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Sample records for area luquillo experimental

  1. An annotated list of the flora of the Bisley Area Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico 1987 to 1992

    Treesearch

    Jesus Danilo Chinea; Renee J. Beymer; Carlos Rivera; Ines Sastre de Jeses; F.N. Scatena

    1993-01-01

    Known species of plants, including bryophytes and ferns, are listed for the area of the Bisley experimental watershed area, a subtropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico.

  2. Luquillo Experimental Forest: Research History and Opportunities

    Treesearch

    Nancy L. Harris; Ariel E. Lugo; Sandra Brown; Tamara Heartsill-Scalley

    2012-01-01

    The goals of this Luquillo Experimental Forest: Research History and Opportunities are to synthesize the new research that has emerged from the LEF since the publication of Brown et al. (1983) into a concise summary of key research findings and to highlight opportunities for future research that will contribute to a greater understanding of the structure and function...

  3. Water and the Ecosystems of the Luquillo Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Ariel E. Lugo

    1986-01-01

    Water dynamics, water balance, and water requirements of the ecosystems and aquatic organisms of the Luquillo Experimental Forest (aka Caribbean National Forest) are reviewed. Objective is to draw attention to research needs and to highlight importance of freshwater allocations to natural ecosystems.

  4. Spatial and seasonal dynamics of surface soil carbon in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    Hongqing Wang; Joseph D. Cornell; Charles A.S. Hall; David P. Marley

    2002-01-01

    We developed a spatially-explicit version of the CENTURY soil model to characterize the storage and flux of soil organic carbon (SOC, 0–30 cm depth) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), Puerto Rico as a function of climate, vegetation, and soils. The model was driven by monthly estimates of average air temperature, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration...

  5. Instream-Flow Analysis for the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico: Methods and Analysis

    Treesearch

    F.N. Scatena; S.L. Johnson

    2001-01-01

    This study develops two habitat-based approaches for evaluating instream-flow requirements within the Luquillo Experimental Forest in northeastern Puerto Rico. The analysis is restricted to instream-flow requirements in upland streams dominated by the common communities of freshwater decapods. In headwater streams, pool volume was the most consistent factor...

  6. Research in the Luquillo Experimental Forest has advanced understanding of tropical forests and resolved management issues

    Treesearch

    A.E. Lugo; T. Heartsill Scalley

    2014-01-01

    Long-term research on the response of wet forests in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) to natural and anthropogenic disturbances yielded information useful for the management of these forests and to a better understanding of the functioning of tropical forests and how species composition changes under different distrubance regimes. We summarize studies on basal...

  7. Climate impacts on soil carbon processes along an elevation gradient in the tropical Luquillo Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Dingfang Chen; Mei Yu; Grizelle González; Xiaoming Zou; Qiong Gao

    2017-01-01

    Tropical forests play an important role in regulating the global climate and the carbon cycle. With the changing temperature and moisture along the elevation gradient, the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Northeastern Puerto Rico provides a natural approach to understand tropical forest ecosystems under climate change. In this study, we conducted a soil translocation...

  8. Annotated list of the flora of the Bisley Area, luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico 1987 to 1992. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chinea, J.D.; Beymer, R.J.; Sastre de Jesus, I.; Scatena, F.N.

    1993-08-01

    The plant species of the Bisley area were surveyed for several years, mostly as a result of studies conducted under the Long-Term Ecological Research Program of the National Science Foundation. A list was prepared that contains a total of 336 plant species in 255 genera and 102 families of bryophytes and vascular plants. Within these species there are 107 tree species, 20 shrub species, 28 dicotyledonous vines, 86 herbs, 52 bryophytes, and 43 ferns. There are 22 introduced and 314 native species (of the later, 30 are endemic to Puerto Rico). Nine families account for 39 percent of all species found in the Bisley area. Forests of the Bisley area have been classified as subtropical wet forests, lower montane rain forests, and single-dominant forests. The Bisley watersheds are covered by a secondary forest of the tabonuco type (Dacryodes excelsa). This forest type is part of the Dacryodes-Sloanea association of Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and higher elevation islands of the Lesser Antilles.

  9. Predicting the temporal and spatial probability of orographic cloud cover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico using generalized linear (mixed) models.

    Treesearch

    Wei Wu; Charlesb Hall; Lianjun Zhang

    2006-01-01

    We predicted the spatial pattern of hourly probability of cloud cover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in North-Eastern Puerto Rico using four different models. The probability of cloud cover (defined as “the percentage of the area covered by clouds in each pixel on the map” in this paper) at any hour and any place is a function of three topographic variables...

  10. Research History and Opportunities in the Luquillo Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Sandra Brown; Ariel E. Lugo; Susan Silander; Leon Liegel

    1983-01-01

    Tropical forests account for about 50% of the world's total forest area and tropical countries have a total population of about one billion people. Today many of the tropical forests are being subjected to high rates of deforestation because of the increased demand for agricultural land and fuel by the increasing human population. Management of forest areas in...

  11. Water Withdrawn From the Luquillo Experimental Forest, 2004

    Treesearch

    Kelly E. Crook; Fred N. Scatena; Catherine M. Pringle

    2007-01-01

    This study quantifies the amount of water withdrawn from the Luqillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in 2004. Spatially averaged mean monthly water budgets were generated for watersheds draining the LEF by combining long-term data from various government agencies with estimated extraction data. Results suggest that, on a typical day, 70 percent of water generated within the...

  12. Avian studies and research opportunities in the Luquillo Experimental Forest: a tropical rain forest in Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Joseph Wunderle, Jr; Wayne J. Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) located on the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico has a rich history of ecological research, including a variety of avian studies, and is one of the most active ecological research sites in the Neotropics. The LEF spans an elevational range from 100 to 1075mover which five life zones and four forest types are found in a warm, humid...

  13. Variation in nutrient characteristics of surface soils from the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico: A multivariate perspective.

    Treesearch

    S. B. Cox; M. R. Willig; F. N. Scatena

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the effects of landscape features (vegetation type and topography), season, and spatial hierarchy on the nutrient content of surface soils in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) of Puerto Rico. Considerable spatial variation characterized the soils of the LEF, and differences between replicate sites within each combination of vegetation type (tabonuco vs...

  14. Temporal and spatial stability of red-tailed hawk territories in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boal, C.W.; Snyder, H.A.; Bibles, Brent D.; Estabrook, T.S.

    2003-01-01

    We mapped Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) territories in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) of Puerto Rico in 1998. We combined our 1998 data with that collected during previous studies of Red-tailed Hawks in the LEF to examine population numbers and spatial stability of territorial boundaries over a 26-yr period. We also investigated potential relationships between Red-tailed Hawk territory sizes and topographic and climatic factors. Mean size of 16 defended territories during 1998 was 124.3 ?? 12.0 ha, which was not significantly different from our calculations of mean territory sizes derived from data collected in 1974 and 1984. Aspect and slope influenced territory size with the smallest territories having high slope and easterly aspects. Territory size was small compared to that reported for other parts of the species' range. In addition, there was remarkably little temporal change in the spatial distribution, area, and boundaries of Red-tailed Hawk territories among the study periods. Further, there was substantial boundary overlap (21-27%) between defended territories among the different study periods. The temporal stability of the spatial distribution of Red-tailed Hawk territories in the study area leads us to believe the area might be at or near saturation.

  15. Denudation rates determined from the accumulation of in situ-produced 10Be in the luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Erik Thorson; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Raisbeck, Grant M.; Yiou, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    We present a simple method for estimation of long-term mean denudation rates using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sediments. Procedures are discussed to account for the effects of soil bioturbation, mass wasting and attenuation of cosmic rays by biomass and by local topography. Our analyses of 10Be in quartz from bedrock outcrops, soils, mass-wasting sites and riverine sediment from the Icacos River basin in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, are used to characterize denudation for major landform elements in that basin. The 10Be concentration of a discharge-weighted average of size classes of river sediment corresponds to a long-term average denudation of ≈ 43 m Ma −1, consistent with mass balance results. 

  16. Histories of Puerto Rican parrot nests in the Caribbean National Forest/Luquillo Experimental Forest, 1973-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wunderle, J.M.; Snyder, N.F.R.; Muiznieks, B.; Wiley, J.W.; Meyers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    This publication summarizes the histories of all known Puerto Rican parrot nests in the Caribbean National Forest/Luquillo Experimental Forest from 1973 through 2000. Included for each nest, when known, are the identifies of the pair, clutch size, known fertile and infertile eggs, number of eggs that hatched, number of chicks that survived, sources of mortality, fostering (source, destination. or both), number of young fledged from the pair and from the nest, and percentage of days the nest was guarded. This information is useful for detecting and assessing potential changes in reproductive output and nest threats and is fundamental for understanding some of the demographic and genetic factors influencing the wild parrot population.

  17. Probing the deep critical zone beneath the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, Heather; Brantley, S. L.; Scatena, Fred; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Blum, Alex; Schulz, M; Jimenez, M; White, Art; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that weathering processes occurring in the subsurface produce the majority of silicate weathering products discharged to the world s oceans, thereby exerting a primary control on global temperature via the well-known positive feedback between silicate weathering and CO2. In addition, chemical and physical weathering processes deep within the critical zone create aquifers and control groundwater chemistry, watershed geometry and regolith formation rates. Despite this, most weathering studies are restricted to the shallow critical zone (e.g., soils, outcrops). Here we investigate the chemical weathering, fracturing and geomorphology of the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico, from two boreholes drilled to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth, from which continuous core samples were taken. Corestones exposed aboveground were also sampled. Weathered rinds developed on exposed corestones and along fracture surfaces on subsurface rocks slough off of exposed corestones once rinds attain a thickness up to ~1 cm, preventing the corestones from rounding due to diffusion limitation. Such corestones at the land surface are assumed to be what remains after exhumation of similar, fractured bedrock pieces that were observed in the drilled cores between thick layers of regolith. Some of these subsurface corestones are massive and others are highly fractured, whereas aboveground corestones are generally massive with little to no apparent fracturing. Subsurface corestones are larger and less fractured in the borehole drilled on a road where it crosses a ridge compared to the borehole drilled where the road crosses the stream channel. Both borehole profiles indicate that the weathering zone extends to well below the stream channel in this upland catchment; hence weathering depth is not controlled by the stream level within the catchment and not all of the water in the watershed is discharged to the stream.

  18. Probing the deep critical zone beneath the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buss, Heather L.; Brantley, Susan L.; Scatena, Fred; Bazilevskaya, Katya; Blum, Alex E.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Jiménez, Rafael; White, Arthur F.; Rother, G.; Cole, D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that weathering processes occurring in the subsurface produce the majority of silicate weathering products discharged to the world's oceans, thereby exerting a primary control on global temperature via the well-known positive feedback between silicate weathering and CO2. In addition, chemical and physical weathering processes deep within the critical zone create aquifers and control groundwater chemistry, watershed geometry and regolith formation rates. Despite this, most weathering studies are restricted to the shallow critical zone (e.g. soils, outcrops). Here we investigate the chemical weathering, fracturing and geomorphology of the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico, from two boreholes drilled to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth, from which continuous core samples were taken. Corestones exposed aboveground were also sampled. Weathered rinds developed on exposed corestones and along fracture surfaces on subsurface rocks slough off of exposed corestones once rinds attain a thickness up to ~1 cm, preventing the corestones from rounding due to diffusion limitation. Such corestones at the land surface are assumed to be what remains after exhumation of similar, fractured bedrock pieces that were observed in the drilled cores between thick layers of regolith. Some of these subsurface corestones are massive and others are highly fractured, whereas aboveground corestones are generally massive with little to no apparent fracturing. Subsurface corestones are larger and less fractured in the borehole drilled on a road where it crosses a ridge compared with the borehole drilled where the road crosses the stream channel. Both borehole profiles indicate that the weathering zone extends to well below the stream channel in this upland catchment; hence weathering depth is not controlled by the stream level within the catchment and not all of the water in the watershed is discharged to the stream

  19. WATERSHED SCALE RAINFALL INTERCEPTION ON TWO FORESTED WATERSHEDS IN THE LUQUILLO MOUNTAINS OF PUERTO RICO

    Treesearch

    F.N. SCATENA

    1990-01-01

    Interception losses were monitored for one year and related to vegetation characteristics in two forested watersheds in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico. Total watershed interception was then modeled by weighting values of throughfall measured in representative areas of different vegetation types by the total watershed area of that vegetation group....

  20. Non-indigenous bamboo along headwater streams of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: leaf fall, aquatic leaf decay and patterns of invasion

    Treesearch

    PAUL J. O' CONNOR; ALAN P. COVICH; F. N. SCATENA; LLOYD L. LOOPE

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of bamboo to montane rain forests of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico in the 1930s and 1940s has led to present-day bamboo monocultures in numerous riparian areas. When a non-native species invades a riparian ecosystem, in-stream detritivores can be affected. Bamboo dynamics expected to in¯uence stream communities in the Luquillo Experimental Forest...

  1. Spatial modelling of evapotranspiration in the Luquillo experimental forest of Puerto Rico using remotely-sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Hall, Charles A. S.; Scatena, Frederick N.; Quackenbush, Lindi J.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryActual evapotranspiration (aET) and related processes in tropical forests can explain 70% of the lateral global energy transport through latent heat, and therefore are very important in the redistribution of water on the Earth's surface [Mauser, M., Schädlich, S., 1998. Modelling the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration on different scales using remote sensing data. J. Hydrol. 212-213, 250-267]. Unfortunately, there are few spatial studies of these processes in tropical forests. This research integrates one Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) image and three Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images with a hydrological model [Granger, R.J., Gray, D.M., 1989. Evaporation from natural nonsaturated surfaces. J. Hydrol. 111, 21-29] to estimate the spatial pattern of aET over the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) - a tropical forest in northeastern Puerto Rico - for the month of January, the only month that these remotely sensed images were acquired. The derived aETs ranged from 0 to 7.22 mm/day with a mean of 3.08 ± 1.35 mm/day which were comparable to other estimates. Simulated aET was highest in the low elevation forest and decreased progressively toward higher elevations. Because of differences in solar radiation at different elevations, aspects and topographic positions, aET tended to be higher on south slopes and along ridges than on north slopes and in valleys. In addition, the Bowen ratio (the ratio of sensible heat to latent heat) varied across different vegetation types and increased with elevation, thus reflecting differences in the distribution of net solar radiation incident on the earth's surface. Over a day, the highest simulated aET occurred at around noon. We also applied this model to simulate the average monthly aET over an entire year based on the cloud patterns derived from at least two MODIS images for each month. The highest simulated aET occurred in February and March and the lowest in May. These observations are

  2. Slopewash, surface runoff and fine-litter transport in forest and landslide scars in humid-tropical steeplands, Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, M.C.; Torres-Sanchez, A. J.; Concepcion, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Rainfall, slopewash (the erosion of soil particles), surface runoff and fine-litter transport at humid-tropical steepland sites in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico (18??20' N, 65??45' W) were measured from 1991 to 1995. Hillslopes underlain by (1) Cretaceous tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone in subtropical rain (tabonuco) forest with vegetation recovering from Hurricane Hugo (1989), and (2) Tertiary quartz diorite in subtropical lower montane wet (colorado and dwarf) forest with undisturbed forest canopy were compared to recent landslide scars. Monthly surface runoff on these very steep hillslopes (24??to 43??) was only 0.2 to 0.5 per cent of monthly rainfall. Slopewash was higher in sandy loam soils whose parent material is quartz diorite (averaging 46 g m-2 a-1) than in silty clay loam soils derived from tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone where the average was 9 g m-2 a-1. Annual slopewash of 100 to 349 g m-2 on the surfaces of two recent, small landslide scars was measured initially but slopewash decreased to only 3 to 4 g m-2 a-1 by the end of the study. The mean annual mass of fine litter (mainly leaves and twigs) transported downslope at the forested sites ranged from 5 to 8 g m-2 and was lower at the tabonuco forest site, where post-Hurricane Hugo recovery is still in progress. Mean annual fine-litter transport was 2.5 g m-2 on the two landslide scars.

  3. Changes in home range of breeding and post-breeding male Pearly-eyed Thrashers in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Jose William Beltran; Joseph M. Wunderle, Jr.; Wayne J. Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Food abundance, time of year, and stage of the reproductive cycle are important factors affecting home range size in birds. Between 23 January and 28 November 2003, we determined the home range and core area sizes for 10 radio-tagged male Pearly-eyed Thrashers (Margarops fuscatus; Mimidae) within the Luquillo Experimental Forest, northeastern Puerto Rico. We found...

  4. Effects of hurricane disturbance on stream water concentrations and fluxes in eight tropical forest watersheds of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    DOUGLAS. A. SCHAEFER; WILLIAM H. McDOWELL; FREDRICK N. SCATENA; CLYDE E. ASBURY

    2000-01-01

    Stream water chemistry responds substantially to watershed disturbances, but hurricane effects have not been extensively investigated in tropical regions. This study presents a long-term (2.5±11 y) weekly record of stream water chemistry on eight forested watersheds (catchment basins) in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. This includes a period before and at least...

  5. The Luquillo Mountains: forest resources and their history

    Treesearch

    P. L. Weaver

    2012-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the El Yunque National Forest, which is also designated as Luquillo Experimental Forest, in northeastern Puerto Rico. The principal topics include the environmental setting (geology, soils, and climate), environmental gradients, arborescent flora, vertebrate fauna, and forest management (i.e., plantations, silvicultural operations,...

  6. Culvert flow in small drainages in montane tropical forests: observations from the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    F. N. Scatena

    1990-01-01

    This paper describe the hydraulics of unsubmerged flow for 5 culverts in the Luiquillo Esperimental Forest of Puerto Rico. A General equation based on empirical data is presented to estimate culvert discharge during unsubmerged conditions. Large culverts are needed in humid tropical montane areas than in humid temperatute watersheds and are usually appropriate only...

  7. Forest structure and composition in the lower montane rain forest of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Peter L. Weaver

    2010-01-01

    Six groups of three plots stratified by aspect and topography and varying in elevation were used to sample forest structure and tree species composition within the lower montane rain forest (tabonuco forest) of the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in Puerto Rico. Stem density, tree height, and total above ground biomass varied by site. Significant differences in...

  8. An assessment of climate change in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    F. N. Scatena

    1998-01-01

    Change in the surface temperature of the coastal plain of 1 to 2C and/or a 11 to 33% change in annual rainfall could dramatically alter the distribution of forest vegetation within the Luquillo Experimental Forest(LEF) of northeastern Puerto Rico.

  9. Controls on spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide fluxes across a tropical rainforest ecosystem in the Luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSwiney, Claire Patricia

    1999-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a trace gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and participates in the reactions that destroy stratospheric ozone. Soil microbial processes are significant producers of this trace gas, particularly in tropical areas, which are considered major sources in the global N2O budget. Nitrous oxide fluxes to the atmosphere are variable in space and time. In this study, spatial and temporal variability in surface N2O fluxes were assessed as well as the major environmental controls on N2O production for a tropical rainforest watershed in northeastern Puerto Rico. A static chamber technique was used to assess surface fluxes and soil air probes were installed at different depths to determine soil concentrations of N2O, methane (CH4), and oxygen (O2). Suction lysimeters were installed to sample soil water for the concentrations of the major regulators of the production of N2O, specifically, nitrate (NO3-), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and ammonium (NH4+). Water table heights were monitored manually over the course of the study. Patterns in surface N2O flux across three topographic sequences were stable through time. The three sequences had similar flux rates in aerobic, slope environments and the streambank, however, they differed in anaerobic, riparian environments. The greatest fluxes in two of the sites and lowest fluxes in the third site occurred at the junction between the slope and the riparian zone. In one of the sites, the slope-riparian break was where soil water NO3- and DOC concentrations decreased precipitously. Soil N2O concentrations were greatest in probes that had intermediate O2 concentrations. Over the course of storm events, there were no drastic changes in N2 O fluxes or the concentrations of the controllers of its production in the break between the slope and the riparian zone. Redox status is helpful in predicting where N2O fluxes will occur on the landscape, with sites that are intermediate in O2 status having the highest

  10. Reassessing rainfall in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Local and global ecohydrological implications

    Treesearch

    Sheila F. Murphy; Robert F. Stallard; Martha A. Scholl; Grizelle Gonzalez; Angel J. Torres-Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Mountains receive a greater proportion of precipitation than other environments, and thus make a disproportionate contribution to the world’s water supply. The Luquillo Mountains receive the highest rainfall on the island of Puerto Rico and serve as a critical source of water to surrounding communities. The area’s role as a long-term research site has generated...

  11. Non-indigenous bamboo along headwater streams of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Leaf fall, aquatic leaf decay and patterns of invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, P. J.; Covich, A.P.; Scatena, F.N.; Loope, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of bamboo to montane rain forests of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico in the 1930s and 1940s has led to present-day bamboo monocultures in numerous riparian areas. When a non-native species invades a riparian ecosystem, in-stream detritivores can be affected. Bamboo dynamics expected to influence stream communities in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) were examined. Based on current distributions, bamboo has spread down-stream at a rate of 8 m y-1. Mean growth rate of bamboo culms was 15.3 cm d-1. Leaf fall from bamboo stands exceeded that of native mixed-species forest by c. 30% over a 10-mo study. Bamboo leaves (k = -0.021), and leaves from another abundant riparian exotic, Syzygium jambos (Myrtaceae) (k = -0.018), decayed at relatively slow rates when submerged in streams in fine-mesh bags which excluded macro-invertebrate leaf processors. In a second study, with leaf processors present, bamboo decay rates remained unchanged (k = -0.021), while decay rates of S. jambos increased (k = -0.037). Elemental losses from bamboo leaves in streams were rapid, further suggesting a change in riparian zone/stream dynamics following bamboo invasion. As non-indigenous bamboos spread along Puerto Rico streams, they are likely to alter aquatic communities dependent on leaf input.

  12. Basal area growth for 15 tropical trees species in Puerto Rico. Forest

    Treesearch

    B. R. Parresol

    1995-01-01

    The tabonuco forest of Puerto Rico support a diverse population of tree species valued for timber, fuel, food, wildlife food and cover, and erosion control among other use. tree basal area growth data spanning 39 years are avaible on 15 species from eigth permanent plots in Luquillo Experimental Forest. The complexity of the rain forest challeges current forest...

  13. Basal area growth for 15 tropical tree species in Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Bernard R. Parresol

    1995-01-01

    The tabonuco forests of Puerto Rico support a diverse population of tree species valued for timber, fuel, food, wildlife food and cover, and erosion control among other uses. Tree basal area growth data spanning 39 years are available on 15 species from eight permanent plots in the Luquillo Experimental Forest. The complexity of the rain forest challenges current...

  14. Insects of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.A.

    1994-07-01

    In this review of the literature on forest entomology in Puerto Rico, emphasis is given to research conducted in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF). This review should serve as an introduction to the insects inhabiting the LEF for researchers and as a guide for the identification of possible insect pests. There are three sections to this review. The first deals with basic insect ecology; the second, forest insect pests; and the third, insect attacks on dry wood and during wood seasoning. The reference section and appendices contain information on the systematics and taxonomy of different insect orders found in Puerto Rico.

  15. Red-tailed Hawk movements and use of habitat in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vilella, Francisco; Nimitz, Wyatt F.

    2012-01-01

    The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is a top predator of upland ecosystems in the Greater Antilles. Little information exists on the ecology of the insular forms of this widely distributed species. We studied movements and resource use of the Red-tailed Hawk from 2000 to 2002 in the montane forests of northeastern Puerto Rico. We captured 32 and used 21 radio-marked Red-tailed Hawks to delineate home range, core area shifts, and macrohabitat use in the Luquillo Mountains. Red-tailed Hawks in the Luquillo Mountains frequently perched near the top of canopy emergent trees and were characterized by wide-ranging capabilities and extensive spatial overlap. Home range size averaged 5,022.6 6 832.1 ha (305–11,288 ha) and core areas averaged 564.8 6 90.7 ha (150–1,230 ha). This species had large mean weekly movements (3,286.2 6 348.5 m) and a preference for roadside habitats. Our findings suggest fragmentation of contiguous forest outside protected areas in Puerto Rico may benefit the Red-tailed Hawk

  16. Early assessment of the trees of the Luquillo Mountains

    Treesearch

    Frank H. Wadsworth

    2009-01-01

    This is a description of the composition of a forest in Puerto Rico almost unique in that it probably had not received human modification. It comes from a 1948 inventory of 4,570 hectares of what today is the El Yunque National Forest in the Luquillo Mountains. The inventory, preparatory to a forest management plan, was a search for sustainable level of timber volume...

  17. ISABELLE. Volume 3. Experimental areas, large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This section presents the papers which resulted from work in the Experimental Areas portion of the Workshop. The immediate task of the group was to address three topics. The topics were dictated by the present state of ISABELLE experimental areas construction, the possibility of a phased ISABELLE and trends in physics and detectors.

  18. Experimental area power monitoring during shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Pathiyil, J.

    1989-03-01

    The power consumption at the site is increasing every year and the power consumption in the fixed target beam lines is constantly changing for each run. Since we do not have an energy monitoring program in effect in the experimental areas; we are not in a position to tell whether we are using the electrical energy efficiently. The purpose of this study is to find the summer and winter base load of the three experimental areas while the beamlines are off and also to identify what kind loads are on. The most important purpose was to find the base loads in each of the big experimental halls during the shutdown.

  19. H.T. Odum and the Luquillo Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Ariel E. Lugo

    2004-01-01

    How does the forest operate, develop its patterns, retain information in its memory sites, and transmit the great message to the future? (Odum, 1970a, p. x) The rain forest achieves complexity, high metabolism, and stability over geological time periods without surges and waste. Can we find in this example the clues for designing our own equally effective systems of...

  20. The new experimental areas oxygen monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Schoo, D.

    1988-08-01

    Because of the nature of the beamline requirements for oxygen monitoring equipment to operate ancillary equipment, such as exhaust fans, doors and cryogenic valves, and because of the well known problems of the oxygen sensors installed in high radiation areas, a new design for sensing the oxygen content of ambient air was needed. A new monitor system was designed to solve these problems and some others that compromised the reliability and the maintenance of the monitoring system. From the operating experience gained with the Accelerator Standard Oxygen Monitor System currently installed in many locations in the experimental area, from suggestions solicited from the Safety Group and from the Cryogenics Group, I designed a new Experimental Areas Standard Oxygen Monitor. Many suggestions were carefully considered and a design that incorporates most of them was constructed. I will summarize a list of the important improvements that will be of interest to the users of the system, and explain how these functions will make the oxygen system easier to live with. 2 figs.

  1. Topographic frequency of trees in the tabonuco forest of the Luquillo Mountains

    Treesearch

    Frank H. Wadsworth

    2009-01-01

    A previous study of tree productivity in the subtropical wet forest of the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico was used to expose the frequency of 12 timber tree species to six different topographic sites, convex versus concave surface, lower versus upper slopes, and windward versus leeward aspects. All but one of the species are found in all six locations and the...

  2. Pre- and Post-Hurricane Fruit Availability: Implications for Puerto Rican Parrots in the Luquillo Mountains.

    Treesearch

    JR WUNDERLE

    1999-01-01

    Fruit availability on 25 plant species, consumed or potentially consumed by the Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata), was studied to document the seasonal and annual variation in fruit production in the Luquillo Mountains. In the 33 months before Hurricane Hugo, an annual cycle in the number of species with ripe fruit was evident, with a peak in October-February and a...

  3. Dwarf forest recovery after disturbances in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    P.L. Weaver

    2008-01-01

    Dwarf forest in Puerto Rico’s Luquillo Mountains varies according to substrate and topography with very short, dense forest growing on exposed, rocky sites. High elevation level sites suffered considerable damage during past hurricanes whereas the trees on certain lower slopes were protected by ridges or spurs. Post-disturbance recovery of dwarf forest on two types of...

  4. Reassessing rainfall in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Local and global ecohydrological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.; Scholl, Martha A.; Gonzalez, Grizelle; Torres-Sanchez, Angel J.

    2017-01-01

    Mountains receive a greater proportion of precipitation than other environments, and thus make a disproportionate contribution to the world’s water supply. The Luquillo Mountains receive the highest rainfall on the island of Puerto Rico and serve as a critical source of water to surrounding communities. The area’s role as a long-term research site has generated numerous hydrological, ecological, and geological investigations that have been included in regional and global overviews that compare tropical forests to other ecosystems. Most of the forest- and watershed-wide estimates of precipitation (and evapotranspiration, as inferred by a water balance) have assumed that precipitation increases consistently with elevation. However, in this new analysis of all known current and historical rain gages in the region, we find that similar to other mountainous islands in the trade wind latitudes, leeward (western) watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains receive lower mean annual precipitation than windward (eastern) watersheds. Previous studies in the Luquillo Mountains have therefore overestimated precipitation in leeward watersheds by up to 40%. The Icacos watershed, however, despite being located at elevations 200–400 m below the tallest peaks and to the lee of the first major orographic barrier, receives some of the highest precipitation. Such lee-side enhancement has been observed in other island mountains of similar height and width, and may be caused by several mechanisms. Thus, the long-reported discrepancy of unrealistically low rates of evapotranspiration in the Icacos watershed is likely caused by previous underestimation of precipitation, perhaps by as much as 20%. Rainfall/runoff ratios in several previous studies suggested either runoff excess or runoff deficiency in Luquillo watersheds, but this analysis suggests that in fact they are similar to other tropical watersheds. Because the Luquillo Mountains often serve as a wet tropical archetype in global

  5. Reassessing rainfall in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Local and global ecohydrological implications

    PubMed Central

    Stallard, Robert F.; Scholl, Martha A.; González, Grizelle; Torres-Sánchez, Angel J.

    2017-01-01

    Mountains receive a greater proportion of precipitation than other environments, and thus make a disproportionate contribution to the world’s water supply. The Luquillo Mountains receive the highest rainfall on the island of Puerto Rico and serve as a critical source of water to surrounding communities. The area’s role as a long-term research site has generated numerous hydrological, ecological, and geological investigations that have been included in regional and global overviews that compare tropical forests to other ecosystems. Most of the forest- and watershed-wide estimates of precipitation (and evapotranspiration, as inferred by a water balance) have assumed that precipitation increases consistently with elevation. However, in this new analysis of all known current and historical rain gages in the region, we find that similar to other mountainous islands in the trade wind latitudes, leeward (western) watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains receive lower mean annual precipitation than windward (eastern) watersheds. Previous studies in the Luquillo Mountains have therefore overestimated precipitation in leeward watersheds by up to 40%. The Icacos watershed, however, despite being located at elevations 200–400 m below the tallest peaks and to the lee of the first major orographic barrier, receives some of the highest precipitation. Such lee-side enhancement has been observed in other island mountains of similar height and width, and may be caused by several mechanisms. Thus, the long-reported discrepancy of unrealistically low rates of evapotranspiration in the Icacos watershed is likely caused by previous underestimation of precipitation, perhaps by as much as 20%. Rainfall/runoff ratios in several previous studies suggested either runoff excess or runoff deficiency in Luquillo watersheds, but this analysis suggests that in fact they are similar to other tropical watersheds. Because the Luquillo Mountains often serve as a wet tropical archetype in global

  6. Chemical weathering in a tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: II. Rate and mechanism of biotite weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, S.F.; Brantley, S.L.; Blum, A.E.; White, A.F.; Dong, H.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of soil, saprolite, bedrock, and porewater from a lower montane wet forest, the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in Puerto Rico, were studied to investigate the rates and mechanisms of biotite weathering. The soil profile, at the top of a ridge in the Rio Icacos watershed, consists of a 50-100-cm thick layer of unstructured soil above a 600-800 cm thick saprolite developed on quartz diorite. The only minerals present in significant concentration within the soil and saprolite are biotite, quartz, kaolinite, and iron oxides. Biotite is the only primary silicate releasing significant K and Mg to porewaters. Although biotite in samples of the quartz diorite bedrock is extensively chloritized, chlorite is almost entirely absent in the saprolite phyllosilicates. Phyllosilicate grains are present as 200-1000 ??m wide books below about 50 cm depth. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analyses indicate that the phyllosilicate grains contain a core of biotite surrounded by variable amounts of kaolinite. Lattice fringe images under transmission electron microscope (TEM) show single layers of biotite altering to two layers of kaolinite, suggesting dissolution of biotite and precipitation of kaolinite at discrete boundaries. Some single 14-A?? layers are also observed in the biotite under TEM. The degree of kaolinitization of individual phyllosilicate grains as observed by TEM decreases with depth in the saprolite. This TEM work is the first such microstructural evidence of epitaxial growth of kaolinite onto biotite during alteration in low-temperature environments. The rate of release of Mg in the profile, calculated as a flux through the soil normalized per watershed land area, is approximately 500 mol hectare-1 yr-1 (1.6 ?? 10-9 molMg m-2soil s-1). This rate is similar to the flux estimated from Mg discharge out the Rio Icacos (1000 mol hectare-1 yr-1, or 3.5 ?? 10-9 molMg m-2soil s-1), indicating that scaling up from the soil to the watershed is

  7. The Relative Importance of Convective and Trade-wind Orographic Precipitation to Streamflow in the Luquillo Mountains, Eastern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.; Occhi, M.; Scatena, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Like many mountainous areas in the tropics, watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico (18.3° N) have abundant rainfall and stream discharge, but relatively little storage capacity. Therefore, the water supply is vulnerable to drought and water availability may be affected by projected changes in regional temperature and atmospheric dynamics due to global warming. To help determine the links between climate and water availability, precipitation patterns were analyzed, and stable-isotope signatures of precipitation from different seasonal weather systems were established to identify those that are most important in maintaining streamflow and groundwater recharge. Stable isotope data include cloud water, rainfall, throughfall, streamflow, and groundwater from the Rio Mameyes and Rio Icacos/ Rio Blanco watersheds. Precipitation inputs have a wide range of stable isotope values, from fog/cloud water with δ2H and δ18O averaging +3.2‰, -1.74‰ respectively, to tropical storm rain with values as low as -154‰, -20.4‰. Spatial and temporal patterns of water isotopic values on this Caribbean island are different than higher latitude, continental watersheds. The data exhibit a 'reverse seasonality', with higher isotopic values in winter and lower values in summer; and stable isotope values of stream water do not decrease as expected with increasing altitude, because of cloud water input. Rain isotopic values vary predictably with local and mesoscale weather patterns and correlate strongly with cloud altitude. This correlation allows us to assign isotopic signatures to different sources of precipitation, and to investigate which climate patterns contribute to streamflow and groundwater recharge. At a measurement site at 615 m in the Luquillo Mountains, the average length of time between rain events was 15 h, and 45% of the rain events were <2 mm, reflecting the frequent small rain events of the trade-wind orographic rainfall weather pattern. Long

  8. Chemical weathering in a tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: I. Long-term versus short-term weathering fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Blum, A.E.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Larsen, M.; Murphy, S.F.; Eberl, D.

    1998-01-01

    The pristine Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Mountains in eastern Puerto Rico has the fastest documented weathering rate of silicate rocks on the Earth's surface. A regolith propagation rate of 58 m Ma-1 calculated from iso-volumetric saprolite formation from quartz diorite, is comparable to the estimated denudation rate (25-50 Ma-1) but is an order of magnitude faster than the global average weathering rate (6 Ma-1). Weathering occurs in two distinct environments; plagioclase and hornblende react at the saprock interface and biotite and quartz weather in the overlying thick saprolitic regolith. These environments produce distinctly different water chemistries, with K, Mg, and Si increasing linearly with depth in saprolite porewaters and with stream waters dominated by Ca, Na, and Si. Such differences are atypical of less intense weathering in temperate watersheds. Porewater chemistry in the shallow regolith is controlled by closed-system recycling of inorganic nutrients such as K. Long-term elemental fluxes through the regolith (e.g., Si = 1.7 ?? 10-8 moles m-2 s-1) are calculated from mass losses based on changes in porosity and chemistry between the regolith and bedrock and from the age of the regolith surface (200 Ma). Mass losses attributed to solute fluxes are determined using a step-wise infiltration model which calculates mineral inputs to the shallow and deep saprolite porewaters and to stream water. Pressure heads decrease with depth in the shallow regolith (-2.03 m H2O m-1), indicating that both increasing capillary tension and graviometric potential control porewater infiltration. Interpolation of experimental hydraulic conductivities produces an infiltration rate of 1 m yr-1 at average field moisture saturation which is comparable with LiBr tracer tests and with base discharge from the watershed. Short term weathering fluxes calculated from solute chemistries and infiltration rates (e.g., Si = 1.4 ?? 10-8 moles m-2 s-1) are compared to watershed

  9. Experimental fatigue curves for aluminium brazed areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitescu, A.; Babiş, C.; Niţoi, D. F.; Radu, C.

    2017-08-01

    An important factor for the quality of joints is the brazed area. The fatigue check occupies a major position among many test procedures and methods, especially by the joining technologies. The results of processing the fatigue data experiments for aluminium brazed samples are used to find the regression function and the response surface methodology. The fatigue process of mechanical components under service loading is stochastic in nature. The prediction of time-dependent fatigue reliability is critical for the design and maintenance planning of many structural components.

  10. Comparing experimental and simulated pressure-area isotherms for DPPC.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Susan L; Larson, Ronald G

    2008-04-15

    Although pressure-area isotherms are commonly measured for lipid monolayers, it is not always appreciated how much they can vary depending on experimental factors. Here, we compare experimental and simulated pressure-area isotherms for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at temperatures ranging between 293.15 K and 323.15 K, and explore possible factors influencing the shape and position of the isotherms. Molecular dynamics simulations of DPPC monolayers using both coarse-grained (CG) and atomistic models yield results that are in rough agreement with some of the experimental isotherms, but with a steeper slope in the liquid-condensed region than seen experimentally and shifted to larger areas. The CG lipid model gives predictions that are very close to those of atomistic simulations, while greatly improving computational efficiency. There is much more variation among experimental isotherms than between isotherms obtained from CG simulations and from the most refined simulation available. Both atomistic and CG simulations yield liquid-condensed and liquid-expanded phase area compressibility moduli that are significantly larger than those typically measured experimentally, but compare well with some experimental values obtained under rapid compression.

  11. Tree species distribution and forest structure along environmental gradients in the dwarf forest of the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Peter L. Weaver

    2010-01-01

    Eleven groups of three plots stratified by aspect (windward vs. leeward) and topography (ridge, slope, and ravine) and varying in elevation from 880 to about 1,000 metres were used to sample forest structure and species composition within the dwarf forest of the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Stem density to windward was significantly greater on slopes, andf or all...

  12. Land-cover composition, water resources and land management in the watersheds of the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    Tamara Heartsill Scalley; Tania del M. Lopez-Marrero

    2014-01-01

    An important element of the wise use of water-related ecosystem services provided by El Yunque National Forest, located in the Luquillo Mountains in northeastern Puerto Rico, is the facilitation of a clear understanding about the composition of land cover and its relation to water resources at different scales of analysis, management, and decision making. In this study...

  13. Differential abundance of microbial functional groups along the elevation gradient from the coast to the Luquillo Mountains

    Treesearch

    Sharon A. Cantrell; D. Jean Lodge; Carlos A. Cruz; Luis M. García; Jose R. Pérez-Jiménez; Marirosa. Molina

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities respond to multiple abiotic and biotic factors that change along elevation gradients. We compare changes in microbial community composition in soil and review previous research on differential abundance of microbial functional groups along an elevation gradient in eastern Puerto Rico. Previous studies within the Luquillo Mountains showed that...

  14. Lack of Ecotypic Differentiation: Plant Response to Elevation, Population Origin, and Wind in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Ned Fetcher; Roberto A. Cordero; Janice Voltzow

    2000-01-01

    How important is ecotypic differentiation along elevational gradients in the tropics? Reciprocal transplants of two shrubs, Clibadium erosum (Asteraceae) and Psychotria berteriana (Rubiaceae), and a palm, Prestoea acuminata var. montana (Palmaceae), were used to test for the effect of environment and population origin on growth and physiology in the Luquillo...

  15. Particle mobility over flood and annual timescales in mountain streams of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. B.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Linking the mechanics of fluvial and hillslope processes is critical for understanding how landscapes are sculpted. Over short timescales, the rate of bed load transport in mountain streams is determined by transport mechanics: channel hydraulics, bed configuration, and the intensity of flow events. At larger timescales, the rate of bed load transport represents the supply of coarse-grained sediment from hillslopes. Linking the mechanics of event-scale bed load transport to longer duration bed load transport rates is necessary for understanding mountain stream dynamics. We present a unique dataset using passive integrated transponder radio frequency identification (PIT RFID) tagged tracer particles in three streams in the humid tropical region of Northeast Puerto Rico. This region receives an average of four meters of precipitation per year. Importantly, precipitation occurs in short duration, high intensity events that are capable of mobilizing coarse sediment multiple times per year. Although landslides and debris flows are active in the area, most river reaches show strong evidence of being organized by bed load transport. The high frequency of cobble/boulder transport makes Luquillo an ideal location to study bed load transport in mountain streams. Tracer particles (375 total) were placed during the summers of 2010 and 2011 in three reaches within the Mameyes river catchment with slopes and drainage areas ranging from .007-.09 and .028-24.2 km2 respectively. Grain size distributions of the median grain diameter for the three study reaches range from 2-1100 mm. Grain size distributions of the tracer particles were picked to match that of the study reach grain size distribution greater than 50 mm. Hydrodynamic forcing was parameterized using a time series of Shields stress, estimated for each reach from nearby USGS stream gaging stations. Tracer particle transport distances were recorded following single events, and on a yearly basis. At the single-flood scale

  16. Apatite Weathering and Phosphorus Availability in Deep Regolith, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, H. L.; Williams, J. Z.; White, A. F.; Brantley, S. L.

    2007-05-01

    Rapid weathering and erosion rates in mountainous tropical watersheds lead to highly variable soil and saprolite thicknesses which in turn impact nutrient fluxes and biological populations. Here we investigate the weathering of primary minerals containing iron and phosphorous and the role of resident microorganisms in the cycling of these elements in the deep regolith of the Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, a tropical montane rainforest in northeastern Puerto Rico. In the Rio Icacos watershed, which has one of the fastest documented chemical weathering rates of granitic rocks in the world, the quartz diorite bedrock weathers spheroidally, producing a complex interface comprised of partially weathered rock layers called rindlets. This rindlet zone (about 0.2-3 m thick) is overlain by saprolite (2-8 m) topped by soil (0.5-1 m). Samples were taken from cores augered to 7.5 m on a ridgetop. The profile included about 5 m of regolith (soil \\p saprolite), and more than 2.5 m of rindlets. A 0.5 m thick rindlet zone was also sampled in a nearby roadcut. Weathering reactions of primary minerals were examined in thin sections made from rindlets. Total chemistry was measured on all solid samples and Fe, Fe(II), and P were measured in 0.1 M NaOH and 0.5 M HCl extractions performed on augered samples. NaOH-extractable P was assumed to include inorganic and organic P that is bioavailable on both short and long timescales including P associated with secondary Fe(III)- (hydro)oxides. Concentrations of NaOH-extractable P are very low throughout the regolith but increase significantly in the rindlet zone (below 5 m depth). Residual P, believed to include primary apatite and occluded, resistant organic and inorganic forms of P, generally increases with depth. Below 5 m depth, this fraction of P is near zero. Solid-state reaction rates can be calculated for minerals in a weathering profile from the elemental distribution in the profile. Here we quantify a

  17. Tracing Terrestrial Silica Cycling Using Ge/Si Ratios, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, A. C.; Derry, L. A.; Troester, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Ge/Si ratios are fractionated by several processes in the weathering environment, potentially providing insight on silicate weathering processes and providing a tracer of Si sources in streamwater. We are analyzing Ge/Si ratios in soils, soilwaters, streams, and plants from the USGS Luquillo Water, Energy and Biogeochemical Budgets research watershed in Puerto Rico in an effort to apply this tracer system to granitoid weathering in a tropical environment. This system has many features in common with our previous work in the Hawaiian Islands, but the mineralogy here is more complex and more globally representative. Bedrock is a quartz diorite pluton with a Ge/Si ratio of 2.4 μ mol/mol. Soil and saprolite ratios range from 2.6 to 3.6 μ mol/mol. Soil Ge/Si ratios are lower than ratios measured in basaltic soils due to the accumulation of primary quartz with a low (0.5 μ mol/mol) Ge/Si ratio. Soil kaolinite has a Ge/Si ratio of 5.9 μ mol/mol demonstrating preferential partitioning of Ge into secondary soil clays. Nine common plant species were sampled from the Luquillo site to investigate the role of plants in the terrestrial silica cycle. Many plant species contain abundant opal phytoliths (as much as 4.4 wt% SiO2 in aboveground biomass). Consistent with our work in Hawaii, plant phytolith opal at Luquillo has very low Ge/Si ratios (0.05 to 0.6 μ mol/mol). Recycling of phytolith opal likely explains surface (top 20 cm) maxima in soil-saprolite porewater [Si] profiles measured in lysimeter samples. Globally, most streams have Ge/Si ratios that vary with discharge and can be explained by mixing of a low-Ge/Si, high [Si] component, and a high Ge/Si, low [Si] component. Our prior work in Hawaii suggests that the low Ge/Si ratios commonly seen in streams reflect a contribution of plant-cycled Si that is particularly important at base flow. We will test this model with samples collected this fall by automatic streamwater samplers during storm events at two gauged

  18. Case Studies of Ecological Integrative Information Systems: The Luquillo and Sevilleta Information Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Gil, Inigo; White, Marshall; Melendez, Eda; Vanderbilt, Kristin

    The thirty-year-old United States Long Term Ecological Research Network has developed extensive metadata to document their scientific data. Standard and interoperable metadata is a core component of the data-driven analytical solutions developed by this research network Content management systems offer an affordable solution for rapid deployment of metadata centered information management systems. We developed a customized integrative metadata management system based on the Drupal content management system technology. Building on knowledge and experience with the Sevilleta and Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research sites, we successfully deployed the first two medium-scale customized prototypes. In this paper, we describe the vision behind our Drupal based information management instances, and list the features offered through these Drupal based systems. We also outline the plans to expand the information services offered through these metadata centered management systems. We will conclude with the growing list of participants deploying similar instances.

  19. The stable isotope amount effect: New insights from NEXRAD echo tops, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schol, M.A.; Shanley, J.B.; Zegarra, J.P.; Coplen, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotope amount effect has often been invoked to explain patterns of isotopic composition of rainfall in the tropics. This paper describes a new approach, correlating the isotopic composition of precipitation with cloud height and atmospheric temperature using NEXRAD radar echo tops, which are a measure of the maximum altitude of rainfall within the clouds. The seasonal differences in echo top altitudes and their corresponding temperatures are correlated with the isotopic composition of rainfall. These results offer another factor to consider in interpretation of the seasonal variation in isotopic composition of tropical rainfall, which has previously been linked to amount or rainout effects and not to temperature effects. Rain and cloud water isotope collectors in the Luquillo Mountains in northeastern Puerto Rico were sampled monthly for three years and precipitation was analyzed for ??18O and ??2H. Precipitation enriched in , 18O and 2H occurred during the winter dry season (approximately December-May) and was associated with a weather pattern of trade wind showers and frontal systems. During the summer rainy season (approximately June-November), precipitation was depleted in 18O and 2H and originated in low pressure systems and convection associated with waves embedded in the prevailing easterly airflow. Rain substantially depleted in 18O and 2H compared to the aforementioned weather patterns occurred during large low pressure systems. Weather analysis showed that 29% of rain input to the Luquillo Mountains was trade wind orographic rainfall, and 30% of rainfall could be attributed to easterly waves and low pressure systems. Isotopic signatures associated with these major climate patterns can be used to determine their influence on streamflow and groundwater recharge and to monitor possible effects of climate change on regional water resources.

  20. Stream Ammonium Uptake Across Scales in Headwater Catchments of a Tropical Rainforest, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, R. L.; McDowell, W. H.; Wymore, A.

    2015-12-01

    Many tropical forest streams export high amounts of nitrogen relative to streams draining undisturbed watersheds of other biomes. With their low DOC concentrations and high rates of respiration, headwater streams in the Luquillo Mountains have been previously characterized as energy-limited, suggesting that NH4+ uptake is dominated not by N demand but by energy demand. In the Rio Icacos watershed, high concentrations of NH4+ (>1 mg N/L) are found in groundwater adjacent to the streams, making high inputs of NH4+ to the stream channel via groundwater seepage likely. Stream nutrient spiraling metrics can be used to quantify uptake and retention rates of specific nutrients, and can be measured by solute additions. Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization (TASCC) is a recently developed method (Covino et al. 2010) for quantifying nutrient uptake with a single slug addition of nutrient and conservative tracer. Here we present NH4+ uptake metrics from TASCC additions in three Luquillo streams of different sizes, ranging from 2nd to 4th order: the Rio Icacos, a larger, 3rd order tributary and a smaller 2nd order tributary. Background NH4+ concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude, with highest concentrations (27 μg N/L) found in the smaller tributary. Background DOC concentrations are uniformly low and show no difference between the three streams (500-600 μg C/L). The smaller tributary has the shortest uptake length (155 m) and highest uptake velocity (2.9 mm/min) of the three streams. Unexpectedly, the Rio Icacos has a higher uptake velocity (1.7 mm/min) than the larger tributary (1.0 mm/min), despite having an uptake length more than double (1400 m) that of the larger tributary (596 m). Overall, NH4+ uptake is substantial in all three streams and varies with background concentrations, not stream size.

  1. Seven-year responses of trees to experimental hurricane effects in a tropical rainforest, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Jess K. Zimmerman; James Aaron Hogan; Aaron B. Shiels; John E. Bithorn; Samuel Matta Carmona; Nicholas Brokaw

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally manipulated key components of severe hurricane disturbance, canopy openness and detritus deposition, to determine the independent and interactive effects of these components on tree recruitment, forest structure, and diversity in a wet tropical forest in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Canopy openness was increased by trimming branches...

  2. Stormflow generation in a small rainforest catchment in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    J. Schellekens; F. N. Scatena; L.A. Bruijnzee; A. I. J. M. van Dijk; M. M. A. Groen; R. J. P. van Hogezand

    2004-01-01

    Various complementary techniques were used to investigate the stormflow generating processes in a small headwater catchment in northeastern Puerto Rico. Over 100 samples were taken of soil matrix water, macropore flow, streamflow and precipitation, mainly during two storms of contrasting magnitude, for the analysis of calcium, magnesium, silicon, potassium, sodium and...

  3. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM. PMID:27152691

  4. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-09-01

    Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM.

  5. Experimental verification of theoretical model for speckle intensity excursion areas

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, T.L.; Harvey, J.E.; Hefele, D.

    1994-12-31

    Speckle is inherently an interference phenomenon produced when a rough object or turbulent medium introduces some degree of randomness to a reflected or transmitted electromagnetic field. Speckle characteristics are therefore a major concern in many laser imaging or wave propagation applications. For many applications, a detailed description of speckle size as a function of intensity threshold level is desirable. Extensive experimental measurements of average speckle size as a function of intensity threshold level were therefore made for several different targets and illumination conditions. The authors then compare these measurements with a theoretical model for excursion areas of speckle intensity. Excellent agreement is obtained for intensity threshold levels greater than approximately twice the mean intensity level.

  6. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  7. A review on the establishment and research in hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas in China and abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai; Wang, Chuanhai; Hua, Wenjuan

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviewed some specific conceptions of hydrological experimental areas (catchments) while found that the traditional definition of 'catchment' may be difficult to meet in plain areas. According to the review of development history and current situation of hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas in China, 4 stages were shown besides the recent 10 years, i.e., 'golden stage(1952-1966)', 'backward stage(1966-1986)', 'short recovery stage(1986-1989)' and 'stagnant stage(1986-2006)'. It gets new impetus since 2006 with some investigation work promoted by the government. Furthermore, some historic problems during establishing experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas were revealed based on the document literature and a few meaningful lessons were drawn from the past. It was also the first time to collect and classify the details of both 11 representative experimental areas in China and abroad, after that a brief comparison about the measurement level and research directions was made between two regions. Additionally, we took the experimental research work in the plain of Taihu Lake Basin as example and introduced the particular research goals and the corresponding establishing process, including how to design the experimental area, eg, size, location, land use type, arranging the measurement instruments et al. We hope such case can provide a reference for newly-building, recovering and extending hydrological experimental areasin plain areas in the future. Finally, this paper prospected the future development in establishment and research in hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas. It may be more common to see the cooperation between model scientists and field experts. Because of the comprehensive goals in water problems, researchers from various fields would work together in the future experimental research work. Scale study and modelling in plain areas will be a promising branch after some typical experimental areas

  8. Effects of drought and hurricane disturbances on headwater distributions of palaemonid river shrimp (Macrobrachium spp.) in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    Alan P. Covich; Todd A. Crowl; Tamara Heartsill Scalley

    2006-01-01

    Extreme events (hurricanes, floods, and droughts) can influence upstream migration of macroinvertebrates and wash out benthic communities, thereby locally altering food webs and species interactions. We sampled palaemonid river shrimp (Macrobrachium spp.), dominant consumers in headwaters of the Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico, to determine their...

  9. Changes in necromass and nutrients on the forest floor of a palm floodplain forest in the Luquillo mountains of Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    ARIEL E. LUGO; JORGE L. FRANGI

    2003-01-01

    We studied changes that occurred between 1980 and 2000 in forest floor biomass (necromass+ biomass of herbaceous plants), nutrient stocks, and plant composition of a Prestoea montana floodplain forest. The forest was located in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Several storms and hurricanes passed near the study site during that period, the most severe being...

  10. Experimental observation of plastic deformation areas, using an acoustic microscope.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, I; Semba, T; Kanda, H; Katakura, K; Tani, Y; Sato, H

    1989-01-01

    Novel techniques are described for the observation of plastic deformation areas by using an acoustic microscope. On a test piece subjected to plastic deformation, an area was found that had an abnormal contrast in the crystal grain and a pointed end at the V notch. Calculation of the propagation velocity of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) showed a difference of several percent between this area and the rest of the test piece. It has been presumed that this difference reflects the local plastic deformation, and that the abnormal contrast area corresponds to the image of the two-dimensionally distributed plastic deformation area of metals.

  11. Linking geomorphology, weathering and cation availability in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porder, S.; Johnson, A. H.; Xing, H.; Brocard, G. Y.; Goldsmith, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    have ˜2x more again. The isotopic composition of exchangeable strontium suggests the high Ca stocks near the knickpoint are mostly (˜80%) derived from primary mineral weathering, whereas above the knickpoint exchangeable Ca is supplied by atmospheric deposition (˜70%). These data demonstrate that regional uplift, lithology, weathering, atmospheric inputs and forest communities combine to shape cation availability across the Luquillo landscape, and we hypothesize similar interactions are important in other montane tropical forests.

  12. Testing the 234U/238U weathering tracer in a tropical granitoid watershed, Luquillo, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Derry, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies have employed U-series disequilibria as a tracer of both weathering profile development and of timescale of erosion for whole watersheds. We have undertaken a detailed analysis of the behavior of the U- series isotopes in a previously well-characterized watershed in order to test this approach. In the Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico, previous studies have determined both the rate of propagation of the chemical weathering front by regolith mass balance analysis, and the surface denudation rate using the cosmogenic 10Be tracer. Our study aims to determine whether the U-series approach provides regolith development and erosion rates in agreement with those previously determined. In order to better constrain interpretations based on U-series data, we have coupled the U-series analysis with analyses of trace element concentrations, δ^{30}Si, Ge/Si, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Used together, these geochemical tracers provide a powerful tool for understanding weathering reactions, chemical transfers within and out of the weathering profile, and the timing of these chemical transfers. Analyses of soil, saprolite and pore water samples reveal a complex history of U and Th transformations including mobilization of both U and Th in the soil followed by re-adsorption deeper in the profile. 234U/238U activity ratios in soil and saprolite show significant variability both with depth, and also among individual mineral phases at any particular depth. This variation among mineral phases, combined with the likely physical sorting of these phases during erosional transport, results in an additional isotopic fractionation unrelated to that imparted by the weathering process. This implies that suspended sediment samples taken from streamwater are unlikely to accurately reflect the average disequilibria carried by the secondary minerals phases in the soil and saprolite. Our analyses also reveal a significant contribution of atmospheric mineral

  13. Canopy arthropod responses to experimental canopy opening and debris deposition in a tropical rainforest subject to hurricanes

    Treesearch

    Timothy D. Schowalter; Michael R. Willig; Steven J. Presley

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed responses of canopy arthropods on seven representative early and late successional overstory and understory tree species to a canopy trimming experiment designed to separate effects of canopy opening and debris pulse (resulting from hurricane disturbance) in a tropical rainforest ecosystem at the Luquillo Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (...

  14. Experimental confirmation of sample area definition in infrared microspectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffner, John A.; Hornlein, Robert W.

    1998-06-01

    Using photolithography, thin polymer films with a controlled geometric pattern were produced as a test pattern for infrared microspectroscopy(IMS). Test samples were prepared on barium fluoride for transmission and gold mirrors for reflection measurements. The test pattern and methods for evaluating an IMS system are described. The purpose of this study is to provide a quantitative method for determining the ability of a microscope to define the infrared beam to a specific area and to determine limits of detection.

  15. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... well as other plant communities that have special or unique characteristics of scientific interest and... are required to maintain a plant community which the area is intended to represent. Within areas...

  16. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... well as other plant communities that have special or unique characteristics of scientific interest and... are required to maintain a plant community which the area is intended to represent. Within areas...

  17. The rf experimental program in the fermilab mucool test area

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Sandstrom, R.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.S.; Johnson, R.

    2005-05-20

    The rf R&D program for high-gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown and dark current production under a variety of conditions.

  18. The rf experimental program in the Fermilab mucool test area

    SciTech Connect

    J. Norem; R. Sandstrom; A. Bross; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; Y. Torun; R. Rimmer; D. Li; M. Zisman; R. Johnson

    2005-05-16

    The rf R&D program for high gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown, and dark current production under a variety of conditions.

  19. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record a... a series of research natural areas, sufficient in number and size to illustrate adequately or...

  20. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record a... a series of research natural areas, sufficient in number and size to illustrate adequately or...

  1. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record a... a series of research natural areas, sufficient in number and size to illustrate adequately or typify...

  2. Lithological influences on contemporary and long-term regolith weathering at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Heather L.; Chapela Lara, María; Moore, Oliver W.; Kurtz, Andrew C.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; White, Art F.

    2017-01-01

    Lithologic differences give rise to the differential weatherability of the Earth's surface and globally variable silicate weathering fluxes, which provide an important negative feedback on climate over geologic timescales. To isolate the influence of lithology on weathering rates and mechanisms, we compare two nearby catchments in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in Puerto Rico, which have similar climate history, relief and vegetation, but differ in bedrock lithology. Regolith and pore water samples with depth were collected from two ridgetops and at three sites along a slope transect in the volcaniclastic Bisley catchment and compared to existing data from the granitic Río Icacos catchment. The depth variations of solid-state and pore water chemistry and quantitative mineralogy were used to calculate mass transfer (tau) and weathering solute profiles, which in turn were used to determine weathering mechanisms and to estimate weathering rates. Regolith formed on both lithologies is highly leached of most labile elements, although Mg and K are less depleted in the granitic than in the volcaniclastic profiles, reflecting residual biotite in the granitic regolith not present in the volcaniclastics. Profiles of both lithologies that terminate at bedrock corestones are less weathered at depth, near the rock-regolith interfaces. Mg fluxes in the volcaniclastics derive primarily from dissolution of chlorite near the rock-regolith interface and from dissolution of illite and secondary phases in the upper regolith, whereas in the granitic profile, Mg and K fluxes derive from biotite dissolution. Long-term mineral dissolution rates and weathering fluxes were determined by integrating mass losses over the thickness of solid-state weathering fronts, and are therefore averages over the timescale of regolith development. Resulting long-term dissolution rates for minerals in the volcaniclastic regolith include chlorite: 8.9 × 10-14 mol m-2 s-1, illite: 2.1 × 10-14 mol m

  3. Lithological influences on contemporary and long-term regolith weathering at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buss, Heather L.; Lara, Maria Chapela; Moore, Oliver; Kurtz, Andrew C.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; White, Arthur F.

    2017-01-01

    Lithologic differences give rise to the differential weatherability of the Earth’s surface and globally variable silicate weathering fluxes, which provide an important negative feedback on climate over geologic timescales. To isolate the influence of lithology on weathering rates and mechanisms, we compare two nearby catchments in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in Puerto Rico, which have similar climate history, relief and vegetation, but differ in bedrock lithology. Regolith and pore water samples with depth were collected from two ridgetops and at three sites along a slope transect in the volcaniclastic Bisley catchment and compared to existing data from the granitic Río Icacos catchment. The depth variations of solid-state and pore water chemistry and quantitative mineralogy were used to calculate mass transfer (tau) and weathering solute profiles, which in turn were used to determine weathering mechanisms and to estimate weathering rates.Regolith formed on both lithologies is highly leached of most labile elements, although Mg and K are less depleted in the granitic than in the volcaniclastic profiles, reflecting residual biotite in the granitic regolith not present in the volcaniclastics. Profiles of both lithologies that terminate at bedrock corestones are less weathered at depth, near the rock-regolith interfaces. Mg fluxes in the volcaniclastics derive primarily from dissolution of chlorite near the rock-regolith interface and from dissolution of illite and secondary phases in the upper regolith, whereas in the granitic profile, Mg and K fluxes derive from biotite dissolution. Long-term mineral dissolution rates and weathering fluxes were determined by integrating mass losses over the thickness of solid-state weathering fronts, and are therefore averages over the timescale of regolith development. Resulting long-term dissolution rates for minerals in the volcaniclastic regolith include chlorite: 8.9 × 10−14 mol m−2 s−1, illite: 2.1

  4. Push-pull tests to determine in-situ nitrogen processing in groundwaters of a tropical riparian forest, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Riparian zones are biogeochemical hot spots known to control the flux of dissolved nitrogen (N) from groundwater to surface waters by providing favorable conditions for N removal and retention. In many watersheds with agricultural or urban inputs, N enters groundwater after being leached from soils in the form of nitrate, which is then removed from solution by denitrification in the anoxic riparian groundwater. Certain tropical forested watersheds, however, display spatial patterns in groundwater N chemistry that cannot be explained by simple denitrification. High ammonium concentrations (>0.5 mg/L), in comparison to other reference watersheds, exist in groundwaters directly adjacent to streams carrying little or no ammonium. The N speciation is accompanied by dramatic shifts in redox conditions from hillslope to riparian zone to stream. A valuable ecosystem service is being provided by these tropical ecosystems but that service has not been adequately described by science. What is the source and fate of this ammonium? The push-pull test is a recently developed method to determine in-situ reaction rates by the addition of reactive substrates and a conservative tracer to groundwater, followed by an incubation period and sampling over time. In the Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico, push-pull tests were conducted to determine the reaction pathways of ammonium production and consumption. Shallow groundwater wells (1-4 m below soil surface) in a riparian zone of a tributary the Rio Icacos were tested in two locations: immediately adjacent to the stream and at the topographic break between the hillslope and the floodplain. 10 L "push" solutions with ammonium, nitrate, or both and a chloride or bromide tracer were added and incubated over a 20-40 hr period (depending on the hydraulic conductivity of the individual well). Initial results were consistent with coupled nitrification-denitrification occurring at both the hillslope

  5. El Toro Wilderness, Luqillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Peter L. Weaver

    2011-01-01

    The El Toro Wilderness, designated by Congress in 2005, occupies about 36 percent of the 11,300 ha Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in northeastern Puerto Rico. It is the only tropical forest in the wilderness system managed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. El Toro extends from 370 to 1,074 m in elevation, and is occupied by four forest types found in the...

  6. Integrated geophysical study to understand the architecture of the deep critical zone in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Hynek, S. A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Terry, N.; Whiting, F.; Job, M. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Fletcher, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in Puerto Rico is characterized by a complex system of heterogeneous fractures that participate in the formation of corestones, and influence the development of a regolith by the alteration of the bedrock at very rapid weathering rates. The spatial distribution of fractures, and its influence on regolith thickness is, however, currently not well understood. In this study, we used an array of near-surface geophysical methods, including ground penetrating radar, terrain conductivity, electrical resistivity imaging and induced polarization, OhmMapper, and shallow seismic, constrained with direct methods from previous studies. These methods were combined with stress modeling to better understand: 1) changes in regolith thickness; and 2) variation of the spatial distribution and density of fractures with topography and proximity to the knickpoint. Our observations show the potential of geophysical methods for imaging variability in regolith thickness, and agree with the result of a stress model showing increased dilation of fractures with proximity to the knickpoint.

  7. Spatially continuous characterization of the bedrock - regolith interface at the Rio Icacos Watershed (Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory) Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Recinos, E.; Hynek, S. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Joint processing of geophysical data can enhance data interpretation. This study focuses on spatially continuous multifrequency electro-magnetic (EM) data for near subsurface characterization. Recent advances in EM data processing allow for efficient inversion of multi-frequency data, utilization of calibration routines and additional constrains for better subsurface imaging. For this work the newly developed FEMIC (Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Inversion Code) code was used to invert the EM data. High resolution electrical resistivity (ER) data were used to calibrate the EM process; additionally, available data from ground penetrating radar (GPR) and field observations were used to better constrain the inversions. The multistep EM processing allowed for improving characterization of the subsurface over long (i.e. Km scale) 2D transects. The aim of this work was to better understand the lateral extent of the bedrock-regolith interface in the Rio Icacos watershed of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO), while providing evidence for changes in regolith thickness as related to proximity to the nickpoint. This research highlights the advantages of geophysical methods for critical zone studies and their potential for improving spatial characterization of the subsurface at multiples scales. Furthermore it shows the potential of EM methods for translating high resolution spatially limited point measurements (e.g. boreholes) to large (km) scales.

  8. Chemical weathering in a tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico III: Quartz dissolution rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, M.S.; White, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    The paucity of weathering rates for quartz in the natural environment stems both from the slow rate at which quartz dissolves and the difficulty in differentiating solute Si contributed by quartz from that derived from other silicate minerals. This study, a first effort in quantifying natural rates of quartz dissolution, takes advantage of extremely rapid tropical weathering, simple regolith mineralogy, and detailed information on hydrologic and chemical transport. Quartz abundances and grain sizes are relatively constant with depth in a thick saprolite. Limited quartz dissolution is indicated by solution rounding of primary angularity and by the formation of etch pits. A low correlation of surface area (0.14 and 0.42 m2 g-1) with grain size indicates that internal microfractures and pitting are the principal contributors to total surface area. Pore water silica concentration increases linearly with depth. On a molar basis, between one and three quarters of pore water silica is derived from quartz with the remainder contributed from biotite weathering. Average solute Si remains thermodynamically undersaturated with respect to recently revised estimates of quartz solubility (17-81 ??M). Etch pitting is more abundant on grains in the upper saprolite and is associated with pore waters lower in dissolved silica. Rate constants describing quartz dissolution increase with decreasing depth (from 10-14.5-10-15.1 mol m-2 s-1), which correlate with both greater thermodynamic undersaturation and increasing etch pit densities. Unlike for many aluminosilicates, the calculated natural weathering rates of quartz fall slightly below the rate constants previously reported for experimental studies (10-12.4-10-14.2 mol m-2 s-1). This agreement reflects the structural simplicity of quartz, dilute solutes, and near-hydrologic saturation.

  9. Spatial modelling of evapotranspiration in the Luquillo experimental forest of Puerto Rico using remotely-sensed data.

    Treesearch

    Wei Wu; Charles A.S. Hall; Frederick N. Scatena; Lindi J. Quackenbush

    2006-01-01

    Summary Actual evapotranspiration (aET) and related processes in tropical forests can explain 70% of the lateral global energy transport through latent heat, and therefore are very important in the redistribution of water on the Earth’s surface [Mauser, M., Scha¨dlich, S., 1998. Modelling the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration on different scales using remote...

  10. Impacts of disturbance initiated by road construction in a subtropical cloud forest in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Lydia P. Olander; F.N Scatena; Whendee L. Silver

    1998-01-01

    The impacts of road construction and the spread of exotic vegetation, which are common threats to upper elevation tropical forests, were evaluated in the subtropical cloud forests of Puerto Rico. The vegetation, soil and microclimate of 6-month-old road®lls, 35-year-old road®lls and mature forest with and without grass understories were compared. Recent road®lls had...

  11. Changes in Carbon Chemistry and Stability Along Deep Tropical Soil Profiles at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Hockaday, W. C.; Plante, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests are the largest terrestrial carbon (C) sink, and tropical forest soils contribute disproportionately to the poorly-characterized deep soil C pool. The goal of this study was to evaluate how carbon chemistry and stability change with depth in tropical forest soils formed on two contrasting parent materials. We used soils from pits excavated to 140 cm depth that were stratified across two soil types (Oxisols and Inceptisols) at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in northeast Puerto Rico. We used 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize soil C chemistry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) coupled with evolved gas analysis (CO2-EGA) to evaluate the thermal stability of soil C during ramped combustion. Thirty-four samples with an initial C concentration ≥1% were chosen from discrete depth intervals (0, 30, 60, 90 & 140 cm) for 13C NMR analysis, while DSC was performed on 122 samples that included the NMR sample set and additional samples at 20, 50, 80 and 110 cm depth. Preliminary 13C NMR results indicate higher alkyl : O-alkyl ratios and an enrichment of aliphatic and proteinaceous C with depth, compared with greater aromatic and carbohydrate signals in surface soils. The energy density of soil C (J mg-1 C) also declined significantly with depth. In Oxisols, most CO2 evolution from combustion occurred around 300ºC, while most CO2 evolution occurred at higher temperatures (400-500ºC) in Inceptisols. Our findings suggest soil C is derived primarily of plant biomolecules in surface soils and becomes increasingly microbial with depth. Soil matrix-mediated differences in C transport and preservation may result in differences in C chemistry between the two soil types and a more thermally labile C pool in the Oxisols. We suggest that energy-poor substrates, combined with potentially stronger organo-mineral interactions in subsoils, may explain the long-term stability of deep C in highly weathered tropical soils.

  12. Tropical river suspended load and solute dynamics in storms within an extreme drought, Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. E.; Shanley, J. B.; Perdrial, N.; Scholl, M. A.; Perdrial, J. N.; Plante, A. F.; McDowell, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    Drought is projected to become more prevalent in the tropics under a changing climate. Drought affects hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the critical zone, which in turn can affect transport of solutes and solids to marine receiving waters. To assess the effects of drought, we examined stream biogeochemistry at two montane rivers during a series of four rewetting events in late August 2015 within an extreme drought in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO), Puerto Rico. We analyzed particulate load (suspended sediment, mineralogy, particulate organic carbon, particulate nitrogen) and dissolved load (dissolved organic carbon, major solutes). Both Río Icacos and Rio Mameyes have continuous streamflow gages, and Río Icacos also had in-stream sensors for specific conductance, turbidity, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM) for detailed insight into river behavior. Using solute concentrations and stable isotopes, we determined that new water dominated streamflow during the rewetting period, indicating the importance of rainfall during drought. Relations of suspended sediment and solute concentrations to discharge during rewetting events did not vary from the long-term record, indicating a lack of sediment and solute buildup during drought. Sources of suspended minerals varied through the rewetting events, depending on catchment geology, where particulate minerals varied between primary and secondary minerals over the hydrograph. Sources of particulate organic matter progressively shifted from in-channel sources in the first storms, to mineral soil, and vegetation and organic soil in later storms. These findings suggest that these tropical rivers in the LCZO are resilient to extreme drought.

  13. Tracing mineral weathering reactions in the critical zone using Mg, Ca, and Sr isotopes, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, H. L.; White, A. F.; Vivit, D.; Bullen, T. D.; Blum, A. E.; Dessert, C.; Gaillardet, J.

    2008-12-01

    Mineral weathering in the critical zone directly impacts the availability of many important soil nutrients. As part of the USGS Water Energy and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program and the Critical Zone Exploration Network, we are investigating mineral nutrient distributions and fluxes in depth profiles (to 16 m) at five sites in the Bisley 1 catchment in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. The Bisley 1 catchment contains a thick regolith developed on marine bedded, andesitic, volcaniclastic bedrock. Pore waters were sampled as a function of depth from nested suction water samplers. Pore water chemistry was analyzed and compared to total chemistry of solid samples taken from augered cores. Mg, Ca and Sr isotope ratios were measured of the pore waters at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (Mg) and at the USGS in Menlo Park, CA (Ca, Sr). The Mg isotope ratios increase with increasing depth from δ26Mg = -0.772 at the surface to - 0.267 at depth, relative to the DSM3 standard. Sr isotope ratios vary from 0.70922 to 0.71016 87Sr/86Sr, with no discernible depth trend. The regolith is highly weathered and is depleted in primary minerals (except quartz) with respect to bedrock. Volumetric strain, calculated with respect to quartz, indicates approximately 25% volume collapse occurred relative to the original volume of the bedrock. Plagioclase, chlorite, pyroxene, and amphibole weather at the bedrock-regolith interface. The regolith contains quartz, kaolinite, other clays, and iron and manganese oxides. Increasing solid and pore water Mg concentrations and δ26Mg with depth likely indicate a two step weathering process wherein high-Mg chlorite dissolves at the bedrock-regolith interface and forms Mg-containing secondary clays and oxides, which then dissolve within the regolith profile.

  14. Expanding the vision of the Experimental Forest and Range network to urban areas

    Treesearch

    J. Morgan. Grove

    2014-01-01

    After 100 years, the USDA Forest Service has emerging opportunities to expand the Experimental Forest and Range (EFR) network to urban areas. The purpose of this expansion would be to broaden the types of ecosystems studied, interdisciplinary approaches used, and relevance to society of the EFR network through long-term and large-scale social-ecological projects in...

  15. Experimental performance of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at high combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thrust coefficient of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at combustion chamber pressures of 12.4 to 16.5 MPa (1800 to 2400 psia). A nozzle with a modified Rao contour and an expansion area ratio of 1025:1 was tested with hydrogen and oxygen at altitude conditions. The same nozzle, truncated to an area ratio of 440:1, was also tested. Values of thrust coefficient are presented along with characteristic exhaust velocity efficiencies, nozzle wall temperatures, and overall thruster specific impulse.

  16. An experimental investigation of internal area ruling for transonic and supersonic channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. B.; Vanrintel, H. L.; Rizvi, G.

    1982-01-01

    A simulated transonic rotor channel model was examined experimentally to verify the flow physics of internal area ruling. Pressure measurements were performed in the high speed wind tunnel at transonic speeds with Mach 1.5 and Mach 2 nozzle blocks to get an indication of the approximate shock losses. The results showed a reduction in losses due to internal area ruling with the Mach 1.5 nozzle blocks. The reduction in total loss coefficient was of the order of 17 percent for a high blockage model and 7 percent for a cut-down model.

  17. Unsupervised statistical learning applied to experimental high-energy physics and related areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simas Filho, Eduardo F.; Seixas, José M.

    2016-12-01

    Unsupervised statistical learning (USL) techniques, such as self-organizing maps (SOMs), principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis explore different statistical properties to efficiently process information from multiple variables. USL algorithms have been successfully applied in experimental high-energy physics (HEP) and related areas for different purposes, such as feature extraction, signal detection, noise reduction, signal-background separation and removal of cross-interference from multiple signal sources in multisensor measurement systems. This paper presents both a review of the theoretical aspects of these signal processing methods and examples of some successful applications in HEP and related areas experiments.

  18. Energy balance model applied to pasture experimental areas in São Paulo State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayma-Silva, Gustavo; de Castro Teixeira, Antonio Heriberto; de Castro Victoria, Daniel; Furlan Nogueira, Sandra; Freitas Leivas, Janice; Coaguila, Daniel N.; Rodrigues Herling, Valdo

    2016-10-01

    The Simple Algorithm for Evapotranspiration Retrieving (SAFER) was used to estimate biophysical parameters and the energy balance components in two different pasture experimental areas, in the São Paulo state, Brazil. The experimental pastures consist in six rotational (RGS) and three continuous grazing systems (CGS) paddocks. Landsat-8 images from 2013 and 2015 dry and rainy seasons were used, as these presented similar hydrological cycle, with 1,600 mm and 1,613 mm of annual precipitation, resulting in 19 cloud-free images. Bands 1 to 7 and thermal bands 10 and 11 were used with weather data from a station located near the experimental area. NDVI, biomass, evapotranspiration and latent heat flux (λE) temporal values statistically differ CGS from RGS areas. Grazing systems influences the energy partition and these results indicate that RGS benefits biomass production, evapotranspiration and the microclimate, due higher LE values. SAFER is a feasible tool to estimate biophysical parameters and energy balance components in pasture and has potential to discriminate continuous and rotation grazing systems in a temporal analysis.

  19. Stable-isotope and solute-chemistry approaches to flow characterization in a forested tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha A.; Shanley, James B.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Willenbring, Jane K; Occhi, Marcie; González, Grizelle

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of changing climate has led to uncertainty about the resilience of forested mountain watersheds in the tropics. In watersheds where frequent, high rainfall provides ample runoff, we often lack understanding of how the system will respond under conditions of decreased rainfall or drought. Factors that govern water supply, such as recharge rates and groundwater storage capacity, may be poorly quantified. This paper describes 8-year data sets of water stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) of precipitation (4 sites) and a stream (1 site), and four contemporaneous stream sample sets of solute chemistry and isotopes, used to investigate watershed response to precipitation inputs in the 1780-ha Río Mameyes basin in the Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico. Extreme δ2H and δ18O values from low-pressure storm systems and the deuterium excess (d-excess) were useful tracers of watershed response in this tropical system. A hydrograph separation experiment performed in June 2011 yielded different but complementary information from stable isotope and solute chemistry data. The hydrograph separation results indicated that 36% of the storm rain that reached the soil surface left the watershed in a very short time as runoff. Weathering-derived solutes indicated near-stream groundwater was displaced into the stream at the beginning of the event, followed by significant dilution. The more biologically active solutes exhibited a net flushing behavior. The d-excess analysis suggested that streamflow typically has a recent rainfall component (∼25%) with transit time less than the sampling resolution of 7 days, and a more well-mixed groundwater component (∼75%). The contemporaneous stream sample sets showed an overall increase in dissolved solute concentrations with decreasing elevation that may be related to groundwater inputs, different geology, and slope position. A considerable amount of water from rain events runs off as quickflow and bypasses

  20. Computational and Experimental Investigation of Interfacial Area in Near-Field Diesel Spray Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Pandal, Adrian; Pastor, Jose Marie; Kastengren, A.; ...

    2017-03-28

    The dense spray region in the near-field of diesel fuel injection remains an enigma. This region is difficult to interrogate with light in the visible range and difficult to model due to the rapid interaction between liquid and gas. In particular, modeling strategies that rely on Lagrangian particle tracking of droplets have struggled in this area. To better represent the strong interaction between phases, Eulerian modeling has proven particularly useful. Models built on the concept of surface area density are advantageous where primary and secondary atomization have not yet produced droplets, but rather form more complicated liquid structures. Surface areamore » density, a more general concept than Lagrangian droplets, naturally represents liquid structures, no matter how complex. These surface area density models, however, have not been directly experimentally validated in the past due to the inability of optical methods to elucidate such a quantity. Optical diagnostics traditionally measure near-spherical droplet size far downstream, where the spray is optically thin. Using ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) measurements to measure the surface area and x-ray radiography to measure the density, we have been able to test one of the more speculative parts of Eulerian spray modeling. The modeling and experimental results have been combined to provide insight into near-field spray dynamics.« less

  1. Computational and Experimental Investigation of Interfacial Area in Near-Field Diesel Spray Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Pandal, Adrian; Pastor, Jose M.; Payri, Raul; ...

    2017-03-28

    The dense spray region in the near-field of diesel fuel injection remains an enigma. This region is difficult to interrogate with light in the visible range and difficult to model due to the rapid interaction between liquid and gas. In particular, modeling strategies that rely on Lagrangian particle tracking of droplets have struggled in this area. To better represent the strong interaction between phases, Eulerian modeling has proven particularly useful. Models built on the concept of surface area density are advantageous where primary and secondary atomization have not yet produced droplets, but rather form more complicated liquid structures. Surface areamore » density, a more general concept than Lagrangian droplets, naturally represents liquid structures, no matter how complex. These surface area density models, however, have not been directly experimentally validated in the past due to the inability of optical methods to elucidate such a quantity. Optical diagnostics traditionally measure near-spherical droplet size far downstream, where the spray is optically thin. Using ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) measurements to measure the surface area and x-ray radiography to measure the density, we have been able to test one of the more speculative parts of Eulerian spray modeling. In conclusion, the modeling and experimental results have been combined to provide insight into near-field spray dynamics.« less

  2. Experimental thrust performance of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavli, Albert J.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Smith, Tamara A.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thrust performance attainable from high-area-ratio rocket nozzles. A modified Rao-contoured nozzle with an expansion area of 1030 was test fired with hydrogen-oxygen propellants at altitude conditions. The nozzle was also tested as a truncated nozzle, at an expansion area ratio of 428. Thrust coefficient and thrust coefficient efficiency values are presented for each configuration at various propellant mixture ratios (oxygen/fuel). Several procedural techniques were developed permitting improved measurement of nozzle performance. The more significant of these were correcting the thrust for the aneroid effects, determining the effective chamber pressure, and referencing differential pressure transducers to a vacuum reference tank.

  3. Experimental Study of Coal and Gas Outbursts Related to Gas-Enriched Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qingyi; Cheng, Yuanping; Guo, Pinkun; Jiang, Jingyu; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Rong

    2016-09-01

    A coal and gas outburst can lead to a catastrophic failure in a coal mine. These outbursts usually occur where the distribution of coal seam gas is abnormal, commonly in tectonic belts. To study the effects of the abnormal distribution of this gas on outbursts, an experimental apparatus to collect data on simulated coal seam outbursts was constructed. Experiments on specimens containing discrete gas-enriched areas were run to induce artificial gas outbursts and further study of these outbursts using data from the experiment was conducted. The results suggest that more gas and outburst energy are contained in gas-enriched areas and this permits these areas to cause an outburst easily, even though the gas pressure in them is lower. During mining, the disappearance of the sealing effect of a coal pillar establishes the occurrence conditions for an outburst. When the enriched gas and outburst energy in the gas-enriched area is released suddenly, a reverse unloading wave and a high gas pressure gradient are formed, which have tension effects on the coal. Under these effects, the fragmentation degree of the coal intensifies and the intensity of the outburst increases. Because a high gas pressure gradient is maintained near the exposed surface and the enriched energy release reduces the coal strength, the existence of a gas-enriched area in coal leads to a faster outburst and the average thickness of the spall is smaller than where is no gas-enriched area.

  4. Experimental determination of the PTW 60019 microDiamond dosimeter active area and volume.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G

    2016-09-01

    Small field output correction factors have been studied by several research groups for the PTW 60019 microDiamond (MD) dosimeter, by comparing the response of such a device with both reference dosimeters and Monte Carlo simulations. A general good agreement is observed for field sizes down to about 1 cm. However, evident inconsistencies can be noticed when comparing some experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations obtained for smaller irradiation fields. This issue was tentatively attributed by some authors to unintentional large variations of the MD active surface area. The aim of the present study is a nondestructive experimental determination of the MD active surface area and active volume. Ten MD dosimeters, one MD prototype, and three synthetic diamond samples were investigated in the present work. 2D maps of the MD response were recorded under scanned soft x-ray microbeam irradiation, leading to an experimental determination of the device active surface area. Profiles of the device responses were measured as well. In order to evaluate the MD active volume, the thickness of the diamond sensing layer was independently evaluated by capacitance measurements and alpha particle detection experiments. The MD sensitivity, measured at the PTW calibration laboratory, was also used to calculate the device active volume thickness. An average active surface area diameter of (2.19 ± 0.02) mm was evaluated by 2D maps and response profiles of all the MDs. Average active volume thicknesses of (1.01 ± 0.13) μm and (0.97 ± 0.14) μm were derived by capacitance and sensitivity measurements, respectively. The obtained results are well in agreement with the nominal values reported in the manufacturer dosimeter specifications. A homogeneous response was observed over the whole device active area. Besides the one from the device active volume, no contributions from other components of the housing nor from encapsulation materials were observed in the 2D response maps. The

  5. An experimental and numerical investigation of velocity in an enclosed residential complex parking area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Khosro; Motlagh, Majid Shafie Pour; Mousavi, Monireh Sadat; Niksokhan, Mohhamad hosein; Vosoughifar, Hamid Reza

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present research is analysis of velocity vector and magnitude in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran. Velocity parameters are key factor and can be helpful in proposing solutions to improve indoor air quality. Since The flow pattern determines that how and where the pollutants propagate. In this research at first, the proportion of vehicular exhaust emissions is estimated and then experimental and numerical analyses are performed. In experimental analysis, a full-scale experiment of parking area has been used; velocity is measured by calibrated measuring devices. Samples were performed in several times. In order to perform numerical calculation, a 3-dimensional model was created by Fluent software that solves flow equations with finite volume method. In this research, the flow condition is assumed to be incompressible and turbulent. Standard k-ɛ scheme was selected as turbulence modeling. In the Computational Fluid Dynamics technique the geometry of parking area is generated in ICEM-CFD software and hexahedral mesh type is used. Velocity vectors and magnitudes in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran are estimated. The findings obtained from numerical simulation are in complete accord with experimental results.

  6. High-Area-Ratio Rocket Nozzle at High Combustion Chamber Pressure: Experimental and Analytical Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smith, Timothy D.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained on an optimally contoured nozzle with an area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 1800 to 2400 psia and mixture ratios of 3.89 to 6.15. This report compares the experimental performance, heat transfer, and boundary layer total pressure measurements with theoretical predictions of the current Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) developed methodology. This methodology makes use of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle performance code. Comparisons of the TDK-predicted performance to experimentally attained thrust performance indicated that both the vacuum thrust coefficient and the vacuum specific impulse values were approximately 2.0-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 1025:1 configurations, and approximately 0.25-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 440:1 configuration. Nozzle wall temperatures were measured on the outside of a thin-walled heat sink nozzle during the test fittings. Nozzle heat fluxes were calculated front the time histories of these temperatures and compared with predictions made with the TDK code. The heat flux values were overpredicted for all cases. The results range from nearly 100 percent at an area ratio of 50 to only approximately 3 percent at an area ratio of 975. Values of the integral of the heat flux as a function of nozzle surface area were also calculated. Comparisons of the experiment with analyses of the heat flux and the heat rate per axial length also show that the experimental values were lower than the predicted value. Three boundary layer rakes mounted on the nozzle exit were used for boundary layer measurements. This arrangement allowed total pressure measurements to be obtained at 14 different distances from the nozzle wall. A comparison of boundary layer total pressure profiles and analytical

  7. Design and construction of an experimental pervious paved parking area to harvest reusable rainwater.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ullate, E; Novo, A V; Bayon, J R; Hernandez, Jorge R; Castro-Fresno, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Pervious pavements are sustainable urban drainage systems already known as rainwater infiltration techniques which reduce runoff formation and diffuse pollution in cities. The present research is focused on the design and construction of an experimental parking area, composed of 45 pervious pavement parking bays. Every pervious pavement was experimentally designed to store rainwater and measure the levels of the stored water and its quality over time. Six different pervious surfaces are combined with four different geotextiles in order to test which materials respond better to the good quality of rainwater storage over time and under the specific weather conditions of the north of Spain. The aim of this research was to obtain a good performance of pervious pavements that offered simultaneously a positive urban service and helped to harvest rainwater with a good quality to be used for non potable demands.

  8. River Suspended Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Transport in Two Montane Catchments in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory of Puerto Rico over 25 years: 1989 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. E.; Plante, A. F.; Willenbring, J. K.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Gonzalez, G.; Stallard, R. F.; Murphy, S. F.; Vann, D. R.; Leon, M.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Physical erosion in mountain catchments mobilizes large amounts of sediment, while exporting carbon and nutrients from forest ecosystems. This study expands from previous studies quantifying river suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon loads in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, in Puerto Rico. We evaluate the influences on river suspended load due to i) underlying basin geology, ii) hillslope debris and biomass supply, and iii) hurricanes and large storms. In the Mameyes and Icacos catchments of the Luquillo Mountains, we estimate suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon yields over a 25-year period using streamflow discharge determined from stage measurements at 15-intervals, with estimates of discharge replacing gaps in data, and over 3000 suspended sediment samples. We estimate variation in suspended sediment loads over time, and examine variation in particulate organic carbon loads. Mass spectrometry was used to determine organic carbon concentrations. We confirm that higher suspended sediment fluxes occurred i) in the highly weathered quartz diorite catchment rather than the predominantly volcaniclastic catchment, ii) on the rising limb of the hydrograph once a threshold discharge had been reached, and iii) during hurricanes and other storm events, and we explore these influences on particulate organic carbon transport. Transport of suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon in the rivers shows considerable hysteresis, and we evaluate the extent to which hysteresis affects particulate fluxes over time and between catchments. Because particulate organic carbon is derived from the critical zone and transported during high flow, our research highlights the role of major tropical storms in controlling carbon storage in the critical zone and the coastal ocean.

  9. Experimental Studies of the Inspection of Areas With Restricted Access Using A0 Lamb Wave Tomography.

    PubMed

    Seher, Matthias; Huthwaite, Peter; Lowe, Michael J S

    2016-09-01

    Corrosion damage in inaccessible regions presents a significant challenge to the petrochemical industry, and determining the remaining wall thickness is important to establish the remaining service life. Guided wave tomography is one solution to this and involves transmitting Lamb waves through the area of interest and, subsequently, using the received signals to reconstruct a thickness map of the remaining wall thickness. This avoids the need to access all points on the surface, making the technique well suited to inspection for areas with restricted access. The influence of these areas onto the ability to detect and size surface conditions, such as corrosion damage, using guided wave tomography is assessed. For that, a guided wave tomography system is employed, which is based on low-frequency A0 Lamb waves that are excited and detected with two arrays of electromagnetic acoustic transducers. Two different defect depths are considered with different contrasts relative to the nominal wall thickness, both of which are smoothly varying and well-defined. The influence of areas with restricted surface access, support locations, pipe clamps, and STOPAQ(R) coatings is experimentally tested, and their influence assessed through comparison to a baseline reconstruction without the respective restriction in place, demonstrating only a small influence on the detected value of the remaining wall thickness.

  10. Experimental evaluation of heat transfer on a 1030:1 area ratio rocket nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Pavli, Albert J.; Smith, Tamara A.

    1987-01-01

    A 1030:1 carbon steel, heat-sink nozzle was tested. The test conditions included a nominal chamber pressure of 2413 kN/sq m and a mixture ratio range of 2.78 to 5.49. The propellants were gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. Outer wall temperature measurements were used to calculate the inner wall temperature and the heat flux and heat rate to the nozzle at specified axial locations. The experimental heat fluxes were compared to those predicted by the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) computer model analysis program. When laminar boundary layer flow was assumed in the analysis, the predicted values were within 15% of the experimental values for the area ratios of 20 to 975. However, when turbulent boundary layer conditions were assumed, the predicted values were approximately 120% higher than the experimental values. A study was performed to determine if the conditions within the nozzle could sustain a laminar boundary layer. Using the flow properties predicted by TDK, the momentum-thickness Reynolds number was calculated, and the point of transition to turbulent flow was predicted. The predicted transition point was within 0.5 inches of the nozzle throat. Calculations of the acceleration parameter were then made to determine if the flow conditions could produce relaminarization of the boundary layer. It was determined that if the boundary layer flow was inclined to transition to turbulent, the acceleration conditions within the nozzle would tend to suppress turbulence and keep the flow laminar-like.

  11. An experimental method of modeling ;Line-Type; and ;Area-Type; connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mian; Zheng, Gangtie

    2017-07-01

    A method for experimentally modeling complex connections, such as ;Line-Type; connection (LTC) and ;Area-Type; connection (ATC), is proposed in this paper. Unlike traditional methods, instead of treating the junction forces as presumed approximate functions, a new strategy proposed in the present paper is to estimate them from experimentally measured accelerations. Along with them, the junction motion information is also estimated from the measured data. Based on this estimated information, the connection's model is built. In this way, two potential disadvantages of traditional methods in modeling complex connections, i.e. the difficulty in finding appropriate functions for complex connections and the computation burden in identifying too many parameters through optimization process, can be avoided. In the proposed method, the LTC is modeled as a series of independent junction node pairs, and the ATC is modeled as a combination of a presumed Virtual Structure and a series of independent Virtual Node Pairs. Numerical and experimental results with the constructed example have verified the effectiveness of the proposed method in modeling both LTC and ATC.

  12. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R.; McPherron, Shannon P.

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  13. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility.

    PubMed

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R; McPherron, Shannon P

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  14. Familiarity Breeds Contempt: Kangaroos Persistently Avoid Areas with Experimentally Deployed Dingo Scents

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Michael H.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75±3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0±107.0 g (P<0.001). Macropodids fled more when encountering a urine treatment, X = 4.50±2.08 flights, as compared to the control, X = 0 flights (P<0.001). There was no difference in effect between urine or feces treatments (P>0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R2 = 83.8; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids

  15. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Michael H; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2010-05-05

    Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P<0.001). Macropodids fled more when encountering a urine treatment, X = 4.50+/-2.08 flights, as compared to the control, X = 0 flights (P<0.001). There was no difference in effect between urine or feces treatments (P>0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2) = 83.8; P<0.001). Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with

  16. Target experimental area and systems of the U.S. National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M; Van Wonterghem, B; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, W; Kalantar, D; Lee, F D; Pittenger, L; Wong, K

    1999-12-17

    One of the major goals of the US National Ignition Facility is the demonstration of laser driven fusion ignition and burn of targets by inertial confinement and provide capability for a wide variety of high energy density physics experiments. The NIF target area houses the optical systems required to focus the 192 beamlets to a target precisely positioned at the center of the 10 meter diameter, 10-cm thick aluminum target chamber. The chamber serves as mounting surface for the 48 final optics assemblies, the target alignment and positioning equipment, and the target diagnostics. The internal surfaces of the chamber are protected by louvered steel beam dumps. The target area also provides the necessary shielding against target emission and environmental protection equipment. Despite its complexity, the design provides the flexibility to accommodate the needs of the various NIF user groups, such as direct and indirect drive irradiation geometries, modular final optics design, capability to handle cryogenic targets, and easily re-configurable diagnostic instruments. Efficient target area operations are ensured by using line-replaceable designs for systems requiring frequent inspection, maintenance and reconfiguration, such as the final optics, debris shields, phase plates and the diagnostic instruments. A precision diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIMS) allows fast removal and precise repositioning of diagnostic instruments. In addition the authors describe several activities to enhance the target chamber availability, such as the target debris mitigation, the use of standard experimental configurations and the development of smart shot operations planning tools.

  17. Numerical model validation using experimental data: Application of the area metric on a Francis runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatenet, Q.; Tahan, A.; Gagnon, M.; Chamberland-Lauzon, J.

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, engineers are able to solve complex equations thanks to the increase of computing capacity. Thus, finite elements software is widely used, especially in the field of mechanics to predict part behavior such as strain, stress and natural frequency. However, it can be difficult to determine how a model might be right or wrong, or whether a model is better than another one. Nevertheless, during the design phase, it is very important to estimate how the hydroelectric turbine blades will behave according to the stress to which it is subjected. Indeed, the static and dynamic stress levels will influence the blade's fatigue resistance and thus its lifetime, which is a significant feature. In the industry, engineers generally use either graphic representation, hypothesis tests such as the Student test, or linear regressions in order to compare experimental to estimated data from the numerical model. Due to the variability in personal interpretation (reproducibility), graphical validation is not considered objective. For an objective assessment, it is essential to use a robust validation metric to measure the conformity of predictions against data. We propose to use the area metric in the case of a turbine blade that meets the key points of the ASME Standards and produces a quantitative measure of agreement between simulations and empirical data. This validation metric excludes any belief and criterion of accepting a model which increases robustness. The present work is aimed at applying a validation method, according to ASME V&V 10 recommendations. Firstly, the area metric is applied on the case of a real Francis runner whose geometry and boundaries conditions are complex. Secondly, the area metric will be compared to classical regression methods to evaluate the performance of the method. Finally, we will discuss the use of the area metric as a tool to correct simulations.

  18. Experimental evaluation of the effects of quench rate and quartz surface area on homogeneous mercury oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fry; Brydger Cauch; Geoffrey D. Silcox; JoAnn S. Lighty; Constance L. Senior

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a mercury oxidation data set suitable for validation of fundamental kinetic models of mercury chemistry and for mechanism development. Experimental facilities include a mercury reactor fitted with a 300-W, quartz-glass burner and a quartz reaction chamber. While operated with a temperature profile representative of a typical boiler, a residence time of 6 s was achieved. Participating reacting species (chlorine, mercury) were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. Speciated mercury measurements were performed using a Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a conditioning system. Homogeneous mercury reactions involving chlorine have been investigated under two different temperature profiles producing quench rates of -210 K/s and -440 K/s. The larger quench rate produced 52% greater total oxidation than the lower quench at chlorine concentrations of 200 ppm. The effect of reactor surface area on oxidation was also investigated. The quartz surfaces interacted with mercury only in the presence of chlorine and their overall effect was to weakly inhibit oxidation. The extent of oxidation was predicted using a detailed kinetic model. The model predicted the effects of quench rate and chlorine concentration shown in experimentation. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Cadmium whole lake experiment at the Experimental Lakes Area: An anachronism

    SciTech Connect

    Malley, D.F.

    1995-12-31

    In the late 1970s, Cd was chosen over Hg, Zn, or Pb for whole lake experimentation at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario. Cadmium is highly toxic to aquatic life. Cadmium in some bodies of water approaches toxic levels, and it is easy to analyses. The experiment began on Lake 382 in the mid-1980s when the federal Long-Range Transport of Air Pollutants (LRTAP) program solicited proposals for non-acidic LRTAP pollutants. The purpose was to document the fate and effects of Cd at levels not exceeding the Canadian Water Quality Guideline (CWQG) of 0.2 ug/L Cd for water hardness < 60 mg/L. This dictated that the experiment would be protracted. Cd was added to test one-third, then half the CWQG before reaching the full CWQG level. Whole lake additions began in 1987 and were halted in May 1992 by Freshwater Institute Management when it was learned through word of mouth that the Ontario Ministry of Environment and Energy (ONEE) was preparing a draft Primary List of Candidate Substances for Bans or Phase Outs: Toxic, Persistent and Bioaccumulative. Cadmium was on that list. Reluctantly, ONEE allowed the addition of Cd to Lake 382 in 1992. In 1993, scientists recommended continuation of Cd additions but Freshwater Institute Managers did not seek ONEE for agreement for continued additions. By 1994, the tripartite (DFO, ONEE, OMNR) ELA Management Board was in place and in 1994 and 1995, the Board refused approval for the addition of Cd to Lake 382. Cadmium is a toxic metal of intense current focus for research and regulation (assessed under the CEPA; a focus of the CNTC; the subject of draft guidelines by Environment Canada for the CCCNE for water, dietary residue and sediment). Cadmium studies are timely, but experimentation with Cd fate and effects in an actual lake ecosystem in Ontario, unfortunately, cannot be conducted at this time.

  20. Agricultural interventions for water saving and crop yield improvement, in a Mediterranean area - an experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morianou, Giasemi; Kourgialas, Nektarios; Psarras, George; Koubouris, George; Arampatzis, George; Karatzas, George; Pavlidou, Elisavet

    2017-04-01

    This work is a part of LIFE+ AGROCLIMAWATER project and the aim is to improve the water efficiency, increase the adaptive capacity of tree corps and save water, in a Mediterranean area, under different climatic conditions and agricultural practices. The experimental design as well as preliminary results at farm and river basin scales are presented in this work. Specifically, ten (10) pilot farms, both organic and conventional ones have been selected in the sub-basin of Platanias in western Crete - Greece. These ten pilot farms were selected representing the most typical crops in Platanias area (olive trees and citrus trees), as well as the typical soil, landscape and agricultural practices differentiation for each crop (field slope, water availability, soil type, management regime). From the ten pilot farms, eight were olive farms and the rest two citrus. This proportion correspond adequacy to the presentence of olive and citrus crops in the extended area of Platanias prefecture. Each of the ten pilot farm has been divided in two parts, the first one will be used as a control part, while the other one as the demonstration part where the interventions will be applied. The action plans for each selected farm are based on the following groups of possible interventions: a) reduction of water evaporation losses from soil surface, b) reduction of transpiration water losses through winter pruning and summer pruning, c) reduction of deep percolation water and nutrient losses, d) reduction of surface runoff, e) measures in order to maximize the efficiency of irrigation and f) rationalization of fertilizers and agrochemicals utilized. Preliminary results indicate that water saving and crop yield can be significantly improved based on the above innervations both at farm and river basin scale.

  1. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and running....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation...

  2. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and running...

  3. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and running...

  4. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and running...

  5. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and running...

  6. A methodology for evacuation design for urban areas: theoretical aspects and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, F.; Vitetta, A.

    2009-04-01

    of models for evacuation simulation; (c) to calibrate and validate system of model for evacuation simulation from a real experimentation. In relation to the proposed objectives in this paper: (a) a general framework about risk analysis is reported in the first part, with specific methods and models to analyze urban transportation system performances in emergency conditions when exogenous phenomena occur and for the specification of the risk function; (b) a formulation of the general evacuation problem in the standard simulation context of "what if" approach is specified in the second part with reference to the model considered for the simulation of transportation system in ordinary condition; (c) a set of models specified in the second part are calibrated and validated from a real experimentation in the third part. The experimentation was developed in the central business district of an Italian village and about 1000 inhabitants were evacuated, in order to construct a complete data-base. Our experiment required that socioeconomic information (population, number employed, public buildings, schools, etc.) and ‎transport supply characteristics (infrastructures, etc.) be measured before and during experimentation. The real data of evacuation were recorded with 30 video cameras for laboratory analysis. The results are divided into six strictly connected tasks: Demand models; Supply and supply-demand interaction models for users; Simulation of refuge areas for users; Design of path choice models for emergency vehicles; Pedestrian outflow models in a building; Planning process and guidelines.

  7. The San Niccolo' experimental area for studying the hydrology of coastal Mediterranean peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetto, Rudy; Barbagli, Alessio; Sabbatini, Tiziana; Silvestri, Nicola; Bonari, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    Starting from 1930, a large part of the Massaciuccoli Lake coastal area (Tuscany, Italy) has been drained for agricultural purposes by a complex network of artificial drains and pumping stations. In the drained areas, peat soils, with values of organic matter up to 50% in some cases, are largely present (Pistocchi et al., 2012). As a consequence of the human impact, environmental problems arose in the last 50 years: i. the eutrophication status of the Massaciuccoli lake caused by nutrient enrichment (N, P) in surface- and ground-water (Rossetto et al., 2010a); ii. the subsidence (2-3 m in 70 years) of the lake bordering areas due to soil compaction and mineralization (Rossetto et al., 2010b). As a potential solution to improve water quality and to decrease soil organic matter mineralization, a rewetted pilot experimental area of 15 ha with phyto-treatment functionalities has been set up. This pilot, adequately instrumented, now constitutes an open field lab to conduct research on the hydrology of coastal Mediterranean peatlands. Site investigation was performed and data on stratigraphy (from top on average: 1/2 m thick peat layer, 1/3 m organic matter-rich silt, 1/3 m stiff blue-gray clay, up to 30 m thick sand layer) and water (ground- and surface-water) quantity and quality were gathered and related to both local and regional groundwater flows. The inferred hydrological conceptual model revealed the pilot is set in a regional discharge area and the ground-water dependent nature of the agro-ecosystem, with mixing of waters with different origins. The site has been divided in three different phyto-treatment systems: a constructed wetland system, internally and externally banked in order to force water flow to a convoluted pattern where Phragmites australis L. and Thypha angustifolia L. constitute the sparse natural vegetation; a vegetation filter system based on the plantation of seven different no-food crops managed according to a periodic cutting and biomass

  8. An experimental study of aerosol distribution over a Mediterranean urban area.

    PubMed

    Flocas, Helena A; Assimakopoulos, Vasiliki D; Helmis, Costas G

    2006-08-31

    In this study an attempt is made to investigate the aerosol spatial and size distributions at different heights over the Greater Athens Area (GAA), Greece, under sea breeze conditions and clear sky and to further discuss possible implications for aerosol characteristics. The data used are airborne measurements of aerosol collected during two flights that were performed within the context of the 1997 STAAARTE experimental campaign. The aerosol measurements cover particle diameters from 0.1 to 45.5 microm. The horizontal and vertical distribution revealed that higher concentrations exist within or just above the atmospheric boundary layer, while greater concentrations are observed over the sea compared to land at high altitudes. At all altitudes the number size distributions show dominant diameter ranges between 0.1 and 0.3 microm at all altitudes. The volume distributions are characterised by two modes, one in the accumulation and the other in the coarse particle regime. At lower altitudes, fresh combustion emissions more likely cause the predominance of the size range 0.1-0.3 microm while enhanced physical and chemical processes that favour the growth of smaller particles to larger sizes could also act. The relative humidity does not seem to affect the observed number size distributions at low altitudes, where relative humidity is below 70% while at 4000 m the distributions seem to change over the sea where the humidity increases.

  9. Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, Justin; Bettencourt, Ron; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Gharibyan, Narek; Talison, Bahram; Morris, Kevin; Smith, Cal

    2015-08-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the flux of neutrons and charged particles at peak burn in an inertial confinement fusion capsule induces measureable concentrations of nuclear reaction products in the target material. Radiochemical analysis of post-shot debris can be used to determine diagnostic parameters associated with implosion of the capsule, including fuel areal density and ablator-fuel mixing. Additionally, analysis of debris from specially doped targets can support nuclear forensic research. We have developed and are deploying the Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) diagnostic to collect shot debris and interact with post-shot reaction products at the NIF. VADER uses quick release collectors that are easily reconfigured for different materials and geometries. Collectors are located ~50 cm from the NIF target; each of up to 9 collectors views ~0.005-0.0125 steradians solid angle, dependent upon configuration. Dynamic loading of the NIF target vaporized mass was modelled using LS-DYNA. 3-dimensional printing was utilized to expedite the design process. Model-based manufacturing was used throughout. We will describe the design and operation of this diagnostic as well as some initial results.

  10. Water quality and quantity assessment of pervious pavements performance in experimental car park areas.

    PubMed

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Charlesworth, Susanne M; Castro-Fresno, Daniel; Andres-Valeri, Valerio C A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Pervious pavements have become one of the most used sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) techniques in car parks. This research paper presents the results of monitoring water quality from several experimental car park areas designed and constructed in Spain with bays made of interlocking concrete block pavement, porous asphalt, polymer-modified porous concrete and reinforced grass with plastic and concrete cells. Moreover, two different sub-base materials were used (limestone aggregates and basic oxygen furnace slag). This study therefore encompasses the majority of the materials used as permeable surfaces and sub-base layers all over the world. Effluent from the test bays was monitored for dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, total suspended solids, turbidity and total petroleum hydrocarbons in order to analyze the behaviour shown by each combination of surface and sub-base materials. In addition, permeability tests were undertaken in all car parks using the 'Laboratorio Caminos Santander' permeameter and the Cantabrian Portable Infiltrometer. All results are presented together with the influence of surface and sub-base materials on water quality indicators using bivariate correlation statistical analysis at a confidence level of 95%. The polymer-modified porous concrete surface course in combination with limestone aggregate sub-base presented the best performance.

  11. Parametric experimental studies on mixing characteristics within a low area ratio rectangular supersonic gaseous ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, S. K.; Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2016-07-01

    We use the rectangular gaseous supersonic ejector as a platform to study the mixing characteristics of a confined supersonic jet. The entrainment ratio (ER) of the ejector, the non-mixed length (LNM), and potential core length (LPC) of the primary supersonic jet are measures to characterize mixing within the supersonic ejector. Experiments are carried out on a low area ratio rectangular supersonic ejector with air as the working fluid in both primary and secondary flows. The design Mach number of the nozzle (MPD = 1.5-3.0) and primary flow stagnation pressure (Pop = 4.89-9.89 bars) are the parameters that are varied during experimentation. Wall static pressure measurements are carried out to understand the performance of the ejector as well as to estimate the LNM (the spatial resolution is limited by the placement of pressure transducers). Well-resolved flow images (with a spatial resolution of 50 μm/pixel and temporal resolution of 1.25 ms) obtained through Planar Laser Mie Scattering (PLMS) show the flow dynamics within the ejector with clarity. The primary flow and secondary flow are seeded separately with acetone that makes the LNM and LPC clearly visible in the flow images. These parameters are extracted from the flow images using in-house image processing routines. A significant development in this work is the definition of new scaling parameters within the ejector. LNM, non-dimensionalized with respect to the fully expanded jet height hJ, is found to be a linear function of the Mach number ratio (Mach number ratio is defined as the ratio of design Mach number (MPD) and fully expanded Mach number (MPJ) of the primary jet). This definition also provides a clear demarcation of under-expanded and over-expanded regimes of operation according to [MPD/MPJ] > 1 and [MPD/MPJ] < 1, respectively. It is observed that the ER increased in over-expanded mode (to 120%) and decreased in under-expanded mode (to 68%). Similarly, LNM decreased (to 21.8%) in over-expanded mode

  12. Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

  13. Research publications of the Cascade Head Experimental Forest and Scenic Research Area, Oregon Coast Range, 1934 to 1990.

    Treesearch

    Sarah E. Greene; Tawny. Blinn

    1991-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from research at the Cascade Head Experimental Forest and Scenic Research Area, Siuslaw National Forest, Oregon, from 1934 to 1990 is presented. Over 200 publications are listed, including papers, theses, and reports. An index is provided that cross-references the listings under appropriate keywords.

  14. Ecological restoration experiments (1992-2007) at the G.A. Pearson Natural Area, Fort Valley Experimental Forest (P-53)

    Treesearch

    Margaret M. Moore; Wallace Covington; Peter Z. Fulé; Stephen C. Hart; Thomas E. Kolb; Joy N. Mast; Stephen S. Sackett; Michael R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    In 1992 an experiment was initiated at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest to evaluate long-term ecosystem responses to two restoration treatments: thinning only and thinning with prescribed burning. Fifteen years of key findings about tree physiology, herbaceous, and ecosystem responses are presented.

  15. Ecological restoration experiments (1992-2007) at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area, Fort Valley Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Margaret M. Moore; W. Wallace Covington; Peter Z. Fule; Stephen C. Hart; Thomas E. Kolb; Joy N. Mast; Stephen S. Sackett; Michael R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    In 1992 an experiment was initiated at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest to evaluate long-term ecosystem responses to two restoration treatments: thinning only and thinning with prescribed burning. Fifteen years of key findings about tree physiology, herbaceous, and ecosystem responses are presented.

  16. Optimum design and experimental verification of glue bonding area and thickness for an eight-inch reflective mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Yen; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2016-09-01

    Effects of glue bonding area and bonding thickness on an eight-inch BOROFLOAT® reflective mirror have been studied numerically and experimentally. The comparison of optical aberrations under the self-weight loading and temperature difference has also been investigated. RTV566 has been selected to bond the mirror with on a ring support mount. The optimum glue bonding area and bonding thickness for isolating the temperature variation have been obtained through a design optimization process and then been used practically. A laser interferometer with a wavelength of 632.8 nm has been used to observe the optical path difference pattern and aberrations. The influence of ambient temperature on the mirror with the optimum glue bonding area and thickness has been carried out. It is concluded that the optimum design of the glue for isolating the temperature variation has been attained numerically and verified successfully with the experimental observations.

  17. Ecological Restoration Through Silviculture--A Savanna Management Demonstration Area, Sinkin Experimental Forest, Missouri

    Treesearch

    Edward F. Loewenstein; Kenneth R. Davidson

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, a project was initiated to demonstrate techniques and evaluate the efficacy of reducing overstory tree density and reintroducing fire in order to develop the tree composition, structure, and herbaceous complex typical of a savanna. On three study areas, two dominated by oak and one by shortleaf pine, the total basal area of all trees = 1.6 inches DBH was...

  18. Influence of Soil Erosion and Landslide Occurrence on Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Loss in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dialynas, Y. G.; Bastola, S.; Bras, R. L.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Silver, W. L.; Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests play a significant role in the global carbon (C) cycle. The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in Puerto Rico is characterized by intense erosion and landslide occurrence, which have been historically influenced by human activity and land use change, and drive the redistribution and burial of soil organic C (SOC) across the landscape. Estimates of regional C budgets do not systematically account for linkages between hydrological, geomorphological, and biogeochemical processes, which control the fate of eroded SOC. We quantify the impacts of erosion and rainfall-triggered landslides on SOC oxidation and accumulation at the Mameyes and Icacos watersheds. We developed and calibrated a spatially-explicit model of SOC dynamics, i.e. tRIBS-ECO (Triangulated Irregular Network-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator-Erosion and Carbon Oxidation), based on a coupled physically-based hydro-geomorphic model. The model inputs we used include measurements of SOC content at different horizons, and SOC oxidation and production rates derived from SOC turnover characteristics. We demonstrate the extent to which depth-dependent SOC oxidation and production are altered at eroding hillslopes and at landslide locations, and how this is being moderated by management practices. We estimated the SOC deposition rates at the floodplains of Mameyes and Icacos rivers, part of which is fluvially transported out of the system. The contrasting lithology of the two watersheds leads to different hydro-geomorphological behavior which controls the redistribution and storage of SOC. Results showed that topography and heterogeneity of tropical vegetation lead to significant spatial variability of the erosion-induced soil CO2 flux to the atmosphere. We highlight the importance of the representation of SOC redistribution driven by local variation in lithological and geomorphological characteristics and hydroclimatic conditions in attempts to quantify watershed-scale soil C

  19. Experimental study on interfacial area transport in downward two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyi

    In view of the importance of two group interfacial area transport equations and lack of corresponding accurate downward flow database that can reveal two group interfacial area transport, a systematic database for adiabatic, air-water, vertically downward two-phase flow in a round pipe with inner diameter of 25.4 mm was collected to gain an insight of interfacial structure and provide benchmarking data for two-group interfacial area transport models. A four-sensor conductivity probe was used to measure the local two phase flow parameters and data was collected with data sampling frequency much higher than conventional data sampling frequency to ensure the accuracy. Axial development of local flow parameter profiles including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and Sauter mean diameter were presented. Drastic inter-group transfer of void fraction and interfacial area was observed at bubbly to slug transition flow. And the wall peaked interfacial area concentration profiles were observed in churn-turbulent flow. The importance of local data about these phenomenon on flow structure prediction and interfacial area transport equation benchmark was analyzed. Bedsides, in order to investigate the effect of inlet conditions, all experiments were repeated after installing the flow straightening facility, and the results were briefly analyzed. In order to check the accuracy of current data, the experiment results were cross-checked with rotameter measurement as well as drift-flux model prediction, the averaged error is less than 15%. Current models for two-group interfacial area transport equation were evaluated using these data. The results show that two-group interfacial area transport equations with current models can predict most flow conditions with error less than 20%, except some bubbly to slug transition flow conditions and some churn-turbulent flow conditions. The disagreement between models and experiments could result from underestimate of inter

  20. Experimental Altitude Performance of JP-4 Fuel and Liquid-Oxygen Rocket Engine with an Area Ratio of 48

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, Anthony; Hendrix, Charles D.; Huff, Vearl N.

    1959-01-01

    The performance for four altitudes (sea-level, 51,000, 65,000, and 70,000 ft) of a rocket engine having a nozzle area ratio of 48.39 and using JP-4 fuel and liquid oxygen as a propellant was evaluated experimentally by use of a 1000-pound-thrust engine operating at a chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute. The altitude environment was obtained by a rocket-ejector system which utilized the rocket exhaust gases as the pumping fluid of the ejector. Also, an engine having a nozzle area ratio of 5.49 designed for sea level was tested at sea-level conditions. The following table lists values from faired experimental curves at an oxidant-fuel ratio of 2.3 for various approximate altitudes.

  1. An Experimental Study of the Noise Due to Traffic in a Congested Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, M.; Sankar, P.

    2016-03-01

    Noise pollution in an urban environment is an issue of serious concern in the major cities of India. There are various factors that contribute to the increase of noise levels in urban areas. The intensity of traffic is one of the factors which contributes to a drastic increase in environmental noise. The management of noise pollution has to be considered in the decision making process. In this paper, an attempt is made to study the existing noise level due to the traffic in Velachery which is declared as a sensitive area by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MoEF). The noise level data is collected using the MS6710 digital sound meter. The Custic simulation software version 3.2 is used for finding the propagation of noise. The spatial patterns of measurement were also calculated, in the sub-urban area of Velachery, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India. A means of transmitting this data to vehicles moving in the area, through a wireless medium is simulated using NCTUns 6.0 (network simulator), to enable drivers to understand the environmental conditions. A hardware was also designed which can be used to transmit and receive the noise data using the Zigbee module. A noise transmitting station is placed at a junction, so that it can transmit this noise data to the receivers which are fitted inside the vehicles.

  2. Vascular flora of the Fernow Experimental Forest and adjacent portions of the Otter Creek Wilderness Area

    Treesearch

    Robert B. Coxe; Steven L. Stephenson; Darlene M. Madarish; Gary W. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The vascular flora of the region we considered include 94 families representing at least 461 species. Fifty-four of these or nearly 12 percent are species known to have been introduced. Asteraceae (46 species) is the single largest family; Cyperaceae (31), Liliaceae (29), Poaceae and Rosaceae (20 each) also are important families in the general study area. The 461...

  3. The precautionary principle and risk perception: experimental studies in the EMF area.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Peter M; Schütz, Holger

    2005-04-01

    Possible adverse health effects due to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from cellular phones and base stations present a major public health issue across Europe. Because scientists cannot exclude that EMFs may cause health problems, the application of the precautionary principle is debated heavily. By considering precautionary measures, political decision makers hope to cope with public fears about EMFs. We present results from two experimental studies that indicate that precautionary measures may trigger concerns, amplify EMF-related risk perceptions, and lower trust in public health protection. Such impacts, questioning common expectations, should be considered in decisions about precautionary measures.

  4. The Precautionary Principle and Risk Perception: Experimental Studies in the EMF Area

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Peter M.; Schütz, Holger

    2005-01-01

    Possible adverse health effects due to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from cellular phones and base stations present a major public health issue across Europe. Because scientists cannot exclude that EMFs may cause health problems, the application of the precautionary principle is debated heavily. By considering precautionary measures, political decision makers hope to cope with public fears about EMFs. We present results from two experimental studies that indicate that precautionary measures may trigger concerns, amplify EMF-related risk perceptions, and lower trust in public health protection. Such impacts, questioning common expectations, should be considered in decisions about precautionary measures. PMID:15811829

  5. Experimental Mating of Trapped Vortex Diffusers with Large Area Ratio Thrust Augmentors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    oto 4e SL#0 0.o Na NN Ill0 0 0 0 00 iii m m.I- *0 CL 100 0 ww mU *00 C 6. 0 4.2 u >.- E enin >ý FL .C- +JJJJ J~N •mmmm mmm ill iiJ: JJJ JJ •7 / z cc...used by the VSD high speed wind tunnel. The balance has a maximum designed axial load of 700 pounds. 14 SECTION III TEST PROCEDURE Prior to the tests...performed. Experimental output Is listed in Table II and schematics of all configurations are given In Figura I1. Tabulated and plotted augmentation

  6. Area-averaged surface fluxes and their time-space variability over the FIFE experimental domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. A.; Hsu, A. Y.; Crosson, W. L.; Field, R. T.; Fritschen, L. J.; Gurney, R. J.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Kustas, W. P.; Nie, D.; Shuttleworth, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    The underlying mean and variance properties of surface net radiation, sensible-latent heat fluxes and soil heat flux are studied over the densely instrumented grassland region encompassing FIFE. Flux variability is discussed together with the problem of scaling up to area-averaged fluxes. Results are compared and contrasted for cloudy and clear situations and examined for the influence of surface-induced biophysical controls (burn and grazing treatments) and topographic controls (aspect ratios and slope factors).

  7. Behavior of volatiles in Mars' polar areas - A model incorporating new experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, D. W.; Farmer, C. B.; Laporte, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    A model has been developed to explain the north polar water vapor results obtained by the Viking orbiter Mars atmospheric water detector; it has also been used to compute the thickness of seasonally deposited CO2 frost, the variation of the total atmospheric pressure, and wind velocities due to mass motions associated with CO2 condensation. A north polar water ice thickness in excess of 1 m and an ice albedo a of 0.34(+0.06,-0.03) are inferred from a comparison of the model and experimental data. The model results confirm an earlier conclusion that the atmosphere over the ice is saturated. It is suggested that concentration of the atmospheric inert gases in the polar region, combined with local topography and arctic circulation patterns, could be responsible for the south remnant cap not being at the south pole

  8. Patrones de lluvia, transcolación y flujo de nutrientes en las cuencas de Bisley, Bosque Experimental de Luquillo, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Tamara Heartsill; Carlos R. Estrada Ruiz; Samuel Moya

    2006-01-01

    Describimos la cantidad de lluvia y transcolación durante veinte años (1988-2008), incluyendo varios periodos de sequías, huracanes y lluvias intensas. La composición de nutrientes en la lluvia y transcolación fueron medidos semanalmente durante quince años (1988-2002), incluyendo los periodos de...

  9. STUDY OF SOIL AND LEAF LITTER MICROBIAL FATTY ACID PROFILES IN TABONUCO FOREST IN THE LUQUILLO EXPERIMENTAL FOREST IN PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of this study suggests that there are two significantly distinct microbial communities in the leaf litter and soil components of this tropical forest. Fungi are more abundant in the leaf litter while bacteria are more abundant in the soil.

  10. STUDY OF SOIL AND LEAF LITTER MICROBIAL FATTY ACID PROFILES IN TABONUCO FOREST IN THE LUQUILLO EXPERIMENTAL FOREST IN PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of this study suggests that there are two significantly distinct microbial communities in the leaf litter and soil components of this tropical forest. Fungi are more abundant in the leaf litter while bacteria are more abundant in the soil.

  11. Distribution of nitrous oxide and regulators of its production across a tropical rainforest catena in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    CLAIRE P. MCSWINEY; WILLIAM H. MCDOWELL; MICHAEL KELLER

    2001-01-01

    Understanding of N2O fluxes to the atmosphere is complicated by interactions between chemical and physical controls on both production and movement of the gas. To better understand how N2O production is controlled in the soil, we measured concentrations of N2O and of the proximal controllers on its production in soil water and soil air in a field study in the Rio...

  12. Experimental set-up for three PHOEBUS type large-area heliostats at the PSA

    SciTech Connect

    Haeger, M.; Schiel, W.; Romero, M.; Schmitz-Goeb, M.

    1995-11-01

    Three large-area heliostat prototypes are being erected at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria by Spanish and German industry. The objective is to demonstrate their technical and economical suitability for a PHOEBUS power tower plant. The two different heliostat designs including two 100 ml glass/metal faceted heliostats and one 150 m{sup 2} stressed membrane heliostat are tested at a representative distance of 485 m to the PSA`s CESA tower. The paper introduces the heliostat designs and test set-up, such as location, targets, flux measurement, data acquisition and control.

  13. Experimental investigation of the influences of shape and surface area on the EGR cooler efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sanghoon; Park, Sangki; Choi, Kapseung; Kim, Hyungman

    2011-06-01

    The cooled EGR system is one of the most effective techniques currently available for reducing NOx emissions. In this study, engine dynamometer experiments were performed to investigate the efficiencies of the shell and tube-type and stack-type EGR coolers. The results show that the heat exchange of the stack-type EGR cooler is much more effective than that of the shell and tube type because of the increased surface area and better mixing of the coolant flow, and also more PM is produced at low exhaust gas temperature than at high temperature.

  14. Particulate matter levels in a suburban Mediterranean area: analysis of a 53-month long experimental campaign.

    PubMed

    Pateraki, St; Asimakopoulos, D N; Maggos, Th; Vasilakos, Ch

    2010-10-15

    Parallel measurements of ambient particulate matter mass in terms of PM(10), PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10), conducted during a 53 months long experiment, between 2003 and 2008. The data constituting one of the longest simultaneous comparative data sets for the three PM fractions in Europe, collected at a suburban area of Athens, Aghia Paraskevi. Total means of mass concentrations for PM(10), PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) were in the order of 34.8, 18.0 and 23.8 microg/m(3), respectively. Seasonal variability of PM levels governed by the fact that the specific site is dominated by secondary aerosol emissions with the concentrations presenting a shift to the warm period. During the whole sampling period PM(10) were mainly composed of PM(2.5) while particles with the bigger diameter proved to be strongly correlated in all the cases. It would be interesting to mention that all the three aerosol fractions did not present any association with the inorganic pollutants. Stagnant conditions as well as the wind direction proved to be key mechanisms for the configuration of the air quality patterns. Saronic Gulf sea-breeze development enhanced the aerosol transportation from the industrialized greater area of Piraeus and the polluted center of the city, to the Northern suburbs. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An analytical and experimental study of sound propagation and attenuation in variable-area ducts. [reducing aircraft engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kaiser, J. E.; Marshall, R. L.; Hurst, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of sound suppression techniques in ducts that produce refraction effects due to axial velocity gradients was evaluated. A computer code based on the method of multiple scales was used to calculate the influence of axial variations due to slow changes in the cross-sectional area as well as transverse gradients due to the wall boundary layers. An attempt was made to verify the analytical model through direct comparison of experimental and computational results and the analytical determination of the influence of axial gradients on optimum liner properties. However, the analytical studies were unable to examine the influence of non-parallel ducts on the optimum linear conditions. For liner properties not close to optimum, the analytical predictions and the experimental measurements were compared. The circumferential variations of pressure amplitudes and phases at several axial positions were examined in straight and variable-area ducts, hard-wall and lined sections with and without a mean flow. Reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental results was obtained.

  16. High surface area electrodes in ionic polymer transducers: Numerical and experimental investigations of the electro-chemical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Habchi, Wassim; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Akle, Etienne J.; Leo, Donald J.

    2011-04-01

    Ionomeric polymer transducer (IPT) is an electroactive polymer that has received considerable attention due to its ability to generate large bending strain (>5%) and moderate stress at low applied voltages (±2 V). Ionic polymer transducers consist of an ionomer, usually Nafion, sandwiched between two electrically conductive electrodes. A novel fabrication technique denoted as the direct assembly process (DAP) enabled controlled electrode architecture in ionic polymer transducers. A DAP built transducer consists of two high surface area electrodes made of electrically conducting particles uniformly distributed in an ionomer matrix sandwiching an ionomer membrane. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and simulate the effect of these high surface area particles on the electro-chemical response of an IPT. Theoretical investigations as well as experimental verifications are performed. The model used consists of a convection-diffusion equation describing the chemical field as well as a Poisson equation describing the electrical field. The two-dimensional model incorporates highly conductive particles randomly distributed in the electrode area. Traditionally, these kinds of electrodes were simulated with boundary conditions representing flat electrodes with a large dielectric permittivity at the polymer boundary. This model enables the design of electrodes with complicated geometrical patterns. In the experimental section, several transducers are fabricated using the DAP process on Nafion 117 membranes. The architecture of the high surface area electrodes in these samples is varied. The concentration of the high surface area RuO2 particles is varied from 30 vol% up to 60 vol% at a fixed thickness of 30 μm, while the overall thickness of the electrode is varied from 10 μm up to 40 μm at a fixed concentration of 45%. The flux and charge accumulation in the materials are measured experimentally and compared to the results of the numerical simulations. Trends of

  17. Soil Organic Matter Characterization by 13C-NMR and Thermal Analysis in Deep Tropical Soil Profiles from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store large quantities of carbon (C) as soil organic matter (SOM), a substantial proportion of which is stored deep (> 30 cm) in the soil profile. Characterization of tropical SOM remains difficult, in part due to the analytical challenges associated high iron and low C concentrations. In this study, we combined solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with analytical thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; evolved CO2 gas analysis, CO2-EGA) to explore patterns in SOM composition in deep soil profiles from two contrasting soil types at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in northeast Puerto Rico. Prior to 13C NMR, soils were repeatedly demineralized with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic compounds and concentrate organic matter. Given the scant information on tropical subsoil OM, we also sought to evaluate the effect of HF acid treatments on tropical subsoil SOM. HF treatments effectively enriched sample C and removed paramagnetic compounds, allowing us to obtain high-quality NMR spectra for low-C subsoils. C:N ratios before and after HF treatment were nearly identical (mean = 16.6 ± 0.8), suggesting that the SOM pool was not substantially fractionated, though C recoveries were low and variable. Thermal analyses confirmed the loss of a substantial fraction of the soil mineral matrix, however, retention of several endothermic regions in post-HF Inceptisol soils indicated that not all minerals were completely solubilized. In addition, important differences in the DSC and CO2-EGA thermograms were observed in comparing samples before versus after HF treatments. These results suggest that the organo-mineral associations were substantially altered, though it is not immediately clear the degree to which alterations in chemical composition versus binding association have changed. In addition to these qualitative changes, quantitative interpretations of 13C-NMR results from low-C and high

  18. Shielding design of an underground experimental area at point 5 of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS).

    PubMed

    Mueller, Mario J; Stevenson, Graham R

    2005-01-01

    Increasing projected values of the circulating beam intensity in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and decreasing limits to radiation exposure, taken with the increasing non-acceptance of unjustified and unoptimised radiation exposures, have led to the need to re-assess the shielding between the ECX and ECA5 underground experimental areas of the SPS. Twenty years ago, these experimental areas at SPS-Point 5 housed the UA1 experiment, where Carlo Rubbia and his team verified the existence of W and Z bosons. The study reported here describes such a re-assessment based on simulations using the multi-purpose FLUKA radiation transport code. This study concludes that while the main shield which is made of concrete blocks and is 4.8 m thick satisfactorily meets the current design limits even at the highest intensities presently planned for the SPS, dose rates calculated for liaison areas on both sides of the main shield significantly exceed the design limits. Possible ways of improving the shielding situation are discussed.

  19. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Sperduti, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Pola, A.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a 241Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm-2 s-1 to 1000 cm-2 s-1 can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  20. Man-made chemicals found in remote areas of the world: the experimental definition for POPs.

    PubMed

    Ballschmite, Karlheinz; Hackenberg, Rudolf; Jarman, Walter M; Looser, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Members of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN-ECE) signed a legally binding protocol on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in February 1998 under the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. A treaty that intends to control the production, import, export, disposal and use of toxic chemicals that persist for decades in the environment has been formally signed at a conference in May 2001 in Stockholm. The 2001 POP treaty, like the 1998 LRTAP POP protocol, contains a provision on adding further chemicals to the initial group of twelve or fifteen. The occurrence of a compound or a group of compounds in so called remote and pristine areas, e.g. in the Artic or in the Southern Hemisphere, proves its stability under the chemical and biological conditions of the environment. Compounds identified in this way, in samples taken primarily in very remote regions of the planet, are classified by their environmental fate and global distribution as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), regardless of any political assessments.

  1. Visual motion processing by neurons in area MT of macaque monkeys with experimental amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    El-Shamayleh, Yasmine; Kiorpes, Lynne; Kohn, Adam; Movshon, J. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Early experience affects the development of the visual system. Ocular misalignment or unilateral blur often causes amblyopia, a disorder which has become a standard for understanding developmental plasticity. Neurophysiological studies of amblyopia have focused almost entirely on the first stage of cortical processing in striate cortex. Here we provide the first extensive study of how amblyopia affects extrastriate cortex in nonhuman primates. We studied macaque monkeys (M. nemestrina) for which we have detailed psychophysical data, directly comparing physiological findings to perceptual capabilities. Because these subjects showed deficits in motion discrimination, we focused on area MT/V5, which plays a central role in motion processing. Most neurons in normal MT respond equally to visual stimuli presented through either eye; most recorded in amblyopes strongly preferred stimulation of the non-amblyopic (fellow) eye. The pooled responses of neurons driven by the amblyopic eye showed reduced sensitivity to coherent motion, and preferred higher speeds, in agreement with behavioral measurements. MT neurons were more limited in their capacity to integrate motion information over time than expected from behavioral performance; neurons driven by the amblyopic eye had even shorter integration times than those driven by the fellow eye. We conclude that some, but not all, of the motion sensitivity deficits associated with amblyopia can be explained by abnormal development of MT. PMID:20826682

  2. An experimental study of a minette from the Milk River area, southern Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Sean P.; Luth, Robert W.

    2012-12-01

    Buhlmann et al. (Can J Earth Sci 37: 1629-1650, 2000) studied the minettes and xenoliths from the Milk River area of southern Alberta, Canada. Based on previous work, they hypothesized that the minettes were derived from a source containing phlogopite + clinopyroxene ± olivine, at pressures ≥1.7 GPa. To test this hypothesis, liquidus experiments were performed on a primitive minette between 1.33 and 2.21 GPa and between 1,300 and 1,400 °C to constrain the mineralogy of its source region. We found a multiple saturation point along the liquidus at 1.77 GPa and 1,350 °C, where the liquid coexists with orthopyroxene and olivine. Neither phlogopite nor clinopyroxene were found to be liquidus phases, which is inconsistent with Buhlmann et al.'s hypothesis. We suggest that our minette is not primary, but had re-equilibrated with harzburgitic mantle subsequent to formation. In such a scenario, partial melting of a veined source containing mica and clinopyroxene occurred at or near the base of the Wyoming craton (~200 km). Minimal heating or the introduction of hydrous fluids into the source would be required to induce partial melting. Rapid ascent rates, coupled with slow cooling rates, of the "primary minette magma" would preserve the high temperature observed in our experiments. At ~58 km, our "primary minette magma" likely stalled and re-equilibrated with the harzburgite surroundings.

  3. Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the explosive experimental area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, E.C.; Bell, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic and water-quality data were collected at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site at Dahlgren, Virginia, as part of a hydrogeologic assessment of the shallow aquifer system begun in 1993. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted this study to provide the U.S. Navy with hydrogeologic data to aid in the evaluation of the effects from remediation of contaminated sites and to protect against additional contamination. This report describes the ground-water observation- well network, hydrogeologic, and water-quality data collected between October 1993 and April 1995. The report includes a description of the locations and construction of 28 observation wells on the Explosive Experimental Area. Hydrogeologic data include lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements of selected core intervals. Hydrologic data include synoptic and hourly measurements of ground-water levels, and observation-well slug tests to determine horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Water-quality data include analyses of major dissolved constituents in ground water and surface water.

  4. Response of phytoplankton communities to acidification and recovery in Killarney Park and the Experimental Lakes Area, Ontario.

    PubMed

    Findlay, David L

    2003-04-01

    It has been widely speculated that controls of SO2 emissions would stimulate recovery of acidified freshwater lakes in Canada, the United States and Europe. Phytoplankton communities from 22 lakes near Killarney Park Ontario, covering a pH range from 4.5-7.7, were studied from 1998-2000 and compared to data from experimentally acidified (pH decreased 6.7 to 4.5) and recovered (pH increased to 6.0) Lake 302 South at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario to assess recovery from acidification. Based on historical data, pH levels have rebounded to above 6.0 in several lakes in the Killarney area that were previously acidified to pH 5.0-5.5. Phytoplankton biomass was not correlated to pH, but there was a highly significant relationship between species richness and pH. Recovery trajectories were observed in a subset of 6 lakes, combining species diversity data from the present study with historical data. Correspondence analysis indicated that several of the lakes that experienced increased pH have shifted towards phytoplankton assemblages typical of circumneutral environments.

  5. Interfacial Area Transport Equation Models and Validation against High Resolution Experimental Data for Small and Large Diameter Vertical Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Akshay J.

    For analyses of Nuclear Power Plants, the current state-of-the-art model for predicting the behavior of two-phase flows is the two-fluid model. In the two-fluid model, balance equations are coupled together through transfer terms that depend on the area of the interface between liquid and gas. Efforts in the past have been focused on the development of an interfacial area transport equation model (IATE) in order to eliminate the drawbacks of static flow regime maps currently used in best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system codes. The IATE attempts to model the dynamic evolution of the gas/liquid interface by accounting for the different interaction mechanisms (i.e. bubble break-up and coalescence). The further development and validation of IATE models has been hindered by the lack of adequate experimental databases in regions beyond the bubbly flow regime. At the TOPFLOW test facility, experiments utilizing wire-mesh sensors have been performed over a wide range of flow conditions, establishing a database of high resolution (in space and time) data. The objective of the dissertation is to evaluate and improve current IATE models using the TOPFLOW database and to assess the uncertainty in the reconstructed interfacial area measured using wire-mesh sensors. The small-diameter Fu-Ishii model was assessed against the TOPFLOW 52 mm data. The model was found to perform well (within the experimental uncertainty of +/-10%) for low void fractions. At high void fractions, the bubble interaction mechanism responsible for poor performance of the model was identified. A genetic algorithm was then used to quantify the correct incidence of this mechanism on the overall evolution of the interfacial area concentration along the pipe vertical axis. The large-diameter Smith-Schlegel model was assessed against the TOPFLOW 198 mm data. This model was also found to perform well at low void fractions. At high void fractions, the good agreement between the model predictions and the

  6. The impact of area-based initiatives on physical activity trends in deprived areas; a quasi-experimental evaluation of the Dutch District Approach.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Daniëlle; Droomers, Mariël; Jongeneel-Grimen, Birthe; Wingen, Marleen; Stronks, Karien; Kunst, Anton E

    2014-03-11

    Numerous area-based initiatives (ABIs) have been implemented in deprived neighbourhoods across Europe. These large-scale initiatives aim to tackle the socio-economic and environmental problems in these areas that might influence physical activity (PA). There is little robust evidence of their impact on PA. This study aimed to assess the impact of a Dutch ABI called the District Approach on trends in leisure-time PA in deprived districts. Repeated cross-sectional data on 48401 adults across the Netherlands were obtained from the Integrated Survey on Household Living Conditions (POLS) 2004-2011. 1517 of these adults resided in deprived target districts and 46884 adults resided elsewhere in the Netherlands. In a quasi-experimental interrupted time-series design, multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to assess trends in leisure-time walking, cycling, and sports before and during the intervention. Trends in deprived target districts were compared with trends in various control groups. The role of the intensity of environmental interventions was also assessed. Deprived target districts showed a significantly positive change in walking trend between the pre-intervention and intervention period. The trend change in the deprived target districts was significantly larger compared to the rest of the Netherlands, but not compared to other deprived districts. For cycling and sports, neither deprived districts nor control districts showed a significant trend change. For all leisure-time PA outcomes, trend changes were not related to the intensity of environmental interventions in the deprived target districts. Some evidence was found to suggest that ABIs like the District Approach have a positive impact on leisure-time PA in deprived districts, regardless of the intensity of environmental interventions.

  7. Experimental validation of damping properties and solar pressure effects on flexible, high area-to-mass ratio debris model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channumsin, Sittiporn; Ceriotti, Matteo; Radice, Gianmarco; Watson, Ian

    2017-09-01

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) is a recently-discovered type of debris originating from delamination of aging spacecraft; it is mostly detected near the geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Observation data indicates that these objects are characterised by high reflectivity, high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR), fast rotation, high sensitivity to perturbations (especially solar radiation pressure) and change of area-to-mass ratio (AMR) over time. As a result, traditional models (e.g. cannonball) are unsuitable to represent and predict this debris' orbital evolution. Previous work by the authors effectively modelled the flexible debris by means of multibody dynamics to improve the prediction accuracy. The orbit evolution with the flexible model resulted significantly different from using the rigid model. This paper aims to present a methodology to determine the dynamic properties of thin membranes with the purpose to validate the deformation characteristics of the flexible model. A high-vacuum chamber (10-4 mbar) to significantly decrease air friction, inside which a thin membrane is hinged at one end but free at the other provides the experimental setup. A free motion test is used to determine the damping characteristics and natural frequency of the thin membrane via logarithmic decrement and frequency response. The membrane can swing freely in the chamber and the motion is tracked by a static, optical camera, and a Kalman filter technique is implemented in the tracking algorithm to reduce noise and increase the tracking accuracy of the oscillating motion. Then, the effect of solar radiation pressure on the thin membrane is investigated: a high power spotlight (500-2000 W) is used to illuminate the sample and any displacement of the membrane is measured by means of a high-resolution laser sensor. Analytic methods from the natural frequency response and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) including multibody simulations of both experimental setups are used for the validation of the

  8. An experimental study of Aurelia aurita feeding behaviour: Inference of the potential predation impact on a temperate estuarine nursery area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Rita; Teodósio, Maria Alexandra; Garrido, Susana

    2014-06-01

    Temperate estuaries are nursery areas for economically important fisheries resources. The common jellyfish Aurelia aurita is a resident species in many of these areas, where it can reach high abundances. This work aimed to determine the potential for predation of A. aurita on zooplanktonic organisms and early life stages of fishes, measuring feeding rates at concentrations that mimic those occurring for zooplankton, fish eggs and larvae in an estuarine nursery area. A set of experiments was aimed at determining the feeding selectivity of jellyfish when offered a mixture of fish eggs and larvae and wild plankton. Clearance rates varied markedly with prey availability and concentrations. When given mixtures of different prey types, jellyfish preferentially elected some taxa (copepods and fish eggs). Data obtained in the laboratory experiments were used to infer the potential impact of jellyfish predation upon zooplankton and ichthyoplankton in the Guadiana estuary (Southern Iberia). Repeated sampling of zooplankton, fish eggs and medusae was undertaken during the summer season of 2011. Abundance determinations were combined with experimentally estimated clearance rates of individual medusa to infer the potential jellyfish-induced mortality on prey in the area. In June and early August jellyfish-induced mortality rates were very high, and half-life times (t1/2) were consequently short for the zooplankton and ichthyoplankton. Although the potentially overestimation of our feeding rates typical of confined laboratory experiments, the results show high ingestion and clearance rates at high temperatures, typical from summer condition, and results also suggest that either by predation on early life stages of fish, or by competition for food resources, jellyfish may have a significant impact on estuarine communities and its nursery function.

  9. Effects of living near an urban motorway on the wellbeing of local residents in deprived areas: Natural experimental study.

    PubMed

    Foley, Louise; Prins, Richard; Crawford, Fiona; Humphreys, David; Mitchell, Richard; Sahlqvist, Shannon; Thomson, Hilary; Ogilvie, David

    2017-01-01

    Health and wellbeing are partly shaped by the neighbourhood environment. In 2011, an eight kilometre (five mile) extension to the M74 motorway was opened in Glasgow, Scotland, constructed through a predominantly urban, deprived area. We evaluated the effects of the new motorway on wellbeing in local residents. This natural experimental study involved a longitudinal cohort (n = 365) and two cross-sectional samples (baseline n = 980; follow-up n = 978) recruited in 2005 and 2013. Adults from one of three study areas-surrounding the new motorway, another existing motorway, or no motorway-completed a postal survey. Within areas, individual measures of motorway proximity were calculated. Wellbeing was assessed with the mental (MCS-8) and physical (PCS-8) components of the SF-8 scale at both time points, and the short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (SWEMWBS) at follow-up only. In multivariable linear regression analyses, cohort participants living nearer to the new M74 motorway experienced significantly reduced mental wellbeing over time (MCS-8: -3.6, 95% CI -6.6 to -0.7) compared to those living further away. In cross-sectional and repeat cross-sectional analyses, an interaction was found whereby participants with a chronic condition living nearer to the established M8 motorway experienced reduced (MCS-8: -3.7, 95% CI -8.3 to 0.9) or poorer (SWEMWBS: -1.1, 95% CI -2.0 to -0.3) mental wellbeing compared to those living further away. We found some evidence that living near to a new motorway worsened local residents' wellbeing. In an area with an existing motorway, negative impacts appeared to be concentrated in those with chronic conditions, which may exacerbate existing health inequalities and contribute to poorer health outcomes. Health impacts of this type of urban regeneration intervention should be more fully taken into account in future policy and planning.

  10. Status report of Area 15 experimental dairy farm: dairy husbandry January 1977-June 1979, agronomic practices January 1978-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final status report on the operation of the experimental dairy herd and farm in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site. Operation of the farm was transferred from the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas to a contractor in September of 1979. The dairy herd portion of the report covers the period from January 1977 to June 1979. Improvement and addition to the facilities, production and reproduction statistics for individual cows and the herd, the veterinary medicine practices employed, and summaries of the metabolism studies that involved the dairy herd are discussed. The agronomic portion of the report covers the period January 1978 to June 1979. Topics include irrigation, fertilization, weed and insect control, and forage production.

  11. Experimental demonstration of a novel indoor optical wireless localization system for high-speed personal area networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Lim, Christina; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2015-04-01

    In this Letter, we propose a novel indoor localization system based on optical wireless technology. By using the same architecture as the high-speed full-duplex indoor optical wireless communication system, the "search and scan" process, and the added transmission power and beam footprint information in the "search and scan" message, indoor localization functionality is achieved. Proof-of-concept experiments are carried out, and results show that an average error of <15  cm is achieved with a localization beam size of 1 m. In addition, the major localization-accuracy-limiting factors are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. When incorporated with the optical wireless communication system, high-speed indoor wireless personal area networks can be achieved.

  12. Vascular plant checklist of the Chimney Spring and Limestone Flats Prescribed Burning Study Areas within ponderosa pine experimental forests in northern Arizona

    Treesearch

    Catherine Scudieri; James F. Fowler; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Laura Williams; Sally M. Haase

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a vascular plant species list for two sites that are part of a long-term study exploring the effects of varying fire intervals on forest characteristics including the abundance and composition of understory vegetation. The Chimney Spring study area is on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest near Flagstaff, AZ, and the Limestone Flats study area is on...

  13. Vascular plant checklist of the Chimney Spring and Limestone Flats prescribed burning study areas within ponderosa pine experimental forests in northern Arizona (P-53)

    Treesearch

    Catherine Scudieri; James Fowler; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Laura Williams; Sally Haase

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a vascular plant species list for two sites that are part of a long-term study exploring the effects of varying fire intervals on forest characteristics including the abundance and composition of understory vegetation. The Chimney Spring study area is on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest near Flagstaff, AZ and the Limestone Flats study area is on...

  14. The Experimental Lakes Area: Over 45 Years of Whole Ecosystem Monitoring and Manipulation Experiments and a Focus on the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The IISD Experimental Lakes Area is a unique facility which has existed since 1968 and consists of 58 lakes and their watersheds set aside for research purposes. The IISD-ELA also boasts an on-site water chemistry lab, accommodations and facilities for up to 60 personnel. Since its inception in 1968 over 50 whole ecosystem experiments have been conducted at the ELA including eutrophication, acidification of lakes, environmental mercury fates, hydro-electric reservoir impacts and much more. The recent partnership between IISD and ELA has allowed ELA to refocus on freshwater research and policy development in a time where the preservation of the earth's most precious resource is of the utmost concern. In addition to water quality monitoring, the ELA is also focused on autotrophic ecology, zooplankton community structures, fish population and behaviour and food-web interactions. Monitoring all of these disciplines and their inter-relationships gives the research facility a unique perspective and along with the long term dataset stretching back to 1968 the ELA can look at historical records to monitor long term changes in the environment.

  15. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeldt, M.; Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-08-01

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPPlat) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPPlat is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910 nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPPlat is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPPlat, whose influence on total BPPlat remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  16. Optimizing low impact development (LID) for stormwater runoff treatment in urban area, Korea: Experimental and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sang-Soo; Choi, Dong-Ho; Jung, Jae-Woon; Lee, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Hyuk; Yoon, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Kyung Hwa

    2015-12-01

    Currently, continued urbanization and development result in an increase of impervious areas and surface runoff including pollutants. Also one of the greatest issues in pollutant emissions is the first flush effect (FFE), which implies a greater discharge rate of pollutant mass in the early part in the storm. Low impact development (LID) practices have been mentioned as a promising strategy to control urban stormwater runoff and pollution in the urban ecosystem. However, this requires many experimental and modeling efforts to test LID characteristics and propose an adequate guideline for optimizing LID management. In this study, we propose a novel methodology to optimize the sizes of different types of LID by conducting intensive stormwater monitoring and numerical modeling in a commercial site in Korea. The methodology proposed optimizes LID size in an attempt to moderate FFE on a receiving waterbody. Thereby, the main objective of the optimization is to minimize mass first flush (MFF), which is an indicator for quantifying FFE. The optimal sizes of 6 different LIDs ranged from 1.2 mm to 3.0 mm in terms of runoff depths, which significantly moderate the FFE. We hope that the new proposed methodology can be instructive for establishing LID strategies to mitigate FFE.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Analyses on the Temperature Distribution in the Dental Implant Preparation Area when Using a Surgical Guide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Feng; Wu, Jian-Lei; Zhang, Jian-Xing; Peng, Wei; Liao, Wen-Qing

    2016-04-14

    close to the critical point at which bone necrosis occurs. Based on theoretical analysis, experimentation, and FEM simulation, the temperature distribution of the drilling area in the placement of dental implants under surgical guide was determined. For clinical operation, improved cooling methods, such as using a drill with an internal cooling channel, should be used, and the drill should be regularly withdrawn during drilling. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. [Experimental study. Reduction of pressure in areas of risk of developing pressure ulcers with a hydrocellular dressing].

    PubMed

    Torra i Bou, J E; Rueda López, J; Ramón Cantón, C

    2000-03-01

    The handling of pressure is a basic measure in the prevention and treatment of bed sores. It is possible to reduce and ease pressure by various means including changes in posture, use of special surfaces for handling pressure as well as the use of local applications or external applications which reduce pressure. Today nurses have a large quantity of external applications available to use although only some hydrocellular ones are capable to reduce pressure due to their hydrocellular structure. An experimental study was designed to calculate the level of pressure before and after applying an Allevyn hydrocellular external application in the area of the sacrum, ischium, and heel of three healthy volunteers; first, Volunteer A, a 85 kg. 170 cm man; second, Volunteer B, a 54.3 kg. 159 cm woman; and third, Volunteer C, a 69.4 kg 164 cm man. Measures were taken on two types of surfaces: a viscoelastic foam mattress and a conventional hospital mattress. All measurements were repeated at 0, 30, 45 and 60 degrees of inclination. Pressure was determined by means of a Talley pressure monitor, Oxford Pressure Monitor MK II. A total of 144 pressure reading were taken. The overall average reduction after applying a external hydrocellular application on all volunteers, at all inclinations and on all surfaces for each of the three zones were 19.5% in the sacrum, 13.8% in the ischium and 20.15% in the heel. Even though our study has its limitations, such as young, healthy volunteers, we can establish that the external hydrocellular application studied does have a local reducing effect on pressure. Since every external hydrocellular application has its own specific structure, the results of our study can not be applied with certainty to other external applications inside the hydrocellular group.

  19. A new experimental method for the determination of the effective orifice area based on the acoustical source term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, L.; Knapp, Y.; Pibarot, P.; Bertrand, E.; Garcia, D.; Durand, L. G.; Rieu, R.

    2005-12-01

    The effective orifice area (EOA) is the most commonly used parameter to assess the severity of aortic valve stenosis as well as the performance of valve substitutes. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) may be used for in vitro estimation of valve EOA. In the present study, we propose a new and simple method based on Howe’s developments of Lighthill’s aero-acoustic theory. This method is based on an acoustical source term (AST) to estimate the EOA from the transvalvular flow velocity measurements obtained by PIV. The EOAs measured by the AST method downstream of three sharp-edged orifices were in excellent agreement with the EOAs predicted from the potential flow theory used as the reference method in this study. Moreover, the AST method was more accurate than other conventional PIV methods based on streamlines, inflexion point or vorticity to predict the theoretical EOAs. The superiority of the AST method is likely due to the nonlinear form of the AST. There was also an excellent agreement between the EOAs measured by the AST method downstream of the three sharp-edged orifices as well as downstream of a bioprosthetic valve with those obtained by the conventional clinical method based on Doppler-echocardiographic measurements of transvalvular velocity. The results of this study suggest that this new simple PIV method provides an accurate estimation of the aortic valve flow EOA. This new method may thus be used as a reference method to estimate the EOA in experimental investigation of the performance of valve substitutes and to validate Doppler-echocardiographic measurements under various physiologic and pathologic flow conditions.

  20. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeldt, M. Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-08-14

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910 nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  1. A study on the levels of radioactivity in fish samples from the experimental lakes area in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Rennie, Michael D; Sadi, Baki; Zhang, Weihua; St-Amant, Nadereh

    2016-03-01

    To better understand background radiation levels in country foods, a total of 125 fish samples were collected from three lakes (Lake 226, Lake 302 and Lake 305) in the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario of Canada during the summer of 2014. Concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides ((226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) as well as anthropogenic radionuclides ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) were measured. This study confirmed that (210)Po is the dominant contributor to radiation doses resulting from fish consumption. While concentrations of (210)Pb and (226)Ra were below conventional detection limits, (210)Po was measured in almost all fish samples collected from the ELA. The average concentration was about 1.5 Bq/kg fresh weight (fw). None of the fish samples analysed in this study contained any detectable levels of (134)Cs. An average (137)Cs level of 6.1 Bq/kg fw was observed in freshwater fishes harvested in the ELA, almost twice that of samples measured in the National Capital Region of Canada in 2014 and more than 20 times higher than the levels observed in marine fish harvested from the Canadian west coast in 2013 and 2014. However, it is important to note that the concentrations of (137)Cs in fish samples from these inland lakes are considered very low from a radiological protection perspective. The resulting radiation dose for people from fish consumption would be a very small fraction of the annual dose from exposure to natural background radiation in Canada. The results indicate that fishes from inland lakes do not pose a radiological health concern. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Discussion about the use of the volume specific surface area (VSSA) as a criterion to identify nanomaterials according to the EU definition. Part two: experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Lecloux, André J; Atluri, Rambabu; Kolen'ko, Yury V; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2017-09-27

    The first part of this study was dedicated to the modelling of the influence of particle shape, porosity and particle size distribution on the volume specific surface area (VSSA) values in order to check the applicability of this concept to the identification of nanomaterials according to the European Commission Recommendation. In this second part, experimental VSSA values are obtained for various samples from nitrogen adsorption isotherms and these values were used as a screening tool to identify and classify nanomaterials. These identification results are compared to the identification based on the 50% of particles with a size below 100 nm criterion applied to the experimental particle size distributions obtained by analysis of electron microscopy images on the same materials. It is concluded that the experimental VSSA values are able to identify nanomaterials, without false negative identification, if they have a mono-modal particle size, if the adsorption data cover the relative pressure range from 0.001 to 0.65 and if a simple, qualitative image of the particles by transmission or scanning electron microscopy is available to define their shape. The experimental conditions to obtain reliable adsorption data as well as the way to analyze the adsorption isotherms are described and discussed in some detail in order to help the reader in using the experimental VSSA criterion. To obtain the experimental VSSA values, the BET surface area can be used for non-porous particles, but for porous, nanostructured or coated nanoparticles, only the external surface of the particles, obtained by a modified t-plot approach, should be considered to determine the experimental VSSA and to avoid false positive identification of nanomaterials, only the external surface area being related to the particle size. Finally, the availability of experimental VSSA values together with particle size distributions obtained by electron microscopy gave the opportunity to check the

  3. Experimental Performance of Area Ratio 200, 25 and 8 Nozzles on JP-4 Fuel and Liquid Oxygen Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, J. Calvin; Samanich, Nick E.; Barnett, Donald O.

    1960-01-01

    The performance of an area ratio 200 bell-shaped nozzle, an area ratio 25 bell-shaped nozzle, and an area ratio 8 conic nozzle on a JP-4 fuel and liquid-oxygen rocket engine has been determined. Tests were conducted using a nominal 4000-pound-thrust rocket in the Lewis 10- by 10-foot supersonic tunnel, which provided the altitude environment needed for fully expanded nozzle flow. The area ratio 200 nozzle had a vacuum thrust coefficient of 1.96, compared with 1.82 and 1.70 for the area ratio 25 and 8 nozzles, respectively. These values are approximately equal to those for theoretical frozen expansion. The measured value of vacuum specific impulse for the area ratio 200 nozzle was 317 seconds for a combustion-chamber characteristic velocity of 5200 feet per second. The vacuum-specific-impulse increase for the area-ratio increase from 8 to 200 was 46 seconds.

  4. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS AND PEARL DACE FROM CONTROL (NON-DOSED) AND LAKES DOSED WITH EE2 IN THE CANADIAN EXPERIMENTAL LAKES AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario for three years beginning in 2001. This experiment examined population, organismal, biochemical and cellular-level effects in la...

  5. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS AND PEARL DACE FROM CONTROL (NON-DOSED) AND LAKES DOSED WITH EE2 IN THE CANADIAN EXPERIMENTAL LAKES AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario for three years beginning in 2001. This experiment examined population, organismal, biochemical and cellular-level effects in la...

  6. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY(INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Experimental Investigation of Quality of Lensless Ghost Imaging with Pseudo-Thermal Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xia; Bai, Yan-Feng; Qin, Tao; Han, Shen-Sheng

    2008-11-01

    Factors influencing the quality of lensless ghost imaging are investigated. According to the experimental results, we find that the imaging quality is determined by the number of independent sub light sources on the imaging plane of the reference arm. A qualitative picture based on advanced wave optics is presented to explain the physics behind the experimental phenomena. The present results will be helpful to provide a basis for improving the quality of ghost imaging systems in future works.

  7. The Impact of Eutrophication on Mercury Cycling in Lake 227 at the Experimental Lakes Area in Northwestern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J.; Lehnherr, I.; Gleason, A.; St. Louis, V. L.; Muir, D.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a pollutant of global concern as concentrations of methyl mercury (MeHg), the toxic and bioaccumulative form of Hg, are often present in fish at levels high enough to pose health risks to consumers. Although we are beginning to understand the factors controlling MeHg production in freshwater lakes, the impacts of environmental disturbances, such as eutrophication, on Hg cycling are not known. As part of a larger project examining controls on eutrophication, we are studying Hg cycling and MeHg production in the artificially eutrophied Lake 227 at the Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario. In addition to 40 years of ancillary data, Lake 227 is ideal for this study as it has an anoxic hypolimnion which may be an important zone of microbial MeHg production. To determine sources and losses of inorganic Hg(II) and MeHg from the lake, we are using a mass balance approach including: detailed lake profiles to determine the water column pools of Hg(II) and MeHg, Hg(II) and MeHg inputs via precipitation, and losses of Hg(II) and MeHg from the lake via gaseous elemental Hg(0) evasion and MeHg photodemethylation, respectively. Rates of water column MeHg production are also being determined using Hg stable isotope tracer experiments. 2010-2011 water column profiles demonstrated that although total Hg (THg) and MeHg concentrations were fairly low in Lake 227 surface waters (2.42 ± 0.64 and 0.11 ± 0.06 ng/L, respectively), MeHg concentrations (1.08 ± 0.39 ng/L) and the % THg that was MeHg (16 ± 5%) were high in deep regions of the water column (6-9 m). The zone of elevated water column MeHg expanded throughout summers 2010-2011, closely following the zone of anoxia, suggesting MeHg is produced in the anoxic hypolimnion. The zone of high particulate-bound THg (62 ± 6%) also migrated with the zone of anoxia over the summer suggesting that particle sinking and sediment resuspension, which are controlled by the timing of algal blooms, are important

  8. [Development of loach eggs after experimental increase of cell mass in the dorsal and ventral areas of blastoderm].

    PubMed

    Sleptsova, L A; Ivanova, E E; Golichenkov, V A

    2004-01-01

    The fertilized loach eggs were injected, before the beginning of cleavage, with the nuclear dye Hoechst 33258 and left to develop until the late blastula stage. Some cells of the dorsal area of stained blastoderm were transplanted in the analogous area of intact embryos of the same age, which led to an earlier and more pronounced development of head and trunk structures in recipients. A relationship was established between specific features of the development of recipients and localization of descendants of the transplanted cells. Transplantation of cells of the dorsal area of stained blastoderm in the ventral area of embryos of the same age led to the formation of two axial complexes, both at the same level of development, nut behind the control, and stained cells were located predominantly in one of twin embryos.

  9. Police evaluation research: an experimental and cost-benefit analysis of a helicopter patrol in a high crime area1

    PubMed Central

    Schnelle, John F.; Kirchner, Robert E.; Macrae, John W.; McNees, M. Patrick; Eck, Richard H.; Snodgrass, Stana; Casey, Joe D.; Uselton, Paul H.

    1978-01-01

    The significance of a helicopter patrol procedure directed toward prevention of home burglaries was evaluated from experimental and cost-benefit perspectives. The helicopter patrolled one city zone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for two 12-day periods. Each 12-day period was separated by a baseline period in which only normal patrol-car levels were maintained. Significantly reduced burglary levels during the intervention periods, compared to baseline periods, documented the experimental significance of the helicopter procedure. The cash costs of implementing the patrol procedure were compared to two estimates of the resulting cash benefits. This latter cost-benefit analysis was supplemented by a discussion of the intangible costs and benefits of the helicopter procedure. Taken together, these analyses documented that the marginal costs of the helicopter intervention were exceeded by all estimates of benefits. PMID:16795578

  10. [Morphometric measurements in the area of the epiphyseal groove of the parietal vertebra in experimentally-induced scoliosis in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Kneer, W; Mitzkat, K

    1986-01-01

    In 3 rabbits we provoked a short-curved dorsolumbal scoliosis by costo-lumbal cerclage. In order to quantify with morphometric methods the morphologically by various authors described effect of pressure parallel to the axis of epiphyseal growth under Hueter-Volkmann's law, we measured the height and area of different parts of the epiphyseal plate in frontal semi-thin sections (Alcian-blue) by means of a pictoral analysis system based on a mini-computer. On the concave side, the side of increased pressure, we found a relative atrophy of the epiphyseal plate of 40% and a diminished area of 49%.

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Area Suction for the Control of the Laminar Boundary Layer on an NACA 64a010 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, Albert L; Burrows, Dale L; Tetervin, Neal; Visconti, Fioravante

    1951-01-01

    A low-turbulence wind-tunnel investigation was made of an NACA 64a010 airfoil having a porous surface to determine the reduction in section total-drag coefficient that might be obtained at large Reynolds numbers by the use of suction to produce continuous inflow through the surface of the airfoil (area suction). In addition to the experimental investigation, a related theoretical analysis was made to provide a basis of comparison for the test results.

  12. Measurement of the 240Pu(n,f) cross-section at the CERN n_TOF facility: First results from experimental area II (EAR-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatopoulos, A.; Tsinganis, A.; Colonna, N.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Plompen, A.; Heyse, J.; Žugec, P.; Barbagallo, M.; Calviani, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Chiaveri, E.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cerutti, F.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Deo, K.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frost, R. J. W.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; García, A. R.; Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Licata, M.; Meo, S. Lo; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Palomo-Pinto, F. R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, J. I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.

    2017-09-01

    The accurate knowledge of the neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides and other isotopes involved in the nuclear fuel cycle is essential for the design of advanced nuclear systems, such as Generation-IV nuclear reactors. Such experimental data can also provide the necessary feedback for the adjustment of nuclear model parameters used in the evaluation process, resulting in the further development of nuclear fission models. In the present work, the 240Pu(n,f) cross-section was measured at CERN's n_TOF facility relative to the well-known 235U(n,f) cross section, over a wide range of neutron energies, from meV to almost MeV, using the time-of-flight technique and a set-up based on Micromegas detectors. This measurement was the first experiment to be performed at n_TOF's new experimental area (EAR-2), which offers a significantly higher neutron flux compared to the already existing experimental area (EAR-1). Preliminary results as well as the experimental procedure, including a description of the facility and the data handling and analysis, are presented.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL AND MODEL-COMPUTED AREA AVERAGED VERTICAL PROFILES OF WIND SPEED FOR EVALUATION OF MESOSCALE URBAN CANOPY SCHEMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous urban canopy schemes have recently been developed for mesoscale models in order to approximate the drag and turbulent production effects of a city on the air flow. However, little data exists by which to evaluate the efficacy of the schemes since "area-averaged&quo...

  14. EXPERIMENTAL AND MODEL-COMPUTED AREA AVERAGED VERTICAL PROFILES OF WIND SPEED FOR EVALUATION OF MESOSCALE URBAN CANOPY SCHEMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous urban canopy schemes have recently been developed for mesoscale models in order to approximate the drag and turbulent production effects of a city on the air flow. However, little data exists by which to evaluate the efficacy of the schemes since "area-averaged&quo...

  15. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Experimental Study on Coherence Time of a Light Field with Single Photon Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Yu-Chi; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Guo, Yan-Qiang; Li, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min; Zhang, Tian-Cai

    2009-07-01

    The second-order degree of coherence of pseudo-thermal light and coherence time are experimentally studied via the Hanbruy-Brown-Twiss (HBT) scheme. The system consists of two non-photon-number-resolving single- photon-counting modules (SPCMs) operating in the Geiger mode. We investigate the coherence time of the incident beam for different spot sizes on a ground glass and speeds of a rotating ground glass. The corresponding coherence time can be obtained from Gaussian fitting for the measured second-order degree of coherence. The results show that the coherence time of measured pseudo-thermal light depends on the spot sizes and the rotating speeds of the ground glass. The maximum value of the second-order degree of coherence is reduced as the rotating speed decreases. This result can be well explained by the model of mixed thermal and coherent fields with different ratios.

  16. Experimental investigation of the impact of macroalgal mats on flow dynamics and sediment stability in shallow tidal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venier, C.; Figueiredo da Silva, J.; McLelland, S. J.; Duck, R. W.; Lanzoni, S.

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to quantify the impact of macroalgal mats of Ulva intestinalis on flow dynamics and sediment stability. Such mats are becoming increasingly common in many coastal and estuarine intertidal habitats, thus it is important to determine whether they increase flow resistance, promote bed stability and therefore reduce the risk of erosion leading to tidal flooding or to degradation of coastal lagoons. The study has been carried out through a systematic series of experiments conducted in the large open-channel flume of the Total Environment Simulator (TES) facility, University of Hull, UK. The experimental facility was set up with a bed of fine sand, partially covered by strands of U. intestinalis; living individuals attached to large clasts were collected from Budle Bay, in the Lindisfarne National Nature Reserve, UK, and transplanted to the flume. The TES was equipped with acoustic doppler velocimetry (ADV) and acoustic backscatter (ABS) sensors, which measured current velocity, water level, bed level, and suspended sediment concentration. The experiments consisted of several unidirectional flow runs, firstly with a mobile sediment bed covered with U. intestinalis, then with a bare sediment surface, conducted at three different water depths. Under the investigated experimental range of velocities, typical of tidal environments, the macroalgal filaments were bent parallel to the sediment bed. The resulting velocity profile departed from the classical logarithmic trend, implying an increase of the overall roughness. This result reflects the different vertical Reynolds shear stress profiles and energy spectra features of the turbulent flow with respect to a bare sandy bed configuration. Macroalgae are also found to affect the morphological configuration of bedforms. The overall result is significant bio-stabilization, with increased flow resistance and reduced sediment transport.

  17. High surface area electrodes in ionic polymer transducers: numerical and experimental investigations of the chemo-electric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Akle, Etienne; Leo, Donald J.

    2008-03-01

    Ionomeric polymer transducers have received considerable attention in the past ten years due to their ability to generate large bending strain and moderate stress at low applied voltages. Ionic polymer transducers consist of an ionomer, usually Nafion, sandwiched between two electrically conductive electrodes. Recently, a novel fabrication technique denoted as the direct assembly process (DAP) enabled controlled electrode architecture in ionic polymer transducers. A DAP transducer usually consists of two high surface area electrodes made of uniform distributed particles sandwiching an ionomer membrane. Further enhancements to the DAP enabled sub-micron control of the electrode architecture. In this study a previously developed finite element model, capable of simulating ionic polymer transducers with high surface area electrodes is used to study the effect of electrode architecture on the actuation performance due to a unit volt step input. Four architectures are considered: Agglomerate, Gradient, Random, and Lines. The four architectures are simulated for low particle loading and high particle loading. The agglomerate presents the case of badly dispersed metal particles in the electrode. Simulation results demonstrate that particle aggregation reduces the actuation performance on an IPT. The Gradient simulates an IPT built using an Impregnation-Reduction method. The Gradient is compared to a randomly distributed electrode which represents an IPT built using the DAP method. Simulation results demonstrate that the DAP built IPT outperforms the one built using the impregnation-reduction method. Finally line architecture is simulated and results demonstrate that it outperforms random architecture especially at high particle loading.

  18. Roles of different areas of palatine bone denudation on growth and development of the maxilla and dental arch: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tian; Shi, Bing; Huang, Xu; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Yan; Wu, Min; Lu, Yong; Li, Sheng

    2007-03-01

    This study was designed to explore the relationship of the growth of the maxilla and dental arch with different sizes of the denudation area on the hard palate. We tested the hypothesis that different sizes of denudation areas on the hard palate following palatoplasty would significantly influence the growth of the maxilla and dental arch differently. Fifty-one three-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into a control group and 3 experimental groups. In the three experimental groups, bilateral palatal mucoperiosteum was excised to three different proportions, i.e. one-quarter, one-half and three-quarters of the palate. Then, the animals were sequentially injected weekly with different fluorescent markers alternately. Three in each group were sacrificed randomly every two weeks with maxilla dissected following injections. The widths of the maxilla and dental arch were measured and the fluorescent labeling investigated at different phases. The results showed that the growth of the maxilla and dental arch here was inversely correlated with the area of denuded bone on palate. Therefore, our data may provide references for optimal treatment of cleft palate.

  19. The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Allen L.; Sextro, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open floor areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high-permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open floor area of 165 x 10{sup -4}m{sup 2}; however the ratio increases to 30 for an open floor area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. The relationship between open area and soil-gas entry rate is complex. It depends on both the amount and distribution of the open area as well as the permeability of the soil near the opening. The entry rate into the experimental structures is largely determined by the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. Therefore open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the structures. The extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area or the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. The average subslab pressure coupling is an estimate of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts the absolute entry rate into each structure by a factor of 1.5.

  20. Experimental observation and modelling of rock - water interaction in a landslide-prone loess area of Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udvardi, Beatrix; Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Freiler, Ágnes; Kónya, Péter; Jerabek, Csaba; Pálfi, Éva; Kovács, István; Nagy, Péter; Halupka, Gábor

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that water from precipitation or other sources (e.g. groundwater, river) contributes to the triggering of landslides by means of infiltration into the slope, which causes an increase in the pore pressure and a reduction in the strength of the involved material. The physical failure is commonly coupled with chemical changes in landslides due the fact that soluble components dissolve in the pore water and others precipitate during rock-water interaction. Thus the composition of sediments and water chemistry are used jointly as indicators of the development of landslides. Rock-water interaction, however, takes a long time, and depends on hydrology and geochemistry of the landslide area; therefore, many researchers have focused on numerical simulation and laboratory experiment for setting up a landslide early warning system. Since water chemistry can change over time in landslides due to the seasonal rainfall pattern, groundwater fluctuation and flood events, the intensity of rock-water interaction (e.g. dissolution, precipitation) may also vary. Thus, the physicochemical processes cannot be elucidated precisely without understanding both the solution evolution and the mineral alteration in landslides. From this aspect, field survey, mineralogical (XRD, FTIR, DTG) and chemical measurements (ICP-OES), and geochemical modelling (PHREEQC) were conducted in a landslide-prone loess area along the River Danube (Hungary). Water from the River Danube and three springs were sampled during four field campaigns at Kulcs over a year. Additionally, landslide deposits including sliding surface and secondary precipitations were collected at Kulcs and Dunaújváros. In combination with previous hydrochemical analyses of the area and average rainfall composition of Hungary, it is possible to model the kinetic dissolution and precipitation of minerals during rainfall events and flooding periods of the river. The chemistry of springs shows that the Mg-Ca-HCO3 facies with

  1. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of a large-area capacitive strain sensor for fatigue crack monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian; Bennett, Caroline; Collins, William; Laflamme, Simon

    2016-12-01

    A large-area electronics in the form of a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) has shown great promise as a strain sensor for fatigue crack monitoring in steel structures. The SEC sensors are inexpensive, easy to fabricate, highly stretchable, and mechanically robust. It is a highly scalable technology, capable of monitoring deformations on mesoscale systems. Preliminary experiments verified the SEC sensor’s capability in detecting, localizing, and monitoring crack growth in a compact specimen. Here, a numerical simulation method is proposed to simulate accurately the sensor’s performance under fatigue cracks. Such a method would provide a direct link between the SEC’s signal and fatigue crack geometry, extending the SEC’s capability to dense network applications on mesoscale structural components. The proposed numerical procedure consists of two parts: (1) a finite element (FE) analysis for the target structure to simulate crack growth based on an element deletion method; (2) an algorithm to compute the sensor’s capacitance response using the FE analysis results. The proposed simulation method is validated based on test data from a compact specimen. Results from the numerical simulation show good agreement with the SEC’s response from the laboratory tests as a function of the crack size. Using these findings, a parametric study is performed to investigate how the SEC would perform under different geometries. Results from the parametric study can be used to optimize the design of a dense sensor network of SECs for fatigue crack detection and localization.

  2. Effects of an invasive tree on community structure and diversity in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    K. A. Brown; F. N. Scatena; J. Gurevitch; NO-VALUE

    2006-01-01

    We report the effects of an invasive tree (Syzygium jambos, Myrtaceace) on species composition, plant diversity patterns, and forest regeneration in primary and secondary forest in the Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico, including the area in and around the Caribbean National Forest (CNF) and the Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research site (Luquillo LTER)....

  3. Estimation of radioactive contamination of soils from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" technical areas of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.

    PubMed

    Evseeva, T; Belykh, E; Geras'kin, S; Majstrenko, T

    2012-07-01

    In spite of the long history of the research, radioactive contamination of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS) in the Republic of Kazakhstan has not been adequately characterized. Our cartographic investigation has demonstrated highly variable radioactive contamination of the SNTS. The Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154, Co-60, and Am-241 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Balapan" site were 42.6-17646, 96-18250, 1.05-11222, 0.6-4865, 0.23-4893, and 1.2-1037 Bq kg(-1), correspondingly. Cs-137 and Sr-90 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Experimental field" site were varied from 87 up to 400 and from 94 up to 1000 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Activity concentrations of Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154 were lower than the minimum detectable activity of the method used. Concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (K-40, Ra-226, U-238, and Th-232) in the majority of soil samples from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites did not exceed typical for surrounding of the SNTS areas levels. Estimation of risks associated with radioactive contamination based on the IAEA clearance levels for a number of key radionuclides in solid materials shows that soils sampled from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites might be considered as radioactive wastes. Decrease in specific activity of soil from the sites studied up to safety levels due to Co-60, Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154 radioactive decay and Am-241 accumulation-decay will occur not earlier than 100 years. In contrast, soils from the "Experimental field" and the "Balapan" sites (except 0.5-2.5 km distance from the "Chagan" explosion point) cannot be regarded as the radioactive wastes according safety norms valid in Russia and Kazakhstan.

  4. Experimental Study of Floating-Gate-Type Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitors with Nanosize Triangular Cross-Sectional Tunnel Areas for Low Operating Voltage Flash Memory Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongxun; Guo, Ruofeng; Kamei, Takahiro; Matsukawa, Takashi; Endo, Kazuhiko; O'uchi, Shinichi; Tsukada, Junichi; Yamauchi, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Hayashida, Tetsuro; Sakamoto, Kunihiro; Ogura, Atsushi; Masahara, Meishoku

    2012-06-01

    The floating-gate (FG)-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with planar (planar-MOS) and three-dimensional (3D) nanosize triangular cross-sectional tunnel areas (3D-MOS) have successfully been fabricated by introducing rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) and postdeposition annealing (PDA), and their electrical characteristics between the control gate (CG) and FG have been systematically compared. It was experimentally found in both planar- and 3D-MOS capacitors that the uniform and higher breakdown voltages are obtained by introducing RTO owing to the high-quality thermal oxide formation on the surface and etched edge regions of the n+ polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) FG, and the leakage current is highly suppressed after PDA owing to the improved quality of the tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) silicon dioxide (SiO2) between CG and FG. Moreover, a lower breakdown voltage between CG and FG was obtained in the fabricated 3D-MOS capacitors as compared with that of planar-MOS capacitors thanks to the enhanced local electric field at the tips of triangular tunnel areas. The developed nanosize triangular cross-sectional tunnel area is useful for the fabrication of low operating voltage flash memories.

  5. Hydrogeology and water quality of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia, which is located on the Potomac River in the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. The study provides a description of the hydrogeologic units, directions of ground-water flow, and back-ground water quality in the study area to a depth of about 100 feet. Lithologic, geophysical, and hydrologic data were collected from 28 wells drilled for this study, from 3 existing wells, and from outcrops. The shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area consists of two fining-upward sequences of Pleistocene fluvial-estuarine deposits that overlie Paleocene-Eocene marine deposits of the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. The surficial hydrogeologic unit is the Columbia aquifer. Horizontal linear flow of water in this aquifer generally responds to the surface topography, discharging to tidal creeks, marshes, and the Potomac River, and rates of flow in this aquifer range from 0.003 to 0.70 foot per day. The Columbia aquifer unconformably overlies the upper confining unit 12-an organic-rich clay that is 0 to 55 feet thick. The upper confining unit conformably overlies the upper confined aquifer, a 0- to 35-feet thick unit that consists of interbedded fine-grained to medium-grained sands and clay. The upper confined aquifer probably receives most of its recharge from the adjacent and underlying Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. Water in the upper confined aquifer generally flows eastward, northward, and northeastward at about 0.03 foot per day toward the Potomac River and Machodoc Creek. The Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit consists of glauconitic, fossiliferous silty fine-grained sands of the Nanjemoy Formation. Where the upper confined system is absent, the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit is directly overlain by the Columbia aquifer. In some parts of

  6. An Experimental Study of Rock Dissolution Kinetics and Implications On Weathering Rates In An Active Volcanic Area: The Case Study of Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, B.; Parello, F.; Valenza, M.

    Six dissolution experiments were performed on fresh and undisturbed basaltic rock samples (hawaiite), that were collected from two quarries in the Mount Etna area. They can be attributed to the well documented historical 1669 lava flow. Different operating conditions were selected to carry out the experiments, with the aim of quan- tifying the role of chemico-physical parameters on dissolution, such as temperature, partial pressure of CO2 and rock grain size. In order to calculate the molal fluxes, the amount of a chemical element released from the solid to the interacting solution was normalized to the specific surface area of grains and then to the reaction time. In longer reaction times, only Na and SiO2 appear to reach a pseudo-steady state, where concentration and molal flux change linearly with time. Na and silica dissolution rate constants were determined in this linear regime stage. Then, they were applied to nat- ural groundwaters from wells and springs of two distinct sectors of the volcano (E and NE) where chemical data is well-known. If no sources or sinks other than weathering process are involved, residence time can be considered to be the time elapsed from when water was separated from the atmosphere to when it emerged at the surface. Yet, this is also the time when water could react with the host rocks, acquiring its measur- able solute content because of the processes of alteration and dissolution. Therefore, residence time is calculated on a) a conservative element concentration in sampled water at a given time, b) on initial element concentration in local rainwaters and c) on the geometric parameters evaluating water-rock contact effective surface area or the wet area (like the mean open fracture width in the rocks). Experimental results indicate that higher constrained PCO2 values increase dissolution constants up to two orders of magnitudes, causing an apparent decrease in residence times. Nevertheless, calculations show that longer residence

  7. Experimental Plan: 300 Area Treatability Test: In Situ Treatment of the Vadose Zone and Smear Zone Uranium Contamination by Polyphosphate Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Oostrom, Mart; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-08-31

    The overall objectives of the treatability test is to evaluate and optimize polyphosphate remediation technology for infiltration either from ground surface, or some depth of excavation, providing direct stabilization of uranium within the deep vadose and capillary fringe above the 300 Area aquifer. Expected result from this experimental plan is a data package that includes: 1) quantification of the retardation of polyphosphate, 2) the rate of degradation and the retardation of degradation products as a function of water content, 3) an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) an understanding of the transformation mechanism, identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and –silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, 5) quantification of the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and capillary fringe, and 6) quantification of reliable equilibrium solubility values for autunite under hydraulically unsaturated conditions allowing accurate prediction of the long-term stability of autunite. Moreover, results of intermediate scale testing will quantify the transport of polyphosphate and degradation products, and yield degradation rates, at a scale that is bridging the gap between the small-scale UFA studies and the field scale. These results will be used to test and verify a site-specific, variable saturation, reactive transport model and to aid in the design of a pilot-scale field test of this technology. In particular, the infiltration approach and monitoring strategy of the pilot test would be primarily based on results from intermediate-scale testing. Results from this

  8. UAV-based Estimation of Carbon Exports from Heterogeneous Soil Landscapes - A Case Study from the CarboZALF Experimental Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrhan, Marc; Rauneker, Philipp; Sommer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The advantages of remote sensing using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a high spatial resolution of images, temporal flexibility and narrow-band spectral data from different wavelengths domains. This enables the detection of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental variables, like plant-related carbon dynamics in agricultural landscapes. In this paper we quantify spatial patterns of fresh phytomass and related carbon (C) export using imagery captured by a 12-band multispectral camera mounted on the fixed wing UAV Carolo P360. The study was performed in 2014 at the experimental area CarboZALF-D in NE Germany. From radiometrically corrected and calibrated images of lucerne (Medicago sativa), the performance of four commonly used vegetation indices (VIs) was tested using band combinations of six near-infrared bands. The highest correlation (R² = 0.88) between ground-based measurements of fresh phytomass of lucerne and VIs was obtained for the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) using near-infrared band 11 (899 nm). The resulting map was transformed into dry phytomass and finally upscaled to total C export by harvest. The observed spatial variability (75-225 g C m-2) at field- and plot-scale could be attributed to small-scale soil heterogeneity in part. Soil effects were suppressed by the nearly optimal weather conditions for plant growth in 2014.

  9. Locating hybrid individuals in the red wolf (Canis rufus) experimental population area using a spatially targeted sampling strategy and faecal DNA genotyping.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer R; Lucash, Chris; Schutte, Leslie; Waits, Lisette P

    2007-05-01

    Hybridization with coyotes (Canis latrans) continues to threaten the recovery of endangered red wolves (Canis rufus) in North Carolina and requires the development of new strategies to detect and remove coyotes and hybrids. Here, we combine a spatially targeted faecal collection strategy with a previously published reference genotype data filtering method and a genetic test for coyote ancestry to screen portions of the red wolf experimental population area for the presence of nonred wolf canids. We also test the accuracy of our maximum-likelihood assignment test for identifying hybrid individuals using eight microsatellite loci instead of the original 18 loci and compare its performance to the Bayesian approach implemented in newhybrids. We obtained faecal DNA genotypes for 89 samples, 73 of which were matched to 23 known individuals. The performance of two sampling strategies - comprehensive sweep and opportunistic spot-check was evaluated. The opportunistic spot-check sampling strategy required less effort than the comprehensive sweep sampling strategy but identified fewer individuals. Six hybrids or coyotes were detected and five of these individuals were subsequently captured and removed from the population. The accuracy and power of the genetic test for coyote ancestry is decreased when using eight loci; however, nonred wolf canids are identified with high frequency. This combination of molecular and traditional field-based approaches has great potential for addressing the challenge of hybridization in other species and ecosystems.

  10. UAV-Based Estimation of Carbon Exports from Heterogeneous Soil Landscapes—A Case Study from the CarboZALF Experimental Area

    PubMed Central

    Wehrhan, Marc; Rauneker, Philipp; Sommer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of remote sensing using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a high spatial resolution of images, temporal flexibility and narrow-band spectral data from different wavelengths domains. This enables the detection of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental variables, like plant-related carbon dynamics in agricultural landscapes. In this paper, we quantify spatial patterns of fresh phytomass and related carbon (C) export using imagery captured by a 12-band multispectral camera mounted on the fixed wing UAV Carolo P360. The study was performed in 2014 at the experimental area CarboZALF-D in NE Germany. From radiometrically corrected and calibrated images of lucerne (Medicago sativa), the performance of four commonly used vegetation indices (VIs) was tested using band combinations of six near-infrared bands. The highest correlation between ground-based measurements of fresh phytomass of lucerne and VIs was obtained for the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) using near-infrared band b899. The resulting map was transformed into dry phytomass and finally upscaled to total C export by harvest. The observed spatial variability at field- and plot-scale could be attributed to small-scale soil heterogeneity in part. PMID:26907284

  11. Development of experimental approach to examine U occurrence continuity over the extended area reconnoitory boreholes: Lostoin Block, West Khasi Hills district, Meghalaya (India).

    PubMed

    Kukreti, B M; Kumar, Pramod; Sharma, G K

    2015-10-01

    Exploratory drilling was undertaken in the Lostoin block, West Khasi Hills district of Meghalaya based on the geological extension to the major uranium deposit in the basin. Gamma ray logging of drilled boreholes shows considerable subsurface mineralization in the block. However, environmental and exploration related challenges such as climatic, logistic, limited core drilling and poor core recovery etc. in the block severely restricted the study of uranium exploration related index parameters for the block with a high degree confidence. The present study examines these exploration related challenges and develops an integrated approach using representative sampling of reconnoitory boreholes in the block. Experimental findings validate a similar geochemically coherent nature of radio elements (K, Ra and Th) in the Lostoin block uranium hosting environment with respect to the known block of Mahadek basin and uranium enrichment is confirmed by the lower U to Th correlation index (0.268) of hosting environment. A mineralized zone investigation in the block shows parent (refers to the actual parent uranium concentration at a location and not a secondary concentration such as the daughter elements which produce the signal from a total gamma ray measurement) favoring uranium mineralization. The confidence parameters generated under the present study have implications for the assessment of the inferred category of uranium ore in the block and setting up a road map for the systematic exploration of large uranium potential occurring over extended areas in the basin amid prevailing environmental and exploratory impediments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. UAV-Based Estimation of Carbon Exports from Heterogeneous Soil Landscapes--A Case Study from the CarboZALF Experimental Area.

    PubMed

    Wehrhan, Marc; Rauneker, Philipp; Sommer, Michael

    2016-02-19

    The advantages of remote sensing using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a high spatial resolution of images, temporal flexibility and narrow-band spectral data from different wavelengths domains. This enables the detection of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental variables, like plant-related carbon dynamics in agricultural landscapes. In this paper, we quantify spatial patterns of fresh phytomass and related carbon (C) export using imagery captured by a 12-band multispectral camera mounted on the fixed wing UAV Carolo P360. The study was performed in 2014 at the experimental area CarboZALF-D in NE Germany. From radiometrically corrected and calibrated images of lucerne (Medicago sativa), the performance of four commonly used vegetation indices (VIs) was tested using band combinations of six near-infrared bands. The highest correlation between ground-based measurements of fresh phytomass of lucerne and VIs was obtained for the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) using near-infrared band b899. The resulting map was transformed into dry phytomass and finally upscaled to total C export by harvest. The observed spatial variability at field- and plot-scale could be attributed to small-scale soil heterogeneity in part.

  13. Comparative biochemical changes in young Zebu cattle experimentally infected with Trypanosoma vivax from tsetse infested and non-tsetse infested areas of northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Dagnachew, Shimelis; Terefe, Getachew; Abebe, Getachew; Barry, Dave J; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2014-10-15

    Trypanosomosis is a vector-borne protozoan disease of animals and humans in sub-Saharan Africa. In Ethiopia, particularly the northwest region is affected by both tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted trypanosomosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects and compare differences in virulence of Trypanosoma vivax infection between tsetse and non-tsetse infested areas of northwest Ethiopia on the basis of serum biochemical values in Zebu cattle. Eighteen cattles purchased from trypanosome free area and aged between 9 and 12 months were assigned into three groups of six animals (Group TT=infected with T. vivax from tsetse infested area, Group NT=infected with T. vivax from non-tsetse infested area and Group C=non-infected control). For each experimental animal 3 ml of blood from naturally infected cattle was inoculated intravenously at 10(6) trypanosomes/ml except the control. Blood sample was collected once a week for 8 consecutive weeks for analyzing serum biochemical values (glucose, total cholesterol, total protein, albumin, and enzymes including GOT, GPT and ALP) using a Humastar 80 clinical chemistry analyzer. Both T. vivax parasites caused an acute infection with parasites appearing in circulation on 6 and 12 days post-infection for NT and TT cattle, respectively. A significant reduction (P<0.001) in glucose levels was observed in infected groups compared with the control with mean values of 33.8 ± 3.6 mg/dl for TT, 34.3 ± 3.6 mg/dl for NT and 70.9 ± 3.0 mg/dl for control groups. A similar reduction was also seen in total cholesterol values (P=0.001) with 70.4 ± 10.6 mg/dl for TT and 78.0 ± 10.6 mg/dl for NT groups compared to 139.5 ± 8.7 mg/dl for the control group. No difference was observed for total serum protein between the three groups (P=0.260) whereas the mean albumin level was significantly (P<0.001) decreased (3.5 ± 0.1g/dl and 2.9 ± 0.1g/dl in TT and NT groups respectively) compared to that for control cattle (4.5 ± 0.1g

  14. Community-directed educational intervention for malaria elimination in Bhutan: quasi-experimental study in malaria endemic areas of Sarpang district

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As per the World Malaria Report 2011, there was a 17% reduction in morbidity and 26% reduction in mortality in 2010, compared to 2000. In Bhutan, there were only 194 malaria cases in 2011 as compared to 5,935 cases in 2000. As the country moves towards an elimination phase, educating the community and empowering them on malaria prevention and control is imperative. Hence, this study was conducted to elucidate the effectiveness of the community-directed educational intervention on malaria prevention and control in malaria-endemic areas of Sarpang district, Bhutan. Methods This quasi-experimental study design was conducted using both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were carried out in addition to household survey using a structured questionnaire conducted before and after the intervention. Intervention was conducted using community action groups, who were provided with training and which then developed action plans for implementation of interventions within their communities. Results The study resulted in a significant improvement in knowledge and attitude in intervention as compared to control during the post-intervention survey (p < 0.001). The practice score was higher in the control group both during pre- and post-intervention, however, the mean ( ±sd) score of practice in intervention group increased from 6.84 ± 1.26 in pre-intervention to 8.35 ± 1.14 in post-intervention (p < 0.001), where as it decreased from 9.19 ± 1.78 to 9.10 ± 1.98 in the control group (p = 0. 68). When comparing pre- and post- in the intervention group, there was significant improvement during post-intervention in knowledge, attitude and practice (p < 0.001). Conclusions The findings from this study corroborate that community-directed interventions can be utilized as an effective means for improving knowledge, attitude and practice in the malaria-endemic areas of Bhutan

  15. Comparing Optic Nerve Head Rim Width, Rim Area, and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness to Axon Count in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Hardin, Christy; Reynaud, Juan; Cull, Grant; Yang, Hongli; Wang, Lin; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compare spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) measurements of minimum rim width (MRW), minimum rim area (MRA), and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) to complete orbital optic nerve axon counts in nonhuman primates (NHP) with unilateral experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods Biweekly SDOCT measurements of MRW, MRA, and RNFLT were acquired under manometric IOP control (10 mm Hg) in 51 NHP during baseline (mean ± SD, 5.0 ± 1.6 sessions) and after laser photocoagulation was applied to the trabecular meshwork of one eye to induce chronic IOP elevation. At the study endpoint (predefined for each NHP), 100% axon counts were obtained from each optic nerve. Results For SDOCT parameters at baseline, the correlation between the two eyes of each animal was strongest for RNFLT (R = 0.97) and MRW (R = 0.97), but lower for MRA (R = 0.85). At the final time point, average values in EG eyes relative to control eyes were: −22% for RNFLT, −38% for MRW, −36% for MRA, and −36% for optic nerve axons. The correlation with axon counts was strongest for RNFLT (R = 0.81), compared to MRW (R = 0.72, P = 0.001) or MRA (R = 0.70, P = 0.001). Diagnostic sensitivity was 75% for RNFLT, 90% for MRW, and 88% for MRA; all had 100% specificity. Conclusions Peripapillary RNFLT was correlated more closely with total orbital optic nerve axon count than were the ONH parameters MRW or MRA. This is likely because glaucomatous deformation (beyond axon loss alone) has a greater influence on the ONH parameters MRW and MRA than on RNFLT. PMID:27409499

  16. VEGA: A low-power front-end ASIC for large area multi-linear X-ray silicon drift detectors: Design and experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Macera, Daniele; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Malcovati, Piero; Grassi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and the first experimental characterization of VEGA, an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) designed to read out large area monolithic linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD's). VEGA consists of an analog and a digital/mixed-signal section to accomplish all the functionalities and specifications required for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 500 eV and 50 keV. The analog section includes a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper with 3-bit digitally selectable shaping times from 1.6 μs to 6.6 μs and a peak stretcher/sample-and-hold stage. The digital/mixed-signal section includes an amplitude discriminator with coarse and fine threshold level setting, a peak discriminator and a logic circuit to fulfill pile-up rejection, signal sampling, trigger generation, channel reset and the preamplifier and discriminators disabling functionalities. A Serial Peripherical Interface (SPI) is integrated in VEGA for loading and storing all configuration parameters in an internal register within few microseconds. The VEGA ASIC has been designed and manufactured in 0.35 μm CMOS mixed-signal technology in single and 32 channel versions with dimensions of 200 μm×500 μm per channel. A minimum intrinsic Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) of 12 electrons r.m.s. at 3.6 μs peaking time and room temperature is measured and the linearity error is between -0.9% and +0.6% in the whole input energy range. The total power consumption is 481 μW and 420 μW per channel for the single and 32 channels version, respectively. A comparison with other ASICs for X-ray SDD's shows that VEGA has a suitable low noise and offers high functionality as ADC-ready signal processing but at a power consumption that is a factor of four lower than other similar existing ASICs.

  17. Anthropogenic mercury deposition in Flin Flon Manitoba and the Experimental Lakes Area Ontario (Canada): A multi-lake sediment core reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wiklund, Johan A; Kirk, Jane L; Muir, Derek C G; Evans, Marlene; Yang, Fan; Keating, Jonathan; Parsons, Matthew T

    2017-05-15

    High-resolution records of anthropogenic mercury (Hg) deposition were constructed from 9 lakes located 5-75km from the Flin Flon, Manitoba smelter (formerly one of North America's largest atmospheric Hg point sources) and 5 lakes in Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), Ontario; a region remote from major Hg point sources. Anthropogenic Hg deposition, as both a flux and inventory, was determined after accounting for lake-specific natural Hg background concentrations, changes in sedimentation and sediment focusing. Results show that records of anthropogenic flux and inventory of Hg were remarkably consistent among the ELA lakes, but varied by 2 orders of magnitude among Flin Flon lakes. The relation between Hg inventories (normalized for prevailing wind direction) and distance from the smelter was used to estimate the total Hg fallout within a 50km radius in 5year time-steps, thus providing a quantitative spatial-temporal Hg depositional history for the Flin Flon region. The same relation solved for 8 cardinal directions weighted by the inverse of the previously applied wind direction normalization generates a map of Hg inventory and deposition on the landscape (Supplementary video). This novel application of sediment core data constructs a landscape model and allows for a visualization of contaminant deposition with respect to a point major source in both space and time. The propensity for Hg to undergo long-range, even global transport explains why Hg deposition within 50km of Flin Flon was ~11% of estimated releases. That is until smelter releases were reduced >10-fold (post-2000), after which observed deposition exceeded smelter releases, suggesting landscape re-emission/remobilization of legacy Hg is a major ongoing regional source of Hg.

  18. On the validity of modeling concepts for the simulation of groundwater flow in lowland peat areas - case study at the Zegveld experimental field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambauer, P.; Nonner, J.; Heijkers, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2011-09-01

    The groundwater flow models currently used in the western part of The Netherlands and in other similar peaty areas are thought to be a too simplified representation of the hydrological reality. One of the reasons is that, due to the schematization of the subsoil, its heterogeneity cannot be represented adequately. Moreover, the applicability of Darcy's law in these types of soils has been questioned, but this law forms the basis of most groundwater flow models. With the purpose of assessing the typical heterogeneity of the subsoil and to verify the applicability of Darcy's law, geo-hydrological fieldwork was completed at an experimental field within a research area in the western part of The Netherlands. The assessments were carried out for the so-called Complex Confining Layer (CCL), which is the Holocene peaty to clayey layer overlying Pleistocene sandy deposits. Borehole drilling through the CCL with a hand auger was completed and revealed the typical heterogeneous character of this layer, showing a dominance of muddy, humified peat which is alternated with fresher peat and clay. Slug tests were carried out to study the applicability of Darcy's law, given that previous studies suggested its non-validity for humified peat soils due to a variable horizontal hydraulic conductivity Kh with head differences. For higher humification degrees, the experiments indeed suggested a variable Kh, but this appeared to be the result of the inappropriate use of steady-state formulae for transient experiments in peaty environments. The muddy peat sampled has a rather plastic nature, and the high compressibility of this material leads to transient behavior. However, using transient formulae, the slug tests conducted for different initial groundwater heads showed that there was hardly any evidence of a variation of the hydraulic conductivity with the applied head differences. Therefore, Darcy's law can be used for typical peat soils present in The Netherlands. The heterogeneity of

  19. Laboratory-scale experimental burning of selected Palaeozoic limestones from the Barrandian area (Prague Basin, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic): re-evaluation of properties of historical raw material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Prikryl, Richard; Stastna, Aneta

    2013-04-01

    Palaeozoic limestones from the Barrandian area (Prague Basin, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic) have been quarried and utilized, among others, for manufacturing of inorganic binders. Certain beds, e.g. Devonian dvorecko-prokopské limestones were historically burnt for high quality hydraulic lime which is not produced recently. Aiming to evaluate potential of this specific raw material for small-scale production of restoration hydraulic lime, we have conducted some laboratory experimental burning tests in an electrical furnace up to 1200°C. Prior to the burning, all studied lithotypes (4 in total) have been examined for their mineralogy (optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence study, X-ray diffraction of insoluble residue) and geochemistry (wet chemical analyses). Studied biomicritic limestones can be classified as wackstones to packstones. Carbonate content varies from 80 to 90 %, the rest is due to dominant illite and silica, and subordinate kaolinite, feldspars, and/or chlorite. Specific composition of non-carbonate component (specifically high content of illite and silica) positively influences formation of CS, Ca, and/or CAS phases when burnt at calcination temperatures from 850 to 1200°C (in steps of 50°C). In the products formed during firing, mineral phases typical for hydraulic lime, such as larnite, brownmillerite, and gehlenite, along with free lime, quartz and silica phases, and portlandite were identified by X-ray diffraction. The amount of the dominant hydraulic phase, larnite, increased with higher firing temperature. On the other hand, content of free lime, quartz and silica decreased. The amount of portlandite was almost independent of the firing temperature. Higher amounts of larnite and other hydraulic phase were detected during the peak firing temperature of 1200°C in specimens containing higher amount of insoluble residue. From the study performed, it is evident that studied dvorecko-prokopské limestone, which included favourable amount of

  20. Analyzing Sustainable Energy Opportunities for a Small Scale Off-Grid Facility: A Case Study at Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggirala, Bhanu

    This thesis explored the opportunities to reduce energy demand and renewable energy feasibility at an off-grid science "community" called the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Being off-grid, ELA is completely dependent on diesel and propane fuel supply for all its electrical and heating needs, which makes ELA vulnerable to fluctuating fuel prices. As a result ELA emits a large amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) for its size. Energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies can reduce energy consumption and consequently energy cost, as well as GHG. Energy efficiency was very important to ELA due to the elevated fuel costs at this remote location. Minor upgrades to lighting, equipment and building envelope were able to reduce energy costs and reduce load. Efficient energy saving measures were recommended that save on operating and maintenance costs, namely, changing to LED lights, replacing old equipment like refrigerators and downsizing of ice makers. This resulted in a 4.8% load reduction and subsequently reduced the initial capital cost for biomass by 27,000, by 49,500 for wind power and by 136,500 for solar power. Many alternative energies show promise as potential energy sources to reduce the diesel and propane consumption at ELA including wind energy, solar heating and biomass. A biomass based CHP system using the existing diesel generators as back-up has the shortest pay back period of the technologies modeled. The biomass based CHP system has a pay back period of 4.1 years at 0.80 per liter of diesel, as diesel price approaches $2.00 per liter the pay back period reduces to 0.9 years, 50% the generation cost compared to present generation costs. Biomass has been successfully tried and tested in many off-grid communities particularly in a small-scale off-grid setting in North America and internationally. Also, the site specific solar and wind data show that ELA has potential to harvest renewable resources and produce heat and power at competitive

  1. Perspectives on Advertising Education: Curricula, Research--Descriptive, Research--Experimental, Industry/Educators' Cooperation, Special Interest Areas, and Instruction; Proceedings of the 1974 National Conference for University Professors of Advertising at the Univ. of Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Sherilyn K., Ed.

    This document contains all of the presentations given at the 1974 National American Academy of Advertising Conference in Newport, Rhode Island. The theme of the conference was "Perspectives on Advertising" and the areas of focus were curricula and instruction, descriptive and experimental research, cooperation between educators and the advertising…

  2. Experimental Study of the Effects of Finite Surface Disturbances and Angle of Attack on the Laminar Boundary Layer of an NACA 64A010 Airfoil with Area Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, Milton A; Braslow, Albert L

    1952-01-01

    A Langley low-turbulence wind-tunnel investigation of a porous NACA 64A010 airfoil section has been made to determine the effectiveness of area suction in maintaining full-chord laminar flow behind finite disturbances and at angles of attacks other than 0 degrees. Aero suction resulted in only a small increase in the size of a finite disturbance required to cause premature boundary-layer transition as compared with that for the airfoil without suction. Combined wake and suction drags lower than the drag of the plain airfoil were obtained through a range of low lift coefficient by the use of area suction.

  3. Comparison of theoretical and experimental thrust performance of a 1030:1 area ratio rocket nozzle at a chamber pressure of 2413 kN/m2 (350 psia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Tamara A.; Pavli, Albert J.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1987-01-01

    The joint Army. Navy, NASA. Air Force (JANNAF) rocket engine peformnace prediction procedure is based on the use of various reference computer programs. One of the reference programs for nozzle analysis is the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Program. The purpose of this report is to calibrate the JANNAF procedure incorporated into the December l984 version of the TDK program for the high-area-ratio rocket engine regime. The calibration was accomplished by modeling the performance of a 1030:1 rocket nozzle tested at NASA Lewis Research Center. A detailed description of the experimental test conditions and TDK input parameters is given. The results show that the computer code predicts delivered vacuum specific impulse to within 0.12 to 1.9 percent of the experimental data. Vacuum thrust coefficient predictions were within + or - 1.3 percent of experimental results. Predictions of wall static pressure were within approximately + or - 5 percent of the measured values. An experimental value for inviscid thrust was obtained for the nozzle extension between area ratios of 427.5 and 1030 by using an integration of the measured wall static pressures. Subtracting the measured thrust gain produced by the nozzle between area ratios of 427.5 and 1030 from the inviscid thrust gain yielded experimental drag decrements of 10.85 and 27.00 N (2.44 and 6.07 lb) for mixture ratios of 3.04 and 4.29, respectively. These values correspond to 0.45 and 1.11 percent of the total vacuum thrust. At a mixture ratio of 4.29, the TDK predicted drag decrement was 16.59 N (3.73 lb), or 0.71 percent of the predicted total vacuum thrust.

  4. Experimental validation of two-dimensional depth-averaged models for forecasting rainfall-runoff from precipitation data in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, L.; Garrido, M.; Puertas, J.

    2010-03-01

    SummaryThis paper presents an experimental validation of two widely used numerical models in urban flood inundation studies, the two-dimensional dynamic and diffusive wave models. Instead of using the common approach in flood inundation modelling, which consists of computing the water depth and velocity fields for a given water discharge, in this study the rainfall intensity is imposed directly in the model, the surface runoff being generated automatically. Both the dynamic and diffusive wave models are implemented in the same unstructured finite volume code, removing in such a way any differences in the numerical discretisation other than the wave approximation used to compute the water velocity. Two different methods for representing buildings are used and compared, the so-called building-block and building-hole approaches. Experimental validation of the models is presented in several simplified laboratory configurations of urban catchments, in which the surface runoff has been measured for different hyetographs. For this purpose, 72 experiments were undertaken in a rainfall simulator, including eight catchment configurations and nine hyetographs. Numerical results show that the dynamic wave model is able to predict the peak discharge and its arrival time, as well as the shape of the outlet hydrograph, while the diffusive wave model gives less accurate results. The experimental validation confirms that, when the geometry of the problem is well defined, depth-averaged dynamic wave models may be used to predict rainfall-runoff from direct precipitation data in urban environments.

  5. Effect of experimental crude oil contamination on abundance, mortality and resettlement of representative mud flat organisms in the mesohaline area of the elbe estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bernem, K. H.

    After repeated experimental contamination with small doses of the crude oils Arabian light, Kuwait crude and Iranian light on a silty mud flat in the Elbe estuary, neither an increased mortality nor emigration was found in Macoma balthica or Nereis diversicolor. Oligochaetes increased in abundance. The entire population of Corophium volutator tried to leave the contaminated sediment. Most specimens came into contact with the oil coating of the sediment and were killed. Twelve weeks after the beginning of the contaminations the original community structure had reestablished. Different effects between the 3 crude oils tested were not significant.

  6. In vivo experimental drug resistance study in Trypanosoma vivax isolates from tsetse infested and non-tsetse infested areas of Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Dagnachew, Shimelis; Terefe, Getachew; Abebe, Getachew; Barry, Dave; McCulloch, Richard; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Ethiopia, particularly in the Northwest region, is affected by both tsetse fly and non-tsetse fly transmitted trypanosomosis with a significant impact on livestock productivity. The control of trypanosomosis in Ethiopia relies on either curative or prophylactic treatment of animals with diminazene aceturate (DA) or isometamidium chloride (ISM), respectively. However, since these two trypanocides have been on the market for more than 40 years, this may have resulted in drug-resistance. Therefore, in vivo drug resistance tests on two Ethiopian isolates of Trypanosoma vivax were completed, one from an area where tsetse flies are present and one from an area where tsetse flies are not present. Twenty four cattle (Bos indicus) aged between 6 and 12 months, purchased from a trypanosome-free area (Debre Brehan: Northcentral Ethiopia) and confirmed to be trypanosome-negative, were randomly assigned into four groups of six animals, which were infected with T. vivax isolated from a tsetse-infested or non-tsetse infested area, and in each case treated with curative doses of DA or ISM. Each animal were inoculated intravenously 3×10(6) trypanosomes from donor animals. Parasitaemia became patent earlier in infections with non-tsetse T. vivax (∼7 days post-infection) than tsetse (∼14 days post-infection). Both groups were treated at the highest peak parasitaemia with DA or ISM and nine cattle, four with non-tsetse T. vivax (two ISM- and two DA-treated) and five with tsetse T. vivax (three ISM- and two DA-treated) showed relapses of parasitaemia. Moreover, treatment did not improve diagnostic host markers of trypanosome infections in these animals. In conclusion, in vivo drug tests indicated the presence of resistant parasites (>20% of treated animals in each group relapsed) against recommended doses of both available trypanocidal drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical and experimental study of a warming up effect of an underexpanded rarefied rf plasma jet outflowing into a flooded area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemakhin, A. Yu; Zheltukhin, V. S.; Khubatkhuzin, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    A mathematical model of the rf plasma flow at 13.3-133 Pa in transition regime at Knudsen number values 8 × 10-3 ≤ Kn ≤ 7 × 10-2 and the nozzle pressure ratio n = 10 for the carrier gas is described. The model based on both the statistical approach to the neutral component of the rf plasma and the approach to the continuum model for electron and ion components. The results of plasma flow calculations performed both for an undisturbed flow and for the stream with a sample at a prescribed electric field are described. The effect of a warming up of a stream in a mixture zone confirmed by comparison of numerical results with experimental ones is found.

  8. Is the increase in oil pollution a possibility of the presence of diverse microorganisms? An experimental dataset on oil prevalent areas of Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahaysa N

    2016-12-01

    Survey data and wet lab reports presented in this paper were collected from Western coastlines of India from Goan beaches. Oil polluted areas were captured on camera as evidence for oil and tar pollution. Several microorganisms showing diverse characteristics such as pigment producers, salt tolerant and hydrocarbon resistance were isolated and cultured in the laboratory. The dataset presented in this paper supports "A case study on effects of oil spills and tar-ball pollution on beaches of Goa (India)" (Rekadwad and Khobragade, 2015) [1] and "Microbial diversity of oil spills and tar resistant bacteria isolated from beaches of Goa (India)" (Rekadwad and Khobragade, 2016) [2].

  9. [Effect of fluid resuscitation for hemorrhagic shock on oxygenation of subjects in early period of first visit of high altitude area, an experimentation on dogs].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-feng; Geng, Zhi-long; Liu, Dong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Hui-wen; Li, Tao

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the effect of fluid resuscitation on oxygenation of subjects with hemorrhagic shock in early period of first visit to area of high altitude, an experiment in dogs was performed. A model of serious hemorrhagic shock was reproduced by exsanguination resulting in a lowering of mean arterial pressure to (35+/-5) mm Hg (1 mm Hg=0.133 kPa) maintain for 1 hour. Thirteen mongrel dogs were carried to an area of 3,780 metres above sea level from an area of 1,510 metres, and they were randomly divided into three groups, namely lactated Ringer's (LR) group, 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) group, and control group. The dogs in LR group were infused intravenously LR in 1.5 times the volume of blood loss; those in 6% HES group were given HES in equal volume. No fluid infusion was given in the control group. After 1 hour of resuscitation, LR was intravenously given at 5 ml.kg(-1).h(-1) in all groups as maintenance dose. The changes in oxygenation were observed. All animals in control group were dead after 2 hours. One hour after establishment of shock, the oxygen consumption (VO(2)), oxygen delivery (DO(2)), oxygen extraction ratio (O(2)ER), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) in two resuscitation groups were significantly lower than those before shock, but venous oxygen saturation (Sv(2)) and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (A-aDO(2)) were significantly higher (all P<0.05). In LR group, the oxygenation parameters including VO(2), DO(2), O(2)ER, SaO(2) after 2 hours of resuscitation were significantly higher than those 1 hour after shock, while A-aDO(2) was significantly lower (all P<0.05); and in HES group, VO(2), DO(2), O(2)ER were significantly higher than those 1 hour after shock, while SvO(2) was significantly lower (all P<0.05). All dogs with serious hemorrhagic shock would die of hemorrhagic shock in the early period of entering a high altitude area if fluid resuscitation is denied. Two hours after infusion of LR in 1.5 times of quantity of blood loss

  10. Effects of living near a new urban motorway on the travel behaviour of local residents in deprived areas: Evidence from a natural experimental study.

    PubMed

    Foley, Louise; Prins, Richard; Crawford, Fiona; Sahlqvist, Shannon; Ogilvie, David

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a new motorway built through deprived neighbourhoods on travel behaviour in residents. This natural experiment comprised a longitudinal cohort (n=365) and two cross-sectional samples (baseline n=980; follow-up n=978) recruited in 2005 and 2013. Adults from one of three study areas - surrounding the new motorway (South), an existing motorway (East), or no motorway (North) - completed a previous day travel record. Adjusted two-part regression models examined associations between exposure and outcome. Compared to the North, cohort participants in the South were more likely to undertake travel by any mode (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.0-4.2) at follow-up. Within the South study area, cohort participants living closer to a motorway junction were more likely to travel by any mode at follow-up (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.1-19.7), and cross-sectional participants living closer were more likely to use a car at follow-up (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.1-10.7), compared to those living further away. Overall, the new motorway appeared to promote travel and car use in those living nearby, but did not influence active travel. This may propagate socioeconomic inequalities in non-car owners.

  11. Experimental investigation on the large-area fabrication of micro-pyramid arrays by roll-to-roll hot embossing on PVC film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yujun; Yi, Peiyun; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin; Lin, Zhongqin

    2014-04-01

    Large-area polymeric components with micro-pyramids have been widely applied in the fields of optics, optoelectronics, biology and chemistry, etc. Roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing is regarded as a promising approach to fulfil high throughput fabrication of patterned polymeric films. In this study, an R2R hot embossing system has been developed in-house and effective and continuous production of the polymeric component with micro-pyramids is demonstrated by R2R hot embossing. The influence of processing parameters has been firstly investigated by using the one-variable-at-a-time method. Afterwards, a series of experiments based on the central composite design approach have been conducted for the analysis of variance and the establishment of empirical models of the R2R hot embossing process. As a result, a 90 mm × 90 mm PVC sample with a feature height of 65 µm was successfully fabricated and the height consistency reached 94.5%. Additionally, a process window with a mold temperature of 150-160 °C, an applied force of 18-25 kgf and a feeding speed of 0.3-0.5 m min-1, was established to achieve 100% passable micro-pyramid arrays. The processing rules and the concrete ranges of parameter values can guide the process production of large-area micro-pyramids.

  12. Effect of supply/regeneration section area ratio on the performance of desiccant wheels in hot and humid climates: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendehboudi, Alireza; Esmaeili, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Desiccant cooling system is a suitable alternative option for conventional cooling system in humid climates. It is an environmental protection technique for cooling buildings. This study has investigated the effect of supply/regeneration section area ratio on the performance of desiccant wheels in hot and humid climates, using Silica Gel (WSG) and Molecular Sieve (LT3) desiccants. To this end, some parameters such as outlet air humidity ratio, process removed moisture, process outlet temperature, reactivation outlet temperature and reactivation outlet moisture have been examined as a function of rotational speed and inlet air humidity ratio in 1:3, 1:2 and 1:1 split. In this study, desiccant materials are regenerated using a constant regeneration temperature of 80 °C, wheel rotation speed range of 4-12 RPH (revolutions per hour) and variable humidity. The results show that a rise in area ratio causes an increase in process removed moisture, process outlet temperature, reactivation outlet temperature and a drop in reactivation outlet moisture and outlet humidity ratio of process air.

  13. Three-dimensional Characterization of A High-K Aquifer at the Hanford 300 Area and Retrospective Analysis of Experimental Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Chen, X.; Hahn, M. S.; Liu, Y.; Rockhold, M. L.; Vermeul, V.; Rubin, Y.

    2009-12-01

    There is a significant challenge associated with characterizing local-scale heterogeneity of a hydraulic conductivity field in a high-permeability and coarse-grained aquifer such as the Hanford 300 Area. In addition to the fact that point conductivity measurements are not reliable, conventional pumping-test interpretations yield only effective properties over a large area. While electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) tests are feasible to obtain a large number of small-scale depth-discrete conductivities, the EBF data needs to be converted to absolute conductivity values, using a local-scale transmissivity value at each well location from the other aquifer tests. In this study, we first present a 3-D characterization of the hydraulic conductivity field under the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the Hanford 300 Area, by combining EBF data with constant-rate injection test data. In order to characterize the transmissivity field based on injection tests, we apply the method of anchor distributions (MAD), which is a general Bayesian geostatistical inversion framework. In addition to typical structural parameters, the parameter vector includes conditioning points, called anchors, which capture local trends of the field and reduce uncertainty in prediction. Our goal is to obtain a joint posterior distribution of the parameters rather than point estimates so as to fully characterize the uncertainty. We invert the zeroth temporal moments of drawdowns during multiple tests, which can eliminate uncertainty in a storage coefficient as well as reduce the computational cost significantly. From the absolute conductivity values based on the inversion results and the EBF data, we obtain a joint posterior distribution of 3-D geostatistical parameters of the conductivity field. As a retrospective design analysis, we investigate the number and configuration of the constant-rate injection tests used in the inversion, by choosing subsets of the 14 injection tests

  14. Experimental constraints on the rheology and mechanical properties of lava erupted in the Holuhraun area during the 2014 rifting event at Bárðarbunga, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Wall, Richard; von Aulock, Felix; Kennedy, Ben; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2015-04-01

    A fissure eruption began at Holuhraun on 16 August 2014, following magma drainage from the Bárðarbunga volcanic system (Iceland). Extrusion initiated as fire fountaining along a segment of the fracture and rapidly localised to a series of small, aligned cones containing a lava lake that over spilled at both ends, feeding a large lava field. The lava composition and flow behaviour put some constraints on its rheology and mechanical properties. The lava erupted is a nearly aphyric basalt containing approximately 2-3% plagioclase with traces of olivine and pyroxene in a quenched groundmass composed of glass and 20-25% microlites. The transition from fire fountaining to lava flow leads to lava with variable vesicularities; pyroclasts expelled during fire fountaining reach up to 80% vesicles whilst the lava contain up to 45% vesicles. Textures in the lava vary from a'a to slabby pahoehoe, and flow thicknesses from several meters to few centimetres. Tension gashes, crease structures and shear zones in the upper lava carapace reveal the importance of both compressive and tensional stresses. In addition, occasional frictional marks at the base of the lava flow as well as bulldozing of sediments along the flow hint at the importance of frictional properties of the rocks during lava flow. Flow properties, textures and failure modes are strongly dependent on the material properties as well as the local conditions of stress and temperature. Here we expand our field observation with preliminary high-temperature experimental data on the rheological and mechanical properties of the erupted lava. Dilatometric measurements are used to constrain the thermal expansion coefficient of the lava important to constrain the dynamics of cooling of the flow. Micropenetration is further employed to determine the viscosity of the melt at super-liquidus temperature, which is compared to the temperature-dependence of viscosity as constrained by geochemistry. Lastly, uniaxial compression and

  15. RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT FOR THE EXPERIMENTAL AREA OF A HYPER-INTENSE LASER WITH PEAK-POWER OF 1PW-CETAL.

    PubMed

    Florescu, M G; Duliu, O G; Pantazi, D; Ticos, C M; Sporea, D; Vasilache, R; Ionescu, V; Oane, M

    2016-09-24

    Ultra-high intensity lasers in use are connected with ionizing radiation sources that raise a real concern in relation to installations, personnel, population and environment protection. The shielding of target areas in these facilities has to be evaluated from the conceptual stage of the building design. The sizing of the protective concrete walls was determined using computer codes such as Fluka. For the experiments to be carried out in the facility of the Center for Advanced Laser Technologies (CETAL), both proton beams with the energy of 100 MeV and electron beams with 300 MeV energy were considered to calculate the dimensions of structural shielding and to establish technical solutions fulfilling the radiation protection constraints imposed by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control.

  16. Future considerations in aspiration pneumonia in the critically ill patient: what is not known, areas for future research, and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    DiSario, James A

    2002-01-01

    The medical literature supports the use of enteral feeding to provide nutrition and improve patient outcomes. A major complication of enteral feeding is aspiration and associated morbidity and mortality. Many knowledge gaps exist that inhibit our ability to define and diagnose aspiration, identify patients at risk, and develop prevention techniques. Several areas of inquiry should be explored to help us define and prevent the disorder--for instance, standardized criteria should be developed for diagnosing aspiration pneumonia and for differentiating it from other types of pneumonia, and accurate tests should be devised for detecting it. Research also is needed to evaluate the influence of (1) various enteral feeding sites on aspiration risk, (2) the effects of risk reduction techniques such as selective decontamination and use of promotility agents, and (3) potential benefits of immunonutrition. Current parameters used in decisions about when to initiate enteral feeding in critically ill patients are defined.

  17. Experimental dem Extraction from Aster Stereo Pairs and 3d Registration Based on Icesat Laser Altimetry Data in Upstream Area of Lambert Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, G.; Xie, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, L.; Li, R.; Tong, X.

    2017-09-01

    DEM Extraction from ASTER stereo pairs and three-dimensional registration by reference to ICESat laser altimetry data are carried out in upstream area of Lambert Glacier, East Antarctica. Since the study area is located in inland of East Antarctica where few textures exist, registration between DEM and ICESat data is performed. Firstly, the ASTER DEM generation is based on rational function model (RFM) and the procedure includes: a) rational polynomial coefficient (RPC) computation from ASTER metadata, b) L1A image product de-noise and destriping, c) local histogram equalization and matching, d) artificial collection of tie points and bundle adjustment, and e) coarse-to-fine hierarchical matching of five levels and grid matching. The matching results are filtered semi-automatically. Hereafter, DEM is interpolated using spline method with ground points converted from matching points. Secondly, the generated ASTER DEM is registered to ICESat data in three-dimensional space after Least-squares rigid transformation using singular value decomposition (SVD). The process is stated as: a) correspondence selection of terrain feature points from ICESat and DEM profiles, b) rigid transformation of generated ASTER DEM using selected feature correspondences based on least squares technique. The registration shows a good result that the elevation difference between DEM and ICESat data is low with a mean value less than 2 meters and the standard deviation around 7 meters. This DEM is generated and specially registered in Antarctic typical region without obvious ground rock control points and serves as true terrain input for further radar altimetry simulation.

  18. Experimental Study of Porosity Changes in Shale Caprocks Exposed to CO2-Saturated Brines I: Evolution of Mineralogy, Pore Connectivity, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    DOE PAGES

    Mouzakis, Katherine M.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Rother, Gernot; ...

    2016-07-18

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage, one proposed method of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, relies on low permeability formations, such as shales, above injection formations to prevent upward migration of the injected CO2. Porosity in caprocks evaluated for sealing capacity before injection can be altered by geochemical reactions induced by dissolution of injected CO2 into pore fluids, impacting long-term sealing capacity. Therefore, long-term performance of CO2 sequestration sites may be dependent on both initial distribution and connectivity of pores in caprocks, and on changes induced by geochemical reaction after injection of CO2, which are currently poorly understood. This paper presentsmore » results from an experimental study of changes to caprock porosity and pore network geometry in two caprock formations under conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration. Pore connectivity and total porosity increased in the Gothic Shale; while total porosity increased but pore connectivity decreased in the Marine Tuscaloosa. Gothic Shale is a carbonate mudstone that contains volumetrically more carbonate minerals than Marine Tuscaloosa. Carbonate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than silicate minerals in Gothic Shale under high CO2 conditions, leading to increased porosity at length scales <~200 nm that contributed to increased pore connectivity. In contrast, silicate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than carbonate minerals in Marine Tuscaloosa leading to increased porosity at all length scales, and specifically an increase in the number of pores >~1 μm. Mineral reactions also contributed to a decrease in pore connectivity, possibly as a result of precipitation in pore throats or hydration of the high percentage of clays. Finally, this study highlights the role that mineralogy of the caprock can play in geochemical response to CO2 injection and resulting changes in sealing capacity in long-term CO2 storage projects.« less

  19. First Experimental Campaign For Meteorological And Ozone Vertical Soundings And Surface Pollutants Measurements In The Metropolitan Area Of São Paulo, Fall-2006.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, T. T.; Pinheiro, S. D.; Leme, N. P.; Andrade, M.

    2007-05-01

    Frequently the air quality standards are exceeded in the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo, MASP, mainly due to the emitted gases of the vehicles, reason why great emphasis has been given to the control of the vehicle emissions. Regarding ozone, the dominant situation leads to the need of the control of the volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen, which are the ozone precursors through photochemical processes. Besides the ozone, these processes also generate a range of aggressive substances, generally denominated photochemical oxidizers. Additionally they generate a considerable amount of secondary organic aerosols that, due to their small size, have significant health importance. A pioneering campaign was carried out in the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP), Brazil. Hourly measurements of the gases NOx, NO, NO2 (on the surface) and O3 (on the surface and in altitude) were carried out from May 12th to May 29th, 2006. This campaign was organized by the group LAPAT together with Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais and São Paulo Environmental Protection Agency. Meteorological radiosondes coupled with ozonesoundes were released. The sounds were launched on May 15th (14h50min and 21h18min), May 16th (02h30min, 16h30min and 18h30min), May 17th (00h50min, 10h30min and 14h50min) and on May 18th (06:00 and 11:00), totaling 10 releases. They measured the following variables in the vertical structure of the atmosphere: pressure (mb), relative humidity (%), temperature (°C), altitude (m), currents and ozone (nb). Comparing the measurements of ozone carried out on the surface with those of the first point in altitude that the radiosondes measured, it was observed that there is a good correlation among these values of concentration of ozone (r2 = 0,746). The May 15th and May 16th measurements presented an increase in the concentration of the ozone during dawn, the same doesn't happen on the following days. Since the ozone is not formed during the night, this

  20. [Occurrence and treatment of monogenoides in fingerlings of florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) cultivated experimentally in the north area of the state of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Sanches, Eduardo G; Ostini, Sergio; Rodrigues, Vivian Carolina Dos S

    2007-01-01

    This work had as objective tests therapeutic treatments seeking the monogenea eradication in fingerlings Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) servants in cage net in the area of Ubatuba, State of São Paulo. The fingerlings presented an accentuated weigh loss and strong discoloration and through observation of scraped of gills under light microscope were identified a high amount of monogenea. Three treatments were tested in form of baths: T1 (fresh water for 5 minutes); T2 (formalin: 1:1.000 for 20 minutes) and T3: (formalin: 1:4.000 for 30 minutes). The treatments were appraised through scraped of gills, mounted among you laminate and lamínulas and observed to the light microscope. It was observed that in the tested conditions all of the treatments were efficient in the elimination of the monogenea without presenting lethality to the fish. The treatment is recommended T1 (take a bath in fresh water for 5 minutes) for the facility in the application and for the absence of use of chemical products.

  1. Experimental study of effectiveness of four radon mitigation solutions, based on underground depressurization, tested in prototype housing built in a high radon area in Spain.

    PubMed

    Frutos Vázquez, Borja; Olaya Adán, Manuel; Quindós Poncela, Luis Santiago; Sainz Fernandez, Carlos; Fuente Merino, Ismael

    2011-04-01

    The present paper discusses the results of an empirical study of four approaches to reducing indoor radon concentrations based on depressurization techniques in underground sumps. The experiments were conducted in prototype housing built in an area of Spain where the average radon concentration at a depth of 1 m is 250 kBq m(-3). Sump effectiveness was analysed in two locations: underneath the basement, which involved cutting openings into the foundation, ground storey and roof slabs, and outside the basement walls, which entailed digging a pit alongside the building exterior. The effectiveness of both sumps was likewise tested with passive and forced ventilation methods. The systems proved to be highly efficient, lowering radon levels by 91-99%, except in the solution involving passive ventilation and the outside sump, where radon levels were reduced by 53-55%. At wind speeds of over 8 m/s, however, passive ventilation across an outside sump lowered radon levels by 95% due to a Venturi effect induced drop in pressure.

  2. Theoretical and experimental substantiation of a thermogravimetric method for assessing the water-retention capacity and specific surface area of disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.; Sadovnikova, N. B.; Bashina, A. S.; Kirichenko, A. V.; Vityazev, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    A conceptually new instrumental method has been proposed for the determination of the sorption fragment of the soil water retention curve and the specific surface area of soils and sediments by drying samples at different temperatures, which is based on fundamental models for relative air humidity and thermodynamic water potential ( Ψ) as functions of temperature ( T). The basic equation for the calculation of water potential in the first (linear) approximation is as follows: Ψ = Q- aT, where Q is the specific heat of evaporation, and a is the physically substantiated parameter related to the initial relative air humidity in the laboratory. The setting of model parameters necessary for quantitative calculations has been performed from tabulated data for the saturated water vapor pressure as a function of temperature and results of an independent experiment with gradual air heating and synchronous automated control of air humidity and temperature with DS 1923 hydrochrons. The potentialities of the method have been demonstrated using literature data on the dehydration of soil colloids and our own results on the drying of a silty sandy soil (Arenosol) from Dubai, a light loamy soddy-podzolic soil (Albic Retisol) and a low-moor peat soil (Histosol) from Moscow oblast, and a loamy ordinary chernozem (Haplic Chernozem) from Krasnodar region.

  3. Mobility of Po and U-isotopes under acid mine drainage conditions: an experimental approach with samples from Río Tinto area (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Barbero, L; Gázquez, M J; Bolívar, J P; Casas-Ruiz, M; Hierro, A; Baskaran, M; Ketterer, M E

    2014-12-01

    Under acid mine drainage (AMD) conditions, the solubilities and mobilities of many elements are vastly different from conditions prevailing in most natural waters. Studies are underway in the Río Tinto area (Iberian Pyrite Belt), in order to understand the behavior and mobility of long-lived U-series radionuclides under AMD conditions. A set of leaching experiments utilizing typical country rocks from the Tinto River basin, waste rock pile composite materials, iron-rich riverbed sediments and gossan (weathered naturally rock) were performed towards this purpose. Initial leaching experiments using distilled water kept in contact with solid material for 300, 100, 50 and 1 h resulted in very low concentrations of U with (234)U/(238)U activity ratios close to equilibrium and activity concentrations of (210)Po < 0.03 mBq/g. Leaching experiments performed with sulfuric acid media (0.1 and 0.01 M), and contact times between the solid and solution for 24 h were conducted to quantify the amount of U-isotopes and (210)Po leached, and the radioactive disequilibria generated between the radionuclides in the leachate. These experiments show that Po mobility in acidic conditions (pH around 1-2) is very low, with (210)Po activity in the leachate to be 6% in average for the solid sample. By contrast, mobility of U-isotopes is higher than that of Po, around 1.2%.

  4. Population density of tropical forest frogs: relation to retreat sites.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M M; Pough, F H

    1983-08-05

    The forest frog Eleutherodactylus coqui defends specific sites for retreats and nests in the Luquillo Forest, Puerto Rico. The hypothesis that shortages of nest and retreat sites limit population size was tested by placing 100 bamboo frog houses in plots measuring 100 square meters in areas of high frog density. These new sites were readily adopted by adult frogs. After one year, experimental plots had significantly more nests and frogs of all sizes than did control plots.

  5. Geologic controls on gas production in the devonian shale, GRI Experimental Development Research Area, Pike County, Kentucky. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 1 of 2. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Kubik, W.T.; Falleur, J.P.; Lowry, P.H.

    1992-12-01

    Gas production from the Devonian Shale within the Experimental Development Research Area is controlled by its stratigraphic and structural framework. The main pay interval for the area are the black and gray shales of the Lower Huron and lower portion of the Chagrin (Transition Zone). Permeability and productivity within this interval is controlled by a variety of natural fracturing styles including regional jointing, flexure-related (density log) fracturing, and small-scale thrust faulting. The regional joint sets provide the basic permeability system for the reservoir, while these other features contribute to substantial increased productivity. Optimal completion zone selection requires the proper identification of these production-enhancing components in individual wells, and successful site selection should be based upon the definition of regions within an exploitation play which have the greatest likelihood of encountering these features.

  6. Sandstone compaction under actively controlled uniaxial strain conditions - an experimental study on the causes of subsidence in the Dutch Wadden Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Mossop, Antony; van der Linden, Arjan; Zuiderwijk, Pedro; Makurat, Axel; van Eijs, Rob

    2016-04-01

    In the Wadden Sea, a tidal-flat area located between the North Sea and the Dutch mainland shore, and UNESCO World Heritage site, subsidence could potentially impact the ecological system. To guide the licensing process governing gas extraction for the area by a solid understanding of the system's response to production, Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij (NAM) has carried out a study on the magnitudes, timing, and mechanisms of subsidence related to gas production. As part of this study program, we address the effect of production-induced reservoir compaction, using core samples from the Moddergat field located at the Wadden Sea coastline, from a depth of ~3800 m TVDSS, to assess the nature of the compaction mechanisms that operate. In this contribution, we focus on the uniaxial strain response of Permian, Aeolian sandstone to pore pressure depletion. As the majority of experiments reported in the literature are conducted under triaxial stress conditions, this data set is somewhat unique, and can help confirm the validity of micromechanical processes found for triaxial stress conditions. We report over 30 data sets of experiments carried out using 1.0 and 1.5 inch diameter plugs, sub-sampled from the extracted sandstone core material. The experiments start at in-situ conditions of pore pressure (Pf=~57 MPa), stress (Sv=~80 MPa, Sh=~67 MPa) and temperature (T up to 100 °C), and deplete to a pore pressure of 3 MPa, under actively controlled lateral constraint boundary conditions (i.e. uniaxial strain). Care was taken to systematically vary porosity and sample morphology to ensure representation of the intra-reservoir variability. Our laboratory data show that pressure-depletion results in a strain in the range of 5·10-3-1·10-2 over the total duration of the experiments of 5-12 weeks, with approximately 80% of the total strain response being close to instantaneous, and 20% developing over time. The total strain response develops during depletion as a result of

  7. The effect of minimum impact education on visitor spatial behavior in parks and protected areas: An experimental investigation using GPS-based tracking.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Abigail M; Monz, Christopher; D'Antonio, Ashley; Manning, Robert E; Reigner, Nathan; Goonan, Kelly A; Jacobi, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The unmanaged impacts of recreation and tourism can often result in unacceptable changes in resource conditions and quality of the visitor experience. Minimum impact visitor education programs aim to reduce the impacts of recreation by altering visitor behaviors. Specifically, education seeks to reduce impacts resulting from lack of knowledge both about the consequences of one's actions and impact-minimizing best practices. In this study, three different on-site minimum impact education strategies ("treatments") and a control condition were applied on the trails and summit area of Sargent Mountain in Acadia National Park, Maine. Treatment conditions were designed to encourage visitors to stay on marked trails and minimize off-trail travel. Treatments included a message delivered via personal contact, and both an ecological-based message and an amenity-based message posted on signs located alongside the trail. A control condition of current trail markings and directional signs was also assessed. The efficacy of the messaging was evaluated through the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of visitor spatial behavior on/off trails. Spatial analysis of GPS tracks revealed statistically significant differences among treatments, with the personal contact treatment yielding significantly less dispersion of visitors on the mountain summit. Results also indicate that the signs deployed in the study were ineffective at limiting off-trail use beyond what can be accomplished with trail markers and directional signs. These findings suggest that personal contact by a uniformed ranger or volunteer may be the most effective means of message delivery for on-site minimum impact education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Does artificial ascites induce the heat-sink phenomenon during percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area?: an in vivo experimental study using a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyunchul; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). One rabbit from the "W" group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups "W" and "R" throughout the procedures (39.2+/-0.4 degrees C in group W and 33.4+/-4.3 degrees C in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4+/-237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0+/-468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6+/-665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group "C" rabbits (p = 0.030). Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region.

  9. The Communities First (ComFi) study: protocol for a prospective controlled quasi-experimental study to evaluate the impact of area-wide regeneration on mental health and social cohesion in deprived communities

    PubMed Central

    White, James; Greene, Giles; Dunstan, Frank; Rodgers, Sarah; Lyons, Ronan A; Humphreys, Ioan; John, Ann; Webster, Chris; Palmer, Stephen; Elliott, Eva; Phillips, Ceri J; Fone, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recent systematic reviews have highlighted the dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of regeneration on health and health inequalities. ‘Communities First’ is an area-wide regeneration scheme to improve the lives of people living in the most deprived areas in Wales (UK). This study will evaluate the impact of Communities First on residents’ mental health and social cohesion. Methods and analysis A prospective controlled quasi-experimental study of the association between residence in Communities First regeneration areas in Caerphilly county borough and change in mental health and social cohesion. The study population is the 4226 residents aged 18–74 years who responded to the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Study in 2001 (before delivery) and 2008 (after delivery of Communities First). Data on the location, type and cost of Communities First interventions will be extracted from records collected by Caerphilly county borough council. The primary outcome is the change in mental health between 2001 and 2008. Secondary outcomes are changes: in common mental disorder case status (using survey and general practice data), social cohesion and mental health inequalities. Multilevel models will examine change in mental health and social cohesion between Communities First and control areas, adjusting for individual and household level confounding factors. Further models will examine the effects of (1) different types of intervention, (2) contamination across areas, (3) length of residence in a Communities First area, and (4) population migration. We will carry out a cost-consequences analysis to summarise the outcomes generated for participants, as well as service utilisation and utility gains. Ethics and dissemination This study has had approval from the Information Governance Review Panel at Swansea University (Ref: 0266 CF). Findings will be disseminated through peer-review publications, international conferences, policy and practice partners in

  10. On the validity of modeling concepts for (the simulation of) groundwater flow in lowland peat areas - case study at the Zegveld experimental field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambauer, P.; Nonner, J.; Heijkers, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2011-02-01

    The groundwater flow models currently used in the western part of The Netherlands and in other similar peaty areas are thought to be a too simplified representation of the hydrological reality. One of the reasons is that due to the schematization of the subsoil, its heterogeneity cannot be represented adequately. Moreover, the applicability of Darcy's law in these types of soils has been questioned, but this law forms the basis of most groundwater flow models. With the purpose of assessing the typical heterogeneity of the subsoil and to verify the applicability of Darcy's law fieldwork was completed at a research site in the western part of The Netherlands. The assessments were carried for the so called Complex Confining Layer (CCL), which is the Holocene peaty to clayey layer overlying Pleistocene sandy deposits. Borehole drilling through the CCL with a hand auger was completed and revealed the typical heterogeneous character of this layer showing a dominance of muddy, humified peat which is alternated with fresher peat and clay. Slug tests were carried out to study the applicability of Darcy's law given that previous studies suggested the non validity for humified peat soils given by a variable hydraulic conductivity K with the hydraulic gradient. For higher humification degrees, the experiments indeed suggested a variable K, but this seems to be the result of the inappropriate use of steady-state formulae for transient experiments in peaty environments. The muddy peat sampled has a rather plastic nature, and the high compressibility of this material leads to transient behavior. However, using transient formulae, the slug tests conducted for different initial hydraulic heads showed that there was hardly any evidence of a variation of the hydraulic conductivity with the hydraulic gradient. Therefore, Darcy's law can be used for peat soils. The heterogeneity of the subsoil and the apparent applicability of Darcy's law were taking into account for the detailed

  11. Introduction, study area description, and experimental design

    Treesearch

    Elaine Kennedy Sutherland; Todd F. Hutchinson; Daniel A. Yaussy

    2003-01-01

    Throughout much of the Eastern Deciduous Forest, the sustainability of oak-dominated forests is threatened by poor oak regeneration as other tree species increase in abundance. Historically, fire was a frequent process in oak-dominated ecosystems (savannas, woodlands, open-structured forests) as Native Americans and then Euro-American settlers used fire for a variety...

  12. Proposal to Acquire Experimental Data and to Model the Results with a Monte Carlo Calculation of a Secondary Source Correction Factor for Area Source Acquisitions of Holdup y-PHA Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.

    2003-02-10

    This report describes an interference observed when acquiring y-ray holdup data. The interference comes from secondary contaminated surfaces that contribute to the y-ray signal when acquiring data in the area source configuration. It is often the case that these unwanted contributions can not be isolated and eliminated, so it is necessary to mathematically correct for the contribution. In this report we propose experiments to acquire the necessary data to determine the experimental correction factor specifically for highly enriched uranium holdup measurements. We then propose to use the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code to model the contribution in several acquisition configurations and for multiple interfering y-ray energies. Results will provide a model for calculation of this secondary source correction factor for future holdup measurements. We believe the results of the experiments and modeling of the data acquired in this proposal will have a significant impact on deactivation and de commissioning activities throughout the DOE weapons complex.

  13. Summary of experimental talks

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1999-12-08

    This final talk of the meeting briefly discussed a number of experimental topics that the author found particularly interesting in the area of High Energy Physics. It also includes some critical comments about the future direction of their discipline.

  14. The communities first (ComFi) study: protocol for a prospective controlled quasi-experimental study to evaluate the impact of area-wide regeneration on mental health and social cohesion in deprived communities.

    PubMed

    White, James; Greene, Giles; Dunstan, Frank; Rodgers, Sarah; Lyons, Ronan A; Humphreys, Ioan; John, Ann; Webster, Chris; Palmer, Stephen; Elliott, Eva; Phillips, Ceri J; Fone, David

    2014-10-14

    Recent systematic reviews have highlighted the dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of regeneration on health and health inequalities. 'Communities First' is an area-wide regeneration scheme to improve the lives of people living in the most deprived areas in Wales (UK). This study will evaluate the impact of Communities First on residents' mental health and social cohesion. A prospective controlled quasi-experimental study of the association between residence in Communities First regeneration areas in Caerphilly county borough and change in mental health and social cohesion. The study population is the 4226 residents aged 18-74 years who responded to the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Study in 2001 (before delivery) and 2008 (after delivery of Communities First). Data on the location, type and cost of Communities First interventions will be extracted from records collected by Caerphilly county borough council. The primary outcome is the change in mental health between 2001 and 2008. Secondary outcomes are changes: in common mental disorder case status (using survey and general practice data), social cohesion and mental health inequalities. Multilevel models will examine change in mental health and social cohesion between Communities First and control areas, adjusting for individual and household level confounding factors. Further models will examine the effects of (1) different types of intervention, (2) contamination across areas, (3) length of residence in a Communities First area, and (4) population migration. We will carry out a cost-consequences analysis to summarise the outcomes generated for participants, as well as service utilisation and utility gains. This study has had approval from the Information Governance Review Panel at Swansea University (Ref: 0266 CF). Findings will be disseminated through peer-review publications, international conferences, policy and practice partners in local and national government, and updates on our study website

  15. Wind River Experimental Forest.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    The Wind River Experimental Forest, known as the cradle of forest research in the Pacific Northwest, is a major center for ecological and silvicultural research in west-side Pacific Northwest forests. In the state of Washington, Wind River Experimental Forest is in the south-central area of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, north of the Columbia River Gorge National...

  16. Surgical area contamination--comparable bacterial counts using disposable head and mask and helmet aspirator system, but dramatic increase upon omission of head-gear: an experimental study in horizontal laminar air-flow.

    PubMed

    Friberg, B; Friberg, S; Ostensson, R; Burman, L G

    2001-02-01

    The effect of different head coverings on air-borne transmission of bacteria and particles in the surgical area was studied during 30 strictly standardized sham operations performed in a horizontal laminar air flow (LAF) unit. The operating team members wore disposable gowns plus either a non-sterile head covering consisting of a squire type disposable hood and triple laminar face mask, a sterilized helmet aspirator system or no head cover at all. In the wound area both types of head cover resulted in low and comparable air (means of 8 and 4cfu/m(3)) and surface contamination (means of 69 and 126cfu/m(2)/h) rates. Omission of head-gear resulted in a three- to five-fold increase (P > or = 0.01- 0.001), depending on site sampled air contamination rate (mean of 22cfu/m(3)) whereas the bacterial sedimentation rate in the wound area increased about 60-fold ( P > or = 0.0001). A proper head cover minimized the emission of apparently heavy particles that were not removed by the horizontal LAF and contained mainly streptococci, presumably of respiratory tract origin. Dust particle counts revealed no differences between the three experimental situations. No correlation between air and surface contamination rates or between air contamination and air particle counts was found. We conclude that, from a bacteriological point of view, disposable hoods of squire type and face masks are equally as efficient as a helmet aspirator system and both will efficiently contain the substantial emission of bacteria-carrying droplets from the respiratory tract occurring when head cover is omitted. Finally, the use of bacterial air counts to assess surgical site surface contamination in horizontal LAF units must be seriously questioned.

  17. Disturbance regime

    Treesearch

    F.N. Scatena; J.F. Blanco; K.H. Beard; R.B. Waide; A.E. Lugo; N. Brokaw; W.L. Silver; B.L. Haines; J.K. Zimmerman

    2012-01-01

    The Luquillo Mountains are affected by a wide array of environmental processes and distnrbances. Events that concurrently alter the environmental space of several different areas of the Luquillo Mountains occur every 2 to 5 years. Events such as hurricanes that cause widespread environmental modification occur once every 20 to 60 years. The most common disturbance-...

  18. Experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Kawecki, Tadeusz J; Lenski, Richard E; Ebert, Dieter; Hollis, Brian; Olivieri, Isabelle; Whitlock, Michael C

    2012-10-01

    Experimental evolution is the study of evolutionary processes occurring in experimental populations in response to conditions imposed by the experimenter. This research approach is increasingly used to study adaptation, estimate evolutionary parameters, and test diverse evolutionary hypotheses. Long applied in vaccine development, experimental evolution also finds new applications in biotechnology. Recent technological developments provide a path towards detailed understanding of the genomic and molecular basis of experimental evolutionary change, while new findings raise new questions that can be addressed with this approach. However, experimental evolution has important limitations, and the interpretation of results is subject to caveats resulting from small population sizes, limited timescales, the simplified nature of laboratory environments, and, in some cases, the potential to misinterpret the selective forces and other processes at work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. FURSMASA: a new approach to rapid scoring functions that uses a MD-averaged potential energy grid and a solvent-accessible surface area term with parameters GA fit to experimental data.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, David A; Rao, B Govinda; Charifson, Paul

    2008-05-15

    correlation coefficient. We also find that the FURSAMA function is able to reliably predict the water solubility for 1032 compounds from the Syracuse Research solubility database with a cross-correlated PI of 0.84 and a correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.69. This prediction, which is based solely on a term derived from the atom-based solvent-accessible surface areas, compares favorably with the best prediction methods in the literature, most of which are more complex and/or require experimental data. Finally, as a rigorous test of the applicability to database screening, we apply FURSMASA to large active/decoy ligand databases for IMPDH (400 actives vs. 10,000 decoys), p38 (502 actives vs. 10,000 decoys), and HIV (787 actives vs. 10,000 decoys) used in earlier work to critically evaluate many popular scoring functions, and find that FURSMASA performs surprisingly well for IMPDH and HIV.

  20. Blois V: Experimental summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation.

  1. Helping HELP with limited resources: the Luquillo experience

    Treesearch

    F.N. Scatena; JR Ortiz-Zayas; J.F. Blanco-Libreros

    2008-01-01

    By definition the HELP approach involves the active participation of individuals from a wide range of disciplines and backgrounds, including representatives of industry, academics, natural resource managers, and local officials and community leaders. While there is considerable enthusiasm and support for the integrated HELP approach, a central problem for all HELP...

  2. NATURAL AREA ROADLESS AREA, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys of the Natural Area Roadless Area, Florida, identified a substantiated resource potential for scattered low-grade phosphate deposits. The area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral resources or oil and gas, although the possibilities for the occurrence of these two hydrocarbons cannot be ruled out. The only mineral material that has been produced in the area is clayey sand used in stabilizing roads. Peaty material is present in swamps in the roadless area, but none of it is thick or pure and no resource potential was identified. Limestone underlies all of the Natural Area Roadless Area but is under too much overburden for quarrying. Heavy minerals are present in the area but are not sufficiently concentrated to consider the area as having resource potential.

  3. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  4. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  5. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  6. Determination of the Effective Detector Area of an Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometer at the Scanning Electron Microscope Using Experimental and Theoretical X-Ray Emission Yields.

    PubMed

    Procop, Mathias; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan; Terborg, Ralf; Berger, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    A method is proposed to determine the effective detector area for energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS). Nowadays, detectors are available for a wide range of nominal areas ranging from 10 up to 150 mm2. However, it remains in most cases unknown whether this nominal area coincides with the "net active sensor area" that should be given according to the related standard ISO 15632, or with any other area of the detector device. Moreover, the specific geometry of EDS installation may further reduce a given detector area. The proposed method can be applied to most scanning electron microscope/EDS configurations. The basic idea consists in a comparison of the measured count rate with the count rate resulting from known X-ray yields of copper, titanium, or silicon. The method was successfully tested on three detectors with known effective area and applied further to seven spectrometers from different manufacturers. In most cases the method gave an effective area smaller than the area given in the detector description.

  7. Should Broca's area include Brodmann area 47?

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain organization of speech production has been a principal goal of neuroscience. Historically, brain speech production has been associated with so-called Broca’s area (Brodmann area –BA- 44 and 45), however, modern neuroimaging developments suggest speech production is associated with networks rather than with areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of BA47 ( pars orbitalis) in relation to language . A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the language network in which BA47 is involved. The Brainmap database was used. Twenty papers corresponding to 29 experimental conditions with a total of 373 subjects were included. Our results suggest that BA47 participates in a “frontal language production system” (or extended Broca’s system). The BA47  connectivity found is also concordant with a minor role in language semantics. BA47 plays a central role in the language production system.

  8. Convenience experimentation.

    PubMed

    Krohs, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Systems biology aims at explaining life processes by means of detailed models of molecular networks, mainly on the whole-cell scale. The whole cell perspective distinguishes the new field of systems biology from earlier approaches within molecular cell biology. The shift was made possible by the high throughput methods that were developed for gathering 'omic' (genomic, proteomic, etc.) data. These new techniques are made commercially available as semi-automatic analytic equipment, ready-made analytic kits and probe arrays. There is a whole industry of supplies for what may be called convenience experimentation. My paper inquires some epistemic consequences of strong reliance on convenience experimentation in systems biology. In times when experimentation was automated to a lesser degree, modeling and in part even experimentation could be understood fairly well as either being driven by hypotheses, and thus proceed by the testing of hypothesis, or as being performed in an exploratory mode, intended to sharpen concepts or initially vague phenomena. In systems biology, the situation is dramatically different. Data collection became so easy (though not cheap) that experimentation is, to a high degree, driven by convenience equipment, and model building is driven by the vast amount of data that is produced by convenience experimentation. This results in a shift in the mode of science. The paper shows that convenience driven science is not primarily hypothesis-testing, nor is it in an exploratory mode. It rather proceeds in a gathering mode. This shift demands another shift in the mode of evaluation, which now becomes an exploratory endeavor, in response to the superabundance of gathered data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental philosophy.

    PubMed

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  10. SPHINX experimenters information package

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    This information package was prepared for both new and experienced users of the SPHINX (Short Pulse High Intensity Nanosecond X-radiator) flash X-Ray facility. It was compiled to help facilitate experiment design and preparation for both the experimenter(s) and the SPHINX operational staff. The major areas covered include: Recording Systems Capabilities,Recording System Cable Plant, Physical Dimensions of SPHINX and the SPHINX Test cell, SPHINX Operating Parameters and Modes, Dose Rate Map, Experiment Safety Approval Form, and a Feedback Questionnaire. This package will be updated as the SPHINX facilities and capabilities are enhanced.

  11. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  12. Pigeon homing from unfamiliar areas

    PubMed Central

    Wallraff, Hans G

    2014-01-01

    The conclusion that pigeons and other birds can find their way home from unfamiliar areas by means of olfactory signals is well based on a variety of experiments and supporting investigations of the chemical atmosphere. Here I argue that alternative concepts proposing other sources of geopositional information are disproved by experimental findings or, at least, are not experimentally supported and hardly realistic. PMID:25346789

  13. Experimental macroevolution†

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  14. Transfer of contaminants from surface to hands: experimental assessment of linearity of the exposure process, adherence to the skin, and area exposed during fixed pressure and repeated contact with surfaces contaminated with a powder.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, D H; Kroese, R; Van Hemmen, J J

    1999-04-01

    Estimation of dermal exposure in the workplace resulting from contact with contaminated surfaces is important in risk assessment. Models have been developed to describe the process of exposure due to transfer, but for major input parameters--that is, contact area surface and adherence--defaults are used. This study examines the effect of one single-hand press contact and repeated contacts with a contaminated glass plate on both skin area exposed and loading of the skin for three volunteers. A fluorescent whitening agent was used to study the process of exposure and to determine the increase of the area exposed as well as the adherence of the compound to the skin surface after 1 to 12 consecutive contacts by a video imaging technique. In addition, loading of the skin after 12 contacts was compared to loading of a cotton glove monitor with similar hand pressures. The results show that after one single-hand contact only 4 to 16 percent of the total surface of the palm of the hand was exposed, whereas after 12 contacts this was increased to about 40 percent. The efficiency of transfer was < or = 2 percent of the contamination of the surface. The adherence to the skin was 1.07 micrograms/cm2 after 12 contacts and tended to increase non-linearly with increase in contacts. Because defaults of adherence for use in exposure models are generally a factor 500 to 5,000 higher, and the area exposed is assumed to be the total surface of the hand, overestimation of dermal exposure due to a single hand-surface contact in workplaces may occur. Therefore, additional studies on multi-contact exposure scenarios are indicated to adjust defaults for hand-surface transfer processes.

  15. experimental tectonophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handin, John; Logan, J. M.

    Because virtually all tectonophysical processes are masked by the overburden, or occur too slowly for adequate observation in anthropocentric time, or both, they must be studied in carefully controlled laboratory experiments that simulate the natural environment as realistically as is practicable. Extrapolations of laboratory data in space and time are invalid unless the experimental and natural phenomenologies are essentially the same. The size of conventional specimens is of the order of 10 cm, whereas the discontinuities (defects in a continuum) in real rock-masses are often much larger, of the order of l m of more. Furthermore, such discontinuities as macrofractures (joints) may well dominate the mechanical and fluid-transport properties in nature. Adequate sampling of rock-mass properties will probably always require in-situ testing, but testing machines much larger than any now available could provide useful data at least at intermediate scale.

  16. Experimental tectonophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Handin, J.; Logan, J.M.

    1981-07-01

    Because virtually all tectonophysical processes are marked by the overburden, or occur to slowly for adequate observation in anthropocentric time, or both, they must be studied in carefully controlled laboratory experiments that simulate the natural environment as realistically as is practicable. Extrapolations of laboratory data in space and time are invalid unless the experimental and natural phenomenologies are essentially the same. The size of conventional specimens is of the order of 10 cm, whereas the discontinuities (defects in a continuum) in real rock-masses are often much larger, of the order of 1 m or more. Furthermore, such discontinuities as macrofractures (joints) may well dominate the mechanical and fluid-transport properties in nature. Adequate sampling of rock-mass properties will probably always require in-situ testing, but testing machines much larger than any now available could provide useful data at least at intermediate scale.

  17. Real-time vehicle emissions monitoring using a compact LiDAR system and conventional instruments: first results of an experimental campaign in a suburban area in southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parracino, Stefano; Richetta, Maria; Gelfusa, Michela; Malizia, Andrea; Bellecci, Carlo; De Leo, Leonardo; Perrimezzi, Carlo; Fin, Alessandro; Forin, Marco; Giappicucci, Francesca; Grion, Massimo; Marchese, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Pasquale

    2016-10-01

    Urban air pollution causes deleterious effects on human health and the environment. To meet stringent standards imposed by the European Commission, advanced measurement methods are required. Remote sensing techniques, such as light detection and ranging (LiDAR), can be a valuable option for evaluating particulate matter (PM), emitted by vehicles in urban traffic, with high sensitivity and in shorter time intervals. Since air quality problems persist not only in large urban areas, a measuring campaign was specifically performed in a suburban area of Crotone, Italy, using both a compact LiDAR system and conventional instruments for real-time vehicle emissions monitoring along a congested road. First results reported in this paper show a strong dependence between variations of LiDAR backscattering signals and traffic-related air pollution levels. Moreover, time-resolved LiDAR data averaged in limited regions, directly above conventional monitoring stations at the border of an intersection, were found to be linearly correlated to the PM concentration levels with a correlation coefficient between 0.75 and 0.84.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R. H.

    1898-01-01

    From the results of the various experiments already detailed I feel justified in drawing the following conclusions: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  19. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, R H

    1898-03-01

    FROM THE RESULTS OF THE VARIOUS EXPERIMENTS ALREADY DETAILED I FEEL JUSTIFIED IN DRAWING THE FOLLOWING CONCLUSIONS: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  20. Experimental Study of Porosity Changes in Shale Caprocks Exposed to CO2-Saturated Brines I: Evolution of Mineralogy, Pore Connectivity, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    SciTech Connect

    Mouzakis, Katherine M.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Rother, Gernot; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Wang, Xiuyu; Kaszuba, John P.; Heath, Jason E.; Miller, Quin R. S.; Alvarado, Vladimir; McCray, John E.

    2016-07-18

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage, one proposed method of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, relies on low permeability formations, such as shales, above injection formations to prevent upward migration of the injected CO2. Porosity in caprocks evaluated for sealing capacity before injection can be altered by geochemical reactions induced by dissolution of injected CO2 into pore fluids, impacting long-term sealing capacity. Therefore, long-term performance of CO2 sequestration sites may be dependent on both initial distribution and connectivity of pores in caprocks, and on changes induced by geochemical reaction after injection of CO2, which are currently poorly understood. This paper presents results from an experimental study of changes to caprock porosity and pore network geometry in two caprock formations under conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration. Pore connectivity and total porosity increased in the Gothic Shale; while total porosity increased but pore connectivity decreased in the Marine Tuscaloosa. Gothic Shale is a carbonate mudstone that contains volumetrically more carbonate minerals than Marine Tuscaloosa. Carbonate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than silicate minerals in Gothic Shale under high CO2 conditions, leading to increased porosity at length scales <~200 nm that contributed to increased pore connectivity. In contrast, silicate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than carbonate minerals in Marine Tuscaloosa leading to increased porosity at all length scales, and specifically an increase in the number of pores >~1 μm. Mineral reactions also contributed to a decrease in pore connectivity, possibly as a result of precipitation in pore throats or hydration of the high percentage of clays. Finally, this study highlights the role that mineralogy of the caprock can play in geochemical response to CO2 injection and resulting changes in

  1. Experimental Study of Porosity Changes in Shale Caprocks Exposed to CO2-Saturated Brines I: Evolution of Mineralogy, Pore Connectivity, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    SciTech Connect

    Mouzakis, Katherine M.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Rother, Gernot; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Wang, Xiuyu; Kaszuba, John P.; Heath, Jason E.; Miller, Quin R. S.; Alvarado, Vladimir; McCray, John E.

    2016-07-18

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage, one proposed method of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, relies on low permeability formations, such as shales, above injection formations to prevent upward migration of the injected CO2. Porosity in caprocks evaluated for sealing capacity before injection can be altered by geochemical reactions induced by dissolution of injected CO2 into pore fluids, impacting long-term sealing capacity. Therefore, long-term performance of CO2 sequestration sites may be dependent on both initial distribution and connectivity of pores in caprocks, and on changes induced by geochemical reaction after injection of CO2, which are currently poorly understood. This paper presents results from an experimental study of changes to caprock porosity and pore network geometry in two caprock formations under conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration. Pore connectivity and total porosity increased in the Gothic Shale; while total porosity increased but pore connectivity decreased in the Marine Tuscaloosa. Gothic Shale is a carbonate mudstone that contains volumetrically more carbonate minerals than Marine Tuscaloosa. Carbonate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than silicate minerals in Gothic Shale under high CO2 conditions, leading to increased porosity at length scales <~200 nm that contributed to increased pore connectivity. In contrast, silicate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than carbonate minerals in Marine Tuscaloosa leading to increased porosity at all length scales, and specifically an increase in the number of pores >~1 μm. Mineral reactions also contributed to a decrease in pore connectivity, possibly as a result of precipitation in pore throats or hydration of the high percentage of clays. Finally, this study highlights the role that mineralogy of the caprock can play in geochemical response to CO2 injection and resulting changes in

  2. An Experimental LISP Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lun, Wang

    1987-04-01

    This paper presents a multi-microprocessor LISP machine whose goal is to exploit the inherent parallelism in the LISP programs fully. The base architecture is a MIMD architecture based on a hybrid model for combinating data driven, demand driven and VoN Neumann process schemes. The basic evaluation strategy is data driven. Lazy evaluation mechanism is introduced to avoid unnecessary and unsafe computations. An experimental system with the four processor elements has been built in HIT, China. The system consists of a Z80 microcomputer and three TP8O1s interconnected through three buses. Each processor evaluates a part of programs asynchronously. The shared memory is divided into two parts: list cell area and enviroment area, each of which has the indepen-dent common bus to avoid the bus bottleneck.

  3. Genetics of experimental hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, A F; Clark, J S; Jeffs, B; Anderson, N H; Negrin, C D; Lee, W K; Brosnan, M J

    1998-12-01

    Experimental models of genetic hypertension are used to develop paradigms to study human essential hypertension while removing some of the complexity inherent in the study of human subjects. Since 1991 several quantitative trait loci responsible for blood pressure regulation have been identified in various rat crosses. More recently, a series of interesting quantitative trait loci influencing cardiac hypertrophy, stroke, metabolic syndrome and renal damage has also been described. It is recognized that the identification of large chromosomal regions containing a quantitative trait locus is only a first step towards gene identification. The next step is the production of congenic strains and substrains to confirm the existence of the quantitative trait locus and to narrow down the chromosomal region of interest. Several congenic strains have already been produced, with further refinement of the methodology currently in progress. The ultimate goal is to achieve positional cloning of the causal gene, a task which has so far been elusive. There are several areas of cross-fertilization between experimental and human genetics of hypertension, with a successful transfer of two loci directly from rats to humans and with new pharmacogenetic approaches which may be utilized in both experimental and clinical settings.

  4. Vermont management in focal areas

    Treesearch

    Judy Rosovsky; Bruce L. Parker; Luke Curtis

    1991-01-01

    Following the 1979 outbreak of gypsy moths Lymantria dispar L. in Vermont, state personnel began monitoring a number of focal areas for signs of increase in gypsy moth populations. In 1986 data from this early warning system indicated an incipient outbreak. We took advantage of this increase to test an experimental management technique. Would...

  5. Vehicular road influence areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas, María E.; Huertas, José I.; Valencia, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Vehicle operation over paved and unpaved roads is an emission source that significantly contributes to air pollution. Emissions are derived from vehicle exhaust pipes and re-suspension of particulate matter generated by wind erosion and tire to road surface interactions. Environmental authorities require a methodology to evaluate road impact areas, which enable managers to initiate counter-measures, particularly under circumstances where historic meteorological and/or air quality data is unavailable. The present study describes an analytical and experimental work developed to establish a simplified methodology to estimate the area influenced by vehicular roads. AERMOD was chosen to model pollutant dispersion generated by two roads of common attributes (straight road over flat terrain) under the effects of several arbitrary chosen weather conditions. The resulting pollutant concentration vs. Distance curves collapsed into a single curve when concentration and distance were expressed as dimensionless numbers and this curve can be described by a beta distribution function. This result implied that average concentration at a given distance was proportional to emission intensity and that it showed minor sensitivity to meteorological conditions. Therefore, road influence was defined by the area adjacent to the road limited by distance at which the beta distribution function equaled the limiting value specified by the national air quality standard for the pollutant under consideration.

  6. Earth Observations taken by the Expedition 16 Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-23

    ISS016-E-018385 (23 Dec. 2008) --- Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 16 crewmember on the International Space Station. The Luquillo Mountains are located in the northeastern portion of Puerto Rico and rise to elevations of 1,075 meters. According to scientists, the mountains are comprised mainly of volcanic rock material that was uplifted by tectonism - Puerto Rico is located between the junction of the North American and Caribbean plates - approximately 37--28 million years ago. Prevailing easterly winds bring moisture from the Caribbean Sea that falls as precipitation as they cross the mountains. Higher elevations receive more rainfall than lower elevations, leading to subtropical forest types in the lowlands and montane forest types near the summits. This image, taken during the rainy season, illustrates the rich vegetation cover of the mountains. The rapid change in ecosystems with elevation, land use history, and exposure to frequent natural disturbances (such as hurricanes) makes the Luquillo Mountains as ideal location for ecological study. The Luquillo Experimental Forest Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site is contained within the Luquillo National Forest, covering much of the mountains to the southwest of the city of Luquillo (center). Historical human land uses in the Forest -- such as logging, agriculture, charcoal production, and coffee plantations - have determined much of the current ecosystem structure. Results of LTER site research indicates that the forest ecosystems recover more rapidly from natural disturbances (like hurricanes) than they do from human disturbance.

  7. Experimental Model of the L-Area Outfall

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.

    2001-07-17

    A once-through cooling lake has been chosen to provide for thermal mitigation of the reactor effluent cooling water. This alternative provides satisfactory cooling performance and thermal buffering, with moderate construction time, cost, and maintenance. In the event that the cooling lake fails to meet South Carolina environmental requirements during the summer months, SRP will reduce reactor power until supplemental cooling can be provided. To minimize this further expense and delay, it is desirable to realize the best performance possible from the cooling lake.

  8. Arcjet Nozzle Area Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  9. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  10. Experimental medicine 1000 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the state of experimentation in the field of medicine during the Medieval Islamic era. With few exceptions, most of the contemporary sources on history of medicine propagate the idea that the roots of experimental medicine in its modern form, including clinical trials and drug-potency studies, first started during the European Renaissance in the 16th to the 18th centuries. This study is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary primary-source investigation of the original Arabic works of 11 Islamic medical scholars who lived and practiced between the 9th and the 13th centuries. The study critically evaluated and documented their contributions to the development of the scientific method and experimental medicine during that medieval Islamic era in several areas including critical appraisal of previous knowledge, clinical observations and case reports, clinical therapeutic trials, drug potency trials, experimentation on animals, dissection and dissection experiments as well as postmortem examinations. In each of the above-mentioned areas, significant contributions were made during the Medieval Islamic era from as early as the ninth century AD. PMID:21747591

  11. Students' Epistemologies about Experimental Physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder…

  12. Students' Epistemologies about Experimental Physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder…

  13. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  14. Experimental Determination of Ramsey Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  15. Experimental determination of Ramsey numbers.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-27

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  16. Area contingency plan Wisconsin area. (COTP Milwaukee)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-30

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Eastern Wisconsin Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Milwaukee Coastal Zone.

  17. Area contingency plan Chicago area. (COTP Chicago)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Chicago Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Chicago Coastal Zone.

  18. Health Service Areas (HSAs) - Small Area Estimates

    Cancer.gov

    Health Service Areas (HSAs) are a compromise between the 3000 counties and the 50 states. An HSA may be thought of as an area that is relatively self-contained with respect to hospital care and may cross over state boundries.

  19. Experimental design methods for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Keskin Gündoğdu, Tuğba; Deniz, İrem; Çalışkan, Gülizar; Şahin, Erdem Sefa; Azbar, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Experimental design is a form of process analysis in which certain factors are selected to obtain the desired responses of interest. It may also be used for the determination of the effects of various independent factors on a dependent factor. The bioengineering discipline includes many different areas of scientific interest, and each study area is affected and governed by many different factors. Briefly analyzing the important factors and selecting an experimental design for optimization are very effective tools for the design of any bioprocess under question. This review summarizes experimental design methods that can be used to investigate various factors relating to bioengineering processes. The experimental methods generally used in bioengineering are as follows: full factorial design, fractional factorial design, Plackett-Burman design, Taguchi design, Box-Behnken design and central composite design. These design methods are briefly introduced, and then the application of these design methods to study different bioengineering processes is analyzed.

  20. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  1. Automatic emotional expression analysis from eye area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkoç, Betül; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Eyes play an important role in expressing emotions in nonverbal communication. In the present study, emotional expression classification was performed based on the features that were automatically extracted from the eye area. Fırst, the face area and the eye area were automatically extracted from the captured image. Afterwards, the parameters to be used for the analysis through discrete wavelet transformation were obtained from the eye area. Using these parameters, emotional expression analysis was performed through artificial intelligence techniques. As the result of the experimental studies, 6 universal emotions consisting of expressions of happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, anger and fear were classified at a success rate of 84% using artificial neural networks.

  2. Is animal experimentation fundamental?

    PubMed

    d'Acampora, Armando José; Rossi, Lucas Félix; Ely, Jorge Bins; de Vasconcellos, Zulmar Acciolli

    2009-01-01

    The understanding about the utilization of experimental animals in scientific research and in teaching is many times a complex issue. Special attention needs to be paid to attain the understanding by the general public of the importance of animal experimentation in experimental research and in undergraduate medical teaching. Experimental teaching and research based on the availability of animals for experimentation is important and necessary for the personal and scientific development of the physician-to-be. The technological arsenal which intends to mimic experimentation animals and thus fully replace their use many times does not prove to be compatible with the reality of the living animal. The purpose of this paper is to discuss aspects concerning this topic, bringing up an issue which is complex and likely to arouse in-depth reflections.

  3. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, C.A.; Mayerle, Ronald T.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys of the Rattlesnake Roadless Area in Montana identified a small area of substantiated resource potential for a low-grade stratabound copper occurrence along the northwest border of the area. A demonstrated barite (BaSO//4) resource of 45 tons and a demonstrated limestone resource suitable for cement production are present in the southern part of the roadless area. Limestone, silica in quartz veins, and sand and gravel deposits are known in the southern part of the area but similar deposits occur widely outside the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area.

  4. Mainstreaming Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jeremy C.; Cutter, Asher D.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evolution provides a powerful manipulative tool for probing evolutionary process and mechanism. As this approach to hypothesis testing has taken purchase in biology, so too has the number of experimental systems that use it, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The depth of biological knowledge about Caenorhabditis nematodes, combined with their laboratory tractability, positions them well for exploiting experimental evolution in animal systems to understand deep questions in evolution and ecology, as well as in molecular genetics and systems biology. To date, Caenorhabditis elegans and related species have proved themselves in experimental evolution studies of the process of mutation, host–pathogen coevolution, mating system evolution and life-history theory. Yet these organisms are not broadly recognized for their utility for evolution experiments and remain underexploited. Here, we outline this experimental evolution work undertaken so far in Caenorhabditis, detail simple methodological tricks that can be exploited and identify research areas that are ripe for future discovery. PMID:24430852

  5. Mainstreaming Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jeremy C; Cutter, Asher D

    2014-03-07

    Experimental evolution provides a powerful manipulative tool for probing evolutionary process and mechanism. As this approach to hypothesis testing has taken purchase in biology, so too has the number of experimental systems that use it, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The depth of biological knowledge about Caenorhabditis nematodes, combined with their laboratory tractability, positions them well for exploiting experimental evolution in animal systems to understand deep questions in evolution and ecology, as well as in molecular genetics and systems biology. To date, Caenorhabditis elegans and related species have proved themselves in experimental evolution studies of the process of mutation, host-pathogen coevolution, mating system evolution and life-history theory. Yet these organisms are not broadly recognized for their utility for evolution experiments and remain underexploited. Here, we outline this experimental evolution work undertaken so far in Caenorhabditis, detail simple methodological tricks that can be exploited and identify research areas that are ripe for future discovery.

  6. Large area mercuric iodide photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Markakis, J.M.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1984-02-01

    Results of an investigation of large area mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetectors are reported. Different entrance contacts were studied, including semitransparent metallic films and conductive liquids. Theoretical calculations of electronic noise of these photodetectors were compared with experimental results. HgI/sub 2/ photodetectors with active area up to 4 cm/sup 2/ were matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and were evaluated as gamma-radiation spectrometers. Energy resolution of 9.3% for gamma radiation of 511 keV with a CsI(Tl) scintillator and energy resolution of 9.0% for gamma radiation of 622 keV with a NaI(Tl) scintillator have been obtained.

  7. CUCAMONGA ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Peters, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys and an investigation of mines, prospects, and mineralized areas, the Cucamonga Roadless Areas in California have two areas of probable mineral-resource potential. An area of probable mineral-resource potential for low-grade tungsten and gold resources is located in the northern part of the roadless areas, and an area of similar potential for small deposits of silver, lead, and zinc is located in the southwestern part of the roadless areas. An interpretation of an aeromagnetic survey of the Cucamonga Roadless Areas showed magnetic anomalies and patterns closely related to magnetic variation in rock units, but indicated no unknown areas of mineral-resource potential.

  8. The Experimental College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiklejohn, Alexander

    "The Experimental College" tells the story of a 4-year academic experiment at the University of Wisconsin established by Alexander Meiklejohn. Aimed at finding a method of teaching that would help students develop "intelligence in the conduct of their own lives," the Experimental College discarded major requirements,…

  9. On experimental oil spills

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, D.; Thornton, D. E.; Blackall, P. J.; Sergy, G. S.; Snow, N.; Hume, H.

    1980-09-01

    Experimental oil spills are an essential component of overall oil pollution research efforts. However, such experiments must be carefully designed and coordinated in order to cull the most information possible. Physical, biological, and ecological impacts must be examined simultaneously. Long-term monitoring of the multidisciplinary effects of experimental oil spills is recommended.

  10. Questioning and Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-01-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated…

  11. Questioning and Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-01-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated…

  12. 7. VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST WELL HOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST WELL HOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST BUNKHOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST GARAGE, AND FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST RESIDENCE. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  13. Class 1 Areas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A Class 1 area is a geographic area recognized by the EPA as being of the highest environmental quality and requiring maximum protection. Class I areas are areas of special national or regional scenic, recreational or historic value for which the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) regulations provide special protection. These data were compiled based on EPA's list of mandatory Class I areas and Region 8 listing of non-mandatory Class 1 areas for three tribes. Spatial data are from National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, and U.S. Census Bureau.

  14. Moriond QCD 2013 Experimental Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Dmitri

    2013-06-28

    The article presents experimental highlights of Moriond 2013 QCD conference. This was fantastic conference and the first Moriond QCD since the discovery of the Higgs boson. Many new results about its properties have been presented at the conference with Higgs-like particle becoming a Higgs as it properties match expected for the Higgs boson pretty well. There were many new results presented in all experimental areas including QCD, elecroweak, studies of the top, bottom and charm quarks, searches for physics beyond Standard Model as well as studies of the heavy ion collisions. 56 experimental talks have been presented at the conference and it is impossible to cover each result in the summary, so highlights are limited to what I was able to present in my summary talk presented on March 16 2013. The proceedings of the conference cover in depth all talks presented and I urge you to get familiar with all of them. Theoretical Summary of the conference was given by Michelangelo Mangano, so theory talks are not covered in the article.

  15. [Experimental nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    An earlier study of unusual electromagnetic decays in {sup 86}Zr was extended in order to make comparisons with its isotone {sup 84}Sr and with {sup 84}Zr. The K=14 (t {sub {1/2}} = 70 ns) high-spin isomer in {sup 176}W was found to have a 13% branch directly to the K=O ground-state band, one of the strongest violations of K-selection rules known. A new program to search for a predicted region of oblate deformation involving neutron deficient isotopes in the Rn/Fr/Ra region was begun. In the area of nuclear astrophysics, as part of a study of the onset of the rp-Process, a set of measurements searching for possible new resonances for {sup 14}O+{alpha} and {sup 17}F+p reactions was completed and a coincidence experiment measuring the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne({alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne(p){sup 18}F reactions in order to determine the rates of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne reactions was begun. Experimental measurements of {beta}n{alpha} coincidences from the {sup 15}N(d,p){sup 16}N({beta}{sup {minus}}{nu}){sup 16}O({alpha}){sup 12}C reaction have also been completed and are currently being analyzed to determine the rate of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}) reaction. In the APEX collaboration, we have completed the assembly and testing of two position-sensitive Na barrels which surround the axial silicon detector arrays and serve as the e{sup +} triggers by detecting their back-to-back annihilation quanta were completed. The HI@AGS and RHIC collaborations, construction and implementation activities associated with the space-time-tracker detector and in the design of the central detector for the PHENIX experiment were carried out. Operation of the ESTU tandem accelerator has been reliable, delivering beam on target at terminal voltages as high as 19.3 MV and running for as long as 143 days between tank openings. Fabrication and bench testing of a new negative ion source system have been completed.

  16. Land use, population dynamics, and land-cover change in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter B in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, William A.; Martinuzzi, Sebastián; Pares-Ramos, Isabel K.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed current and historic land use and land cover in the Luquillo Mountains and surrounding area in eastern Puerto Rico, including four small subwatersheds that are study watersheds of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program. This region occupies an area of 1,616 square kilometers, about 18 percent of the total land in Puerto Rico. Closed forests occupy about 37 percent of the area, woodlands and shrublands 7 percent, nonforest vegetation 43 percent, urban development 10 percent, and water and natural barrens total less than 2 percent. The area has been classified into three main land-use categories by integrating recent census information (population density per barrio in the year 2000) with satellite image analyses (degree of developed area versus natural land cover). Urban land use (in this analysis, land with more than 20 percent developed cover within a 1-square-kilometer area and population density greater than 500 people per square kilometer) covered 16 percent of eastern Puerto Rico. Suburban land use (more than 80 percent natural land cover, more than 500 people per square kilometer, and primarily residential) covers 50 percent of the area. Rural land use (more than 80 percent natural land cover, less than 500 people per square kilometer, and primarily active or abandoned agricultural, wetland, steep slope, or protected conservation areas) covered 34 percent of the area. Our analysis of land-cover change indicates that in the 1990s, forest cover increased at the expense of woodlands and grasslands. Urban development increased by 16 percent during that time. The most pronounced change in the last seven decades has been the shift from a nonforested to a forested landscape and the intensification of the ring of urbanization that surrounds the long-protected Luquillo Experimental Forest.

  17. SUGARLOAF ROADLESS AREA, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Schmauch, Steven W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey local areas in and near the western edge of the Sugarloaf Roadless Area, Nevada have probable resource potential for silver and small amounts of associated lead, zinc, and gold.

  18. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; McColly, Robert

    1984-01-01

    There is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area, Arizona, as judged from field studies. Significant concentrations of minerals within the roadless area are not indicated by geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, or aeromagnetic studies. Basalt, volcanic cinders, sand and gravel, and sandstone that may be suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but are more readily accessible outside the roadless area boundary.

  19. The Ethiopean Language Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Charles A.

    This paper constitutes the fifth chapter of the forthcoming volume "Language in Ethiopia." In an effort to better define the particular linguistic area, the author analyzes phonological and grammatical features that languages in the area have in common. A number of features have been identified as characteristic of the area, and this…

  20. Developing Environmental Study Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan M.

    This publication is designed to help the teacher in developing environmental study areas. Numerous examples of study areas, including airports, lakes, shopping centers, and zoos, are listed. A current definition of environmental study areas is given and guidelines for their development and identification are included. The appendix, which comprises…

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic generator experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, E. S.

    1972-01-01

    The results for an experimental study of a one wavelength MHD induction generator operating on a liquid flow are presented. First the design philosophy and the experimental generator design are summarized, including a description of the flow loop and instrumentation. Next a Fourier series method of treating the fact that the magnetic flux density produced by the stator is not a pure traveling sinusoid is described and some results summarized. This approach appears to be of interest after revisions are made, but the initial results are not accurate. Finally, some of the experimental data is summarized for various methods of excitation.

  2. Experimental Semiotics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Galantucci, Bruno; Garrod, Simon

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years a new line of research has appeared in the literature. This line of research, which may be referred to as experimental semiotics (ES; Galantucci, 2009; Galantucci and Garrod, 2010), focuses on the experimental investigation of novel forms of human communication. In this review we will (a) situate ES in its conceptual context, (b) illustrate the main varieties of studies thus far conducted by experimental semioticians, (c) illustrate three main themes of investigation which have emerged within this line of research, and (d) consider implications of this work for cognitive neuroscience. PMID:21369364

  3. CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Welsh, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

  4. 142. ARAIII General plan of GCRE area, including electrical distribution ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    142. ARA-III General plan of GCRE area, including electrical distribution plan for power and lighting. Includes detail of floodlight and security lighting poles and fixtures. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-406-1. Date: February 1958. Ineel index code no. 063-0406-00-013-102539. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 99. ARAIII. Overall view of drilling area in reactor pit. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. ARA-III. Overall view of drilling area in reactor pit. Bridge over pit in use for operations. Shows water in pool, reactor, hoist, operators, and general view of interior of reactor pit area. August 12, 1963. Ineel photo no. 63-4454. Photographer: Benson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Research in high speed fiber optics local area networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobagi, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The design of high speed local area networks (HSLAN) for communication among distributed devices requires solving problems in three areas: the network medium and its topology, the medium access control, and the network interface. Considerable progress was already made in the first two areas. Accomplishments are divided into two groups according to their theoretical or experimental nature. A brief summary is given.

  7. Nuclear test experimental science

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

  8. Designing an Experimental "Accident"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picker, Lester

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experimental "accident" that resulted in much student learning, seeks help in the identification of nematodes, and suggests biology teachers introduce similar accidents into their teaching to stimulate student interest. (PEB)

  9. TROUBLESOME ROADLESS AREA, KENTUCKY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigleo, W.R.; Hammack, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey identified resources of coal, oil and gas, sandstone, and shale in the Troublesome Roadless Area, Kentucky. Demonstrated resources of approximately 429,100 short tons of coal in an area of substantiated resource potential are contained in two major coal beds more than 28 in. thick and the area also contains an additional 483,900 short tons of coal in beds between 14 and 28 in. thick. A probable potential for oil and gas is assigned to the entire area as these fuels may be present in underlying rocks of Mississippian age. Sandstone for silica sand, construction sand, and dimension stone, and shale for structural clay products occur in the area, but these commodities also occur in abundance outside the roadless area. A geochemical survey indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources in the roadless area.

  10. MADISON ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Lambeth, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Madison Roadless Area in the Madison Range of southwestern Montana was made. The Madison Roadless Area has demonstrated resources of about 93,000 tons of sillimanite rock at the Placer Creek deposit and of about 83,000 tons of asbestos rock at the Karst deposit. The roadless area also has areas of substantiated phosphate resource potential; much of the phosphate is in thin deeply buried beds. An area near the south edge of the roadless area has a probable resource potential for copper and silver. The concentration of uranium-rich stream-sediment samples in the southwest part of the roadless area suggests that a further attempt to identify the source rocks might be justified.

  11. Experimental high-speed network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Kevin M.; Klein, William P.; Vercillo, Richard; Alsafadi, Yasser H.; Parra, Miguel V.; Dallas, William J.

    1993-09-01

    Many existing local area networking protocols currently applied in medical imaging were originally designed for relatively low-speed, low-volume networking. These protocols utilize small packet sizes appropriate for text based communication. Local area networks of this type typically provide raw bandwidth under 125 MHz. These older network technologies are not optimized for the low delay, high data traffic environment of a totally digital radiology department. Some current implementations use point-to-point links when greater bandwidth is required. However, the use of point-to-point communications for a total digital radiology department network presents many disadvantages. This paper describes work on an experimental multi-access local area network called XFT. The work includes the protocol specification, and the design and implementation of network interface hardware and software. The protocol specifies the Physical and Data Link layers (OSI layers 1 & 2) for a fiber-optic based token ring providing a raw bandwidth of 500 MHz. The protocol design and implementation of the XFT interface hardware includes many features to optimize image transfer and provide flexibility for additional future enhancements which include: a modular hardware design supporting easy portability to a variety of host system buses, a versatile message buffer design providing 16 MB of memory, and the capability to extend the raw bandwidth of the network to 3.0 GHz.

  12. Cancer in Light of Experimental Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sprouffske, Kathleen; Merlo, Lauren M.F.; Gerrish, Philip J.; Maley, Carlo C.; Sniegowski, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer initiation, progression, and the emergence of therapeutic resistance are evolutionary phenomena of clonal somatic cell populations. Studies in microbial experimental evolution and the theoretical work inspired by such studies are yielding deep insights into the evolutionary dynamics of clonal populations, yet there has been little explicit consideration of the relevance of this rapidly growing field to cancer biology. Here, we examine how the understanding of mutation, selection, and spatial structure in clonal populations that is emerging from experimental evolution may be applicable to cancer. Along the way, we discuss some significant ways in which cancer differs from the model systems used in experimental evolution. Despite these differences, we argue that enhanced prediction and control of cancer may be possible using ideas developed in the context of experimental evolution, and we point out some prospects for future research at the interface between these traditionally separate areas. PMID:22975007

  13. Glacier Primitive Area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Granger, H.C.; Patten, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Glacier Primitive Area and an adjoining area to the northwest was made in 1968 and 1969. The study area was mapped geologically, an aeromagnetic survey was made, a geochemical study was done, and known mineralized occurrences and claims were examined. Two localities were found to contain small concentrations of uranium and several samples displayed minor anomalies in base and precious metals. A probable resource potential for lead, molybdenum, arsenic, barium, fluorite, and uranium exists in the area near the Ross Lakes shear zone and a small area of probable uranium resource potential exists around the Dubois claims. The study area, in general, is believed to have little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources.

  14. WINCHESTER ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, William J.; Kreidler, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    The Winchester Roadless Area, located in northwestern Cochise County, Arizona, consists of 22 sq mi of Coronado National Forest in the Winchester Mountains. This study consisted of (1) field checking and modification of the existing geologic maps of the area, (2) field examination of all mines, prospects, and mineralized areas in and adjacent to the Winchester Roadless Area, (3) sampling of bedrock and stream sediments from drainage basins for geochemical analysis; and (4) examination and interpretation of available aeromagnetic and gravity data. Results of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mining activity and production surveys indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic and nonmetallic or energy resources in the area. Volcanic rocks cover the area to a thickness of 1000 to 2000 ft and possibly more, thus preventing inspection and evaluation of the underlying rock.

  15. GLACIER PRIMITIVE AREA, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry C.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Glacier Primitive Area, Wyoming and an adjoining area to the northeast was made. The study area was mapped geologically, an aeromagnetic survey was made, a geochemical study was done, and known mineralized occurrences and claims were examined. Two localities were found to contain small concentrations of uranium and several samples displayed minor anomalies in base and precious metals. A probable resource potential for lead, molybdenum, arsenic, barium, fluorite, and uranium exists in the area near the Ross Lakes shear zone and a small area of probable uranium resource potential exists around the Dubois claims. The study area, in general, is believed to have little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources.

  16. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  17. SUGARLOAF ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and a survey of mines, quarries, and prospects the Sugarloaf Roadless Area, California, has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or energy resources. Units of carbonate rock and graphitic schist have demonstrated resources of magnesian marble and graphite. Sand, gravel, and construction stone other than carbonate rock are present in the roadless area, but similar or better quality materials are abundant and more accessible outside the area.

  18. Protected area management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagre, Daniel B.; Prato, Tony; Wang, Yeqiao

    2014-01-01

    Designated protected areas are diverse in scope and purpose and have expanded from Yellowstone National Park in the United States, the world’s first national park, to 157,897 parks and protected areas distributed globally. Most are publicly owned and serve multiple needs that reflect regional or national cultures. With ever-increasing threats to the integrity of protected areas, managers are turning to flexible management practices such as scenario planning and adaptive management.

  19. SAVANNAH ROADLESS AREA, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Savannah Roadless Area in Florida was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. The commodities identified in the area are deposits of sand and gravel; however, they are deeply buried, far from potential markets, and more readily accessible material exists outside the roadless area. The possibility that oil and gas might occur in the Jurassic Smackover Formation or in other formations at depth cannot be ruled out.

  20. Northwest Area Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuentes, Tracy L.; van Heeswijk, Marijke; Grossman, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    Northwest Area Facts * Population about 12 million * 43 federally recognized Tribes * Hydropower provides about two-thirds of electricity supply * 78 federally listed threatened and endangered species * 12 active or potentially active volcanoes * Columbia River system drains more than 260,000 square miles, an area about the size of Texas * More than 175 square miles covered by glaciers * More than 900 miles of Pacific Ocean coastline * More than 2,300 miles of greater Puget Sound coastline * Some forests store more carbon per unit area than any other area in the world, including the tropics * 51 percent federal lands * Significant lead, zinc, silver, and phosphate deposits

  1. Phoenix Lander Work Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm work area with an overlay. The pink area is available for digging, the green area is reserved for placing the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) instrument. Soil can be dumped in the violet area.

    Images were displayed using NASA Ames 'Viz' visualization software.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Weathering of the Rio Blanco quartz diorite, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Coupling oxidation, dissolution, and fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Heather L.; Sak, Peter B.; Webb, Samuel M.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2008-09-01

    In the mountainous Rio Icacos watershed in northeastern Puerto Rico, quartz diorite bedrock weathers spheroidally, producing a 0.2-2 m thick zone of partially weathered rock layers (˜2.5 cm thickness each) called rindlets, which form concentric layers around corestones. Spheroidal fracturing has been modeled to occur when a weathering reaction with a positive Δ V of reaction builds up elastic strain energy. The rates of spheroidal fracturing and saprolite formation are therefore controlled by the rate of the weathering reaction. Chemical, petrographic, and spectroscopic evidence demonstrates that biotite oxidation is the most likely fracture-inducing reaction. This reaction occurs with an expansion in d (0 0 1) from 10.0 to 10.5 Å, forming "altered biotite". Progressive biotite oxidation across the rindlet zone was inferred from thin sections and gradients in K and Fe(II). Using the gradient in Fe(II) and constraints based on cosmogenic age dates, we calculated a biotite oxidation reaction rate of 8.2 × 10 -14 mol biotite m -2 s -1. Biotite oxidation was documented within the bedrock corestone by synchrotron X-ray microprobe fluorescence imaging and XANES. X-ray microprobe images of Fe(II) and Fe(III) at 2 μm resolution revealed that oxidized zones within individual biotite crystals are the first evidence of alteration of the otherwise unaltered corestone. Fluids entering along fractures lead to the dissolution of plagioclase within the rindlet zone. Within 7 cm surrounding the rindlet-saprolite interface, hornblende dissolves to completion at a rate of 6.3 × 10 -13 mol hornblende m -2 s -1: the fastest reported rate of hornblende weathering in the field. This rate is consistent with laboratory-derived hornblende dissolution rates. By revealing the coupling of these mineral weathering reactions to fracturing and porosity formation we are able to describe the process by which the quartz diorite bedrock disaggregates and forms saprolite. In the corestone, biotite oxidation induces spheroidal fracturing, facilitating the influx of fluids that react with other minerals, dissolving plagioclase and chlorite, creating additional porosity, and eventually dissolving hornblende and precipitating secondary minerals. The thickness of the resultant saprolite is maintained at steady state by a positive feedback between the denudation rate and the weathering advance rate driven by the concentration of pore water O 2 at the bedrock-saprolite interface.

  3. Weathering of the Rio Blanco Quartz Diorite, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Coupling Oxidation, Dissolution, And Fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, H.L.; Sak, P.B.; Webb, S.M.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-05-12

    In the mountainous Rio Icacos watershed in northeastern Puerto Rico, quartz diorite bedrock weathers spheroidally, producing a 0.2-2 m thick zone of partially weathered rock layers ({approx}2.5 cm thickness each) called rindlets, which form concentric layers around corestones. Spheroidal fracturing has been modeled to occur when a weathering reaction with a positive {Delta}V of reaction builds up elastic strain energy. The rates of spheroidal fracturing and saprolite formation are therefore controlled by the rate of the weathering reaction. Chemical, petrographic, and spectroscopic evidence demonstrates that biotite oxidation is the most likely fracture-inducing reaction. This reaction occurs with an expansion in d (0 0 1) from 10.0 to 10.5 {angstrom}, forming 'altered biotite'. Progressive biotite oxidation across the rindlet zone was inferred from thin sections and gradients in K and Fe(II). Using the gradient in Fe(II) and constraints based on cosmogenic age dates, we calculated a biotite oxidation reaction rate of 8.2 x 10{sup -14} mol biotite m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Biotite oxidation was documented within the bedrock corestone by synchrotron X-ray microprobe fluorescence imaging and XANES. X-ray microprobe images of Fe(II) and Fe(III) at 2 {micro}m resolution revealed that oxidized zones within individual biotite crystals are the first evidence of alteration of the otherwise unaltered corestone. Fluids entering along fractures lead to the dissolution of plagioclase within the rindlet zone. Within 7 cm surrounding the rindlet-saprolite interface, hornblende dissolves to completion at a rate of 6.3 x 10{sup -13} mol hornblende m{sup -2} s{sup -1}: the fastest reported rate of hornblende weathering in the field. This rate is consistent with laboratory-derived hornblende dissolution rates. By revealing the coupling of these mineral weathering reactions to fracturing and porosity formation we are able to describe the process by which the quartz diorite bedrock disaggregates and forms saprolite. In the corestone, biotite oxidation induces spheroidal fracturing, facilitating the influx of fluids that react with other minerals, dissolving plagioclase and chlorite, creating additional porosity, and eventually dissolving hornblende and precipitating secondary minerals. The thickness of the resultant saprolite is maintained at steady state by a positive feedback between the denudation rate and the weathering advance rate driven by the concentration of pore water O{sub 2} at the bedrock-saprolite interface.

  4. Weathering of the Rio Blanco quartz diorite, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Coupling oxidation, dissolution, and fracturing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buss, H.L.; Sak, P.B.; Webb, S.M.; Brantley, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    In the mountainous Rio Icacos watershed in northeastern Puerto Rico, quartz diorite bedrock weathers spheroidally, producing a 0.2-2 m thick zone of partially weathered rock layers (???2.5 cm thickness each) called rindlets, which form concentric layers around corestones. Spheroidal fracturing has been modeled to occur when a weathering reaction with a positive ??V of reaction builds up elastic strain energy. The rates of spheroidal fracturing and saprolite formation are therefore controlled by the rate of the weathering reaction. Chemical, petrographic, and spectroscopic evidence demonstrates that biotite oxidation is the most likely fracture-inducing reaction. This reaction occurs with an expansion in d (0 0 1) from 10.0 to 10.5 A??, forming 'altered biotite'. Progressive biotite oxidation across the rindlet zone was inferred from thin sections and gradients in K and Fe(II). Using the gradient in Fe(II) and constraints based on cosmogenic age dates, we calculated a biotite oxidation reaction rate of 8.2 ?? 10-14 mol biotite m-2 s-1. Biotite oxidation was documented within the bedrock corestone by synchrotron X-ray microprobe fluorescence imaging and XANES. X-ray microprobe images of Fe(II) and Fe(III) at 2 ??m resolution revealed that oxidized zones within individual biotite crystals are the first evidence of alteration of the otherwise unaltered corestone. Fluids entering along fractures lead to the dissolution of plagioclase within the rindlet zone. Within 7 cm surrounding the rindlet-saprolite interface, hornblende dissolves to completion at a rate of 6.3 ?? 10-13 mol hornblende m-2 s-1: the fastest reported rate of hornblende weathering in the field. This rate is consistent with laboratory-derived hornblende dissolution rates. By revealing the coupling of these mineral weathering reactions to fracturing and porosity formation we are able to describe the process by which the quartz diorite bedrock disaggregates and forms saprolite. In the corestone, biotite oxidation induces spheroidal fracturing, facilitating the influx of fluids that react with other minerals, dissolving plagioclase and chlorite, creating additional porosity, and eventually dissolving hornblende and precipitating secondary minerals. The thickness of the resultant saprolite is maintained at steady state by a positive feedback between the denudation rate and the weathering advance rate driven by the concentration of pore water O2 at the bedrock-saprolite interface. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Insights on Forest Structure and Composition from Long-Term Research in the Luquillo Mountains

    Treesearch

    Tamara Heartsill Scalley

    2017-01-01

    The science of ecology fundamentally aims to understand species and their relation to the environment. At sites where hurricane disturbance is part of the environmental context, permanent forest plots are critical to understand ecological vegetation dynamics through time. An overview of forest structure and species composition from two of the longest continuously...

  6. Elfin Woodland Recovery 30 years After a Plane Wreck in Puerto Rico’s Luquillo Mountains

    Treesearch

    PETER L.WEAVER

    2000-01-01

    Grasses and ferns characterized the recovery of elfin woodland for the first 18 years after a December 1968 airplane crash. From 1986 to 1998, ferns and woody dicots were prominent and the total aboveground dry weight biomass increased from 775 to 2210 g/m2. Woody dicots increased 3.5 times, palms 1.3 times, and ferns 4.4 times above their 1986 levels. Grasses and...

  7. Soil Phosphorus Fractionation during Forest Development on Landslide Scars in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    Jacqueline Frizano; Arthur H. Johnson; David R. Vann; Frederick N. Scatena

    2002-01-01

    Mineral soils from a chronosequence of landslide scars ranging in age from 1 to more than 55 years in a subtropical montane rain forest of eastern Puerto Rico were used to determine the rate at which labile P capital recovers during primary succession. Nine organic and inorganic soil P fractions were measured using the Hedley sequential extraction procedure. Deep soil...

  8. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  9. Overview of Experimental Capabilities - Supersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of experimental capabilities applicable to the area of supersonic research. The contents include: 1) EC Objectives; 2) SUP.11: Elements; 3) NRA; 4) Advanced Flight Simulator Flexible Aircraft Simulation Studies; 5) Advanced Flight Simulator Flying Qualities Guideline Development for Flexible Supersonic Transport Aircraft; 6) Advanced Flight Simulator Rigid/Flex Flight Control; 7) Advanced Flight Simulator Rapid Sim Model Exchange; 8) Flight Test Capabilities Advanced In-Flight Infrared (IR) Thermography; 9) Flight Test Capabilities In-Flight Schlieren; 10) Flight Test Capabilities CLIP Flow Calibration; 11) Flight Test Capabilities PFTF Flowfield Survey; 12) Ground Test Capabilities Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA); 13) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); 14) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); and 15) Ground Test Capabilities EDL Optical Measurement Capability (PIV) for Rigid/Flexible Decelerator Models.

  10. Frozen waves: experimental generation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Tarcio A; Gesualdi, Marcos R R; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Frozen waves (FWs) are very interesting particular cases of nondiffracting beams whose envelopes are static and whose longitudinal intensity patterns can be chosen a priori. We present here for the first time (that we know of) the experimental generation of FWs. The experimental realization of these FWs was obtained using a holographic setup for the optical reconstruction of computer generated holograms (CGH), based on a 4-f Fourier filtering system and a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), where FW CGHs were first computationally implemented, and later electronically implemented, on the LC-SLM for optical reconstruction. The experimental results are in agreement with the corresponding theoretical analytical solutions and hold excellent prospects for implementation in scientific and technological applications.

  11. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  12. Self-experimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, John K

    2003-01-01

    Except in certain cases of unusual risk, self-experimentation should not be encouraged. It is usually scientifically inadequate for lack of proper controls and sufficient subjects to generate meaningful results. It is also inadequate as an ethical test because even if lay persons are also enrolled, self-experimentation is neither necessary nor sufficient to establish that they may participate. It is not necessary to establish that lay persons may participate because institutional ethics review and informed consent are better ways to determine this. It is not sufficient because the investigator may be more risk accepting or not medically typical. Moreover, because scientific research is now done in teams, self-experimentation may involve undue influence when junior investigators participate as research subjects.

  13. Remote experimental site concept development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Thomas A.; Meyer, William; Butner, David

    1995-01-01

    Scientific research is now often conducted on large and expensive experiments that utilize collaborative efforts on a national or international scale to explore physics and engineering issues. This is particularly true for the current US magnetic fusion energy program where collaboration on existing facilities has increased in importance and will form the basis for future efforts. As fusion energy research approaches reactor conditions, the trend is towards fewer large and expensive experimental facilities, leaving many major institutions without local experiments. Since the expertise of various groups is a valuable resource, it is important to integrate these teams into an overall scientific program. To sustain continued involvement in experiments, scientists are now often required to travel frequently, or to move their families, to the new large facilities. This problem is common to many other different fields of scientific research. The next-generation tokamaks, such as the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will operate in steady-state or long pulse mode and produce fluxes of fusion reaction products sufficient to activate the surrounding structures. As a direct consequence, remote operation requiring robotics and video monitoring will become necessary, with only brief and limited access to the vessel area allowed. Even the on-site control room, data acquisition facilities, and work areas will be remotely located from the experiment, isolated by large biological barriers, and connected with fiber-optics. Current planning for the ITER experiment includes a network of control room facilities to be located in the countries of the four major international partners; USA, Russian Federation, Japan, and the European Community.

  14. SAA drift:experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Kudela, K.; Romashova, V. V.; Drozdov, A. Yu.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth's magnetic field connected with magnetic momentum changing. Besides these variations affects on the trapped belt South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations including Space Shuttle short-time flights approved the existence SAA westward drift with speed 0.1-1.0 (deg/year) and northward drift with speed approximately 0.1 (deg/year). In this work we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in SINP MSU in 1972-2003 from different satellites. There were analyzed the fluxes of protons with energy > 50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy > 500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1-1.0 MeV in SAA area and their maxima location. The data about fluxes were obtained onboard the orbital stations ``Salut-6'' (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the identical experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact of the SAA westward drift. Moreover the same analysis of maximum flux location of electrons with hundreds keV energy (satellites ``Kosmos-484'' (1972), ``Interkosmos-17'' (1977) and ``Activny'' (``Interkosmos-24'', 1991)) confirmed not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  15. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  16. Experimental quantum channel simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, He; Liu, Chang; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Yao, Xing-Can; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Sanders, Barry C.; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Quantum simulation is of great importance in quantum information science. Here, we report an experimental quantum channel simulator imbued with an algorithm for imitating the behavior of a general class of quantum systems. The reported quantum channel simulator consists of four single-qubit gates and one controlled-not gate. All types of quantum channels can be decomposed by the algorithm and implemented on this device. We deploy our system to simulate various quantum channels, such as quantum-noise channels and weak quantum measurement. Our results advance experimental quantum channel simulation, which is integral to the goal of quantum information processing.

  17. Experimental probes of axions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  18. Questioning and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-08-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated model can be interpreted realistically. Moreover, the model demonstrates an explicit logic of knowledge acquisition. So, the natural extension of the model is to apply it to an analysis of the learning process.

  19. Significant natural areas

    Treesearch

    C. I. Millar; M. G. Barbour; D. L. Elliott-Fisk; J. R. Shevock; W. B. Woolfenden

    1996-01-01

    The Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project mapped 945 areas in the Sierra Nevada of ecological, cultural, and geological significance. Theseareas contain outstanding features of unusual rarity, diversity, andrepresentativeness on national forest and national park lands. Morethan 70% of the areas were newly recognized during the SNEP project. Local agency specialists familiar...

  20. Quadrilaterals: Diagonals and Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The task shared in this article provides geometry students with opportunities to recall and use basic geometry vocabulary, extend their knowledge of area relationships, and create area formulas. It is characterized by reasoning and sense making (NCTM 2009) and the "Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others"…

  1. Study area description

    Treesearch

    Mary M. Rowland; Matthias Leu

    2011-01-01

    The boundary for the Wyoming Basins Ecoregional Assessment (WBEA) was largely determined by the co-occurrence of some of the largest tracts of intact sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) remaining in the western United States with areas of increasing resource extraction. The WBEA area includes two ecoregions in their entirety, Wyoming Basins and Utah-Wyoming...

  2. Cleaning Physical Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses techniques to help create clean and inviting school locker rooms. Daily, weekly or monthly, biannual, and annual cleaning strategies for locker room showers are highlighted as are the specialized maintenance needs for aerobic and dance areas, running tracks, and weight training areas. (GR)

  3. Creative Outdoor Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Considering the creation of proper play areas for children (school sites, municipal and mini parks, private homes and backyards, shopping centers, apartment complexes, recreational areas, roadside parks, nursery schools, churches, summer camps, and drive-in theaters) as one of today's major challenges, the author recommends that professional…

  4. Outdoor Creative Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Guidelines are given for the development of outdoor play areas on school sites to provide children with natural areas and simple facilities for creative play. Site selection, analysis, and development are discussed. Natural, topographical features of the environment and natural play equipment are suggested. Illustrations are also presented to aid…

  5. Creative Outdoor Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Considering the creation of proper play areas for children (school sites, municipal and mini parks, private homes and backyards, shopping centers, apartment complexes, recreational areas, roadside parks, nursery schools, churches, summer camps, and drive-in theaters) as one of today's major challenges, the author recommends that professional…

  6. Broca's area - thalamic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bohsali, Anastasia A; Triplett, William; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Gullett, Joseph M; McGregor, Keith; FitzGerald, David B; Mareci, Thomas; White, Keith; Crosson, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Broca's area is crucially involved in language processing. The sub-regions of Broca's area (pars triangularis, pars opercularis) presumably are connected via corticocortical pathways. However, growing evidence suggests that the thalamus may also be involved in language and share some of the linguistic functions supported by Broca's area. Functional connectivity is thought to be achieved via corticothalamic/thalamocortical white matter pathways. Our study investigates structural connectivity between Broca's area and the thalamus, specifically ventral anterior nucleus and pulvinar. We demonstrate that Broca's area shares direct connections with these thalamic nuclei and suggest a local Broca's area-thalamus network potentially involved in linguistic processing. Thalamic connectivity with Broca's area may serve to selectively recruit cortical regions storing multimodal features of lexical items and to bind them together during lexical-semantic processing. In addition, Broca's area-thalamic circuitry may enable cortico-thalamo-cortical information transfer and modulation between BA 44 and 45 during language comprehension and production. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. KSC Technology Area 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Tracking, Timing, Communications and Navigation are critical to all NASA missions. Accurate weather prediction is critical to KSC launch activities. KSC is involved with and in several cases leading research and development in many exciting areas and with partners. We welcome new partners in all of these areas!

  8. Content Area Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Michael P., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    The theme for this focused journal issue is reading in the content areas. Articles discuss the following topics: (1) teaching reading strategies instead of skills; (2) teaching reading in elementary content areas; (3) metacognition and mapping; (4) a summer school program designed to appeal to poorly motivated junior high school students who are…

  9. PYRAMID ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey was conducted in the Pyramid Roadless Area, California. The area contains mineral showings, but no mineral-resource potential was identified during our studies. Three granodiorite samples on the west side of the roadless area contained weakly anomalous concentrations of uranium. Two samples of roof-pendant rocks, one metasedimentary rock and one metavolcanic rock, contain low concentrations of copper, and of copper and molybdenum, respectively. Although none was identified, the geologic terrane is permissive for mineral occurrences and large-scale, detailed geologic mapping of the areas of metasedimentary and metavolcanic roof pendants in the Pyramid Roadless Area could define a mineral-resource potential for tungsten and precious metals.

  10. OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Neumann, Terry R.

    1984-01-01

    The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

  11. Experimental verification of low sonic boom configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.; Wang, H. H.; Sorensen, H.

    1972-01-01

    A configuration designed to produce near field signature has been tested at M = 2.71 and the results are analyzed, by taking in account three-dimensional and second order effects. The configuration has an equivalent total area distribution that corresponds to an airplane flying at 60,000 ft. having a weight of 460,000 lbs, and 300 ft. length. A maximum overpressure of 0.95 lb/square foot has been obtained experimentally. The experimental results agree well with the analysis. The investigation indicates that the three-dimensional effects are very important when the measurements in wind tunnels are taken at small distances from the airplane.

  12. Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Ward W. McCaughey

    1996-01-01

    The Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, established in 1961, is representative of the vast expanses of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) found east of the Continental Divide in Montana, southwest Alberta, and Wyoming. Discrete generations of even-age lodgepole stands form a mosaic typical of the fireprone forests at moderate to high altitudes in the Northern Rocky...

  13. Research, Innovation and Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    This is the second in a series of annual presentations on the innovative, experimental, and research activities conducted at Santa Fe Junior College. The studies include: classroom activities, college-wide research, short statements on different instructional approaches to formal dissertation abstracts, subjective observations, intricate…

  14. Experimental fluvial geomorphology

    SciTech Connect

    Schumm, S.A.; Mosley, M.P.; Weaver, W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors bring together the results of several years of experimental work in drainage basin evolution, hydrology, river-channel morphology, and sedimentology. These investigations are related to real-world applications, particularly geological exploration and mapping. This text shows how awareness of natural phenomena can improve management of the natural environment, such as the control of rivers and eroding gullies.

  15. Experimental review on pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, M. V. Mizuk, R. V.

    2008-04-15

    The experimental evidence for pentaquarks is reviewed and compared with the experiments that do not see any sign of pentaquarks. This paper is based on a lecture given at the 33rd ITEP Winter School of Physics in the beginning of 2005. Results obtained since then are summarized in the epilogue.

  16. Experimental review on pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, M. V.; Mizuk, R. V.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental evidence for pentaquarks is reviewed and compared with the experiments that do not see any sign of pentaquarks. This paper is based on a lecture given at the 33rd ITEP Winter School of Physics in the beginning of 2005. Results obtained since then are summarized in the epilogue.

  17. Maybeso Experimental Forest.

    Treesearch

    Valerie Rapp

    2004-01-01

    The Maybeso Experimental Forest is in southeast Alaska within the Tongass National Forest, the largest national forest in the United States and home to the Northern Hemi-sphere's largest temperate rain forest. Located about 42 miles west of Ketchikan, Alaska, it is on Prince of Wales Island, the largest island of the Alexander Archipelago and the third largest...

  18. The Experimental College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiklejohn, Alexander; Powell, John Walker, Ed.

    In the early twentieth century, Alexander Meiklejohn believed the undergraduate college must teach students how to think. He aspired to make students into thinking, caring, active citizens with the intellectual skills to participate in a democratic society. In 1927, with the founding of the Experimental College at the University of Wisconsin, he…

  19. Kane Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Research Station

    1999-01-01

    The 1,737 acres of forest land that comprise the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF), were originally part of the Allegheny National Forest. On March 23, 1932, the land was formally dedicated to research use for the Allegheny Forest Experiment Station (now the Northeastern Research Station). The KEF was established to promote the study of the unglaciated portion of the...

  20. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  1. The Experimental College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiklejohn, Alexander; Powell, John Walker, Ed.

    In the early twentieth century, Alexander Meiklejohn believed the undergraduate college must teach students how to think. He aspired to make students into thinking, caring, active citizens with the intellectual skills to participate in a democratic society. In 1927, with the founding of the Experimental College at the University of Wisconsin, he…

  2. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  3. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MAINTENANCE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1962-01-22

    A method of housing experimental animals such as mice in individual tube- like plastic enclosures is described. Contrary to experience, when this was tried with metal the mice did not become panicky. Group housing, with its attendant difficulties, may thus be dispensed with. (AEC)

  4. Trends in animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosangela; Brandau, Ricardo; Gomes, Walter J; Braile, Domingo M

    2009-01-01

    The search of the understanding of etiological factors, mechanisms and treatment of the diseases has been taking to the development of several animal models in the last decades. To discuss aspects related to animal models of experimentation, animal choice and current trends in this field in our country. In addition, this study evaluated the frequency of experimental articles in medical journals. Five Brazilian journals indexed by LILACS, SciELO, MEDLINE, and recently incorporate for Institute for Scientific Information Journal of Citation Reports were analyzed. All the papers published in those journals, between 2007 and 2008, that used animal models, were selected based on the abstracts. Of the total of 832 articles published in the period, 92 (11.1%) experimentation papers were selected. The number of experimental articles ranged from 5.2% to 17.9% of the global content of the journal. In the instructions to the authors, four (80%) journals presented explicit reference to the ethical principles in the conduction of studies with animals. The induced animal models represented 100% of the articles analyzed in this study. The rat was the most employed animal in the analyzed articles (78.3%). The present study can contribute, supplying subsidies for adoption of future editorials policies regarding the publication of animal research papers in Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery.

  5. Bartlett Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Jane Gamal-Eldin

    1998-01-01

    The Bartlett Experimental Forest is a field laboratory for research on the ecology and management of northern forest ecosystems. Research on the Bartlett includes: 1) extensive investigations on structure and dynamics of forests at several levels, and developing management alternatives to reflect an array of values and benefits sought by users of forest lands, 2) a...

  6. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  7. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  8. Experimental design and husbandry.

    PubMed

    Festing, M F

    1997-01-01

    Rodent gerontology experiments should be carefully designed and correctly analyzed so as to provide the maximum amount of information for the minimum amount of work. There are five criteria for a "good" experimental design. These are applicable both to in vivo and in vitro experiments: (1) The experiment should be unbiased so that it is possible to make a true comparison between treatment groups in the knowledge that no one group has a more favorable "environment." (2) The experiment should have high precision so that if there is a true treatment effect there will be a good chance of detecting it. This is obtained by selecting uniform material such as isogenic strains, which are free of pathogenic microorganisms, and by using randomized block experimental designs. It can also be increased by increasing the number of observations. However, increasing the size of the experiment beyond a certain point will only marginally increase precision. (3) The experiment should have a wide range of applicability so it should be designed to explore the sensitivity of the observed experimental treatment effect to other variables such as the strain, sex, diet, husbandry, and age of the animals. With in vitro data, variables such as media composition and incubation times may also be important. The importance of such variables can often be evaluated efficiently using "factorial" experimental designs, without any substantial increase in the overall number of animals. (4) The experiment should be simple so that there is little chance of groups becoming muddled. Generally, formal experimental designs that are planned before the work starts should be used. (5) The experiment should provide the ability to calculate uncertainty. In other words, it should be capable of being statistically analyzed so that the level of confidence in the results can be quantified.

  9. Teaching experimental design.

    PubMed

    Fry, Derek J

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of poor design and published concerns over study quality stimulated the development of courses on experimental design intended to improve matters. This article describes some of the thinking behind these courses and how the topics can be presented in a variety of formats. The premises are that education in experimental design should be undertaken with an awareness of educational principles, of how adults learn, and of the particular topics in the subject that need emphasis. For those using laboratory animals, it should include ethical considerations, particularly severity issues, and accommodate learners not confident with mathematics. Basic principles, explanation of fully randomized, randomized block, and factorial designs, and discussion of how to size an experiment form the minimum set of topics. A problem-solving approach can help develop the skills of deciding what are correct experimental units and suitable controls in different experimental scenarios, identifying when an experiment has not been properly randomized or blinded, and selecting the most efficient design for particular experimental situations. Content, pace, and presentation should suit the audience and time available, and variety both within a presentation and in ways of interacting with those being taught is likely to be effective. Details are given of a three-day course based on these ideas, which has been rated informative, educational, and enjoyable, and can form a postgraduate module. It has oral presentations reinforced by group exercises and discussions based on realistic problems, and computer exercises which include some analysis. Other case studies consider a half-day format and a module for animal technicians. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. 7. Ball mill area and second level entry with overhead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Ball mill area and second level entry with overhead crane in background - Bureau of Mines Boulder City Experimental Station, Ore Dressing Pilot Plant, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  11. Protected areas and poverty

    PubMed Central

    Brockington, Daniel; Wilkie, David

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are controversial because they are so important for conservation and because they distribute fortune and misfortune unevenly. The nature of that distribution, as well as the terrain of protected areas themselves, have been vigorously contested. In particular, the relationship between protected areas and poverty is a long-running debate in academic and policy circles. We review the origins of this debate and chart its key moments. We then outline the continuing flashpoints and ways in which further evaluation studies could improve the evidence base for policy-making and conservation practice. PMID:26460124

  12. The Harz Foehn Area,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-08

    AD-AI05 602 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AF8 OH F/S 4/2 THE HARZ FOEHN AREA,(U) SEP 81 8 H NTS HEL UNCLASSIFIED FTD-IDIRS)T!0859-81 NLI I...7- 1981.3 THE HARZ FOEHN AREA E by Gerhard Hentsche. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. U8 FTD-ID (RS)T-0859-81 EDITED TRANSLATION...DIVISION VISION. WP.AFB. OHIO. FTD-ID(RS)T-0859-81 Date 8 Sep 9 81 f 0 THE HARZ FOEHN AREA Gerhard Hentscheo i THE ARZ OEHNARE 1d A. INTRODUCTION I

  13. Protected areas and poverty.

    PubMed

    Brockington, Daniel; Wilkie, David

    2015-11-05

    Protected areas are controversial because they are so important for conservation and because they distribute fortune and misfortune unevenly. The nature of that distribution, as well as the terrain of protected areas themselves, have been vigorously contested. In particular, the relationship between protected areas and poverty is a long-running debate in academic and policy circles. We review the origins of this debate and chart its key moments. We then outline the continuing flashpoints and ways in which further evaluation studies could improve the evidence base for policy-making and conservation practice.

  14. RUBICON ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwood, David S.; Cather, Eric E.

    1984-01-01

    The Rubicon Roadless Area encompasses about 8 sq mi along the lower reaches of the Rubicon River, a major tributary of the Middle Fork of the American River that drains the west slope of the Sierra Nevada in eastern California. Based on mineral-resource surveys the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic or energy resources. A very small demonstrated gold resource occurs at the Pigeon Roost mine. Glacial deposits, which occur in the eastern part of the area, are too bouldery and too small to be of value as construction materials.

  15. History of the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest, 1933 through 1981

    Treesearch

    Donald T. Gordon

    1981-01-01

    Before the telling of this tale could take place, there had to be an Experimental Forest and sorre events. Reasons for the establishment of the area will be covered later, but some of the records of establishment have been found.Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest, about 10,000 acres in size, was withdrawn from lands of Lassen National...

  16. Urban Greening Bay Area

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the San Francisco Bay Water Quality Project (SFBWQP) Urban Greening Bay Area, a large-scale effort to re-envision urban landscapes to include green infrastructure (GI) making communities more livable and reducing stormwater runoff.

  17. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  18. Investigating Curiosity Drill Area

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-09

    NASA Mars rover Curiosity used its Mast Camera Mastcam to take the images combined into this mosaic of the drill area, called John Klein, where the rover ultimately performed its first sample drilling.

  19. Acquisitions for Area Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert D.

    1970-01-01

    Common policies, practices, and trends in acquisitions in the complex field of area studies, including the weak structure of the book trade, the lack of bibliographic control, and current cooperative efforts. (JS)

  20. Student Commons Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Rhonda

    2001-01-01

    Explores the new philosophy, lighting arrangements, and planning considerations behind the next generation of school common area design. Designs that enhance safety and security, and that can be flexible for other school functions are also discussed. (GR)

  1. Phoenix Work Area Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-28

    This image from Sol 1 shows a mosaic of NASA Mars Phoenix digging area in the Martian terrain. Phoenix scientists were very pleased with this view as the terrain features few rocks -- an optimal place for digging.

  2. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  3. Uncratered Area on Mercury

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-08

    A dark, smooth, relatively uncratered area on Mercury was photographed two hours after NASA Mariner 10 flew by the planet. The prominent, sharp crater with a central peak is 30 kilometers 19 miles across.

  4. Sacramento Metropolitan Area, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    2) the Alert Phase, during which the Corps’ Emergency Operations Center is activated and office and field personnel cooperate with emergency teams... fields provide foraging areas for the red-tailed hawk, Brewer’s blackbird, and Swainson’s hawk, which often nest in nearby riparian areas and use...agricultural fields and annual grassland for feeding. (See EIS/EIR Chapter 10.) Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species. One Federally threatened species

  5. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black

  6. Experimental temporal quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-11-01

    Temporal steering is a form of temporal correlation between the initial and final state of a quantum system. It is a temporal analogue of the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (spatial) steering. We demonstrate, by measuring the photon polarization, that temporal steering allows two parties to verify if they have been interacting with the same particle, even if they have no information about what happened with the particle in between the measurements. This is the first experimental study of temporal steering. We also performed experimental tests, based on the violation of temporal steering inequalities, of the security of two quantum key distribution protocols against individual attacks. Thus, these results can lead to applications for secure quantum communications and quantum engineering.

  7. Geoengineering as Collective Experimentation.

    PubMed

    Stilgoe, Jack

    2016-06-01

    Geoengineering is defined as the 'deliberate and large-scale intervention in the Earth's climatic system with the aim of reducing global warming'. The technological proposals for doing this are highly speculative. Research is at an early stage, but there is a strong consensus that technologies would, if realisable, have profound and surprising ramifications. Geoengineering would seem to be an archetype of technology as social experiment, blurring lines that separate research from deployment and scientific knowledge from technological artefacts. Looking into the experimental systems of geoengineering, we can see the negotiation of what is known and unknown. The paper argues that, in renegotiating such systems, we can approach a new mode of governance-collective experimentation. This has important ramifications not just for how we imagine future geoengineering technologies, but also for how we govern geoengineering experiments currently under discussion.

  8. Experimental temporal quantum steering

    PubMed Central

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Temporal steering is a form of temporal correlation between the initial and final state of a quantum system. It is a temporal analogue of the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (spatial) steering. We demonstrate, by measuring the photon polarization, that temporal steering allows two parties to verify if they have been interacting with the same particle, even if they have no information about what happened with the particle in between the measurements. This is the first experimental study of temporal steering. We also performed experimental tests, based on the violation of temporal steering inequalities, of the security of two quantum key distribution protocols against individual attacks. Thus, these results can lead to applications for secure quantum communications and quantum engineering. PMID:27901121

  9. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Walter, Chris [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States

    2016-07-12

    In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

  10. Experimental Robot Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-05

    Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be...05 NOV 1985 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-11-1985 to 00-11-1985 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Robot Psychology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 21 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE

  11. USACDEC Experimentation Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Evaluated impact of assigning five crewmen per tank in selected armor units (conducted in West Germany and several CONUS posts). TASYAAL Effectiveness of...in the form of findings, assessments, and suggested Improvements. These test results have great potential impact on the decision making process. They...reports of experimentation are ODEC’s most widely distributed and visible product. Many CDEC reports have had significant impact on the organization

  12. MSFC Skylab experimenter's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined in the main text and amplified, as appropriate, in appendixes. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  13. Network Science Experimentation Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Collaborative Research Alliance (CS CRA) and Applied Research and Experimentation Partner (AREP) Programs 19 3.3 Researcher Empowerment and...comprising of social, communications and information networks. Sometimes it is better for users to look for information that can be found on websites or...in data repositories; other times it is better for users to consult subject matter experts (SMEs); and many times users should employ a hybrid

  14. The Massabesic Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Thomas W. McConkey; Wendell E. Smith

    1958-01-01

    White pine and fire! These two - the tree and its destroyer, fire - are keys to the history and present make-up of the research program on the Massabesic Experimental Forest at Alfred, Maine. The Forest was established in the late 1930's to study the management of eastern white pine. During World War II, it was shut down, and reopened again in 1946. Then, in 1947...

  15. SAA drift: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  16. Woodward Effect Experimental Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Paul

    2004-02-01

    The work of J. F. Woodward (1990 1996a; 1996b; 1998; 2002a; 2002b; 2004) on the existence of ``mass fluctuations'' and their use in exotic propulsion schemes was examined for possible application in improving space flight propulsion and power generation. Woodward examined Einstein's General Relativity Theory (GRT) and assumed that if the strong Machian interpretation of GRT as well as gravitational / inertia like Wheeler-Feynman radiation reaction forces hold, then when an elementary particle is accelerated through a potential gradient, its rest mass should fluctuate around its mean value during its acceleration. Woodward also used GRT to clarify the precise experimental conditions necessary for observing and exploiting these mass fluctuations or ``Woodward effect'' (W-E). Later, in collaboration with his ex-graduate student T. Mahood, they also pushed the experimental verification boundaries of these proposals. If these purported mass fluctuations occur as Woodward claims, and his assumption that gravity and inertia are both byproducts of the same GRT based phenomenon per Mach's Principle is correct, then many innovative applications such as propellantless propulsion and gravitational exotic matter generators may be feasible. This paper examines the reality of mass fluctuations and the feasibility of using the W-E to design propellantless propulsion devices in the near to mid-term future. The latest experimental results, utilizing MHD-like force rectification systems, will also be presented.

  17. Play, experimentation and creativity.

    PubMed

    Caper, R

    1996-10-01

    Beginning with Klein's description of a psychotic boy's inability to play, published in 1930, the author explores the relationship between play and symbol-formation, and the use of play by children and adults as a serious type of experimentation by means of which one learns about the internal and external worlds. In this view, play is a way of externalising fantasies originating in one's inner world so they may be seen and learned about. Play is also a vehicle of projection, a fact that allows one to use it to assess the impact of one's inner world on the external world, especially on the minds of one's objects. In this way, playing becomes a way of probing external reality as well. This type of learning depends on the ability to keep internal and external realities distinct even while projecting the former into the latter. In psychotic states, this ability is lost, and the psychotic patient's projections, instead of being usable as a form of playful experimentation, lead to delusions and claustrophobic anxiety. A brief clinical vignette is presented to illustrate these points. The author then explores the application of these ideas to an understanding of artistic creativity, and makes some observations about possible underlying unities between play, scientific experimentation and artistic creativity.

  18. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it possible to determine these values, and thereby identify an optimal experimental design. After describing the method, it is demonstrated in two content areas in cognitive psychology in which models are highly competitive: retention (i.e., forgetting) and categorization. The optimal design is compared with the quality of designs used in the literature. The findings demonstrate that design optimization has the potential to increase the informativeness of the experimental method. PMID:19618983

  19. Experimental modeling of cavitation occurring at vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynutdinova, D. F.; Modorskii, V. Ya.; Shevelev, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    The article investigates the problem of effects in two-stage centrifugal pumps due to hydro-gas-dynamic processes resulting from vibrations of design elements which are difficult to forecast. Numerical and experimental simulation of this problem was conducted. The experiment discovered cavitation effects brought about by the vibrations. The area of cavitations was plotted. Dependence of cavitation bubble concentration on amplitude and frequency of the vibrations was found.

  20. Experimental alcohol blastopathy.

    PubMed

    Sandor, S

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data are presented with respect to "experimental alcohol blastopathy" performed in our laboratory. As in our interpretation the notion of blastopathy involves both pathological changes during preimplantation development due to previous, preconceptional or preimplantation influences and later, pre- or postnatal effects induced by factors active during the preimplantation period, up to now the following experimental models were applied (on rats and mice): chronic and acute maternal, biparental or paternal ethanol alcoholization; preimplantation treatment with acetaldehyde or disulfiram followed by ethanol administration; acute ethanol intoxication before implantation on the background of chronic maternal ethanol intake; chronic maternal intake of various beverages. The main components of experimental alcohol blastopathy detected (by using a complex control methodology) were: pathological changes during the preimplantation developmental stages (lower mean number of embryos/animal, retardation of development, lowered migration rate of the embryos from the oviduct to the uterus, higher number of pathological morphological features), delayed implantation, disturbances of the early postimplantation development, retarded late foetal and placental growth. The effect of ethanol may be direct (ethanol being detectable in the oviductal and uterine fluid after both acute and chronic alcoholization) or indirect, via changes of the maternal macro- or microenvironment. The increase of the maternal blood acetaldehyde level may contribute to the appearance of alcohol blastopathy. Chronic beer and wine intake and acute intoxication with cognac suggest - up to now - the enhancing effect of beverage congeners. The noxious effect of acute ethanol intoxication superposed to chronic alcoholization is more marked that the separate effect of the two kinds of treatment. The chronic ethanol intake of fertilizing males (in mice) leads, both in the case of treated or untreated

  1. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2000-03-15

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area.

  2. Police. An Experimental Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, George G.

    This unit examines four topic areas related to police: rules and enforcement, police discretion, variety of police tasks, and police differences among societies as products of certain social pressures. High-school students learn about the police as an institution that responds to social and historical pressures. Students study police systems in…

  3. Biasing Effects of Experimenters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Robert

    1977-01-01

    Explains the types of effects, usually unintentional, that psychologists can have upon the results of their research; describes the "Pygmalion Experiment," in which teachers' expectations for children's behavior proved to be self-fulfilling prophecies; and points to research needs in the area of interpersonal expectations. (GT)

  4. Area change effects on shock wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowse, J.; Skews, B.

    2014-07-01

    Experimental testing was conducted for a planar shock wave of incident Mach number propagating through one of three compound parabolic profiles of 130, 195 or 260 mm in length, all of which exhibit an 80 % reduction in area. Both high-resolution single shot and low-resolution video were used in a schlieren arrangement. Results showed three main types of flow scenarios for propagation through a gradual area reduction, and an optimal net increase of 12.7 % in shock Mach number was determined for the longest profile, which is within 5 % of theoretical predictions using Milton's modified Chester-Chisnell-Whitham relation.

  5. Area confined position control of molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Buller, Oleg; Wang, Wenchong; Heuer, Andreas; Zhang, Deqing; Fuchs, Harald; Chi, Lifeng

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental approach to control the position of molecular aggregates on surfaces by vacuum deposition. The control is accomplished by regulating the molecular density on the surface in a confined area. The diffusing molecules are concentrated at the centre of the confined area, producing a stable cluster when reaching the critical density for nucleation. Mechanistic aspects of that control are obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The dimensions of the position can further be controlled by varying the beam flux and the substrate temperature.

  6. Computer-assisted area detector masking.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher J; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2017-03-01

    Area detectors have become the predominant type of detector for the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction, small-angle scattering and total scattering. These detectors record the scattering for a large area, giving each shot good statistical significance to the resulting scattered intensity I(Q) pattern. However, many of these detectors have pixel level defects, which cause error in the resulting one-dimensional patterns. In this work, new software to automatically find and mask these dead pixels and other defects is presented. This algorithm is benchmarked with both ideal simulated and experimental datasets.

  7. Highlight area inpainting guided by illumination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; Jiang, Zhiguo; Shi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a two-step algorithm based on the combination of the exemplar-based algorithm and the illumination model to deal with specular images, especially those contain saturated pixels in the highlight areas. First the proposed modified exemplar-based algorithm is employed to process the unsaturated specular pixels under the supervision of illumination model. Then we inpaint the rest regions in which the pixels are saturated with original exemplar-based algorithm to obtain the final result. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm performs better on the images with saturated pixels in the highlight areas compared with classical highlight removal and image inpainting algorithms.

  8. Large area LED package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullon, L.; Jordan, R.; Braun, T.; Bauer, J.; Becker, F.; Hutter, M.; Schneider-Ramelow, M.; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state lighting using LED-dies is a rapidly growing market. LED-dies with the needed increasing luminous flux per chip area produce a lot of heat. Therefore an appropriate thermal management is required for general lighting with LEDdies. One way to avoid overheating and shorter lifetime is the use of many small LED-dies on a large area heat sink (down to 70 μm edge length), so that heat can spread into a large area while at the same time light also appears on a larger area. The handling with such small LED-dies is very difficult because they are too small to be picked with common equipment. Therefore a new concept called collective transfer bonding using a temporary carrier chip was developed. A further benefit of this new technology is the high precision assembly as well as the plane parallel assembly of the LED-dies which is necessary for wire bonding. It has been shown that hundred functional LED-dies were transferred and soldered at the same time. After the assembly a cost effective established PCB-technology was applied to produce a large-area light source consisting of many small LED-dies and electrically connected on a PCB-substrate. The top contacts of the LED-dies were realized by laminating an adhesive copper sheet followed by LDI structuring as known from PCB-via-technology. This assembly can be completed by adding converting and light forming optical elements. In summary two technologies based on standard SMD and PCB technology have been developed for panel level LED packaging up to 610x 457 mm2 area size.

  9. OLED area illumination source

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Nealon, William Francis; Bortscheller, Jacob Charles

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  10. CHANCHELULLA ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Stebbins, Scott A.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey there seems to be little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Chanchelulla Roadless Area, California, except for a demonstrated resource of about 7200 tons containing 0. 084 oz gold/ton, 0. 84 oz silver/ton, and accessory copper at the Chanchelulla prospect. This prospect is located on a northwest-trending quartz vein. Limestone and small amounts of magnetite occur in the area but on the basis of available data no resources are identified. No potential for energy resources was identified.

  11. SELKIRK ROADLESS AREA, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Fred K.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of mineral-resource surveys the Selkirk Roadless Area, Idaho has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Molybdenum, lead, uranium, thorium, chromium, tungsten, zirconium, and several rare-earth elements have been detected in panned concentrates from samples of stream sediment, but no minerals containing the first five elements were found in place, nor were any conditions conducive to their concentration found. Zirconium, thorium, and the rare earths occur in sparsely disseminated accessory minerals in granitic rocks and no resource potential is identified. There is no history of mining in the roadless area and there are no oil, gas, mineral, or geothermal leases or current claims.

  12. Explosively activated egress area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bailey, J. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A lightweight, add on structure which employs linear shaped pyrotechnic charges to smoothly cut an airframe along an egress area periphery is provided. It compromises reaction surfaces attached to the exterior surface of the airframe's skin and is designed to restrict the skin deflection. That portion of the airframe within the egress area periphery is jettisoned. Retention surfaces and sealing walls are attached to the interior surface of the airframe's skin and are designed to shield the interior of the aircraft during detonation of the pyrotechnic charges.

  13. Experimental turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Milčák, Petr; Noga, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The experimental air turbine VT400 is located in hall laboratories of the Department of Power System Engineering. It is a single-stage air turbine located in the suction of the compressor. It is able to solve various problems concerning the construction solution of turbine stages. The content of the article will deal mainly with the description of measurements on this turbine. The up-to-now research on this test rig will be briefly mentioned, too, as well as the description of the ongoing reconstruction.

  14. Experimental models of stress

    PubMed Central

    Patchev, Vladimir K.; Patchev, Alexandre V.

    2006-01-01

    Illustrating the complexity of the stress response and its multifaceted manifestations is the leading idea of this overview of experimental paradigms used for stress induction in laboratory animals. The description of key features of models based on naturalistic stressors, pharmacological challenges, and genomic manipulations is complemented by comprehensive analysis of physiological, behavioral, neurochemical, and endocrine changes and their appropriatness as outcome readouts. Particular attention has been paid to the role of sex and age as determinants of the dynamics of the stress response. Possible translational applications of stress-inducing paradigms as models of disease are briefly sketched. PMID:17290800

  15. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1964-04-01

    A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

  16. Outsourcing of experimental work.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    With the development of new technologies for simultaneous analysis of many genes, transcripts, or proteins (the "omics" revolution), it has become common to outsource parts of the experimental work. In order to maintain the integrity of the research projects, it is important that the interphase between the researcher and the service is further developed. This involves robust protocols for sample preparation, an informed choice of analytical tool, development of standards for individual technologies, and transparent data analysis. This chapter introduces some of the problems related to analysis of RNA samples in the "omics" context and gives a few hints and key references related to sample preparation for the non-specialist.

  17. Hourly laying patterns of the Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus) in Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Wayne Arendt

    2011-01-01

    Temporal aspects of egg deposition are important factors governing avian reproductive success. I report hourly egg-laying patterns of the Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in northeastern Puerto Rico during 1979–2000. Initiatory eggs were laid by early morning (median 5 0642 hrs, AST) and almost half of the eggs were laid by...

  18. Recovery of a tropical stream after a harvest-related chlorine poisoning event.

    Treesearch

    EFFIE A. GREATHOUSE; JAMES G. MARCH; PRINGLE; CATHERINE M.

    2005-01-01

    1. Harvest-related poisoning events are common in tropical streams, yet research on stream recovery has largely been limited to temperate streams and generally does not include any measures of ecosystem function, such as leaf breakdown. 2. We assessed recovery of a second-order, high-gradient stream draining the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, 3 months after...

  19. Chemical constituents in clouds and rainwater in the Puerto Rican rainforest: potential sources and seasonal drivers

    Treesearch

    A. Gioda; O.L. Mayol-Bracero; F. N. Scatena; K. C. Weathers; V. L. Mateus; W. H. McDowell

    2013-01-01

    Cloud- and rain-water samples collected between 1984 and 2007 in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, were analyzed in order to understand the main processes and sources that control their chemistry. Three sites were used: El Verde Field Station (380 m asl), Bisley (361 m asl), and East Peak (1051 m asl). Bulk rainwater samples were collected from all sites,...

  20. Dynamics of organic matter and nutrient return from litterfall in stands of ten tropical tree plantation species.

    Treesearch

    E. Cuevas; A. E. Lugo

    1998-01-01

    We studied the rates and patterns of carbon and nutrient fuxes in litterfall in ten tropical tree plantation species grown at the USDA Forest Service Arboretum in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. The stands were 26-years old and grew under similar climatic and edaphic conditions. Individual plantation species ranked differently in terms of their capacity...

  1. Long-term response of Caribbean palm forests to hurricanes

    Treesearch

    Ariel Lugo; J.L. Frangi

    2016-01-01

    We studied the response of Prestoea montana (Sierra Palm, hereafter Palm) brakes and a Palm floodplain forest to hurricanes in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico. Over a span of 78 years, 3 hurricanes passed over the study sites for which we have 64 years of measurements for Palm brakes and 20 years for the Palm floodplain forest. For each stand, species...

  2. Migration Patterns, Densities, and Growth of Neritina punctulata Snails in Rio Espiritu Santo and Rio Mameyes, Northeastern Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    MARK PYRON; ALAN P. COVICH

    2003-01-01

    Snail size-frequency distributions in Rios Espiritu Santo and Mameyes, which drain the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, showed that Neritina punctulata with shell lengths greater than 30 mm were the most abundant size class at upstream sites. The highest densities for all size classes were at the downstream sites. Growth rates were 0.015 mm/day for a large...

  3. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, David

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of word processors, micro- and minicomputer systems, and other digital office equipment is causing major design changes in existing networks. Local Area Networks (LANs) which have adequately served terminal users in the past must now be redesigned. Implementation at Clemson is described. (MLW)

  4. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Kenneth E.; Nielsen, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Discusses cabling that is needed in local area networks (LANs). Types of cables that may be selected are described, including twisted pair, coaxial cables (or ethernet), and fiber optics; network topologies, the manner in which the cables are laid out, are considered; and cable installation issues are discussed. (LRW)

  5. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasatir, Marilyn; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four papers discuss LANs (local area networks) and library applications: (1) "Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers Standards..." (Charles D. Brown); (2) "Facilities Planning for LANs..." (Gail Persky); (3) "Growing up with the Alumni Library: LAN..." (Russell Buchanan); and (4) "Implementing a LAN...at the Health Sciences Library"…

  6. Area Handbook for Syria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyrop, Richard; And Others

    This volume on Syria is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of the American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of various countries. The emphasis is on…

  7. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  8. SAFIS Area Estimation Techniques

    Treesearch

    Gregory A. Reams

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Annual Forest inventory System (SAFIS) is in various stages of implementation in 8 of the 13 southern states served by the Southern Research Station of the USDA Forest Service. Compared to periodic inventories, SAFIS requires more rapid generation of land use and land cover maps. The current photo system for phase one area estimation has changed little...

  9. SAFIS area estimation techniques

    Treesearch

    Gregory A. Reams

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Annual Forest Inventory System (SAFIS) is in various stages of implementation in 8 of the 13 southern states served by the Southern Research Station of the USDA Forest Service. Compared to periodic inventories, SAFIS requires more rapid generation of land use and land cover maps. The current photo system for phase one area estimation has changed little...

  10. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  11. Areas of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, John

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the recommendations made by the Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum (the Rose Report in 2009) that the curriculum should be organised into areas of learning. The implications for teachers are considered. By drawing upon past experience some major weaknesses and strengths implicit in the approach are identified and…

  12. LOCATING AREAS OF CONCERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple method to locate changes in vegetation cover, which can be used to identify areas under stress. The method only requires inexpensive NDVI data. The use of remotely sensed data is far more cost-effective than field studies and can be performed more quickly. Local knowledg...

  13. Content Area Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Students' vocabulary knowledge is a significant predictor of their overall comprehension. The Common Core State Standards are raising the expectations for word learning and there are now 4 distinct standards related to vocabulary as well as expectations in other standards, including content areas. To address these expectations, teachers need…

  14. Saving Natural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchinger, Maria

    This manual serves as a handbook for those involved in the art of land saving. The various topics in the booklet are dealt with in great detail since little has been published on the preservation of natural areas in international publications. Most of the document is derived from articles, books, and publications published by, or describing the…

  15. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasatir, Marilyn; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four papers discuss LANs (local area networks) and library applications: (1) "Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers Standards..." (Charles D. Brown); (2) "Facilities Planning for LANs..." (Gail Persky); (3) "Growing up with the Alumni Library: LAN..." (Russell Buchanan); and (4) "Implementing a LAN...at the Health Sciences Library"…

  16. Area Handbook for Iraq.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Harvey H.; And Others

    This volume is one of a series of handbooks prepared by Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of The American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political and military institutions and practices of various countries. This particular handbook…

  17. Area Handbook for Mozambique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Allison Butler

    This publication is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Areas Studies (FAS) of The American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political and military institutions and practices of various countries. The present handbook…

  18. Area Handbook for Guatemala.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, John; And Others

    This volume is one of a series of handbooks prepared by Foreign Area Studies of American University designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of various countries. Chapters focus on: (1) the general character…

  19. Area Handbook for Uganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Allison Butler; And Others

    One of a series of handbooks prepared by Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of The American University, this book is an attempt to provide a comprehensive study of the dominant social, political, and economic aspects of Ugandan society, to present its strengths and weaknesses, and to identify the patterns of behavior characteristics of its members.…

  20. Areas and Brownies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, C. Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that connects area with cutting brownies which are in different shapes for different numbers, uses algebraic equations, and fixes the exact dimensions of brownies. Concludes with four different solutions from six people for the class of 16 and a trapezoidal brownie. (ASK)

  1. Areas and Brownies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, C. Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that connects area with cutting brownies which are in different shapes for different numbers, uses algebraic equations, and fixes the exact dimensions of brownies. Concludes with four different solutions from six people for the class of 16 and a trapezoidal brownie. (ASK)

  2. Metropolitan area of Chicago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The metropolitan area of Chicago is encompassed in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package (EREP) S190-B photograph taken on September 18, 1973 from the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. The surrounding major cities of Aurora and Joliet, Illinois; Hammond, Gary and East Chicago, Indiana, are easily delineated.

  3. LOCATING AREAS OF CONCERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple method to locate changes in vegetation cover, which can be used to identify areas under stress. The method only requires inexpensive NDVI data. The use of remotely sensed data is far more cost-effective than field studies and can be performed more quickly. Local knowledg...

  4. Tangrams and Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charlotte

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity for demonstrating the area of five geometric figures--the square, the rectangle, the parallelogram, the triangle, and the trapezoid--that is based on a simple tangram puzzle. Suggests ways in which this activity can be used at several different levels. (ASK)

  5. Area Vocational Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Michael

    1966-01-01

    This description of the DeKalb Area Technical School near Clarkston, Georgia, serves as a guide on methods of developing curriculums and facilities for such schools. The classrooms, laboratories, and shops are described with photographic illustrations of the course offerings to daytime and nighttime students. The necessity to tailor vocational…

  6. Areas of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, John

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the recommendations made by the Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum (the Rose Report in 2009) that the curriculum should be organised into areas of learning. The implications for teachers are considered. By drawing upon past experience some major weaknesses and strengths implicit in the approach are identified and…

  7. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Kenneth E.; Nielsen, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Discusses cabling that is needed in local area networks (LANs). Types of cables that may be selected are described, including twisted pair, coaxial cables (or ethernet), and fiber optics; network topologies, the manner in which the cables are laid out, are considered; and cable installation issues are discussed. (LRW)

  8. Area Handbook for Afghanistan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Harvey H.; And Others

    This handbook is one of a series prepared by Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of The American University as a convenient compilation of basic fact for American military and other personnel overseas. It deals with the political, social, economic, and military developments since 1959, which have contributed to Afghanistan's continuing national stability…

  9. Small Area Forecast Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, Detroit.

    The results of a small area forecast with regard to household composition, population and employment distribution, development and school costs, environmental impact, and transportation in Southeast Michigan are evaluated in this report. The role of public policy in influencing the community demography by the year 2000 is considered by…

  10. Some recent theoretical and experimental developments in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Eftis, J.; Hones, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in four distinct areas of fracture mechanics research are described. These are as follows: experimental comparisons of different nonlinear fracture toughness measures, including the nonlinear energy, R curve, COD and J integral methods; the singular elastic crack-tip stress and displacement equations and the validity of the proposition of their general adequacy as indicated, for example, by the biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat crack; the thermodynamic nature of surface energy induced by propagating cracks in relation to a general continuum thermodynamic description of brittle fracture; and analytical and experimental aspects of Mode II fracture, with experimental data for certain aluminum, steel and titanium alloys.

  11. In vivo experimental models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carmen; Rubio-Osornio, Moises; Retana-Márquez, Socorro; Verónica Custodio, Marisol López; Paz, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    This study reviews the different in vivo experimental models that have been used for the study of epileptogenesis. In this review we will focus on how to replicate the different models that have led to the study of partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures and the status epilepticus. The main characteristics that participate in the processes that generate and modulate the manifestations of different models of epileptogenesis are described. The development of several models of experimental epilepsy in animals has clearly helped the study of specific brain areas capable of causing convulsions. The experimental models of epilepsy also have helped in the study the mechanisms and actions of epilepsy drugs. In order to develop experimental animal models of epilepsy, animals are generally chosen according to the kind of epilepsy that can be developed and studied. It is currently known that animal species can have epileptic seizures similar to those in humans. However, it is important to keep in mind that it has not been possible to entirely evaluate all manifestations of human epilepsy. Notwithstanding, these experimental models of epilepsy have allowed a partial understanding of most of the underlying mechanisms of this disease.

  12. [Animal experimentation in Israel].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram; Leshem, Micah

    2002-04-01

    In 1994 the Israeli parliament (Knesset) amended the Cruelty to Animals Act to regulate the use of experimental animals. Accordingly, animal experiments can only be carried out for the purposes of promoting health and medical science, reducing suffering, advancing scientific research, testing or production of materials and products (excluding cosmetics and cleaning products) and education. Animal experiments are only permitted if alternative methods are not possible. The National Board for Animal Experimentation was established to implement the law. Its members are drawn from government ministries, representatives of doctors, veterinarians, and industry organizations, animal rights groups, and academia. In order to carry out an animal experiment, the institution, researchers involved, and the specific experiment, all require approval by the Board. To date the Board has approved some 35 institutions, about half are public institutions (universities, hospitals and colleges) and the rest industrial firms in biotechnology and pharmaceutics. In 2000, 250,000 animals were used in research, 85% were rodents, 11% fowls, 1,000 other farm animals, 350 dogs and cats, and 39 monkeys. Academic institutions used 74% of the animals and industry the remainder. We also present summarized data on the use of animals in research in other countries.

  13. Experimentation in machine discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Simon, Herbert A.

    1990-01-01

    KEKADA, a system that is capable of carrying out a complex series of experiments on problems from the history of science, is described. The system incorporates a set of experimentation strategies that were extracted from the traces of the scientists' behavior. It focuses on surprises to constrain its search, and uses its strategies to generate hypotheses and to carry out experiments. Some strategies are domain independent, whereas others incorporate knowledge of a specific domain. The domain independent strategies include magnification, determining scope, divide and conquer, factor analysis, and relating different anomalous phenomena. KEKADA represents an experiment as a set of independent and dependent entities, with apparatus variables and a goal. It represents a theory either as a sequence of processes or as abstract hypotheses. KEKADA's response is described to a particular problem in biochemistry. On this and other problems, the system is capable of carrying out a complex series of experiments to refine domain theories. Analysis of the system and its behavior on a number of different problems has established its generality, but it has also revealed the reasons why the system would not be a good experimental scientist.

  14. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible tissue damage such as acinar cell atrophy and pancreatic fibrosis that results in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Recently, many studies of chronic pancreatitis have been prompted by the discovery of the pancreatic stellate cell, which has been identified and distinguished as the key effector cell of pancreatic fibrosis. However, investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of pancreatitis face many obstacles because of its anatomical location and disparate clinical course. Due to these difficulties, most of our knowledge on pancreatitis is based on research conducted using experimental models of pancreatitis. In this review, several experimental models of pancreatitis will be discussed in terms of technique, advantages, and limitations. PMID:24944983

  15. Experimental data filtration algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Tamas, R.; Danisor, A.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental data reduction is an important topic because the resulting information is used to calibrate the theoretical models and to verify the accuracy of their results. The paper presents some ideas used to extract a subset of points from the initial set of points which defines an experimentally acquired curve. The objective is to get a subset with significantly fewer points as the initial data set and which accurately defines a smooth curve that preserves the shape of the initial curve. Being a general study we used only data filtering criteria based geometric features that at a later stage may be related to upper level conditions specific to the phenomenon under investigation. Five algorithms were conceived and implemented in an original software consisting of more than 1800 computer code lines which has a flexible structure that allows us to easily update it using new algorithms. The software instrument was used to process the data of several case studies. Conclusions are drawn regarding the values of the parameters used in the algorithms to decide if a series of points may be considered either noise, or a relevant part of the curve. Being a general analysis, the result is a computer based trial-and-error method that efficiently solves this kind of problems.

  16. Experimental trichinellosis in goats.

    PubMed

    Reina, D; Muñoz-Ojeda, M C; Serrano, F; Molina, J M; Navarrete, I

    1996-03-01

    The susceptibility and distribution of Trichinella spiralis infection in goats were examined in ten autochthonous kids, 2 months old and about 10 kg body weight. The animals were divided into two groups: one experimental group with eight animals, infected with 10,000 T. spiralis 'T1' encysted larvae and a control group with two non-infected animals. All the animals of the experimental group infected by the parasite showed that Trichinella larvae have a special affinity for the tongue, masseters, diaphragm, flexor-extensor muscles, intercostal muscles and myocardium in decreasing order. The ELISA test carried out showed the first increments of optical density (OD) on Day 16 postinfection (p.i), peaking on Days 37-44 p.i. and remaining elevated from this day on, with a slight fall at the end of the experiment (Day 90 p.i.). No alterations were observed in the OD obtained in control animals throughout the experiment. The great muscular establishment of T. spiralis larvae and the sigmoidal evolution of antibody levels confirm the host character of the goat to the parasite.

  17. [Experimental animal research in the EU legislation].

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Gieri

    2002-01-01

    The legislation of the European Union captures experimental animal research only in part. Binding standards can be found in various legal records of the community-legislation, and in particular in the so-called guideline for animal experimentation 86/609/EWG. But these guidelines do not represent an actual animal protection measure but rather one of harmonisation with the primary goal of unification of the regulations of the participating states in order to prevent distortions of competition and trade barriers which could harm the common market. Although the guideline contains some practicable approaches in the direction of an up-to-date animal experimentation law, it only defines general goals which allows for considerable leeway in national implementation within the individual EU countries, and it has only a limited area of legal operation. On the one hand, only vertebrae are being included, and on the other, the law is only being applied in the area of applied research and protects only animals used in product- and substance-development or test procedures as well as those used in the framework of environmental protection. Various important fields of research are thus not subject to a common regulation and are assigned to national regulation. This concerns animal experimentation in education and training or for military or so-called defence-relevant medical purposes and, in particular, the whole area of basic research including the field of genetic engineering in animals with it's growing significance. The guideline is in need of widening it's scope of application as well as of various adjustments to recent scientific findings and developments in order to become suitable as a more restrictive animal protection law on the community level. It could also be desirable to include animal protection into the catalogue of community-goals in order to make it an independent component of the politics of the Union and to establish the groundwork for a decree of comprehensive

  18. Experimental investigations of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Various experimental studies of elastohydrodynamic lubrication have been reviewed. The various types of machines used in these investigations, such as the disc, two and four ball, crossed-cylinders, and crossed-axes rolling disc machine, are described. The measurement of the most important parameters, such as film shape, film thickness, pressure, temperature, and traction, is considered. Determination of the film thickness is generally the most important of these effects since it dictates the extent to which the asperities on opposing surfaces can come into contact and thus has a direct bearing on wear and fatigue failure of the contacting surfaces. Several different techniques for measuring film thickness have been described, including electrical resistance, capacitance, X-ray, optical interferometry, laser beam diffraction, strain gage, and spring dynamometer methods. An attempt has been made to describe the basic concepts and limitations of each of these techniques. These various methods have been used by individual researchers, but there is no universally acceptable technique for measuring elastohydrodynamic film thickness. Capacitance methods have provided most of the reliable data for nominal line or rectangular conjunctions, but optical interferometry has proved to be the most effective procedure for elliptical contacts. Optical interferometry has the great advantage that it reveals not only the film thickness, but also details of the film shape over the complete area of the conjunction.

  19. Experimental investigation of plasmofluidic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bonwoo; Kwon, Min-Suk; Shin, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-16

    Plasmofluidic waveguides are based on guiding light which is strongly confined in fluid with the assistance of a surface plasmon polariton. To realize plasmofluidic waveguides, metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal (MISIM) waveguides, which are hybrid plasmonic waveguides fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, are employed. The insulator of the MISIM waveguide is removed to form 30-nm-wide channels, and they are filled with fluid. The plasmofluidic waveguide has a subwavelength-scale mode area since its mode is strongly confined in the fluid. The waveguides are experimentally characterized for different fluids. When the refractive index of the fluid is 1.440, the plasmofluidic waveguide with 190-nm-wide silicon has propagation loss of 0.46 dB/μm; the coupling loss between it and an ordinary silicon photonic waveguide is 1.79 dB. The propagation and coupling losses may be reduced if a few fabrication-induced imperfections are removed. The plasmofluidic waveguide may pave the way to a dynamically phase-tunable ultracompact device.

  20. Experimental evolution of multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Denison, R. Ford; Borrello, Mark; Travisano, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Multicellularity was one of the most significant innovations in the history of life, but its initial evolution remains poorly understood. Using experimental evolution, we show that key steps in this transition could have occurred quickly. We subjected the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to an environment in which we expected multicellularity to be adaptive. We observed the rapid evolution of clustering genotypes that display a novel multicellular life history characterized by reproduction via multicellular propagules, a juvenile phase, and determinate growth. The multicellular clusters are uniclonal, minimizing within-cluster genetic conflicts of interest. Simple among-cell division of labor rapidly evolved. Early multicellular strains were composed of physiologically similar cells, but these subsequently evolved higher rates of programmed cell death (apoptosis), an adaptation that increases propagule production. These results show that key aspects of multicellular complexity, a subject of central importance to biology, can readily evolve from unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:22307617

  1. Experimental evolution gone wild.

    PubMed

    Scheinin, M; Riebesell, U; Rynearson, T A; Lohbeck, K T; Collins, S

    2015-05-06

    Because of their large population sizes and rapid cell division rates, marine microbes have, or can generate, ample variation to fuel evolution over a few weeks or months, and subsequently have the potential to evolve in response to global change. Here we measure evolution in the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi evolved in a natural plankton community in CO2-enriched mesocosms deployed in situ. Mesocosm enclosures are typically used to study how the species composition and biogeochemistry of marine communities respond to environmental shifts, but have not been used for experimental evolution to date. Using this approach, we detect a large evolutionary response to CO2 enrichment in a focal marine diatom, where population growth rate increased by 1.3-fold in high CO2-evolved lineages. This study opens an exciting new possibility of carrying out in situ evolution experiments to understand how marine microbial communities evolve in response to environmental change.

  2. Planetary impact experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Schultz, Peter H.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1987-01-01

    An understanding of impact processes in low- and microgravity environments would be advanced significantly by the construction and use of an impact facility on the Space Station. It is proposed that initial studies begin as soon as possible in ground-based impact laboratories, on the NASA KC-135 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft, and in existing drop towers. The resulting experience and information base could then be applied toward an experiment package designed for use on Shuttle orbiters to support pilot studies in orbital environments. These experiments, as well as the first efforts made on the IOC Space Station, should involve the impact of various free-floating targets; such studies would yield a substantial scientific return while providing valuable experience and engineering information for use in refining the design of the dedicated Space Station Impact Facility. The dedicated facility should be designed to support impact experimentation, including but not limited to cratering, asteroid and ring-particle dynamics, and accretional processes.

  3. Experimental Sloshing Reference Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lada, C.; Such-Taboada, M.; Ngan, I.; Grigore, L.; Appolloni, M.; Roure, S.; Murray, N.; Mendes Leal, M.; de Wilde, D.; Longo, J.; Bureo-Dacal, R.; Cozzani, A.; Laine, B.

    2014-06-01

    This article describes the sloshing experiment performed on the HYDRA multi-axis hydraulic shaker at ESTEC. Two tank geometries, a rectangular tank and a pill shaped tank, were excited in the lateral direction. Both tanks, manufactured from a transparent material in order to provide high visibility of the phenomenon, were filled with water and several fill ratios were tested, varying the amplitude of the input and the sweep rate. The results of the test are presented from a structural point of view, with the main objective to study the interface force due to dynamic fluid sloshing motion. An investigation of the behaviour of the water around the main resonance of the assembly is conducted through the observation of the identified modes and the damping values. The experimental results confirm the amplification effect at low frequency caused by water sloshing motion and a comparison with data from numerical simulation is provided.

  4. Future experimental programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    I was asked to discuss future experimental programs even though I am a theorist. As a result, I present my own personal views on where the field is, and where it is going, based on what I myself have been working on. In particular, I discuss why we need expeditions into high energies to find clues to where the relevant energy scale is for dark matter, baryon asymmetry and neutrino mass. I also argue that the next energy frontier machine should be justified on the basis of what we know, namely the mass of the Higgs boson, so that we will learn what energy we should aim at once we nail the Higgs sector. Finally, I make remarks on dark energy.

  5. Experimental Quantum Coin Tossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Terriza, G.; Vaziri, A.; Ursin, R.; Zeilinger, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter we present the first implementation of a quantum coin-tossing protocol. This protocol belongs to a class of “two-party” cryptographic problems, where the communication partners distrust each other. As with a number of such two-party protocols, the best implementation of the quantum coin tossing requires qutrits, resulting in a higher security than using qubits. In this way, we have also performed the first complete quantum communication protocol with qutrits. In our experiment the two partners succeeded to remotely toss a row of coins using photons entangled in the orbital angular momentum. We also show the experimental bounds of a possible cheater and the ways of detecting him.

  6. Fusion of experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gesú, Vito; Maccarone, Maria Concetta

    The integration of information from various sensory systems is one of the most difficult challenges in understanding both perception and cognition. For example, the problem of auditory-visual integration is a correspondence problem between perceived auditory and visual scenes. Two main questions arise when designing data analysis systems: what is the useful information to be integrated?, and what are the integration rules? The problem of integrating information becomes relevant whenever: (a) the same kind of data are detected by spatially distributed sensors; (b) heterogeneous data are detected by different sensors; (c) heterogeneous distributed data are involved. General problems concerning the integration of experimental data are reviewed. The case of the BeppoSAX X-ray astronomical satellite is given as an example.

  7. Experimental evolution gone wild

    PubMed Central

    Scheinin, M.; Riebesell, U.; Rynearson, T. A.; Lohbeck, K. T.; Collins, S.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their large population sizes and rapid cell division rates, marine microbes have, or can generate, ample variation to fuel evolution over a few weeks or months, and subsequently have the potential to evolve in response to global change. Here we measure evolution in the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi evolved in a natural plankton community in CO2-enriched mesocosms deployed in situ. Mesocosm enclosures are typically used to study how the species composition and biogeochemistry of marine communities respond to environmental shifts, but have not been used for experimental evolution to date. Using this approach, we detect a large evolutionary response to CO2 enrichment in a focal marine diatom, where population growth rate increased by 1.3-fold in high CO2-evolved lineages. This study opens an exciting new possibility of carrying out in situ evolution experiments to understand how marine microbial communities evolve in response to environmental change. PMID:25833241

  8. Experimentalism in bioethics research.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, T F

    1983-05-01

    Basson's commentary on my proposals regarding the structure and function of research in bioethics provides a welcome opportunity for extended comparison of standard approaches with the suggestions made in 'What Bioethics Should Be.' I begin by noting a common assumption underlying our respective views. I then address points of fundamental difference, indicating why the experimental method proposed in my original essay presents a potentially more productive strategy for examining moral issues in biomedicine. In the latter respect, I certainly disagree with Basson's contention that "we are unable to test" metaethical hypotheses "against reality" (Basson, p. 185) - a proposition which seems no more defensible than the equally untenable claim that we cannot refine methods of natural science research through examination of their usefulness in advancing our understanding of the correlation of events in nature.

  9. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  10. Experimental quantum Hamiltonian learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Paesani, Stefano; Santagati, Raffaele; Knauer, Sebastian; Gentile, Antonio A.; Wiebe, Nathan; Petruzzella, Maurangelo; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Rarity, John G.; Laing, Anthony; Thompson, Mark G.

    2017-06-01

    The efficient characterization of quantum systems, the verification of the operations of quantum devices and the validation of underpinning physical models, are central challenges for quantum technologies and fundamental physics. The computational cost of such studies could be improved by machine learning enhanced by quantum simulators. Here we interface two different quantum systems through a classical channel--a silicon-photonics quantum simulator and an electron spin in a diamond nitrogen-vacancy centre--and use the former to learn the Hamiltonian of the latter via Bayesian inference. We learn the salient Hamiltonian parameter with an uncertainty of approximately 10-5. Furthermore, an observed saturation in the learning algorithm suggests deficiencies in the underlying Hamiltonian model, which we exploit to further improve the model. We implement an interactive version of the protocol and experimentally show its ability to characterize the operation of the quantum photonic device.

  11. Experimental Quantum Error Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian-Min; Yi, Zhen-Huan; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Fei; Yang, Tao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Faithful transmission of quantum information is a crucial ingredient in quantum communication networks. To overcome the unavoidable decoherence in a noisy channel, to date, many efforts have been made to transmit one state by consuming large numbers of time-synchronized ancilla states. However, such huge demands of quantum resources are hard to meet with current technology and this restricts practical applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate quantum error detection, an economical approach to reliably protecting a qubit against bit-flip errors. Arbitrary unknown polarization states of single photons and entangled photons are converted into time bins deterministically via a modified Franson interferometer. Noise arising in both 10 m and 0.8 km fiber, which induces associated errors on the reference frame of time bins, is filtered when photons are detected. The demonstrated resource efficiency and state independence make this protocol a promising candidate for implementing a real-world quantum communication network. PMID:22953047

  12. Experimental Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Broome, Matthew; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Rahimi-Keshari, Saleh; Ralph, Timothy; Dove, Justin; Aaronson, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Quantum computers are unnecessary for exponentially-efficient computation or simulation if the Extended Church-Turing thesis--a foundational tenet of computer science--is correct. The thesis would be directly contradicted by a physical device that efficiently performs a task believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a task is BOSONSAMPLING: obtaining a distribution of n bosons scattered by some linear-optical unitary process. Here we test the central premise of BOSONSAMPLING, experimentally verifying that the amplitudes of 3-photon scattering processes are given by the permanents of submatrices generated from a unitary describing a 6-mode integrated optical circuit. We find the protocol to be robust, working even with the unavoidable effects of photon loss, non-ideal sources, and imperfect detection. Strong evidence against the Extended-Church-Turing thesis will come from scaling to large numbers of photons, which is a much simpler task than building a universal quantum computer.

  13. Experimental adaptive process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, I. A.; Struchalin, G. I.; Straupe, S. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kravtsov, K. S.; Kulik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive measurements were recently shown to significantly improve the performance of quantum state tomography. Utilizing information about the system for the online choice of optimal measurements allows one to reach the ultimate bounds of precision for state reconstruction. In this article we generalize an adaptive Bayesian approach to the case of process tomography and experimentally show its superiority in the task of learning unknown quantum operations. Our experiments with photonic polarization qubits cover all types of single-qubit channels. We also discuss instrumental errors and the criteria for evaluation of the ultimate achievable precision in an experiment. It turns out that adaptive tomography provides a lower noise floor in the presence of strong technical noise.

  14. Experimental Physics - Modern Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, R. A.

    1988-10-01

    Designed for physics students treating the underlying basis for modern techniques and the devices used, this timely survey describes current experimental methods in a clear and accessible text. This up-to-date volume provides an essential part of undergraduate physics training; until now, students were often expected to learn many of these methods in the laboratory without proper introduction. The broad coverage of available techniques includes discussion of state-of-the-art electronic equipment, as well as such topics as discrete semiconductor devices, signal processing, thermometry, optical components, nuclear instrumentation, and x-ray diffraction methods. Professor Dunlap's text will serve not only as a complete introduction for majors but also as a reference work for technicians throughout a professional career. In addition to tutorial discussions presented, tables of numerical data and constants are included, further enhancing the book as a permanent reference.

  15. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  16. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  17. Large area mass analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachev, Mikhail; Srama, Ralf; Srowig, Andre; Grün, Eberhard

    2004-12-01

    A new time-of-flight spectrometer for the chemical analysis of cosmic dust particles in space has been simulated by Simion 7.0. The instrument is based upon impact ionization. This method is a reliable method for in situ dust detection and is well established. Instruments using the impact ionization flew on board of Helios and Galileo and are still in operation on board of the Ulysses and Cassini-Huygens missions. The new instrument has a large sensitive area of 0.1 m2 in order to achieve a significant number of measurements. The mass resolution M/ΔM>100 and the mass range covers the most relevant elements expected in cosmic dust. The instrument has a reflectron configuration which increases the mass resolution. Most of the ions released during the impact are focused to the detector. The ion detector consists of a large area ion-to-electron converter, an electron reflectron and a microchannel plate detector.

  18. Management: Area Support Responsibilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Georgia: All counties north of Bleckley, Bryan, Dodge, Effingham, Evans, Jones, Lamarr, Meriwether , Monroe, Montgomery, Pike, Tattnall, Telfair, Troup...the actual cost of materials). b. Area of responsibility. Table C–2 provides installation taskings by installation, State, and county . These taskings...responsibility Devens RFTA FORSCOM CT: All counties ME: All counties MA: All counties NH: All counties RI: All counties VT: All counties Fort Belvoir, VA

  19. Acoustics Local Area Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    contract was to provide a shared computing i : resource - the acou tics local area network (ALAN) - to support ocean acoustic and related oceanographic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT: THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified I I ONRCtI COMPUTER V 10 11/94 STANDARD FORM 233 (REV 241) oo 0 90 " VLNV1LV HNO Og6OuLtOI, CT:tT 96/OT/0

  20. Belize Area Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-20

    and reported. Dental disease is rather prevalent affecting 90% of the pcpulation and is primarily treated by extractions . Nutrition Energy-protein...of problems, one of which is smut disease. Since its outbreak in 1978, smut infestation has spread to all cane growing areas. Smut-resistant seeds ...2-;.--;. *: ~ - **.;.1 scope for the promotion and expansion of production of such tree crops as coconuts and avocados . The former has the potential