volume in the supplementary motor area (SMA), a key region of the motor system.

  11. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 8: Phoenix Area, 1966-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The eighth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Phoenix Area Office and the Tucson Sub-Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) The Context: Political and Geographic (the…

  12. The impact of surface area, volume, curvature, and Lennard-Jones potential to solvation modeling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc D; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2017-01-05

    This article explores the impact of surface area, volume, curvature, and Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential on solvation free energy predictions. Rigidity surfaces are utilized to generate robust analytical expressions for maximum, minimum, mean, and Gaussian curvatures of solvent-solute interfaces, and define a generalized Poisson-Boltzmann (GPB) equation with a smooth dielectric profile. Extensive correlation analysis is performed to examine the linear dependence of surface area, surface enclosed volume, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, mean curvature, and Gaussian curvature for solvation modeling. It is found that surface area and surfaces enclosed volumes are highly correlated to each other's, and poorly correlated to various curvatures for six test sets of molecules. Different curvatures are weakly correlated to each other for six test sets of molecules, but are strongly correlated to each other within each test set of molecules. Based on correlation analysis, we construct twenty six nontrivial nonpolar solvation models. Our numerical results reveal that the LJ potential plays a vital role in nonpolar solvation modeling, especially for molecules involving strong van der Waals interactions. It is found that curvatures are at least as important as surface area or surface enclosed volume in nonpolar solvation modeling. In conjugation with the GPB model, various curvature-based nonpolar solvation models are shown to offer some of the best solvation free energy predictions for a wide range of test sets. For example, root mean square errors from a model constituting surface area, volume, mean curvature, and LJ potential are less than 0.42 kcal/mol for all test sets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Relationship of serum estrogens and metabolites with area and volume mammographic densities.

    PubMed

    Gierach, Gretchen L; Patel, Deesha A; Falk, Roni T; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Geller, Berta M; Vacek, Pamela M; Weaver, Donald L; Chicoine, Rachael E; Shepherd, John A; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Fan, Bo; Herschorn, Sally D; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy; Fuhrman, Barbara; Sherman, Mark E; Brinton, Louise A

    2015-06-01

    Elevated mammographic density is a breast cancer risk factor, which has a suggestive, but unproven, relationship with increased exposure to sex steroid hormones. We examined associations of serum estrogens and estrogen metabolites with area and novel volume mammographic density measures among 187 women, ages 40-65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies at an academic facility in Vermont. Serum parent estrogens, estrone and estradiol, and their 2-, 4-, and 16-hydroxylated metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Area mammographic density was measured in the breast contralateral to the biopsy using thresholding software; volume mammographic density was quantified using a density phantom. Linear regression was used to estimate associations of estrogens with mammographic densities, adjusted for age and body mass index, and stratified by menopausal status and menstrual cycle phase. Weak, positive associations between estrogens, estrogen metabolites, and mammographic density were observed, primarily among postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal luteal phase women, the 16-pathway metabolite estriol was associated with percent area (p = 0.04) and volume (p = 0.05) mammographic densities and absolute area (p = 0.02) and volume (p = 0.05) densities. Among postmenopausal women, levels of total estrogens, the sum of parent estrogens, and 2-, 4- and 16-hydroxylation pathway metabolites were positively associated with area density measures (percent: p = 0.03, p = 0.04, p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.07; absolute: p = 0.02, p = 0.02, p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.03, respectively) but not volume density measures. Our data suggest that serum estrogen profiles are weak determinants of mammographic density and that analysis of different density metrics may provide complementary information about relationships of estrogen exposure to breast tissue composition.

  14. Relationship of Serum Estrogens and Metabolites with Area and Volume Mammographic Densities

    PubMed Central

    Gierach, Gretchen L.; Patel, Deesha A.; Falk, Roni T.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Geller, Berta M.; Vacek, Pamela M.; Weaver, Donald L.; Chicoine, Rachael E.; Shepherd, John A.; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Fan, Bo; Herschorn, Sally D.; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy; Fuhrman, Barbara; Sherman, Mark E.; Brinton, Louise A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elevated mammographic density is a breast cancer risk factor, which has a suggestive, but unproven, relationship with increased exposure to sex-steroid hormones. We examined associations of serum estrogens and estrogen metabolites with area and novel volume mammographic density measures among 187 women, ages 40–65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies at an academic facility in Vermont. Methods Serum parent estrogens, estrone and estradiol, and their 2-, 4-, and 16-hydroxylated metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Area mammographic density was measured in the breast contralateral to the biopsy using thresholding software; volume mammographic density was quantified using a density phantom. Linear regression was used to estimate associations of estrogens with mammographic densities, adjusted for age and body mass index, and stratified by menopausal status and menstrual cycle phase. Results Weak, positive associations between estrogens, estrogen metabolites and mammographic density were observed, primarily among postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal luteal phase women, the 16-pathway metabolite estriol was associated with percent area (p=0.04) and volume (p=0.05) mammographic densities and absolute area (p=0.02) and volume (p=0.05) densities. Among postmenopausal women, levels of total estrogens, the sum of parent estrogens, and 2-, 4- and 16-hydroxylation pathway metabolites were positively associated with area density measures (percent: p=0.03, p=0.04, p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.07; absolute: p=0.02, p=0.02, p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.03, respectively), but not volume density measures. Conclusions Our data suggest that serum estrogen profiles are weak determinants of mammographic density and that analysis of different density metrics may provide complementary information about relationships of exposures to breast tissue composition. PMID:25757805

  15. United States and New York State History, Grade 7. A Multicultural Perspective. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This resource guide, designed for use by New York City teachers, provides a wide range of suggested approaches and materials from which teachers can select as they teach the grade 7 and grade 8 course "United States and New York State History." The resource guide strives to include the histories, perspectives, and contributions of all…

  16. United States and New York State History, Grade 7. A Multicultural Perspective. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This resource guide, designed for use by New York City teachers, provides a wide range of suggested approaches and materials from which teachers can select as they teach the grade 7 and grade 8 course "United States and New York State History." The resource guide strives to include the histories, perspectives, and contributions of all…

  17. Journal of the Midwest History of Education Society. Volume 17, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Edward, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    The 18 papers of this conference were divided into five topics ranging from literacy to the history of progressive reform to history of education from an international perspective. Part 1 includes: "Isabella Graham and Joanna Bethune's Early American Experiments in Educating Illiterates" (L. Townsend); "The Dilemma of Equivalency:…

  18. Relationship of Terminal Duct Lobular Unit Involution of the Breast with Area and Volume Mammographic Densities

    PubMed Central

    Gierach, Gretchen L.; Patel, Deesha A.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Linville, Laura; Papathomas, Daphne; Johnson, Jason M.; Chicoine, Rachael E.; Herschorn, Sally D.; Shepherd, John A.; Wang, Jeff; Malkov, Serghei; Vacek, Pamela M.; Weaver, Donald L.; Fan, Bo; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Palakal, Maya; Xiang, Jackie; Oh, Hannah; Horne, Hisani N.; Sprague, Brian L.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated mammographic density (MD) is an established breast cancer risk factor. Reduced involution of terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs), the histologic source of most breast cancers, has been associated with higher MD and breast cancer risk. We investigated relationships of TDLU involution with area and volumetric MD, measured throughout the breast and surrounding biopsy targets (peri-lesional). Three measures inversely related to TDLU involution (TDLU count/mm2, median TDLU span, median acini count/TDLU) assessed in benign diagnostic biopsies from 348 women, ages 40–65, were related to MD area (quantified with thresholding software) and volume (assessed with a density phantom) by analysis of covariance, stratified by menopausal status and adjusted for confounders. Among premenopausal women, TDLU count was directly associated with percent peri-lesional MD (P-trend=0.03), but not with absolute dense area/volume. Greater TDLU span was associated with elevated percent dense area/volume (P-trend<0.05) and absolute peri-lesional MD (P=0.003). Acini count was directly associated with absolute peri-lesional MD (P=0.02). Greater TDLU involution (all metrics) was associated with increased nondense area/volume (P-trend≤0.04). Among postmenopausal women, TDLU measures were not significantly associated with MD. Among premenopausal women, reduced TDLU involution was associated with higher area and volumetric MD, particularly in peri-lesional parenchyma. Data indicating that TDLU involution and MD are correlated markers of breast cancer risk suggest that associations of MD with breast cancer may partly reflect amounts of at-risk epithelium. If confirmed, these results could suggest a prevention paradigm based on enhancing TDLU involution and monitoring efficacy by assessing MD reduction. PMID:26645278

  19. Calculation of area and volume for the south part of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskin, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife Resources, collected bathymetric data for the south part of Great Salt Lake during 2002-04 using a single-beam, high-definition fathometer and real-time differential global positioning system. About 7.6 million depth measurements were collected along more than 930 miles (1,690 kilometers) of survey transects. Sound-velocity profiles were obtained in conjunction with the bathymetric data to provide time-of-travel corrections to the depth calculations. Data were processed with commercial hydrographic software and exported into geographic information system (GIS) software for mapping and calculation of area and volume. Area and volume calculations show a maximum area of about 508,000 acres (2,056 square kilometers) and a maximum volume of about 9,257,000 acre-feet (11.42 cubic kilometers) at a water-surface altitude of 4,200 feet (1,280 meters). Minimum water-surface altitude of the south part of Great Salt Lake is just below 4,167 feet (1,279 meters) in the area just south of the Union Pacific railroad causeway halfway between Promontory Point and the western edge of the lake. At this altitude, and continuing up to about 4,176 feet (1,279 meters), the south part of the lake is separated into two areas by a ridge extending from Promontory Point to Hat Island. Calculations for area and volume are based on a low altitude of 4,167 feet (1,279 meters) to a high altitude of 4,200 feet (1,280 meters).

  20. Maximal area and conformal welding heuristics for optimal slice selection in splenic volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Peng, Hao; Gu, Xianfeng; Barish, Mathew; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate estimation of splenic volume is crucial for the determination of disease progression and response to treatment for diseases that result in enlargement of the spleen. However, there is no consensus with respect to the use of single or multiple one-dimensional, or volumetric measurement. Existing methods for human reviewers focus on measurement of cross diameters on a representative axial slice and craniocaudal length of the organ. We propose two heuristics for the selection of the optimal axial plane for splenic volume estimation: the maximal area axial measurement heuristic and the novel conformal welding shape-based heuristic. We evaluate these heuristics on time-variant data derived from both healthy and sick subjects and contrast them to established heuristics. Under certain conditions our heuristics are superior to standard practice volumetric estimation methods. We conclude by providing guidance on selecting the optimal heuristic for splenic volume estimation.

  1. Development of the meshless finite volume particle method with exact and efficient calculation of interparticle area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, Nathan J.; Lobovský, Libor; Nestor, Ruairi M.

    2014-06-01

    The Finite Volume Particle Method (FVPM) is a meshless method based on a definition of interparticle area which is closely analogous to cell face area in the classical finite volume method. In previous work, the interparticle area has been computed by numerical integration, which is a source of error and is extremely expensive. We show that if the particle weight or kernel function is defined as a discontinuous top-hat function, the particle interaction vectors may be evaluated exactly and efficiently. The new formulation reduces overall computational time by a factor between 6.4 and 8.2. In numerical experiments on a viscous flow with an analytical solution, the method converges under all conditions. Significantly, in contrast with standard FVPM and SPH, error depends on particle size but not on particle overlap (as long as the computational domain is completely covered by particles). The new method is shown to be superior to standard FVPM for shock tube flow and inviscid steady transonic flow. In benchmarking on a viscous multiphase flow application, FVPM with exact interparticle area is shown to be competitive with a mesh-based volume-of-fluid solver in terms of computational time required to resolve the structure of an interface.

  2. Calculation of area and volume for the north part of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskin, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry, Fire, and State Lands, collected bathymetric data for the north part of Great Salt Lake during the spring and early summer of 2006 using a single-beam, high-definition fathometer and real-time differential global positioning system. About 5.2 million depth measurements were collected along more than 765 miles (1,230 kilometers) of survey transects. Sound-velocity profiles were obtained in conjunction with the bathymetric data to provide time-of-travel corrections to the depth calculations. Data were processed with commercial hydrographic software and exported into geographic information system (GIS) software for mapping and calculation of area and volume. Area and volume calculations show a maximum area of about 385,000 acres (1,560 square kilometers) and a maximum volume of about 5,693,000 acre-feet (about 7 cubic kilometers) at a water-surface altitude of 4,200 feet (1,280 meters). Minimum natural water-surface altitude of the north part of Great Salt Lake is just below 4,167 feet (1,270 meters) in the area just north of the Union Pacific railroad causeway halfway between Saline and the western edge of the lake. The north part of Great Salt Lake generally grades gradually to the west and north and is bounded by steep scarps along its eastern border. Calculations for area and volume are based on a low altitude of 4,167 feet (1,270 meters) to a high altitude of 4,200 feet (1,280 meters).

  3. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2006-06-30

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period January 01, 2006 to June 30, 2006 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse completed obtaining additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in a previous reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed obtaining raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (Cd/m) information for 9 more biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated before in this project. Results of the mean mass data obtained to date are reported here, and analysis of the raw data collected by REM is in progress.

  4. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2006-01-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2005 to December 31, 2005 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse continued to obtain additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in the last reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has obtained raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (C{sub d}/m) information for several biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated in the last reporting period. Preliminary results of the mean mass and the shape data obtained are reported here, and more data collection is in progress.

  5. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-16

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  6. Soft tissue facial areas and volumes in subjects with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Dellavia, Claudia; Zanotti, Gianfranco; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this study was to supply quantitative information about the facial soft-tissues of a group of subjects with Down syndrome. The three-dimensional coordinates of 28 soft-tissue facial landmarks were obtained by an electromechanic digitizer in 17 male and 11 female subjects with Down syndrome aged 12-45 years, and in 429 healthy individuals of the same age, ethnicity, and sex. From the landmarks, facial areas (eyes, ears, nose, and lips) and volumes (nose and lips) were calculated according to a geometrical model of face. Data were compared to those collected in the normal subjects by computing z-scores. Male and female z-scores were not significantly different. Most of the facial volumes were significantly (Student's t, P < 0.05) smaller in subjects with Down syndrome than in their normal controls. Ear areas were significantly reduced (mean z-scores in males -2.07 right, -1.9 left; in females -2.11 right, -2.21 left), as well as nasal surface area (mean z-score -1.53 in males, -2.45 in females). In women, age and some z-scores were significantly correlated (P < 0.05): upper lip volume (r = 0.714), left and right eye area (r = 0.635, right; 0.604, left), nasal area (r = 0.603): with increasing age, the negative values of the z-scores approached the 0 value of the reference population. In the pooled sample, age and the z-score of the total lip area were significantly correlated (r = 0.423): increasing age corresponded to a larger z-score value. The method allowed a simple, low cost, fast, and noninvasive examination of the subjects, and provided a quantitative assessment of the deviation from the norm.

  7. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 5: Billings Area, 1963-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The fifth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Billings Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) General Description (geography, demography, and transportation facilities…

  8. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds: An interim report: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.; Wallace, D.W.; Newcomer, D.R.; Schramke, J.A.; Chamness, M.A.; Cline, C.S.; Airhart, S.P.; Wilbur, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents information derived from the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. This volume contains the main text. Volume 2 contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text. This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report are the preliminary interpretations of the hydrogeologic environment of six low-level burial grounds, which comprise four waste management areas (WMAs) located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretations were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the construction of 35 ground-water monitoring wells as well as a multitude of previously existing boreholes. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a ground-water monitoring program initiated in 1986. This ground-water monitoring program is based on requirements for interim status facilities in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (1976).

  9. Volumes of recent floods and potential for storage in upland watershed areas of Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, Robert C.; Eash, David A.; Harvey, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    During the autumn of 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, began a study to determine the volume of water associated with recent flood events in parts of the Midwestern United States and a preliminary evaluation of the potential upland areas for storage of flood-waters in selected watersheds. This analysis, although preliminary, may be useful in determining the feasibility of conducting additional, more detailed studies into the role of upland areas in a watershed management strategy. The methods and results of this preliminary hydrologic study are presented in this report.

  10. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    8217 AD-AI13 146 ERTEC WESTERN INC. LONG BEACH CA F/6 B/7 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY, SEVEN AGOITI--ETC(U) UNCLASSIFIED E-TR...50 MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY SEVEN ADDITIONAL VALLEYS NEVADA/UTAH SITING AREA VOLUME IV 4Prepared for: U. S. Department of the Air Force Ballistic...VALLEY MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEfV STUDY AREA OXJNOARY SEPT. 26, 1960 I MX SITING INVESTIGATION 27 FEDC t97 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE I ik 320’- 36 37 4

  11. Distinct activated cortical areas and volumes in Uygur-Chinese bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mei; Yang, Li-Xia; Jia, Lin; Shi, Xin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Lin-yun; Abaydulla, Yari; Zhu, Li-Na; Jia, Wen-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate variations in cortical activation in early and late Uygur-Chinese bilinguals from the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. Methodology: During a semantic judgment task with visual stimulation by a single Chinese or Uygur word, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed. The fMRI data regarding activated cortical areas and volumes by both languages were analyzed. Results The first language (L1) and second language (L2) activated language-related hemispheric regions, including the left inferior frontal and parietal cortices, and L1 specifically activated the left middle temporal gyrus. For both L1 and L2, cortical activation was greater in the left hemisphere, and there was no significant difference in the lateralization index (LI) between the two languages (p > 0.05). Although the total activated cortical areas were larger in early than late bilinguals, the activation volumes were not significantly different. Conclusion Activated brains areas in early and late fluent bilinguals largely overlapped. However, these areas were more scattered upon presentation of L2 than L1, and L1 had a more specific pattern of activation than L2. For both languages, the left hemisphere was dominant. We found that L2 proficiency level rather than age of acquisition had a greater influence on which brain areas were activated with semantic processing. PMID:28123807

  12. Personality and Biography: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on the History of Adult Education. Volume I: General, Comparative, and Synthetic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedenthal-Haase, Martha, Ed.

    This volume includes the following papers: "Foreword: The Standing International Conference on the History of Adult Education (AE)" (Franz Poeggeler); "Editor's Introduction: Perspectives on the Sixth International Conference on the History of AE" (Martha Friedenthal-Haase); two special addresses by Joerg Prinzhausen and Ursula…

  13. A Study of Selected Eighth Grade United States History Textbooks. 1982-83 Michigan Social Studies Textbook Study. Volume I. Overview, Summary of Findings, Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    This volume describes a study of 10 frequently used eighth grade U. S. history textbooks which were examined to determine the extent to which they reflected pluralism in the United States, promoted the concept of global interdependence, and were educationally sound. The ten texts examined were: "American History for Today" (Ginn), "America: Its…

  14. Postglacial relative sea-level history of the Prince Rupert area, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letham, Bryn; Martindale, Andrew; Macdonald, Rebecca; Guiry, Eric; Jones, Jacob; Ames, Kenneth M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a history of relative sea level (RSL) change for the last 15,000 years in the Prince Rupert region on the northern coast of British Columbia, Canada. One hundred twenty-three radiocarbon ages of organic material from isolation basin cores, sediment sequence exposures, and archaeological sites having a recognized relation to past sea levels constrain postglacial RSL. The large number of new measurements relating to past sea-level provides a well constrained RSL curve that differs in significant ways from previously published results. After deglaciation following the Last Glacial Maximum, the region experienced an isostatically-induced rapid RSL drop from as much 50 m asl to as low as -6.3 m asl in as little as a few centuries between 14,500 BP and 13,500 BP. After a lowstand below current sea level for about 2000 years during the terminal Pleistocene, RSL rose again to a highstand at least 6 m asl after the end of the Younger Dryas. RSL slowly dropped through the Holocene to close to its current position by 2000-1500 BP, with some potential fluctuations between 3500 and 1500 BP. This study highlights variation in RSL histories across relatively short distances, which must be accounted for by local RSL reconstructions such as this one. This RSL curve aided in the identification of an 8000-9000 year old archaeological site on a 10-12 m asl terrace, which is currently the earliest dated archaeological site in the area, and it provides guidance for searching for even older archaeological remains. We highlight the utility and potential of this refined RSL history for developing surveys for other archaeological sites associated with paleoshorelines.

  15. From Forge to Fast Food: A History of Child Labor in New York State. Volume II: Civil War to the Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Richard B.; And Others

    This volume of essays and activities is written for use in the eighth grade course "United States and New York State History." The volume follows the chronology from the Civil War to the present, emphasizing child labor during those years. The essays are intended for teachers but can be mastered by many students. The activities focus on…

  16. Glacier volume and area change by 2050 in high mountain Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyun; Ding, Ran; Moore, John C.

    2014-11-01

    We estimate individual area and volume change by 2050 of all 67,028 glaciers, with a total area of 122,969 km2, delineated in the Randolph Glacier Inventory 2.0 of high mountain Asia (HMA). We used the 25 km resolution regional climate model RegCM 3.0 temperature and precipitation change projections forced by the IPCC A1B scenario. Glacier simulations were based on a novel surface mass balance-altitude parameterization fitted to observational data, and various volume-area scaling approaches using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission surface topography of each individual glacier. We generate mass balance-altitude relations for all the glaciers by region using nearest available glacier measurements. Equilibrium line altitude (ELA) sensitivities to temperature and precipitation change vary by region based on the relative importance of sublimation and melting processes. We also made simulations with mass balance tuned to match satellite observations of glacier thickness changes in HMA from 2003 to 2009. Net mass loss is half as much using the tuned model than using just glaciological calibration data, suggesting the representativity of benchmark glaciers is a larger source of uncertainty in future HMA contributions to sea level rise than errors in glacier inventories or volume-area scaling. Both models predict that about 35% of the glaciers in Karakoram and the northwestern Himalaya are advancing, which is consistent with the observed slight mass gain of glaciers in these regions in recent years. However, we find that 76% of all the glaciers will retreat, most of which are of the maritime type. We project total glacier area loss in high mountain Asia in 2050 to be 22% (in the tuned model) or 35% (un-tuned) of their extent in 2000, and they will contribute 5 mm (tuned model) to global sea level rise.

  17. Black History at Your Doorstep: Resource Packet 1985-1986. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Commission on Afro-American History and Culture, Annapolis.

    This packet of resource materials was compiled to help teachers infuse the study of Afro-American history and culture into the curriculum throughout the school year. The packet contains both informational materials and sample activities. In order to assist teachers in studying the Afro-American experience in their own communities, special emphasis…

  18. Community Connections for Science Education, Volume II: History and Theory You Can Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Phyllis, Ed.

    Science beyond the schoolhouse is the subject of this close-up look at informal science--education in non-traditional settings, including Boys and Girls Clubs, 4-H, zoos, aquariums, and public television. More than a dozen writers draw on personal experiences to tell why they became informal science educators and how they use the history and…

  19. A Brief History of Attempts To Monitor Testing. NBETPP Statements, Volume 2, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madaus, George F.

    This paper provides a brief history of attempts to monitor testing in the United States. It describes proposals for monitoring from the first attempts in the 1920s to similar proposals in the 1990s. The discussion focuses on: (1) Giles Ruche's proposal for a consumer research bureau on tests; (2) Oscar K. Burros' reviews of tests and efforts to…

  20. China's Encounter with the West: A History Institute for Teachers. Footnotes. Volume 13, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy

    2008-01-01

    On March 1-2, 2008, FPRI's Wachman Center presented a weekend of discussion on "China's Encounter with the West" for 45 teachers from 21 states across the country, held at and co-sponsored by the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Asia Program. Sessions included: (1) China's Early Encounters with the West: A History in Reverse…

  1. Our Documents: A National Initiative on American History, Civics, and Service. Teacher Sourcebook, Volume III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Julie, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Thousands of educators are using America's most important historic documents to help students learn the story of their nation and its citizens, thanks to the Our Documents initiative. This was one of the main objectives of Our Documents, which is part of the "National Initiative on American History, Civics, and Service," launched by President…

  2. United States History: Eyes on the Economy. Volume One: Through the Civil War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Caldwell, Jean; Wentworth, Donald R.; Kraig, Beth; Highsmith, Robert J.

    This lesson guide is designed to help U.S. history teachers and students in grades 8-11 examine historic events through basic economic reasoning. It lends itself to instruction grounded in inquiry learning, direct instruction, and cooperative learning. It calls for students to be engaged in case studies, simulation exercises, and group work, as…

  3. United States History: Eyes on the Economy. Volume Two: Through the 20th Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Caldwell, Jean; Wentworth, Donald R.; Kraig, Beth; Highsmith, Robert J.

    This lesson guide is designed to help U.S. history teachers and students in grades 8-11 examine historic events through basic economic reasoning. It lends itself to instruction grounded in inquiry learning, direct instruction, and cooperative learning. It calls for students to be engaged in case studies, simulation exercises, and group work, as…

  4. Global marine protected areas do not secure the evolutionary history of tropical corals and fishes

    PubMed Central

    Mouillot, D.; Parravicini, V.; Bellwood, D. R.; Leprieur, F.; Huang, D.; Cowman, P. F.; Albouy, C.; Hughes, T. P.; Thuiller, W.; Guilhaumon, F.

    2016-01-01

    Although coral reefs support the largest concentrations of marine biodiversity worldwide, the extent to which the global system of marine-protected areas (MPAs) represents individual species and the breadth of evolutionary history across the Tree of Life has never been quantified. Here we show that only 5.7% of scleractinian coral species and 21.7% of labrid fish species reach the minimum protection target of 10% of their geographic ranges within MPAs. We also estimate that the current global MPA system secures only 1.7% of the Tree of Life for corals, and 17.6% for fishes. Regionally, the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific show the greatest deficit of protection for corals while for fishes this deficit is located primarily in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Central Pacific. Our results call for a global coordinated expansion of current conservation efforts to fully secure the Tree of Life on coral reefs. PMID:26756609

  5. Global marine protected areas do not secure the evolutionary history of tropical corals and fishes.

    PubMed

    Mouillot, D; Parravicini, V; Bellwood, D R; Leprieur, F; Huang, D; Cowman, P F; Albouy, C; Hughes, T P; Thuiller, W; Guilhaumon, F

    2016-01-12

    Although coral reefs support the largest concentrations of marine biodiversity worldwide, the extent to which the global system of marine-protected areas (MPAs) represents individual species and the breadth of evolutionary history across the Tree of Life has never been quantified. Here we show that only 5.7% of scleractinian coral species and 21.7% of labrid fish species reach the minimum protection target of 10% of their geographic ranges within MPAs. We also estimate that the current global MPA system secures only 1.7% of the Tree of Life for corals, and 17.6% for fishes. Regionally, the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific show the greatest deficit of protection for corals while for fishes this deficit is located primarily in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Central Pacific. Our results call for a global coordinated expansion of current conservation efforts to fully secure the Tree of Life on coral reefs.

  6. The Archaeology and History of Lake Ray Roberts. Volume 1. Cultural Resources Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    in the Tehuacan Valley of Mexico and speculations about the cultural processes. In Man, settlement and urbanism. Ucko, Tringham and Dimbleby...The prehistory of the Tehuacan Valley, Volume 5: Excavations and reconnaissance. The University of Texas Press. Mattson, Richard 1980 The bungalow

  7. Evaluation of approximations in modeling the thermal history of a volcanic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giberti, G.; Sartoris, G.

    1989-02-01

    The thermal history of a relatively young volcanic area, characterized by a shallow magmatic reservoir and the occurrence of a major eruption accompanied by caldera collapse, is simulated numerically. Geometry, geology and volcanic history of the system are chosen having in mind the Campi Flegrei volcanic area, Southern Italy. The 3D axially symmetric model adopted is nonhomogeneous, with variable geometry and thermal properties depending on temperature. Heat transfer is treated using the conduction equations. Convection in the magma - undoubtedly vigorous in the early stages of the cooling process - is taken into account by a temperature-averaging procedure. Moderate convection in the permeable rocks overlying the reservoir is simulated by using effective thermal parameters. The mathematical problem is solved by a finite-difference method. This model is then adopted as "reality" and its results are compared with those obtained with other models, referred to as "approximations" in which some features of the conventional reality have been neglected. It is found that the temperature field of a static model (in which the eruption of about 110 km 3 of magma, caldera collapse and the related physical changes are neglected) is in good agreement with "reality" 30,000 years after the eruption. The assumption of magma and surrounding rocks having the same constant thermal properties yields poor results (errors of 100-150°K at shallow depth on the axis of symmetry). If homogeneity is assumed only for the host rocks, while the magma is assigned "real" properties, the temperature field above the reservoir is affected by quite similar errors. The temperature field is quite well approximated by solving the "reality" in a vertical plane through the axis of symmetry (errors <20°K and 40°K in the central part of the caldera for t=120,000 years and t=250,000 years, respectively, after the emplacement of the magmatic body). The solution of "reality" in just one dimension yields

  8. Internodal myelin volume and axon surface area. A relationship determining myelin thickness?

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Blakemore, W F; Murray, J A; Patterson, R C

    1982-08-01

    Internodes from normal, remyelinated and regenerated nerve fibres have been isolated from rat spinal roots and sciatic nerve. The internodes have been examined quantitatively by light and electron microscopy to determine their internodal length, myelin thickness, and the circumference and cross-sectional area of both the axons and fibre. Comparison of these measurements of the axon and myelin sheath has revealed a close relationship between the volume of myelin comprising the internode and the area over which the Schwann cell and axon are in close proximity, i.e. the surface area of the axolemma beneath the internodal myelin sheath. The same relationship described not only the internodes on normal nerve fibres, where internodal length is proportional to axon diameter, but also the short and thinly myelinated internodes formed in the adult animal on remyelinated and on regenerated axons. Examination of data presented by Berthold (1978) revealed that a closely similar relationship is also present in feline nerve fibres. In view of the constancy of the relationship between such different types of internode it is suggested that the regulation of myelin volume, and thereby of myelin thickness, may be mediated via the area of the axolemma or of the Schwann cell membrane beneath the myelin sheath.

  9. Determination of burning area and port volume in complex burning regions of a solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the geometry of the burning in both star-cylindrical port interface regions and regions of partially inhibited slots is presented. Some characteristics parameters are defined and illustrated. Methods are proposed for calculating burning areas which functionally depend only on the total distance burned. According to this method, several points are defined where abrupt changes in geometry occur, and these are tracked throughout the burn. Equations are developed for computing port perimeter and port area at pre-established longitudinal positions. Some common formulas and some newly developed formulas are then used to compute burning surface area and port volume. Some specific results are presented for the solid rocket motor committed to the space shuttle project.

  10. Trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume maturation in normal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D.; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Hudziak, James J.; Mateos-Pérez, J.M.; Labbe, Aurelie; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of developmental trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual typically-developing subjects with repeated scanning (1–3 per subject, total scans n=753) from 4.9 to 22.3 years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear) was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models, with statistical correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory. Analyses were performed with and without controlling for total brain volume. These data are provided for reference and comparison with other databases. Further discussion and interpretation on cortical developmental trajectories can be found in the associated Ducharme et al.׳s article “Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development – the importance of quality control procedures” (Ducharme et al., 2015) [1]. PMID:26702424

  11. Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) hardware development. Volume 2: History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    While, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Hardware development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) is described. The system consists of an array of fourteen pressure ports, installed in an Orbiter nose cap, which, when coupled with existing fuselage mounted static pressure ports permits computation of entry flight parameters. Elements of the system that are described include the following: (1) penetration assemblies to place pressure port openings at the surface of the nose cap; (2) pressure tubes to transmit the surface pressure to transducers; (3) support posts or manifolds to provide support for, and reduce the length of, the individual pressure tubes; (4) insulation for the manifolds; and (5) a SEADS nose cap. Design, analyses, and tests to develop and certify design for flight are described. Specific tests included plasma arc exposure, radiant thermal, vibration, and structural. Volume one summarizes highlights of the program, particularly as they relate to the final design of SEADS. Volume two summarizes all of the Vought responsible activities in essentially a chronological order.

  12. The environmental history of Chatthin Wildlife Sanctuary, a protected area in Myanmar (Burma).

    PubMed

    Aung, Myint; Khaing Swe, Khaing; Oo, Thida; Kyaw Moe, Kyaw; Leimgruber, Peter; Allendorf, Teri; Duncan, Chris; Wemmer, Chris

    2004-09-01

    We reconstructed the history of Chatthin Wildlife Sanctuary (CWS) to understand how social and economic events, and policy changes affected the sanctuary's condition. We surveyed 25 villages surrounding CWS to evaluate past and present ecological conditions, compare the results with historical accounts and identify causal relationships. During the first half of the 20th century, the primary threat was the government's reduction of old growth forest to supply fuel wood for the British-built railway. The railroad opened the area to colonization, but the villagers' impact on timber and wildlife was low. From 1945 to 1988, villagers became the primary force of landscape degradation. The post-war windfall of firearms increased hunting pressure, and populations of large mammal started to decline. With the economic decline of the 1970s and 1980s, the community's demand for game and forest products intensified, and the large mammal fauna was reduced from eleven to four species. From 1988-2003, the forests surrounding the sanctuary were fragmented and degraded. The absence of large predators rendered the park safe for livestock, and the combined effects of grazing and removal of forest products seriously degraded habitat within CWS. Major threats to CWS during the past two decades have resulted from land use decisions in which government-planned economic enterprises caused encroachment by villagers. Stabilization and recovery of this sanctuary will require management compatible with human needs, including expanded buffer zones, better core area protection, community forestry projects, and probably relocation of villages within the park.

  13. Changes in area and volume of all Swiss glaciers over the last 25 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Mauro; Huss, Matthias; Hoelzle, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Since the mid-1980s, glaciers in the European Alps have shown widespread and accelerating mass losses. These glacier changes have been investigated in several studies both focusing on area and length changes as well as on volume losses. Because the Alps are dominated by relatively small glaciers, we argue that a sound analysis of glacier elevation changes can only satisfactorily be done if source data of sufficient quality is available. For the Swiss Alps, these prerequisites are now given with the new Swiss Glacier Inventory INVGLAZ10MF derived by manual digitization from high-resolution (50cm) aerial orthophotographs and a new digital elevation model swissALTI3D of the same acquisition dates. By comparing the DHM25 level1 Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) acquired during the 1980s with the swissALTI3D DEMs from 2008-2011 and combining the former with the 1973 inventory and the latter with the 2010 inventory, we present glacier-specific changes in area, surface elevation, volume and geodetic mass balance for every single glacier in Switzerland. Because there are - depending on the individual acquisition dates of the source data - significant differences in the observation period over which glacier elevation changes have been derived by DEM differencing, we present an approach to temporally homogenize resulting changes. This is necessary for directly comparing individual glaciers or glacierized catchments. Furthermore, we validate our results using volume changes calculated over the same periods from photogrammetrically derived DEMs. According to the latest Swiss Glacier Inventory, the total area still glacierized in Switzerland by 2010 amounts to 944 km2 (-28% or 366 km2 since 1973). Very small glaciers (< 0.5 km2) account for 82% of the total number, but in relative terms even more glacierized area (and volume) belongs to fewer glacier entities compared to 1973. Observed area changes are largest between 2800-2900 m a.s.l. and still significant even above 3500 m a

  14. New model for estimating the relationship between surface area and volume in the human body using skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Kasabova, Boryana E; Holliday, Trenton W

    2015-04-01

    A new model for estimating human body surface area and body volume/mass from standard skeletal metrics is presented. This model is then tested against both 1) "independently estimated" body surface areas and "independently estimated" body volume/mass (both derived from anthropometric data) and 2) the cylindrical model of Ruff. The model is found to be more accurate in estimating both body surface area and body volume/mass than the cylindrical model, but it is more accurate in estimating body surface area than it is for estimating body volume/mass (as reflected by the standard error of the estimate when "independently estimated" surface area or volume/mass is regressed on estimates derived from the present model). Two practical applications of the model are tested. In the first test, the relative contribution of the limbs versus the trunk to the body's volume and surface area is compared between "heat-adapted" and "cold-adapted" populations. As expected, the "cold-adapted" group has significantly more of its body surface area and volume in its trunk than does the "heat-adapted" group. In the second test, we evaluate the effect of variation in bi-iliac breadth, elongated or foreshortened limbs, and differences in crural index on the body's surface area to volume ratio (SA:V). Results indicate that the effects of bi-iliac breadth on SA:V are substantial, while those of limb lengths and (especially) the crural index are minor, which suggests that factors other than surface area relative to volume are driving morphological variation and ecogeographical patterning in limb prorportions.

  15. Relationship Between the Surface Area to Volume Ratio and Temperature across Geologic Time in Ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Zaroff, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    In 1877 Joseph Allen proposed that endothermic terrestrial organisms would have lower surface area to volume ratios (SAVR) in colder climates and higher SAVRs in warmer climates. With a smaller surface area compared to volume, organisms can retain more heat in cold climates. We tested to see if this principle applied to ostracods, a type of ectothermic marine invertebrate. We hypothesised that Allen's rule applies to ostracods, as Allen's rule has been demonstrated in frogs (Alho 2011), which are also ectotherms . We used the linear dimensions of the three major carapace axes of ostracod holotypes to estimate the SAVR. We compared ostracod SAVRs with paleotemperatures from Royer et al. (2004). We found that there was a correlation between surface area and temperature; it is a small, but statistically significant correlation (adj. R2=0.0167). This means that as temperature increased, the SAVR also increased. We also found a negative correlation between ostracod SAVR to geologic time(adj. R2=0.0114), which shows us that as time has gone on, ostracod SAVR has decreased. We then plotted the correlation coefficient of SAVR to temperature over geologic time to explore trends in the strength of Allen's rule. For most of time there was no relationship but during the Devonian, Allen's Rule did explain the trend. In short, temperature does explain some of the correlation between the SAVR and temperature, but it is likely there were other environmental factors affecting this relationship.

  16. Decoding individuated finger movements using volume-constrained neuronal ensembles in the M1 hand area.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Soumyadipta; Tenore, Francesco; Aggarwal, Vikram; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Schieber, Marc H; Thakor, Nitish V

    2008-02-01

    Individuated finger and wrist movements can be decoded using random subpopulations of neurons that are widely distributed in the primary motor (M1) hand area. This work investigates 1) whether it is possible to decode dexterous finger movements using spatially-constrained volumes of neurons as typically recorded from a microelectrode array; and 2) whether decoding accuracy differs due to the configuration or location of the array within the M1 hand area. Single-unit activities were sequentially recorded from task-related neurons in two rhesus monkeys as they performed individuated movements of the fingers and the wrist. Simultaneous neuronal ensembles were simulated by constraining these activities to the recording field dimensions of conventional microelectrode array architectures. Artificial neural network (ANN) based filters were able to decode individuated finger movements with greater than 90% accuracy for the majority of movement types, using as few as 20 neurons from these ensemble activities. Furthermore, for the large majority of cases there were no significant differences (p < 0.01) in decoding accuracy as a function of the location of the recording volume. The results suggest that a brain-machine interface (BMI) for dexterous control of individuated fingers and the wrist can be implemented using microelectrode arrays placed broadly in the M1 hand area.

  17. Surface area and the seabed area, volume, depth, slope, and topographic variation for the world's seas, oceans, and countries.

    PubMed

    Costello, Mark John; Cheung, Alan; De Hauwere, Nathalie

    2010-12-01

    Depth and topography directly and indirectly influence most ocean environmental conditions, including light penetration and photosynthesis, sedimentation, current movements and stratification, and thus temperature and oxygen gradients. These parameters are thus likely to influence species distribution patterns and productivity in the oceans. They may be considered the foundation for any standardized classification of ocean ecosystems and important correlates of metrics of biodiversity (e.g., species richness and composition, fisheries). While statistics on ocean depth and topography are often quoted, how they were derived is rarely cited, and unless calculated using the same spatial resolution the resulting statistics will not be strictly comparable. We provide such statistics using the best available resolution (1-min) global bathymetry, and open source digital maps of the world's seas and oceans and countries' Exclusive Economic Zones, using a standardized methodology. We created a terrain map and calculated sea surface and seabed area, volume, and mean, standard deviation, maximum, and minimum, of both depth and slope. All the source data and our database are freely available online. We found that although the ocean is flat, and up to 71% of the area has a < 1 degree slope. It had over 1 million approximately circular features that may be seamounts or sea-hills as well as prominent mountain ranges or ridges. However, currently available global data significantly underestimate seabed slopes. The 1-min data set used here predicts there are 68,669 seamounts compared to the 30,314 previously predicted using the same method but lower spatial resolution data. The ocean volume exceeds 1.3 billion km(3) (or 1.3 sextillion liters), and sea surface and seabed areas over 354 million km(2). We propose the coefficient of variation of slope as an index of topographic heterogeneity. Future studies may improve on this database, for example by using a more detailed bathymetry

  18. Cenozoic Plate tectonic history of the northern Venezuela-Trinidad Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlich, Robert N.; Barrett, S. F.

    1990-02-01

    Geological and geophysical data, coupled with recent plate tectonic reconstructions, suggest that the Cenozoic geologic history of the northern Venezuela-Trinidad area has been dominated by strike-slip displacement of discrete crustal blocks. Allochthonous terranes within the area include metavolcanic rocks of the Cretaceous Villa de Cura Group and metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian to Cretaceous Cordillera de la Costa. A relatively competent crustal block (Margarita Block) is defined by an outline around the metamorphic basement of Margarita Island, the Araya/Paria peninsula, the Northern Range of Trinidad, and Tobago Island. Reconstruction of the Margarita Block to its original position requires at least partial closure of the Falcon Basin, closure of the Bonaire and Cariaco basins, and restoration of about 50 km of motion on both the Oca and Bocono faults. Post middle Eocene eastward translation of the Caribbean plate caused eastward motion of the Margarita Block. A minor change in relative plate motion during the late Oligocene or early Miocene produced a right step in the Moron fault, forming the Cariaco pull-apart basin and El Pilar fault zone. Maximum offset on El Pilar fault is estimated to be no more than 125 km, though displacement along the entire fault zone may have been greater. Transpressional stresses between the Caribbean plate and northern South America caused folding of the Serrania del Interior of Venezuela and the Central Range of Trinidad. Eastward migration of transpressional stresses at the southeastern corner of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary is being accommodated by formation of oblique thrusts, transpressive anticlines, and downwarping of the crust. Bouguer gravity data suggest that Jurassic-aged Atlantic oceanic crust is being depressed as the Caribbean plate expands into the Demerara Plateau area. This study suggests that the faults and transtensional/transpressional/compressional structures identified in this study are

  19. Oral History Interview Transcripts Tombigbee Historic Townsites Project. Volume 6 (Interview Numbers 129-133).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    before the Civil War t , tained close ties with Vinton residents through their member’ - :he Vinton Masonic Lodge . A great deal of Vinton’s history has...Wilder Shaw did. They belonged at Vinton first. They had their lodge at Vinton, and Uncle Charlie joined - ’.r. 976 down there. Then they moved it up to...Did you ever hear any stories about the Masonic Lodge in Vinton? R: Only that they had their meetings there. I have read that in the old letters. They

  20. Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 7. Eastern Study Area, Section 1. 0, Version 3.2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    locations. Dithiane and 1,4-oxathiane were detected in near surface soil samples at these spill locations, although thiogdiglycol and chloroacetic acid were...Dibromochloropropane 3-62 3.3.8 Fluoroacetic Acid 3-62 3.3.9 Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons 3-65 3.3.10 Semivolatile Halogenated Organics 3-65 3.3.11...Organophosphorous Compounds, GB-Agent Related ESA 3.4-7 Potentially Contaminated Soil Areas and Volumes for Fluoroacetic Acid ESA 3.4-8 Potentially

  1. Quantitative analysis of molecular surfaces: areas, volumes, electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Felipe A; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Brinck, Tore; Murray, Jane S; Politzer, Peter

    2010-11-01

    We describe a procedure for performing quantitative analyses of fields f(r) on molecular surfaces, including statistical quantities and locating and evaluating their local extrema. Our approach avoids the need for explicit mathematical representation of the surface and can be implemented easily in existing graphical software, as it is based on the very popular representation of a surface as collection of polygons. We discuss applications involving the volumes, surface areas and molecular surface electrostatic potentials, and local ionization energies of a group of 11 molecules.

  2. Understanding the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes via the ``cluster volume to surface area" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandati, Sreekanth; Kunstmann, Jens; Boerrnert, Felix; Schoenfelder, Ronny; Ruemmeli, Mark; Kar, Kamal K.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2010-03-01

    The influence of mixed catalysts for the high yield production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been studied systematically. Based on extensive experimental data a ``Catalyst Volume to Surface Area'' (CVSA) model was developed to understand the influence of the process parameters on the yield and CNT diameter distribution [1]. In our study, we present a refined version of the CVSA model developed by combining experiments and simulations. We discuss our current understanding of the growth mechanism and how the model might be used to increase CNT yields by using mixed catalysts.[4pt] [1] S. Tetali et al., ACS Nano (2009), DOI: 10.1021/nn9012548.

  3. Introduction to integral calculus at high school through calculating area and volume with spreadsheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives an account of an experiment in which 33 high school students of age 16-19 acquired the principles of the integral calculus through applying the rectangle method in spreadsheet to calculate the area of a planar figure bounded by the graph of a function and the volume of a body created by the rotation of the graph. A questionnaire survey was carried out to find out whether the students found the lesson interesting, contributing to their mathematical and technological knowledge and motivating to continue with more complicated tasks.

  4. [Cotyla quid? On the early history of late medieval medical volume calculations].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Axel

    2005-01-01

    As can be made evident chiefly by their comparative numerical examination, the Egyptian pyramids (the step pyramids being excluded for the present purpose) have been, from the beginning up to the Egyptian fashion in early Imperial Rome, designed and built with the additional intention of physically manifesting a volume of pi x 10k x (average value) 0.96824 cm3, where k is either a positive integer or zero, and where pi is a short product, following very restrictive formation rules which to some extent are traceable in the papyrus Rhind, of prime numbers. Conceptually (but not really as to the Hin at least) this establishes the capacity units 1 [2]Heqat = 9682.4 cm3 and 1 Hin = 484.12 cm3 already for the Old Kingdom. It is shown further that the Attic Medimnos as introduced in the course of finishing Solon's reforms is identical with the Egyptian volume system's standard unification: pisigma = 2 x 3 x 5 x 7 x 11 x 23, and k = 0, so that 1 Medimnos = about 51443 cm3. Accordingly and by means of some adjacent considerations a Kotyle / Cotyla of 269 cm3 +/- 1 cm3 is established for the Hellenistic, early Arabic, and Medieval Latin medicine.

  5. Very Large Area/Volume Microwave ECR Plasma and Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor); Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing very large area and large volume plasmas. The invention utilizes electron cyclotron resonances in conjunction with permanent magnets to produce dense, uniform plasmas for long life ion thruster applications or for plasma processing applications such as etching, deposition, ion milling and ion implantation. The large area source is at least five times larger than the 12-inch wafers being processed to date. Its rectangular shape makes it easier to accommodate to materials processing than sources that are circular in shape. The source itself represents the largest ECR ion source built to date. It is electrodeless and does not utilize electromagnets to generate the ECR magnetic circuit, nor does it make use of windows.

  6. Area volume properties of fluid interfaces in turbulence: scale-local self-similarity and cumulative scale dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catrakis, Haris J.; Aguirre, Roberto C.; Ruiz-Plancarte, Jesus

    2002-07-01

    Area volume properties of fluid interfaces are investigated to quantify the scale-local and cumulative structure. An area volume density g3([lambda]) and ratio [Omega]3([lambda]) are introduced to examine the interfacial behaviour as a function of scale [lambda] or across a range of scales, respectively. These measures are demonstrated on mixed-fluid interfaces from whole-field [similar]10003 three-dimensional space time concentration measurements in turbulent jets above the mixing transition, at Re [similar] 20000 and Sc [similar] 2000, recorded by laser-induced-fluorescence and digital-imaging techniques, with Taylor's hypothesis applied. The cumulative structure is scale dependent in [Omega]3([lambda]), with a dimension D3([lambda]) that increases with increasing scale. In contrast, the scale-local structure exhibits self-similarity in g3([lambda]) with an exponent [alpha]g [approximate]1.3 for these interfaces. The scale dependence in the cumulative structure arises from the large scales, while the self-similarity corresponds to the small-scale area volume contributions. The small scales exhibit the largest area volume density and provide the dominant contributions to the total area volume ratio, which corresponds to [similar]10 times the area of a purely large-scale interface for the present flow conditions. The self-similarity in the scale-local structure at small scales provides the key ingredient to extrapolate the area volume behaviour to higher Reynolds numbers.

  7. Seismic response in archaeological areas: the case-histories of Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, Stefano; Funiciello, Renato; Rovelli, Antonio

    1999-03-01

    Rome is affected by earthquakes associated to three different seismogenic districts: the Central Apennines area, the Colli Albani volcanic area and the Roman area. The major effects were exclusively due to Apennine seismicity and reached in some cases felt intensities up to VII-VIII degree (MCS scale). The predominant role in the damage distribution seems to be played by the local geological conditions. The historical centre of the city is characterized by the presence of two geomorphologic domains: the alluvial plain of Tiber river and the topographic relieves of Roman Hills, where tradition indicates the first site of the city foundation. In particular, the right river side is characterized by the outcropping of the regional bedrock along the Monte Mario-Gianicolo ridge, while the eastern relieves are the remnants of the Sabatini and Albani volcanic plateau, deeply eroded by the Tiber river and its tributaries during the last glacial low-stand (Würm). These domains are characterized by a large difference in seismic response, due to the high impedance contrast between Holocene coarse deposits filling the Tiber Valley and sedimentary and volcanic Plio-Pleistocene units. Seismic damage observed in 150 monuments of downtown Rome was indicating a significant concentration on alluvial recent deposits. This result was confirmed by the geographical distribution of conservation and retrofitting activities subsequent to main earthquakes, mostly related to local geological conditions. The cases of Marcus Aurelius' Column and Colosseum confirmed the influence of the Holocene alluvial network in local seismic response. During 2500 years of history, the monuments of Rome have `memorized' the seismic effects of historical earthquakes. In some cases, the integration of historical and geological research and macroseismic observations may provide original and useful indications to seismologists to define the seismic response of the city. Local site effects represent a serious

  8. Fire history reconstruction in grassland ecosystems: amount of charcoal reflects local area burned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leys, Bérangère; Brewer, Simon C.; McConaghy, Scott; Mueller, Joshua; McLauchlan, Kendra K.

    2015-11-01

    Fire is one of the most prevalent disturbances in the Earth system, and its past characteristics can be reconstructed using charcoal particles preserved in depositional environments. Although researchers know that fires produce charcoal particles, interpretation of the quantity or composition of charcoal particles in terms of fire source remains poorly understood. In this study, we used a unique four-year dataset of charcoal deposited in traps from a native tallgrass prairie in mid-North America to test which environmental factors were linked to charcoal measurements on three spatial scales. We investigated small and large charcoal particles commonly used as a proxy of fire activity at different spatial scales, and charcoal morphotypes representing different types of fuel. We found that small (125-250 μm) and large (250 μm-1 mm) particles of charcoal are well-correlated (Spearman correlation = 0.88) and likely reflect the same spatial scale of fire activity in a system with both herbaceous and woody fuels. There was no significant relationship between charcoal pieces and fire parameters <500 m from the traps. Moreover, local area burned (<5 km distance radius from traps) explained the total charcoal amount, and regional burning (200 km radius distance from traps) explained the ratio of non arboreal to total charcoal (NA/T ratio). Charcoal variables, including total charcoal count and NA/T ratio, did not correlate with other fire parameters, vegetation cover, landscape, or climate variables. Thus, in long-term studies that involve fire history reconstructions, total charcoal particles, even of a small size (125-250 μm), could be an indicator of local area burned. Further studies may determine relationships among amount of charcoal recorded, fire intensity, vegetation cover, and climatic parameters.

  9. Fungal colonization in soils with different management histories: modeling growth in three-dimensional pore volumes.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Alexandra; Falconer, Ruth E; Grinev, Dmitri; Otten, Wilfred

    2011-06-01

    Despite the importance of fungi in soil functioning they have received comparatively little attention, and our understanding of fungal interactions and communities is lacking. This study aims to combine a physiologically based model of fungal growth with digitized images of internal pore volume of samples of undisturbed soil from contrasting management practices to determine the effect of physical structure on fungal growth dynamics. We quantified pore geometries of the undisturbed-soil samples from two contrasting agricultural practices, conventionally plowed (chisel plow) (CT) and no till (NT), and from native-species vegetation land use on land that was taken out of production in 1989 (NS). Then we modeled invasion of a fungal species within the soil samples and evaluated the role of soil structure on the progress of fungal colonization of the soil pore space. The size of the studied pores was > or =110 microm. The dynamics of fungal invasion was quantified through parameters of a mathematical model fitted to the fungal invasion curves. Results indicated that NT had substantially lower porosity and connectivity than CT and NS soils. For example, the largest connected pore volume occupied 79% and 88% of pore space in CT and NS treatments, respectively, while it only occupied 45% in NT. Likewise, the proportion of pore space available to fungal colonization was much greater in NS and CT than in NT treatment, and the dynamics of the fungal invasion differed among the treatments. The relative rate of fungal invasion at the onset of simulation was higher in NT samples, while the invasion followed a more sigmoidal pattern with relatively slow invasion rates at the initial time steps in NS and CT samples. Simulations allowed us to elucidate the contribution of physical structure to the rates and magnitudes of fungal invasion processes. It appeared that fragmented pore space disadvantaged fungal invasion in soils under long-term no-till, while large connected pores in

  10. Application of 3D Scanned Imaging Methodology for Volume, Surface Area, and Envelope Density Evaluation of Densified Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of surface area, volume, and density is an essential for quantifying, evaluating, and designing the biomass densification, storage, and transport operations. Acquiring accurate and repeated measurements of these parameters for hygroscopic densified biomass are not straightforward and on...

  11. Surface area and volume measurements of volcanic ash particles by SEM stereoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Orkun

    2010-05-01

    Surface area of volcanic ash particles is of great importance to research including plume dynamics, particle chemical and water reactions in the plume, modelling (i.e. plume shape, particle interactions , dispersion etc.), remote sensing of transport and SO2, HCl, H2O, CO2 levels, forecasting plume location, and transportation and deposition of ash particles. The implemented method presented in this study offer new insights for surface characterization of volcanic ash particles on macro-pore regions. Surface area and volumes of volcanic ash particles were measured using digital elevation models (DEM) reconstructed from stereoscopic images acquired from different angles by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The method was tested using glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) micro-spheres which exhibit low spherical imperfections. The differences between measured and geometrically calculated surface areas were introduced for both micro-spheres and volcanic ash particles in order to highlight the probable errors in modelling on volcanic ash behaviour. The specific surface areas of volcanic ash particles using this method are reduced by half (from mean values of 0.045 m2/g to 0.021 m2/g) for the size increment 63 μm to 125 μm. Ash particles mostly have higher specific surface area values than the geometric forms irrespective of particle size. The specific surface area trends of spheres and ash particles resemble for finer particles (63 μm). Approximation to sphere and ellipsoid have similar margin of error for coarser particles (125 μm) but both seem to be inadequate for representation of real ash surfaces.

  12. Surface area and volume measurements of volcanic ash particles by SEM stereoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Orkun

    2010-02-01

    Surface area of volcanic ash particles is of great importance to research including plume dynamics, particle chemical and water reactions in the plume, modelling (i.e. plume shape, particle interactions, dispersion etc.), remote sensing of transport and SO 2, HCl, H 2O, CO 2 levels, forecasting plume location, and transportation and deposition of ash particles. The implemented method presented in this study offers new insights for surface characterization of volcanic ash particles on macro-pore regions. Surface area and volumes of volcanic ash particles were measured using digital elevation models (DEM) reconstructed from stereoscopic images acquired from different angles by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The method was tested using glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) micro-spheres which exhibit low spherical imperfections. The differences between measured and geometrically calculated surface areas were introduced for both micro-spheres and volcanic ash particles in order to highlight the probable errors in modelling on volcanic ash behaviour. The specific surface areas of volcanic ash particles using this method are reduced by half (from mean values of 0.045 m 2/g to 0.021 m 2/g) for the size increment 63 µm to 125 µm. Ash particles mostly have higher specific surface area values than the geometric forms irrespective of particle size. The specific surface area trends of spheres and ash particles resemble for finer particles (63 µm). Approximation to sphere and ellipsoid have similar margin of error for coarser particles (125 µm) but both seem to be inadequate for representation of real ash surfaces.

  13. History of the U.S. Army Artillery and Missile School. Volume 3. 1945-1957

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1957-01-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJEC" TASK AREA A WORK UNIT NUMNERS I’,. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADORESI 12. REPORT DATE 1911...1967 13. NUMBER OF PAGES 14. MONITORING AGENCY NAME B AOORESS(Ifdifferenl rmm Controlling Olle,) IS. SECURITY CLASS. rat Is l ep ’epr) Unclassifieod If...alone, During tho S war the School was under the direct control of the Replacement and School Command which was activated on 27 March 1942. This came

  14. History of the Coastal Engineering Research Center 1963-1983, Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    and developing sand trac- ing experiments . 56 Field Research Facility As stated earlier, theoretical modeling sought a practical way to integrate ...sufficient s ize and accuracy, CERC researchers cou ld rapidly deve lop general, predic6ve theories . Designers then would be able to extract the...million in coastal areas and S17.5 million overall. The theory was that more research would produce more data and lead to greater savings.7 Those

  15. The Pedagogy of Subversion in History Education in Conflict-Ridden Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogev, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The article proposes an approach that is based on the assumption that the fostering of the political-critical dimension in the study of history can develop an effective historical consciousness among young students of history that will strengthen their independent informed thinking, reflective skills, and the ability to show empathy. First, I…

  16. Sex differences in resilience to childhood maltreatment: effects of trauma history on hippocampal volume, general cognition and subclinical psychosis in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Samplin, Erin; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Malhotra, Anil K; Szeszko, Philip R; Derosse, Pamela

    2013-09-01

    Recent data suggests that a history of childhood maltreatment is associated with reductions in hippocampal volume in healthy adults. Because this association is also evident in adults with psychiatric illness, it has been suggested that reductions in hippocampal volume associated with childhood maltreatment may be a risk factor for psychiatric illness. Such an interpretation suggests that healthy adults with a history of childhood maltreatment are more resilient to the effects of maltreatment. Current models of resilience suggest, however, that resiliency should be measured across multiple domains of functioning. The present study sought to investigate childhood maltreatment in relationship to hippocampal volumes in healthy adults and to address the question of whether the putative resiliency extends to other domains of functioning. Sixty-seven healthy Caucasian adults were assessed for a history of childhood emotional abuse, emotional neglect and physical abuse and received high resolution structural MR imaging scans. Participants with and without histories of abuse or neglect were compared on measures of total hippocampal volume, general cognitive ability and subclinical psychopathology. Our results suggest that childhood emotional abuse is associated with reduced hippocampus volume in males, but not in females. However, emotional abuse was associated with higher levels of subclinical psychopathology in both males and females. These data suggest that while females may be more resilient to the neurological effects of childhood maltreatment, they are not more resilient to the psychiatric symptoms associated with childhood maltreatment. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in these different levels of resilience.

  17. Estimating intracranial volume using intracranial area in healthy children and those with childhood status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Rory J; Yoong, Michael M; Pujar, Suresh; Chin, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    Background Correcting volumetric measurements of brain structures for intracranial volume (ICV) is important in comparing volumes across subjects with different ICV. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intracranial area (ICA) reliably predicts actual ICV in a healthy pediatric cohort and in children with convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). Methods T1-weighted volumetric MRI was performed on 20 healthy children (control group), 10 with CSE with structurally normal MRI (CSE/MR-), and 12 with CSE with structurally abnormal MRI (CSE/MR+). ICA, using a mid-sagittal slice, and the actual ICV were measured. Results A high Spearman correlation was found between the ICA and ICV measurements in the control (r = 0.96; P < 0.0001), CSE/MR− (r = 0.93; P = 0.0003), and CSE/MR+ (r = 0.94; P < 0.0001) groups. On comparison of predicted and actual ICV, there was no significant difference in the CSE/MR− group (P = 0.77). However, the comparison between predicted and actual ICV was significantly different in the CSE/MR+ (P = 0.001) group. Our Bland–Altman plot showed that the ICA method consistently overestimated ICV in children in the CSE/MR+ group, especially in those with small ICV or widespread structural abnormalities. Conclusions After further validation, ICA measurement may be a reliable alternative to measuring actual ICV when correcting volume measurements for ICV, even in children with localized MRI abnormalities. Caution should be applied when the method is used in children with small ICV and those with multilobar brain pathology. PMID:25365798

  18. [Soft tissues volumes changing in malar and cheek area after fat grafting].

    PubMed

    Nadtochiy, A G; Grischenko, S V; Malitskaya, O A

    2016-01-01

    To improve the predictability of facial soft tissues fat grafting results tissue thickness dynamics before and 1 year postoperatively was assessed by means of ultrasonic method in 58 patients under standardized position of the ultrasonic transducer, physical and technical scanning conditions. The study revealed direct correlation of soft tissues thickness increase after fat grafting with the initial thickness of recipient area tissues. One year after fat grafting 60-65% of additional thickness remained in the lower regions of malar-cheek area (with the greatest soft tissues thickness), and only 25-27% preserved in the upper regions with the minimal initial thickness of soft tissues. I.e. to achieve necessary correction volume in a zone with small initial soft tissues thickness it is necessary to increase the amount of fat grafting stages. As the rates of soft tissues thickness in correction area change during 3-4 months after fat grafting remaining stable after this period it is expedient to assess postoperative results and to carry out repeated fat grafting not earlier than 4 months after operation.

  19. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Wallow burn area, eastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned in 2011 by the Wallow wildfire in eastern Arizona. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and debris-flow volumes for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall and (2) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 percent in response to both the 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall and the 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall to a high of 41 percent in response to the 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. The low probabilities in all modeled drainage basins are likely due to extensive low-gradient hillslopes, burned at low severities, and large drainage-basin areas (greater than 25 square kilometers). Estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from a low of 24 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters, indicating a considerable hazard should debris flows occur

  20. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Monument burn area, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.; Verdin, Kristine L.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the Monument wildfire in southeastern Arizona, in 2011. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain Western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volumes of debris flows for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, (2) 5-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, and (3) 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from a low of 26 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall to 100 percent in response to the 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. The high probabilities in all modeled drainage basins are likely due to the abundance of steep hillslopes and the extensive areas burned at moderately to high severities. The estimated volumes ranged from a low of about 2,000 cubic meters to a high of greater than 200,000 cubic meters.

  1. NRSN1 associated grey matter volume of the visual word form area reveals dyslexia before school.

    PubMed

    Skeide, Michael A; Kraft, Indra; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Neef, Nicole E; Brauer, Jens; Wilcke, Arndt; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes; Friederici, Angela D

    2016-10-01

    Literacy learning depends on the flexibility of the human brain to reconfigure itself in response to environmental influences. At the same time, literacy and disorders of literacy acquisition are heritable and thus to some degree genetically predetermined. Here we used a multivariate non-parametric genetic model to relate literacy-associated genetic variants to grey and white matter volumes derived by voxel-based morphometry in a cohort of 141 children. Subsequently, a sample of 34 children attending grades 4 to 8, and another sample of 20 children, longitudinally followed from kindergarten to first grade, were classified as dyslexics and controls using linear binary support vector machines. The NRSN1-associated grey matter volume of the 'visual word form area' achieved a classification accuracy of ~ 73% in literacy-experienced students and distinguished between later dyslexic individuals and controls with an accuracy of 75% at kindergarten age. These findings suggest that the cortical plasticity of a region vital for literacy might be genetically modulated, thereby potentially preconstraining literacy outcome. Accordingly, these results could pave the way for identifying and treating the most common learning disorder before it manifests itself in school.

  2. A scenario and forecast model for Gulf of Mexico hypoxic area and volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    For almost three decades, the relative size of the hypoxic region on the Louisiana-Texas continental shelf has drawn scientific and policy attention. During that time, both simple and complex models have been used to explore hypoxia dynamics and to provide management guidance relating the size of the hypoxic zone to key drivers. Throughout much of that development, analyses had to accommodate an apparent change in hypoxic sensitivity to loads and often cull observations due to anomalous meteorological conditions. Here, we describe an adaptation of our earlier, simple biophysical model, calibrated to revised hypoxic area estimates and new hypoxic volume estimates through Bayesian estimation. This application eliminates the need to cull observations and provides revised hypoxic extent estimates with uncertainties, corresponding to different nutrient loading reduction scenarios. We compare guidance from this model application, suggesting an approximately 62% nutrient loading reduction is required to reduce Gulf hypoxia to the Action Plan goal of 5,000 km2, to that of previous applications. In addition, we describe for the first time, the corresponding response of hypoxic volume. We also analyze model results to test for increasing system sensitivity to hypoxia formation, but find no strong evidence of such change.

  3. Surface Area, Volume, Mass, and Density Distributions for Sized Biomass Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2007-06-30

    This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to June 30, 2007 which covers the entire performance period of the project. 25 individual biomass particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546 in the size range of 100-200 microns) were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and their external surface area, volume, and drag coefficient/mass (C{sub d}/m) ratios were characterized applying highly specialized video based and high-speed diode array imaging systems. Analysis methods were employed using shape and drag information to calculate mass and density distributions for these particles. Results of these measurements and analyses were validated by independent mass measurements using a particle weighing and counting technique. Similar information for 28 PSOC 1451D bituminous coal particles was retrieved from a previously published work. Using these two information, density correlations for coal/biomass blends were developed. These correlations can be used to estimate the density of the blend knowing either the volume fraction or the mass fraction of coal in the blend. The density correlations presented here will be useful in predicting the burning rate of coal/biomass blends in cofiring combustors. Finally, a discussion on technological impacts and economic projections of burning biomass with coal in US power plants is presented.

  4. Reliable nanomaterial classification of powders using the volume-specific surface area method.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Mielke, Johannes; Bianchin, Alvise; Ghanem, Antoine; Freiberger, Harald; Rauscher, Hubert; Gemeinert, Marion; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2017-01-01

    The volume-specific surface area (VSSA) of a particulate material is one of two apparently very different metrics recommended by the European Commission for a definition of "nanomaterial" for regulatory purposes: specifically, the VSSA metric may classify nanomaterials and non-nanomaterials differently than the median size in number metrics, depending on the chemical composition, size, polydispersity, shape, porosity, and aggregation of the particles in the powder. Here we evaluate the extent of agreement between classification by electron microscopy (EM) and classification by VSSA on a large set of diverse particulate substances that represent all the anticipated challenges except mixtures of different substances. EM and VSSA are determined in multiple labs to assess also the level of reproducibility. Based on the results obtained on highly characterized benchmark materials from the NanoDefine EU FP7 project, we derive a tiered screening strategy for the purpose of implementing the definition of nanomaterials. We finally apply the screening strategy to further industrial materials, which were classified correctly and left only borderline cases for EM. On platelet-shaped nanomaterials, VSSA is essential to prevent false-negative classification by EM. On porous materials, approaches involving extended adsorption isotherms prevent false positive classification by VSSA. We find no false negatives by VSSA, neither in Tier 1 nor in Tier 2, despite real-world industrial polydispersity and diverse composition, shape, and coatings. The VSSA screening strategy is recommended for inclusion in a technical guidance for the implementation of the definition. Graphical abstractWe evaluate the extent of agreement between classification by electron microscopy (EM) and classification by Volume-Specific Surface Area (VSSA) on a large set of diverse particulate substances. These represent the challenges anticipated for identification of nanomaterials by the European Commission

  5. Thermal comfort of people in the hot and humid area of China-impacts of season, climate, and thermal history.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Chen, H; Wang, J; Meng, Q

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a climate chamber study on the thermal comfort of people in the hot and humid area of China. Sixty subjects from naturally ventilated buildings and buildings with split air conditioners participated in the study, and identical experiments were conducted in a climate chamber in both summer and winter. Psychological and physiological responses were observed over a wide range of conditions, and the impacts of season, climate, and thermal history on human thermal comfort were analyzed. Seasonal and climatic heat acclimatization was confirmed, but they were found to have no significant impacts on human thermal sensation and comfort. The outdoor thermal history was much less important than the indoor thermal history in regard to human thermal sensation, and the indoor thermal history in all seasons of a year played a key role in shaping the subjects' sensations in a wide range of thermal conditions. A warmer indoor thermal history in warm seasons produced a higher neutral temperature, a lower thermal sensitivity, and lower thermal sensations in warm conditions. The comfort and acceptable conditions were identified for people in the hot and humid area of China.

  6. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 15, The Real Number System, Chapter 16, Area, Volume, and Computation. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    Topics covered in the first chapter of Unit 8 of this SMSG series include square roots, operations with radicals, operations with real numbers, and the structure of the real number system. The second chapter deals with measurement of area (for rectangular regions, other polygons, and circles), volume and surface area, computation involving…

  7. Groundwater contaminant plume maps and volumes, 100-K and 100-N Areas, Hanford Site, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kenneth H.

    2016-09-27

    extents are shown graphically and in tabular form for comparison to previous estimates. Plume data also were interpolated to a finer grid (10 × 10 m) for some processing, particularly to estimate volumes of contaminated groundwater. However, hydrogeologic transport modeling was not considered for the interpolation. The compilation of plume extents for each contaminant also allowed estimates of overlap of the plumes or areas with more than one contaminant above regulatory standards.A mapping of saturated aquifer thickness also was derived across the 100-K and 100–N study area, based on the vertical difference between the groundwater level (water table) at the top and the altitude of the top of the Ringold Upper Mud geologic unit, considered the bottom of the uppermost unconfined aquifer. Saturated thickness was calculated for each cell in the finer (10 × 10 m) grid. The summation of the cells’ saturated thickness values within each polygon of plume regulatory exceedance provided an estimate of the total volume of contaminated aquifer, and the results also were checked using a SURFER® volumetric integration procedure. The total volume of contaminated groundwater in each plume was derived by multiplying the aquifer saturated thickness volume by a locally representative value of porosity (0.3).Estimates of the uncertainty of the plume delineation also are presented. “Upper limit” plume delineations were calculated for each contaminant using the same procedure as the “average” plume extent except with values at each well that are set at a 95-percent upper confidence limit around the log-normally transformed mean concentrations, based on the standard error for the distribution of the mean value in that well; “lower limit” plumes are calculated at a 5-percent confidence limit around the geometric mean. These upper- and lower-limit estimates are considered unrealistic because the statistics were increased or decreased at each well simultaneously and were not

  8. Community History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Helen M.

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the experience of researching community history in Ivanhoe, Virginia, between 1987 and 1990. The Ivanhoe History Project involved community members in collecting photographs, memorabilia, and oral histories of their town. Subsequent published volumes won the W. D. Weatherford Award and inspired a quilt exhibit and a theatrical production.…

  9. Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 11. North Central Study Area, Section 1.0 Text. Version 3.3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    generally heterogeneous. In some areas, the water table extends into the upper fine grained clay and silty sand layers of the alluvium. In other areas...Organochlorine Pesticides ......... ................. NCSA 3.4-13 Potentially Contaminated Soil Areas and Volumes for Arsenic...NCSA Surface Water, Spring 1987 NCSA 2.2-11 Distribution of Organochlorine Pesticides in NCSA Surface Water, Spring 1987 NCSA 2.2-12 Distribution of

  10. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 1. Introduction and decision-making documentation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. Volume I of the five-volume series summarizes the main elements and the key decision points in the Habitability Study as an introduction to the series.

  11. The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field, western Mexico: ages, volumes, and relative proportions of lava types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis-Kenedi, Catherine B.; Lange, Rebecca A.; Hall, Chris M.; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2005-06-01

    The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field (1600 km2) in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is based on 40Ar/39Ar chronology and volume estimates for eruptive units younger than 1 Ma. Ages are reported for 49 volcanic units, including Volcán Tequila (an andesitic stratovolcano) and peripheral domes, flows, and scoria cones. Volumes of volcanic units ≤1 Ma were obtained with the aid of field mapping, ortho aerial photographs, digital elevation models (DEMs), and ArcGIS software. Between 1120 and 200 kyrs ago, a bimodal distribution of rhyolite (~35 km3) and high-Ti basalt (~39 km3) dominated the volcanic field. Between 685 and 225 kyrs ago, less than 3 km3 of andesite and dacite erupted from more than 15 isolated vents; these lavas are crystal-poor and show little evidence of storage in an upper crustal chamber. Approximately 200 kyr ago, ~31 km3 of andesite erupted to form the stratocone of Volcán Tequila. The phenocryst assemblage of these lavas suggests storage within a chamber at ~2 3 km depth. After a hiatus of ~110 kyrs, ~15 km3 of andesite erupted along the W and SE flanks of Volcán Tequila at ~90 ka, most likely from a second, discrete magma chamber located at ~5 6 km depth. The youngest volcanic feature (~60 ka) is the small andesitic volcano Cerro Tomasillo (~2 km3). Over the last 1 Myr, a total of 128±22 km3 of lava erupted in the Tequila volcanic field, leading to an average eruption rate of ~0.13 km3/kyr. This volume erupted over ~1600 km2, leading to an average lava accumulation rate of ~8 cm/kyr. The relative proportions of lava types are ~22 43% basalt, ~0.4 1% basaltic andesite, ~29 54% andesite, ~2 3% dacite, and ~18 40% rhyolite. On the basis of eruptive sequence, proportions of lava types, phenocryst assemblages, textures, and chemical composition, the lavas do not reflect the differentiation of a single (or only a few) parental liquids in a long-lived magma chamber. The rhyolites are geochemically diverse and were likely

  12. Depositional history and seismic stratigraphy of Lower Cretaceous rocks in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lower Cretaceous rocks, which are widespread throughout the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) and adjacent areas north of the Brooks Range, make up the major part of the thick sedimentary fill of the Colville basin. Much seismic and well information obtained since 1974 has aided considerably in understanding these rocks. These data include about 20,000 km of seismic lines, covering much of the NPRA with a grid spacing of 10-20 km, and 28 exploratory wells that bring the total to more than 50 wells in and adjacent to the NPRA. The purpose of this chapter is to interpret the depositional history of Lower Cretaceous rocks in the NPRA and adjacent areas on the basis of the latest seismic and well data and well data and on information from outcrops in the southern part of the Colville basin. The basin geometry and depositional history described in earlier reports are repeated here in the context of the overall Lower Cretaceous depositional history. Well data (including paleontology) and seismic data are used almost exclusively to interpret relations in the northern foothills and coastal plain areas. Surface data and some well data are used in the southern parts of the northern foothills, and surface data are used exclusively to interpret the depositional history in the southern foothills and Brooks Range. The quality of seismic data is fair to good in most of the coastal plain, where the structure is simple. In the northern foothills, tracing seismic reflections is more difficult, especially in the shallower part of the section because of structural complications in the thrust-faulted anticlines. The quality of seismic data across the structurally complex southern foothills area is inadequate to correlate stratigraphic units of the outcrop area of the southern foothills with subsurface units to the north.

  13. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 5. Peer review summary: TRC (Technical Review Committee) responses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. These volumes (II through IV) were reviewed by a peer-review panel of expert scientists. The scientists concluded that each of the three environmental studies was well planned and well executed. Volume V summarizes the peer review and gives additional information or clarifications as requested during the peer review. Volume V also provides additional supplemental statistical analyses requested by the peer reviewer panel.

  14. Communal visual histories to detect environmental change in northern areas: Examples of emerging North American and Eurasian practices.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Tero

    2015-12-01

    This article explores the pioneering potential of communal visual-optic histories which are recorded, painted, documented, or otherwise expressed. These materials provide collective meanings of an image or visual material within a specific cultural group. They potentially provide a new method for monitoring and documenting changes to ecosystem health and species distribution, which can effectively inform society and decision makers of Arctic change. These visual histories can be positioned in a continuum that extends from rock art to digital photography. They find their expressions in forms ranging from images to the oral recording of knowledge and operate on a given cultural context. For monitoring efforts in the changing boreal zone and Arctic, a respectful engagement with visual histories can reveal emerging aspects of change. The examples from North America and case studies from Eurasia in this article include Inuit sea ice observations, Yu'pik visual traditions of masks, fish die-offs in a sub-boreal catchment area, permafrost melt in the Siberian tundra and early, first detection of a scarabaeid beetle outbreak, a Southern species in the Skolt Sámi area. The pros and cons of using these histories and their reliability are reviewed.

  15. Materials and Area of Study for Advanced Placement Program in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Peter A.

    This paper describes and evaluates benefits of advanced placement programs and identifies materials which can help high school history classroom teachers develop effective advanced placement programs. An advanced placement program is defined as a program which requires a student to do extensive research and writing throughout the school year.…

  16. Cenozoic burial and exhumation history of the Kangerlussuaq area, East Greenland, revealed by new apatite fission-track data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Bonow, Johan M.; Nielsen, Troels F.

    2010-05-01

    The Kangerlussuaq area in East Greenland (c. 68°N) has witnessed a complex geological development during the Cenozoic. The Skaergaard intrusion and the up to 5 km thick flood basalts formed during a short period around 55 Ma, and subsequently numerous intrusive bodies were emplaced, primarily during the Eocene. Relatively little is known about the geological history over the last 35 Myr, other than that an outlier of Middle Miocene lavas is located in the area at an elevation of c. 2.7 km. At the present-day, the area is deeply eroded and magmatic bodies that were emplaced deeply in the crust, are now exposed at the surface, but at the same time, the area has a significant elevation and even hosts the highest peak in Greenland, Gunbjørn Fjeld, 3.7 km above sea level. To unravel the history of burial and exhumation in the Kangerlussuaq area, new apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) data has been acquired for 75 rock samples. Preliminary results show that the area has been subject to several phases of cooling since burial under the Palaeogene flood basalts. Phases of regional cooling along the coast that occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene transition and in the late Neogene are interpreted to be due to uplift and exhumation. Cooling events of local extent that occurred in the Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene are interpreted to be related to both exhumation and to circulating hot fluids. Results from samples along vertical transects reveal details of the protracted exhumation history, and that the present topography was formed during the late Neogene.

  17. Scaling of Haversian canal surface area to secondary osteon bone volume in ribs and limb bones.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Knight, Alex N; Clark, Gunnar C; Crowder, Christian M; Dominguez, Victoria M; Qiu, Shijing; Mulhern, Dawn M; Donahue, Seth W; Busse, Björn; Hulsey, Brannon I; Zedda, Marco; Sorenson, Scott M

    2013-06-01

    Studies of secondary osteons in ribs have provided a great deal of what is known about remodeling dynamics. Compared with limb bones, ribs are metabolically more active and sensitive to hormonal changes, and receive frequent low-strain loading. Optimization for calcium exchange in rib osteons might be achieved without incurring a significant reduction in safety factor by disproportionally increasing central canal size with increased osteon size (positive allometry). By contrast, greater mechanical loads on limb bones might favor reducing deleterious consequences of intracortical porosity by decreasing osteon canal size with increased osteon size (negative allometry). Evidence of this metabolic/mechanical dichotomy between ribs and limb bones was sought by examining relationships between Haversian canal surface area (BS, osteon Haversian canal perimeter, HC.Pm) and bone volume (BV, osteonal wall area, B.Ar) in a broad size range of mature (quiescent) osteons from adult human limb bones and ribs (modern and medieval) and various adult and subadult non-human limb bones and ribs. Reduced major axis (RMA) and least-squares (LS) regressions of HC.Pm/B.Ar data show that rib and limb osteons cannot be distinguished by dimensional allometry of these parameters. Although four of the five rib groups showed positive allometry in terms of the RMA slopes, nearly 50% of the adult limb bone groups also showed positive allometry when negative allometry was expected. Consequently, our results fail to provide clear evidence that BS/BV scaling reflects a rib versus limb bone dichotomy whereby calcium exchange might be preferentially enhanced in rib osteons.

  18. Tobacco control policies in outdoor areas of high volume American transit systems.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elizabeth G; Kennedy, Ryan David; Berman, Micah

    2014-08-01

    Very little is known about how smoking and other tobacco use is regulated in outdoor and semi-enclosed spaces across transit systems. The purpose of this study was to understand how American transit systems are regulating cigarettes and other tobacco products, including smokeless tobacco and e-cigarettes, in outdoor or quasi-outdoor spaces. Within four regions of the United States, a purposive convenience sample was taken of the top five volume American transit systems (n = 20) based on annual ridership. Each transit authority website was systematically reviewed to produce a cross-sectional study of the published policies regarding tobacco product use for indoor, outdoor, and quasi-outdoor spaces of transit property; rules regarding cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and electronic cigarettes were identified. Policies regulating tobacco use were enacted by transit systems and/or the cities and states in which transit systems are located. The majority (80%) of transit systems banned smoking in outdoor areas; few prohibited smokeless tobacco use (15%, n = 3) and some disallowed e-cigarettes (30%, n = 6). Violation consequences ranged widely from none to verbal warnings, ejection from transit property, fines, and imprisonment. Regulating smoking in outdoor or quasi-outdoor environments is common in American transit environments. These policies can help protect vulnerable populations from exposure to secondhand smoke and communicate a tobacco-free norm.

  19. Surface area and volume fraction of random open-pore systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, H.; Elsner, A.; Stoyan, D.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, explicit approximate formulas are presented for the volume fraction and specific surface area of random open-pore systems with poly-disperse pore size distributions. It is shown that the formulas are valid for broad classes of models for porous media characterized by tunable pore size distributions and a variable degree of inter-penetrability of pores. The formulas for the poly-disperse case are based on expressions derived previously for mono-disperse penetrable-sphere models. The results are obtained by analysis of a series of open-pore models, which are prepared by computer simulation of systems of randomly packed partially penetrable spheres with various poly-disperse size distributions such as gamma, lognormal, and Gaussian. The formulas are applied in a study of atomic layer deposition processes on open-pore systems, and the effective Young's modulus and the effective thermal conductivity of Al2O3 coated porous polypropylene electrodes for lithium ion batteries are predicted.

  20. Visualizing surface area and volume of lumens in three dimensions using images from histological sections

    PubMed Central

    LIVINGSTON, DAVID P.; TUONG, TAN D.; KISSLING, GRACE E.; CULLEN, JOHN M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Visualizing the interior (lumen) of a tubular structure within tissue can provide a unique perspective on anatomical organization of the tissue. Portal tracts of the liver contain several vessels and ducts in various patterns of intertwining branches and are an example of such spaces. An inexpensive method, using light microscopy and a sample of conventionally stained canine livers, was used to colorize and allow visualization of the lumens of vessels within the portal tract in three dimensions. When the colour of the background was digitally cleared and the lumen filled with a solid colour, it was possible to measure areas and volumes of the portal vein, arteries, bile ducts and lymphatics. Significant differences between vessels and ducts across lobes and gender in control samples are discussed. Differences were also found between control and mixed breed dogs and between controls and a dog that died of accidental traumatic haemorrhage. These differences are discussed in relation to visualizing lumens using images generated from a light microscope. Vessels in plants such as xylem and continuously formed spaces resulting from ice formation are other examples where this technique could be applied. PMID:25204459

  1. Reliable nanomaterial classification of powders using the volume-specific surface area method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Mielke, Johannes; Bianchin, Alvise; Ghanem, Antoine; Freiberger, Harald; Rauscher, Hubert; Gemeinert, Marion; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2017-02-01

    The volume-specific surface area (VSSA) of a particulate material is one of two apparently very different metrics recommended by the European Commission for a definition of "nanomaterial" for regulatory purposes: specifically, the VSSA metric may classify nanomaterials and non-nanomaterials differently than the median size in number metrics, depending on the chemical composition, size, polydispersity, shape, porosity, and aggregation of the particles in the powder. Here we evaluate the extent of agreement between classification by electron microscopy (EM) and classification by VSSA on a large set of diverse particulate substances that represent all the anticipated challenges except mixtures of different substances. EM and VSSA are determined in multiple labs to assess also the level of reproducibility. Based on the results obtained on highly characterized benchmark materials from the NanoDefine EU FP7 project, we derive a tiered screening strategy for the purpose of implementing the definition of nanomaterials. We finally apply the screening strategy to further industrial materials, which were classified correctly and left only borderline cases for EM. On platelet-shaped nanomaterials, VSSA is essential to prevent false-negative classification by EM. On porous materials, approaches involving extended adsorption isotherms prevent false positive classification by VSSA. We find no false negatives by VSSA, neither in Tier 1 nor in Tier 2, despite real-world industrial polydispersity and diverse composition, shape, and coatings. The VSSA screening strategy is recommended for inclusion in a technical guidance for the implementation of the definition.

  2. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Ramanathan

    2004-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to December 31, 2004 which covers the first six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, supply requests were processed and supplies including biomass test particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546) in the size range of 100-200 microns were obtained from a cofiring pilot plant research facility owned by Southern Company, Birmingham, AL. Morehouse has completed setting up of the gravimetric technique measurement system in the heat transfer laboratory, department of physics and dual degree engineering, Morehouse College. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed setting up of the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system to characterize shape and mass for individual biomass particles. Testing of the gravimetric system, and calibration of the cameras and imaging systems using known sizes of polystyrene particles are in progress.

  3. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2004-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to December 31, 2004 which covers the first six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, supply requests were processed and supplies including biomass test particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546) in the size range of 100-200 microns were obtained from a cofiring pilot plant research facility owned by Southern Company, Birmingham, AL. Morehouse has completed setting up of the gravimetric technique measurement system in the heat transfer laboratory, department of physics and dual degree engineering, Morehouse College. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed setting up of the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system to characterize shape and mass for individual biomass particles. Testing of the gravimetric system, and calibration of the cameras and imaging systems using known sizes of polystyrene particles are in progress.

  4. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 3: Papers by Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.)

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process-and how-would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. This volume contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  5. Improving glacier volume-area scaling to better quantify tropical Andean glacial water resources from remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, A. G.; Kincaid, J. L.; Dobreva, I. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical glaciers are an important component of the water budget for high-altitude catchments in much of the central Andes. The majority of tropical Andean glaciers are small, but it has been suggested that because of their numbers the volume of water they contain is significant. Unfortunately, the ice volume measurements needed to inform decision makers have been made for only a handful of tropical glaciers. In August 2012, with the assistance of the Instituto Geográfico Militar in Bolivia, ground penetrating radar (GPR) and differential Global Positioning System (dGPS) measurements were collected along transects totaling 3,189 m in length on the Charquini SE cirque glacier. This small cirque glacier which is located in the southern portion of the Cordillera Real in Bolivia had an approximate surface area in 2012 of 02.42 square kilometers. Our initial observations indicate that the GPR survey was able to adequately capture the ice bedrock interface. Ordinary Kriging was used to develop maps of surface and subsurface topography from the dGPS and GPR observations. In 2012, the Charquini SE glacier contained a minimum of 3,900,000 cubic meters of ice. This information, along with other recent volume measurements for tropical and sub-tropical Andean glaciers, was used to update earlier volume-area scaling relationships established for these glaciers. This relationship will then be applied to determine the volume of water currently stored in tropical Andean glaciers based on previous research on glaciers areas using remote sensing.

  6. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Arkansas area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 9 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Arkansas Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 1,417 trees sampled in the Arkansas Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination woth total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  7. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Appalachian area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 20 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Appalachian Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,670 trees sampled in the Appalachian Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  8. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Delta area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 13 species and 6 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Delta Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 990 trees sampled in the Delta Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on diameter outside of the bark (d.o.b.) in combination with height with to a 9-inch d.o.b. top.

  9. Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Quantitative Analysis of Structural MRI from the ABIDE Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucharsky Hiess, R.; Alter, R.; Sojoudi, S.; Ardekani, B. A.; Kuzniecky, R.; Pardoe, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced corpus callosum area and increased brain volume are two commonly reported findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated these two correlates in ASD and healthy controls using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Automated methods were used to segment the corpus callosum and intracranial…

  10. Structural Area Inspection Frequency Evaluation (SAIFE). Volume 4. Software Documentation and User’s Manual. Book 2 Modified Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    REPORT NO. FAA-RD-78-29, IV Book 2, LEVW STRUCTURAL AREA INSPECTION FREQUENCY EVALUATION (SAIFE) Volume IV. Software Documentation and User’s Manual...OCOR, OSDM, OPD - These variables are the number of occurrences 6 -fTirst- craks , corrosion, service damage, and production defects, respectively, for a

  11. Cardiac energetics: from E(max) to pressure-volume area.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hiroyuki

    2003-08-01

    1. To celebrate this Festschrift for Professor Colin Gibbs, as an invited speaker, I would like to review briefly my 35 year research career in cardiac physiology. 2. My career started in the late 1960s in Tokyo with my serendipitous discovery of Emax (ventricular end-systolic maximum elastance) as a load-independent contractility index based on the time-varying elastance (E(t)) model of the ventricle. Professor K Sagawa at the Johns Hopkins University, USA, whom I joined in 1971, encouraged me to go further. 3. The next serendipitous event in my career was the discovery of ventricular pressure-volume area (PVA) as a measure of total mechanical energy of ventricular contraction in the late 1970s. The PVA concept was theoretically deducible from the E(t) and Emax concept and correlated surprisingly well with ventricular O2 consumption (Vo2). 4. Professor Gibbs' intuitive recognition of the significance of PVA in myocardial energetics in the 1980-1990s greatly encouraged me thereafter. The third serendipitous event in my career occurred in the mid 1990s and was my discovery of a novel integrative analysis method to assess the total amount of Ca2+ recruited in each excitation-contraction coupling from the decay rate of postextrasystolic potentiation, taking advantage of the Emax-PVA-Vo2 framework. 5. I am now hoping to experience one more serendipitous experience by developing an integrative analysis method of cross-bridge cycling in a beating heart using the Emax and PVA concepts.

  12. Depositional history of sedimentary linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) in a large South American industrial coastal area (Santos Estuary, Southeastern Brazil).

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Bícego, Márcia C; Mahiques, Michel M; Figueira, Rubens C L; Tessler, Moyses G; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports the reconstruction of the contamination history of a large South American industrial coastal area (Santos Estuary, Brazil) using linear alkylbenzenes (LABs). Three sediment cores were dated by (137)Cs. Concentrations in surficial layers were comparable to the midrange concentrations reported for coastal sediments worldwide. LAB concentrations increased towards the surface, indicating increased waste discharges into the estuary in recent decades. The highest concentration values occurred in the early 1970s, a time of intense industrial activity and marked population growth. The decreased LAB concentration, in the late 1970s was assumed to be the result of the world oil crisis. Treatment of industrial effluents, which began in 1984, was represented by decreased LAB levels. Microbial degradation of LABs may be more intense in the industrial area sediments. The results show that industrial and domestic waste discharges are a historical problem in the area.

  13. The Wind and Beyond: A Documentary Journey into the History of Aerodynamics in America. Volume 1; The Ascent of the Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R. (Editor); Taylor, D. Bryan; Kinney, Jeremy; Lee, J. Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    This first volume, plus the succeeding five now in preparation, covers the impact of aerodynamic development on the evolution of the airplane in America. As the six-volume series will ultimately demonstrate, just as the airplane is a defining technology of the twentieth century, aerodynamics has been the defining element of the airplane. Volumes two through six will proceed in roughly chronological order, covering such developments as the biplane, the advent of commercial airliners, flying boats, rotary aircraft, supersonic flight, and hypersonic flight. This series is designed as an aeronautics companion to the Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the U.S. Civil Space Program (NASA SP-4407) series of books. As with Exploring the Unknown, the documents collected during this research project were assembled from a diverse number of public and private sources. A major repository of primary source materials relative to the history of the civil space program is the NASA Historical Reference Collection in the NASA Headquarters History Office. Historical materials housed at NASA field centers, academic institutions, and Presidential libraries were other sources of documents considered for inclusion, as were papers in the archives of private individuals and corporations.

  14. Dysfunctional, but not functional, impulsivity is associated with a history of seriously violent behaviour and reduced orbitofrontal and hippocampal volumes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Veena; Barkataki, Ian; Goswami, Sangeeta; Flora, Satinder; Das, Mrigendra; Taylor, Pamela

    2009-07-15

    Aggression and violent acts have been linked with impulsive responding. We investigated whether impulsive personality trait, especially suggestive of dysfunctional impulsivity (i.e. fast and inaccurate responding where this is non-optimal), is associated with a history of seriously violent behaviour and specific brain deficits in schizophrenia. Twenty-four male participants with schizophrenia, of whom 10 had a history of serious physical violence, and 14 healthy male participants were assessed on impulsiveness (dysfunctional impulsivity), venturesomeness (functional impulsivity), and empathy. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The results revealed that participants with schizophrenia and a history of violence showed elevated impulsiveness but had comparable scores on venturesomeness and empathy dimensions. Impulsiveness scores correlated negatively with reduced orbitofrontal grey matter volume in both the patient and healthy control groups, and with hippocampal volume in the patient group. Our findings suggest that dysfunctional, but not functional, impulsivity is elevated in patients with schizophrenia with a propensity for repetitive violence, and this in turn appears to be associated with reduce volumes of both the orbitofrontal cortex grey matter and the hippocampus. Violence risk prediction and management strategies in schizophrenia may benefit from including specific measures of dysfunctional impulsive traits.

  15. The US Air Force Aerial Spray Unit: a history of large area disease vector control operations, WWII through Katrina.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark; Haagsma, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The US Air Force has had a long history of aerial applications of pesticides to fulfill a variety of missions, the most important being the protection of troops through the minimization of arthropod vectors capable of disease transmission. Beginning in World War II, aerial application of pesticides by the military has effectively controlled vector and nuisance pest populations in a variety of environments. Currently, the military aerial spray capability resides in the US Air Force Reserve (USAFR), which operates and maintains C-130 airplanes capable of a variety of missions, including ultra low volume applications for vector and nuisance pests, as well as higher volume aerial applications of herbicides and oil-spill dispersants. The USAFR aerial spray assets are the only such fixed-wing aerial spray assets within the Department of Defense. In addition to troop protection, the USAFR Aerial Spray Unit has participated in a number of humanitarian/relief missions, most recently in the response to the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which heavily damaged the Gulf Coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This article provides historical background on the Air Force Aerial Spray Unit and describes the operations in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

  16. A history of intertidal flat area in south San Francisco Bay, California: 1858 to 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, Bruce; Foxgrover, Amy

    2006-01-01

    A key question in salt pond restoration in South San Francisco Bay is whether sediment sinks created by opening ponds will result in the loss of intertidal flats. Analyses of a series of bathymetric surveys of South San Francisco Bay made from 1858 to 2005 reveal changes in intertidal flat area in both space and time that can be used to better understand the pre-restoration system. This analysis also documents baseline conditions of intertidal flats that may be altered by restoration efforts. From 1858 to 2005, intertidal flat area decreased by about 25% from 69.2 +6.4/-7.6 km2 to 51.2 +4.8/-5.8 km2. Intertidal flats in the north tended to decrease in area during the period of this study whereas those south of Dumbarton Bridge were either stable or increased in area. From 1983 to 2005, intertidal flats south of Dumbarton Bridge increased from 17.6 +1.7/-2.5 km2 to 24.2 +1.0/-1.8 km2. Intertidal flats along the east shore of the bay tended to be more erosional and decreased in area while those along the west shore of the bay did not significantly change in area. Loss of intertidal flats occurred intermittently along the eastern shore of the bay north of the Dumbarton Bridge. There was little or no loss from 1931 to 1956 and from 1983 to 2005. Predictions of future change in intertidal flat area that do not account for this spatial and temporal variability are not likely to be accurate. The causes of the spatial and temporal variability in intertidal flat area in South San Francisco Bay are not fully understood, but appear related to energy available to erode sediments, sediment redistribution from north to south in the bay, and sediment available to deposit on the flats. Improved understanding of sediment input to South San Francisco Bay, especially from Central Bay, how it is likely to change in the future, the redistribution of sediment within the bay, and ultimately its effect on intertidal flat area would aid in the management of restoration of South San

  17. Successes and failures of recording and interpreting seismic data in structurally complex area: seismic case history

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, V.C.; Johnson, J.H.; Crittenden, J.L.; Anderson, T.D.

    1986-05-01

    There are successes and failures in recording and interpreting a single seismic line across the South Owl Creek Mountain fault on the west flank of the Casper arch. Information obtained from this type of work should help explorationists who are exploring structurally complex areas. A depth cross section lacks a subthrust prospect, but is illustrated to show that the South Owl Creek Mountain fault is steeper with less apparent displacement than in areas to the north. This cross section is derived from two-dimensional seismic modeling, using data processing methods specifically for modeling. A flat horizon and balancing technique helps confirm model accuracy. High-quality data were acquired using specifically designed seismic field parameters. The authors concluded that the methodology used is valid, and an interactive modeling program in addition to cross-line control can improve seismic interpretations in structurally complex areas.

  18. History or current selection? A molecular analysis of 'area effects' in the land snail Cepaea nemoralis.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, A; Clarke, B

    2000-01-01

    We have used molecular variation in microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA to throw light on the origins of enigmatic geographical patterns, known as 'area effects', in the shell polymorphisms of the land snail Cepaea nemoralis. Our aim was to assess the relative importance of recent selection and historical events in the formation of these patterns. On the Marlborough Downs in Wiltshire, England, the 'type locality' for area effects, the frequencies of microsatellites are significantly associated with the frequencies of alleles for shell banding. A less clear association is found between microsatellites and shell colour. Mitochondrial haplotypes show no significant relationships. Although the correlated geographical patterns could be the results of random genetic drift from an initially uniform array of populations, the magnitudes of the patterns, and of the correlations between them, seem too strong to have arisen by drift since the last glaciation. Our results suggest that invasions from refugia have been the most important factors in forming area effects. PMID:10983823

  19. History of the negotiations of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Alper, J.M.

    1988-04-01

    This work chronicles events leading to a recommendation that an agency be created by compact among Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia to provide a regional rail-transportation system. The body of text describes the process through which framers of the compact finally brought the recommendation to fruition. Many issues arose during the course of negotiations, but each was resolved satisfactorily, leading to a successful political instrument that has enabled the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to design and construct a rapid-rail transit system for the metropolitan area.

  20. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. VIII. The Global Star Formation Histories of 60 Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Skillman, Evan D.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Holtzman, Jon; Rosema, Keith; Cole, Andrew; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2011-09-01

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 60 nearby (D <~ 4 Mpc) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations from images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and analyzed as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST). This volume-limited sample contains 12 dwarf spheroidal (dSph)/dwarf elliptical (dE), 5 dwarf spiral, 28 dwarf irregular (dI), 12 dSph/dI (transition), and 3 tidal dwarf galaxies. The sample spans a range of ~10 mag in MB and covers a wide range of environments, from highly interacting to truly isolated. From the best-fit SFHs, we find three significant results for dwarf galaxies in the ANGST volume: (1) the majority of dwarf galaxies formed the bulk of their mass prior to z ~ 1, regardless of current morphological type; (2) the mean SFHs of dIs, transition dwarf galaxies (dTrans), and dSphs are similar over most of cosmic time, and only begin to diverge a few Gyr ago, with the clearest differences between the three appearing during the most recent 1 Gyr and (3) the SFHs are complex and the mean values are inconsistent with simple SFH models, e.g., single bursts, constant star formation rates (SFRs), or smooth, exponentially declining SFRs. The mean SFHs show clear divergence from the cosmic SFH at z <~ 0.7, which could be evidence that low-mass systems have experienced delayed star formation relative to more massive galaxies. The sample shows a strong density-morphology relationship, such that the dSphs in the sample are less isolated than the dIs. We find that the transition from a gas-rich to gas-poor galaxy cannot be solely due to internal mechanisms such as stellar feedback, and instead is likely the result of external mechanisms, e.g., ram pressure and tidal stripping and tidal forces. In terms of their environments, SFHs, and gas fractions, the majority of the dTrans appear to be low-mass dIs that simply lack Hα emission, similar to Local Group (LG) dTrans DDO 210

  1. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  2. Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

  3. A Brief Technical History of the Large-Area Picosecond Photodetector (LAPPD) Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.W.; et al.

    2016-03-06

    The Large Area Picosecond PhotoDetector (LAPPD) Collaboration was formed in 2009 to develop large-area photodetectors capable of time resolutions measured in pico-seconds, with accompanying sub-millimeter spatial resolution. During the next three and one-half years the Collaboration developed the LAPPD design of 20 x 20 cm modules with gains greater than $10^7$ and non-uniformity less than $15\\%$, time resolution less than 50 psec for single photons and spatial resolution of 700~microns in both lateral dimensions. We describe the R\\&D performed to develop large-area micro-channel plate glass substrates, resistive and secondary-emitting coatings, large-area bialkali photocathodes, and RF-capable hermetic packaging. In addition, the Collaboration developed the necessary electronics for large systems capable of precise timing, built up from a custom low-power 15-GigaSample/sec waveform sampling 6-channel integrated circuit and supported by a two-level modular data acquisition system based on Field-Programmable Gate Arrays for local control, data-sparcification, and triggering. We discuss the formation, organization, and technical successes and short-comings of the Collaboration. The Collaboration ended in December 2012 with a transition from R\\&D to commercialization.

  4. Retrieval of phase history parameters from distributed scatterers in urban areas using very high resolution SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Bamler, Richard

    2012-09-01

    In a recent contribution Ferretti and co-workers (Ferretti, A., Fumagalli, A., Novali, F., Prati, C., Rocca, F., Rucci, A., 2011. A new algorithm for processing interferometric data-stacks: SqueeSAR IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 49(9), pp. 3460-3470) have proposed the SqueeSAR method, a way to exploit temporally coherent distributed scatterers in coherent SAR data stacks. Elevation and deformation or subsidence estimates are obtained with accuracy similar as in the well known persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI). In this paper we propose an alternative approach and provide a first demonstration of the optimal estimation of distributed scatterers' phase histories in urban areas. Different to SqueeSAR, we derive phase histories for each distributed scatterer pixel rather than for groups of pixels. We use the Anderson-Darling statistical test to identify neighboring samples of the same distribution. Prior to covariance matrix estimation required for maximum likelihood estimation we apply a multi-resolution defringe technique. By using TerraSAR-X high resolution spotlight data, it is demonstrated that we are able to retrieve reliable phase histories and motion parameter estimates from distributed scatterers with signal-to-noise-ratio far below the common range.

  5. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ~1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ~20%–35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  6. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, M.B.; Stoliker, D.L.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ???1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ???20%-35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Social Science on the Frontier: New Horizons in History and Geography. The Social Science Education Consortium Conference Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham, Ed.; Bednarz, Robert S., Ed.

    This collection of essays examines recent scholarship in history and geography. The readings are for teachers, teacher educators, curriculum coordinators, and developers of curriculum materials. Following a foreword by the series editors, Matthew T. Downey and Joseph P. Stoltman, the essays are: (1) "At Play with Education and History"…

  8. History of the Balkans: Twentieth Century. Volume 2. The Joint Committee on Eastern Europe Publication Series. No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelavich, Barbara

    Principal issues in the 20th century development of the Balkan Peninsula are discussed in this introductory history text. Three themes--national rivalries, great power interference, and the economic, social, and political problems of modernization--are given special emphasis. An overview of 18th and 19th century history precedes the two major…

  9. [An automatic extraction algorithm for individual tree crown projection area and volume based on 3D point cloud data].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Heng; Feng, Zhong-Ke; Su, Zhi-Fang; Xu, Hui; Jiao, You-Quan; Deng, Ou

    2014-02-01

    Tree crown projection area and crown volume are the important parameters for the estimation of biomass, tridimensional green biomass and other forestry science applications. Using conventional measurements of tree crown projection area and crown volume will produce a large area of errors in the view of practical situations referring to complicated tree crown structures or different morphological characteristics. However, it is difficult to measure and validate their accuracy through conventional measurement methods. In view of practical problems which include complicated tree crown structure, different morphological characteristics, so as to implement the objective that tree crown projection and crown volume can be extracted by computer program automatically. This paper proposes an automatic untouched measurement based on terrestrial three-dimensional laser scanner named FARO Photon120 using plane scattered data point convex hull algorithm and slice segmentation and accumulation algorithm to calculate the tree crown projection area. It is exploited on VC+6.0 and Matlab7.0. The experiments are exploited on 22 common tree species of Beijing, China. The results show that the correlation coefficient of the crown projection between Av calculated by new method and conventional method A4 reaches 0.964 (p<0.01); and the correlation coefficient of tree crown volume between V(VC) derived from new method and V(C) by the formula of a regular body is 0.960 (p<0.001). The results also show that the average of V(C) is smaller than that of V(VC) at the rate of 8.03%, and the average of A4 is larger than that of A(V) at the rate of 25.5%. Assumed Av and V(VC) as ture values, the deviations of the new method could be attributed to irregularity of the crowns' silhouettes. Different morphological characteristics of tree crown led to measurement error in forest simple plot survey. Based on the results, the paper proposes that: (1) the use of eight-point or sixteen-point projection with

  10. Volume and surface area size distribution, water mass and model fitting of GCE/CASE/WATOX marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.

    1990-06-01

    As a part of the Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX), size distributions of marine aerosols were measured at two altitudes of about 2750 and 150 m above sea level (asl) over the size range 0.1 ˜ 32 μm. Lognormal fitting was applied to the corrected aerosol size spectra to determine the volume and surface area size distributions of the CASE-WATOX marine aerosols. Each aerosol size distribution was fitted with three lognormal distributions representing fine-, large-, and giant-particle modes. Water volume fraction and dry particle size of each aerosol size distribution were also calculated using empirical formulas for particle size as a function of relative humidity and particle type. Because of the increased influence from anthropogenic sources in the continental United States, higher aerosol volume concentrations were observed in the fine-particle mode near-shore off the east coast; 2.11 and 3.63 μm3 cm-3 for free troposphere (FT) and marine boundary layer (MBL), compared with the open-sea Bermuda area values; 0.13 and 0.74 μm3 cm-3 for FT and MBL. The large-particle mode exhibits the least variations in volume distributions between the east coast and open-sea Bermuda area, having a volume geometric median diameter (VGMD) between 1.4 and 1.6 μm and a geometric standard deviation between 1.57 and 1.68. For the giant-particle mode, larger VGMD and volume concentrations were observed for marine aerosols nearshore off the east coast than in the open-sea Bermuda area because of higher relative humidity and higher surface wind speed conditions. Wet VGMD and aerosol water volume concentrations at 15 m asl ship level were determined by extrapolating from those obtained by analysis of the CASE-WATOX aircraft aerosol data. Abundance of aerosol water in the MBL serves as an important pathway for heterogeneous conversion of SO2 in sea salt aerosol particles.

  11. Using the genetics of Echinococcus multilocularis to trace the history of expansion from an endemic area.

    PubMed

    Umhang, G; Knapp, J; Hormaz, V; Raoul, F; Boué, F

    2014-03-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis, is the most serious parasitic disease for humans in Europe, with a sylvatic life cycle generally between small rodents and red foxes. General expansion of the range of E. multilocularis has been observed across Europe over the last 15years. In France, a westward spread of the known endemic areas of the parasite was described recently. For genotyping, the microsatellite EmsB was used to trace expansion in five French areas. A total of 22 EmsB profiles were identified, with five similar to those previously described in other parts of Europe. An imbalance of genetic diversity was observed between the five areas which also revealed their interconnection with the presence of common profiles, notably the two main profiles both present in all regions except one in the North. These two findings are similar to those described at the European level, highlighting transmission of the parasite by a mainland-island system. A spatio-temporal scenario of the expansion of E. multilocularis can be proposed with spread from the French historical focus in eastern France to the Lorraine, the Champagne-Ardenne and finally the North, while simultaneously another expansion has occurred from the historical focus into the West. The colonization by the parasite into the West and North areas from the historical focus was probably due to the migration of foxes several decades ago. Recent detection of the parasite in new endemic "départements" may be due to more active research rather than a recent spread of the parasite. Regarding the numerous data obtained by the different EmsB analyses, principally across Europe, centralization of all the profiles described in a public databank appears necessary in order to obtain a precise understanding of transmission of the parasite from one country to another.

  12. Static allometry of unicellular green algae: scaling of cellular surface area and volume in the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales).

    PubMed

    Neustupa, J

    2016-02-01

    The surface area-to-volume ratio of cells is one of the key factors affecting fundamental biological processes and, thus, fitness of unicellular organisms. One of the general models for allometric increase in surface-to-volume scaling involves fractal-like elaboration of cellular surfaces. However, specific data illustrating this pattern in natural populations of the unicellular organisms have not previously been available. This study shows that unicellular green algae of the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales) have positive allometric surface-to-volume scaling caused by changes in morphology of individual species, especially in the degree of cell lobulation. This allometric pattern was also detected within most of the cultured and natural populations analysed. Values of the allometric S:V scaling within individual populations were closely correlated to the phylogenetic structure of the clade. In addition, they were related to species-specific cellular morphology. Individual populations differed in their allometric patterns, and their position in the allometric space was strongly correlated with the degree of allometric S:V scaling. This result illustrates that allometric shape patterns are an important correlate of the capacity of individual populations to compensate for increases in their cell volumes by increasing the surface area. However, variation in allometric patterns was not associated with phylogenetic structure. This indicates that the position of the populations in the allometric space was not evolutionarily conserved and might be influenced by environmental factors.

  13. Corpus callosum area and brain volume in autism spectrum disorder: quantitative analysis of structural MRI from the ABIDE database.

    PubMed

    Kucharsky Hiess, R; Alter, R; Sojoudi, S; Ardekani, B A; Kuzniecky, R; Pardoe, H R

    2015-10-01

    Reduced corpus callosum area and increased brain volume are two commonly reported findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated these two correlates in ASD and healthy controls using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Automated methods were used to segment the corpus callosum and intracranial region. No difference in the corpus callosum area was found between ASD participants and healthy controls (ASD 598.53 ± 109 mm(2); control 596.82 ± 102 mm(2); p = 0.76). The ASD participants had increased intracranial volume (ASD 1,508,596 ± 170,505 mm(3); control 1,482,732 ± 150,873.5 mm(3); p = 0.042). No evidence was found for overall ASD differences in the corpus callosum subregions.

  14. Geographical Area and Life History Traits Influence Diet in an Arctic Marine Predator

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Global changes are thought to affect most Arctic species, yet some populations are more at risk. Today, the Barents Sea ecoregion is suffering the strongest sea ice retreat ever measured; and these changes are suspected to modify food access and thus diet of several species. Biochemical diet tracers enable investigation of diet in species such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). We examined individual diet variation of female polar bears in Svalbard, Norway, and related it to year, season (spring and autumn), sampling area and breeding status (solitary, with cubs of the year or yearlings). Sampling areas were split according to their ice cover: North-West (less sea ice cover), South-East (larger amplitude in sea ice extent) and North-East/South-West (NESW) as bears from that zone are more mobile among all regions of Svalbard. We measured fatty acid (FA) composition in adipose tissue and carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotopes in plasma and red blood cells. Females feeding in the North-West area had lower δ15N values than those from the NESW. In South-East females, δ13C values were lower in autumn compared to spring and females seemed less selective in their diet as depicted by large variances in stable isotope values. Considering the differences in FA composition and stable isotope values, we suggest that females from the North-West and South-East could ingest a higher proportion of avian prey. With regard to breeding status, solitary females had higher δ15N values and smaller variance in their stable isotopic values than females with cubs, suggesting that solitary females were more selective and prey on higher trophic level species (i.e. seals). Overall, our results indicate that prey availability for Svalbard polar bears varies according to geographical area and prey selectivity differs according to breeding status. Our findings suggest that complex changes in sea ice and prey availability will interact to affect Svalbard polar bear feeding patterns

  15. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory`s 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory`s Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram.

  16. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 7: Oklahoma City Area, 1969-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The seventh volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Oklahoma City Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) General Description: Geography and Demography (population;…

  17. Comparison of two flow-based imaging methods to measure individual red blood cell area and volume.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Rossi, Domenico; Caserta, Sergio; Cesarelli, Mario; Guido, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    The red blood cells (RBCs) population is characterized by a high heterogeneity in membrane area, cellular volume, and mechanical properties, mainly due to the variety of mechanical and chemical stresses that a red cell undergoes in its entire life span. Here, we provide the first simultaneous area and volume measurements of RBCs flowing in microcapillaries, by using high-speed video microscopy imaging and quantitative data processing based on image analysis techniques. Both confined and unbounded flow conditions (depending on the relative size of RBCs and microcapillary diameter) are investigated. The results are compared with micropipette experiments from the literature and data from Coulter counter routine clinical blood tests. Good agreement is found for RBC volume, especially in the case of confined flow conditions. Surface area measurements, which are lacking in the routine clinical test, are of special interest being a potential diagnostic parameter of altered cell deformability and aggregability. Overall, our results provide a novel flow methodology suitable for high-throughput measurements of RBC geometrical parameters, allowing one to overcome the limits of classical static methods, such as micropipette aspiration, which are not suitable for handling a large number of cells.

  18. 76 FR 76299 - Higher Volume Port Area-State of Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... and within a 50-mile arc measured from Cape Flattery, Washington, to the HVPA. Higher volume port...://www.regulations.gov , inserting USCG-2011-0576 in the ``Keyword'' box, and then clicking ``Search... the HVPA, currently a 50-mile arc centered on the entrance to Port Angeles, Washington, westward...

  19. Sulcal Morphology and Volume of Broca's Area Linked to Handedness and Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Joanne L.; Kemp, Graham J.; Roberts, Neil; Garcia-Finana, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of handedness and sex on: (i) sulcal contours defining PO and PTR and (ii) volume estimates of PO and PTR subfields in 40 left- and 42 right-handers. Results show an effect of handedness on discontinuity of the inferior frontal sulcus (IFS: P less than 0.01). Discontinuity of IFS was observed in: 43% left- and 62% right…

  20. Final Remedial Investigation Report Area of Contamination (AOC) 57. Volume II. Appendices A through D

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    occupied by Fort Devens were retained by the Army for reserve forces training and renamed the Devens Reserve Forces Training Area ( RFTA ). Areas not retained...as part of the Devens RFTA were, or are in the process of being, transferred to new owners for reuse and redevelopment. AOC 57 is located in an area

  1. Learning to Share: A Report on the Disadvantaged Country Areas Program for 1978. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Shirley K.

    The Disadvantaged Country Areas Program in Australia involves a limited number of areas in each State selected according to their relative poverty, special need for improved educational provisions, and lack of opportunities for employment and training for young people. All schools in the declared areas are expected to share the services and…

  2. The Astroni volcano: the only example of closely spaced eruptions in the same vent area during the recent history of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaia, Roberto; D'Antonio, Massimo; Dell'Erba, Francesco; Di Vito, Mauro; Orsi, Giovanni

    2004-05-01

    The Astroni volcano formed during the third and most recent epoch of activity (4.8-3.8 ka) of the Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc). The activity of the volcano was dominated by explosive, mostly phreatomagmatic eruptions, with only subordinate lava effusions. We have grouped the sequence of deposits into seven distinct units, separated by erosional unconformities or very thin paleosols. The units include mostly surge beds, with subordinate strombolian deposits and lavas, and one plinian fallout layer. The total volume of erupted magma is 0.45 km 3 (DRE), while the total mass is 1.12×10 12 kg. The magma feeding the first five eruptions was alkali-trachytic and slightly zoned, while the last two eruptions tapped a magma batch resulting from mixing of the previously extruded alkali-trachytic and a less evolved trachytic magma. The volcano grew at the northwestern edge of the polygonal volcano-tectonic collapse, northwest-southeast elongated, which accompanied the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (4.1 ka), the largest of the third epoch. Available radiometric dates and stratigraphical data constrain the age of the volcano in the final part of the 4.1-3.8 ka time span. This implies that the seven eruptions followed each other at very short time intervals. This conclusion is also supported by constancy in archaeological facies of findings within the paleosols between variable Astroni units, in the plain north of the caldera. The sequence of close eruptions in the same area, although with a slight migration of the vent from northwest to southeast, makes the Astroni volcano peculiar in the recent history of the CFc. Therefore, the definition of its history is very important in order to understand one of the past phenomenologies of the caldera, relevant elements to forecast its behavior.

  3. Small ICBM Area Narrowing Report. Volume 3: Hard Silo in Patterned Array Basing Mode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    from full enjoyment of the natural scenic, recreational and other aspects of the national forest " (16 USC 497). The recently enacted Forest and...areas, National /State Forests lands, and other special land use categories were considered in the Deployment Area evaluation. Areas that have no or...Wilderness Areas (5.3.1.A.1) National /State Monuments (5.3.1.A.2) National Recreation Areas (5.3.1.A.3) National /State Parks (5.3.1.A.4) Wild and Scenic Rivers

  4. Cenozoic structural history of selected areas in the eastern Great Basin, Nevada-Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Ernest

    1983-01-01

    axis of the CRST. The most intensely faulted and tilted rocks along the axis of the CRST are located in the Tunnel Spring Mountains where Miocene(?) extension on closely spaced listric faults produced as much as 70 percent extension locally. Three episodes of Oligocene-Miocene deformation, all interpreted to have formed in an extensional environment, are recognized in the Tunnel Spring Mountains. The nearby Burbank Hills area may have been involved in the same deformational episodes, though there the relationships are not as clear-cut nor does evidence occur of extreme extension. Tight asymmetric folds in the Burbank Hills are interpreted as drape structures formed over buried normal faults. Other structures along the southern CRST have fold-like forms, but they result from cross-strike alternations in fault-related tilt directions, and they formed in an extensional stress regime. Least-principal stress directions inferred from orientations of extensional structures vary from ENE-WSW in the southern Tunnel Spring Mountains to approximately E-W in the Disappointment Hills and NW-SE in selected areas east of the axis of the CRST. The size, geographic distribution, and new data on the age of areas of major extensional faulting preclude previously published interpretations that the extension is related to major east-directed overthrusting of the Sevier orogeny in areas east of the hinterland of west-central Utah.

  5. Glacial history of a mid-altitude mountain massif: cartography and dating in the Chablais area (France, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, A.; Reynard, E.; Delannoy, J.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The Chablais area, considered as one of the cradles of glaciology (de Charpentier, 1841; Morlot, 1859), has been studied for a long time but several questions still remain unresolved. This study aims to reconstruct the glacial history of the massif, in order to explain the glacial landforms, which constitute an important part of the local geomorphology. The study focuses on the last glacial cycle (OIS 5 - OIS 2). The area is primarily associated with the the Valais glacier, by several local glacial flows and, to a lesser extent, by the Giffre glacier. Its position at the interface of the important Valais glacial flow and less powerful local flows is a specificity of the study area, which implies several bifurcations, penetration of the main glacier into laterals valleys, damming situations, and different responses of the various ice bodies to climatic changes. The study is divided in four steps. (1) The first step was to carry out a wide bibliographic survey to identify the state of knowledge, especially in relation to areas previously poorly studied and areas that needed to be reconsidered given developments in dating methods. (2) Field surveys allowed us to complete observations and prepare local geomorphological maps (of glacial landforms and associated phenomena). (3) The third step was to assemble heterogeneous data (old and new maps, Digital Terrain Models, aerial photographies) in a GIS to establish maps of glacial stages. (4) Finally, the absolute and relative chronology of deglaciation (Guitter, 2003) was completed by cosmogenic nuclide dating. Results have allowed us to address the conditions of glacial landform deposition and evolution in a mid-altitude mountain range, and show the need to be prudent in comparing results of different dating methods. Our results suggest that the ages obtained are overall too young in regard to 10Be ages on the northern alpine foreland (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004) and are in conflict with 14C dates obtained in the area

  6. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2012 Waldo Canyon Burn Area near Colorado Springs, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Dupree, Jean A.; Elliott, John G.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the 2012 Waldo Canyon fire near Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and potential volume of debris flows along the drainage network of the burned area and to estimate the same for 22 selected drainage basins along U.S. Highway 24 and the perimeter of the burned area. Input data for the models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 2-year storm (29 millimeters); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 10-year storm (42 millimeters); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 25-year storm (48 millimeters). Estimated debris-flow probabilities at the pour points of the the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 to 54 percent in response to the 2-year storm; from less than 1 to 74 percent in response to the 10-year storm; and from less than 1 to 82 percent in response to the 25-year storm. Basins and drainage networks with the highest probabilities tended to be those on the southern and southeastern edge of the burn area where soils have relatively high clay contents and gradients are steep. Nine of the 22 drainage basins of interest have greater than a 40-percent probability of producing a debris flow in response to the 10-year storm. Estimated debris-flow volumes for all rainfalls modeled range from a low of 1,500 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters. Estimated debris-flow volumes increase with basin size and distance along the drainage network, but some smaller drainages were also predicted to produce

  7. Advanced Transportation System Studies. Technical Area 3: Alternate Propulsion Subsystems Concepts. Volume 3; Program Cost Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel J. H.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to provide definition of alternate propulsion systems for both earth-to-orbit (ETO) and in-space vehicles (upper stages and space transfer vehicles). For such propulsion systems, technical data to describe performance, weight, dimensions, etc. was provided along with programmatic information such as cost, schedule, needed facilities, etc. Advanced technology and advanced development needs were determined and provided. This volume separately presents the various program cost estimates that were generated under three tasks: the F- IA Restart Task, the J-2S Restart Task, and the SSME Upper Stage Use Task. The conclusions, technical results , and the program cost estimates are described in more detail in Volume I - Executive Summary and in individual Final Task Reports.

  8. United States Coast Guard Local Area Network (LAN). Feasibility Analysis Report. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    entitled RUSCG Headquarters Local Area Network (LAN) Feasibility Analysis", was begun September 30, 1985. It is based upon the updated Requirements...Alternative LAN Architectures Four alternative local area network conceptual designs were selected through an iterative process, described below and...These criteria represent the set of most significant factors that Coast Guard management might use to select a local area network for Headquarters

  9. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 3, Subject Area reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, R.I.

    1994-01-14

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Subject Area manuals are designed as reference guides, that is, each chapter provides the information needed to make best use of each subject area, its tables, and reporting capabilities. Each subject area is documented in a chapter in one of the subject area manuals. Because these are reference manuals, most of the information is also available in the online help system as well. See Section 5.4.2 of the HEIS User`s Guide (DOE-RL 1994a) for a detailed description of the online help.

  10. Hydrogeology, distribution, and volume of saline groundwater in the southern midcontinent and adjacent areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osborn, Noël I.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Seger, Christian H.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogeology, distribution, and volume of saline water in 22 aquifers in the southern midcontinent of the United States were evaluated to provide information about saline groundwater resources that may be used to reduce dependency on freshwater resources. Those aquifers underlie six States in the southern midcontinent—Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas—and adjacent areas including all or parts of Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming and some offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico. Saline waters of the aquifers were evaluated by defining salinity zones; digitizing data, primarily from the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the U.S. Geological Survey; and computing the volume of saline water in storage. The distribution of saline groundwater in the southern midcontinent is substantially affected by the hydrogeology and groundwater-flow systems of the aquifers. Many of the aquifers in the southern midcontinent are underlain by one or more aquifers, resulting in vertically stacked aquifers containing groundwaters of varying salinity. Saline groundwater is affected by past and present hydrogeologic conditions. Spatial variation of groundwater salinity in the southern midcontinent is controlled primarily by locations of recharge and discharge areas, groundwater-flow paths and residence time, mixing of freshwater and saline water, and interactions with aquifer rocks and sediments. The volume calculations made for the evaluated aquifers in the southern midcontinent indicate that about 39,900 million acre-feet (acre-ft) of saline water is in storage. About 21,600 million acre-ft of the water in storage is slightly to moderately saline (1,000–10,000 milligrams per liter [mg/L] dissolved solids), and about 18,300 million acre-ft is very saline (10,000–35,000 mg/L dissolved solids). The largest volumes of saline water are in the coastal lowlands (about

  11. Students’ perception and experience of intimate area examination and sexual history taking during undergraduate clinical skills training:

    PubMed Central

    Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Haque, Shafiul; Irshad, Mohammad; Al-Zahrani, Noor; Al-Bedaie, Eman; Al-Fahad, Latifah; Al-Eid, Manar; Al-Mohaimeed, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study explores the experiences of Saudi undergraduate medical students about intimate-area examination (IAE) and sexual history taking (SHT) skills and assesses the barriers and their impacts on students’ learning. This survey-based study was performed at 2 Saudi university medical colleges and revealed that most of the students never performed IAE, that is, female breast, male genital, female genital, female pelvic, male rectal, and female rectal. We found that 42.3% students had never taken any sexual history during their course. Both, male and female students reported barriers of patient refusal, mismatched sex, cultural background, ethical factors, lack of supervision, lack of training, and lack of skills. Among the currently used pedagogical techniques, majority of the students were satisfied with real patient-based learning, followed by video and manikin-based learning. The study indicates that Saudi students do not have sufficient experience of IAE and SHT because of above-mentioned barriers along with religious issues. This study suggests that teachers provide positive support to students and that they develop novel, competent teaching-and-learning techniques to meet the skills training of students without compromising on religious, sociocultural, and ethical values of the kingdom. PMID:27472734

  12. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2012 High Park Burn Area near Fort Collins, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Dupree, Jean A.; Elliott, John G.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the 2012 High Park fire near Fort Collins in Larimer County, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volume of debris flows along the burned area drainage network and to estimate the same for 44 selected drainage basins along State Highway 14 and the perimeter of the burned area. Input data for the models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall (25 millimeters); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall (43 millimeters); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall (51 millimeters). Estimated debris-flow probabilities along the drainage network and throughout the drainage basins of interest ranged from 1 to 84 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall; from 2 to 95 percent in response to the 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall; and from 3 to 97 in response to the 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Basins and drainage networks with the highest probabilities tended to be those on the eastern edge of the burn area where soils have relatively high clay contents and gradients are steep. Estimated debris-flow volumes range from a low of 1,600 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters. Estimated debris-flow volumes increase with basin size and distance along the drainage network, but some smaller drainages were also predicted to produce substantial volumes of material. The predicted probabilities and some of the volumes predicted for the modeled storms indicate a potential for substantial debris-flow impacts on structures, roads, bridges, and culverts located both within and

  13. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    market for certain clays and result in commercial exploitation. P 5.3.4.5 Pegmatite Minerals Feldspar, beryl, and mica are the economically important...pegma- P tite minerals in Nevada; however, no production from pegmatites is known in the study area. Since pegmatites are not common in the study area

  14. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2010 Fourmile burn area, Boulder County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.; Stevens, Michael R.; Verdin, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the Fourmile Creek fire in Boulder County, Colorado, in 2010. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volumes of debris flows for selected drainage basins. Data for the models include burn severity, rainfall total and intensity for a 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainstorm, and topographic and soil property characteristics. Several of the selected drainage basins in Fourmile Creek and Gold Run were identified as having probabilities of debris-flow occurrence greater than 60 percent, and many more with probabilities greater than 45 percent, in response to the 25-year recurrence, 1-hour rainfall. None of the Fourmile Canyon Creek drainage basins selected had probabilities greater than 45 percent. Throughout the Gold Run area and the Fourmile Creek area upstream from Gold Run, the higher probabilities tend to be in the basins with southerly aspects (southeast, south, and southwest slopes). Many basins along the perimeter of the fire area were identified as having low probability of occurrence of debris flow. Volume of debris flows predicted from drainage basins with probabilities of occurrence greater than 60 percent ranged from 1,200 to 9,400 m3. The predicted moderately high probabilities and some of the larger volumes responses predicted for the modeled storm indicate a potential for substantial debris-flow effects to buildings, roads, bridges, culverts, and reservoirs located both within these drainages and immediately downstream from the burned area. However, even small debris flows that affect structures at the basin outlets could cause considerable damage.

  15. Institutional origins of the Department of Energy: the Office of Military Application. Energy History Series Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, R. M.

    1980-08-01

    The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 brought together for the first time in one department most of the government's energy programs. With these programs came a score of organizational entities, each with its own history and traditions, from a dozen departments and independent agencies. This report traces the history of the Office of Military Application, from its inception as the Division of Military Application in the Atomic Energy Commission, through the Energy Research and Development Administration to its present status as an office in the Department of Energy. (RWR)

  16. M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

  17. Compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Supplement E

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    In the Supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42 Volume I, new or revised emissions data are presented for Anthracite Coal Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Liquified Petroleum Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion In Boilers; Bagasse Combustion In Sugar Mills; Residential Fireplaces; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Automobile Body Incineration; Conical Burners; Open Burning; Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy Duty Natural Gas Fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Gasoline and Diesel Industrial Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and All Stationary Dual Fuel Engines; Soap and Detergents; and Storage of Organic Liquids.

  18. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.H. Jr.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    These Appendices describe various technologies that may be applicable to the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (MWTP) Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). These technologies were identified by the CPTS Technical Support Group (TSG) as potentially applicable to a variety of separation, volume reduction, and decontamination requirements. The purpose was to identify all available and developing technologies, and their characteristics, for subsequent evaluation for specific requirements identified for the CPTS. However, the technologies described herein are not necessarily all inclusive, nor are they necessarily all applicable.

  19. Structure, Quaternary history, and general geology of the Corral Canyon area, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yerkes, R.F.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    1965-01-01

    The Corral Canyon nuclear power plant site consists of about 305 acres near the mouth of Corral Canyon in the central Santa Monica Mountains; it is located on an east-trending segment of the Pacific Coast between Point Dume and Malibu Canyon, about 28 miles due west of Los Angeles. The Santa Monica Mountains are the southwesternmost mainland part of the Transverse Ranges province, the east-trending features of which transect the otherwise relatively uniform northwesterly trend of the geomorphic and geologic features of coastal California. The south margin of the Transverse Ranges is marked by the Santa Monica fault system, which extends eastward near the 34th parallel for at least 145 miles from near Santa Cruz Island to the San Andreas fault zone. In the central Santa Monica Mountains area the Santa Monica fault system includes the Malibu Coast fault and Malibu Coast zone of deformation on the north; from the south it includes an inferred fault--the Anacapa fault--considered to follow an east-trending topographic escarpmemt on the sea floor about 5 miles south of the Malibu Coast fault. The low-lying terrain south of the fault system, including the Los Angeles basin and the largely submerged Continental Borderland offshore, are dominated by northwest-trending structural features. The Malibu Coat zone is a wide, east-trending band of asymmetrically folded, sheared, and faulted bedrock that extends for more than 20 miles along the north margin of the Santa Monica fault system west of Santa Monica. Near the north margin of the Malibu Coast zone the north-dipping, east-trending Malibu Coast fault juxtaposes unlike, in part contemporaneous sedimentary rock sections; it is inferred to be the near-surface expression of a major crustal boundary between completely unrelated basement rocks. Comparison of contemporaneous structural features and stratigraphic sections (Late Cretaceous to middle Miocene sedimentary, rocks and middle Miocene volcanic and intrusive igneous rocks

  20. Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 6. Southern Study Area, Final, Version 3.3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    r oror Structure - - -6 Section Number q k Stream... .of Dich 17,- Study Area Boundary 174.000 S’ate PNor. Grid Anolyte Sample Location "nd...Se6tionle Numnber ~i I I - Streami or Ditch - ,I - -- ~ -Study Area Boundary 17 4.000 State Plant Grid -- v1. Anolyte Sample Location and...Existing Structure :j6 Section Number __z! Study Area Boundary I 7i4.000 State Plane Grid Anolyte Sample Location ____ _ Iand Concentration (ug/1) 0

  1. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 2: Research and technology recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Terminal Area Compatibility (TAC) study is briefly summarized for background information. The most important research items for the areas of noise congestion, and emissions are identified. Other key research areas are also discussed. The 50 recommended research items are categorized by flight phase, technology, and compatibility benefits. The relationship of the TAC recommendations to the previous ATT recommendations is discussed. The bulk of the document contains the 50 recommended research items. For each item, the potential payoff, state of readiness, recommended action and estimated cost and schedule are given.

  2. Water Resources Investigation. Cape Girardeau - Jackson Metropolitan Area, Missouri. Volume 2. Appendices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    TABLE A-3a LOG-LOG TRANSFORMATION OF A POLY-CURVE FIT 2" (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau Year County City Jackson RSA ± ’ Hinterland...2030 92,700 72,600 15,700 1,800 2,600 1/ RSA : Remaining Study Area 2/ Hinterland: Remaining County Area 3/ Columns 2, 3, and 4 from the Study Area...4) football /soccer -33 fields; (5) baseball/softball - nine fields; (6) basketball - seventeen courts; sixteen swimming pools; (8) tent camping - 84

  3. Compulsory Education: Schools, Pupils, Teachers, Programs and Methods. Conference Papers for the 8th Session of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education (Parma, Italy, September 3-6, 1986). Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genovesi, Giovanni, Ed.

    This second of four volumes on the history of compulsory education among the nations of Europe and the western hemisphere covers schools, pupils, teachers, programs, and methods. Of the volume's 16 selections, 13 are written in English and 3 are written in Italian. Most selections contain summaries; summaries of the Italian articles are written in…

  4. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 5, Surface-based subject areas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    The purpose of the Biota subject area of the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is to manage the data collected from samples of plants and animals. This includes both samples taken from the plant or animal or samples related to the plant or animal. Related samples include animal feces and animal habitat. Data stored in the Biota subject area include data about the biota samples taken, analysis results counts from population studies, and species distribution maps.

  5. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This report contains Appendix B which provides all of the laboratory summary data sheets for the Area 6 SCEPs closure activities.

  6. Economics in History: What Every High School Student and Teacher Needs to Know. Footnotes. Volume 15, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Lucien

    2011-01-01

    Historians work in a discipline with few inherent concepts and are obliged to draw upon many fields in recreating the past. Yet authors of most school history texts, state and national standards and curriculum materials seldom incorporate economic analysis in their work. Just look at state standards that include Adam Smith and John Locke but draw…

  7. History, Reflection, and Narrative: The Professionalization of Composition, 1963-1983. Perspectives on Writing: Theory, Research, Practice. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Mary, Ed.; Boehm, Beth, Ed.; Journet, Debra, Ed.

    This collection of essays, culled from presentations at the first Thomas R. Watson Conference in Rhetoric and Composition, examines the development of composition as a profession, focusing on the period between 1963 and 1983 when composition changed in a number of crucial ways. Essays in the collection are: (1) "Composition History and…

  8. A New Middle East? A Report of FPRI's History Institute for Teachers. Footnotes. Volume 10, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the current conflicts and political changes in the Middle East us important for American educators if American students are to understand the dynamics of the region. To discuss these issues, FPRI held its 12th History Institute for Teachers on October 16-17, 2004. Forty teachers from 15 states attended the weekend program at the…

  9. History of the Balkans: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Volume 1. The Joint Committee on Eastern Europe Publications Series. No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelavich, Barbara

    Designed as an introductory history, this book covers developments in the Balkan Peninsula from the 17th through the 19th centuries. Emphasis is placed on the process by which separate nationalities broke away from imperial rule, established independent states, and embarked on economic and social modernization. To establish perspective on the role…

  10. Chryse Planitia region, Mars: Channeling history, flood-volume estimates, and scenarios for bodies of water in the northern plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotto, Susan L.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    1992-01-01

    The Chryse Planitia region of Mars includes several outflow channels that debouched into a single basin. Here we evaluate possible volumes and areal extents of standing bodies of water that collected in the northern lowland plains, based on evidence provided by topography, fluvial relations, and channel chronology and geomorphology.

  11. Mechanical Properties and Elution Characteristics of Polymethylmethacrylate Bone Cement Impregnated with Antibiotics for Various Surface Area and Volume Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Duey, Richard E.; Chong, Alexander CM.; McQueen, David A.; Womack, James L.; Song, Zheng; Steinberger, Tristan A.; Wooley, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have examined the elution characteristics and the effects of antibiotics from bone cement. this study seeks to determine the effect that surface area and volume have on the elution characteristics and bioavailability of tobramycin and vancomycin when mixed in polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) bone cement in various combinations. It also investigates the mechanical properties of antibiotic-impregnated bone cement and its relationship to surface area and volume. Methods Three antibiotic-bone cement combinations were used, and these consisted of PMMA mixed with tobramycin and vancomycin or tobramycin alone. Four groups of specimens (different surface area and volume) were made. the elution characteristics of the different specimens were examined using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIc) method at different time intervals. the bacteria used during testing were methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus aureus (MssA). the ultimate compressive strength (Ucs) of the specimens was also determined at various time intervals. Results the bactericidal activity of a tobramycin/vancomycin combination against MssA was not significantly greater than tobramycin alone. tobramycin was more effective than vancomycin against MssA (average: 168%, p<0.05). the inhibitory capabilities of tobramycin and vancomycin individually were not found to be additive. combination 2 (1.0g tobramycin/1.0g vancomycin) had a higher antibiotic elution mass and rate for all sample sizes compared to the other two combinations (average: 170%, p<0.05). surface area and volume did not have a significant effect on the elution rate of the antibiotics. the Ucs of all samples tested was greater than 70MPa at all three testing intervals. Discussion Mixing tobramycin and vancomycin did not have a synergistic effect against the bacteria as expected. Increasing the concentration of antibiotics in bone cement increases both elution mass and elution rate over time. Although the Ucs of the

  12. The History of Star Formation in Galaxy Disks in the Local Volume as Measured by the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Skillman, Evan; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Holtzman, Jon; de Jong, Roelof S.

    2011-06-01

    We present a measurement of the age distribution of stars residing in spiral disks and dwarf galaxies. We derive a complete star formation history of the ~140 Mpc3 covered by the volume-limited sample of galaxies in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). The total star formation rate density history (ρSFR(t)) is dominated by the large spirals in the volume, although the sample consists mainly of dwarf galaxies. Our ρSFR(t) shows a factor of ~3 drop at z ~ 2, in approximate agreement with results from other measurement techniques. While our results show that the overall ρSFR(t) has decreased since z ~ 1, the measured rates during this epoch are higher than those obtained from other measurement techniques. This enhanced recent star formation rate appears to be largely due to an increase in the fraction of star formation contained in low-mass disks at recent times. Finally, our results indicate that despite the differences at recent times, the epoch of formation of ~50% of the stellar mass in dwarf galaxies was similar to that of ~50% of the stellar mass in large spiral galaxies (z >~ 2), despite the observed galaxy-to-galaxy diversity among the dwarfs.

  13. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; Huebner, T.L.; Ross, W.; Nakaoka, R.; Schumacher, R.; Cunnane, J.; Singh, D.; Darnell, R.; Greenhalgh, W.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents information on low-level mixed waste forms.The descriptions of the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) streams that are considered by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) are given in Appendix A. This information was taken from descriptions generated by the Mixed Waste Treatment Program (MWTP). Appendix B provides a list of characteristic properties initially considered by the Final Waste Form (FWF) Working Group (WG). A description of facilities available to test the various FWFs discussed in Volume I of DOE/MWIP-3 are given in Appendix C. Appendix D provides a summary of numerous articles that were reviewed on testing of FWFS. Information that was collected by the tests on the characteristic properties considered in this report are documented in Appendix D. The articles reviewed are not a comprehensive list, but are provided to give an indication of the data that are available.

  14. Results of temperature gradient and heat flow in Santiam Pass Area, Oregon, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L.; Gardner, M.C.; Koenig, J.B.

    1981-08-01

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) There is a weakly defined thermal anomaly within the area examined by temperature-gradient holes in the Santiam Pass area. This is a relict anomaly showing differences in permeability between the High Cascades and Western Cascades areas, more than a fundamental difference in shallow crustal temperatures. (2) The anomaly as defined by the 60 F isotherms at 400 feet follows a north-south trend immediately westward of the Cascade axis in the boundary region. It is clear that all holes spudded into High Cascades rocks result in isothermal and reversal gradients. Holes spudded in Western Cascades rocks result in positive gradients. (3) Cold groundwater flow influences and masks temperature gradients in the High Cascades to a depth of at least 700 feet, especially eastward from the major north-south trending faults. Pleistocene and Holocene rocks are very permeable aquifers. (4) Shallow gradient drilling in the lowlands westward of the faults provides more interpretable information than shallow drilling in the cold-water recharge zones. Topographic and climatological effects can be filtered out of the temperature gradient results. (5) The thermal anomaly seems to have 2 centers: one in the Belknap-Foley area, and one northward in the Sand Mountain area. The anomalies may or may not be connected along a north-south trend. (6) A geothermal effect is seen in holes downslope of the Western-High Cascade boundary. Mixing with cold waters is a powerful influence on temperature gradient data. (7) The temperature-gradient program has not yet examined and defined the geothermal resources potential of the area eastward of the Western Cascades-High Cascades boundary. Holes to 1500-2000 feet in depth are required to penetrate the high permeability-cold groundwater regime. (8) Drilling conditions are unfavorable. There are very few accessible level drill sites. Seasonal access problems and environmental restrictions together with frequent lost

  15. Closure plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6: Volume 1, Closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This Closure Plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) a disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and hazardous materials, of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) describes how portions of SWSA 6 will be closed under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status per 40 CFR 265 Subpart G (TN Rule 1200-1-11-.05(7)). An overview is provided of activities necessary for final closure and corrective measures for all of SWSA 6. Results of surface waters and groundwater sampling are provided.

  16. The geophysical contribution to the safeguard of historical sites in active volcanic areas.. The Vesuvius case-history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patella, Domenico; Mauriello, Paolo

    1999-03-01

    The Earth's surface is characterized by the presence of many active volcanoes, most of which are surrounded by ancient villages. High-valued historical sites are often so exposed that it becomes imperative to perform volcanic risk assessment including cultural heritage. For the safeguard of the historical property in volcanic areas, two major problems are definition of (a) criteria for diagnosis and evaluation of hazard and vulnerability, and (b) methods for risk prevention and mitigation. In this paper, we first review the state-of-the-art and most outstanding geophysical prospecting and modeling methods currently on the use, which contribute to the solution of the problems mentioned above. We then show the results of an application on the most alarming volcano in Italy, Mount Vesuvius in the Neapolitan area. The imaged configuration of the feeding and plumbing systems induces to consider Vesuvius a high-risk volcano with a high probability of pyroclastic flow in case of reactivation. Finally, we show the results from a modeling approach of a pyroclastic flow simulating the eruptive scenario of Vesuvius compatible with its internal structure and dynamics. The simulation shows that the emplacement of artificial barriers close to the eruptive vent is a practical solution to reduce the local radial momentum of the pyroclastic flow and to transfer the related energy to the vertical buoyant cloud. The Vesuvius case history allows us to conclude that the integrated geophysical surveying and modeling approach can notably contribute to make decisions and also for the protection of the historical heritage in active volcanic areas.

  17. Visualizing surface area and volumes of lumens in 3 dimensions using images from histological sections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visualizing areas of tissue that are occupied by air or liquid can provide a unique perspective on the relationships between various spaces within the tissue. The portal tracts of liver tissue are an example of such a space since the liver contains several vessels and ducts in various patterns of i...

  18. Pittsburgh Area Preschool Association Publication: Selected Articles (Volume 8, No. 1-4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Mary, Ed.

    This compilation of short reports distributed to preschool teachers in the Pittsburgh area covers four main topics: (1) Adoption (2) Expressive Art Therapy, (3) The Infant, and (4) Learning Disorders in Young Children. The adoption section includes reports pertaining to the adoption process in Pennsylvania, adoptive parents' legal rights, medical…

  19. VAMP: A computer program for calculating volume, area, and mass properties of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, P. J.; Glatt, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized procedure developed for analyzing aerospace vehicles evaluates the properties of elemental surface areas with specified thickness by accumulating and combining them with arbitrarily specified mass elements to form a complete evaluation. Picture-like images of the geometric description are capable of being generated.

  20. An economic assessment of STOL aircraft potential including terminal area environmental considerations. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. L.; Sokolsky, S.

    1973-01-01

    An economic assessment of short takeoff aircraft for short haul air transportation applications is presented. The economic viability and environmental compatibility of short takeoff aircraft service in high density areas were evaluated. The subjects discussed are: (1) aircraft configurations and performance, (2) airfield and terminal requirements, and (3) direct and indirect operating costs.

  1. Area Alcohol Education and Training Program Evaluation. Volume I. Summary Findings and Recommendations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CONSAD Research Corp., Pittsburgh, PA.

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) suppports four non-profit units, Area Alcohol Education and Training Programs (AAETP), organized in 1974 to facilitate the delivery of alcohol education and training at the state and local level. In 1976, the NIAAA initiated an evaluation of the AAETP. Goals were to determine…

  2. Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the US Civil Space Program. Volume 5; Exploring the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Snyder, Amy Paige (Editor); Launius, Roger D. (Editor); Garber, Stephen J. (Editor); Newport, Regan Anne (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The documents selected for inclusion in this volume are presented in three major sections, each covering a particular aspect of the origins, evolution, and execution of the US space science program. Chapter 1 deals with the origins, evolution, and organization of the space science program. Chapter 2 deals with the solar system exploration. Chapter 3 deals with NASA's astronomy and astrophysics efforts. Each chapter in the present volume is introduced by an overview essay. In the main, these essays are intended to introduce and complement the documents in the chapter and to place them in a chronological and substantive context. Each essay contains references to the documents in the chapter it introduces, and may also contain references to documents in other chapters of the collection

  3. Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the U.S. Civilian Space Program. Volume 2; External Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Day, Dwayne A. (Editor); Launius, Roger D. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The documents selected for inclusion in this volume are presented in three chapters, each covering a particular aspect of the evolution of U.S. space exploration. These chapters address (1) the relations between the civilian space program of the United States and the space activities of other countries, (2) the relations between the U.S. civilian space program and the space efforts of national security organizations and the military, and (3) NASA's relations with industry and academic institutions.

  4. A numerical study on the elastic modulus of volume and area dilation for a deformable cell in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Young; Tanner, Roger I; Lee, Joon Sang

    2016-07-01

    A red blood cell (RBC) in a microfluidic channel is highly interesting for scientists in various fields of research on biological systems. This system has been studied extensively by empirical, analytical, and numerical methods. Nonetheless, research of predicting the behavior of an RBC in a microchannel is still an interesting area. The complications arise from deformation of an RBC and interactions among the surrounding fluid, wall, and RBCs. In this study, a pressure-driven RBC in a microchannel was simulated with a three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method of an immersed boundary. First, the effect of boundary thickness on the interaction between the wall and cell was analyzed by measuring the time of passage through the narrow channel. Second, the effect of volume conservation stiffness was studied. Finally, the effect of global area stiffness was analyzed.

  5. Large-area chromogenics: Materials and devices for transmittance control. Volume IS 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.; Granqvist, C.G.

    1990-12-31

    Chromogenic materials can alter their optical properties in a persistent yet reversible manner when subjected to a change in external conditions such as irradiation intensity, temperature, or electric-field strength. In the future chromogenic materials may be used on large scale to regulate the throughput of radiant energy for windows in buildings and cars, so that comfortable lighting and temperature are maintained without excessive air conditioning. The purpose of this book is to give a broad coverage of large-area chromogenics and to discuss their applications. The book is divided into the following areas: applications; photochromic materials; thermochromic materials; inorganic electrochromic materials; inorganic electrochromic materials; organic electrochromic materials; conductors for ions and electrons in electrochromic devices; electrochromic devices; and liquid crystals materials and devices. Separate abstracts were prepared for 33 papers in this book.

  6. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 3. Soil assessment: indicator chemicals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. The soil assessment compared concentrations of the Love Canal Indicator Chemicals found in the EDA to concentrations found in similar western New York communities. An analytical technique was developed to detect the indicator chemicals at very low levels, i.e. 1.0 ppb. The analytical technique utilized a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer operating in the selected ion monitoring mode. The analytical results were statistically compared between the EDA and the comparison areas using a modified Wilcoxon rank sum test.

  7. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that - at least with respect to language acquisition - early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood.

  8. Retrospective Analysis of Midsummer Hypoxic Area and Volume in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, 1985–2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Robust estimates of hypoxic extent (both area and volume) are important for assessing the impacts of low dissolved oxygen on aquatic ecosystems at large spatial scales. Such estimates are also important for calibrating models linking hypoxia to causal factors, such as nutrient loading and stratification, and for informing management decisions. In this study, we develop a rigorous geostatistical modeling framework to estimate the hypoxic extent in the northern Gulf of Mexico from data collected during midsummer, quasi-synoptic monitoring cruises (1985–2011). Instead of a traditional interpolation-based approach, we use a simulation-based approach that yields more robust extent estimates and quantified uncertainty. The modeling framework also makes use of covariate information (i.e., trend variables such as depth and spatial position), to reduce estimation uncertainty. Furthermore, adjustments are made to account for observational bias resulting from the use of different sampling instruments in different years. Our results suggest an increasing trend in hypoxic layer thickness (p = 0.05) from 1985 to 2011, but less than significant increases in volume (p = 0.12) and area (p = 0.42). The uncertainties in the extent estimates vary with sampling network coverage and instrument type, and generally decrease over the study period. PMID:23895102

  9. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S.; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that – at least with respect to language acquisition – early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood. PMID:26106338

  10. Application of 3D scanned imaging methodology for volume, surface area, and envelope density evaluation of densified biomass.

    PubMed

    Igathinathane, C; Davis, J D; Purswell, J L; Columbus, E P

    2010-06-01

    Measurement of volume, surface area, and density is an essential for quantifying, evaluating, and designing the biomass densification, storage, and transport operations. Acquiring accurate and repeated measurements of these parameters for hygroscopic densified biomass are not straightforward and only a few methods are available. A 3D laser scanner was used as a measurement device and the 3D images were analyzed using image processing software. The validity of the method was verified using reference objects of known geometry and the accuracy obtained was in excess of 98%. Cotton gin trash briquettes, switchgrass pellets, switchgrass cubes, hardwood pellets, and softwood chips were tested. Most accurate results of the volume and surface area required the highest possible resolution of the scanner, which increased the total scan-process times, and image file size. Physical property determination using the 3D scanning and image analysis is highly repeatable (coefficient of variation <0.3%), non-invasive, accurate, and alternative methodology. The various limitations and merits of the developed method were also enumerated.

  11. The Archaeology of Coralville Lake, Iowa. Volume 4. Recreation Area Survey. (Interim Report 2).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    at least one buried soil evidenced by a buried - argillic (clay enriched) horizon. This landform has been for the most part destroyed by previous...subsurface investigations showed an eluvial horizon with an underlying argillic Bt horizon. At this time, no evidence supports the existence of a buried...subsurface argillic horizon. The potential for recovering buried stable surfaces at this recreation area appears remote. LAKE MacBRIDE STATE PARK

  12. Tooele Army Depot-North Area Suspected Releases SWMUs. Phase 1 RFI report. Volume 1. Text

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    location of the continental storm track , most of the precipitation in the Tooele Valley occurs as snow between the months of October and May. Summers are...of railroad tracks . Stormwater from the Administration Area drains via an underground concrete piping system to a depression in a dry wash, where it...Shank (JMM) with Ammunition survelliance Chief, Milo Serreyn, Tooele Army Depot, Utah, October 1992. Siniscalchi, 1991. Telephone interview conducted

  13. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 2. Air assessment: indicator chemicals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. An air assessment was conducted for Love Canal Indicator Chemicals. Homes throughout the EDA were sampled using the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer Model 6000E.

  14. F-area seepage basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1. First and second quarters 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) is monitored in compliance with Module 111, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SCl-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 86 FSB wells and well HSB 85A. These wells are screened in the three hydrostratigraphic Units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1900. Data from 9 FSL wells are included in this report only to provide additional information for this area; the FSL wells are not part of Permit SCl-890-008-989. Monitoring results are compared to the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), which is specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit (November 1992). Historically and currently, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the first half of 1995, notably aluminum, iodine-129, pH, strontium-90, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the first half of 1995.

  15. Advanced transportation system studies. Technical area 2: Heavy lift launch vehicle development. Volume 2; Technical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Sections 10 to 13 of the Advanced Transportation System Studies final report are included in this volume. Section 10 contains a copy of an executive summary that was prepared by Lockheed Space Operations Company (LSOC) to document their support to the TA-2 contract during the first-year period of performance of the contract, May 1992 through May 1993. LSOC participated on the TA-2 contract as part of the concurrent engineering launch system definition team, and provided outstanding heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) ground operations requirements and concept assessments for Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) through an intercompany work transfer as well as providing specific HLLV ground operations assessments at the direction of NASA KSC through KSC funding that was routed to the TA-2 contract. Section 11 contains a copy of a vehicle-independent, launch system health management requirements assessment. The purpose of the assessment was to define both health management requirements and the associated interfaces between a generic advanced transportation system launch vehicle and all related elements of the entire transportation system, including the ground segment. Section 12 presents the major TA-2 presentations provided to summarize the significant results and conclusions that were developed over the course of the contract. Finally, Section 13 presents the design and assessment report on the first lunar outpost heavy lift launch vehicle.

  16. Regular Topologies for Gigabit Wide-Area Networks: Congestion Avoidance Testbed Experiments. Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denny, Barbara A.; McKenney, Paul E., Sr.; Lee, Danny

    1994-01-01

    This document is Volume 3 of the final technical report on the work performed by SRI International (SRI) on SRI Project 8600. The document includes source listings for all software developed by SRI under this effort. Since some of our work involved the use of ST-II and the Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Sun) High-Speed Serial Interface (HSI/S) driver, we have included some of the source developed by LBL and BBN as well. In most cases, our decision to include source developed by other contractors depended on whether it was necessary to modify the original code. If we have modified the software in any way, it is included in this document. In the case of the Traffic Generator (TG), however, we have included all the ST-II software, even though BBN performed the integration, because the ST-II software is part of the standard TG release. It is important to note that all the code developed by other contractors is in the public domain, so that all software developed under this effort can be re-created from the source included here.

  17. Water Resources Data: Hawaii and Other Pacific Areas, Water Year 1999. Volume 1. Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, B.R.; Fontaine, R.A.; Taogoshi, R.I.; Teeters, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 74 stream-gaging stations, 71 miscellaneous streamflow stations, and 88 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; (2) water-quality records for 6 streamflow-gaging stations, and 28 partial-record streamflow stations; (3) water-level records for 84 observation wells; (4) water-quality records for 122 observation wells; and (5) accumulated rainfall records for 40 rainfall stations. This series of annual reports for Hawaii began with the 1961 fiscal year (State of Hawaii) with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 fiscal year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report format was changed to include, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Beginning with the 1993 water year, accumulated rainfall data were included in the report.

  18. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 1, Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams) are influenced by Western`s power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Western`s firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action altemative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  19. Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6. Salt Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox Formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the Area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker Trail Formation. The current data base is insufficient to estimate ground-water flow rates and directions in this unit. The middle unit includes the evaporites in the Paradox Formation and no laterally extensive flow systems are apparent. The lower unit consists of the rocks below the Paradox Formation where permeabilities vary widely, and the apparent flow direction is toward the west. 108 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6: Salt Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker trail formation.

  1. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report: First and second quarters 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    During the first half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, R61-79.265, Subpart F. Eighty-seven wells provided samples from the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison is the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B Permit (November 1992). Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the first half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, technetium-99, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents.

  2. Case histories of recently implemented technologies for citrus-processing energy-efficiency improvement. Volume II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    For each of six citrus industry sites where energy efficiency improvement technologies have been implemented, a case history is presented which describes the implemented technology, its investment cost, and the energy and cost savings. The technologies are: double pressing in feed mill operation; evaporator microprocessor controller; feed mill vent stack controller; addition of a waste heat evaporator to a feed mill; enhanced lime reaction for improved pressing and dewatering in a feed mill, and added effect to a temperature-accelerated short-time evaporator. (LEW)

  3. Advanced Transportation System Studies. Technical Area 3: Alternate Propulsion Subsystem Concepts. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel J. H.

    2000-01-01

    SSTO mission This volume overviews each of the tasks giving its objectives, main results. and conclusions. More detailed Final Task Reports are available on each individual task.

  4. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with Module 3, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 87 FSB wells screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison became the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit. Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the second half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} wells. However, several Aquifer Unit 2A wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  5. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Volume 1. Hard mobile launcher in random movement basing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify those areas that could potentially support deployment of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) utilizing basing modes presently considered viable: the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, the Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, and the Hard Silo in Patterned Array. Specifically, this report describes the process and the rationale supporting the application of Exclusionary and Evaluative Criteria and lists those locations that were eliminated through the application of these criteria. The remaining locations will be the subject of further investigations.

  6. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations.

  7. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 1: Compatibility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made to identify airplane research and technology necessary to ensure advanced transport aircraft the capability of accommodating forecast traffic without adverse impact on airport communities. Projections were made of the delay, noise, and emissions impact of future aircraft fleets on typical large urban airport. Design requirements, based on these projections, were developed for an advanced technology, long-haul, subsonic transport. A baseline aircraft was modified to fulfill the design requirements for terminal area compatibility. Technical and economic comparisons were made between these and other aircraft configured to support the study.

  8. H-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Report: Volume 1, Third and Fourth quarters 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Isoconcentration/isocactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area Seepage Basins have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  9. F-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Report: Volume 1, Third and fourth quarters 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the F-Area Seepage Basins have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  10. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Volume 2. Hard mobile launcher at minuteman facilities basing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify those areas that could potentially support deployment of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) utilizing basing modes presently considered viable: the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, the Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, and the Hard Silo in Patterned Array. Specifically, this report describes the process and the rationale supporting the application of Exclusionary and Evaluative Criteria and lists those locations that were eliminated through the application of these criteria. The remaining locations will be the subject of further investigations.

  11. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Volume 3: Hard silo in patterned array basing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify those areas that could potentially support deployment of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) utilizing basing modes presently considered viable: the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, the Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, or the Hard Silo in Patterned Array. Specifically, this report describes the process and the rationale supporting the application of Exclusionary and Evaluative Criteria and lists those locations that were eliminated through the application of these criteria. The remaining locations will be the subject of further investigations.

  12. Antidepressant Use and Lifetime History of Mental Disorders in a Community Sample: Results from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Yoichiro; Spira, Adam P.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Hock, Rebecca S.; Carras, Michelle C.; Eaton, William W.; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Past studies have shown that many individuals who use antidepressants do not have a current or lifetime history of mental disorders. However, recent studies suggest that the one-time retrospective evaluation of mental disorders commonly used in such studies may substantially underestimate the true lifetime prevalence of mental disorders. We examined the prevalence of mental disorders, assessed prospectively over multiple interviews, among individuals currently using antidepressants in a community sample. Methods Using data from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) Survey Wave 1 (1981) through Wave 4 (2004) (N = 1071), we assessed lifetime prevalence of common mood and anxiety disorders according to the DSM-III and DSM-III-R criteria, based on 4 interviews, among participants who reported current antidepressant use. Furthermore, we examined factors associated with current antidepressant use. Results Thirteen percent of participants at Wave 4 reported currently using antidepressant medications. Among antidepressant users, 69% never met criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD), and 38% never met criteria for MDD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder in their lifetime. Female gender, Caucasian ethnicity, recent or current physical problems (e.g., loss of bladder control, hypertension and back pain) and recent mental health facility visits were associated with antidepressant use in addition to mental disorders. Conclusions Many individuals who are prescribed and use antidepressant medications may not have met criteria for mental disorders. Our data indicate that antidepressants are commonly used in the absence of clear evidence-based indications. PMID:25188822

  13. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1, First and second quarters 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    During the first half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit. Samples were collected from 130 wells that monitor the three separate hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the HASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard is the standard for comparison. Historically, as well as currently, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB, notably aluminum, iodine-129, mercury, nickel-63, strontium-89, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc during the first half of 1993. Elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occur in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit IIA.

  14. H-Area seepage basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1, First and second quarters 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) is monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SCl-890-008-989. The monitoring wells network is composed of 130 HSB wells that monitor the three separate hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the HASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Data from 16 HSL wells are included in this report only to provide additional information for the HASB. Monitoring results are compared to the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix IIID-A of the permit. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, and zinc) during the first half of 1995. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone IIB. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone IIB, and Aquifer Unit IIA.

  15. Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the U.S. Civil Space Program. Volume 4; Accessing Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Williamson, Ray A. (Editor); Launius, Roger D. (Editor); Acker, Russell J. (Editor); Garber, Stephen J. (Editor); Friedman, Jonathan L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The documents selected for inclusion in this volume are presented in four major chapters, each covering a particular aspect of access to space and the manner in which it has developed over time. These chapters focus on the evolution toward the giant Saturn V rocket, the development of the Space Shuttle, space transportation commercialization, and future space transportation possibilities. Each chapter in this volume is introduced by an overview essay, prepared by individuals who are particularly well qualified to write on the topic. In the main, these essays are intended to introduce and complement the documents in the chapter and to place them, for the most part, in a chronological and substantive context. Each essay contains references to the documents in the chapter it introduces, and many also contain references to documents in other chapters of the collection. These introductory essays are the responsibility of their individual authors, and the views and conclusions contained therein do not necessarily represent the opinions of either George Washington University or NASA.

  16. An economic assessment of STOL aircraft potential including terminal area environmental considerations, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. L.; Sokolsky, S.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an economic and environmental study of short haul airline systems using short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft are presented. The STOL system characteristics were optimized for maximum patronage at a specified return on investment, while maintaining noise impact compatibility with the terminal area. Supporting studies of aircraft air pollution and hub airport congestion relief were also performed. The STOL concept specified for this study was an Augmentor Wing turbofan aircraft having a field length capability of 2,000 ft. and an effective perceived noise level of 95 EPNdB at 500 ft. sideline distance. An economic and environmental assessment of the defined STOL system and a summary of the methodology, STOL system characteristics and arena characteristics are provided.

  17. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning first quarter 1993, the HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix 3D-A of the cited permit, became the standard for comparison. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constitutents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc) during the second half of 1993. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit 2A. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps include in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1993. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the HASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  18. A simple method to retrospectively estimate patient dose-area product for chest tomosynthesis examinations performed using VolumeRAD

    SciTech Connect

    Båth, Magnus Svalkvist, Angelica; Söderman, Christina

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate a method of retrospectively estimating the dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data available in the scout image. Methods: DICOM data were retrieved for 20 patients undergoing chest tomosynthesis using VolumeRAD. Using information about how the exposure parameters for the tomosynthesis examination are determined by the scout image, a correction factor for the adjustment in field size with projection angle was determined. The correction factor was used to estimate the DAP for 20 additional chest tomosynthesis examinations from DICOM data available in the scout images, which was compared with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs acquired during the tomosynthesis examination. Results: A field size correction factor of 0.935 was determined. Applying the developed method using this factor, the average difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was 0.2%, with a standard deviation of 0.8%. However, the difference was not normally distributed and the maximum error was only 1.0%. The validity and reliability of the presented method were thus very high. Conclusions: A method to estimate the DAP of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system from DICOM data in the scout image was developed and validated. As the scout image normally is the only image connected to the tomosynthesis examination stored in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) containing dose data, the method may be of value for retrospectively estimating patient dose in clinical use of chest tomosynthesis.

  19. Canadian History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Libraries in Canada, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Includes 22 articles that address Canadian history and the importance of having students honor Canada's past by providing articles relating to the areas of History and Social Studies covering: historical fiction as instructional material; Canadian scientists; agricultural fairs; the Historical Foundation; social science books on Canada; student…

  20. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Horseshoe II burn area, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned in 2011 by the Horseshoe II wildfire in southeastern Arizona. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and debris-flows volumes for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, (2) 5-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, and (3) 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall to a high of 100 percent in response to the 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. The high probabilities in all modeled drainage basins are likely due to the abundance of steep hillslopes and the extensive areas burned at moderate to high severities. The estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from a low of 20 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters.

  1. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.H. Jr.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs and activities throughout the DOE Complex. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to develop, deploy, and complete appropriate technologies for the treatment of an DOE low-level mixed waste (LLMW). The MWIP mission includes development of strategies related to enhanced waste form production, improvements to and testing of the EM-30 baseline flowsheet for mixed waste treatment, programmatic oversight for ongoing technical projects, and specific technical tasks related to the site specific Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) based on primary functional areas of the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant) identified by EM-30. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Chemical/Physical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. The focus of this document is the Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). The CPTS performs the required pretreatment and/or separations on the waste streams passing through the system for discharge to the environment or efficient downstream processing. Downstream processing can include all system components except Front-End Waste Handling. The primary separations to be considered by the CPTS are: (1) removal of suspended and dissolved solids from aqueous and liquid organic streams, (2) separation of water from organic liquids, (3) treatment of wet and dry solids, including separation into constituents as required, for subsequent thermal treatment and final form processing, (4) mercury removal and control, and (5) decontamination of equipment and waste classified as debris.

  2. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M.; Darnell, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

  3. Characteristics of surface-wave and volume-wave plasmas produced with internally mounted large-area planar microwave launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Naito, Katsutoshi; Ogino, Akihisa; Ninomiya, Keigo; Nanko, Shohei

    2005-10-17

    We studied discharge characteristics of microwave plasmas excited with a large-area planar microwave launcher installed internally in a 600-mm-diam cylindrical vacuum chamber. With the microwave power less than roughly 400 W, we demonstrated the large volumetric volume-wave plasma (VWP) spread in the entire chamber at a pressure of 14-27 Pa in He. Above 400 W, the plasma discharge made a sudden transition to higher-density, uniform surface-wave plasma (SWP) having a spatial uniformity of {+-}3.5% over 300 mm in diameter. Electron energy probability functions in the downstream region were studied using Langmuir probe measurements with Druyvesteyn method in both the SWP and VWP discharges.

  4. Lack of self-control as assessed by a personality inventory is related to reduced volume of supplementary motor area.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mié; Yoneyama, Eiichi; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Noguchi, Kyo; Nohara, Shigeru; Suzuki, Michio; Kawasaki, Yasuhiro; Seto, Hikaru; Kurachi, Masayoshi

    2002-11-30

    The present study was performed to examine the relationship between schizophrenia-related personality and brain morphometry. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and schizophrenia-related personality scales extracted from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) were administered to 42 university students. Analysis of the relationships between the gray matter segmented from the MR images on a voxel-by-voxel basis through the use of the statistical parametric mapping technique and the schizophrenia-related personality subscale scores from the MMPI revealed that lack of self-control subscale scores were negatively related to the gray matter volume of the supplementary motor area (SMA). Furthermore, it was suggested that self-control including self-inhibition is associated with the density of the SMA, the precuneous and the cerebellar vermis, which govern voluntary movements and motor imagery. These results provide important clues to the neural basis for the disturbance of self commonly observed in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  5. Isotopic Systematics (U, nitrate and Sr) of the F-Area Acidic Contamination Plume at the Savannah River Site: Clues to Contaminant History and Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J. N.; Conrad, M. E.; Bill, M.; Denham, M.; Wan, J.; Rakshit, S.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Spycher, N.

    2010-12-01

    Seepage basins in the F-Area of the Savannah River Site were used from 1955 to 1989 for the disposal of low-level radioactive acidic (ave. pH ˜2.9) waste solutions from site operations involving irradiated uranium billets and other materials used in the production of radionuclides. These disposal activities resulted in a persistent acidic groundwater plume (pH as low as 3.2) beneath the F-Area including contaminants such as tritium, nitrate, 90Sr, 129I and uranium and that has impinged on surface water (Four Mile Branch) about 600 m from the basins. After cessation of disposal in 1989, the basins were capped in 1991. Since that time, remediation has consisted of a pump-and-treat system that has recently been replaced with in situ treatment using a funnel-and-gate system with injection of alkaline solutions in the gates to neutralize pH. In order to delineate the history of contamination and the current mobility and fate of contaminants in F-Area groundwater, we have undertaken a study of variations in the isotopic compositions of U (234U/238U, 235U/238U, 236U/238U), Sr (87Sr/86Sr) and nitrate (δ15N, δ18O) within the contaminant plume. This data can be used to trace U transport within the plume, evaluate chemical changes of nitrate, and potentially track plume/sediment chemical interaction and trace the migration of 90Sr. We have analyzed a suite of groundwater samples from monitoring wells, as well as pore-water samples extracted from aquifer sediment cores to map out the isotopic variation within the plume. The isotopic compositions of U from well samples and porewater samples are all consistent with the variable burn-up of depleted U. The variation in U isotopic composition requires at least three different endmembers, without any significant influence of background natural U. The δ15N and δ18O of nitrate from F-Area plume groundwater are distinct both from natural and unaltered synthetic nitrate, and likely represents fractionation due to waste volume

  6. Stable isotope physiology of stem succulents across a broad range of volume-to-surface area ratio.

    PubMed

    Hultine, Kevin R; Williams, David G; Dettman, David L; Butterfield, Bradley J; Puente-Martinez, Raul

    2016-11-01

    Volume-to-surface area ratio (V:S) across stem succulent taxa varies by almost two orders of magnitude. The broad range in V:S of cacti and other succulent species likely has considerable importance for adaptation since stem volume determines the storage capacity of water, carbon and nutrients and stem surface area is directly related to whole-stem photosynthetic capacity. We examined the intrinsic physiological tradeoffs across diverse stem morphologies in three divergent evolutionary groups where stem succulence is common: Cactoideae, Opuntioideae (Cactaceae) and Euphorbiaceae. We predicted that variation in physiological response to environmental conditions would be (1) constrained by stem V:S, and (2) detectable in the stable isotope ratios of plant tissues. Stable isotope ratios were measured in the spines/prickles of 62 stem-succulent species occurring in a common garden setting in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Biomass δ(13)C, δ(2)H and δ(18)O increased with V:S in Cactoideae only, possibly reflecting various levels of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) strength in the other lineages. Within Cactoideae-group with the highest CAM strength and largest range in V:S-δ(13)C and δ(18)O increased 2.2 and 11.5 ‰, respectively, with a 22-fold increase in V:S. Both δ(13)C and V:S decreased with species climate-niche estimates of precipitation, indicating that stem morphology and physiology in Cactoideae may be constrained by available moisture. Taken together, these data suggest that physiological tradeoffs associated with stem V:S are detectable across broad evolutionary groups despite differences in CAM strength.

  7. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  8. Diagenetic history and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Permian carbonate buildups, Wegener Halvoe area, Jameson Land basin, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. ); Stemmerik, L. )

    1991-04-01

    The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two carbonate sequences, the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The Karstryggen Formation contains hypersaline carbonates and localized evaporites that were heavily weathered and dissected prior to deposition of the overlying strata. The overlying Wegener Halvoe Formation represents an abrupt and extensive marine inundation over the underlying karstified Karstryggen surface. Bryozoan-brachiopod-algal-cement buildups of the Wegener Halvoe Formation are localized on karstic highs, and show up to 150 m of depositional relief. The diagenetic histories of the core and flank facies are very different. Core facies porosity was initially obliterated by marine cements, but repeated meteoric exposure altered unstable core facies constituents. This alteration produced extensive secondary porosity through grain and cement leaching with local collapse brecciation. Flank strata, however, underwent little sea-floor diagenesis, and low permeability and mineralogically stable grain composition protected these strata from meteoric alteration. Subsequent fracturing and hydrothermal fluid flow, however, flushed hydrocarbons and filled pores with ferroan calcite, barite, fluorite, galena, and baroque dolomite. This heating and flushing is thought to have been especially intense in the Wegener Halvoe region; thus, more basinal areas may still have reservoirs containing significant oil in equivalent Upper Permian limestones. If, as is likely, the sea level changes affecting the Greenland Permian were eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin and the Arctic basin of the Barent Sea. This study also provides some important connections to the probably time-equivalent Guadalupian carbonate reservoir rocks of west Texas-New Mexico and Wyoming.

  9. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Introduction, history, and current candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Roy, A.K.; Jones, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is to evaluate Yucca Mountain for its suitability as a potential site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been occupied for a number of years with developing and evaluating the performance of waste packages for the potential repository. In recent years this work has been carried out under the guidance of and in collaboration with the Management and Operating contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., which in turn reports to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes the history of the selection and characterization of materials to be used in the engineered barrier system for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, describes the current candidate materials, presents a compilation of their properties, and summarizes available corrosion data and modeling. The term ``engineered materials`` is intended to distinguish those materials that are used as part of the engineered barrier system from the natural, geologic materials of the site.

  10. Somatosensory Brain Function and Gray Matter Regional Volumes Differ According to Exercise History: Evidence from Monozygotic Twins.

    PubMed

    Hautasaari, Pekka; Savić, Andrej M; Loberg, Otto; Niskanen, Eini; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kujala, Urho M; Tarkka, Ina M

    2017-01-01

    Associations between long-term physical activity and cortical function and brain structure are poorly known. Our aim was to assess whether brain functional and/or structural modulation associated with long-term physical activity is detectable using a discordant monozygotic male twin pair design. Nine monozygotic male twin pairs were carefully selected for an intrapair difference in their leisure-time physical activity of at least three years duration (mean age 34 ± 1 years). We registered somatosensory mismatch response (SMMR) in EEG to electrical stimulation of fingers and whole brain MR images. We obtained exercise history and measured physical fitness and body composition. Equivalent electrical dipole sources of SMMR as well as gray matter (GM) voxel counts in regions of interest indicated by source analysis were evaluated. SMMR dipolar source strengths differed between active and inactive twins within twin pairs in postcentral gyrus, medial frontal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus and in anterior cingulate (AC) GM voxel counts differed similarly. Compared to active twins, their inactive twin brothers showed greater dipole strengths in short periods of the deviant-elicited SMMR and larger AC GM voxel counts. Stronger activation in early unattended cortical processing of the deviant sensory signals in inactive co-twins may imply less effective gating of somatosensory information in inactive twins compared to their active brothers. Present findings indicate that already in 30's long-term physical activity pattern is linked with specific brain indices, both in functional and structural domains.

  11. History of the Army Ground Forces. Study Number 15. The Desert Training Center and C-AMA, (California - Arizona Area)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-01-01

    8217; ". . . . .* , - -* - " ’ , - ; " I " ’ ’- ;- 13. ’History of the Cbmm =ications Zone, CAMA," iacl 2 to CAMA itr, 30 Apr 44, sub: Transfer of CAMA to ASF. Desert

  12. Depositional history of Jurassic rocks in the area of the Powder River basin, northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the history of clastic sedimentation in the eastern part of the middle Western Interior during the Middle and Late Jurassic. Fourteen lithostratigraphic units are discussed in relation to five separate marine inundations and six intervening erosional events.

  13. Bathymetric map, area/capacity table, and sediment volume estimate for Millwood Lake near Ashdown, Arkansas, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Joseph M.; Green, W. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Millwood Lake, in southwestern Arkansas, was constructed and is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for flood-risk reduction, water supply, and recreation. The lake was completed in 1966 and it is likely that with time sedimentation has resulted in the reduction of storage capacity of the lake. The loss of storage capacity can cause less water to be available for water supply, and lessens the ability of the lake to mitigate flooding. Excessive sediment accumulation also can cause a reduction in aquatic habitat in some areas of the lake. Although many lakes operated by the USACE have periodic bathymetric and sediment surveys, none have been completed for Millwood Lake. In March 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USACE, surveyed the bathymetry of Millwood Lake to prepare an updated bathymetric map and area/capacity table. The USGS also collected sediment thickness data in June 2013 to estimate the volume of sediment accumulated in the lake.

  14. Sex determination using discriminant analysis of upper and lower extremity bones: New approach using the volume and surface area of digital model.

    PubMed

    Lee, U-Young; Kim, In-Beom; Kwak, Dai-Soon

    2015-08-01

    This study used 110 CT images taken from donated Korean cadavers to create 3-D models of the following upper and lower limb bones: the clavicle, scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, hip bone (os coxa), femur, patella (knee cap), tibia, talus, and calcaneus. In addition, the bone volume and surface area were calculated to determine sex differences using discriminant analysis. Significant sex differences were found in all bones with respect to volume and surface area (p<0.01). The order of volume was the same in females and males (femur>hip bone>tibia>humerus>scapula), although the order of surface area was different. The largest surface area in men was the femur and in women was the hip bone (p<0.01). An interesting finding of this study was that the ulna is the bone with the highest accuracy for sex determination (94%). When using the surface area of multiple bones, the maximum accuracy (99.4%) was achieved. The equation was as follows: (discriminant equation of surface area; female<0volume and surface area of extremity bones can be used for sex determination.

  15. Comparison of grey matter volume and thickness for analysing cortical changes in chronic schizophrenia: a matter of surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Kong, Li; Herold, Christina J; Zöllner, Frank; Salat, David H; Lässer, Marc M; Schmid, Lena A; Fellhauer, Iven; Thomann, Philipp A; Essig, Marco; Schad, Lothar R; Erickson, Kirk I; Schröder, Johannes

    2015-02-28

    Grey matter volume and cortical thickness are the two most widely used measures for detecting grey matter morphometric changes in various diseases such as schizophrenia. However, these two measures only share partial overlapping regions in identifying morphometric changes. Few studies have investigated the contributions of the potential factors to the differences of grey matter volume and cortical thickness. To investigate this question, 3T magnetic resonance images from 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 well-matched healthy controls were chosen for analyses. Grey matter volume and cortical thickness were measured by VBM and Freesurfer. Grey matter volume results were then rendered onto the surface template of Freesurfer to compare the differences from cortical thickness in anatomical locations. Discrepancy regions of the grey matter volume and thickness where grey matter volume significantly decreased but without corresponding evidence of cortical thinning involved the rostral middle frontal, precentral, lateral occipital and superior frontal gyri. Subsequent region-of-interest analysis demonstrated that changes in surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature accounted for the discrepancies. Our results suggest that the differences between grey matter volume and thickness could be jointly driven by surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature.

  16. Compulsory Education: Statistics, Methodology, Reforms and New Tendencies. Conference Papers for the 8th Session of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education (Parma, Italy, September 3-6, 1986). Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genovesi, Giovanni, Ed.

    This collection, the last of four volumes on the history of compulsory education among the nations of Europe and the western hemisphere, analyzes statistics, methodology, reforms, and new tendencies. Twelve of the document's 18 articles are written in English, 3 are written in French and 3 are in Italian. Summaries accompany most articles; three…

  17. Social-Economic Life and Compulsory Education. Conference Papers for the 8th Session of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education (Parma, Italy, September 3-6, 1986). Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genovesi, Giovanni, Ed.

    Socioeconomic life is the theme of this third of four volumes on the history of compulsory education among the nations of Europe and the western hemisphere. Of the document's 18 articles, 15 are written in English and 3 are written in French. Most selections offer summaries; one of the three articles written in French provides a resume in English.…

  18. Introduction, Development and Extension of Compulsory Education. Conference Papers for the 8th Session of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education (Parma, Italy, September 3-6, 1986). Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genovesi, Giovanni, Ed.

    This first of four volumes on the history of compulsory education among the nations of Europe and the Western hemisphere deals with historical antecedents and early development. Of the 29 total articles, 18 are in English and 2 have English summaries. Many selections include bibliographies. Titles and authors are as follows: "The Political…

  19. Advanced Transportation System Studies Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle Development Contract. Volume 2; Technical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Studies (ATSS) Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle Development contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. This document is Volume 2 of the final report for the contract. It provides documentation of selected technical results from various TA-2 analysis activities, including a detailed narrative description of the SSTO concept assessment results, a user's guide for the associated SSTO sizing tools, an SSTO turnaround assessment report, an executive summary of the ground operations assessments performed during the first year of the contract, a configuration-independent vehicle health management system requirements report, a copy of all major TA-2 contract presentations, a copy of the FLO launch vehicle final report, and references to Pratt & Whitney's TA-2 sponsored final reports regarding the identification of Russian main propulsion technologies.

  20. Women's Experiences of Principalship in Two South African High Schools in Multiply Deprived Rural Areas: A Life History Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data collected from a wider, longitudinal life history study conducted in South Africa between 2010 and 2014. The study focussed specifically on the personal and professional pathways to principalship of a sample of women leaders of co-educational high schools in South Africa, in both rural and peri-urban provinces: a role…

  1. Bibliography on the Natural History of an Urban Area: New York City. Council of Planning Librarians, Exchange Bibliography 990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loggins, Donald

    This is a bibliography of publications related to the natural history found in New York City. Most of the books cited were published in the last 20 years. All of the books listed are available on loan from Brooklyn or New York Public Libraries. In addition, pamphlets, materials in the ERIC system, and organizations are listed. (RH)

  2. Assessing high altitude glacier thickness, volume and area changes using field, GIS and remote sensing techniques: the case of Nevado Coropuna (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peduzzi, P.; Herold, C.; Silverio, W.

    2010-08-01

    Higher temperatures and changes in precipitation patterns have induced an acute decrease in Andean glaciers, thus leading to additional stress on water supply. To adapt to climate changes, local governments need information on the rate of glacier area and volume losses and on current ice thickness. Remote sensing analyses of Coropuna glacier (Peru) delineate an acute glaciated area decline between 1955 and 2008. We tested how volume changes can be estimated with remote sensing and GIS techniques using digital elevation models derived from both topographic maps and satellite images. Ice thickness was measured in 2004 using a Ground Penetrating Radar coupled with a Ground Positioning System during a field expedition. It provided profiles of ice thickness on different slopes, orientations and altitudes. These were used to model the current glacier volume using Geographical Information System and statistical multiple regression techniques. The results revealed a significant glacier volume loss; however the uncertainty is higher than the measured volume loss. We also provided an estimate of the remaining volume. The field study provided the scientific evidence needed by COPASA, a local Peruvian NGO, and GTZ, the German international cooperation agency, in order to alert local governments and communities and guide them in adopting new climate change adaptation policies.

  3. Polymorphism of Lipid-Water Systems: Epitaxial Relationships, Area-per-Volume Ratios, Polar-Apolar Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzzati, Vittorio

    1995-11-01

    The original purpose of this work was to seek an explanation of the empirical observation that pairs of phases in thermodynamic equilibrium often display an epitaxial relationship. Considering that the polar/apolar interfacial interactions appear to play a predominant role among all the forces that stabilize the phases, there is ground for the proposition that the two phases involved in any particular phase transition consist of structure elements whose area/volume ratio is invariant. Volume and area of the structure elements can be expressed as functions of the water content and the cell parameters of the two coexisting phases: their values can thus be determined experimentally. The volume ratio (structure elements)/(lipid molecules) is equivalent to a partition coefficient. These ideas were applied to a large variety of data available in the literature. The partition coefficient was found to display wide variations, remarkably correlated with the chemical and the physical parameters of the system, suggesting that the segregation of the hydrocarbon chains away from the polar headgroups is not as sharp as it is commonly assumed. The notion of a variable polar/apolar partition is a novelty in the field; moreover, this partition coefficient may well turn into an interesting thermodynamic parameter. As to the significance of the epitaxial relationships, a search through the literature shows that its very existence has many exceptions. In order to explain these observations the conjecture is put forward that the epitaxial coincidences have a kinetic effect on the phase transitions. In particular, it is suggested that any transition involving epitaxially related phases is unlikely to display metastable states. The possibility is also evoked that a selective advantage (be it technological, biological or experimental) may be associated with the existence of epitaxial relationships. This conjecture is illustrated by several examples drawn from the literature. De nombreuses

  4. Archaeological Investigation in the Gainesville Lake Area of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. Volume IV. Biocultural Studies in the Gainesville Lake Area.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    affiliation for the features were given to the authors of this volume, two refinements in the chronology found in Jenkins (Volume II) had not been made...the "unknowns" are small fragments of nutshells. As identification procedures were refined , only fragments which did not pass through a 2 mm screen...being refined to insure that the contents of botanical samples as nearly as possible represent the composition of plant remains present at a site, the

  5. The deep sea oxygen isotopic record: Significance for tertiary global ice volume history, with emphasis on the latest Miocene/early Pliocene

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Planktonic and benthic isotopic records as well as carbonate sedimentation records extending from 6.1 to 4.1 Ma for eastern South Atlantic Holes 526A and 525B are presented. These data suggest ice volume variations about a constant mean sufficient to drive sea level between 10 m and 75 m below present. Isotopic records at the deeper (2500 m) site have been enriched by up to 0.5% by dissolution. Carbonate accumulation rates at both sites quadrupled at 4.6 Ma primarily because of increased production and, secondarily, decreased dissolution. The second part presents a Cenozoic-long composite {delta}{sup 18}O curve for tropical shallow-dwelling planktonic foraminifers and the benthic foraminifer Cibicides at 2-4 km depths. Surface {delta}{sup 18}O gradients between various low-and-mid latitude sites reflect: (1) widespread SST stability through the Cenozoic and (2) significant change in Tasman Sea SST through the Tertiary. Assuming average SST for tropical non-upwelling areas was constant, the planktonic composite suggest that global ice volume for the last 40 my has not been significantly less than today. Residual benthic {delta}{sup 18}O reflect relatively warm and saline deep water until the early Miocene after which time deep water progressively cooled. The third part presents {delta}{sup 18}O for Recent Orbulina universa from 44 core-tops distributed through the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The purpose was to test the hypothesis that Orbulina calcifies at constant temperature and so records only ice volume changes. Orbulina commonly calcifies at intermediate depths over a wide range of temperatures salinities, and densities. These physical factors are not the primary controls on the spatial and vertical distribution of Orbulina.

  6. The Efficacy of a Mathematics Readiness Program for Inducing Conservation of Number, Weight, Area, Mass, and Volume in Disadvantaged Preschool Children in the Southern United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Beverly S.

    The present study was designed to determine whether conservation of number, weight, volume, area, and mass could be learned and retained by disadvantaged preschool children when taught by an inexperienced classroom teacher. An instructional sequence of 10-minute lessons was presented on alternate days over a 3 1/2 week period by preservice…

  7. Command History 1970. Volume 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    Hydrophone to detect swimmers . Unsuccess- ful. Insufficient acoustic coupling. 41-69 High Explosive Remote Under- Hydrophone coupled with large explosives... Swimmer Defense a. Successful 37 MK40 Depth Charges Swimmer deterrent weapon. In stock in RVN. Not employed as regularly as concussion grenades. 51...Tethered Anchor Chain Ring Collar for detection of explosives attached to chain. In use at various harbors. 34-68 DENIAL Electric field bridge swimmer

  8. History of Rickettsiology. Volume 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    typical virus to a well-characterized set of bacteria - . - The term " rickettsia " stems from a 1916 publication2 by da Rocha-Lima, a Brazilian...belonged in the genus Rickettsia and in 1922 proposed the name Rickettsia rickettsi. It became apparent in the 1930s that R. rickettsii was not confined to...preceding 2 1/2 years, Cox" discussed changes in virulence that might occur in rickettsiae passaged repeatedly in yolk sacs. A strain of R. rickettsii that

  9. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Differential longitudinal changes in cortical thickness, surface area and volume across the adult life span: regions of accelerating and decelerating change.

    PubMed

    Storsve, Andreas B; Fjell, Anders M; Tamnes, Christian K; Westlye, Lars T; Overbye, Knut; Aasland, Hilde W; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2014-06-18

    Human cortical thickness and surface area are genetically independent, emerge through different neurobiological events during development, and are sensitive to different clinical conditions. However, the relationship between changes in the two over time is unknown. Additionally, longitudinal studies have almost invariably been restricted to older adults, precluding the delineation of adult life span trajectories of change in cortical structure. In this longitudinal study, we investigated changes in cortical thickness, surface area, and volume after an average interval of 3.6 years in 207 well screened healthy adults aged 23-87 years. We hypothesized that the relationships among metrics are dynamic across the life span, that the primary contributor to cortical volume reductions in aging is cortical thinning, and that magnitude of change varies with age and region. Changes over time were seen in cortical area (mean annual percentage change [APC], -0.19), thickness (APC, -0.35), and volume (APC, -0.51) in most regions. Volume changes were primarily explained by changes in thickness rather than area. A negative relationship between change in thickness and surface area was found across several regions, where more thinning was associated with less decrease in area, and vice versa. Accelerating changes with increasing age was seen in temporal and occipital cortices. In contrast, decelerating changes were seen in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In conclusion, a dynamic relationship between cortical thickness and surface area changes exists throughout the adult life span. The mixture of accelerating and decelerating changes further demonstrates the importance of studying these metrics across the entire adult life span.

  11. State of Digital Education Options in the areas of Medical Terminology and the History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Schochow, Maximilian; Steger, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics at German institutions of higher learning have created various e-learning options that are based on different learning platforms and tailored to the specific curricular needs of individual teaching. Up to now no valid data has been available about the types of such e-learning options as well as possibilities of future developments thanks to coordinated cooperation among the different institutes. Methods: Of 31 German institutes of the history and theory of medicine and medical ethics that were asked to fill out a questionnaire, 30 answered, which equals a return rate of 97 per cent. The questionnaire was completed between July and August 2012 using a telephone survey. Results: Available to students online, digitally interactive teaching tools have boomed in the course of the last few years at German institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics. This trend is also reflected in a willingness of more than half of the respective departments (67 per cent) to expand their e-learning options on the basis of previous experience. The offered e-learning systems are accepted very well by the students. 57 per cent of the institutes stated, that 90-100 per cent of the students use the offered systems regularly. E-learning courses for terminology are offered particularly often, this is also reflected in the intended extension of these courses by the majority of institutes which plan to expand their e-learning systems. Conclusions: This article discusses the results of a comprehensive empirical survey about e-learning. It illustrates ways in which individual German institutes plan to expand their e-learning options in the future. Finally, specific proposals for cooperation among institutions (not just online) are introduced, the purpose of which is to produce synergy in e-learning. PMID:26038682

  12. Structural Area Inspection Frequency Evaluation (SAIFE). Volume 4. Software Documentation and User’s Manual. Book 1 - Initial Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    computer program, Volume IV contains detailed computer logic flow diagrams and a complete listing of the program which is written in SIMSCRIPT 11.5. Volume...were Mr. Carter J. Dinkeloo, project engineer, who served as principal investigator; Mr. Martin S. Moran, research engineer, who developed the model for...2. Input .................. .. . ................. 6 2.1 Aircraft Data ............ ............... 7 2.2 Long List Data

  13. Depositional and diagenetic history and petroleum geology of the Jurassic Norphlet Formation of the Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The discovery of deep (>20,000 ft) gas reservoirs in eolian sandstone of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay and offshore Alabama in the late 1970s represents one of the most significant hydrocarbon discoveries in the nation during the past several decades. Estimated original proved gas from Norphlet reservoirs in the Alabama coastal waters and adjacent federal waters is 7.462 trillion ft3 (Tcf) (75% recovery factor). Fifteen fields have been established in the offshore Alabama area. Norphlet sediment was deposited in an arid environment in alluvial fans, alluvial plains, and wadis in updip areas. In downdip areas, the Norphlet was deposited in a broad desert plain, with erg development in some areas. Marine transgression, near the end of Norphlet deposition, resulted in reworking of the upper part of the Norphlet Formation. Norphlet reservoir sandstone is arkose and subarkose, consisting of a simple assemblage of three minerals, quartz, albite, and K-feldspar. The present framework grain assemblage of the Norphlet is dominantly diagenetic, owing to albitization and dissolution of feldspar. Despite the simple framework composition, the diagenetic character of the Norphlet is complex. Important authigenic minerals include carbonate phases (calcite, dolomite, Fe-dolomite, and breunnerite), feldspar (albite and K-feldspar), evaporite minerals (anhydrite and halite), clay minerals (illite and chlorite), quartz, and pyrobitumen. The abundance and distribution of these minerals varies significantly between onshore and offshore regions of Norphlet production. The lack of sufficient internal sources of components for authigenic minerals, combined with unusual chemical compositions of chloride (Mg-rich), breunnerite, and some minor authigenic minerals, suggests that Louann-derived fluids influenced Norphlet diagenesis. In offshore Alabama reservoirs, porosity is dominantly modified primary porosity. Preservation of porosity in deep Norphlet reservoirs is due

  14. Early delta inhabitants: Reconstruction of Late Saalian landscape and habitation history of Flevoland and the Gelderse Vallei area (central Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Biggelaar, Don; Kluiving, Sjoerd; van Balen, Ronald; Kolen, Jan; Verpoorte, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Prior to the maximum southward extension of the Fennoscandian ice sheet (MIS 6, ~150 ka) the central Netherlands was part of a large delta which was inhabited by hunter-gathers. The Middle Palaeolithic flint artefacts left by these early inhabitants of the central Netherlands occur in ice-pushed ridges surrounding the Gelderse Vallei area. These ridges contain pushed alluvial deposits from the rivers Rhine and Meuse. Given the occurrence of the Middle Palaeolithic flint artefacts in the ice-pushed ridges surrounding the Gelderse Vallei area and the knowledge that the ice-pushed ridges continue into the subsurface of Flevoland, we hypothesize that the area of Middle Palaeolithic habitation has a northward extension, via the study area towards the mouth of the river Rhine into a proglacial lake in the current North Sea Basin. To test this hypothesis we have analysed high-quality coring data of pushed Rhine and Meuse alluvial deposits in the subsurface of Almere and correlated to the Middle Palaeolithic artefact-bearing layer exposed in quarries in the Gelderse Vallei area.

  15. Simulated impacts of artificial groundwater recharge and discharge of the source area and source volume of an Atlantic Coastal Plain Stream, Delaware, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasper, Joshua W.; Denver, Judish M.; McKenna, Thomas E.; Ullman, William J.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical groundwater-flow model was used to characterize the source area and volume of Phillips Branch, a baseflow-dominated stream incising a highly permeable unconfined aquifer on the low relief Delmarva Peninsula, USA. Particle-tracking analyses indicate that the source area (5.51 km2) is ~20% smaller than the topographically defined watershed (6.85 km2), and recharge entering ~37% of the surface watershed does not discharge to Phillips Branch. Groundwater residence time within the source volume ranges from a few days to almost 100 years, with 95% of the volume "flushing" within 50 years. Artificial discharge from groundwater pumping alters the shape of the source area and reduces baseflow due to the interception of stream flow paths, but has limited impacts on the residence time of groundwater discharged as baseflow. In contrast, artificial recharge from land-based wastewater disposal substantially reduces the source area, lowers the range in residence time due to the elimination of older flow paths to the stream, and leads to increased discharge to adjacent surface-water bodies. This research suggests that, in this and similar hydrogeologic settings, the "watershed" approach to water-resource management may be limited, particularly where anthropogenic stresses alter the transport of soluble contaminants through highly permeable unconfined aquifers.

  16. Orbitofrontal cortex volume in area 11/13 predicts reward devaluation, but not reversal learning performance, in young and aged monkeys.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sara N; Thome, Alex; Plange, Kojo; Engle, James R; Trouard, Theodore P; Gothard, Katalin M; Barnes, Carol A

    2014-07-23

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala are both necessary for decisions based on expected outcomes. Although behavioral and imaging data suggest that these brain regions are affected by advanced age, the extent to which aging alters appetitive processes coordinated by the OFC and the amygdala is unknown. In the current experiment, young and aged bonnet macaques were trained on OFC- and amygdala-dependent tasks that test the degree to which response selection is guided by reward value and can be adapted when expected outcomes change. To assess whether the structural integrity of these regions varies with levels of performance on reward devaluation and object reversal tasks, volumes of areas 11/13 and 14 of the OFC, central/medial (CM), and basolateral (BL) nuclei of the amygdala were determined from high-resolution anatomical MRIs. With age, there were significant reductions in OFC, but not CM and BL, volume. Moreover, the aged monkeys showed impairments in the ability to associate an object with a higher value reward, and to reverse a previously learned association. Interestingly, greater OFC volume of area 11/13, but not 14, was significantly correlated with an animal's ability to anticipate the reward outcome associated with an object, and smaller BL volume was predictive of an animal's tendency to choose a higher value reward, but volume of neither region correlated with reversal learning. Together, these data indicate that OFC volume has an impact on monkeys' ability to guide choice behavior based on reward value but does not impact ability to reverse a previously learned association.

  17. Advanced transportation system studies technical area 2(TA-2): Heavy lift launch vehicle development. volume 1; Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurry, J.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the TA-2 contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. This document is part of the final report for the TA-2 contract. The final report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 is the Executive Summary, Volume 2 is Technical Results, and Volume 3 is Program Cost Estimates. The document-at-hand, Volume 1, provides a summary description of the technical activities that were performed over the entire contract duration, covering three distinct launch vehicle definition activities: heavy-lift (300,000 pounds injected mass to low Earth orbit) launch vehicles for the First Lunar Outpost (FLO), medium-lift (50,000-80,000 pounds injected mass to low Earth orbit) launch vehicles, and single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicles (25,000 pounds injected mass to a Space Station orbit).

  18. Advanced transportation system studies technical area 2 (TA-2): Heavy lift launch vehicle development. volume 3; Program Cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurry, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the TA-2 contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. The basic period of performance of the TA-2 contract was from May 1992 through May 1993. No-cost extensions were exercised on the contract from June 1993 through July 1995. This document is part of the final report for the TA-2 contract. The final report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 is the Executive Summary, Volume 2 is Technical Results, and Volume 3 is Program Cost Estimates. The document-at-hand, Volume 3, provides a work breakdown structure dictionary, user's guide for the parametric life cycle cost estimation tool, and final report developed by ECON, Inc., under subcontract to Lockheed Martin on TA-2 for the analysis of heavy lift launch vehicle concepts.

  19. Association of Urogenital Symptoms with History of Water Contact in Young Women in Areas Endemic for S. haematobium. A Cross-Sectional Study in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Galappaththi-Arachchige, Hashini Nilushika; Amlie Hegertun, Ingrid Elise; Holmen, Sigve; Qvigstad, Erik; Kleppa, Elisabeth; Sebitloane, Motshedisi; Ndhlovu, Patricia Doris; Vennervald, Birgitte Jyding; Gundersen, Svein Gunnar; Taylor, Myra; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke

    2016-01-01

    Female genital schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Schistosoma haematobium. Infected females may suffer from symptoms mimicking sexually transmitted infections. We explored if self-reported history of unsafe water contact could be used as a simple predictor of genital schistosomiasis. In a cross-sectional study in rural South Africa, 883 sexually active women aged 16–22 years were included. Questions were asked about urogenital symptoms and water contact history. Urine samples were tested for S. haematobium ova. A score based on self-reported water contact was calculated and the association with symptoms was explored while adjusting for other genital infections using multivariable logistic regression analyses. S. haematobium ova were detected in the urine of 30.5% of subjects. Having ova in the urine was associated with the water contact score (p < 0.001). Symptoms that were associated with water contact included burning sensation in the genitals (p = 0.005), spot bleeding (p = 0.012), abnormal discharge smell (p = 0.018), bloody discharge (p = 0.020), genital ulcer (p = 0.038), red urine (p < 0.001), stress incontinence (p = 0.001) and lower abdominal pain (p = 0.028). In S. haematobium endemic areas, self-reported water contact was strongly associated with urogenital symptoms. In low-resource settings, a simple history including risk of water contact behaviour can serve as an indicator of urogenital schistosomiasis. PMID:27854250

  20. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area. Volume 3, Application of technical issues to the TRU-contaminated pits and trenches

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Krisman, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-07-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the acid pit and transuranic pits and trenches (TRU-PTs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues lated with ISV application at the SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in a three-volume report. Volume I identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. Volumes 2 and 3 discuss each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTS, respectively. The three-volume report is a working document that will be updated as necessary to reflect current evaluation strategy for the ISV technology. This is Volume 3.

  1. Volume and surface area of a spherical harmonic surface approximation to a NIF implosion core defined by HGXI/GXD images from the equator and pole

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A

    2011-10-26

    A solid object, such as a simplified approximation to an implosion core defined by the 17% intensity contour, can be described by a sum of spherical harmonics, following the notation of Butkov (Mathematical Physics, ISBN 0-201-00727-4, 1968; there are other notations so care is required), with Pl(x) being the usual (apparently standard) Legendre polynomial. For the present purposes, finding the volume and surface area of an implosion core defined by P0, P2, P4, M0, and M4, I will restrict the problem to consider only A{sub 00}, A{sub 20}, A{sub 40}, and A{sub 44}, with the phase angle set to eliminate the sin(m{phi}) term. Once the volume and surface area are determined, I will explore how these coefficients relate to measured quantities A0, A2/A0, A4/A0, M0, and M4/M0.

  2. Environmental Inventory Report. East St. Louis and Vicinity, Cahokia Canal Drainage Area, Madison and St. Clair Counties, Illinois. Volume 5.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    SEDIMENT QUALITY -ThomeAAon VOLUME 2- ADVERSE ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS I’ll AIR POLLUTION -Thoxuton IV NOISE POLLUTION -Thonton g VOLUME 3 BIOLOGICAL ELEMENTS V...1 g I. .. .. ... ... . . . .. . . .. . . . . -. . -~~7 77w -Aa-. - Table XVII-9 Major Offenses Reported 1977...i + i + LIE AIJ eul~N-r ’o0 C’ - 00 coI IP 4 N m _ I IC. w+ LU~L LA ++ -1 = C9 ~~ -o~e N ’.0 r- A - w~~ ~ 7 " I I + <-- G - ’. AI! a uI % P- C I * N

  3. Thermal and petroleum-generation history of the Mississippian Eleana Formation and Tertiary source rocks, Yucca Mountain Area, Southern Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A geochemical and geologic assessment of petroleum potential in the Yucca Mountain area indicates little remaining potential for significant oil and gas generation in the Mississippian Eleana Formation or related Paleozoic rocks, and good but a really restricted potential in Tertiary rocks in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site. Mesozoic source rocks are not present in the Yucca Mountain area. The Tertiary source rocks in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site are typically carbon-rich, and where hydrogen-rich, they are good oil-prone source rocks that are immature to marginally mature with respect to oil and gas generation. A geologically similar occurrence of hydrothermally altered Tertiary source rocks at north Bare Mountain retains little hydrocarbon generation capacity. The implication is that hydrocarbons were generated during hydrothermal alteration and have since migrated out of the source rocks or alive been lost during exhumation. A reconstructed thermal history of the Yucca Mountain area, based on the Eleana Formation, indicates petroleum was generated in the Late Paleozoic and possibly Early Mesozoic and that the oil was lost or metamorphosed to pyrobitumen during later heating, probably related to igneous activity. The Tertiary rocks are still capable of generating oil and gas, but little potential exists for a major hydrocarbon discovery due to the restricted occurrence of good source rocks and their marginal thermal maturity when situated away from intrusions.

  4. Familial adenomatous polyposis in pediatrics: natural history, emerging surveillance and management protocols, chemopreventive strategies, and areas of ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Septer, Seth; Lawson, Caitlin E; Anant, Shrikant; Attard, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary condition with a near 100 % lifetime risk of colorectal cancer without prophylactic colectomy. Most patients with FAP have a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene on chromosome 5q22. This condition frequently presents in children with polyps developing most frequently in the second decade of life and surveillance colonoscopy is required starting at age ten. Polyps are found not only in the colon, but in the stomach and duodenum. Knowledge of the natural history of FAP is important as there are several extra-colonic sequelae which also require surveillance. In infants and toddlers, there is an increased risk of hepatoblastoma, while in teenagers and adults duodenal carcinomas, desmoid tumors, thyroid cancer and medulloblastoma are more common in FAP than in the general population. Current chemopreventive strategies include several medications and natural products, although to this point there is no consensus on the most efficacious and safe agent. Genetic counseling is an important part of the diagnostic process for FAP. Appropriate use and interpretation of genetic testing is best accomplished with genetic counselor involvement as many families also have concerns regarding future insurability or discrimination when faced with genetic testing.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a large South American industrial coastal area (Santos Estuary, Southeastern Brazil): sources and depositional history.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Bícego, Márcia C; Mahiques, Michel M; Figueira, Rubens C L; Tessler, Moyses G; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2011-01-01

    Located in southeastern Brazil, the Santos Estuary has the most important industrial and urban population area of South America. Since the 1950's, increased urbanization and industrialization near the estuary margins has caused the degradation of mangroves and has increased the discharge of sewage and industrial effluents. The main objectives of this work were to determine the concentrations and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediment cores in order to investigate the input of these substances in the last 50 years. The PAHs analyses indicated multiple sources of these compounds (oil and pyrolitic origin), basically anthropogenic contributions from biomass, coal and fossil fuels combustion. The distribution of PAHs in the cores was associated with the formation and development of Cubatão industrial complex and the Santos harbour, waste disposal, world oil crisis and the pollution control program, which results in the decrease of organic pollutants input in this area.

  6. Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations. Indonesian Coastal Marine Areas. Volume 2. Area 8 - West Borneo, Area 9 - Karimata Strait, Area 10 - Southwest Java Sea, Area 11 - South Central Java, Area 12 - Southeast Java, Area 13 - Southeast Java Sea, Area 14 - Northeast Java Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    5 ’ :00 0 1’.20 2. 219 39 : .:0 :00 .0 A.. AP99 120 , ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -y- ,M -.7yT ,, T , . , .,77M III II P~ kID : (¢E(’Ll) 9•3-977AREA 0009 KARIMATA STRAIT...TYPE OTHER WEATHER PHENOMENA kNO 01D RAIN PAIN VAIL RAIG SNOW OTHER HAI. PORN AT PCPN PAST ?HOR FOG FOG WO SMOKE SPRAY NO SHoR PON FRZN 06 TIME HOUR LTNG...NAONO DIR RAIN RAIN ORIL RCZG SNOW OTHER HAIL PCORN A? FCN PAST THOR OTOH HAZE SPRy NOUST SI ? R G PUG W SMOK SPRAY No PHft PCN PRN OPTM OR LTNG Wa PORN

  7. Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 1. Final remedial investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Volume 1 of this report covers the Remedial Investigation conducted on Site 1, Fire Training Area at Volk Field Air National Guard Base. The remedial work is described and the testing conducted after remediation to insure all contamination has been removed. The study as conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program. Partial contents include: Meteorology; Hydrology; Soils; Water wells; Groundwater; Borings; Samplings; Chemical contamination; Migration; Decontamination.

  8. Is the Volume of the Caudate Nuclei Associated With Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia? – Protocol for a 3-Tesla MRI Study of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Johan Mårtensson, Johan; Becerra, Lino; Christensen, Anders; Nybing, Janus Damm; Havsteen, Inger; Boesen, Mikael; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience and development of pain may be influenced by a number of physiological, psychological, and psychosocial factors. In a previous study we found differences in neuronal activation to noxious stimulation, and microstructural neuroanatomical differences, when comparing healthy volunteers with differences in size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following a standardized burn injury. Objective We aim to investigate the degree of association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization. Methods The study consists of one experimental day, in which whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans will be conducted including T1-weighed three-dimensional anatomy scan, diffusion tensor imaging, and resting state functional MRI. Before the experimental day, all included participants will undergo experimental pain testing in a parallel study (Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02527395). Results from this experimental pain testing, as well as the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia from the included participants, will be extracted from this parallel study. Results The association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the area of secondary hyperalgesia will be investigated by linear regression of the estimated best linear unbiased predictors on the individual volumes of the pain relevant brain structures. Conclusions We plan to investigate the association between experimental pain testing parameters and the volume, connectivity, and resting state activity of pain-relevant structures in the brain. These results may improve our knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the development of acute and chronic pain. ClinicalTrial Danish Research Ethics Committee (identifier: H-15010473). Danish Data Protection Agency (identifier: RH-2015-149). Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02567318; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02567318

  9. Comparison between different approaches of modeling shallow landslide susceptibility: a case history in the area of Oltrepo Pavese, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizioli, D.; Meisina, C.; Valentino, R.; Montrasio, L.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow landslides are triggered by intense rainfalls of short duration. Even though they involve only small portions of hilly and mountainous terrains, they are the cause of heavy damages to people and infrastructures. The identification of shallow landslide prone-areas is, therefore, a necessity to plan mitigation measures. On the 27th and 28th of April 2009, the area of Oltrepo Pavese, northern Italy, was affected by a very intense rainfall event, which caused a great number of shallow landslides. These instability phenomena meanly occurred on slopes taken up by vineyards and caused damages to many roads and one human loss. On the basis of aerial photographs taken immediately after the event and field surveys, it was possible to detect more than 1,600 landslides. After acquiring all the information dealing with topography, geotechnical properties of the involved soils and land use, a susceptibility analysis on territorial scale has been carried out. The paper deals with the application and the comparison, on the study area, of different methods for the susceptibility assessment: a) the physically-based stability models TRIGRS (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Model, Baum et al., 2008), which is designed for modelling the potential occurrences of shallow landslides by incorporating the transient pressure response to rainfall and downward infiltration processes and SLIP (Shallow Landslides Instability Prediction; Montrasio, 2000; Montrasio and Valentino, 2008), which allows to dynamically take into account the connection between the stability condition of a slope, the characteristics of the soil, and the rainfall amounts, including also previous rainfalls; b) the logistic regression and the Neural Artificial Network (ANN) that take into account some important predisposing factors in the study area (slope angle, landform classification, the potential solar radiation, soil thickness, permeability, topographic ruggedness index

  10. Dependence of the head of a centrifugal inclined Archimedean screw pump on the volume of cavitation cavities in the flow area of the pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovskaia, T. A.

    A comparison of theoretical and experimental results shows that the dependence of the head of a centrifugal inclined Archimedean screw pump on the volume of cavities in the flow area of the pump during oscillations is ambiguous and is determined by the effect of cavities in the flow area as well as by the head of the forepump. It is concluded that this finding should be taken into account in the calculation of unsteady processes for regimes with intense reverse flows at the inlet to the pump.

  11. Sedimentology and depositional history of Neogene gravel deposits in lower Tornillo Creek area of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Thurwachter, J.E.

    1984-04-01

    Neogene gravel deposits in the lower Tornillo Creek area of Big Bend National Park, Texas, record the filling of a small structural basin formed during Basin and Range tectonism. Four lithofacies are recognized in the Late Miocene La Noria member (informal name): (1) a medial braided-stream lithofacies consisting of upward-fining packages of cross-bedded gravel, sandstone, and siltstone; (2) a distal braided-stream lithofacies consisting of poorly-defined upward-fining packages of fine gravel, sandstone, and mudstone; (3) a calcrete-rich gravel and sandstone lithofacies representing strike-valley and alluvial-fan deposition, and (4) and ephemeral lake-plain lithofacies consisting of massive and burrowed mudstones with sheet-like sandstone interbeds. Upward-fining packages in the braided-stream lithofacies represent the lateral migration and avulsion of the stream tract across the basin; together with the strike-valley and alluvial-fan deposits, these record the initial stages of basin filling. Provenance studies show that much of this sediment was derived from northern Mexico. Overlying ephemeral-lake deposits record the structural tilting and closing of the downstream (north) end of the basin. Gravels and minor sandstones of the Pleistocene Estufa member (informal name) represent basinward progradation of alluvial fans. Deposition of the Estufa member resulted from: (1) Quaternary tectonic activity in the Chisos Mountains area; (2) lowering of local base level by post-Miocene development of the Rio Grande drainage through the area; and (3) Pleistocene pluvial-period climatic changes. Subsequent Quaternary faulting has caused minor deformation of the deposits.

  12. Hazardous present emergency plans for volcanic eruptions in Neapolitan area: evidences from volcanic and magmatological history and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe; Pappalardo, Lucia

    2010-05-01

    New evidences from volcanic and magmatological features, archaelogical findings, and modeling provide key constraints on the mechanisms and the effects of the explosive eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei, from the prehistory to the modern times. For both volcanic areas, the probability of plinian events (VEI 5) with their complete range of variability is not negligible, differentiated highly explosive magmas are likely already available at depth, and the associated effects of the possible eruption may affect the whole heavily urbanized metropolitan area. Particularly, results of our numerical simulations consistently with field evidences indicate that tephra accumulation during fallout phase of eruption may preserve critical load for roof collapse up to a distance even exceeding 30 km from the vent, while physical proprieties of PDCs may exceed the threshold for human survival even at distance from the vent in the order of 20 km. These results indicate that the appropriate action for the mitigation of volcanic risk should be the complete evacuation of the whole potentially affected area. In contrast with the single intermediate event (1631 sub-plinian eruption) adopted as reference scenario in the present emergency plan for Vesuvius (at present an emergency plan is not available for Campi Flegrei), the adequate reference scenario should correspond to the worst case (VEI 5, for both volcanoes) that not simply reflects the worst eruption occurred in the past but the entire range of the possible events for that VEI. The adoption, during a volcanic crisis, of any minor scenario that accepts variable levels of risk for the people leaving around the volcano, even with the justification of the cost/benefit approach, always may introduce a false perception of safety that may increase the risk.

  13. Benthic reconnaissance of central and northern California OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) Areas. Volume 1. Technical report. Volume 2. Technical appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lissner, A.; Barnett, A.; Johnson, T.; Kanter, R.; Smith, R.

    1989-07-01

    A biological reconnaissance was conducted in November and December 1987 of selected hard and soft substrate habitats at depths of 50-600 meters offshore central and northern California. Stations were located in four general offshore basins, including Eel River, Point Arena, Bodega, and Santa Cruz. The purpose of the survey was to obtain quantitative data on species distribution and community structure as related to geographic range, bottom depth, substrate type, and other environmental variables. Survey methods included a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) outfitted with photographic and video recording systems to study hard substrate areas; box corers were used to sample soft substrate sites. Common hard substrate taxa included anemones (e.g., Metridium senile), feather stars (Florometra serratissima), cup corals (Paracyathus stearnsii), sponges, brachiopods (Laqueus californianus), ophiuroids (Ophiothrix sp./Ophiocanthasp.), and rockfishes (Sebastes spp).

  14. Late-glacial and Holocene history of the dry forest area in the south Colombian Cauca Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrío, Juan Carlos; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Marchant, Robert; Rangel, Orlando

    2002-10-01

    Two sedimentary cores with pollen, charcoal and radiocarbon data are presented. These records document the Late-glacial and Holocene dry forest vegetation, fire and environmental history of the southern Cauca Valley in Colombia (1020 m). Core Quilichao-1 (640 cm; 3° 6N, 76° 31W) represents the periods of 13 150-7720 14C yr BP and, following a hiatus, from 2880 14C yr BP to modern. Core La Teta-2 (250 cm; 3° 5N, 76° 32W) provides a continuous record from 8700 14C yr BP to modern.Around 13 150 14C yr BP core Quilichao-1 shows an active Late-glacial drainage system and presence of dry forest. From 11 465 to 10 520 14C yr BP dry forest consists mainly of Crotalaria, Moraceae/Urticaceae, Melastomataceae/Combretaceae, Piper and low stature trees, such as Acalypha, Alchornea, Cecropia and Celtis. At higher elevation Andean forest comprising Alnus, Hedyosmum, Quercus and Myrica

  15. Paleogene volcanic rocks of the Matanuska Valley area and the displacement history of the Castle Mountain fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberman, M. L.; Grantz, A.

    Primitive strontium-isotopic composition and overall bimodal distribution of silica in upper Paleocene and Eocene subalkalic tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalt and low-potassium rhyolite of the Matanuska Valley and southern Talkeetna Mountains suggest that these rocks were derived from the mantle with little contamination by continental crust. The volcanic rocks consist of rhyolite tuff and ash flows, as well as basalt flows and dikes, in the nonmarine Arkose Ridge Formation of the southwestern Talkeetna Mountains; of subaerial basalt and andesite flows, tuff, and mafic intrusions in the southeastern Talkeetna Mountains; and of felsic and mafic dikes, sills, and small plutons in the Matanuska Valley. The generalized geology of the area in which the volcanic rocks occur and the localities sampled for potassium-argon-age determinations and for chemical and strontinum-isotopic analysis are shown. The analytical results are listed.

  16. Calculation of intercepted volume of sewer overflows: a model for control of nonpoint pollution sources in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. C.; Jung1, D. I.; Won, C. H.; Rim, J. M.

    2006-10-01

    The authors discovered large differences in the characteristics of overflows by the calculation of 1) intercepting volume of overflows for sewer systems using SWMM model which takes into consideration the runoff and pollutants from rainfalls and 2) the intercepted volume in the total flow at an investigation site. The intercepting rate at the investigation point of CSOs showed higher values than the SSDs. Based on the modeling of the receiving water quality after calculating the intercepting amount of overflows by considering the characteristics of outflows for a proper management of the overflow of sewer systems with rainfalls, it is clear that the BOD decreased by 82.9% 94.0% for the discharge after intercepting a specific amount of flows compared to the discharge from unprocessed overflows.

  17. Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendixes: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report documents the UltraSonic Ranging and Data Systems (USRADS) survey conducted for radiological characterization of approximately 5 acres located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. The survey was conducted by Chemrad Tennessee Corporation under subcontract No. 7908-RS-00902 to CDM Federal Programs Corporation. The field survey began June 23, 1994 (Chemrad survey team was unable to actually enter field until June 24 awaiting sign-off of CDM plans by MMES) and was terminated on June 29, 1994. The designated survey area is located on the DOE X-10 facility and South of the main X-10 building complex. The entire north boundary of the site is adjacent to SWSA 4, with the Bath Tubbing Trench Seep Area (BTT) actually being a part of that SWSA (See Figure 1). Approximately one-third of the designated area was actually surveyed. The BTT area slopes moderately eastward toward a small stream in the WAG 4 area. The area is open and had recently been trimmed for the survey. The balance of the designated survey area lies along the small stream within WAG 4 and is densely wooded with heavy underbrush. The area had not been cleared or brushed. Survey reference points for the BTT area mere directly tied into the X-10 coordinate system while the t bale,ice of the designated survey area mere tied into an existing relative metric grid system. The designated area was surveyed for radiological characterization using near-surface gamma and beta detectors as well as an energy independent dosimeter. This report describes the survey method and presents the survey findings.

  18. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area. Volume 2, Application of technical issues to the Acid Pit

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Gratson, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. Volume 1 identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. This document Volume 2 and Volume 3 discusses each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTs, respectively.

  19. Development of an Interactive Shoreline Management Tool for the Lower Wood River Valley, Oregon - Phase I: Stage-Volume and Stage-Area Relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haluska, Tana L.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the parcel and inundation area geographic information system (GIS) layers for various surface-water stages. It also presents data tables containing the water stage, inundation area, and water volume relations developed from analysis of detailed land surface elevation derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data recently collected for the Wood River Valley at the northern margin of Agency Lake in Klamath County, Oregon. Former shoreline wetlands that have been cut off from Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by dikes might in the future be reconnected to Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by breaching the dikes. Issues of interest associated with restoring wetlands in this way include the area that will be inundated, the volume of water that may be stored, the change in wetland habitat, and the variation in these characteristics as surface-water stage is changed. Products from this analysis can assist water managers in assessing the effect of breaching dikes and changing surface-water stage. The study area is in the approximate former northern margins of Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes in the Wood River Valley.

  20. Reconstruction of the volcanic history of the Tacámbaro-Puruarán area (Michoacán, México) reveals high frequency of Holocene monogenetic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbaud, Marie-Noëlle; Siebe, Claus; Layer, Paul; Salinas, Sergio

    2012-07-01

    The 690 km2 Tacámbaro-Puruarán area located at the arc-front part of the Michoácan-Guanajuato volcanic field in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) records a protracted history of volcanism that culminated with intense monogenetic activity in the Holocene. Geologic mapping, 40Ar/39Ar and 14C radiometric dating, and whole-rock chemical analyses of volcanic products provide insights to that history. Eocene volcanics (55-40 Ma) exposed at uplifted blocks are related to a magmatic arc that preceded the TMVB. Early TMVB products are represented by poorly exposed Pliocene silicic domes (5-2 Ma). Quaternary (<2 Ma) volcanoes (114 mapped) are mainly scoria cones with lavas (49 vol.%), viscous lava flows (22 vol.%), and lava shields (22 vol.%). Erupted products are dominantly either basaltic andesites (37 vol. %), or andesites (17 vol.%), or span across both compositions (28 vol.%). Basalts (9 vol.%), dacites (4 vol.%), shoshonites (2 vol.%), and other alkali-rich rocks (<3 vol.%) occur subordinately. Early-Pleistocene volcanism was bimodal (dacites and basalts) and voluminous while since 1 Ma small-volume eruptions of intermediate magmas have dominated. Higher rates of lithospheric extension in the Quaternary may have allowed a larger number of small, poorly evolved dikes to reach the surface during this period. Eruptive centers as old as 1.7 Ma are aligned in a NE direction parallel to both, basement faults and the direction of regional compressive stress, implying structural control on volcanic activity. Data suggest that volcanism was strongly pulsatory and fed by localized low-degree partial melting of mantle sources. In the Holocene, at least 13 eruptions occurred (average recurrence interval of 800 years). These produced ~3.8 km3 of basaltic andesitic to andesitic magma and included four eruptions dated at ~1,000; 4,000; 8,000; and 11,000 years bc (calibrated 14C ages). To date, this is one of the highest monogenetic eruption frequencies detected within such a

  1. The natural and social history of the indigenous lands and protected areas corridor of the Xingu River basin

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, Stephan; Boas, André Villas; Ono, Katia Yukari; Fonseca, Marisa Gesteira; Doblas, Juan; Zimmerman, Barbara; Junqueira, Paulo; Jerozolimski, Adriano; Salazar, Marcelo; Junqueira, Rodrigo Prates; Torres, Maurício

    2013-01-01

    The 280 000 km² Xingu indigenous lands and protected areas (ILPAs) corridor, inhabited by 24 indigenous peoples and about 215 riverine (ribeirinho) families, lies across active agriculture frontiers in some of the historically highest-deforestation regions of the Amazon. Much of the Xingu is anthropogenic landscape, densely inhabited and managed by indigenous populations over the past millennium. Indigenous and riverine peoples' historical management and use of these landscapes have enabled their long-term occupation and ultimately their protection. The corridor vividly demonstrates how ILPAs halt deforestation and why they may account for a large part of the 70 per cent reduction in Amazon deforestation below the 1996–2005 average since 2005. However, ongoing and planned dams, road paving, logging and mining, together with increasing demand for agricultural commodities, continued degradation of upper headwaters outside ILPA borders and climate change impacts may render these gains ephemeral. Local peoples will need new, bottom-up, forms of governance to gain recognition for the high social and biological diversity of these territories in development policy and planning, and finance commensurate with the value of their ecosystem services. Indigenous groups' reports of changing fire and rainfall regimes may themselves evidence climate change impacts, a new and serious threat. PMID:23610170

  2. The natural and social history of the indigenous lands and protected areas corridor of the Xingu River basin.

    PubMed

    Schwartzman, Stephan; Boas, André Villas; Ono, Katia Yukari; Fonseca, Marisa Gesteira; Doblas, Juan; Zimmerman, Barbara; Junqueira, Paulo; Jerozolimski, Adriano; Salazar, Marcelo; Junqueira, Rodrigo Prates; Torres, Maurício

    2013-06-05

    The 280,000 km² Xingu indigenous lands and protected areas (ILPAs) corridor, inhabited by 24 indigenous peoples and about 215 riverine (ribeirinho) families, lies across active agriculture frontiers in some of the historically highest-deforestation regions of the Amazon. Much of the Xingu is anthropogenic landscape, densely inhabited and managed by indigenous populations over the past millennium. Indigenous and riverine peoples' historical management and use of these landscapes have enabled their long-term occupation and ultimately their protection. The corridor vividly demonstrates how ILPAs halt deforestation and why they may account for a large part of the 70 per cent reduction in Amazon deforestation below the 1996-2005 average since 2005. However, ongoing and planned dams, road paving, logging and mining, together with increasing demand for agricultural commodities, continued degradation of upper headwaters outside ILPA borders and climate change impacts may render these gains ephemeral. Local peoples will need new, bottom-up, forms of governance to gain recognition for the high social and biological diversity of these territories in development policy and planning, and finance commensurate with the value of their ecosystem services. Indigenous groups' reports of changing fire and rainfall regimes may themselves evidence climate change impacts, a new and serious threat.

  3. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-23

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  4. Environmental Inventory Report. East St. Louis and Vicinity, Cahokia Canal Drainage Area, Madison and St. Clair Counties, Illinois. Volume 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    coal in the present drainage area was found in 1807 by Trappist monks, who were then living at the Cahokia Mounds. They mined enough for their own...and Clark begin journey from Wood River 1807 Coal discovered in area by Trappist Monks 1809 Territory of Illinois established 1811 National Road begun

  5. Mapping of land use and geomorphology in the APAPORE project area by LANDSAT satellite data, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Dossantos, A. P.; Kux, H. J.; Sausen, T. M.; Bueno, A. M. T. R.; Desouza, L. F.; Nunes, J. S. D.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a land use and geomorphological mapping of the so-called Projeto APAPORE area, at Mato Grosso do Sul State are presented. The study was carried out using multispectral scanner (MSS) and return beam vidicon LANDSAT images (channels 5 and 7 for the MSS) at the scale of 1:250,000 from 1980 through visual interpretation. The results indicate that pastureland is the most widespead class and that the agricultural areas re concentrated in the north of the area under study. The area covered with cerradao (arboreous savanna type) has a great areal extention, thus permitting the advance of the agricultural frontier. The geomorphological mapping can be useful to regional planning of future land use within the studied area.

  6. Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation: Tooele Army Depot, Utah. Volume 1. North Area and Facilities at Hill Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-12

    vetch , balsam root, and yarrow. This area is being invaded by low sagebrush and big sagebrush. To the southeast, the Foothill Range has medium-textured...wheatgrass, Indian ricegrass, sweet vetch , balsam root, and yarrow. This range is also being invaded by Ho’ogeton and cheatgrass. The third soil type is in...spiked vheatgrass, nature blue, needle and thread grass, western wheatgrass, sweet vetch , balsam root, and yarrow. This area has pockets of big sagebrush

  7. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Indian Gulch burn area, near Golden, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned in 2011 by the Indian Gulch wildfire near Golden, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and debris-flow volumes for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from 2 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall to a high of 76 percent in response to the 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from a low of 840 cubic meters to a high of 26,000 cubic meters, indicating a considerable hazard should debris flows occur.

  8. Estimated probabilities, volumes, and inundation areas depths of potential postwildfire debris flows from Carbonate, Slate, Raspberry, and Milton Creeks, near Marble, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Verdin, Kristine L.

    2011-01-01

    During 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Gunnison County, initiated a study to estimate the potential for postwildfire debris flows to occur in the drainage basins occupied by Carbonate, Slate, Raspberry, and Milton Creeks near Marble, Colorado. Currently (2010), these drainage basins are unburned but could be burned by a future wildfire. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of postwildfire debris-flow occurrence and debris-flow volumes for drainage basins occupied by Carbonate, Slate, Raspberry, and Milton Creeks near Marble. Data for the postwildfire debris-flow models included drainage basin area; area burned and burn severity; percentage of burned area; soil properties; rainfall total and intensity for the 5- and 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration-rainfall; and topographic and soil property characteristics of the drainage basins occupied by the four creeks. A quasi-two-dimensional floodplain computer model (FLO-2D) was used to estimate the spatial distribution and the maximum instantaneous depth of the postwildfire debris-flow material during debris flow on the existing debris-flow fans that issue from the outlets of the four major drainage basins. The postwildfire debris-flow probabilities at the outlet of each drainage basin range from 1 to 19 percent for the 5-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, and from 3 to 35 percent for 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. The largest probabilities for postwildfire debris flow are estimated for Raspberry Creek (19 and 35 percent), whereas estimated debris-flow probabilities for the three other creeks range from 1 to 6 percent. The estimated postwildfire debris-flow volumes at the outlet of each creek range from 7,500 to 101,000 cubic meters for the 5-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, and from 9,400 to 126,000 cubic meters for

  9. ARVO: A Fortran package for computing the solvent accessible surface area and the excluded volume of overlapping spheres via analytic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buša, Ján; Džurina, Jozef; Hayryan, Edik; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Plavka, Ján; Pokorný, Imrich; Skřivánek, Jaroslav; Wu, Ming-Chya

    2005-01-01

    In calculating the solvation energy of proteins, the hydration effects, drug binding, molecular docking, etc., it is important to have an efficient and exact algorithms for computing the solvent accessible surface area and the excluded volume of macromolecules. Here we present a Fortran package based on the new exact analytical methods for computing volume and surface area of overlapping spheres. In the considered procedure the surface area and volume are expressed as surface integrals of the second kind over the closed region. Using the stereographic projection the surface integrals are transformed to a sum of double integrals which are reduced to the curve integrals. MPI Fortran version is described as well. The package is also useful for computing the percolation probability of continuum percolation models. Program summaryTitle of program: ARVO Catalogue identifier: ADUL Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUL Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Operating system under which the program has been tested: LINUX system and Windows system Programming language used: FORTRAN Computer: PC Pentium; SPP'2000; Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 633 Number of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5051 Distribution format: tar.gz Card punching code: ASCII Nature of physical problem: Molecular mechanics computations, continuum percolations. Method of solution: Numerical algorithm based on the analytical formulas, after using the stereographic transformation. Restriction on the complexity of the problem: The program does not account explicitly for cavities inside the molecule. Typical running time: Depends on the size of the molecule under consideration. Unusual features of the program: No

  10. History of Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Albert E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the history of American physics, indicating that much effort has been on the atomic bond and high-energy physics, to the detriment of other topics and areas. To offset this tendency, significant research is going on in the history of solid-state physics, with glimmerings in the history of physics education. (JN)

  11. Film and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaber, Robin L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of Web sites that focus on using film to teach history. Includes Web sites in five areas: (1) film and education; (2) history of cinema; (3) film and history resources; (4) film and women; and (5) film organizations. (CMK)

  12. Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

  13. Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume II. Palo Duro basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and high variable precipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

  14. Measuring surface-area-to-volume ratios in soft porous materials using laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. P.; Mair, R. W.; Hoffmann, D.; Hrovat, M. I.; Rogers, R. A.; Topulos, G. P.; Walsworth, R. L.; Patz, S.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a minimally invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique that enables determination of the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of soft porous materials from measurements of the diffusive exchange of laser-polarized 129Xe between gas in the pore space and 129Xe dissolved in the solid phase. We apply this NMR technique to porous polymer samples and find approximate agreement with destructive stereological measurements of S/V obtained with optical confocal microscopy. Potential applications of laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange NMR include measurements of in vivo lung function in humans and characterization of gas chromatography columns.

  15. Similarities in the surface area/volume ratio in the fibers of the recurrent laryngeal nerve can explain the symmetry in the vocal fold mobility?

    PubMed

    de Campos, Deivis; Xavier, Léder Leal; Goulart, Guilherme Reghelin; Thomaz, Leonardo Dalla Giacomassa Rocha; Malysz, Tais; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate in this paper that although there are statistical differences for all morphometric data [axon length, axon diameter, myelinated fiber diameter and degree of the myelination (g-Ratio)] between the fibers of recurrent laryngeal nerve right and left, the surface area/volume ratio in the fibers of both nerves is exactly the same (1/1.7). Thereby, this paper presents the hypothesis that this similarity between the nerves can actually trigger a considerable synchrony in mobility of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx that control of the vocal folds.

  16. Closure plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6: Volume 1, Closure plan. Remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This Closure Plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) a disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and hazardous materials, of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) describes how portions of SWSA 6 will be closed under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status per 40 CFR 265 Subpart G [TN Rule 1200-1-11-.05(7)]. An overview is provided of activities necessary for final closure and corrective measures for all of SWSA 6. Results of surface waters and groundwater sampling are provided.

  17. Area terrace pit coal mining systems: volume 2--appendices. Open file report (final) Sep 1977-Jul 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F.; Simon, C.; Stoddard, M.; Verma, M.; White, M.

    1980-10-01

    This report is principally concerned with the engineering and economic feasibility of area surface coal mining systems other than draglines. This analysis evaluates shovel-trucks, shovel-crusher-conveyors, and shovel-rail excavation and haulage systems for an assortment of geologic environments and production rates in the Powder River Basin (PRB). Shovel-trucks, front-end loader-trucks, and shovel-crusher-conveyors were studied in a multiseam, dipping geologic area of the Four Corners region. The Texas lignite engineering and economic research involved bucket-wheel excavators (BWE), BWE-backhoes, and scraper-backhoe combinations for overburden and coal excavation.

  18. M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report. Second quarter 1995, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report describes the corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site during second quarter 1995. Topics include: changes in sampling, analysis, and reporting; water levels; remedial action of groundwater; and hydrology of the affected aquifer zones.

  19. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the second volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report.

  20. Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO), Central American Coastal Marine Areas, West Coast. Volume 2. Area 6 - Manzanillo SE, Area 7 - Acapulco South, Area 8 - Gulf of Tehuantepec, Area 9 - Guatemala SW Coast, Area 10 - Nicaragua SW Coast, Area 11 - Punta Burica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    AREA COD ACAPULCC $ CLIP PEC1411TGE FR[CU~kCY,*OF ¥I:0 SF1EO BY HOUR IG Tl HOUR CALM 1 -3 4-10 11-21 22-33 34൷ 44- MEAN FRED oeS * S$ a . D* 2z, 6 o...590( r45 .47 :38(0 t0 vOCo SO sIo 33 8. . ! t (3:2 C5 .9 0 :0 .0 3.4:0 .3. 8 0 . 3 .0 .5 3. 3- .3 C 7 . 0 . .0 2.2 . 23 . 0 .0 .0 2. 171 0 c C . .3 .8

  1. Residential history, family characteristics and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Paige M; Dalvi, Tapashi B; Holly, Elizabeth A

    2006-07-01

    A population-based, case-control study (N = 1,593 cases, N = 2,515 controls) was conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, to determine risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). This report examines residential characteristics, number of siblings, childhood infections, and allergic rhinitis to evaluate the association between NHL and the hygiene hypothesis. Adjusted unconditional logistic regression analyses included HIV-negative participants (N = 1,304 cases, N = 2,402 controls) ages 21 to 74 years, who completed in-person interviews. At childhood ages, odds ratios (OR) for NHL decreased with increasing number of household rooms (age 8 years, P(trend) = 0.08; age 15 years, P(trend) < 0.0001) and increased with more crowded living conditions (quartiles of no. people/no. rooms; age 8 years, P(trend) < 0.0001; age 15 years, P(trend) = 0.0004), whereas at older ages a greater number of people in the household and greater number of household rooms were positively associated with NHL. ORs increased with increasing number of siblings (P(trend) = 0.0003) and increasing birth order (P(trend) = 0.01). Participants with five or more younger siblings had a 50% increased OR for NHL. ORs for NHL decreased with an increasing number of different infections during childhood (age 8 years, P(trend) < 0.0001; age 15 years, P(trend) = 0.0003) and with history of allergic rhinitis (P < 0.0001). Our results are somewhat consistent with the hygiene hypothesis that less crowding and better sanitation results in fewer infections early in life and an increased incidence of immune-related conditions later in life. The role of the complex relationship between residential history, family characteristics, childhood infections, and immune function in the development of NHL warrants further investigation in pooled analyses.

  2. Folksong in the Classroom. A Network of Teachers of History, Literature, Music, and the Humanities, A Newsletter. Volume XII, Fall-Spring 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John W., Ed.; Seidman, Laurence, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    "Folksong in the Classroom" is a newsletter of a network of teachers of history, literature, music, and the humanities. Each issue contains songs, background information, classroom activities, and ideas for teachers to use in integrating folksongs into their teaching. Three issues of "Folksong in the Classroom" are included in…

  3. New Perspectives on the Genesis of the U.S.: A Report of FPRI's History Institute for Teachers. Footnotes. Volume 9, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy J.

    2004-01-01

    The Foreign Policy Research Institute held its 11th History Institute for Teachers on June 5-6, 2004, bringing together forty-five teachers from fifteen states for a weekend of lectures and seminars. Sessions included; (1) Colonial Origins of American Identity (Walter McDougall); (2) Migration and Colonization (Daniel Richter); (3) Liberty and…

  4. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third and fourth quarters 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Groundwater at the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) is monitored in compliance with applicable regulations. Monitoring results are compared to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS). Historically and currently, gross alpha, nitrates, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceed the GWPS in the groundwater during the second half of 1995, notably cadmium, lead, radium-226, radium-228, strontium-90, and total alpha-emitting radium. The elevated constituents were found primarily in the water table (aquifer zone IIB{sub 2}), however, several other aquifer unit monitoring wells contained elevated levels of constituents. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the F-Area HWMF have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  5. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third and fourth quarters 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Groundwater at the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) is monitored in compliance with applicable regulations. Monitoring results are compared to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control (SCDHEC) Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS). Historically as well as currently, nitrate-nitrite as nitrogen, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the second half of 1995. Elevated constituents were found primarily in the water table (Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2}), however, constitutents exceeding standards also occurred in several different aquifer zones monitoring wells. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area HWMF have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  6. Can ecological history influence response to pollutants? Transcriptomic analysis of Manila clam collected in different Venice lagoon areas and exposed to heavy metal.

    PubMed

    Milan, Massimo; Matozzo, Valerio; Pauletto, Marianna; Di Camillo, Barbara; Giacomazzo, Matteo; Boffo, Luciano; Binato, Giovanni; Marin, Maria Gabriella; Patarnello, Tomaso; Bargelloni, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Chronic exposure to environmental pollutants can exert strong selective pressures on natural populations, favoring the transmission over generations of traits that enable individuals to survive and thrive in highly impacted environments. The lagoon of Venice is an ecosystem subject to heavy anthropogenic impact, mainly due to the industrial activities of Porto Marghera (PM), which led to a severe chemical contamination of soil, groundwater, and sediments. Gene expression analysis on wild Manila clams collected in different Venice lagoon areas enabled to identify differences in gene expression profiles between clams collected in PM and those sampled in clean areas, and the definition of molecular signatures of chemical stress. However, it remains largely unexplored to which extent modifications of gene expression patterns persists after removing the source of contamination. It is also relatively unknown whether chronic exposure to xenobiotics affects the response to other chemical pollutants. To start exploring such issues, in the present study a common-garden experiment was coupled with transcriptomic analysis, to compare gene expression profiles of PM clams with those of clams collected in the less impacted area of Chioggia (CH) during a period under the same control conditions. Part of the two experimental groups were also exposed to copper for seven days to assess whether different "ecological history" does influence response to such pollutant. The results obtained suggest that the chronic exposure to chemical pollution generated a response at the transcriptional level that persists after removal for the contaminated site. These transcriptional changes are centered on key biological processes, such as defense against either oxidative stress or tissue/protein damage, and detoxification, suggesting an adaptive strategy for surviving in the deeply impacted environment of Porto Marghera. On the other hand, CH clams appeared to respond more effectively to copper

  7. A Cultural Resources Inventory of Proposed Recreation Areas, Lake Oahe: Emmons, Morton, and Sioux Counties, North Dakota. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    wolves (Canis lupus), black bears (Ursus americanus) and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) are known to have inhabited the study area (Bailey 1926... Yellowstone and it must have contained at least 20,000 animals. While aboriginal inhabitants in the Middle Missouri subarea utilized a 23 e:-, e...party from Illinois as a guide for a fur expedition up the Yellowstone (Robinson 1966:48; Eide 1969:218). The following year, 1807, two major parties

  8. Draft Environmental Impact Statement. MX Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition DEIS. Volume 3. Part 1. Affected Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    northwest and west central (near Santa Rosa , New Mexico) portions, due to increasing topographic relief as well as decreasing aridity. The southwestern...3.3.2.8-2, respectively. Aquatic Species (3.3.2.8.3) Protected fish occur mostly in the Pecos River near Roswell, Fort Sumner, and Santa Rosa , in the...National Park Service holding is the Lake Meredith National Recreational Area. The Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands are administered by the U.S

  9. Radiation Therapy for Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Involving the Parotid Area Lymph Nodes: Dose and Volume Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. Grekin, Roy C.; Garcia, Joaquin; Bucci, Mary K.; Margolis, Lawrence W.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: The intraparotid and periparotid lymph nodes are the most commonly involved when skin cancer of the head and neck metastasizes beyond the primary site. We sought to report the clinical outcome of patients treated with radiation therapy for parotid-area metastases from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: The records of 36 patients treated with radiation therapy for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma involving the parotid-area lymph nodes were reviewed. All patients had clinically N0 necks and were without evidence of distant disease. Thirty patients (83%) were treated postoperatively after gross total tumor resection. Median dose to the parotid area was 60 Gy (range, 50-72 Gy). Treatment of clinically N0 necks consisted of surgical dissection (7 patients), irradiation (15 patients), and observation (14 patients). Results: The 5-year estimate of local (parotid) control was 86% in patients treated using surgery with postoperative therapy and 47% in patients treated using radiation therapy alone. Three of 4 patients with tumors that relapsed locally after surgery and postoperative radiation received a dose of less than 60 Gy. Elective neck irradiation decreased the incidence of subsequent nodal failures from 50% to 0% and significantly improved neck control (p < 0.001). The 5-year overall survival rate was 63%. Conclusions: Surgery followed by radiation therapy to doses of at least 60 Gy results in effective local control for patients with parotid area metastasis from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Routine irradiation of the clinically N0 neck is recommended.

  10. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  11. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  12. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  13. Personality and Biography: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on the History of Adult Education. Volume II: Biographies of Adult Educators from Five Continents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedenthal-Haase, Martha, Ed.

    This volume contains 36 biographies: "I.T.A. Wallace-Johnson and Radical Adult Education (AE) in Sierra Leone in the Years 1938/1939" (Turay); "Frank C. Laubach as the Father of the Adult Literacy Movement in India" (Ghosh); "A Historical Study on the Theory and Practice of Social and AE in Korea" (Lee); "Integrative Adult Educators" (Yaron);…

  14. HISTORY OF EMPLOYMENT AND MANPOWER POLICY IN THE UNITED STATES. PARTS I AND II, DEPRESSION EXPERIENCE, PROPOSALS, AND PROGRAMS. SELECTED READINGS IN EMPLOYMENT AND MANPOWER, VOLUME 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.

    THE SELECTED READINGS WERE COMPILED TO PROVIDE SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS WITH A BROAD BACKGROUND OF DEVELOPMENTS LEADING TO THE EMPLOYMENT ACT OF 1946 AND WITH APPRAISALS OF ITS ADEQUACY AND EFFECTIVENESS. MATERIAL IN THIS VOLUME SPANS THE LATE 1920'S AND THE GREAT DEPRESSION. PARTS III AND IV (VT 004 820) CONTINUE THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND REVIEW.…

  15. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  16. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  17. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

  18. Lead-rich sediments, Coeur d'Alene River Valley, Idaho: area, volume, tonnage, and lead content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Box, Stephen E.; Campbell, Julie K.; Foster, Kathryn I.; Jackson, Berne L.

    2001-01-01

    In north Idaho, downstream from the Coeur d?Alene (CdA) silver-lead-zinc mining district, lead-rich sediments, containing at least 1,000 ppm of lead, cover approximately 61 km2 (or 73 percent) of the 84-km2 floor of the CdA River valley, from the confluence of its North and South Forks to the top of its delta-front slope, in CdA Lake. Concentrations of lead (Pb) in surface sediments range from 15 to about 38,500 ppm, and average 3,370 ppm, which is 112 times the mean background concentration (30 ppm) of Pb in uncontaminated sediments of the CdA and St. Joe River valleys. Most of the highest concentrations of Pb are in sediments within or near the river channel, or near the base of the stratigraphic section of Pb-rich sediments. Ranges of Pb concentration in Pb-rich sediments gradually decrease with increasing distance from the river and its distributaries. Ranges of thickness of Pb-rich sediments generally decrease abruptly with increasing distance from the river, from about 3 + 3 m in the river channel to about 1 + 1m on upland riverbanks, levees and sand splays, to about 0.3 + 0.3 m in back-levee marshes and lateral lakes. Thickness of Pb-rich dredge spoils (removed from the river and deposited on Cataldo-Mission Flats) is mostly in the range 4 + 4 m, thinning away from an outfall zone north and west of the river, near the formerly dredged channel reach near Cataldo Landing. We attribute lateral variation in ranges of thickness and Pb content of Pb-rich sediments to the dynamic balance between decreasing floodwater flow velocity with increasing distance from the river and the quantity, size, density, and Pb content of particles mobilized, transported, and deposited. We present alternative median- and mean-based estimates of the volume of Pbrich sediments, their wet and dry tonnage, and their tonnage of contained Pb. We calculate separate pairs of estimates for 23 Estimation Units, each of which corresponds to a major depositional environment, divided into down

  19. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 2, Figures [and] Volume 3, Technical Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R.

    1991-05-31

    This report presents appendices related to the preliminary assessment and risk analysis for high-level radioactive waste transportation routes to the proposed Yucca Mountain Project repository. Information includes data on population density, traffic volume, ecologically sensitive areas, and accident history.

  20. Minerals, lands, and geology for the common defence and general welfare, Volume 1, Before 1879 : A history of public lands, federal science and mapping policy, and development of mineral resources in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rabbitt, Mary C.

    1979-01-01

    This volume, the first of a four-volume study, is concerned with events in the United States before the establishment of the U.S. Geological Survey, during the years in which geology evolved as a science and began to influence economic development and national policy. Subsequent volumes continue the story but focus on the Survey and its role in the events and developments of later years. The method of analysis demonstrates that knowledge of the Earth and its history, processes, and resources has provided a basis for intelligent economic development; also that geologists very soon realized that uncontrolled development of the land and other natural resources could not continue, that some limitations must be made on man's use of the Earth. The Geological Survey was established when public awareness of the need for balance between development and conservation of our resources was becoming evident. That balance is even more necessary now and in the future for the "general welfare" and "common defence" of the Nation. We can be grateful for the wisdom of our Founding Fathers in providing for publicly supported studies in earth science and engineering by well-trained and motivated scientists and engineers. Such studies, undertaken objectively in the search for facts, can continue to be of great value in the formulation and execution of wise policies to protect our environment and to maintain that balance between development and conservation of the natural resources.

  1. Accurate quantitative measurements of brachial artery cross-sectional vascular area and vascular volume elastic modulus using automated oscillometric measurements: comparison with brachial artery ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Ochi, Noriki; Inoue, Mamiko; Nishida, Mutumi; Aziki, Kumi; Horie, Tatsunori; Katoh, Chietsugu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    Increasing vascular diameter and attenuated vascular elasticity may be reliable markers for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements have been complex, operator-dependent or invasive. Recently, we developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure a brachial artery's estimated area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE). The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Rest eA and VE were measured using the recently developed automated detector with the oscillometric method. eA was estimated using pressure/volume curves and VE was defined as follows (VE=Δ pressure/ (100 × Δ area/area) mm Hg/%). Sixteen volunteers (age 35.2±13.1 years) underwent the oscillometric measurements and brachial ultrasound at rest and under nitroglycerin (NTG) administration. Oscillometric measurement was performed twice on different days. The rest eA correlated with ultrasound-measured brachial artery area (r=0.77, P<0.001). Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, VE: ICC=0.78). Under NTG stress, eA was significantly increased (12.3±3.0 vs. 17.1±4.6 mm2, P<0.001), and this was similar to the case with ultrasound evaluation (4.46±0.72 vs. 4.73±0.75 mm, P<0.001). VE was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG. Cross-sectional vascular area calculated using this automated oscillometric measurement correlated with ultrasound measurement and showed good reproducibility. Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. PMID:25693851

  2. Home area geology and Alabama earth science teachers: A resource to improve the understanding and use of the state's rocks to supplement textbook concepts in earth history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacefield, James Anderson

    Recent studies have suggested that teachers of earth science in Alabama secondary schools are undertrained in the content areas of the subject. A survey of academic training and certification of active earth science teachers (Hall, 1985) was replicated as part of a study of the current inservice needs of Alabama earth science teachers (Logue & Lacefield, 1995). Only one-third of responding teachers were found to be properly certified to teach the subject; most had been trained for teaching life science. Approximately one-half had never had a course in geology, astronomy, or meteorology--the three primary components of the typical earth science course. Of 32 earth science topics suggested for possible additional inservice workshops, teachers responding to the Logue and Lacefield survey selected Alabama and Southeastern geology as the topic of greatest interest and need. As an alternative to conventional inservice training, an illustrated book on Alabama geologic history was developed for publication. Its purpose was to supply an ongoing, usable geologic reference for Alabama earth science teachers and their students and to promote greater understanding of Alabama geology by the public in general. Entitled Lost Worlds in Alabama Rocks: The Half-Billion Year Record of Change in the State's Life and Landscape, the 82-page book (included as appendix) explains how geologic history is reconstructed using evidence from rocks, surveys the major sets of sedimentary rocks found within the state, details what each means in terms of ancient environment, and describes how Alabama's present landscape can be interpreted to reflect past geologic changes. The resource includes nearly 200 color photographs and graphics and 12 pages of fossil identification guides illustrating the most common fossil organisms found within the state. A selected group of professional geologists and earth science educators evaluated the book for scientific accuracy, format, presentation of content, and

  3. Feasibility study on transmission system and substation development project, third stage (i-shaped area). Volume 1. Short term report (1994-1998). Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-11

    Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA). The purpose of the report is to identify both system impact and physical requirements to meet the anticipated increase in demand for PEA furnished electric energy in Thailand`s Southern Region. Presented is a technical, financial, and economic feasibility study resulting in planning reports of the 115 kV Electric Power Supply, and Distribution Systems required to accommodate short and long term growth projections. This is the first of two volumes and it includes the First Five Year Feasibility Implementation Plan. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Summary and Conclusions; (2) Introduction and Background; (3) Existing Study Area; (4) Load Forecast; (5) Alternative Plans; (6) Technical Analysis; (7) Economic Analysis of Individual Subprojects; (8) Financial Analysis; (9) Implementation Plan; (10) Project Management; (11) Appendices.

  4. Feasibility study on transmission system and substation development project, third state (i-shaped area). Volume 2. Long term report (1994-2013). Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-11

    The study, conducted by Black & Veatch International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development agency on behalf of Thailand`s Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA). The purpose of the report is to identify both system impact and physical requirements to meet the anticipated increase in demand for PEA furnished electric energy in Thailand`s Southern Region. Presented is a technical, financial, and economic feasibility study resulting in planning reports of the 115 kV Electric Power Supply, and distribution Systems required to accommodate short and long term growth projections. This is the second of two volumes and it includes the Long Term Master Plan Feasibility Study. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Summary and Conclusions; (2) Introduction and Background; (3) Existing Study Area and Development; (4) Load Forecast; (5) Alternative Plans; (6) Technical Analysis; (7) General Economic Analysis; (8) Financial Analysis; (9) Appendices.

  5. 1984-1995 Evolution of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Surface Area, and Volume Derived by Combining SAGE II and CLAES Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Bauman, Jill J.

    2000-01-01

    This SAGE II Science Team task focuses on the development of a multi-wavelength, multi- sensor Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm for retrieving information about stratospheric aerosols from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. The LUT algorithm combines the 4-wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument, thus increasing the information content available from either sensor alone. The algorithm uses the SAGE II/CLAES composite spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub g).

  6. Estimating Digital Terrain Model in forest areas from TanDEM-X and Stereo-photogrammetric technique by means of Random Volume over Ground model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. K.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lagomasino, D.; Osmanoglu, B.; Feliciano, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Terrain Model (DTM) in forest areas is invaluable information for various environmental, hydrological and ecological studies, for example, watershed delineation, vegetation canopy height, water dynamic modeling, forest biomass and carbon estimations. There are few solutions to extract bare-earth Digital Elevation Model information. Airborne lidar systems are widely and successfully used for estimating bare-earth DEMs with centimeter-order accuracy and high spatial resolution. However, expensive cost of operation and small image coverage prevent the use of airborne lidar sensors for large- or global-scale. Although IceSAT/GLAS (Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite/Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) lidar data sets have been available for global DTM estimate with relatively lower cost, the large footprint size of 70 m and the interval of 172 m are insufficient for various applications. In this study we propose to extract higher resolution bare-earth DEM over vegetated areas from the combination of interferometric complex coherence from single-pass TanDEM-X (TDX) data at HH polarization and Digital Surface Model (DSM) derived from high-resolution WorldView (WV) images by means of random volume over ground (RVoG) model. The RVoG model is a widely and successfully used model for polarimetric SAR interferometry (Pol-InSAR) forest canopy height inversion. The bare-earth DEM is obtained by complex volume decorrelation in the RVoG model with the DSM estimated by stereo-photogrammetric technique. Forest canopy height can be estimated by subtracting the estimated bare-earth model from the DSM. Finally, the DTM from airborne lidar system was used to validate the bare-earth DEM and forest canopy height estimates.

  7. Compensatory mechanisms in fish populations: Literature reviews: Volume 1, Critical evaluation of case histories of fish populations experiencing chronic exploitation or impact: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Saila, S.B.; Chen, X.; Erzini, K.; Martin, B.

    1987-05-01

    This study includes case histories of certain fish species which are experiencing chronic perturbations and related literature pertaining to compensation processes. ''Compensation'' has been defined as the ability of fish to offset the population reduction caused by natural or man-induced stresses. Certain compensation methods are widely accepted, and include cannibalism, competition, disease, growth and predation, among others. These compensation methods are examined in relation to each fish species included in the study. Stock-recruit relationships and empirical observations of changes in growth and mortality have been the focus of much of the background on compensation. One of the conclusions drawn from this study is that a significant amount of recruitment variability exists and can be attributed to environmental (rather than compensatory) factors. The stock-recruitment problem appears to be the most significant scientific problem related to compensation in the types of fish included in this study. Results of the most recent studies of the American shad support this theory. Life histories, breeding biology and other pertinent data relating to each species included in the study will be found in the appendices.

  8. Intellectual History, Social History, Cultural History...and Our History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, David Paul

    1990-01-01

    Defines and explores the links among intellectual, social, and cultural history. Warns that an adequate foundation must be laid in the economic and institutional social history of mass media before communication historians jump into cultural history. (SR)

  9. Seasonal profiles of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) larval habitats in an urban area of Costa Rica with a history of mosquito control

    PubMed Central

    Troyo, Adriana; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Fuller, Douglas O.; Solano, Mayra E.; Avendaño, Adrian; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Chadee, Dave D.; Beier, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide and the principal vector-borne disease in Costa Rica. Control of Aedes aegypti populations through source reduction is still considered the most effective way of prevention and control, although it has proven ineffective or unsustainable in many areas with a history of mosquito control. In this study, seasonal profiles and productivity of Aedes aegypti were analyzed in the city of Puntarenas, Costa Rica, where vector control has been practiced for more than ten years. Households contained more than 80% of larval habitats identified, although presence of habitats was more likely in other locations like lots and streets. In the wet season, habitats in the “other” category, like appliances, small manholes, and miscellaneous containers, were the most frequent habitats observed as well as the most common and productive habitats for Ae. aegypti. In the dry season, domestic animal drinking containers were very common, although concrete washtubs contained 79% of Ae. aegypti pupae collected. Individually, non-disposable habitats were as likely or more likely to contain mosquito larvae, and large containers were more likely to harbor mosquito larvae than the small ones only in the dry season. Considering various variables in the logistic regressions, predictors for Ae. aegypti in a habitat were habitat type (p<0.001), setting (p=0.043), and disposability (p=0.022) in the wet season and habitat capacity in the dry season (p=0.025). Overall, traditional Ae. aegypti larval indices and pupal indices in Puntarenas were high enough to allow viral transmission during the wet season. In spite of continued vector control, it has not been possible to reduce vector densities below threshold levels in Puntarenas, and the habitat profiles show that non-household locations, as well as non-disposable containers, should be targeted in addition to the standard control activities. PMID:18697310

  10. Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic subduction-collision history of the Southern Neotethys: new evidence from the Çağlayancerit area, SE Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akıncı, Ahmet Can; Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Ünlügenç, Ulvi Can

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of the subduction-collision history of the S Neotethys is well exposed in the frontal part of the SE Anatolian thrust belt and the adjacent Arabian continental margin. The foreland succession in the study area begins with Eocene shelf carbonates, ranging from shallow marine to deeper marine, without sedimentary input from the Tauride continent to the north. After a regional hiatus (Oligocene), sedimentation resumed during the Early Miocene with terrigenous gravity-flow deposition in the north (Lice Formation) and shallow-marine carbonates further south. Clastic detritus was derived from the Tauride continent and oceanic accretionary material. The base of the overriding Tauride allochthon comprises ophiolite-derived debris flows, ophiolite-related mélange and dismembered ophiolitic rocks. Above this, the regional-scale Bulgurkaya sedimentary mélange (an olistostrome) includes blocks and dismembered thrust sheets of metamorphic rocks, limestone and sandstone, which include Late Cretaceous and Eocene foraminifera. The matrix is mainly strongly deformed Eocene-Oligocene mudrocks, hemipelagic marl and sandstone turbidites. The thrust stack is topped by a regionally extensive thrust sheet (Malatya metamorphic unit), which includes greenschist facies marble, calcschist, schist and phyllite, representing Tauride continental crust. Beginning during the Late Mesozoic, the S Neotethys subducted northwards beneath a backstop represented by the Tauride microcontinent (Malatya metamorphic unit). Ophiolites formed within the S Neotethys and accreted to the Tauride active margin. Large-scale sedimentary mélange developed along the Tauride active margin during Eocene-Oligocene. On the Arabian margin, a sedimentary hiatus and tilting (Oligocene) is interpreted to record initial continental collision. The Early Miocene terrigenous gravity flows represent a collision-related flexural foreland basin. Southward overthrusting of the Tauride allochthon took place during Early

  11. Estimated probabilities and volumes of postwildfire debris flows—A prewildfire evaluation for the Pikes Peak area, El Paso and Teller Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, John G.; Ruddy, Barbara C.; Verdin, Kristine L.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.

    2012-01-01

    Debris flows are fast-moving, high-density slurries of water, sediment, and debris that can have enormous destructive power. Although debris flows, triggered by intense rainfall or rapid snowmelt on steep hillsides covered with erodible material, are a common geomorphic process in some unburned areas, a wildfire can transform conditions in a watershed with no recent history of debris flows into conditions that pose a substantial hazard to residents, communities, infrastructure, aquatic habitats, and water supply. The location, extent, and severity of wildfire and the subsequent rainfall intensity and duration cannot be known in advance; however, hypothetical scenarios based on empirical debris-flow models are useful planning tools for conceptualizing potential postwildfire debris flows. A prewildfire study to determine the potential for postwildfire debris flows in the Pikes Peak area in El Paso and Teller Counties, Colorado, was initiated in 2010 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Utilities. The study was conducted to provide a relative measure of which subwatersheds might constitute the most serious potential debris-flow hazards in the event of a large-scale wildfire and subsequent rainfall.

  12. The glaciers of Sierra Segundera (Zamora, NW Spain) during their Maximum Ice Extent: area, volume, Glacial Equilibrium Line Altitude and paleo-climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Fernández, Jose; Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the Quaternary glaciers which formed the eastern sector of the Sierra Segundera ice-cap (NW Iberian Peninsula) during its Maximum Ice Extent (MIE) local phase (33 ka) in a surface area of 165 km2, to estimate the ice volumes and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs). The study area presents a wide altimetric range of approx. 1200 m, from the Tera glacier front to the Peña Trevinca (42°14'33'' N, 6°47'46'' W; 2127 m) and Peña Negra (42°14'58'' N, 6°47'39'' W; 2121 m) horns, covering a wide plateau at an altitude of over 1700 m. The reconstruction of the MIE paleoglaciers used a combination of various tools: a rheological numerical model which describes the ice flow, GIS and geomorphological field work to validate the results. The model used here allowed the reconstruction of the surface topography of the paleoglacial ice, even though there is no existing geomorphologic evidence to reveal the thickness of the ice at that time. The GIS enabled the creation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and the estimation of thicknesses and volumes. The reconstructed topography and the delimitation of the geomorphologic features were used to estimate the ELA using the following methods: Area x Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR), Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR), Terminus Headwall Altitude Ratio (THAR) and Maximum Elevation of Lateral Moraines (MELM). The DEM reconstructed for the surface of the paleoglaciers obtained an estimated maximum ice thickness of over 450 m during the MIE, and a total ice volume of 2.63 x 10(10)m3 for the eastern half of the ice-cap. When estimating the paleo-ELAs, the AABR and AAR methods obtain more logical values. The AABR method obtains BR=1, which questions the BR=2 assumed as representative for medium latitude glaciers with oceanic influence; the paleo-ELA AABR was 1739 m. Applying the AAR method with the ratio 0.65 gives the result 1735 m. The THAR and MELM methods give values of 1637 m and 1651 m respectively for

  13. Assessment of Glacial Area and Volume Change in Tien Shan (Central Asia) During the Last 60 years Using Geodetic, Aerial Photo, ASTER and STRM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichenok, V.; Aizen, V.; Surazakov, A.; Aizen, E.

    2004-12-01

    The water-issue problems that occur during times of persistent drought are extremely important for central Asia. Despite the presence of large deserts and prairies with very low precipitation and extremely dry climates, central Asian mountains hold one of the greatest concentrations of perennial snow and ice in the mid-latitudes and constitute a vital source of water for more then 100,000,000 people living in this region. This research aims to evaluate glacial area and ice volume changes using aerial photographs from 1943, 1977, and Satellite Remote Sensing data from 2000/2003 over the Akshiirak ice-fields and Ala Archa glacierized basin in the central and northern Tien Shan to understand changes in the glacier water resources of central Asia during the last 60 years. These data were converted from WGS-84 to STRM and then to the Pulkovo 1942 (Russian) coordinate system using a 7-parameter Helmert transformation method. For vertical validation, the STRM DEM was compared to a DEM constructed with additional 5 m and 10 m contour lines digitized from 1:25000 topographic maps for low-relief, non-glacial areas. Glacier boundaries were digitized from an ASTER L1A image acquired on August 18, 2003 and orthorectified using Orthobase digital photogrammetric package with 9.5 m RMSE of 28 ground control points. To delineate glaciers in problem areas, resulting from debris-covered termini and shadows, thermal bands and true hardware-enabled stereo viewing with nadir 3N and backward-looking 3B bands was used. Digitizing accuracy of the 2003 glacier boundaries was verified from GPS field measurements of 7 glacier termini in 2002. For surface elevation comparison, a second DEM was generated from 10 m contour lines for all glaciers (424 km2) using 16 topographic maps of 1:25000 scale that were created using the aerial photographs of 1977. In 1943, the glaciers of the Akshiirak massif covered 424.7 km2 and 42.8 km2 in the Ala Archa glacierized basin. From 1943 to 1977, the glacial

  14. Native American Education in a Contemporary Context. Review Essay of "Indian Education in Canada, Volume 1: The Legacy, Volume 2: The Challenge" (Barman, Hebert, and McCaskill, eds.); "Promises of the Past: A History of Indian Education in the United States" (Dejong); "Native Peoples in Canada: Contemporary Conflicts" (Frideres); "Aboriginal Languages and Education: The Canadian Experience" (Morris, McLeod, and Danesi); and "Teaching American Indian Students" (Reyhner, ed.) .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brascoupe, Simon

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six volumes, published 1986-93, about the history and current state of Native American education in the United States and Canada. Discusses Indian education as an aspect of internal colonization, cultural differences in educational values and learning styles, the growth of Indian control of Indian education, teaching strategies, and Indian…

  15. Word Generation in Boston Public Schools: Natural History of a Literacy Intervention. The Senior Urban Education Research Fellowship Series. Volume III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Catherine E.; Lawrence, Joshua F.

    2011-01-01

    When the Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP) began working with Boston Public Schools (BPS) in 2005, the most pressing need articulated by the district was research and development in the area of middle school literacy. Thus SERP researchers undertook to specify more precisely what the middle school literacy problem in BPS was by…

  16. Investigation of Adaptive-threshold Approaches for Determining Area-Time Integrals from Satellite Infrared Data to Estimate Convective Rain Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.; VonderHaar, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    The principal goal of this project is to establish relationships that would allow application of area-time integral (ATI) calculations based upon satellite data to estimate rainfall volumes. The research is being carried out as a collaborative effort between the two participating organizations, with the satellite data analysis to determine values for the ATIs being done primarily by the STC-METSAT scientists and the associated radar data analysis to determine the 'ground-truth' rainfall estimates being done primarily at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSM&T). Synthesis of the two separate kinds of data and investigation of the resulting rainfall-versus-ATI relationships is then carried out jointly. The research has been pursued using two different approaches, which for convenience can be designated as the 'fixed-threshold approach' and the 'adaptive-threshold approach'. In the former, an attempt is made to determine a single temperature threshold in the satellite infrared data that would yield ATI values for identifiable cloud clusters which are closely related to the corresponding rainfall amounts as determined by radar. Work on the second, or 'adaptive-threshold', approach for determining the satellite ATI values has explored two avenues: (1) attempt involved choosing IR thresholds to match the satellite ATI values with ones separately calculated from the radar data on a case basis; and (2) an attempt involved a striaghtforward screening analysis to determine the (fixed) offset that would lead to the strongest correlation and lowest standard error of estimate in the relationship between the satellite ATI values and the corresponding rainfall volumes.

  17. Past soil erosion history recorded by lake sediments in mountain areas (north and south French Alps): complex interactions with climatic and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giguet-Covex, C.; Poulenard, J.; Arnaud, F.; Disnar, J.-R.; Sabatier, P.; Wilhelm, B.; Jouffroy-Bapicot, I.; Rey, P.-J.; David, F.; Malet, E.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion rates and patterns are influenced both by hydrological activity and the evolution of soil-vegetation cover. This soil-vegetation cover is in turn impacted by climatic changes and human activities through deforestation, grazing and agriculture. Such land uses are reported in mountain areas since several millennia (the Neolithic or Bronze Age in the Alps). The effects of these activities and climatic changes on erosion and above all on soil cover are relatively few documented. However, a good knowledge of these processes is important to better evaluate the future evolution of soils and the sustainability for agricultural practices, in the context of global change. Because lakes act as traps of erosion products, lake sediments represent interesting continuous archives of past soil evolution and erosion. They provide a unique opportunity to reconstruct at high resolution the soil history over long time periods and thus to determine the timing of changes in response to climate and/or anthropogenic pressures. As a result of the Pygmalion research program, we present the study of two small mountain catchment in north (Lake Anterne, 2063 m asl) and south French Alps (Lake Lauzanier, 2285 m asl), covering the Holocene and the last 1000 years, respectively. To trace the past soil erosion erosion history and bring arguments about the origin of changes, mineral and organic geochemical analyses were performed and combined with quantitative reconstructions of terrigenous inputs. To emphasize our assumptions about the origins of recorded changes, a pluridisciplinary approach (palynology, archaeology...) was also adopted. The study of Lake Anterne shows the second half of the Holocene is characterized by four important phases of erosion. These phases are underlined by high flood frequencies and different geochemical composition of sediments. These geochemical signatures reveal changes of sediment sources related to different erosion patterns. In particular, the first phase

  18. History of Vietnamese Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duong Quang Ham

    This is the first of a two-volume textbook, covering the official program of the Ministry of Education, of the secondary curriculum for the history of Vietnamese literature. It is divided into three main sections. The first section "First Year of the Secondary Cycle (Grade 11)" deals with (1) popular literature; (2) the influence of China, (3)…

  19. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  20. LiDAR-Landsat data fusion for large-area assessment of urban land cover: Balancing spatial resolution, data volume and mapping accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kunwar K.; Vogler, John B.; Shoemaker, Douglas A.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2012-11-01

    The structural characteristics of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data are increasingly used to classify urban environments at fine scales, but have been underutilized for distinguishing heterogeneous land covers over large urban regions due to high cost, limited spectral information, and the computational difficulties posed by inherently large data volumes. Here we explore tradeoffs between potential gains in mapping accuracy with computational costs by integrating structural and intensity surface models extracted from LiDAR data with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery and evaluating the degree to which TM, LiDAR, and LiDAR-TM fusion data discriminated land covers in the rapidly urbanizing region of Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. Using supervised maximum likelihood (ML) and classification tree (CT) methods, we classified TM data at 30 m and LiDAR data and LiDAR-TM fusions at 1 m, 5 m, 10 m, 15 m and 30 m resolutions. We assessed the relative contributions of LiDAR structural and intensity surface models to classification map accuracy and identified optimal spatial resolution of LiDAR surface models for large-area assessments of urban land cover. ML classification of 1 m LiDAR-TM fusions using both structural and intensity surface models increased total accuracy by 32% compared to LiDAR alone and by 8% over TM at 30 m. Fusion data using all LiDAR surface models improved class discrimination of spectrally similar forest, farmland, and managed clearings and produced the highest total accuracies at 1 m, 5 m, and 10 m resolutions (87.2%, 86.3% and 85.4%, respectively). At all resolutions of fusion data and using either ML or CT classifier, the relative contribution of the LiDAR structural surface models (canopy height and normalized digital surface model) to classification accuracy is greater than the intensity surface. Our evaluation of tradeoffs between data volume and thematic map accuracy for this study system suggests that a spatial resolution of 5 m for Li

  1. Cygnus History

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Henderson, Raymond E. Gignac, Douglas E. Good, Mark D. Hansen, Charles V. Mitton; Daniel S. Nelson, Eugene C. Ormond; Steve R. Cordova, Isidro Molina; John R. Smith, Evan A. Rose

    2009-07-02

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site. The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images for dynamic plutonium experiments. This work will recount and discuss salient maintenance and operational issues encountered during the history of Cygnus. A brief description of Cygnus systems and rational for design selections will set the stage for this historical narrative. It is intended to highlight the team-derived solutions for technical problems encountered during extended periods of maintenance and operation. While many of the issues are typical to pulsed power systems, some of the solutions are unique. It is hoped that other source teams will benefit from this presentation, as well as other necessary disciplines (e.g., source users, system architects, facility designers and managers, funding managers, and team leaders).

  2. A brittle tectonic history of the Internal Dinarides: an inference based on the paleostress study in the Valjevo area (western Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenović, Ana; Trivić, Branislav; Cvetković, Vladica; Pavlović, Radmila

    2014-05-01

    The Internal Dinarides is part of a complex suture zone situated in the central Balkan Peninsula, which present-day tectonic pattern is a result of Late Cretaceous subduction followed by Cenozoic post-collisional and neotectonic phases. Since the Late Miocene, the most important factor controlling regional tectonic processes in this area has been the counterclockwise rotation and northward motion of the Adria plate in respect to the Dinaric orogen. In Serbia, this tectonic process is manifested through constant moderate seismic activity, where stronger earthquakes are recorded mostly along well-known fault systems active in the neotectonic period. However, brittle fault kinematics in this part of the Internal Dinarides is poorly documented. In this research we performed a calculation of the tectonic stress tensors in order to determine brittle tectonic regimes acting in western Serbia (Valjevo mountains range), as well as their relative chronology. Fault-slip data have been collected in geological units of different age and lithology: Permian, Triassic and Cretaceous limestones and Jurassic peridotites and serpentinites. Slip was determined using linear indicators like "carrot shaped" markings, gouging grain grooves and calcite and magnesite fibres. Relative brittle history was determined using criteria of cross-cutting relationships, fracture mineralization and structural features of the brittle overprint of rocks. We distinguished four brittle deformation phases. Phase D1 is characterized by N-S compression, which is indicated by thrust faulting of NE- and NW-trending faults. Phases D2 and D3, are both extensional. However, since we had clear indicators that phase D3 overprints all the previous deformation phases, we suppose that the two extensional phases occurred separately, rather than acting as a single radial extension phase. Deformation phase D2 is characterized by N-S to NE-SW extension, while D3 phase is represented by NW-SE (orogen parallel) extension

  3. Formation and evolution of the midlands of Venus: Geological features and structures, stratigraphic relationships and geologic history of the Fredegonde area (V-57)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2012-12-01

    units (psh and rp1) that postdate the heavily tectonized units of the deformation zones are only mildly deformed. This suggests that since the emplacement of shield plains, volcanism has been the primary geologic process and that the time of formation of unit psh corresponds to a major change from the earlier regime dominated by tectonics to the later volcanically dominated regime. Consistent age relationships among the main volcanic units within the quadrangle from older shield plains, through regional plains, to lobate plains, documents an evolution in volcanic style. Shield plains were formed from small eruptions from ubiquitous small shield volcanoes and are interpreted to be derived from broadly distributed and shallow magmatic sources. The lower unit of regional plains is widely distributed but vents and flow fronts are rare; this unit is interpreted to represent massive and probably short-lived flood basalts-like eruptions that filled in the lowlands basins. The upper unit of regional plains (rp2) and lobate plains (pl) are associated with localized and distinctive sources, such as late-stage volcanic activity at coronae. Thus, the tectonic stage of evolution of coronae (formation of the rims) and the volcanic stage when coronae served as magmatic centers and sourced lava flows, were separated in time by the emplacement of the shield and lower regional plains. How and when did the major components of Venus midland topography form? Clearly, in the Fredegonde quadrangle, regional deformation produced the deformation belts and groove belts/coronae in the earliest phases, and this topography formed the basis for the next, volcanic stage of emplacement (filling of the basins), with coronae-associated volcanism following this phase. The broad topography resulting from this early phase has persisted until the present. We compare this tectonic-volcanic sequence and history of topography in the Fredegonde quadrangle with other areas on Venus and find that the sequence has

  4. New geochronological constraints on the thermal and exhumation history of the Lesser and Higher Himalayan Crystalline Units in the Kullu-Kinnaur area of Himachal Pradesh (India).

    PubMed

    Thöni, M; Miller, C; Hager, C; Grasemann, B; Horschinegg, M

    2012-06-30

    New geochronological, petrological and structural data from the Beas-Sutlej area of Himachal Pradesh (India) are used to reconstruct the tectonothermal and exhumation history of this part of the Himalayan orogen. Sm-Nd garnet ages at 40.5 ± 1.3 Ma obtained on a pegmatoid from the inverse metamorphic High Himalayan Crystalline (HHC) in the Malana-Parbati area probably mark local melting during initial decompression. Ongoing exhumation in ductilely deformed leuco-gneiss is constrained by Sm-Nd garnet ages at 29 ± 1 Ma and white mica Rb-Sr ages around 24-20 Ma, while Bt Rb-Sr ages indicate a drop of regional metamorphic temperatures below 300 °C between 15 and 12 Ma. The deep Sutlej gorge exposes medium-grade paragneisses and Proterozoic orthogneisses of the Lesser Himalayan Crystalline (LHC), overthrust by the HHC along the Main Central Thrust (MCT). Mica cooling ages in the HHC are in the range of 14-11 Ma. Above the extruded wedge of the HHC, the Leo Pargil leucogranite and associated dykes intrude the Haimanta Unit (HU) below the weakly metamorphic Palaeo-Mesozoic sediments of the Tethyan Himalayas (TH). The Leo Pargil leucogranite yielded a mean Sm-Nd garnet age of 19 ± 1 Ma and Rb-Sr muscovite and biotite cooling ages between 16.4 and 11.6 Ma. Marked young extrusion of LHC units resulted in differentiated exhumation/cooling of more frontal parts of the orogen. Very young ductile deformation of LHC gneisses near Wangtu is constrained by late-kinematic pegmatite intrusions crosscutting the main mylonitic foliation. Sm-Nd garnet and Rb-Sr muscovite ages of these pegmatites range between 7.9 ± 0.9 and 5.5 ± 0.1 Ma. Published apatite FT ages down to 0.6 Ma also document accelerated diachronous sub-recent exhumation of different parts of the orogen. Together with geochronological data from the literature, the new results demonstrate that the HHC and the HU were deformed by shortening and crustal thickening during the Eohimalayan phase (Late

  5. New geochronological constraints on the thermal and exhumation history of the Lesser and Higher Himalayan Crystalline Units in the Kullu–Kinnaur area of Himachal Pradesh (India)

    PubMed Central

    Thöni, M.; Miller, C.; Hager, C.; Grasemann, B.; Horschinegg, M.

    2012-01-01

    New geochronological, petrological and structural data from the Beas–Sutlej area of Himachal Pradesh (India) are used to reconstruct the tectonothermal and exhumation history of this part of the Himalayan orogen. Sm–Nd garnet ages at 40.5 ± 1.3 Ma obtained on a pegmatoid from the inverse metamorphic High Himalayan Crystalline (HHC) in the Malana–Parbati area probably mark local melting during initial decompression. Ongoing exhumation in ductilely deformed leuco-gneiss is constrained by Sm–Nd garnet ages at 29 ± 1 Ma and white mica Rb–Sr ages around 24–20 Ma, while Bt Rb–Sr ages indicate a drop of regional metamorphic temperatures below 300 °C between 15 and 12 Ma. The deep Sutlej gorge exposes medium-grade paragneisses and Proterozoic orthogneisses of the Lesser Himalayan Crystalline (LHC), overthrust by the HHC along the Main Central Thrust (MCT). Mica cooling ages in the HHC are in the range of 14–11 Ma. Above the extruded wedge of the HHC, the Leo Pargil leucogranite and associated dykes intrude the Haimanta Unit (HU) below the weakly metamorphic Palaeo-Mesozoic sediments of the Tethyan Himalayas (TH). The Leo Pargil leucogranite yielded a mean Sm–Nd garnet age of 19 ± 1 Ma and Rb–Sr muscovite and biotite cooling ages between 16.4 and 11.6 Ma. Marked young extrusion of LHC units resulted in differentiated exhumation/cooling of more frontal parts of the orogen. Very young ductile deformation of LHC gneisses near Wangtu is constrained by late-kinematic pegmatite intrusions crosscutting the main mylonitic foliation. Sm–Nd garnet and Rb–Sr muscovite ages of these pegmatites range between 7.9 ± 0.9 and 5.5 ± 0.1 Ma. Published apatite FT ages down to 0.6 Ma also document accelerated diachronous sub-recent exhumation of different parts of the orogen. Together with geochronological data from the literature, the new results demonstrate that the HHC and the HU were deformed by shortening and crustal thickening during the

  6. Overexpression of synapsin Ia in the rat calyx of Held accelerates short-term plasticity and decreases synaptic vesicle volume and active zone area

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Mariya; Renden, Robert; Horstmann, Heinz; Gitler, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Synapsins are synaptic vesicle (SV) proteins organizing a component of the reserve pool of vesicles at most central nervous system synapses. Alternative splicing of the three mammalian genes results in multiple isoforms that may differentially contribute to the organization and maintenance of the SV pools. To address this, we first characterized the expression pattern of synapsin isoforms in the rat calyx of Held. At postnatal day 16, synapsins Ia, Ib, IIb and IIIa were present, while IIa—known to sustain repetitive transmission in glutamatergic terminals—was not detectable. To test if the synapsin I isoforms could mediate IIa-like effect, and if this depends on the presence of the E-domain, we overexpressed either synapsin Ia or synapsin Ib in the rat calyx of Held via recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. Although the size and overall structure of the perturbed calyces remained unchanged, short-term depression and recovery from depression were accelerated upon overexpression of synapsin I isoforms. Using electron microscopic three-dimensional reconstructions we found a redistribution of SV clusters proximal to the active zones (AZ) alongside with a decrease of both AZ area and SV volume. The number of SVs at individual AZs was strongly reduced. Hence, our data indicate that the amount of synapsin Ia expressed in the calyx regulates the rate and extent of short-term synaptic plasticity by affecting vesicle recruitment to the AZ. Finally, our study reveals a novel contribution of synapsin Ia to define the surface area of AZs. PMID:24391547

  7. NUWUVI: A Southern Paiute History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Reno.

    The first in a series of four histories of native Nevadans, this volume presents the story of the Southern Paiutes, or Nuwuvi. Based on interviews with tribal members and research conducted at numerous archives and record centers, the history begins with a description of the ancient culture and territory of the many Nuwuvi bands that lived,…

  8. World History Textbooks: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Gilbert T.

    2004-01-01

    This world history review examines standard textbooks used between the sixth and twelfth grades in schools across the nation. These established textbooks dominate the field and set the pitch for new and forthcoming volumes. The 2002 Texas history textbook adoption and the California list have influenced what textbooks will dominate the national…

  9. Comments on the article by A. J. Lecloux (J Nanopart Res (2015) 17:447) regarding the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) to classify nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Neil; Rauscher, Hubert; Roebben, Gert

    2016-08-01

    In November 2015, an article by A. J. Lecloux was published in this journal (J Nanopart Res, 17:447, 2015). The article focused on the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) for the implementation of the European Commission's recommended definition of "nanomaterial". In that paper, VSSA values were calculated for polydisperse particulate materials using a particle number-based averaging method which do not agree with earlier results of VSSA simulations of polydisperse materials reported in 2014 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). In this contribution, we explain the difference between traditional view of VSSA which was used by the JRC and the proposed model of Lecloux. Through the use of some simple examples for polydisperse materials, it is demonstrated that the latter produces values which neither correspond to the generally accepted definition of VSSA nor relate to the commonly used experimental methods for determining VSSA using gas adsorption. Lecloux's model therefore does not constitute a basis for practical implementation of the EC's definition of nanomaterial using gas adsorption techniques.

  10. Comments on the article by A. J. Lecloux (J Nanopart Res (2015) 17:447) regarding the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) to classify nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Neil; Rauscher, Hubert; Roebben, Gert

    In November 2015, an article by A. J. Lecloux was published in this journal (J Nanopart Res, 17:447, 2015). The article focused on the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) for the implementation of the European Commission's recommended definition of "nanomaterial". In that paper, VSSA values were calculated for polydisperse particulate materials using a particle number-based averaging method which do not agree with earlier results of VSSA simulations of polydisperse materials reported in 2014 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). In this contribution, we explain the difference between traditional view of VSSA which was used by the JRC and the proposed model of Lecloux. Through the use of some simple examples for polydisperse materials, it is demonstrated that the latter produces values which neither correspond to the generally accepted definition of VSSA nor relate to the commonly used experimental methods for determining VSSA using gas adsorption. Lecloux's model therefore does not constitute a basis for practical implementation of the EC's definition of nanomaterial using gas adsorption techniques.

  11. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  12. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    PubMed

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied.

  13. History of the Kansas Extension Service From 1868 to 1964; (Vol. I, II, III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teagarden, Earl H., Comp.

    The comprehensive history of the Kansas Extension Service from 1868 is presented in three volumes and includes administration, information dissemination, club work, special area reports, personnel training, and continuing education. Administration involves such aspects as personnel, finances, organizational changes, cooperation with other agencies…

  14. United States History: United States History I, Honors United States History I ACT, AP US History I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort Worth Independent School District, TX.

    This curriculum guide, covering U.S. history, honors U.S. history, and advanced placement U.S. history contains the following components: a statement of philosophy and broad goals for each content area; objectives organized around broad content goals or strands; scope and sequence charts; instructional planning guides that include suggested…

  15. Cumulated UDC Supplement, 1965-1975. Volume V: Classes 677/9 (677/68 Various Industries and Crafts; Rubber and Plastics, Precision Mechanism Including Automatic Data Processing, Atuomatic Control Engineering, 69 Building, 7 Arts. Architecture. Sport, 8 Languages. Linguistics. Literature, 9 Geography. Biography. History).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation for Documentation, The Hague (Netherlands). Committee on Classification Research.

    In continuation of the "Cumulated UDC Supplement - 1964" published by the International Federation for Documentation, this document provides a cumulative supplement to the Universal Decimal Classification for 1965-1975. This fifth volume of a five volume series lists new classification subdivisions in the following subject areas: (1) various…

  16. Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 2. Final remedial investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Volume II of this report contains data tables and field notes of information gathered from the sampling of soils and ground water. Hydrocarbons and aromatic volatile organics are among the contaminants listed.

  17. Command History. 1967. Volume 2. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-01-01

    his dependents would be transported there at government expense and receive a substantial iamily allowance during the vacation period. After twelve... allowed to visit only in the presence of the entire cell. If one member defected, the remaining two were considered accomplices and were severely...was believed desirable to have the frequency close to but not on the frequency of Radio Hanoi. This would allow Radio Hanoi to be heard when the

  18. Command History. 1969. Volume 3. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-01-01

    command and the press. It allowed the correspondents to receive in-depth background information which aided them in analyaing the war in terms of current... allowed the command greater ’latitude in disclosing information and provided greater opportunity for exchange between correspondents and the...news, Information officers in the field were not autho- rized to waive the ground rules. Backgrounders allow comment about RVN involve- ment which

  19. Command History. 1967. Volume 3. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-01-01

    WALLOWA, 365, 366 YELLOWSTONE , 392 YORK, 339, 341 Optimum Force Structure, 144 Oregon, Task Force, 335, 336, 365 OSA, 218 OSD, 1043 OVERLOOK, Project...SEALAND Containership Service, Initiation of, 773 Searchlights, 416 SEATO Plans, 1021 SEA WOLVES , 474 SECSTATE, 568, 581, 1036, 1040- 1042, 1048 Secure

  20. Command History, 1969. Volume 2. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-01-01

    situation. Although the National Police contribution of reduced terrorist incidents during Phase II was a positive result, it did not meet President Thiou’s...it was also configured to meet the long range RVNAF/GVN requirements as the nucleus of an eventual national telecommunications system. Specific...It nceseary and identity by block number) RVN Armed Forces, Special Operations, Pacification, Nation lBuilding, Logistics, Prisoners of War

  1. Command History 1970. Volume 2. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    problems and recommended actions were: 1. There was inadequate consideration of skill levels and qualifications in the promotion of VNAF and VNN...significant, none of the criteria reflected tile actual skill level and ;-egree of qualification the man attained. The RVNAF promotion system did not...operations. If the senior NCO lacked the skills required of his grade, the operational effectiveness of his unit was seriously reduced. It was recommended

  2. Command History 1971. Volume 2. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    and contributions (amounts in US dollars) of the various countries were: Australia provided building materials , medical assistance, scholarships for...caused by a ruptured pipeline destroys 250 Vietnamese houses , 100 buildings and 80, 000 gallons of gas. 27-- Elements of the ARVN 30th Rgr Bn and 3...Transmission or revelation of its contents in any manner to an unauthorized person is prohibited by law. The material contained within this document is to

  3. The Excitement and Fascination of Science: Volume Two. Reflections by Eminent Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, William C., Comp.

    This volume presents 34 autobiographical chapters from past issues of "Annual Reviews." These essays have been written by scientists active in all areas of research. Some examples are the following: "Musings of an Erstwhile Plant Pathologist" by F.C. Bawden, "Some Personal History and Reflections from the Life of a Biochemist" by John T. Edsall,…

  4. Environmental Inventory and Analysis for Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Volume II. Appendices. Pine Bluff Metropolitan Area, Arkansas Urban Water Management Study. Revised.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    Grass D-22 Table D-2 (continued)4 4 Arundinaria gigantea Wet areas Cane Bromus racemosus Open areas, old fields Br-me Grass ...sandy soil U Panic Grass Panicum scoparium Moist woods, sandy soil C Panic Grass Panicum virgatum Moist open areas C Panic Grass Paspalum floridanum...Moist open areas C Paspalum Paspalum laeve Open woods U Paspalum Paspalum urvillei Moist disturbed areas C Vasey Grass Setaria lutesens Fields,

  5. Spatial and temporal patterns of global burned area in response to anthropogenic and environmental factors: Reconstructing global fire history for the 20th and early 21st centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Tian, Hanqin; Tao, Bo; Ren, Wei; Kush, John; Liu, Yongqiang; Wang, Yuhang

    2014-03-01

    Fire is a critical component of the Earth system, and substantially influences land surface, climate change, and ecosystem dynamics. To accurately predict the fire regimes in the 21st century, it is essential to understand the historical fire patterns and recognize the interaction among fire, human, and environment factors. Until now, few efforts are put on the studies regarding to the long-term fire reconstruction and the attribution analysis of anthropogenic and environmental factors to fire regimes at global scale. To fill this knowledge gap, we developed a 0.5° × 0.5° data set of global burned area from 1901 to 2007 by coupling Global Fire Emission Database version 3 with a process-based fire model and conducted factorial simulation experiments to evaluate the impacts of human, climate, and atmospheric components. The average global burned area is ~442 × 104 km2 yr-1 during 1901-2007 and our results suggest a notable declining rate of burned area globally (1.28 × 104 km2 yr-1). Burned area in tropics and extratropics exhibited a significant declining trend, with no significant trend detected at high latitudes. Factorial experiments indicated that human activities were the dominant factor in determining the declining trend of burned area in tropics and extratropics, and climate variation was the primary factor controlling the decadal variation of burned area at high latitudes. Elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition enhanced burned area in tropics and southern extratropics but suppressed fire occurrence at high latitudes. Rising temperature and frequent droughts are becoming increasingly important and expected to increase wildfire activity in many regions of the world.

  6. Surface area and volume measurements of volcanic ash particles using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT): A comparison with scanning electron microscope (SEM) stereoscopic imaging and geometric considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Orkun; Şen, Erdal; Aydar, Erkan; Tatar, İlkan; Çelik, H. Hamdi

    2010-10-01

    Volcanic ash particles are important components of explosive eruptions, and their surface textures are the subject of intense research. Characterization of ash surfaces is crucial for understanding the physics of volcanic plumes, remote sensing measurements of ash and aerosols, interfacial processes, modelling transportation and deposition of tephra and characterizing eruptive styles. A number of different methods have been used over the years to arrive at surface area estimates. The more common methods include estimates based on geometric considerations (geometric surface area) and physisorption of gas molecules on the surface of interest (physical surface area). In this study, micro computed tomography (micro-CT), which is a non-destructive method providing three-dimensional data, enabled the measurement of surface area and volume of individual ash particles. Results were compared with the values obtained from SEM stereoscopic imaging and geometric considerations. Surface area estimates of micro-CT and SEM stereoscopic imaging are similar, with surface area/volume ratios (SA/V) of 0.0368 and 0.0467, respectively. Ash particle surface textures show a large deviation from that of simple geometric forms, and an approximation both to spheres and ellipsoids do not seem adequate for the representation of ash surface. SEM stereoscopic and/or micro-CT imaging are here suggested as good candidate techniques for the characterization of textures on macro-pore regions of ash particles.

  7. The Shoreline Management Tool - an ArcMap tool for analyzing water depth, inundated area, volume, and selected habitats, with an example for the lower Wood River Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Daniel T.; Haluska, Tana L.; Respini-Irwin, Darius

    2013-01-01

    The Shoreline Management Tool is a geographic information system (GIS) based program developed to assist water- and land-resource managers in assessing the benefits and effects of changes in surface-water stage on water depth, inundated area, and water volume. Additionally, the Shoreline Management Tool can be used to identify aquatic or terrestrial habitat areas where conditions may be suitable for specific plants or animals as defined by user-specified criteria including water depth, land-surface slope, and land-surface aspect. The tool can also be used to delineate areas for use in determining a variety of hydrologic budget components such as surface-water storage, precipitation, runoff, or evapotranspiration. The Shoreline Management Tool consists of two parts, a graphical user interface for use with Esri™ ArcMap™ GIS software to interact with the user to define scenarios and map results, and a spreadsheet in Microsoft® Excel® developed to display tables and graphs of the results. The graphical user interface allows the user to define a scenario consisting of an inundation level (stage), land areas (parcels), and habitats (areas meeting user-specified conditions) based on water depth, slope, and aspect criteria. The tool uses data consisting of land-surface elevation, tables of stage/volume and stage/area, and delineated parcel boundaries to produce maps (data layers) of inundated areas and areas that meet the habitat criteria. The tool can be run in a Single-Time Scenario mode or in a Time-Series Scenario mode, which uses an input file of dates and associated stages. The spreadsheet part of the tool uses a macro to process the results from the graphical user interface to create tables and graphs of inundated water volume, inundated area, dry area, and mean water depth for each land parcel based on the user-specified stage. The macro also creates tables and graphs of the area, perimeter, and number of polygons comprising the user-specified habitat areas

  8. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 3. Hawaiian ecosystem and its environmental determinants with particular emphasis on promising areas for geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, S.M.

    1980-06-01

    A brief geobiological history of the Hawaiian Islands is presented. Climatology, physiography, and environmental degradation are discussed. Soil types and associations, land use patterns and ratings, and vegetation ecology are covered. The fauna discussed include: ancient and recent vertebrate life, land mollusca, marine fauma, and insect fauna. (MHR)

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

  10. Innovation and Change in American Education. Kensington Revisited: A Fifteen Year Follow-Up of an Innovative Elementary School and Its Faculty. Volume II--Milford's Recent History: The School District as Contemporary Context of the Kensington School. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    This second volume of a six-volume study updates and concludes the description of the historical development of a school district code-named "Milford," presented in volume I. Board minutes remain the primary source of data with increasing amounts of information from public documents, interviews, and observation of meetings. Following a brief…

  11. Effect of prenatal loud music and noise on total number of neurons and glia, neuronal nuclear area and volume of chick brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus: a stereological investigation.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Tania; Palanisamy, Pradeep; Nag, T C; Roy, T S; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2013-06-01

    The present study explores whether prenatal patterned and unpatterned sound of high sound pressure level (110 dB) has any differential effect on the morphology of brainstem auditory nuclei, field L (auditory cortex analog) and hippocampus in chicks (Gallus domesticus). The total number of neurons and glia, mean neuronal nuclear area and total volume of the brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus of post-hatch day 1 chicks were determined in serial, cresyl violet-stained sections, using stereology software. All regions studied showed a significantly increased total volume with increase in total neuron number and mean neuronal nuclear area in the patterned music stimulated group as compared to control. Contrastingly the unpatterned noise stimulated group showed an attenuated volume with reduction in the total neuron number. The mean neuronal nuclear area was significantly reduced in the auditory nuclei and hippocampus but increased in the field L. Glial cell number was significantly increased in both experimental groups, being highest in the noise group. The brainstem auditory nuclei and field L showed an increase in glia to neuron ratio in the experimental groups as compared to control. In the hippocampus the ratio remained unaltered between control and music groups, but was higher in the noise group. It is thus evident that though the sound pressure level in both experimental groups was the same there were differential changes in the morphological parameters of the brain regions studied, indicating that the characteristics of the sound had a role in mediating these effects.

  12. Final report of CCQM-K136 measurement of porosity properties (specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobina, E.; Zimathis, A.; Prinz, C.; Emmerling, F.; Unger, W.; de Santis Neves, R.; Galhardo, C. E.; De Robertis, E.; Wang, H.; Mizuno, K.; Kurokawa, A.

    2016-01-01

    CCQM key comparison K-136 Measurement of porosity properties (specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous Al2O3 has been performed by the Surface Analysis Working Group (SAWG) of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM). The objective of this key comparison is to compare the equivalency of the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DIs) for the measurement of specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous substances (sorbents, catalytic agents, cross-linkers, zeolites, etc) used in advanced technology. In this key comparison, a commercial sorbent (aluminum oxide) was supplied as a sample. Five NMIs participated in this key comparison. All participants used a gas adsorption method, here nitrogen adsorption at 77.3 K, for analysis according to the international standards ISO 15901-2 and 9277. In this key comparison, the degrees of equivalence uncertainties for specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter was established. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. History. Predrafted Individual Short-Term Plan/Records (Secondary Level): Directions for Resource Teachers, Teachers and Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Merced, Comp.

    Developed by experienced migrant education teachers using several Sight and Sound Program concepts, this volume presents approximately 120 predrafted individual short-term Plan/Records for secondary level students in the subject area of United States history, and step-by-step directions for their use by Oregon resource teachers, secondary…

  14. Volcanic Signatures in Estimates of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Distribution Width, Surface Area, and Volume Deduced from Global Satellite-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, J. J.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    Volcanic signatures in the stratospheric aerosol layer are revealed by two independent techniques which retrieve aerosol information from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. Both techniques combine the 4-wavelength Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument. The algorithms use the SAGE II/CLAES composite extinction spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub R). The first technique is a multi-wavelength Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm which retrieves values and uncertainties of R(sub eff) by comparing ratios of extinctions from SAGE II and CLAES (e.g., E(sub lambda)/E(sub 1.02) to pre-computed extinction ratios which are based on a range of unimodal lognormal size distributions. The pre-computed ratios are presented as a function of R(sub eff) for a given sigma(sub g); thus the comparisons establish the range of R(sub eff) consistent with the measured spectra for that sigma(sub g). The fact that no solutions are found for certain sigma(sub g) values provides information on the acceptable range of sigma(sub g), which is found to evolve in response to volcanic injections and removal periods. Analogous comparisons using absolute extinction spectra and error bars establish the range of S and V. The second technique is a Parameter Search Technique (PST) which estimates R(sub eff) and sigma(sub g) within a month-latitude-altitude bin by minimizing the chi-squared values obtained by comparing the SAGE II/CLAES extinction spectra and error bars with spectra calculated by varying the lognormal fitting parameters: R(sub eff), sigma(sub g), and the total number of particles N(sub 0). For both techniques, possible biases in

  15. Time-scales of assembly and thermal history of a composite felsic pluton: constraints from the Emerald Lake area, northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Ian M.; Villeneuve, Mike E.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Duncan, Robert A.; Russell, James K.; Mortensen, James K.

    2002-05-01

    Knowledge of the time-scales of emplacement and thermal history during assembly of composite felsic plutons in the shallow crust are critical to deciphering the processes of crustal growth and magma chamber development. Detailed petrological and chemical study of the mid-Cretaceous, composite Emerald Lake pluton, from the northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon Territory, coupled with U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology, indicates that this pluton was intruded as a series of magmatic pulses. Intrusion of these pulses produced a strong petrological zonation from augite syenite, hornblende quartz syenite and monzonite, to biotite granite. Our data further indicate that multiple phases were emplaced and cooled to below the mineral closure temperatures over a time-scale on the order of the resolution of the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique (˜1 Myr), and that emplacement occurred at 94.3 Ma. Simple thermal modelling and heat conduction calculations were used to further constrain the temporal relationships within the intrusion. These calculations are consistent with the geochronology and show that emplacement and cooling were complete in less than 100 kyr and probably 70±5 kyr. These results demonstrate that production, transport and emplacement of the different phases of the Emerald Lake pluton occurred essentially simultaneously, and that these processes must also have been closely related in time and space. By analogy, these results provide insights into the assembly and petrogenesis of other complex intrusions and ultimately lead to an understanding of the processes involved in crustal development.

  16. A case history of using high-resolution LiDAR data to support archaeological prediction models in a low-relief area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacskó, Vivien; Székely, Balázs; Stibrányi, Máté; Koma, Zsófia

    2016-04-01

    Hungary is situated in the crossroad of several large-scale infrastructural pathways like transnational pipelines and transcontinental motorways. At the same time the country is rich in known and potential archaeological sites. Archaeological prediction techniques aided by remote sensing are intended to help increase preparedness for archaeological surveying and rescue activities in response to planned new infrastructural developments (e.g., a new pipeline), as they try to estimate the number of potential archaeological sites, area to be surveyed, potential cost and time needed for these activities. In very low-relief areas microtopographic forms may indicate sites, high-resolution LiDAR DTMs are suitable for their detection. Main sources of archaeological prediction models are known archaeological sites, where optimal environmental conditions of settling down existed at historic ages. Hydrological characteristics, relief, geology, vegetation cover and soil are considered to be as most important natural factors. Sorting of the factors and accuracy of the sampling differentiate our models. Resolution of an inductive model depends on the spatial properties of the integrated data: a raster data set can be generated that contains probability values and the reliability of the estimation. The information content of the predictive model is highly influenced by the resolution of the used digital terrain model (DTM): its derivatives (slope, aspect, topographic features) are important inputs of the modelling. The quality of the DTM is even more important in low-relief areas as microtopographic features may indicate archaeological sites. The conventional digital elevation models (SRTM, ASTER GDEM) provide unsatisfying resolution (both in horizontal and vertical senses) as they are rather digital surface models containing the vegetation and the built-up structures. Processed multiecho LiDAR data can be used instead. Our study area is situated in the foothills of the

  17. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  18. Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

  19. Programa Estrategico do desenvolvimento 1968-70: Area Estrategica IX. Infra-estructura Social. Educacao e Recursos Humanos, 1 e 2 (Strategic Development Program 1968-1970: Strategic Area IX. Education and Human Resources, Volumes 1 & 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazil.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a two volume work dealing with education and human resources as part of the Brazilian Government's Strategic Development Program 1968-70. It offers an integral view of education as an instrument of social transformation and an exposition of the quantitative and…

  20. Displaced/re-worked rhodolith deposits infilling parts of a complex Miocene multistorey submarine channel: A case history from the Sassari area (Sardinia, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murru, Marco; Bassi, Davide; Simone, Lucia

    2015-08-01

    In the Sassari area (north-western Sardinia, Italy), the Miocene Porto Torres sub-basin sequences represent the complex multistorey mixed carbonate-siliciclastic submarine feature called the Sassari Channel. During the late Burdigalian-early Serravallian, repeated terrigenous supplies from uplifted Paleozoic crystalline substrata fed the Sassari Channel system by means of turbidity and locally hyper-concentrated turbidity flows. Shelfal areas were the source of terrigenous clasts, but open shelf rhodalgal/foramol carbonate areas were very productive and largely also contributed to the channel infilling. Re-worked sands and skeletal debris were discontinuously re-sedimented offshore as pure terrigenous, mixed and/or carbonate deposits. Major sediment supply was introduced between the latest Burdigalian and the start of the middle Langhian, during which a large amount of carbonate, mixed and siliciclastic sediments reached the Porto Torres Basin (Sassari Channel I). Contributions from shallow proximal source areas typify the lower intervals (Unit A) in marginal sectors of the channel. Upward, these evolve into autochthonous rhodolith deposits, winnowed by strong currents in relatively shallow well lit settings within a complex network of narrow tidally-controlled channels (Unit D) locally bearing coral assemblages. Conversely, re-sedimented rhodoliths from the Units B and C accumulated under conditions of higher turbidity. In deeper parts of the channel taxonomically diversified rhodoliths point to the mixing of re-deposited skeletal components from different relatively deep bathmetric settings. In the latest early Langhian, major re-sedimentation episodes, resulting in large prograding bodies (Unit D), triggered by repeated regression pulses in a frame of persistent still stand. During these episodes photophile assemblages dwelled in the elevated margin sectors of the channel. A significant latest early Langhian drop in relative sea-level resulted in impressive mass

  1. Histories of Geographical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ashley

    2006-01-01

    This paper revisits the value of and justification for histories of geographical education as a field of research endeavour within geographical education. Four potentially fruitful areas of research are identified. These are pressure groups, especially the International Geographical Union's Commission on Geographical Education; the influence of…

  2. Radiological assessment of radioactive waste-disposal areas at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 3: Technical background information for the ORNL environmental and safety report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, T. W.; Ohnesorge, W. F.; Wagner, E. B.; Chaudhry, M. Y.

    1981-12-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to determine dose equivalent rates in the ORNL solid waste disposal areas. The dosimeters were exchanged and read approximately quarterly during 1979 and 1980. The data were reviewed to detect trends in dose equivalent rates, but no trends were detected other than increased radiation levels in some areas due to the lowering of White Oak Lake. The rates at the disposal site were compared with TLD readings taken in areas on the DOE reservation perimeter, as well as in remote areas that represent natural background for East Tennessee.

  3. Young Physicians in Rural Areas: The Impact of Service in the National Health Service Corps. Volume 2, Survey of Factors Influencing the Location Decision and Practice Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langwell, Kathryn; And Others

    A survey of young physicians in rural areas was conducted and information was gathered from other data sources and analyzed for three main purposes: (1) to evaluate the retention of National Health Service Corps (NHSC) alumni in Health Manpower Shortage Areas (HMSAs); (2) to document the distribution of NHSC alumni, Private Practice Option (PPO)…

  4. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  5. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  6. Unraveling 1.5 Ga of brittle deformation history in the Laxemar-Simpevarp area, southeast Sweden: A contribution to the Swedish site investigation study for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, G.; Venvik GanerøD, G.; Wahlgren, C.-H.

    2009-10-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is undertaking site investigation at two locations in Sweden, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, with the aim of identifying a suitable area for the construction of a deep repository for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear waste. Fault slip data from outcrops and oriented drill cores were used to compute paleostress states and to unravel the sites' brittle deformation history. Results from the Laxemar-Simpevarp area show that its suggested brittle history results from multiple reactivation of fracture and fault sets caused by the many orogenic episodes that affected the region during at least 1.5 Ga of geological evolution in the brittle deformational regime. Two compressional, approximately NW/NNW-SE/SSE and NNE-SSW oriented shortening events generated sets of conjugate, steep strike-slip fractures. These sets formed during the late stages of the Svecokarelian and possibly also of the Gothian orogeny, soon after the region entered the brittle deformation domain. The Mesoproterozoic Sveconorwegian orogeny generated fractures and faults that are assigned to a third set of conjugate strike-slip faults, which constrain an approximately E-W σ1. The Caledonian shortening, oriented approximately NW-SE to E-W, reactivated the latter but also formed a new, similarly oriented set of subvertical strike-slip fractures. Permian transtension was oriented NW-SW and caused a prominent set of moderately dipping NW-SE trending normal faults in the Precambrian basement of the study area. Two other approximately NW-SW and NW-SE oriented shortening events are recorded in Ordovician limestones and can be tentatively linked to the far-field effects of the Laramide and Alpine orogenies.

  7. Surface faulting and paleoseismic history of the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake area, west-central Nevada, and implications for modern tectonics of the Walker Lane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.W.; DePolo, C.M.; Ramelli, A.R.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Meyer, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake (Ms 7.2) was one of the largest historical events in the Walker Lane region of western Nevada, and it produced a complicated strike-slip rupture pattern on multiple Quaternary faults distributed through three valleys. Primary, right-lateral surface ruptures occurred on north-striking faults in Monte Cristo Valley; small-scale lateral and normal offsets occurred in Stewart Valley; and secondary, normal faulting occurred on north-northeast-striking faults in the Gabbs Valley epicentral region. A reexamination of the surface ruptures provides new displacement and fault-zone data: maximum cumulative offset is estimated to be 2.7 m, and newly recognized faults extend the maximum width and end-to-end length of the rupture zone to 17 and 75 km, respectively. A detailed Quaternary allostratigraphic chronology based on regional alluvialgeomorphic relationships, tephrochronology, and radiocarbon dating provides a framework for interpreting the paleoseismic history of the fault zone. A late Wisconsinan alluvial-fan and piedmont unit containing a 32-36 ka tephra layer is a key stratigraphic datum for paleoseismic measurements. Exploratory trenching and radiocarbon dating of tectonic stratigraphy provide the first estimates for timing of late Quaternary faulting along the Cedar Mountain fault zone. Three trenches display evidence for six faulting events, including that in 1932, during the past 32-36 ka. Radiocarbon dating of organic soils interstratified with tectonically ponded silts establishes best-fit ages of the pre-1932 events at 4, 5,12,15, and 18 ka, each with ??2 ka uncertainties. On the basis of an estimated cumulative net slip of 6-12 m for the six faulting events, minimum and maximum late Quaternary slip rates are 0.2 and 0.7 mm/yr, respectively, and the preferred rate is 0.4-0.5 mm/yr. The average recurrence (interseismic) interval is 3600 yr. The relatively uniform thickness of the ponded deposits suggests that similar

  8. Lunar History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunson, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    This section of the workshop describes the history of the moon, and offers explanations for the importance of understanding lunar history for engineers and users of lunar simulants. Included are summaries of the initial impact that is currently in favor as explaining the moon's formation, the crust generation, the creation of craters by impactors, the era of the lunar cataclysm, which some believe effected the evolution of life on earth, the nature of lunar impacts, crater morphology, which includes pictures of lunar craters that show the different types of craters, more recent events include effect of micrometeorites, solar wind, radiation and generation of agglutinates. Also included is a glossary of terms.

  9. Fracture Flow Research, Volume 1: Modeling Rock Fracture Intersections - Application in the Boston Area and Estimation of the Well-Test Flow Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    the three points will cause the formation of polygon 1. a12, D 12 C 7 ao, Do alo , DIo Figure 3.9 - Remaining initial directions for B8, B1 and B2 after...P32 lies within a narrow band . " The plot of the relationship is slightly curved and the slope increases with increasing P32. This observation will...within a narrow band and the shape of the relationship is very similar to that between the intersection length per unit volume versus the fracture

  10. Constraints on the history and topography of the Northeastern Sierra Nevada from a Neogene sedimentary basin in the Reno-Verdi area, Western Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trexler, James; Cashman, Patricia; Cosca, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Neogene (Miocene–Pliocene) sedimentary rocks of the northeastern Sierra Nevada were deposited in small basins that formed in response to volcanic and tectonic activity along the eastern margin of the Sierra. These strata record an early phase (ca. 11–10 Ma) of extension and rapid sedimentation of boulder conglomerates and debrites deposited on alluvial fans, followed by fluvio-lacustrine sedimentation and nearby volcanic arc activity but tectonic quiescence, until ~ 2.6 Ma. The fossil record in these rocks documents a warmer, wetter climate featuring large mammals and lacking the Sierran orographic rain shadow that dominates climate today on the eastern edge of the Sierra. This record of a general lack of paleo-relief across the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada is consistent with evidence presented elsewhere that there was not a significant topographic barrier between the Pacific Ocean and the interior of the continent east of the Sierra before ~ 2.6 Ma. However, these sediments do not record an integrated drainage system either to the east into the Great Basin like the modern Truckee River, or to the west across the Sierra like the ancestral Feather and Yuba rivers. The Neogene Reno-Verdi basin was one of several, scattered endorheic (i.e., internally drained) basins occupying this part of the Cascade intra-arc and back-arc area.

  11. Thunderstorms and Flooding of August 17, 2007, with a Context Provided by a History of Other Large Storm and Flood Events in the Black Hills Area of South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Bunkers, Matthew J.; Carter, Janet M.; Stamm, John F.; Williamson, Joyce E.

    2010-01-01

    The Black Hills area of western South Dakota has a history of damaging flash floods that have resulted primarily from exceptionally strong rain-producing thunderstorms. The best known example is the catastrophic storm system of June 9-10, 1972, which caused severe flooding in several major drainages near Rapid City and resulted in 238 deaths. More recently, severe thunderstorms caused flash flooding near Piedmont and Hermosa on August 17, 2007. Obtaining a thorough understanding of peak-flow characteristics for low-probability floods will require a comprehensive long-term approach involving (1) documentation of scientific information for extreme events such as these; (2) long-term collection of systematic peak-flow records; and (3) regional assessments of a wide variety of peak-flow information. To that end, the U.S. Geological Survey cooperated with the South Dakota Department of Transportation and National Weather Service to produce this report, which provides documentation regarding the August 17, 2007, storm and associated flooding and provides a context through examination of other large storm and flood events in the Black Hills area. The area affected by the August 17, 2007, storms and associated flooding generally was within the area affected by the larger storm of June 9-10, 1972. The maximum observed 2007 precipitation totals of between 10.00 and 10.50 inches occurred within about 2-3 hours in a small area about 5 miles west of Hermosa. The maximum documented precipitation amount in 1972 was 15.0 inches, and precipitation totals of 10.0 inches or more were documented for 34 locations within an area of about 76 square miles. A peak flow of less than 1 cubic foot per second occurred upstream from the 2007 storm extent for streamflow-gaging station 06404000 (Battle Creek near Keystone); whereas, the 1972 peak flow of 26,200 cubic feet per second was large, relative to the drainage area of only 58.6 square miles. Farther downstream along Battle Creek, a 2007

  12. History of Higher Education, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Roger L., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    The six papers in this annual volume on the history of higher education cover some of the changes that evolved over the years in various U.S. Institutions. The first paper is: "The Articulation of Secondary and Higher Education: Four Historical Models at the University of Georgia" (J. Patrick McCarthy), which discusses the efforts of…

  13. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes 1 through 8

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  14. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Sections 4 through 9

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  15. Lateralized task shift effects in Broca's and Wernicke's regions and in visual word form area are selective for conceptual content and reflect trial history.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Michaelsen, Jákup Ludvík Dahl; Rynne, Ian; Nielsen, Rasmus Høll

    2014-11-01

    We investigated whether lateralized BOLD-fMRI activations in Broca's region, Wernicke's region and visual word form area (VWFA) reflect task shift costs and to which extent these effects are specific to language related task shifts. We employed a linguistic one-back memory paradigm where participants (n=58) on each trial responded to whether a given word was the same as the previous word. In concordance with previous findings we found that conceptual shifts (CS), i.e. new words, elicited a strongly left-lateralized response in all three regions compared to repeat words. Words were sometimes presented through the visual modality (read) and sometimes through the auditory modality (spoken). This enabled the study of perceptual modality shifts (PS) relative to trials that stayed in the same modality as the previous trials. Again, we found a strongly left-lateralized effect in all regions. This was independent of whether the word was a CS or not, suggesting that linguistic translation across modalities taxes the same system as CS. Response shifts (RS), on the other hand, when shifting from one response (e.g. reporting a repeat word) to another (e.g. reporting a new word) did not yield an observable left lateralized response in any of the regions, suggesting that the lateralized task shift cost effects in these regions are not shared by all types of task shifts. Lateralization for individual tasks was found to be correlated across brain regions, but not across tasks, suggesting that lateralization may not be a unitary phenomenon, but vary across participants according to task demands. Both response time and lateralization were found to reflect the demands not only of the current trial but also of the previous trial, illustrating the context dependency of even simple cognitive tasks.

  16. Phylogeography of western Pacific Leucetta 'chagosensis' (Porifera: Calcarea) from ribosomal DNA sequences: implications for population history and conservation of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (Australia).

    PubMed

    Wörheide, Gert; Hooper, John N A; Degnan, Bernard M

    2002-09-01

    Leucetta 'chagosensis' is a widespread calcareous sponge, occurring in shaded habitats of Indo-Pacific coral reefs. In this study we explore relationships among 19 ribosomal DNA sequence types (the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region plus flanking gene sequences) found among 54 individuals from 28 locations throughout the western Pacific, with focus on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Maximum parsimony analysis revealed phylogeographical structuring into four major clades (although not highly supported by bootstrap analysis) corresponding to the northern/central GBR with Guam and Taiwan, the southern GBR and subtropical regions south to Brisbane, Vanuatu and Indonesia. Subsequent nested clade analysis (NCA) confirmed this structure with a probability of > 95%. After NCA of geographical distances, a pattern of range expansion from the internal Indonesian clade was inferred at the total cladogram level, as the Indonesian clade was found to be the internal and therefore oldest clade. Two distinct clades were found on the GBR, which narrowly overlap geographically in a line approximately from the Whitsunday Islands to the northern Swain Reefs. At various clade levels, NCA inferred that the northern GBR clade was influenced by past fragmentation and contiguous range expansion events, presumably during/after sea level low stands in the Pleistocene, after which the northern GBR might have been recolonized from the Queensland Plateau in the Coral Sea. The southern GBR clade is most closely related to subtropical L. 'chagosensis', and we infer that the southern GBR probably was recolonized from there after sea level low stands, based on our NCA results and supported by oceanographic data. Our results have important implications for conservation and management of the GBR, as they highlight the importance of marginal transition zones in the generation and maintenance of species rich zones, such as the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

  17. Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermal history of the eastern Mojave Desert, California and western Arizona, with emphasis on the Old Woman Mountains area and the Chemehuevi metamorphic core complex

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Mesozoic thickening and Cenozoic extension resulted in the juxtaposition of upper and middle crustal rocks in the eastern Mojave Desert, southeastern California and western Arizona. The application of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar thermochronology and petrology/thermobarometry to rocks in this region provides information about the timing and nature of thrusting, plutonism, metamorphism, denudation, and detachment faulting. Orogenesis culminated during the Late Cretaceous when rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Chemehuevi, and Sacramento Mountains attained temperatures > 500C. High grade metamorphism of the Old Woman Mountains area was caused by the intrusion of the Old Woman-Piute batholith at 73 {plus minus} 1 Ma; Cretaceous mineral assemblages in Proterozoic pelites increase in grade from greenschist to upper amphibolite facies, and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar hornblende ages from Proterozoic amphibolites decrease in age from {approximately} 1,600 Ma to 73 {plus minus} 1 Ma, in the direction of 73 Ma plutons. Pluton emplacement and metamorphism occurred at 3 to 3.5 kbars and 400 > 600C in the Piute Mountains, and 3.5 to 4.5 kbars and 530 to > 650C in the Old Woman Mountains. Following the Cretaceous, the eastern Mojave Desert underwent a period of cooling at a rate of 2 to 10C/Ma between 65 and 25 Ma. By 30 Ma rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Marble Ship, Clipper and Turtle Mountains were below {approximately} 100C. {sup 40}/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Sacramento Mountains suggest that mylonitization caused by the onset of regional extension occurred at 23 {plus minus} 1 Ma. When extension started in the Chemehuevi Mountains, rocks exposed in the southwestern and northeastern portions of footwall to the Chemehuevi detachment fault were at {approximately} 180C and {approximately} 350C, respectively which suggests that this fault initiated at a dip of 5 to 30{degree}.

  18. Adventures in Law and History. Volume I: Native Americans, the Spanish Frontier, and the Gold Rush. A Law and Civic Education Curriculum for Upper Elementary Grades with Units on Rules and Laws, Property, and Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croddy, Marshall; Degelman, Charles; Doggett, Keri; Hayes, Bill

    This is volume one of a two-volume civics curriculum on law and effective citizenship for upper-elementary students. The lessons, set in American historical eras, engage students in cooperative-learning activities, role plays, simulations, readers theater, stories, and guided discussions, which introduce and reinforce law-related and civic…

  19. Bulletproof History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that the writers and producers of the television documentary, "The Valour and the Horror," provided a false impression of an event to fit preconceived and erroneous interpretations of history. Points out specific examples of inaccurate historical presentations and provides contradictory historical interpretations. (CFR)

  20. Arguing History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    The history of science illustrates some exciting--and sometimes controversial--moments. Unfortunately, textbooks tend to focus on results in a scientific discipline and only occasionally showcase an interesting historical vignette, telling the story behind those results. Although required studies may leave teachers little classroom time for…