Science.gov

Sample records for area-based gini coefficient

  1. The Lorenz Curve and the Gini Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rycroft, Robert

    2003-01-01

    States that the Lorenz Curve and the Gini Coefficient is a Web-based interactive tutorial developed for students in an upper level, undergraduate, elective economics course about income and wealth distribution, poverty, and discrimination. States that students achieve mastery because they cannot complete the tutorial without adequate understanding…

  2. A Simple Geometric Approach to Approximating the Gini Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasper, Hirschel; Golden, John

    2008-01-01

    The author shows how a quick approximation of the Lorenz curve's Gini coefficient can be calculated empirically using numerical data presented in cumulative income quintiles. When the technique here was used to estimate 621 income quintile/Gini coefficient observations from the Deninger and Squire/World Bank data set, this approach performed…

  3. Measurement of Inequality: The Gini Coefficient and School Finance Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lows, Raymond L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses application of the "Lorenz Curve" (a graphical representation of the concentration of wealth) with the "Gini Coefficient" (an index of inequality) to measure social inequality in school finance studies. Examines the basic assumptions of these measures and suggests a minor reconception. (MCG)

  4. Statistical Properties of Generalized Gini Coefficient with Application to Health Inequality Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Dejian; Huang, Jin; Risser, Jan M.; Kapadia, Asha S.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we report statistical properties of two classes of generalized Gini coefficients (G1 and G2). The theoretical results were assessed via Monte Carlo simulations. Further, we used G1 and G2 on life expectancy to measure health inequalities among the provinces of China and the states of the United States. For China, the results…

  5. Estimation of the Gini coefficient for the lognormal distribution of income using the Lorenz curve.

    PubMed

    Darkwah, Kwasi A; Nortey, Ezekiel N N; Lotsi, Anani

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to compare the Newton-Cotes methods such as the Trapezium rule, Simpson 1/3 rule and Simpson 3/8 rule to estimate the area under the Lorenz curve and Gini coefficient of income using polynomial function with degree 5. Comparing the Gini coefficients of income computed from the Polynomial function with degree 5 for the Trapezium, Simpson 1/3 and Simpson 3/8 methods using the relative errors showed that the trapezium rule, Simpson's 1/3 rule and Simpson's 3/8 rule show negative biases with the Simpson 1/3 rule yielding the lowest absolute relative true error of 4.230711 %. PMID:27516934

  6. Application of the environmental Gini coefficient in allocating water governance responsibilities: a case study in Taihu Lake Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenbei; Du, Amin; Bai, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    The equitable allocation of water governance responsibilities is very important yet difficult to achieve, particularly for a basin which involves many stakeholders and policymakers. In this study, the environmental Gini coefficient model was applied to evaluate the inequality of water governance responsibility allocation, and an environmental Gini coefficient optimisation model was built to achieve an optimal adjustment. To illustrate the application of the environmental Gini coefficient, the heavily polluted transboundary Taihu Lake Basin in China, was chosen as a case study. The results show that the original environmental Gini coefficient of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was greater than 0.2, indicating that the allocation of water governance responsibilities in Taihu Lake Basin was unequal. Of seven decision-making units, three were found to be inequality factors and were adjusted to reduce the water pollutant emissions and to increase the water governance inputs. After the adjustment, the environmental Gini coefficient of the COD was less than 0.2 and the reduction rate was 27.63%. The adjustment process provides clear guidance for policymakers to develop appropriate policies and improve the equality of water governance responsibility allocation.

  7. Measuring Education Inequality: Gini Coefficients of Education. Policy Research Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Vinod; Wang, Yan; Fan, Xibo

    This paper aims at developing a measure for educational inequality for a large number of countries over time, using the concept of education Gini index based on school attainment data of the concerned population (or labor force). Education Gini could be used as one of the indicators of welfare, complementing average educational attainment, health…

  8. Educational Inequality in the United States: Methodology and Historical Estimation of Education Gini Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper estimates historical measures of equality in the distribution of education in the United States by age group and sex. Using educational attainment data for the population, the EduGini measure indicates that educational inequality in the U.S. declined significantly between 1950 and 2009. Reductions in educational inequality were more…

  9. Geographical distribution of radiotherapy resources in Japan: investigating the inequitable distribution of human resources by using the Gini coefficient.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, Takumi; Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Okuda, Yasuo; Ando, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    This is a pilot study that aims to elucidate regional disparities in the distribution of medical resources in Japan. For this purpose, we employed the Gini coefficient (GC) in order to analyze the distribution of radiotherapy resources, which are allocated to each prefecture in Japan depending on the size of its population or physical area. Our study used data obtained from the 2005 and 2007 national surveys on the structure of radiation oncology in Japan, conducted by the Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO). Our analysis showed that the regional disparities regarding the radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technologists were small, and concluded that such resources were almost equitably distributed. However, medical physicists are inequitably distributed. Thus, policymakers should create and implement measures to train and retain medical physicists in areas with limited radiotherapy resources. Further, almost 26% of the secondary medical service areas lacked radiotherapy institutions. We attribute this observation to the existence of tertiary medical service areas, and almost all of prefectures face a shortage of such resources. Therefore, patients' accessibility to these resources in such areas should be improved.

  10. Note on Methodology: The Coefficient of Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheret, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Addresses applications of the coefficient of variation as a measure of educational inequality or as a means of measuring changes of inequality status. Suggests the Gini coefficient has many advantages over the coefficient of variation since it can be used with the Lorenz curve (Lorenz provides detail Gini omits). (BRR)

  11. The Gini concentration test for survival data.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Marco; Gigliarano, Chiara; Muliere, Pietro

    2009-12-01

    We apply the well known Gini index to the measurement of concentration in survival times within groups of patients, and as a way to compare the distribution of survival times across groups of patients in clinical studies. In particular, we propose an estimator of a restricted version of the index from right censored data. We derive the asymptotic distribution of the resulting Gini statistic, and construct an estimator for its asymptotic variance. We use these results to propose a novel test for differences in the heterogeneity of survival distributions, which may suggest the presence of a differential treatment effect for some groups of patients. We focus in particular on traditional and generalized cure rate models, i.e., mixture models with a distribution of the lifetimes of the cured patients that is either degenerate at infinity or has a density. Results from a simulation study suggest that the Gini index is useful in some situations, and that it should be considered together with existing tests (in particular, the Log-rank, Wilcoxon, and Gray-Tsiatis tests). Use of the test is illustrated on the classic data arising from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group melanoma clinical trial E1690. PMID:19728088

  12. Against UNESCO: Gedda, Gini and American scientific racism.

    PubMed

    Cassata, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on the ideological, institutional and intellectual connections between Italian eugenics and American scientific racism, from 1953 to 1967. The paper pays special attention to the scientific links between fascist demographer Corrado Gini (the first president of the Italian Central Statistical Institute - Istat), and geneticist Luigi Gedda (the president of the Gregor Mendel Institute in Rome and head of the Catholic political association Azione Cattolica) on the one hand, and on the other, the members of the IAAEE (International Association for the Advancement of Ethnology and Eugenics) and their journal, "The Mankind Quarterly". Corrado Gini and Luigi Gedda were both members of the honorary advisory board of "The Mankind Quarterly", and Gini was also assistant editor in 1962. Despite the theoretical differences between the "neo-Lamarckians" Gini and Gedda, and the "Mendelians" Robert Gayre and Reginald Ruggles Gates--editor and associate editor of "The Mankind Quarterly"--the relationship grew stronger because of a sort of strategic alliance in the ideological fight against UNESCO's Statements on Race. The main source of the paper is Corrado Gini's personal archive, deposited in Rome at the National State Archive (ACS). PMID:19848223

  13. Against UNESCO: Gedda, Gini and American scientific racism.

    PubMed

    Cassata, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on the ideological, institutional and intellectual connections between Italian eugenics and American scientific racism, from 1953 to 1967. The paper pays special attention to the scientific links between fascist demographer Corrado Gini (the first president of the Italian Central Statistical Institute - Istat), and geneticist Luigi Gedda (the president of the Gregor Mendel Institute in Rome and head of the Catholic political association Azione Cattolica) on the one hand, and on the other, the members of the IAAEE (International Association for the Advancement of Ethnology and Eugenics) and their journal, "The Mankind Quarterly". Corrado Gini and Luigi Gedda were both members of the honorary advisory board of "The Mankind Quarterly", and Gini was also assistant editor in 1962. Despite the theoretical differences between the "neo-Lamarckians" Gini and Gedda, and the "Mendelians" Robert Gayre and Reginald Ruggles Gates--editor and associate editor of "The Mankind Quarterly"--the relationship grew stronger because of a sort of strategic alliance in the ideological fight against UNESCO's Statements on Race. The main source of the paper is Corrado Gini's personal archive, deposited in Rome at the National State Archive (ACS).

  14. CORRADO GINI AND THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF FASCIST RACISM.

    PubMed

    Macuglia, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial whether the development of Fascist racism was influenced by earlier Italian eugenic research. Before the First International Eugenics Congress held in London in 1912, Italian eugenics was not characterized by a clear program of scientific research. With the advent of Fascism, however, the equality "number = strength" became the foundation of its program. This idea, according to which the improvement of a nation relies on the amplitude of its population, was conceived by statistician Corrado Gini (1884-1965) already in 1912. Focusing on the problem of the degeneration of the Italian race, Gini had a tremendous influence on Benito Mussolini's (1883-1945) political campaign, and shaped Italian social sciences for almost two decades. He was also a committed racist, as documented by a series of indisputable statements from the primary literature. All these findings place Gini in a linking position among early Italian eugenics, Fascism and official state racism.

  15. CORRADO GINI AND THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF FASCIST RACISM.

    PubMed

    Macuglia, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial whether the development of Fascist racism was influenced by earlier Italian eugenic research. Before the First International Eugenics Congress held in London in 1912, Italian eugenics was not characterized by a clear program of scientific research. With the advent of Fascism, however, the equality "number = strength" became the foundation of its program. This idea, according to which the improvement of a nation relies on the amplitude of its population, was conceived by statistician Corrado Gini (1884-1965) already in 1912. Focusing on the problem of the degeneration of the Italian race, Gini had a tremendous influence on Benito Mussolini's (1883-1945) political campaign, and shaped Italian social sciences for almost two decades. He was also a committed racist, as documented by a series of indisputable statements from the primary literature. All these findings place Gini in a linking position among early Italian eugenics, Fascism and official state racism. PMID:26292521

  16. The Gini Index and the Leimkuhler Curve for Bibliometric Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Quentin L.

    1992-01-01

    Investigates the Leimkuhler curve and the Gini index from a probabilistic viewpoint for studying the concentration of bibliometric distributions. The importance of the time parameter and the special nature of the "nonproducers" in bibliometric studies are examined, standard models of bibliometric processes are described, and further research…

  17. GINI: From ISH Images to Gene Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Puniyani, Kriti; Xing, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate inference of molecular and functional interactions among genes, especially in multicellular organisms such as Drosophila, often requires statistical analysis of correlations not only between the magnitudes of gene expressions, but also between their temporal-spatial patterns. The ISH (in-situ-hybridization)-based gene expression micro-imaging technology offers an effective approach to perform large-scale spatial-temporal profiling of whole-body mRNA abundance. However, analytical tools for discovering gene interactions from such data remain an open challenge due to various reasons, including difficulties in extracting canonical representations of gene activities from images, and in inference of statistically meaningful networks from such representations. In this paper, we present GINI, a machine learning system for inferring gene interaction networks from Drosophila embryonic ISH images. GINI builds on a computer-vision-inspired vector-space representation of the spatial pattern of gene expression in ISH images, enabled by our recently developed system; and a new multi-instance-kernel algorithm that learns a sparse Markov network model, in which, every gene (i.e., node) in the network is represented by a vector-valued spatial pattern rather than a scalar-valued gene intensity as in conventional approaches such as a Gaussian graphical model. By capturing the notion of spatial similarity of gene expression, and at the same time properly taking into account the presence of multiple images per gene via multi-instance kernels, GINI is well-positioned to infer statistically sound, and biologically meaningful gene interaction networks from image data. Using both synthetic data and a small manually curated data set, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in network building. Furthermore, we report results on a large publicly available collection of Drosophila embryonic ISH images from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, where GINI makes novel and

  18. Correlation between the Gini index and the observed prosperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Igor

    2006-03-01

    It has been well established by computer simulations that a free, unregulated market economy (in the simplest model of a yard sale economy) is unstable and collapses to a singular wealth distribution. It is now a common procedure in computer simulations to stabilize a model by favoring the poorer partner in each transaction, or by redistributing the wealth in the society in favor of the poorer part of the population. Such measures stabilize the economy and create a stationary state with a Gini index G<1. This suggests that there is some optimal range of the Gini index which is indicative of a healthy and dynamic economy. To verify this assumption, I plotted the PPP (parity purchasing power) for all countries in the world against their Gini indices, and found that they all (with only 2 outliers) fall into one of two groups: ``wealthy'' countries with PPP>10,000/year, and the rest. The former are characterized by G=0.29±0.07, and the latter by a uniform distribution of all possible Gs. This means that an enforced wealth redistribution is not a moral act of social consciousness, but a necessary precondition for a sustainable economy. The existence of an optimal G is illustrated through a simple model of a yard sale economy with taxation.

  19. A comparison of random forest and its Gini importance with standard chemometric methods for the feature selection and classification of spectral data

    PubMed Central

    Menze, Bjoern H; Kelm, B Michael; Masuch, Ralf; Himmelreich, Uwe; Bachert, Peter; Petrich, Wolfgang; Hamprecht, Fred A

    2009-01-01

    Background Regularized regression methods such as principal component or partial least squares regression perform well in learning tasks on high dimensional spectral data, but cannot explicitly eliminate irrelevant features. The random forest classifier with its associated Gini feature importance, on the other hand, allows for an explicit feature elimination, but may not be optimally adapted to spectral data due to the topology of its constituent classification trees which are based on orthogonal splits in feature space. Results We propose to combine the best of both approaches, and evaluated the joint use of a feature selection based on a recursive feature elimination using the Gini importance of random forests' together with regularized classification methods on spectral data sets from medical diagnostics, chemotaxonomy, biomedical analytics, food science, and synthetically modified spectral data. Here, a feature selection using the Gini feature importance with a regularized classification by discriminant partial least squares regression performed as well as or better than a filtering according to different univariate statistical tests, or using regression coefficients in a backward feature elimination. It outperformed the direct application of the random forest classifier, or the direct application of the regularized classifiers on the full set of features. Conclusion The Gini importance of the random forest provided superior means for measuring feature relevance on spectral data, but – on an optimal subset of features – the regularized classifiers might be preferable over the random forest classifier, in spite of their limitation to model linear dependencies only. A feature selection based on Gini importance, however, may precede a regularized linear classification to identify this optimal subset of features, and to earn a double benefit of both dimensionality reduction and the elimination of noise from the classification task. PMID:19591666

  20. Feeding ducks, bacterial chemotaxis, and the Gini index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peaudecerf, François J.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-08-01

    Classic experiments on the distribution of ducks around separated food sources found consistency with the "ideal free" distribution in which the local population is proportional to the local supply rate. Motivated by this experiment and others, we examine the analogous problem in the microbial world: the distribution of chemotactic bacteria around multiple nearby food sources. In contrast to the optimization of uptake rate that may hold at the level of a single cell in a spatially varying nutrient field, nutrient consumption by a population of chemotactic cells will modify the nutrient field, and the uptake rate will generally vary throughout the population. Through a simple model we study the distribution of resource uptake in the presence of chemotaxis, consumption, and diffusion of both bacteria and nutrients. Borrowing from the field of theoretical economics, we explore how the Gini index can be used as a means to quantify the inequalities of uptake. The redistributive effect of chemotaxis can lead to a phenomenon we term "chemotactic levelling," and the influence of these results on population fitness are briefly considered.

  1. Is Inequality among Universities Increasing? Gini Coefficients and the Elusive Rise of Elite Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halffman, Willem; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    One of the unintended consequences of the New Public Management (NPM) in universities is often feared to be a division between elite institutions focused on research and large institutions with teaching missions. However, institutional isomorphisms provide counter-incentives. For example, university rankings focus on certain output parameters such…

  2. Using the gini coefficient to measure the chemical diversity of small-molecule libraries.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Filippov, Igor V

    2016-08-15

    Modern databases of small organic molecules contain tens of millions of structures. The size of theoretically available chemistry is even larger. However, despite the large amount of chemical information, the "big data" moment for chemistry has not yet provided the corresponding payoff of cheaper computer-predicted medicine or robust machine-learning models for the determination of efficacy and toxicity. Here, we present a study of the diversity of chemical datasets using a measure that is commonly used in socioeconomic studies. We demonstrate the use of this diversity measure on several datasets that were constructed to contain various congeneric subsets of molecules as well as randomly selected molecules. We also apply our method to a number of well-known databases that are frequently used for structure-activity relationship modeling. Our results show the poor diversity of the common sources of potential lead compounds compared to actual known drugs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27353971

  3. Entropy maximization under the constraints on the generalized Gini index and its application in modeling income distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi Tanak, A.; Mohtashami Borzadaran, G. R.; Ahmadi, J.

    2015-11-01

    In economics and social sciences, the inequality measures such as Gini index, Pietra index etc., are commonly used to measure the statistical dispersion. There is a generalization of Gini index which includes it as special case. In this paper, we use principle of maximum entropy to approximate the model of income distribution with a given mean and generalized Gini index. Many distributions have been used as descriptive models for the distribution of income. The most widely known of these models are the generalized beta of second kind and its subclass distributions. The obtained maximum entropy distributions are fitted to the US family total money income in 2009, 2011 and 2013 and their relative performances with respect to generalized beta of second kind family are compared.

  4. New classes of Lorenz curves by maximizing Tsallis entropy under mean and Gini equality and inequality constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preda, Vasile; Dedu, Silvia; Gheorghe, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, by using the entropy maximization principle with Tsallis entropy, new distribution families for modeling the income distribution are derived. Also, new classes of Lorenz curves are obtained by applying the entropy maximization principle with Tsallis entropy, under mean and Gini index equality and inequality constraints.

  5. Inequality in societies, academic institutions and science journals: Gini and k-indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Asim; Chattopadhyay, Nachiketa; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2014-09-01

    Social inequality is traditionally measured by the Gini-index (g). The g-index takes values from 0 to 1 where g=0 represents complete equality and g=1 represents complete inequality. Most of the estimates of the income or wealth data indicate the g value to be widely dispersed across the countries of the world: g values typically range from 0.30 to 0.65 at a particular time (year). We estimated similarly the Gini-index for the citations earned by the yearly publications of various academic institutions and the science journals. The ISI web of science data suggests remarkably strong inequality and universality (g=0.70±0.07) across all the universities and institutions of the world, while for the journals we find g=0.65±0.15 for any typical year. We define a new inequality measure, namely the k-index, saying that the cumulative income or citations of (1-k) fraction of people or papers exceed those earned by the fraction (k) of the people or publications respectively. We find, while the k-index value for income ranges from 0.60 to 0.75 for income distributions across the world, it has a value around 0.75±0.05 for different universities and institutions across the world and around 0.77±0.10 for the science journals. Apart from above indices, we also analyze the same institution and journal citation data by measuring Pietra index and median index.

  6. A methodology to determine the maximum value of weighted Gini-Simpson index.

    PubMed

    Casquilho, José Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Weighted Gini-Simpson index is an analytical tool that promises to be widely used concerning biological and economics applications, relative to the assessment of diversity measured by compositional proportions of a system defined with a finite number of elementary states characterized by positive weights. In this paper, a current literature review on the theme is presented and the mathematical properties of the index are outlined, focusing on the location of the maximizer (maximum point) and evaluation of the maximum value, with emphasis in the role of the Lagrange multiplier critical value-closely related with the harmonic mean of the weights-which is shown to be a barrier concerning the feasibility of the solution. Sequential procedures are presented, either backward or forward, which are used to obtain the correct values of the maximum point coordinates, thus allowing for the computation of the right maximum value of the index. Also, new theoretical results are provided, such as the calculus of limits and partial derivatives related to the critical solution, used to assess of the effectiveness of the algorithms herein proposed and discussed. PMID:27504241

  7. A methodology to determine the maximum value of weighted Gini-Simpson index.

    PubMed

    Casquilho, José Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Weighted Gini-Simpson index is an analytical tool that promises to be widely used concerning biological and economics applications, relative to the assessment of diversity measured by compositional proportions of a system defined with a finite number of elementary states characterized by positive weights. In this paper, a current literature review on the theme is presented and the mathematical properties of the index are outlined, focusing on the location of the maximizer (maximum point) and evaluation of the maximum value, with emphasis in the role of the Lagrange multiplier critical value-closely related with the harmonic mean of the weights-which is shown to be a barrier concerning the feasibility of the solution. Sequential procedures are presented, either backward or forward, which are used to obtain the correct values of the maximum point coordinates, thus allowing for the computation of the right maximum value of the index. Also, new theoretical results are provided, such as the calculus of limits and partial derivatives related to the critical solution, used to assess of the effectiveness of the algorithms herein proposed and discussed.

  8. Murug, Waali, and Gini: Expressions of Distress in Refugees From Somalia

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Jennifer K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study how mental illness is understood, expressed, and treated among Somali refugees and how these factors influence use of health services for mental problems. Method: Seventeen adult Somali refugees (9 women, 8 men) were recruited by mail or by word-of-mouth to participate in the study. The study setting was an urban community health center in Rochester, N.Y., that provides family practice patient care to local Somali refugees. A qualitative design was used that incorporated a combination of methods, chiefly semistructured interviews. Interviews focused on the ways in which sadness, depression, and anxiety are expressed and on the participants' understanding of the origins of and treatment strategies for these problems. Interview transcripts were analyzed to identify recurrent themes. Results: Nearly all participants felt that mental illness was a new problem for their community that did not exist to the same extent in prewar Somalia. Themes that emerged to explain the causes of mental illness included the shock and devastation of war; dead, missing, or separated family members; and spirit possession or a curse. Three major types of mental problems were identified that were associated with specific behaviors and treatment strategies: murug (sadness or suffering), gini (craziness due to spirit possession), and waali (craziness due to severe trauma). Rather than seek help from a clinician, participants preferred to first use family support, prayer, or traditional therapies for most situations. Conclusion: Somali refugees have distinct ways of conceptualizing, expressing, and treating commonly understood mental problems. Participants differed in their opinions about whether they would consult a doctor to discuss feelings of sadness or craziness. Effective mental health care of refugees should address culture-specific belief systems in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:15361926

  9. Measuring social inequality with quantitative methodology: Analytical estimates and empirical data analysis by Gini and k indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Jun-ichi; Ghosh, Asim; Chatterjee, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2015-07-01

    Social inequality manifested across different strata of human existence can be quantified in several ways. Here we compute non-entropic measures of inequality such as Lorenz curve, Gini index and the recently introduced k index analytically from known distribution functions. We characterize the distribution functions of different quantities such as votes, journal citations, city size, etc. with suitable fits, compute their inequality measures and compare with the analytical results. A single analytic function is often not sufficient to fit the entire range of the probability distribution of the empirical data, and fit better to two distinct functions with a single crossover point. Here we provide general formulas to calculate these inequality measures for the above cases. We attempt to specify the crossover point by minimizing the gap between empirical and analytical evaluations of measures. Regarding the k index as an 'extra dimension', both the lower and upper bounds of the Gini index are obtained as a function of the k index. This type of inequality relations among inequality indices might help us to check the validity of empirical and analytical evaluations of those indices.

  10. Cartridge case image matching using effective correlation area based method.

    PubMed

    Yammen, S; Muneesawang, P

    2013-06-10

    A firearm leaves a unique impression on fired cartridge cases. The cross-correlation function plays an important role in matching the characteristic features on the cartridge case found at the crime scene with a specific firearm, for accurate firearm identification. This paper proposes that the computational forensic techniques of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches to image matching are essential to firearm identification. Specifically, the reference and the corresponding cartridge cases are aligned according to the phase-correlation criterion on the transform domain. The informative segments of the breech face marks are identified by a cross-covariance coefficient using the coefficient value in a window located locally in the image space. The segments are then passed to the measurement of edge density for computing effective correlation areas. Experimental results on a new dataset show that the correlation system can make use of the best properties of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches, and can attain significant improvement of image-correlation results, compared with the traditional image-matching methods for firearm identification, which employ cartridge-case samples. An analysis of image-alignment score matrices suggests that all translation and scaling parameters are estimated correctly, and contribute to the successful extraction of effective correlation areas. It was found that the proposed method has a high discriminant power, compared with the conventional correlator. This paper advocates that this method will enable forensic science to compile a large-scale image database to perform correlation of cartridge case bases, in order to identify firearms that involve pairwise alignments and comparisons.

  11. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  12. Looking beyond Harlem: International Insights for Area-Based Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.; Gibson, Jordi Diaz; Balslev, Gitte Miller; Scanlan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Purposeful and strategic connections between schools, families, and communities are critical characteristics of effective middle level education. Area-based initiatives (ABIs) have been particularly visible family-school-community policy developments in recent years--especially the federally funded "Promise Neighborhoods," which attempt to…

  13. The Interfacial-Area-Based Relative Permeability Function

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Khaleel, Raziuddin

    2009-09-25

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the services of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical support for the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) activity within the Soil & Groundwater Remediation Project. A portion of the support provided in FY2009, was to extend the soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using an alternative approach. This alternative approach incorporates the Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980), and a modified van Genuchten water-retention models into the interfacial-area-based relative permeability model presented by Embid (1997). The general performance of the incorporated models is shown using typical hydraulic parameters. The relative permeability models for the wetting phase were further examined using data from literature. Results indicate that the interfacial-area-based model can describe the relative permeability of the wetting phase reasonably well.

  14. Area-based approach improves global sediment discharge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-07-01

    By approaching the challenge of calculating global sediment discharge rates from a new angle, Pelletier developed a model that outperforms many existing simulations while minimizing the number of free parameters. Knowing how sediment is transported by the world's rivers is a key factor in understanding how landscapes change over time, with important consequences for agricultural viability, ecological health, and soil properties. Traditionally, the majority of discharge models calculate sediment redistribution at the watershed or drainage basin scale, using watershed average values of the physical properties known to affect sediment transport. The author's model, on the other hand, partitions the planet into sections that are 5 arc minutes wide—roughly 10 kilometers across at the equator and smaller at higher latitudes. This decision to use an area-based grid rather than drainage basin averages allows for an improved representation of small-scale processes that are often washed out at the watershed scale.

  15. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  16. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  17. Reference Material for Seebeck Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Lenz, E.; Haupt, S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a measurement method and a measuring system to determine absolute Seebeck coefficients of thermoelectric bulk materials with the aim of establishing reference materials for Seebeck coefficients. Reference materials with known thermoelectric properties are essential to allow a reliable benchmarking of different thermoelectric materials for application in thermoelectric generators to convert thermal into electrical energy or vice versa. A temperature gradient (1 to 8) K is induced across the sample, and the resulting voltage is measured by using two differential Au/Pt thermocouples. On the basis of the known absolute Seebeck coefficients of Au and Pt, the unknown Seebeck coefficient of the sample is calculated. The measurements are performed in inert atmospheres and at low pressure (30 to 60) mbar in the temperature range between 300 K and 860 K. The measurement results of the Seebeck coefficients of metallic and semiconducting samples are presented. Achievable relative measurement uncertainties of the Seebeck coefficient are on the order of a few percent.

  18. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  19. Graph characterization via Ihara coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ren, Peng; Wilson, Richard C; Hancock, Edwin R

    2011-02-01

    The novel contributions of this paper are twofold. First, we demonstrate how to characterize unweighted graphs in a permutation-invariant manner using the polynomial coefficients from the Ihara zeta function, i.e., the Ihara coefficients. Second, we generalize the definition of the Ihara coefficients to edge-weighted graphs. For an unweighted graph, the Ihara zeta function is the reciprocal of a quasi characteristic polynomial of the adjacency matrix of the associated oriented line graph. Since the Ihara zeta function has poles that give rise to infinities, the most convenient numerically stable representation is to work with the coefficients of the quasi characteristic polynomial. Moreover, the polynomial coefficients are invariant to vertex order permutations and also convey information concerning the cycle structure of the graph. To generalize the representation to edge-weighted graphs, we make use of the reduced Bartholdi zeta function. We prove that the computation of the Ihara coefficients for unweighted graphs is a special case of our proposed method for unit edge weights. We also present a spectral analysis of the Ihara coefficients and indicate their advantages over other graph spectral methods. We apply the proposed graph characterization method to capturing graph-class structure and clustering graphs. Experimental results reveal that the Ihara coefficients are more effective than methods based on Laplacian spectra.

  20. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  1. Local status and power in area-based health improvement partnerships.

    PubMed

    Powell, Katie; Thurston, Miranda; Bloyce, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Area-based initiatives have formed an important part of public policy towards more socio-economically deprived areas in many countries. Co-ordinating service provision within and across sectors has been a common feature of these initiatives. Despite sustained policy interest in area-based initiatives, little empirical work has explored relations between area-based initiative providers, and partnership development within this context remains under-theorised. This article addresses both of these gaps by exploring partnerships as a social and developmental process, drawing on concepts from figurational sociology to explain how provider relations develop within an area-based initiative. Qualitative methods were used to explore, prospectively, the development of an area-based initiative targeted at a town in the north west of England. A central finding was that although effective delivery of area-based initiatives is premised on a high level of co-ordination between service providers, the pattern of interdependencies between providers limits the frequency and effectiveness of co-operation. In particular, the interdependency of area-based initiative providers with others in their organisation (what is termed here as 'organisational pull') constrained the ways in which they worked with providers outside of their own organisations. 'Local' status, which could be earned over time, enabled some providers to exert greater control over the way in which provider relations developed during the course of the initiative. These findings demonstrate how historically constituted social networks, within which all providers are embedded, shape partnership development. The theoretical insight developed here suggests a need for more realistic expectations among policymakers about how and to what extent provider partnerships can be managed.

  2. Local status and power in area-based health improvement partnerships.

    PubMed

    Powell, Katie; Thurston, Miranda; Bloyce, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Area-based initiatives have formed an important part of public policy towards more socio-economically deprived areas in many countries. Co-ordinating service provision within and across sectors has been a common feature of these initiatives. Despite sustained policy interest in area-based initiatives, little empirical work has explored relations between area-based initiative providers, and partnership development within this context remains under-theorised. This article addresses both of these gaps by exploring partnerships as a social and developmental process, drawing on concepts from figurational sociology to explain how provider relations develop within an area-based initiative. Qualitative methods were used to explore, prospectively, the development of an area-based initiative targeted at a town in the north west of England. A central finding was that although effective delivery of area-based initiatives is premised on a high level of co-ordination between service providers, the pattern of interdependencies between providers limits the frequency and effectiveness of co-operation. In particular, the interdependency of area-based initiative providers with others in their organisation (what is termed here as 'organisational pull') constrained the ways in which they worked with providers outside of their own organisations. 'Local' status, which could be earned over time, enabled some providers to exert greater control over the way in which provider relations developed during the course of the initiative. These findings demonstrate how historically constituted social networks, within which all providers are embedded, shape partnership development. The theoretical insight developed here suggests a need for more realistic expectations among policymakers about how and to what extent provider partnerships can be managed. PMID:24695385

  3. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  4. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  5. Diffusion Coefficients in White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saumon, D.; Starrett, C. E.; Daligault, J.

    2015-06-01

    Models of diffusion in white dwarfs universally rely on the coefficients calculated by Paquette et al. (1986). We present new calculations of diffusion coefficients based on an advanced microscopic theory of dense plasmas and a numerical simulation approach that intrinsically accounts for multiple collisions. Our method is validated against a state-of-the-art method and we present results for the diffusion of carbon ions in a helium plasma.

  6. Converting Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a sample and non-uniform intensity in the reverberation chambers under test. In this study, conversion methods from Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients are proposed. The overestimations of the Sabine absorption coefficient are investigated theoretically based on Miki's model for porous absorbers backed by a rigid wall or an air cavity, resulting in conversion factors. Additionally, three optimizations are suggested: An optimization method for the surface impedances for locally reacting absorbers, the flow resistivity for extendedly reacting absorbers, and the flow resistance for fabrics. With four porous type absorbers, the conversion methods are validated. For absorbers backed by a rigid wall, the surface impedance optimization produces the best results, while the flow resistivity optimization also yields reasonable results. The flow resistivity and flow resistance optimization for extendedly reacting absorbers are also found to be successful. However, the theoretical conversion factors based on Miki's model do not guarantee reliable estimations, particularly at frequencies below 250 Hz and beyond 2500 Hz.

  7. Transport coefficients of heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the transport coefficients (drag and momentum diffusion) of the low-lying heavy baryons Λc and Λb in a medium of light mesons formed at the later stages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ the Fokker-Planck approach to obtain the transport coefficients from unitarized baryon-meson interactions based on effective field theories that respect chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. We provide the transport coefficients as a function of temperature and heavy-baryon momentum, and analyze the applicability of certain nonrelativistic estimates. Moreover we compare our outcome for the spatial diffusion coefficient to the one coming from the solution of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation, and we find a very good agreement between both calculations. The transport coefficients for Λc and Λb in a thermal bath will be used in a subsequent publication as input in a Langevin evolution code for the generation and propagation of heavy particles in heavy-ion collisions at LHC and RHIC energies.

  8. Analysis of internal conversion coefficients

    PubMed

    Coursol; Gorozhankin; Yakushev; Briancon; Vylov

    2000-03-01

    An extensive database has been assembled that contains the three most widely used sets of calculated internal conversion coefficients (ICC): [Hager R.S., Seltzer E.C., 1968. Internal conversion tables. K-, L-, M-shell Conversion coefficients for Z = 30 to Z = 103, Nucl. Data Tables A4, 1-237; Band I.M., Trzhaskovskaya M.B., 1978. Tables of gamma-ray internal conversion coefficients for the K-, L- and M-shells, 10 < or = Z < or = 104, Special Report of Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute; Rosel F., Fries H.M., Alder K., Pauli H.C., 1978. Internal conversion coefficients for all atomic shells, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 21, 91-289] and also includes new Dirac Fock calculations [Band I.M. and Trzhaskovskaya M.B., 1993. Internal conversion coefficients for low-energy nuclear transitions, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 55, 43-61]. This database is linked to a computer program to plot ICCs and their combinations (sums and ratios) as a function of Z and energy, as well as relative deviations of ICC or their combinations for any pair of tabulated data. Examples of these analyses are presented for the K-shell and total ICCs of the gamma-ray standards [Hansen H.H., 1985. Evaluation of K-shell and total internal conversion coefficients for some selected nuclear transitions, Eur. Appl. Res. Rept. Nucl. Sci. Tech. 11.6 (4) 777-816] and for the K-shell and total ICCs of high multipolarity transitions (total, K-, L-, M-shells of E3 and M3 and K-shell of M4). Experimental data sets are also compared with the theoretical values of these specific calculations. PMID:10724406

  9. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e

    2011-06-01

    The shear ({eta}) and bulk ({zeta}) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, gg{yields}gg and the inelastic, number nonconserving, gg{yields}ggg processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous coefficients to entropy density (s) ratios. Recently the processes: gg{yields}ggg has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The {eta} and {zeta} have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula recently derived. At large {alpha}{sub s} the value of {eta}/s approaches its lower bound, {approx}1/4{pi}.

  10. Inequality in Academic Performance and Juvenile Convictions: An Area-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabates, Ricardo; Feinstein, Leon; Shingal, Anirudh

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the links between inequality in academic performance and juvenile conviction rates for violent crime, stealing from another person, burglary in a dwelling and racially motivated offences. We use area-based aggregate data to model this relationship. Our results show that, above and beyond impacts of absolute access to…

  11. Area-Based Partnerships in Rural Poland: The Post-Accession Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furmankiewicz, Marek; Thompson, Nicola; Zielinska, Marta

    2010-01-01

    The paper examines the characteristics of area-based partnerships in rural Poland. It is based on the study of partnerships created after the accession to the European Union in 2004. Partnership structures have been rapidly adopted in rural Poland due to opportunities provided by the LEADER+ Pilot Programme. However, the research showed that…

  12. Towards an Area-Based Curriculum? Creating Space for the City in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facer, Keri; Thomas, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses Fraser's (1999) concept of social justice as comprising both redistribution and recognition as a frame to interrogate two "Area-Based Curriculum" projects running since 2008 in Manchester and Peterborough schools. It argues that historic concerns about working with "the local" in cross-curricular activities has originated in a…

  13. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  14. Aerodynamic coefficients and transformation tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Joseph S

    1918-01-01

    The problem of the transformation of numerical values expressed in one system of units into another set or system of units frequently arises in connection with aerodynamic problems. Report contains aerodynamic coefficients and conversion tables needed to facilitate such transformation. (author)

  15. Estimating the Polyserial Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedrick, Edward J.; Breslin, Frederick C.

    1996-01-01

    Simple noniterative estimators of the polyserial correlation coefficient are developed by exploiting a general relationship between the polyserial correlation and the point polyserial correlation to give extensions of the biserial estimators of K. Pearson (1909), H. E. Brogden (1949), and F. M. Lord (1963) to the multicategory setting. (SLD)

  16. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  17. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  18. Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

  19. Prediction of stream volatilization coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are developed for predicting the liquid-film and gas-film reference-substance parameters for quantifying volatilization of organic solutes from streams. Molecular weight and molecular-diffusion coefficients of the solute are used as correlating parameters. Equations for predicting molecular-diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in water and air are developed, with molecular weight and molal volume as parameters. Mean absolute errors of prediction for diffusion coefficients in water are 9.97% for the molecular-weight equation, 6.45% for the molal-volume equation. The mean absolute error for the diffusion coefficient in air is 5.79% for the molal-volume equation. Molecular weight is not a satisfactory correlating parameter for diffusion in air because two equations are necessary to describe the values in the data set. The best predictive equation for the liquid-film reference-substance parameter has a mean absolute error of 5.74%, with molal volume as the correlating parameter. The best equation for the gas-film parameter has a mean absolute error of 7.80%, with molecular weight as the correlating parameter.

  20. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  1. Consistent transport coefficients in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Rovira, M.; Ferrofontan, C.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent theory for dealing with transport phenomena in stellar atmospheres starting with the kinetic equations and introducing three cases (LTE, partial LTE, and non-LTE) was developed. The consistent hydrodynamical equations were presented for partial-LTE, the transport coefficients defined, and a method shown to calculate them. The method is based on the numerical solution of kinetic equations considering Landau, Boltzmann, and Focker-Planck collision terms. Finally a set of results for the transport coefficients derived for a partially ionized hydrogen gas with radiation was shown, considering ionization and recombination as well as elastic collisions. The results obtained imply major changes is some types of theoretical model calculations and can resolve some important current problems concerning energy and mass balance in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that energy balance in the lower solar transition region can be fully explained by means of radiation losses and conductive flux.

  2. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  3. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  4. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  5. The interpretation of selection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Barton, N H; Servedio, M R

    2015-05-01

    Evolutionary biologists have an array of powerful theoretical techniques that can accurately predict changes in the genetic composition of populations. Changes in gene frequencies and genetic associations between loci can be tracked as they respond to a wide variety of evolutionary forces. However, it is often less clear how to decompose these various forces into components that accurately reflect the underlying biology. Here, we present several issues that arise in the definition and interpretation of selection and selection coefficients, focusing on insights gained through the examination of selection coefficients in multilocus notation. Using this notation, we discuss how its flexibility-which allows different biological units to be identified as targets of selection-is reflected in the interpretation of the coefficients that the notation generates. In many situations, it can be difficult to agree on whether loci can be considered to be under "direct" versus "indirect" selection, or to quantify this selection. We present arguments for what the terms direct and indirect selection might best encompass, considering a range of issues, from viability and sexual selection to kin selection. We show how multilocus notation can discriminate between direct and indirect selection, and describe when it can do so. PMID:25790030

  6. Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2005-10-01

    A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

  7. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  8. Note on Two Generalizations of Coefficient Alpha.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.

    1979-01-01

    An important relationship is given for two generalizations of coefficient alpha: (1) Rajaratnam, Cronbach, and Gleser's generalizability formula for stratified-parallel tests, and (2) Raju's coefficient beta. (Author/CTM)

  9. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  10. M-Bonomial Coefficients and Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we introduce M-bonomial coefficients or (M-bonacci binomial coefficients). These are similar to the binomial and the Fibonomial (or Fibonacci-binomial) coefficients and can be displayed in a triangle similar to Pascal's triangle from which some identities become obvious.

  11. Is the G Index a Correlation Coefficient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegelius, Jan

    1980-01-01

    One argument against the G index is that, unlike phi, it is not a correlation coefficient; yet, G conforms to the Kendall and E-coefficient definitions. The G index is also equal to the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient obtained from double scoring. (Author/CP)

  12. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  13. [Responses of vegetation changes to climatic variations in Panxi area based on the MODIS multispectral data].

    PubMed

    Shao, Huai-Yong; Wu, Jin-Hui; Liu, Meng; Yang, Wu-Nian

    2014-01-01

    It is an important research area to quantitatively studying the relationship between global climatic change and vegetation change based on the remote sensing technology. Panxi area is the ecological barrier of the upper reaches of the Yangtze River, and it is essential for the stability of the ecological environment of Sichuan as well as that of the whole China. The present article analyzes the vegetation change in 2001-2008 and the relationship between vegetation change and climatic variations of Panxi area, based on MODIS multispectral data and meteorological data. The results indicate that NDVI is positively correlated with temperature and precipitation. The precipitation is the major factor that affects the change of vegetation in the Panxi region and the trend of NDVI is similar with autumn precipitation; while at the same time the influence of climate has a one-month-time-lag.

  14. Local-Area Based Traffic Splitter for Improving Performance Using Subnetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Meenakshi; Mittal, Mohit Kumar

    2010-11-01

    This document provides an overview of LAN traffic splitter. The tool "Local-Area based Traffic splitter" is based on subnetting techniques. It is basically used for calculating subnets for sub-dividing the LAN. Subnetting an IP Network can be done for a variety of reasons, including organization, use of different physical media (such as Ethernet, FDDI, WAN, etc.), preservation of address space, and security. The most common reason is to control network traffic. There are various techniques for calculating subnets that are considered by this tool. This paper will explore the various features of this tool and will also check the effect of subnetting after implementing it on the LAN. These instructions give you basic guidelines for preparing camera-ready papers for conference proceedings.

  15. Inbreeding coefficients and coalescence times.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, M

    1991-10-01

    This paper describes the relationship between probabilities of identity by descent and the distribution of coalescence times. By using the relationship between coalescence times and identity probabilities, it is possible to extend existing results for inbreeding coefficients in regular systems of mating to find the distribution of coalescence times and the mean coalescence times. It is also possible to express Sewall Wright's FST as the ratio of average coalescence times of different pairs of genes. That simplifies the analysis of models of subdivided populations because the average coalescence time can be found by computing separately the time it takes for two genes to enter a single subpopulation and time it takes for two genes in the same subpopulation to coalesce. The first time depends only on the migration matrix and the second time depends only on the total number of individuals in the population. This approach is used to find FST in the finite island model and in one- and two-dimensional stepping-stone models. It is also used to find the rate of approach of FST to its equilibrium value. These results are discussed in terms of different measures of genetic distance. It is proposed that, for the purposes of describing the amount of gene flow among local populations, the effective migration rate between pairs of local populations, M, which is the migration rate that would be estimated for those two populations if they were actually in an island model, provides a simple and useful measure of genetic similarity that can be defined for either allozyme or DNA sequence data.

  16. Evaluating Area-Based Socioeconomic Status Indicators for Monitoring Disparities within Health Care Systems: Results from a Primary Care Network

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Seth A; Traore, Carine Y; Singer, Daniel E; Atlas, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine which area-based socioeconomic status (SES) indicator is best suited to monitor health care disparities from a delivery system perspective. Data Sources/Study Setting 142,659 adults seen in a primary care network from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2011. Study Design Cross-sectional, comparing associations between area-based SES indicators and patient outcomes. Data Collection Address data were geocoded to construct area-based SES indicators at block group (BG), census tract (CT), and ZIP code (ZIP) levels. Data on health outcomes were abstracted from electronic records. Relative indices of inequality (RIIs) were calculated to quantify disparities detected by area-based SES indicators and compared to RIIs from self-reported educational attainment. Principal Findings ZIP indicators had less missing data than BG or CT indicators (p < .0001). Area-based SES indicators were strongly associated with self-report educational attainment (p < .0001). ZIP, BG, and CT indicators all detected expected SES gradients in health outcomes similarly. Single-item, cut point defined indicators performed as well as multidimensional indices and quantile indicators. Conclusions Area-based SES indicators detected health outcome differences well and may be useful for monitoring disparities within health care systems. Our preferred indicator was ZIP-level median household income or percent poverty, using cut points. PMID:25219917

  17. Gas-film coefficients for streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for predicting the gas-film coefficient for the volatilization of organic solutes from streams are developed. The film coefficient is a function of windspeed and water temperature. The dependence of the coefficient on windspeed is determined from published information on the evaporation of water from a canal. The dependence of the coefficient on temperature is determined from laboratory studies on the evaporation of water. Procedures for adjusting the coefficients for different organic solutes are based on the molecular diffusion coefficient and the molecular weight. The molecular weight procedure is easiest to use because of the availability of molecular weights. However, the theoretical basis of the procedure is questionable. The diffusion coefficient procedure is supported by considerable data. Questions, however, remain regarding the exact dependence of the film coefficint on the diffusion coefficient. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficient procedure with a 0.68-power dependence be used when precise estimate of the gas-film coefficient are needed and that the molecular weight procedure be used when only approximate estimates are needed.

  18. [Estimation of water clarity in offshore marine areas based on modified semi-analysis spectra model].

    PubMed

    Han, Liu-Sheng; Chen, Shui-Sen; Chen, Xiu-Zhi; Li, Dan; Li, Yong; Sun, Lin; Lu, Chu-Qian; Chen, Wei-Qi

    2014-02-01

    The main objectives of the research described in the present paper are to develop a semi-analysis model of water clarity for case 2 waters without inputting the absorption and scattering coefficient, which are not easy to be obtained for offshore marine areas so far. Based on the Zsd (Secchi depth)inversion theory, a simple semi-analysis spectra model was established for offshore seawater clarity by analyzing the relationship between vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient K(d) (490) and the beam attenuation coefficient c(490) with remote sensing reflectance. This semi-analysis spectra model needed two band reflectance ratios on- ly, while tidal correction was produced for this model to improve the precision of the retrieving results. The semi-analysis spectra model was applied to ASD hyperspectral reflectance data measured in the Pearl River Estuary Ecological Zone (October 21, 23, 2012, November 2, 2012; N=20) and the Xuwen Coral Reef Protection Zone (January 13, 14, 2013, N=25) which covered different water body of tidal times and different pollution sources. The results indicated that the changing tendency of predicted values was consistent with the synchronous measurement values after comparing them. However, water clarity calculated by the ASD hyperspectral reflectance measured in spring tidal time, generated 0. 4 m deviation compared with in-situ water clarity, while water clarity calculated by the ASD hyperspectral reflectance measured in neap tidal time is close to the in-situ water clarity. So the tidal correction coefficient of 0.4 was further applied for the model. After modification, the coefficient of determination between the inversed and measured water clarity was 0. 663, the average absolute error was 0. 14 m and the average relative error was 19.5%. Research demonstrated that this semi-analysis inversion algorithm just needs two band reflectance ratio to complete the inversion of water clarity, which is simple and works relatively well for lower

  19. Trace element partition coefficient in ionic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, H

    1966-05-01

    Partition coefficient monovalent trace ions between liquids and either solid NaNO(2) or KCl were determined. The isotropic elastic model of ionic crystals was used for calculating the energy change caused by the ionic substitutions. The observed values of partition coefficients in KCl good agreement with calculate values.

  20. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  1. Commentary on Coefficient Alpha: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    The general use of coefficient alpha to assess reliability should be discouraged on a number of grounds. The assumptions underlying coefficient alpha are unlikely to hold in practice, and violation of these assumptions can result in nontrivial negative or positive bias. Structural equation modeling was discussed as an informative process both to…

  2. Implications of NGA for NEHRP site coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Three proposals are provided to update tables 11.4-1 and 11.4-2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (7-10), by the American Society of Civil Engineers (2010) (ASCE/SEI 7-10), with site coefficients implied directly by NGA (Next Generation Attenuation) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Proposals include a recommendation to use straight-line interpolation to infer site coefficients at intermediate values of ̅vs (average shear velocity). Site coefficients are recommended to ensure consistency with ASCE/SEI 7-10 MCER (Maximum Considered Earthquake) seismic-design maps and simplified site-specific design spectra procedures requiring site classes with associated tabulated site coefficients and a reference site class with unity site coefficients. Recommended site coefficients are confirmed by independent observations of average site amplification coefficients inferred with respect to an average ground condition consistent with that used for the MCER maps. The NGA coefficients recommended for consideration are implied directly by the NGA GMPEs and do not require introduction of additional models.

  3. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  4. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  5. Code System to Calculate Correlation & Regression Coefficients.

    1999-11-23

    Version 00 PCC/SRC is designed for use in conjunction with sensitivity analyses of complex computer models. PCC/SRC calculates the partial correlation coefficients (PCC) and the standardized regression coefficients (SRC) from the multivariate input to, and output from, a computer model.

  6. Transect based analysis versus area based analysis to quantify shoreline displacement: spatial resolution issues.

    PubMed

    Anfuso, Giorgio; Bowman, Dan; Danese, Chiara; Pranzini, Enzo

    2016-10-01

    Field surveys, aerial photographs, and satellite images are the most commonly employed sources of data to analyze shoreline position, which are further compared by area based analysis (ABA) or transect based analysis (TBA) methods. The former is performed by computing the mean shoreline displacement for the identified coastal segments, i.e., dividing the beach area variation by the segment length; the latter is based on the measurement of the distance between each shoreline at set points along transects. The present study compares, by means of GIS tools, the ABA and TBA methods by computing shoreline displacements recorded on two stretches of the Tuscany coast (Italy): the beaches of Punta Ala, a linear coast without shore protection structures, and the one at Follonica, which is irregular due to the presence of groins and detached breakwaters. Surveys were carried out using a differential global positioning system (DGPS) in RTK mode. For each site, a 4800-m-long coastal segment was analyzed and divided into ninety-six 50-m-long sectors for which changes were computed using both the ABA and TBA methods. Sectors were progressively joined to have a length of 100, 200, 400, and 800 m to examine how this influenced results. ABA and TBA results are highly correlated for transect distance and sector length up to 100 m at both investigated locations. If longer transects are considered, the two methods still produce good correlated data on the smooth shoreline (i.e. at Punta Ala), but correlation became significantly lower on the irregular shoreline (i.e., at Follonica). PMID:27640163

  7. An agreement coefficient for image comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Gallo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Combination of datasets acquired from different sensor systems is necessary to construct a long time-series dataset for remotely sensed land-surface variables. Assessment of the agreement of the data derived from various sources is an important issue in understanding the data continuity through the time-series. Some traditional measures, including correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and root mean square error, are not always optimal for evaluating the data agreement. For this reason, we developed a new agreement coefficient for comparing two different images. The agreement coefficient has the following properties: non-dimensional, bounded, symmetric, and distinguishable between systematic and unsystematic differences. The paper provides examples of agreement analyses for hypothetical data and actual remotely sensed data. The results demonstrate that the agreement coefficient does include the above properties, and therefore is a useful tool for image comparison. ?? 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  8. Estimating Tortuosity Coefficients Based on Hydraulic Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Grant R; McBean, Edward A; Feenstra, Stan

    2016-07-01

    While the tortuosity coefficient is commonly estimated using an expression based on total porosity, this relationship is demonstrated to not be applicable (and thus is often misapplied) over a broad range of soil textures. The fundamental basis for a correlation between the apparent diffusion tortuosity coefficient and hydraulic conductivity is demonstrated, although such a relationship is not typically considered. An empirical regression for estimating the tortuosity coefficient based on hydraulic conductivity for saturated, unconsolidated soil is derived based on results from 14 previously reported diffusion experiments performed with a broad range of soil textures. Analyses of these experimental results confirm that total porosity is a poor predictor for the tortuosity coefficient over a large range of soil textures. The apparent diffusion tortuosity coefficient is more reliably estimated based on hydraulic conductivity. PMID:27315019

  9. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  10. Spreading coefficients of aliphatic hydrocarbons on water

    SciTech Connect

    Takii, Taichi; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the equilibrium spreading coefficients of some aliphatic hydrocarbons (C[sub 6]C[sub 10]) on water. The thickness of a discrete lens of each hydrocarbon sample floating on a stagnant water pool was measured interferometrically and used to calculate the spreading coefficient of the hydrocarbon with the aid of Langmuir's capillarity theory. The dependences of the spreading coefficient, thus observed, on temperature (0--50 C) and on the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule are in qualitative agreement with the predictions based on the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces.

  11. Statistical Methods with Varying Coefficient Models

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Zhang, Wenyang

    2008-01-01

    The varying coefficient models are very important tool to explore the dynamic pattern in many scientific areas, such as economics, finance, politics, epidemiology, medical science, ecology and so on. They are natural extensions of classical parametric models with good interpretability and are becoming more and more popular in data analysis. Thanks to their flexibility and interpretability, in the past ten years, the varying coefficient models have experienced deep and exciting developments on methodological, theoretical and applied sides. This paper gives a selective overview on the major methodological and theoretical developments on the varying coefficient models. PMID:18978950

  12. Inferences on the common coefficient of variation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lili

    2005-07-30

    The coefficient of variation is often used as a measure of precision and reproducibility of data in medical and biological science. This paper considers the problem of making inference about the common population coefficient of variation when it is a priori suspected that several independent samples are from populations with a common coefficient of variation. The procedures for confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing are developed based on the concepts of generalized variables. The coverage properties of the proposed confidence intervals and type-I errors of the proposed tests are evaluated by simulation. The proposed methods are illustrated by a real life example.

  13. Measuring optical temperature coefficients of Intralipid.

    PubMed

    McGlone, V Andrew; Martinsen, Paul; Künnemeyer, Rainer; Jordan, Bob; Cletus, Biju

    2007-05-01

    The temperature sensitivities of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the range 700-1000 nm are determined for the liquid phantom Intralipid using spatially resolved continuous wave measurements. The measurements were conducted on a 10 L heated volume of 1% Intralipid subjected to a 40-30 degrees C cooling regime. The temperature sensitivities of the absorbance coefficients are similar to that expected for pure water. However, the reduced scattering coefficients are more sensitive than can be explained by temperature related density changes, and show an unexpected relationship with wavelength. We have also found that temperature perturbations provide a useful means to evaluate instrument model performance. PMID:17440240

  14. On the emission coefficient of uranium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range from 1200 to 6000 A. The results were compared to theoretical calculations and other measurements. Reasonable agreement between theoretical predictions and our measurements was found in the region from 1200 to 2000 A. Although it was difficult to make absolute comparisons among the different reported measurements, considerable disagreement was found for the higher wavelength region. A short discussion regarding the overall comparisons is given, and final suggestions are made as to the most appropriate emission coefficient values to be used in future design calculations. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also reported.

  15. A dose of realism for healthy urban policy: lessons from area-based initiatives in the UK.

    PubMed

    Thomson, H

    2008-10-01

    Many urban policies aim to improve areas and address socioeconomic deprivation. The resulting investment is often delivered through area-based programmes which incorporate initiatives to improve the physical, social and economic environment. Hypotheses that these investments can contribute to wider public health strategies are based on epidemiological data and used to support the concept of healthy urban policy. However, there is little evidence on their ability to generate positive impacts on socioeconomic or health outcomes. The lack of validating evidence on actual impacts raises two important questions: (1) Is area-based investment an effective strategy to tackle socioeconomic deprivation? (2) What is the prospect for new and improved evaluations to provide stronger evidence? Both the programmes of area investment and their accompanying evaluations have been criticised for being overly ambitious in what can be achieved by the investment and what can be measured by an evaluation. Area-based approaches to tackling deprivation have their advantages but a mix of area and individual-level targeting is likely to be needed. While there is scope to improve the utility of evaluation data there are also inevitable constraints on assessing and attributing impacts from urban investment. The inherent limitations to an area-based approach and the ongoing constraints on impact evaluation will inevitably temper expectations of what healthy urban policy can achieve. However, lack of evidence is not grounds to abandon the concept of healthy urban policy; adoption of more realistic expectations together with improved evaluation data may help to increase its credibility.

  16. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    PubMed

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  17. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  18. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  19. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  20. Universal relations of transport coefficients from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cherman, Aleksey; Nellore, Abhinav

    2009-09-15

    We show that there are universal high-temperature relations for transport coefficients of plasmas described by a wide class of field theories with gravity duals. These theories can be viewed as strongly coupled large-N{sub c} conformal field theories deformed by one or more relevant operators. The transport coefficients we study are the speed of sound and bulk viscosity, as well as the conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and charge susceptibility of probe U(1) charges. We show that the sound bound v{sub s}{sup 2}{<=}1/3 is satisfied at high temperatures in these theories and also discuss bounds on the diffusion coefficient, the conductivity, and the bulk viscosity.

  1. String & Sticky Tape Experiments: Coefficient of Restitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Described is an experiment for measuring the coefficient of restitution with a meter stick, balls of different types, and scraps of material for the plates. Provides the experimental procedure and an apparatus diagram. (YP)

  2. [Spatial-temporal characteristics of land surface temperature in Tianshan Mountains area based on MODIS data].

    PubMed

    Guan, Yan-long; Wang, Rang-hui; Li, Cheng; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Jian-ping

    2015-03-01

    Based on the MODIS/MOD11A2 data from 2001 to 2013, this paper researched the characteristics of land surface temperature (LST) of Tianshan Mountains area. The results indicated that the average of LST in the study area was 1.73 °C , and LST was much higher in the east than in the west. The inter-annual variation range of LST in the northwest was significantly large than in other regions, with the largest above 0.55 °C in some areas. The LST tended to slowly increase with time, and the increase rate was 0.147 °C . a-1. It showed a significant seasonal difference, and the fluctuation of winter was significantly larger than in other seasons with the coefficient of variation reaching 12.7%. The LST difference of day time was greater than that at night, and that in summer was greater than in other seasons. The LST differed with land use types, and the fitted results were inconsistent between the LST and NDVI. With the increase of NDVI of woodland and grassland, the LST decreased dramatically. The LST of construction land and cropland under the influence of human activities had higher sensitivity with NDVI than other land types. PMID:26211048

  3. On computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, I. A.; Vinnikov, E. L.

    The algorithm of computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives is proposed with application of recurrent relations. The A.G.M.-method is used for the calculation of values L0(0), L0(1). The FORTRAN-program corresponding to the algorithm is given. The precision control was provided with numerical integrating by Simpsons method. The behavior of Laplace's coefficients and their third derivatives whith varying indices K, n for fixed values of the α-parameter is presented graphically.

  4. Imaging Ground Motions in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Based on MeSO-net Using Lasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusako, S.; Nagao, H.; Kano, M.; Hirose, K.; Hori, M.

    2014-12-01

    A rapid prediction of damage to structures due to a large earthquake is important to prevent secondary disasters. Ground motion at the base of each construction to be input to a numerical simulation is to be estimated from seismograms. An accurate damage prediction requires such ground motions with spatially-high resolution although the seismometers much sparsely distribute comparing with the required resolution. We have been developing a procedure based on sparse modeling to image the ground motions from seismic array data. Our target is the Tokyo metropolitan area of Japan, in which the seismic array "MeSO-net" (Metropolitan Seismic Observation network) is in operation. Mizusako[2013, graduation thesis] applied an algorithm based on the Taylor expansion to MeSO-net data when the Earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku occurred on March 11, 2011. This method was found to never account for ground motions in frequencies higher than 0.15Hz, which was insufficient taking into consideration that the typical eigenfrequency of a construction is usually between 1-10Hz. Moreover, this method requires a priori assumed truncation order in differential and groups of observatories called "cluster", in order to determine the unknown partial differential coefficients. Mizusako[2013] suggested that the truncation order was one and each cluster included five nearest observatories. We propose a new algorithm using lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, Tibshirani[1996]) in order to obtain an image of spatially-high-resolution ground motions objectively determining the truncation differential order and clusters. The truncation order for a given cluster is automatically determined by lasso owing to the L1-norm regularization, and an appropriate cluster is selected based on an information criterion. Our initial result indicates that the ground motion determined by using the information criterion EBIC (Chen and Chen[2008]) is successfully reproduced in frequencies

  5. [Simulation of water and carbon fluxes in harvard forest area based on data assimilation method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting-Long; Sun, Rui; Zhang, Rong-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Model simulation and in situ observation are the two most important means in studying the water and carbon cycles of terrestrial ecosystems, but have their own advantages and shortcomings. To combine these two means would help to reflect the dynamic changes of ecosystem water and carbon fluxes more accurately. Data assimilation provides an effective way to integrate the model simulation and in situ observation. Based on the observation data from the Harvard Forest Environmental Monitoring Site (EMS), and by using ensemble Kalman Filter algorithm, this paper assimilated the field measured LAI and remote sensing LAI into the Biome-BGC model to simulate the water and carbon fluxes in Harvard forest area. As compared with the original model simulated without data assimilation, the improved Biome-BGC model with the assimilation of the field measured LAI in 1998, 1999, and 2006 increased the coefficient of determination R2 between model simulation and flux observation for the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and evapotranspiration by 8.4% and 10.6%, decreased the sum of absolute error (SAE) and root mean square error (RMSE) of NEE by 17.7% and 21.2%, and decreased the SAE and RMSE of the evapotranspiration by 26. 8% and 28.3%, respectively. After assimilated the MODIS LAI products of 2000-2004 into the improved Biome-BGC model, the R2 between simulated and observed results of NEE and evapotranspiration was increased by 7.8% and 4.7%, the SAE and RMSE of NEE were decreased by 21.9% and 26.3%, and the SAE and RMSE of evapotranspiration were decreased by 24.5% and 25.5%, respectively. It was suggested that the simulation accuracy of ecosystem water and carbon fluxes could be effectively improved if the field measured LAI or remote sensing LAI was integrated into the model.

  6. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  7. Temporal correlation coefficient for directed networks.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies dealing with network theory focused mainly on the static aggregation of edges over specific time window lengths. Thus, most of the dynamic information gets lost. To assess the quality of such a static aggregation the temporal correlation coefficient can be calculated. It measures the overall possibility for an edge to persist between two consecutive snapshots. Up to now, this measure is only defined for undirected networks. Therefore, we introduce the adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient to directed networks. This new methodology enables the distinction between ingoing and outgoing edges. Besides a small example network presenting the single calculation steps, we also calculated the proposed measurements for a real pig trade network to emphasize the importance of considering the edge direction. The farm types at the beginning of the pork supply chain showed clearly higher values for the outgoing temporal correlation coefficient compared to the farm types at the end of the pork supply chain. These farm types showed higher values for the ingoing temporal correlation coefficient. The temporal correlation coefficient is a valuable tool to understand the structural dynamics of these systems, as it assesses the consistency of the edge configuration. The adaption of this measure for directed networks may help to preserve meaningful additional information about the investigated network that might get lost if the edge directions are ignored. PMID:27516936

  8. Extinction coefficient determination using target reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Smith, R B; Carswell, A L; Ulitsky, A; Houston, J D

    1989-10-01

    Laboratory measurements are reported for optical extinction at a wavelength of 1.06 microm in water droplet clouds. The extinction coefficient, sigma(T), is determined using the two-way attenuation of a target reflected signal and comparing it to the extinction coefficient sigma determined by a single-pass transmission measurement. As well as solid targets, layers of the clouds have been used as a reflector by employing a selective chopping method to provide range-resolved backscattering information and replicate in the laboratory a lidar configu-ration. It is found that multiple scattering can lead to substantial differences between sigma(T) and sigma and that these differences depend upon the properties of the scattering medium and the target as well as on the field of view of the backscatter receiver used for the reflectance measurements. By keeping the field of view very small, the two methods of measuring the extinction coefficient give the same values.

  9. Virial expansion coefficients in the harmonic approximation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J R; Zinner, N T; Fedorov, D V; Jensen, A S

    2012-08-01

    The virial expansion method is applied within a harmonic approximation to an interacting N-body system of identical fermions. We compute the canonical partition functions for two and three particles to get the two lowest orders in the expansion. The energy spectrum is carefully interpolated to reproduce ground-state properties at low temperature and the noninteracting high-temperature limit of constant virial coefficients. This resembles the smearing of shell effects in finite systems with increasing temperature. Numerical results are discussed for the second and third virial coefficients as functions of dimension, temperature, interaction, and transition temperature between low- and high-energy limits. PMID:23005730

  10. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  11. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  12. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  13. Brownian friction coefficient of Kr/graphite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, R.

    1998-03-01

    Calculations of the Brownian friction coefficient of fluid Kr/graphite are described. The phonon frequencies and polarization vectors are calculated for a thick graphite slab using the Benedek-Onida bond charge model(G. Benedek and G. Onida, Phys. Rev. B 47), 16471 (1993). The fluctuating forces on the adatom from the substrate are expressed in terms of the graphite fluctuation spectrum. The friction coefficient is expressed in terms of a spectral density to be derived from the slab calculations. The relation of the results to diffusive processes in monolayer fluids(F. Y. Hansen, L. W. Bruch, and H. Taub, Phys. Rev. B 54), 14077 (1996). is discussed.

  14. Develop and test a solvent accessible surface area-based model in conformational entropy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-05-25

    It is of great interest in modern drug design to accurately calculate the free energies of protein-ligand or nucleic acid-ligand binding. MM-PBSA (molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area) and MM-GBSA (molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area) have gained popularity in this field. For both methods, the conformational entropy, which is usually calculated through normal-mode analysis (NMA), is needed to calculate the absolute binding free energies. Unfortunately, NMA is computationally demanding and becomes a bottleneck of the MM-PB/GBSA-NMA methods. In this work, we have developed a fast approach to estimate the conformational entropy based upon solvent accessible surface area calculations. In our approach, the conformational entropy of a molecule, S, can be obtained by summing up the contributions of all atoms, no matter they are buried or exposed. Each atom has two types of surface areas, solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and buried SAS (BSAS). The two types of surface areas are weighted to estimate the contribution of an atom to S. Atoms having the same atom type share the same weight and a general parameter k is applied to balance the contributions of the two types of surface areas. This entropy model was parametrized using a large set of small molecules for which their conformational entropies were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G* level taking the solvent effect into account. The weighted solvent accessible surface area (WSAS) model was extensively evaluated in three tests. For convenience, TS values, the product of temperature T and conformational entropy S, were calculated in those tests. T was always set to 298.15 K through the text. First of all, good correlations were achieved between WSAS TS and NMA TS for 44 protein or nucleic acid systems sampled with molecular dynamics simulations (10 snapshots were collected for postentropy calculations): the mean correlation coefficient squares (R²) was 0.56. As to the 20 complexes, the TS

  15. Extending the Constant Coefficient Solution Technique to Variable Coefficient Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Ahmed; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a class of second-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with variable coefficients whose closed-form solutions can be obtained by the same method used to solve ODEs with constant coefficients. General solutions for the homogeneous case are discussed.

  16. Molecular Diffusion Coefficients: Experimental Determination and Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fate, Gwendolyn; Lynn, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are laboratory methods which allow the demonstration and determination of the diffusion coefficients of compounds ranging in size from water to small proteins. Included are the procedures involving the use of a spectrometer, UV cell, triterated agar, and oxygen diffusion. Results including quantification are described. (CW)

  17. Measurement of Coefficient of Restitution Made Easy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple activity that permits students to determine the coefficient of restitution of bouncing balls using only a stopwatch, a metre stick and graphical analysis. The experiment emphasizes that simple models, in combination with careful attention to how students make measurements, can lead to good results in a straightforward way.

  18. Pressure viscosity coefficient of vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) pressure viscosity coefficient (PVC) of ten vegetable oils from commodity and new crops, and two petroleum-based oils, polyalphaolefin (PAO) and hexadecane, were investigated. PVC was measured using three different methods: the So and Klaus (S-K) procedure from oil visco...

  19. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  20. Bitplane Image Coding With Parallel Coefficient Processing.

    PubMed

    Auli-Llinas, Francesc; Enfedaque, Pablo; Moure, Juan C; Sanchez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Image coding systems have been traditionally tailored for multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computing. In general, they partition the (transformed) image in codeblocks that can be coded in the cores of MIMD-based processors. Each core executes a sequential flow of instructions to process the coefficients in the codeblock, independently and asynchronously from the others cores. Bitplane coding is a common strategy to code such data. Most of its mechanisms require sequential processing of the coefficients. The last years have seen the upraising of processing accelerators with enhanced computational performance and power efficiency whose architecture is mainly based on the single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) principle. SIMD computing refers to the execution of the same instruction to multiple data in a lockstep synchronous way. Unfortunately, current bitplane coding strategies cannot fully profit from such processors due to inherently sequential coding task. This paper presents bitplane image coding with parallel coefficient (BPC-PaCo) processing, a coding method that can process many coefficients within a codeblock in parallel and synchronously. To this end, the scanning order, the context formation, the probability model, and the arithmetic coder of the coding engine have been re-formulated. The experimental results suggest that the penalization in coding performance of BPC-PaCo with respect to the traditional strategies is almost negligible.

  1. Coefficient of variation of underwater irradiance fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, V. L.

    2010-06-01

    We consider underwater sunlight fluctuations in the case of a one-dimensional irregular sea surface. Several rigorous and approximate models are proposed, which make it possible to analytically treat and physically explain the dependence of the coefficient of variation of the underwater irradiance on the depth, the wind velocity, and optical parameters of the sea water.

  2. Determination of sedimentation coefficients for small peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, P; MacPhee, C E; Howlett, G J

    1998-01-01

    Direct fitting of sedimentation velocity data with numerical solutions of the Lamm equations has been exploited to obtain sedimentation coefficients for single solutes under conditions where solvent and solution plateaus are either not available or are transient. The calculated evolution was initialized with the first experimental scan and nonlinear regression was employed to obtain best-fit values for the sedimentation and diffusion coefficients. General properties of the Lamm equations as data analysis tools were examined. This method was applied to study a set of small peptides containing amphipathic heptad repeats with the general structure Ac-YS-(AKEAAKE)nGAR-NH2, n = 2, 3, or 4. Sedimentation velocity analysis indicated single sedimenting species with sedimentation coefficients (s(20,w) values) of 0.37, 0.45, and 0.52 S, respectively, in good agreement with sedimentation coefficients predicted by hydrodynamic theory. The described approach can be applied to synthetic boundary and conventional loading experiments, and can be extended to analyze sedimentation data for both large and small macromolecules in order to define shape, heterogeneity, and state of association. PMID:9449347

  3. Rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence has been advanced that the rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO right arrow N2 + O has a small positive temperature dependence at the high temperatures (900 to 1500 K) that prevail in the terrestrial middle and upper thermosphere by Siskind and Rusch (1992), and at the low temperatures (100 to 200 K) of the Martian lower thermosphere by Fox (1993). Assuming that the rate coefficient recommended by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory evaluation (DeMore et al., 1992) is accurate at 300 K, we derive here the low temperature value of the activation energy for this reaction and thus the rate coefficient that best fits the Viking 1 measured NO densities. We find that the fit is acceptable for a rate coefficient of about 1.3 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-400/T) and better for a value of about 2.5 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-600/T)cu cm/s.

  4. A Graphical Interpretation of Probit Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William E.; Waldman, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    Contends that, when discrete choice models are taught, particularly the probit model, it is the method rather than the interpretation of the results that is emphasized. This article provides a graphical technique for interpretation of an estimated probit coefficient that will be useful in statistics and econometrics courses. (GG)

  5. Experimental Influence Coefficients and Vibration Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, Deene J.; Kordes, Eldon E.

    1959-01-01

    Test results are presented for both symmetrical and antisymmetrical static loading of a wing model mounted on a three-point support system. The first six free-free vibration modes were determined experimentally. A comparison is made of the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies with the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies calculated from the experimental influence coefficients.

  6. Microcomputer Listens to the Coefficient of Restitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a procedure for determining the coefficient of restitution using a microcomputer which collects and sends data to a large computer where analysis is done and graphical output is generated. The data collection hardware and software are described, and results are illustrated. (Author/SK)

  7. The Seebeck coefficient of superionic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2015-01-28

    We present a theory of the anomalous Seebeck coefficient found in the superionic conductor Cu{sub 2}Se. It has a phase transition at T = 400 K where the cations disorder but the anions do not. This disorder gives a temperature-dependent width to the electronic states in the conduction band. This width provides the anomalous Seebeck contribution.

  8. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  9. Computer programs for the concordance correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sara B; Kosinski, Andrzej S; Lin, Hung-Mo; Williamson, John M; Barnhart, Huiman X

    2007-10-01

    The CCC macro is presented for computation of the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), a common measure of reproducibility. The macro has been produced in both SAS and R, and a detailed presentation of the macro input and output for the SAS program is included. The macro provides estimation of three versions of the CCC, as presented by Lin [L.I.-K. Lin, A concordance correlation coefficient to evaluate reproducibility, Biometrics 45 (1989) 255-268], Barnhart et al. [H.X. Barnhart, J.L. Haber, J.L. Song, Overall concordance correlation coefficient for evaluating agreement among multiple observers, Biometrics 58 (2002) 1020-1027], and Williamson et al. [J.M. Williamson, S.B. Crawford, H.M. Lin, Resampling dependent concordance correlation coefficients, J. Biopharm. Stat. 17 (2007) 685-696]. It also provides bootstrap confidence intervals for the CCC, as well as for the difference in CCCs for both independent and dependent samples. The macro is designed for balanced data only. Detailed explanation of the involved computations and macro variable definitions are provided in the text. Two biomedical examples are included to illustrate that the macro can be easily implemented.

  10. Phosphorus Availability Coefficients from Various Organic Sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine Phosphorus Availability Coefficients (PACs) for a variety of organic phosphorus (P) sources, and to examine the relationship between PACs measured in simulated rainfall runoff and alternative soil incubations. PAC is an important parameter in the P-Ind...

  11. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  12. Recursive Construction of Operator Product Expansion Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Jan; Hollands, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    We derive a novel formula for the derivative of operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients with respect to a coupling constant. The formula involves just the OPE coefficients themselves but no further input, and is in this sense self-consistent. Furthermore, unlike other formal identities of this general nature in quantum field theory (such as the formal expression for the Lagrangian perturbation of a correlation function), our formula requires no further UV-renormalization, i.e., it is completely well-defined from the start. This feature is a result of a cancelation of UV- and IR-divergences between various terms in our identity. Our proof, and an analysis of the features of the identity, is given for the example of massive, Euclidean theory in 4 dimensional Euclidean space. It relies on the renormalization group flow equation method and is valid to arbitrary, but finite orders in perturbation theory. The final formula, however, makes neither explicit reference to the renormalization group flow, nor to perturbation theory, and we conjecture that it also holds non-perturbatively. Our identity can be applied constructively because it gives a novel recursive algorithm for the computation of OPE coefficients to arbitrary (finite) perturbation order in terms of the zeroth order coefficients corresponding to the underlying free field theory, which in turn are trivial to obtain. We briefly illustrate the relation of this method to more standard methods for computing the OPE in some simple examples.

  13. Develop and Test a Solvent Accessible Surface Area-Based Model in Conformational Entropy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-01-01

    It is of great interest in modern drug design to accurately calculate the free energies of protein-ligand or nucleic acid-ligand binding. MM-PBSA (Molecular Mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area) and MM-GBSA (Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area) have gained popularity in this field. For both methods, the conformational entropy, which is usually calculated through normal mode analysis (NMA), is needed to calculate the absolute binding free energies. Unfortunately, NMA is computationally demanding and becomes a bottleneck of the MM-PB/GBSA-NMA methods. In this work, we have developed a fast approach to estimate the conformational entropy based upon solvent accessible surface area calculations. In our approach, the conformational entropy of a molecule, S, can be obtained by summing up the contributions of all atoms, no matter they are buried or exposed. Each atom has two types of surface areas, solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and buried SAS (BSAS). The two types of surface areas are weighted to estimate the contribution of an atom to S. Atoms having the same atom type share the same weight and a general parameter k is applied to balance the contributions of the two types of surface areas. This entropy model was parameterized using a large set of small molecules for which their conformational entropies were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G* level taking the solvent effect into account. The weighted solvent accessible surface area (WSAS) model was extensively evaluated in three tests. For the convenience, TS, the product of temperature T and conformational entropy S, were calculated in those tests. T was always set to 298.15 K through the text. First of all, good correlations were achieved between WSAS TS and NMA TS for 44 protein or nucleic acid systems sampled with molecular dynamics simulations (10 snapshots were collected for post-entropy calculations): the mean correlation coefficient squares (R2) was 0.56. As to the 20 complexes, the TS changes

  14. Series extension: predicting approximate series coefficients from a finite number of exact coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.

    2016-10-01

    Given the first 20-100 coefficients of a typical generating function of the type that arises in many problems of statistical mechanics or enumerative combinatorics, we show that the method of differential approximants performs surprisingly well in predicting (approximately) subsequent coefficients. These can then be used by the ratio method to obtain improved estimates of critical parameters. In favourable cases, given only the first 20 coefficients, the next 100 coefficients are predicted with useful accuracy. More surprisingly, this is also the case when the method of differential approximants does not do a useful job in estimating the critical parameters, such as those cases in which one has stretched exponential asymptotic behaviour. Nevertheless, the coefficients are predicted with surprising accuracy. As one consequence, significant computer time can be saved in enumeration problems where several runs would normally be made, modulo different primes, and the coefficients constructed from their values modulo different primes. Another is in the checking of newly calculated coefficients. We believe that this concept of approximate series extension opens up a whole new chapter in the method of series analysis.

  15. An assessment of coefficient accuracy in linear regression models with spatially varying coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, David C.; Calder, Catherine A.

    2007-06-01

    The realization in the statistical and geographical sciences that a relationship between an explanatory variable and a response variable in a linear regression model is not always constant across a study area has led to the development of regression models that allow for spatially varying coefficients. Two competing models of this type are geographically weighted regression (GWR) and Bayesian regression models with spatially varying coefficient processes (SVCP). In the application of these spatially varying coefficient models, marginal inference on the regression coefficient spatial processes is typically of primary interest. In light of this fact, there is a need to assess the validity of such marginal inferences, since these inferences may be misleading in the presence of explanatory variable collinearity. In this paper, we present the results of a simulation study designed to evaluate the sensitivity of the spatially varying coefficients in the competing models to various levels of collinearity. The simulation study results show that the Bayesian regression model produces more accurate inferences on the regression coefficients than does GWR. In addition, the Bayesian regression model is overall fairly robust in terms of marginal coefficient inference to moderate levels of collinearity, and degrades less substantially than GWR with strong collinearity.

  16. Yield Coefficient for Surface Penning Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, G. H.; Asbury, M. J.; Davis, R. A.; Ingram, L. A.; Shepard, G. G.; Zich, R.

    2000-06-01

    Surface Penning Ionization (SPI) occurs when a metastable atom strikes a surface. The yield coefficient γ is defined as the probability of electron ejection per collision with the surface. Knowledge of γ is important in modeling rare gas discharges, in which Penning ionization is an important source of charged particles, especially at the confining surfaces, which may be some distance from the active discharge. We present experimental data and Monte Carlo calculations to extract the yield coefficient for helium metastable atoms on chemically-cleaned copper. The experiment involves measuring the ejected electron current from a pair of fine copper meshes placed in the flowtube of a flowing afterglow apparatus. The downstream mesh is closely spaced and destroys all metastable atoms that reach it. The fraction of metastables surviving the upstream mesh is used in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulations, which give the average number of metastable/mesh collision, to yield a robust value of γ.

  17. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  18. Activity coefficient of aqueous sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.; Peiper, J. Christopher

    1980-09-01

    The determination of the activity coefficient and related properties of sodium bicarbonate presents special problems because of the appreciable vapor pressure of CO2 above such solutions. With the development of reliable equations for the thermodynamic properties of mixed electrolytes, it is possible to determine the parameters for NaHCO3 from cell measurements or NaCl-NaHCO3 mixtures. Literature data are analyzed to illustrate the method and provide interim values, hoever it is noted that further measurements over a wider range of concentrations would yield more definitive results. Lastly, an estimate is also given for the activity coefficient of KHCO3.

  19. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  20. THE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF CRYSTALLINE TRYPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Scherp, Henry W.

    1933-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of crystalline trypsin in 0.5 saturated magnesium sulfate at 5°C. is 0.020 ±0.001 cm.2 per day, corresponding to a molecular radius of 2.6 x 10–7 cm. The rate of diffusion of the proteolytic activity is the same as that of the protein nitrogen, indicating that these two properties are held together in chemical combination and not in the form of an adsorption complex. PMID:19872740

  1. Understanding correlation coefficients in treaty verification. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-02-01

    When a pair of images is compared on a point-by-point basis, the linear-correlation coefficient is usually used as a measure of similarity or dissimilarity. This report evaluates the theoretical underpinnings and limitations of the linear-correlation coefficient, as well as other related statistics, particularly for cases where inherent white noise is present. As a result of the limitations in linear-correlation, an additional step has been derived -- local-sum clustering -- in order to improve recognition of small dissimilarities in a pair of otherwise identical images. Results show an optimal three-stage procedure: first, establish congruence of the two images; second, use the linear-correlation coefficient as a test of true negatives; and, third, qualify a true positive by using the cluster (local-sum) method. These three algorithmic stages would be especially useful in application to arms control treaty verification, particularly for comparison of unique identifiers (tags or seals). This is illustrated by comparing scanning-electron microscope topographical images for an intrinsic-surface tag.

  2. Stratospheric eddy diffusion coefficients from tracer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Hunten, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Global distributions of nitrous oxide, methane, ozone, and carbon 14 are used to estimate four sets of stratospheric eddy diffusion coefficients. A photochemical equilibrium model calculates O(3P), O(1D), H, HO2, OH, H2O2, NO, and NO2 densities, as a function of altitude, latitude, and time. The calculated O(1D), OH, and observed Cl densities are used to obtain the eddy profiles associated with the methane and nitrous oxide distributions, for altitudes between 10 and 40 km. Application of a constant flux condition to the seasonally averaged ozone data yields eddy values below 20 km. Time-dependent carbon 14 calculations produce eddy coefficients between 13 and 27 km. A composite profile is obtained by comparing the four sets of coefficients. Further, carbon 14 computations are used to test these profiles as well as those recommended in reports issued by the National Academy of Sciences in 1976 and 1979. The composite eddy profile produces the best agreement.

  3. The electron diffusion coefficient in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T.; Northrop, T.; Baxter, R.; Hess, W.; Lojko, M.

    1974-01-01

    A steady-state model of Jupiter's electron radiation belt is developed. The model includes injection from the solar wind, radial diffusion, energy degradation by synchrotron radiation, and absorption at Jupiter's surface. A diffusion coefficient of the form D sub RR/R sub J squared = k times R to the m-th power is assumed, and then observed data on synchrotron radiation are used to fit the model. The free parameters determined from this fit are m = 1.95 plus or minus 0.5, k = 1.7 plus or minus 0.5 x 10 to the 9th power per sec, and the magnetic moment of injected particles equals 770 plus or minus 300 MeV/G. The value of m shows quite clearly that the diffusion is not caused by magnetic pumping by a variable solar wind or by a fluctuating convection electric field. The process might be field line exchange driven by atmospheric-ionospheric winds; our diffusion coefficient has roughly the same radial dependence but is considerably smaller in magnitude than the upper bound diffusion coefficients recently suggested for this process by Brice and McDonough (1973) and Jacques and Davis (1972).

  4. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

           n in which V = mean cross-sectional velocity of flow, in feet per second; R = hydraulic radius at a cross section, which is the cross-sectional area divided by the wetter perimeter, in feet; Se = energy slope; and n = coefficient of roughness. Many research studies have been made to determine "n" values for open-channel flow (Carter and others, 1963). Guidelines for selecting coefficient of roughness for stream channels are given in most of the literature of stream-channel hydraulics, but few of the data relate directly to streams of Arizona, The U.S> Geological Survey, at the request of the Arizona Highway Department, assembled the color photographs and tables of the Manning "n" values in this report to aid highway engineers in the selection of roughness coefficients for Arizona streams. Most of the photographs show channel reaches for which values of "n" have been assigned by experienced Survey personnel; a few photographs are included for reaches where "n" values have been verified. Verified "n" values are computed from a known discharge and measured channel geometry. Selected photographs of stream channels for which "n" values have been verified are included in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1849 (Barnes, 1967); stereoscopic slides of Barnes' (1967) photographs and additional photographs can be inspected at U.S> Geological Survey offices in: 2555 E. First Street, Tucson; and 5017 Federal Building, 230 N. First Avenue, Phoenix.

  5. Dependence of the osmotic coefficients and average ionic activity coefficients on hydrophobic hydration in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergievskii, V. V.; Rudakov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The model that considers the nonideality of aqueous solutions of electrolytes with allowance for independent contributions of hydration of ions of various types and electrostatic interactions was substantiated using the cluster ion model. The empirical parameters in the model equations were found to be the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions in the standard state and the dispersion of their distribution over the stoichiometric coefficients. A mathematically adequate description of the concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients and average ion activity coefficients of electrolytes was given for several systems. The difference in the rate of the decrease in the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions leads to extremum concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients, which were determined by other authors from isopiestic data for many electrolytes and did not find explanation.

  6. Spatializing Area-Based Measures of Neighborhood Characteristics for Multilevel Regression Analyses: An Areal Median Filtering Approach.

    PubMed

    Oka, Masayoshi; Wong, David W S

    2016-06-01

    Area-based measures of neighborhood characteristics simply derived from enumeration units (e.g., census tracts or block groups) ignore the potential of spatial spillover effects, and thus incorporating such measures into multilevel regression models may underestimate the neighborhood effects on health. To overcome this limitation, we describe the concept and method of areal median filtering to spatialize area-based measures of neighborhood characteristics for multilevel regression analyses. The areal median filtering approach provides a means to specify or formulate "neighborhoods" as meaningful geographic entities by removing enumeration unit boundaries as the absolute barriers and by pooling information from the neighboring enumeration units. This spatializing process takes into account for the potential of spatial spillover effects and also converts aspatial measures of neighborhood characteristics into spatial measures. From a conceptual and methodological standpoint, incorporating the derived spatial measures into multilevel regression analyses allows us to more accurately examine the relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health. To promote and set the stage for informative research in the future, we provide a few important conceptual and methodological remarks, and discuss possible applications, inherent limitations, and practical solutions for using the areal median filtering approach in the study of neighborhood effects on health.

  7. New algorithm for constructing area-based index with geographical heterogeneities and variable selection: An application to gastric cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Yoneoka, Daisuke; Saito, Eiko; Nakaoka, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    To optimally allocate health resources, policy planners require an indicator reflecting the inequality. Currently, health inequalities are frequently measured by area-based indices. However, methodologies for constructing the indices have been hampered by two difficulties: 1) incorporating the geographical relationship into the model and 2) selecting appropriate variables from the high-dimensional census data. Here, we constructed a new area-based health coverage index using the geographical information and a variable selection procedure with the example of gastric cancer. We also characterized the geographical distribution of health inequality in Japan. To construct the index, we proposed a methodology of a geographically weighted logistic lasso model. We adopted a geographical kernel and selected the optimal bandwidth and the regularization parameters by a two-stage algorithm. Sensitivity was checked by correlation to several cancer mortalities/screening rates. Lastly, we mapped the current distribution of health inequality in Japan and detected unique predictors at sampled locations. The interquartile range of the index was 0.0001 to 0.354 (mean: 0.178, SD: 0.109). The selections from 91 candidate variables in Japanese census data showed regional heterogeneities (median number of selected variables: 29). Our index was more correlated to cancer mortalities/screening rates than previous index and revealed several geographical clusters with unique predictors. PMID:27215347

  8. Reference Phantom Method for Acoustic Backscatter Coefficient and Attenuation Coefficient Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linxin

    1990-08-01

    In previous work in our laboratory accurate backscatter coefficient measurements were obtained with a data reduction method that explicitly accounts for experimental factors involved in recording echo data. An alternative, relative processing method for determining the backscatter coefficient and the attenuation coefficient is presented here. This method involves comparison of echo data from a sample with data recorded from a reference phantom whose backscatter and attenuation coefficients are known. The ratio of the signals cancels depth-dependent instrumentation factors. This saves the efforts of beam profile computation and various calibrations. The attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient of the sample are found from these ratios and the known acoustic properties of the reference phantom. This method is tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms with known scattering and attenuation properties. Various experiments have been done using clinical scanners with different transducers to compute attenuation coefficients and backscatter coefficients, and to make quantitative images. This method has been found to be accurate for media containing Rayleigh scatterers, as well as samples containing intermediate-size scatterers. Accuracy was maintained over different frequency bands and for a wide range of transducer-to-ROI distances. Measurements were done in vivo for human livers, kidneys and dog myocardium. The results have shown that the reference phantom method simplifies the measurement procedure as well as keeps the accuracy, and therefore is practical clinically. Statistical uncertainties propagated in the data reduction have been analyzed in detail. Formulae are deduced to predict statistical errors in the attenuation and backscatter coefficients measured with the reference phantom method. Spatial correlations of the echo signals are also considered. A 2-dimensional lateral correlation matrix is introduced to compute the number of effective independent

  9. Computing confidence intervals for standardized regression coefficients.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2013-12-01

    With fixed predictors, the standard method (Cohen, Cohen, West, & Aiken, 2003, p. 86; Harris, 2001, p. 80; Hays, 1994, p. 709) for computing confidence intervals (CIs) for standardized regression coefficients fails to account for the sampling variability of the criterion standard deviation. With random predictors, this method also fails to account for the sampling variability of the predictor standard deviations. Nevertheless, under some conditions the standard method will produce CIs with accurate coverage rates. To delineate these conditions, we used a Monte Carlo simulation to compute empirical CI coverage rates in samples drawn from 36 populations with a wide range of data characteristics. We also computed the empirical CI coverage rates for 4 alternative methods that have been discussed in the literature: noncentrality interval estimation, the delta method, the percentile bootstrap, and the bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap. Our results showed that for many data-parameter configurations--for example, sample size, predictor correlations, coefficient of determination (R²), orientation of β with respect to the eigenvectors of the predictor correlation matrix, RX--the standard method produced coverage rates that were close to their expected values. However, when population R² was large and when β approached the last eigenvector of RX, then the standard method coverage rates were frequently below the nominal rate (sometimes by a considerable amount). In these conditions, the delta method and the 2 bootstrap procedures were consistently accurate. Results using noncentrality interval estimation were inconsistent. In light of these findings, we recommend that researchers use the delta method to evaluate the sampling variability of standardized regression coefficients.

  10. Transport coefficients of He(+) ions in helium.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Larry A; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R; Wright, Timothy G

    2016-02-21

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of (4)He(+) in (4)He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X(2)Σu (+) and A(2)Σg (+) states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of (4)He(+) in (4)He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects. PMID:26896985

  11. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  12. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  13. Micro-Fluidic Diffusion Coefficient Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, F.K.; Galambos, P.

    1998-10-06

    A new method for diffusion coefficient measurement applicable to micro-fluidics is pre- sented. The method Iltilizes an analytical model describing laminar dispersion in rect- anglllar ~llicro_channe]s. The Illethod ~vas verified throllgh measllremen~ of fllloresceill diffusivity in water and aqueolls polymer solutions of differing concentration. The diffll- sivity of flllorescein was measlmed as 0.64 x 10-gm2/s in water, 0.49 x 10-gm2/s in the 4 gm/dl dextran solution and 0.38 x 10-9n12/s in the 8 gnl/dl dextran solution.

  14. Studies of Gaseous Multiplication Coefficient in Isobutane

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Iara B.; Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Goncalves, Josemary A. C.; Botelho, Suzana; Bueno Tobias, Carmen C.; Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio

    2010-05-21

    This work presents the studies of gaseous multiplication coefficient behavior for isobutane, as function of the reduced electric field, by means of signal amplitude analysis. The experimental method used is based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which follows from Townsend equation solution for a uniform electric field. In our configuration, the anode is made of a high resistivity (2.10{sup 12} OMEGA.cm) glass, while the cathode is of aluminium. In order to validate the technique and to analyze effects of non-uniformity, results for nitrogen, which has well-established data available in literature, are also presented.

  15. Surface area coefficients for airship envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    In naval architecture, it is customary to determine the wetted surface of a ship by means of some formula which involves the principal dimensions of the design and suitable constants. These formulas of naval architecture may be extended and applied to the calculation of the surface area of airship envelopes by the use of new values of the constants determined for this purpose. Surface area coefficients were calculated from the actual dimensions, surfaces, and volumes of 52 streamline bodies, which form a series covering the entire range of shapes used in the present aeronautical practice.

  16. Gauge Invariance of Thermal Transport Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercole, Loris; Marcolongo, Aris; Umari, Paolo; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Thermal transport coefficients are independent of the specific microscopic expression for the energy density and current from which they can be derived through the Green-Kubo formula. We discuss this independence in terms of a kind of gauge invariance resulting from energy conservation and extensivity, and demonstrate it numerically for a Lennard-Jones fluid, where different forms of the microscopic energy density lead to different time correlation functions for the heat flux, all of them, however, resulting in the same value for the thermal conductivity.

  17. Modeling canopy reflectance and microwave backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S.

    1985-01-01

    Various approaches to model canopy reflectance (CR) in the visible/infrared region and backscattering coefficient (BSC) in the microwave region are compared and contrasted. It is noted that BSC can be related to CR in the source direction (the 'hot spot' direction). By assuming a frequency dependent leaf reflectance and transmittance it is shown that the observed dependence of BSC on leaf area index, leaf angle distribution, angle of incidence, soil moisture content, and frequency can be simulated by a CR model. Thus both BSC and CR can, in principle, be calculated using a single model which has essentially the same parameters as many CR models do.

  18. Elastic-Stiffness Coefficients of Titanium Diboride

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Hassel; Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-01-01

    Using resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, we measured the monocrystal elastic-stiffness coefficients, the Voigt Cij, of TiB2. With hexagonal symmetry, TiB2 exhibits five independent Cij: C11, C33, C44, C12, C13. Using Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging, we converted these monocrystal values to quasiisotropic (polycrystal) elastic stiffnesses. Briefly, we comment on effects of voids. From the Cij, we calculated the Debye characteristic temperature, the Grüneisen parameter, and various sound velocities. Our study resolves the enormous differences between two previous reports of TiB2’s Cij. PMID:27504232

  19. Estimating Vertical Diffusion Coefficients By Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culkowski, Walter M.; Swisher, Searle D.

    1973-01-01

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory at Oak Ridge, Tennessee has been conducting routine probing of the lower troposphere and comparing the results with those obtained with turbidity photometers and a distant suspended particulate station. The change in scale height, K (sub z) divided by v (sub s), with time permits the vertical turbulence coefficient K (sub z) to be estimated if v (sub s) is known or assumed. Extremely high monthly correlations of turbidity versus the log of backscatter at 100 meters have been obtained. In addition, high correlations of suspended particulate matter at Chattanooga and Oak Ridge suggest that the bulk of particulate matter is of natural, rather than industrial, origin.

  20. Surfaces with adaptive radar reflection coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Barry

    1997-10-01

    Conventional (passive) radar-absorbing materials (RAM) have been in use now for over half a century, but it is only with recent advances in conducting polymer composite materials that large-area surfaces having controllable reflection coefficients at radar frequencies have become practicable. Techniques for utilizing these new materials in re-configurable electromagnetic, or `smart', surfaces are reviewed, with due emphasis given to the problem of system integration. The discussion is complemented by modelled and measured performance data on several smart surface configurations.

  1. Fresnel coefficients in materials with magnetic monopoles.

    PubMed

    Costa-Quintana, J; López-Aguilar, F

    2011-02-14

    Recent experiments have found entities in crystals whose behavior is equivalent to magnetic monopoles. In this paper, we explain some optical properties based on the reformulated "Maxwell" equations in material media in which there are equivalent magnetic charges. We calculate the coefficients of reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave in a plane interface between the vacuum and a medium with magnetic charges. These results can give a more extended vision of the properties of the materials with magnetic monopoles, since the phase and the amplitudes of the reflected and transmitted waves, differ with and without these magnetic entities.

  2. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass.

  3. Virial coefficients of Lennard-Jones mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2009-06-01

    We report results of calculations of the second through sixth virial coefficients for four prototype Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures that have been the subject of previous studies in the literature. Values are reported for temperatures ranging from T =0.6 to T =10.0, where here the temperature is given units of the LJ energy parameter of one of the components. Thermodynamic stability of the mixtures is studied using the virial equation of state (VEOS) with the calculated coefficients, with particular focus on characterizing the vapor-liquid critical behavior of the mixtures. For three of the mixtures, vapor-liquid coexistence and critical data are available for comparison at only one temperature, while for the fourth we can compare to a critical line. We find that the VEOS provides a useful indication of the presence and location of critical behavior, although in some situations we find need to consider "near-miss" critical behavior, where the classical conditions of criticality are nearly but not exactly satisfied.

  4. Angular Fock coefficients: Refinement and further development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2015-10-01

    The angular coefficients ψk ,p(α ,θ ) of the Fock expansion characterizing the S -state wave function of the two-electron atomic system are calculated in hyperspherical angular coordinates α and θ . To solve the problem the Fock recurrence relations separated into the independent individual equations associated with definite power j of the nucleus charge Z are applied. The "pure" j components of the angular Fock coefficients, orthogonal to the hyperspherical harmonics Yk l, are found for even values of k . To this end, the specific coupling equation is proposed and applied. Effective techniques for solving the individual equations with the simplest nonseparable and separable right-hand sides are proposed. Some mistakes or misprints made earlier in representations of ψ2 ,0, are noted and corrected. All j components of ψ4 ,1 and the majority of components and subcomponents of ψ3 ,0 are calculated and presented. All calculations are carried out with the help of Wolfram Mathematica.

  5. The Convergence Coefficient across Political Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move. PMID:24385886

  6. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass. PMID:26613352

  7. Rotordynamic coefficients for stepped labyrinth gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharrer, Joseph K.

    1989-01-01

    The basic equations are derived for compressible flow in a stepped labyrinth gas seal. The flow is assumed to be completely turbulent in the circumferential direction where the friction factor is determined by the Blasius relation. Linearized zeroth and first-order perturbation equations are developed for small motion about a centered position by an expansion in the eccentricity ratio. The zeroth-order pressure distribution is found by satisfying the leakage equation while the circumferential velocity distribution is determined by satisfying the momentum equations. The first order equations are solved by a separation of variables solution. Integration of the resultant pressure distribution along and around the seal defines the reaction force developed by the seal and the corresponding dynamic coefficients. The results of this analysis are presented in the form of a parametric study, since there are no known experimental data for the rotordynamic coefficients of stepped labyrinth gas seals. The parametric study investigates the relative rotordynamic stability of convergent, straight and divergent stepped labyrinth gas seals. The results show that, generally, the divergent seal is more stable, rotordynamically, than the straight or convergent seals. The results also show that the teeth-on-stator seals are not always more stable, rotordynamically, then the teeth-on-rotor seals as was shown by experiment by Childs and Scharrer (1986b) for a 15 tooth seal.

  8. Link prediction with node clustering coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Lin, Youfang; Wang, Jing; Gregory, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Predicting missing links in incomplete complex networks efficiently and accurately is still a challenging problem. The recently proposed Cannistrai-Alanis-Ravai (CAR) index shows the power of local link/triangle information in improving link-prediction accuracy. Inspired by the idea of employing local link/triangle information, we propose a new similarity index with more local structure information. In our method, local link/triangle structure information can be conveyed by clustering coefficient of common-neighbors directly. The reason why clustering coefficient has good effectiveness in estimating the contribution of a common-neighbor is that it employs links existing between neighbors of a common-neighbor and these links have the same structural position with the candidate link to this common-neighbor. In our experiments, three estimators: precision, AUP and AUC are used to evaluate the accuracy of link prediction algorithms. Experimental results on ten tested networks drawn from various fields show that our new index is more effective in predicting missing links than CAR index, especially for networks with low correlation between number of common-neighbors and number of links between common-neighbors.

  9. Coefficient adaptive triangulation for strongly anisotropic problems

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.; Donato, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Second order elliptic partial differential equations arise in many important applications, including flow through porous media, heat conduction, the distribution of electrical or magnetic potential. The prototype is the Laplace problem, which in discrete form produces a coefficient matrix that is relatively easy to solve in a regular domain. However, the presence of anisotropy produces a matrix whose condition number is increased, making the resulting linear system more difficult to solve. In this work, we take the anisotropy into account in the discretization by mapping each anisotropic region into a ``stretched`` coordinate space in which the anisotropy is removed. The region is then uniformly triangulated, and the resulting triangulation mapped back to the original space. The effect is to generate long slender triangles that are oriented in the direction of ``preferred flow.`` Slender triangles are generally regarded as numerically undesirable since they tend to cause poor conditioning; however, our triangulation has the effect of producing effective isotropy, thus improving the condition number of the resulting coefficient matrix.

  10. Trace-Element Diffusion Coefficients in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandler, C.; O'Neill, H. S.

    2006-12-01

    We have undertaken chemical diffusion experiments at 1300°C to determine both crystal/melt partition coefficients and diffusion coefficients for a wide range of trace elements in forsteritic olivine. Experiments were conducted at 1 atm under controlled fO2 for up to 25 days using synthetic melts made to a composition in equilibrium with olivine for major elements, and doped with selected trace elements. The melt was put into a 5 mm diameter cylindrical hole in gem quality San Carlos olivine crystals drilled paralell to the a axis. Diffusion profiles were obtained both for trace elements that were added to the starting material and diffuse into the olivine, and also for several trace elements present at natural abundances in the olivine that diffuse out. The profiles were measured across sections perpendicular to crystal/melt boundary at a variety of crystallographic orientations (confirmed by EBSD) by laser-ablation ICP-MS. A thin laser slit oriented parallel to the crystal/melt interface was traversed from the melt through the crystal. Element concentrations were fitted to the diffusion equation to obtain both diffusion coefficients and concentrations at the crystal/melt interface, and hence partition coefficients. Calculated diffusivities for many trace elements (Ca, REE, Y, Sc, V, Cr, Ni, Co, Mn, Na, Li, Be, Ti) are relatively fast (D = 10-16 to 10^{-13 m2/s at 1300°C). The diffusion of Li in olivine (approx. D = 10^{-15} m2/s) is only slightly slower than REEs and similar to divalent cations, in good agreement with inferences from zoning profiles in natural olivine [1]. This rate is considerably slower than for plagioclase and clinopyroxene [2], a result which has important implications for interpreting Li isotopic data from mantle-derived rocks. The fastest diffusing trace element we observe is Be. Applying our diffusion and partition coefficients to the model of Qin et al. [3], we calculate that the REEs of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the mantle will

  11. Evaluation of area-based collagen scoring by nonlinear microscopy in chronic hepatitis C-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sevrain, David; Dubreuil, Matthieu; Dolman, Grace Elizabeth; Zaitoun, Abed; Irving, William; Guha, Indra Neil; Odin, Christophe; Le Grand, Yann

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we analyze a fibrosis scoring method based on measurement of the fibrillar collagen area from second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of unstained histological slices from human liver biopsies. The study is conducted on a cohort of one hundred chronic hepatitis C patients with intermediate to strong Metavir and Ishak stages of liver fibrosis. We highlight a key parameter of our scoring method to discriminate between high and low fibrosis stages. Moreover, according to the intensity histograms of the SHG images and simple mathematical arguments, we show that our area-based method is equivalent to an intensity-based method, despite saturation of the images. Finally we propose an improvement of our scoring method using very simple image processing tools. PMID:25909005

  12. Evaluation of area-based collagen scoring by nonlinear microscopy in chronic hepatitis C-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sevrain, David; Dubreuil, Matthieu; Dolman, Grace Elizabeth; Zaitoun, Abed; Irving, William; Guha, Indra Neil; Odin, Christophe; Le Grand, Yann

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a fibrosis scoring method based on measurement of the fibrillar collagen area from second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of unstained histological slices from human liver biopsies. The study is conducted on a cohort of one hundred chronic hepatitis C patients with intermediate to strong Metavir and Ishak stages of liver fibrosis. We highlight a key parameter of our scoring method to discriminate between high and low fibrosis stages. Moreover, according to the intensity histograms of the SHG images and simple mathematical arguments, we show that our area-based method is equivalent to an intensity-based method, despite saturation of the images. Finally we propose an improvement of our scoring method using very simple image processing tools. PMID:25909005

  13. Condensation heat transfer coefficient versus wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudgar, M.; De Coninck, J.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we show how condensation on substrates can induce wetting behavior that is quite different from that of deposited or impinging drops. We describe surfaces with the same wettability in ambient conditions presenting different wetting behavior and growth of droplets in condensation. The experimental results show a rapid spread of droplets and formation of the film on the copper surface, while droplets on SU-8 surface remains on the regular shape while they grow within the time, without coalescence, as observed for Cu. Although the heat conductivity of SU-8 is much lower, due to a difference in wetting behavior, the heat transfer coefficient (h) is higher for dropwise condensation on Cu with a thin layer of SU-8 than filmwise on the bare copper.

  14. Optical absorption coefficients of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhao, Xianzhen; Fry, Edward S.

    2002-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter(ICAM), which is independent of scattering effect, is used to measure the absolute values of small optical absorption coefficients of liquid. A modified ICAM is being used to measure the absorption of water in the wavelength range 300 to 700 nm. The ultrapure water produced by a two-stages water purification system reaches Type I quality. This is equal to or better than ASTM,CAP and NCCLS water quality standards. To avoid the fact that dissolved oxygen absorbs ultraviolet light due to the photochemical effect, the water sample is delivered through a nitrogen sealed system which will prevent the sample from contacting with oxygen. A compassion of our absorption spectrum with other existing data is given.

  15. Coefficient alpha and interculture test selection.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The internal consistency reliability of a measure can be a focal point in an evaluation of the potential adequacy of an instrument for adaptation to another cultural setting. Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficient is often used as the statistical index for such a determination. However, alpha presumes a tau-equivalent test and may constitute an inaccurate population estimate for multidimensional tests. These notions are expanded and examined with a Japanese version of a questionnaire on nursing attitudes toward suicidal patients, originally constructed in Sweden using the English language. The English measure was reported to have acceptable internal consistency (α) albeit the dimensionality of the questionnaire was not addressed. The Japanese scale was found to lack tau-equivalence. An alternative to alpha, "composite reliability," was computed and found to be below acceptable standards in magnitude and precision. Implications for research application of the Japanese instrument are discussed. PMID:22523134

  16. Clustering stocks using partial correlation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sean S.; Chang, Woojin

    2016-11-01

    A partial correlation analysis is performed on the Korean stock market (KOSPI). The difference between Pearson correlation and the partial correlation is analyzed and it is found that when conditioned on the market return, Pearson correlation coefficients are generally greater than those of the partial correlation, which implies that the market return tends to drive up the correlation between stock returns. A clustering analysis is then performed to study the market structure given by the partial correlation analysis and the members of the clusters are compared with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS). The initial hypothesis is that the firms in the same GICS sector are clustered together since they are in a similar business and environment. However, the result is inconsistent with the hypothesis and most clusters are a mix of multiple sectors suggesting that the traditional approach of using sectors to determine the proximity between stocks may not be sufficient enough to diversify a portfolio.

  17. Effective Electrocardiogram Steganography Based on Coefficient Alignment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Yu; Wang, Wen-Fong

    2016-03-01

    This study presents two types of data hiding methods based on coefficient alignment for electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, namely, lossy and reversible ECG steganographys. The lossy method is divided into high-quality and high-capacity ECG steganography, both of which are capable of hiding confidential patient data in ECG signals. The reversible data hiding method can not only hide secret messages but also completely restore the original ECG signal after bit extraction. Simulations confirmed that the perceived quality generated by the lossy ECG steganography methods was good, while hiding capacity was acceptable. In addition, these methods have a certain degree of robustness, which is rare in conventional ECG stegangraphy schemes. Moreover, the proposed reversible ECG steganography method can not only successfully extract hidden messages but also completely recover the original ECG data.

  18. Interplanetary diffusion coefficients for cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Information on the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient, kappa, derived from near-earth observations of the solar modulation of galactic electron fluxes and from the near-earth power spectra of the interplanetary magnetic field, has been used to study the heliocentric radial dependence of kappa, and to derive limits on the spatial extent of the solar modulation region. Representing kappa, as a separable function of radius r and rigidity, and assumming kappa(r) proportional to r to the n-th power, we can place a limit on the power law exponent, n not greater than 1.2. The distance of the modulation boundary is a function of n, and, e.g., for n = 0, falls into the range of 6-25 AU.

  19. Manning's roughness coefficient for Illinois streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soong, David T.; Prater, Crystal D.; Halfar, Teresa M.; Wobig, Loren A.

    2012-01-01

    Manning's roughness coefficients for 43 natural and constructed streams in Illinois are reported and displayed on a U.S. Geological Survey Web site. At a majority of the sites, discharge and stage were measured, and corresponding Manning's coefficients—the n-values—were determined at more than one river discharge. The n-values discussed in this report are computed from data representing the stream reach studied and, therefore, are reachwise values. Presentation of the resulting n-values takes a visual-comparison approach similar to the previously published Barnes report (1967), in which photographs of channel conditions, description of the site, and the resulting n-values are organized for each site. The Web site where the data can be accessed and are displayed is at URL http://il.water.usgs.gov/proj/nvalues/.

  20. Comment on "Generalized exclusion processes: Transport coefficients"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T.; Nelissen, K.; Cleuren, B.; Partoens, B.; Van den Broeck, C.

    2016-04-01

    In a recent paper, Arita et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 052108 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.052108] consider the transport properties of a class of generalized exclusion processes. Analytical expressions for the transport-diffusion coefficient are derived by ignoring correlations. It is claimed that these expressions become exact in the hydrodynamic limit. In this Comment, we point out that (i) the influence of correlations upon the diffusion does not vanish in the hydrodynamic limit, and (ii) the expressions for the self- and transport diffusion derived by Arita et al. are special cases of results derived in Becker et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 110601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.110601].

  1. Secondary Ionization Coefficient of Dielectric Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Susumu; Itoh, Haruo

    Experiments for observations and stabilization of discharge paths in several electrode systems are carried out aiming at precise measurement of the secondary ionization coefficient γ of MgO film electrode. The discharge chamber is filled with Ar gas. The waveforms of the applied voltage between the electrodes and the discharge current are measured with visual observation of the discharge light. Two MgO coated electrodes are placed so that they are facing each other. For these MgO electrodes, the discharge paths take a detour, not the shortest distance. Smaller prebreakdown current pulses are observed before the breakdown. After breakdown, discontinuous discharge current is observed. Therefore, it is prepared a glass tube surrounding the discharge area. As the result, the discharge paths take a straight perpendicular for the electrode surface, and the discharge is stabilized.

  2. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, G. K.; Singh, Kulwant; Lark, B. S.; Gerward, L.

    2002-10-01

    The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH 2O 2), acetic acid (C 2H 4O 2), propionic acid (C 3H 6O 2), butyric acid (C 4H 8O 2), n-hexanoic acid (C 6H 12O 2), n-caprylic acid (C 8H 16O 2), lauric acid (C 12H 24O 2), myristic acid (C 14H 28O 2), palmitic acid (C 16H 32O 2), oleic acid (C 18H 34O 2) and stearic acid (C 18H 36O 2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement between experiment and theory.

  3. Sedimentation Coefficient, Frictional Coefficient, and Molecular Weight: A Preparative Ultracentrifuge Experiment for the Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsall, H. B.; Wermeling, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a high-speed preparative centrifuge and calculator to demonstrate effects of the frictional coefficient of a macromolecule on its rate of transport in a force field and to estimate molecular weight of the macromolecule using an empirical relationship. Background information, procedures, and discussion of results are…

  4. Cluster automorphism groups of cluster algebras with coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen; Zhu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    We study the cluster automorphism group of a skew-symmetric cluster algebra with geometric coefficients. For this, we introduce the notion of gluing free cluster algebra, and show that under a weak condition the cluster automorphism group of a gluing free cluster algebra is a subgroup of the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra (i.e. the corresponding cluster algebra without coefficients). We show that several classes of cluster algebras with coefficients are gluing free, for example, cluster algebras with principal coefficients, cluster algebras with universal geometric coefficients, and cluster algebras from surfaces (except a 4-gon) with coefficients from boundaries. Moreover, except four kinds of surfaces, the cluster automorphism group of a cluster algebra from a surface with coefficients from boundaries is isomorphic to the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra; for a cluster algebra with principal coefficients, its cluster automorphism group is isomorphic to the automorphism group of its initial quiver.

  5. The Attenuation of Correlation Coefficients: A Statistical Literacy Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafimow, David

    2016-01-01

    Much of the science reported in the media depends on correlation coefficients. But the size of correlation coefficients depends, in part, on the reliability with which the correlated variables are measured. Understanding this is a statistical literacy issue.

  6. Loss coefficient measurements for flat oval elbows and transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, B.; Khodabakhsh, F.; Idem, S.

    1996-12-31

    Zero-length loss coefficients were measured for several flat oval elbow and transition fittings over a range of Reynolds numbers from 20,000 to 600,000. Least-squares curve fitting was employed to fit a linear function to the loss coefficient data, with the intercept forced to zero. Local loss coefficient values for each fitting are presented.

  7. Coefficients of Association Analogous to Pearson's r for Nonparametric Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavig, Gordon; Acock, Alan C.

    1980-01-01

    Two r coefficients of association are discussed. One of the coefficients can be applied to any nonparametric test statistic (NTS) in which a normal approximation equation is appropriate. The other coefficient is applicable to any NTS in which exact probabilities are known. (Author/RL)

  8. On the Occurrence of Standardized Regression Coefficients Greater than One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deegan, John, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that standardized regression coefficients greater than one can legitimately occur. Furthermore, the relationship between the occurrence of such coefficients and the extent of multicollinearity present among the set of predictor variables in an equation is examined. Comments on the interpretation of these coefficients are…

  9. Factors Affecting Coefficient Alpha: A Mini Monte Carlo Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Brian M.

    Factors affecting a lower-bound estimate of internal consistency reliability, Cronbach's coefficient alpha, are explored. Theoretically, coefficient alpha is an estimate of the correlation between two tests drawn at random from a pool of items like the items in the test under consideration. As a practical matter, coefficient alpha can be an index…

  10. Interpretation of Standardized Regression Coefficients in Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Jerome D.

    The extent to which standardized regression coefficients (beta values) can be used to determine the importance of a variable in an equation was explored. The beta value and the part correlation coefficient--also called the semi-partial correlation coefficient and reported in squared form as the incremental "r squared"--were compared for variables…

  11. Impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-21

    We present a study through extensive simulation that considers the impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data collected from media mimicking breast tissue. We found that while the impact of scattering heterogeneities/targets is modest on photoacoustic recovery of optical absorption coefficients, the impact of scattering contrast caused by adipose tissue, a layer of normal tissue along the boundary of the breast, is dramatic on reconstruction of optical absorption coefficients using photoacoustic data-up to 25.8% relative error in recovering the absorption coefficient is estimated in such cases. To overcome this problem, we propose a new method to enhance photoacoustic recovery of the optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous media by considering inhomogeneous scattering coefficient distribution provided by diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Results from extensive simulations show that photoacoustic recovery of absorption coefficient maps can be improved considerably with a priori scattering information from DOT.

  12. Seismic structure beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and adjacent areas based on the tomographic inversion of regional earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khrepy, Sami; Koulakov, Ivan; Al-Arifi, Nassir; Petrunin, Alexey G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first 3-D model of seismic P and S velocities in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and surrounding areas based on the results of passive travel time tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed based on travel time data from ˜ 9000 regional earthquakes provided by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN), and this was complemented with data from the International Seismological Centre (ISC). The resulting P and S velocity patterns were generally consistent with each other at all depths. Beneath the northern part of the Red Sea, we observed a strong high-velocity anomaly with abrupt limits that coincide with the coastal lines. This finding may indicate the oceanic nature of the crust in the Red Sea, and it does not support the concept of gradual stretching of the continental crust. According to our results, in the middle and lower crust, the seismic anomalies beneath the Gulf of Aqaba seem to delineate a sinistral shift (˜ 100 km) in the opposite flanks of the fault zone, which is consistent with other estimates of the left-lateral displacement in the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform fault. However, no displacement structures were visible in the uppermost lithospheric mantle.

  13. Pulmonary interstitial compliance and microvascular filtration coefficient.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, H S

    1980-08-01

    Static and dynamic properties governing the fluid movement into the pulmonary interstitium were examined in isolated canine lobes. The system was driven by altering intravascular presure (Piv) when the lobe was isogravimetric (change in weight (W) = 0) and allowing the lobe to become isogravimetric again. By making use of an analogy to charging a capacitor across a resistor, calculation of the filtration coefficient for transvascular fluid movement (KF) and determination of the pressure-volume relationship of the pulmonary interstitial space (Pis-Vis), with a minimum of untested assumptions, was possible. KF was found to be the same for fluid moving out of or into the intravascular space, and when the relationship between Piv and alveolar pressure (PAlv) was constant, KF was independent of transpulmonary pressure (PL). When PAlv exceeded Piv, changes in Piv did not influence KF, suggesting no significant change in either surface area available for fluid transudation or vascular permeability. The Pis-Vis curve for increasing values of Vis and Pis is best described by an exponential relationhip and is independent of PL. However, the Pis-Vis curve with decreasing values of Vis and Pis is dependent on PL.

  14. Backscatter coefficient estimation using tapers with gaps.

    PubMed

    Luchies, Adam C; Oelze, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    When using the backscatter coefficient (BSC) to estimate quantitative ultrasound parameters such as the effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC), it is necessary to assume that the interrogated medium contains diffuse scatterers. Structures that invalidate this assumption can affect the estimated BSC parameters in terms of increased bias and variance and decrease performance when classifying disease. In this work, a method was developed to mitigate the effects of echoes from structures that invalidate the assumption of diffuse scattering, while preserving as much signal as possible for obtaining diffuse scatterer property estimates. Backscattered signal sections that contained nondiffuse signals were identified and a windowing technique was used to provide BSC estimates for diffuse echoes only. Experiments from physical phantoms were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed BSC estimation methods. Tradeoffs associated with effective mitigation of specular scatterers and bias and variance introduced into the estimates were quantified. Analysis of the results suggested that discrete prolate spheroidal (PR) tapers with gaps provided the best performance for minimizing BSC error. Specifically, the mean square error for BSC between measured and theoretical had an average value of approximately 1.0 and 0.2 when using a Hanning taper and PR taper respectively, with six gaps. The BSC error due to amplitude bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 1) tapers. The BSC error due to shape bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 4) tapers. These results suggest using different taper types for estimating ESD versus EAC.

  15. Transport coefficients of a relativistic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, O. J.; Rose, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a self-consistent transport theory for a relativistic plasma is developed. Using the notation of Braginskii [S. I. Braginskii, in Reviews of Plasma Physics, edited by M. A. Leontovich (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1965), Vol. 1, p. 174], we provide semianalytical forms of the electrical resistivity, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivity tensors for a Lorentzian plasma in a magnetic field. This treatment is then generalized to plasmas with arbitrary atomic number by numerically solving the linearized Boltzmann equation. The corresponding transport coefficients are fitted by rational functions in order to make them suitable for use in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations and transport calculations. Within the confines of linear transport theory and on the assumption that the plasma is optically thin, our results are valid for temperatures up to a few MeV. By contrast, classical transport theory begins to incur significant errors above kBT ˜10 keV, e.g., the parallel thermal conductivity is suppressed by 15% at kBT =20 keV due to relativistic effects.

  16. Altitude Dependent Auroral Ion Diffusion Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous upgoing auroral H+ and O+ ion beams generate ion acoustic waves which have both parallel and oblique wave vectors with respect to the ambient magnetic field. A parallel mode is investigated with phase velocity UO + CO in the direction of beam propagation, where UO is the oxygen beam velocity and CO is the oxygen ion sound speed. Due to the mass difference, this mode preferentially resonates with the oxygen beam through the n = 1 cyclotron resonance, causing O+ ions to diffuse in a direction that is primarily perpendicular to the background magnetic field. The Landau resonance (n = 0) is very narrow in parallel velocity and does not interact with either ion beam. In one case study the parallel acoustic mode begins to resonate with O+ ions within the auroral acceleration region and this resonant region in velocity space sweeps through the entire O+ beam as it moves into weaker magnetic field regions. The O+ quasilinear diffusion coefficients are examined during this process. Perpendicular diffusion becomes significant when the parallel resonant velocity is close to the parallel group velocity of the waves. This selects regions of velocity space where perpendicular diffusion is maximum which occurs at the leading edge of the resonant region as it sweeps through the O+ beam. In k - space these resonant velocities correspond to the regions of peak growth rate. The relevance of this work to the selective energization of heavy auroral ion beams will be discussed.

  17. Generalized skew coefficients for flood-frequency analysis in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of generalized skew coefficients used in flood-frequency analysis. Station skew coefficients were computed for 267 long-term stream-gaging stations in Minnesota and the surrounding states of Iowa, North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, and the provinces of Manitoba and Ontario, Canada. Generalized skew coefficients were computed from station skew coefficients using a locally weighted regression technique. The resulting regression trend surface was the generalized skew coefficient map, except for the North Shore area, and has a mean square error of 0.182.

  18. The intraclass correlation coefficient: distribution-free definition and test.

    PubMed

    Commenges, D; Jacqmin, H

    1994-06-01

    A definition of the intraclass correlation coefficient is given on the basis of a general class of random effect model. The conventional intraclass correlation coefficient and the intracluster correlation coefficient for binary data are both particular cases of the generalized coefficient. We derive the score test for the hypothesis of null intraclass correlation in the exponential family. The statistic does not depend on the particular distribution in this family and is related to the pairwise correlation coefficient. The test can be adjusted for explanatory variables.

  19. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems.

  20. Distribution Coefficients of Impurities in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.

    2014-04-01

    Impurities dissolved in very pure metals at the level of parts per million often cause an elevation or depression of the freezing temperature of the order of millikelvins. This represents a significant contribution to the uncertainty of standard platinum resistance thermometer calibrations. An important parameter for characterizing the behavior of impurities is the distribution coefficient , which is the ratio of the solid solubility to liquid solubility. A knowledge of for a given binary system is essential for contemporary methods of evaluating or correcting for the effect of impurities, and it is therefore of universal interest to have the most complete set of values possible. A survey of equilibrium values of (in the low concentration limit) reported in the literature for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 fixed points of Hg, Ga, In, Sn, Zn, Al, Au, Ag, and Cu is presented. In addition, thermodynamic calculations of using MTDATA are presented for 170 binary systems. In total, the combined values of from all available sources for 430 binary systems are presented. In addition, by considering all available values of for impurities in 25 different metal solvents (1300 binary systems) enough data are available to characterize patterns in the value of for a given impurity as a function of its position in the periodic table. This enables prediction of for a significant number of binary systems for which data and calculations are unavailable. By combining data from many sources, values of for solutes (atomic number from 1 to 94) in ITS-90 fixed points from Hg to Cu are suggested, together with some tentative predicted values where literature data and calculations are unavailable.

  1. [Study of spatial interpolation of soil Cd contents in sewage irrigated area based on soil spectral information assistance].

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Chang, Qing-Rui; Liu, Jing

    2013-08-01

    To acquire the accuracy distribution information of soil heavy metal, improving interpolation precision is very important for agricultural safety production and soil environment protection. In the present study, the spatial variation and Cokriging interpolation of soil Cd was studied in a sewage irrigation area. Fifty two soil samples were collected to measure the contents of soil total Cd (TCd), available Cd (ACd), pH, organic matter (OM), iron oxide (Fe2 O3) and soil reflection spectrum. Through correlation analysis, it was found that TCd and ACd had a significant correlation with soil first-order differential spectrum (-0.585** at 759 nm and -0.551** at 719 nm, respectively), which were much higher than the correlation coefficients between soil Cd contents and other environmental variables (pH, OM and Fe2O3). The spatial patterns of soil Cd were predicted by Cokriging which used soil first-order differential spectrum as covariate. Compared with the Kriging, the root-mean-square error decreased by 8.22% for TCd and 20.09% for ACd, respectively; the correlation coefficients between the predicted values and measured values increased by 27.45% for TCd and by 53.13% for ACd, respectively. Meanwhile, the prediction accuracy improved by Cokriging with soil spectrum as covariate was still higher than by Cokriging with soil environment variables (OM and Fe2O3). Therefore, it was found that Cokriging was a more accurate interpolation method which could provide more precise distribution information of soil heavy metal. At the same time, soil reflection spectrum was shown to be more economic, time-saving and easier to acquire than these usual environment variables, which indicated that soil spectrum information is more suited as a covariate used in Cokriging.

  2. ANALYTIC FORMS OF THE PERPENDICULAR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT IN NRMHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-02-01

    In the past different analytic limits for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient of energetic particles interacting with magnetic turbulence were discussed. These different limits or cases correspond to different transport modes describing how the particles are diffusing across the large-scale magnetic field. In the current paper we describe a new transport regime by considering the model of noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We derive different analytic forms of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, and while we do this, we focus on the aforementioned new transport mode. We show that for this turbulence model a small perpendicular diffusion coefficient can be obtained so that the latter diffusion coefficient is more than hundred times smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient. This result is relevant to explain observations in the solar system where such small perpendicular diffusion coefficients have been reported.

  3. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  4. PAC91 - PROPERTIES AND COEFFICIENTS 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The two principal functions of PAC91 are to provide a means of generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constant data and to supply a means of fitting these functions to empirical equations by using a least-squares fit. The coefficients obtained from the fit may then be used to generate a library of thermodynamic data in a uniform and easy-to-use format for use in other computer codes. Several large compilations of selected or calculated thermodynamic data currently exist. Nevertheless, there is a continuing need for additional calculations due to the discovery of new species, the revision of existing molecular constant data and structural parameters, the need for data at temperatures other than those already published, the availability of new or revised heats of formation, dissociation or transition, and the revision of fundamental constants or atomic weights. Calculations may also be needed to compare the results of assuming various possible forms of the partition function. In addition, there is often a preference for thermodynamic data in functional rather than tabular form. In order to satisfy these needs, the PAC91 program can perform any combination of the following: (1) calculate thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy) for any set of 1 to 202 temperatures, (2) obtain a least-squares fit of the first three of these functions (either individually, two at a time, or all three simultaneously) for up to eight temperature intervals, and (3) calculate, as a function of temperature, heats of formation and equilibrium constants from assigned reference elements. The thermodynamic functions for ideal gases may be calculated from molecular constant data using one of several partition function variations provided by the program. For monatomic gases, one of three partition function cutoff techniques may be selected by the user, and unobserved but predicted electronic energy levels may be included by the program

  5. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression over the entire UV-visible spectral range. These results are compared to results obtained from the absorbance measurements obtained in the field. The differences in calculated Angstrom absorption exponents between the field and laboratory measurements are attributed partly to the differences in time resolution of the sample collection resulting in heavier particle pileup on the filter surface of the 12-hour samples. Some differences in calculated results can also be attributed to the presence of narrow band absorbers below 400 nm that do not fall in the wavelengths covered by the 7 wavelengths of the aethalometer. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, "The determination of scattering and absorption coefficients of size-fractionated aerosols for radiative transfer calculations." Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  6. Scanning measurement of Seebeck coefficient of a heated sample

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Iwanaga, Shiho

    2016-04-19

    A novel scanning Seebeck coefficient measurement technique is disclosed utilizing a cold scanning thermocouple probe tip on heated bulk and thin film samples. The system measures variations in the Seebeck coefficient within the samples. The apparatus may be used for two dimensional mapping of the Seebeck coefficient on the bulk and thin film samples. This technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separations in the sub-mm range of various thermoelectric materials.

  7. Measuring Furnace/Sample Heat-Transfer Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosch, William R.; Fripp, Archibald L., Jr.; Debnam, William J., Jr.; Woodell, Glenn A.

    1993-01-01

    Complicated, inexact calculations now unnecessary. Device called HTX used to simulate and measure transfer of heat between directional-solidification crystal-growth furnace and ampoule containing sample of crystalline to be grown. Yields measurement data used to calculate heat-transfer coefficients directly, without need for assumptions or prior knowledge of physical properties of furnace, furnace gas, or specimen. Determines not only total heat-transfer coefficients but also coefficients of transfer of heat in different modes.

  8. DCFPAK: Dose coefficient data file package for Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Leggett, R.W.

    1996-07-31

    The FORTRAN-based computer package DCFPAK (Dose Coefficient File Package) has been developed to provide electronic access to the dose coefficient data files summarized in Federal Guidance Reports 11 and 12. DCFPAK also provides access to standard information regarding decay chains and assembles dose coefficients for all dosimetrically significant radioactive progeny of a specified radionuclide. DCFPAK was designed for application on a PC but, with minor modifications, may be implemented on a UNIX workstation.

  9. Discharge coefficients of impingement and film cooling holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, T.; Brown, A.; Garret, S.

    1985-03-01

    In this article measurements of fluid flow through impingement and film cooling holes for typical turbine blade cooling systems are presented. The purpose of the measurements was to determine hole discharge coefficients over a range of Reynolds numbers from 5,000 to 30,000 and to observe in this range the dependence of discharge coefficient on Reynolds number. The effect of hole geometry, that is, sharp edged inlet or corner radius inlet, on discharge coefficients is also measured. Correlations relating discharge coefficients to Reynolds number, corner radius to hole diameter ratio, and blowing parameter are suggested.

  10. Coefficients of convergent multiple Walsh-Paley series

    SciTech Connect

    Plotnikov, Mikhail G

    2012-09-30

    The paper is concerned with the behaviour of the coefficients of multiple Walsh-Paley series that are cube convergent to a finite sum. It is shown that even an everywhere convergent series of this kind may contain coefficients with numbers from a sufficiently large set that grow faster than any preassigned sequence. By Cohen's theorem, this sort of thing cannot happen for multiple trigonometric series that are cube convergent on a set of full measure - their coefficients cannot grow even exponentially. Null subsequences of coefficients are determined for multiple Walsh-Paley series that are cube convergent on a set of definite measure. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  11. Measurement of the extinction coefficients of magnetic fluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A novel spectral transmittance approach for measuring the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluids is proposed. The measuring principle and accuracy of the approach are analysed. Experiments are conducted to measure the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluids with different particle volume fractions. The relative uncertainty of experimental data is less than 1.8%. The experimental results indicate that the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluids increases with increase of the volume fraction of suspended magnetic nanoparticles and the optical properties of the particle material have a significant effect on the extinction coefficient of the magnetic fluids. PMID:21711742

  12. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  13. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U.

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  14. Repeatability study of mechanomyography in submaximal isometric contractions using coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akataki, K; Mita, K; Itoh, Y

    1999-01-01

    The within-day and between-day repeatability of the mechanomyogram (MMG) was assessed using the coefficient of variation (CV) and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and was compared with that of the electromyogram (EMG). The MMG and EMG were recorded simultaneously during isometric elbow flexion trials at different submaximal levels of 10% to 90% MVC. The testing session consisting of 9 submaximal trials was repeated 8 times on the same day for estimation of the within-day variation. In order to examine the between-day variation, the same testing session was also performed 8 times over 3 weeks with a 2-day rest interval between each session. The CVs within-day and between-day in both the MMG and EMG did not demonstrate any significant differences relating to the magnitude of force exerted. The CVs combined over all the force levels were approximately 10% within the same day and 25% between days for both the MMG and EMG. These corresponded to the within-day ICC of approximately 0.95 and the between-day ICC of 0.80. The repeatability of the MMG during submaximal isometric contractions of biceps brachii muscles is considered to be similar to that of the more established EMG.

  15. Binary-YORP Coefficients for Known Asteroid Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    The binary YORP (bYORP) effect has been hypothesized to be a significant factor in the evolution of near-Earth binary asteroid systems (Cuk and Burns, Icarus, v.176, pp.418-431, 2005; McMahon and Scheeres, CMDA, v.106, pp.261-300, 2010). However, understanding of the coefficient values for realistic asteroid shapes is lacking due to the small number of shape models available for the generally smaller secondary asteroids. Until now, we have only calculated the coefficients based on the shape of 1999 KW4 Beta, although various studies by other authors have computed coefficients for artificially generated asteroids based on Gaussian Spheres and some shape models without self-shadowing (Steinberg and Sari, The Astronomical Journal, v.141, pp.55-64, 2011). We also scaled the 1999 KW4 Beta coefficients to other binary systems with no knowledge of the other systems' secondary shapes in order to make evolutionary predictions (McMahon and Scheeres, Icarus Vol. 209, pp 494-509, 2010). In this study, we compute the bYORP coefficient for a range of asteroid shapes, using these as a stand-in for actual secondaries. This allows us to circumvent the lack of information on binary asteroid secondaries and to develop a richer database of realistic coefficients. While this approach may miss some key features of binary secondaries, at the least it provides some statistics on the expected variability of the bYORP coefficient. We analyze all available asteroid shape models on the PDS-SBN, including radar-based shape models and models estimated from past spacecraft missions. The coefficients are computed with an updated algorithm that includes the effects of self-shadowing. We also present the coefficients for perturbed versions of the available shape models, which give effective error bars to the computed coefficients due to inexact shape models. Finally, we discuss the dynamical implications of the derived bYORP coefficients on binary asteroid evolution.

  16. A physical approach of vulnerability mapping in karst area based on a new interpretation of tracer breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly-Comte, V.; Pistre, S.

    2011-12-01

    Strategies for groundwater protection mostly use vulnerability maps to contamination; therefore, a lot of methods have been developed since the 90's with a particular attention to operational techniques. These easy-to-use methods are based on the superposition of relative rating systems applied to critical hydrogeological factors; their major drawback is the subjectivity of the determination of the rating scale and the weighting coefficients. Thus, in addition to vulnerability mapping, empirical results given by tracer tests are often needed to better assess groundwater vulnerability to accidental contamination in complex hydrosystems such as karst aquifers. This means that a lot of data about tracer breakthrough curves (BTC) in karst area are now available for hydrologists. In this context, we propose a physical approach to spatially distributed simulation of tracer BTC based on macrodispersive transport in 1D. A new interpretation of tracer tests performed in various media is shown as a validation of our theoretical development. The vulnerability map is then given by the properties of the simulated tracer BTC (modal time, mean residence time, duration over a given concentration threshold etc.). In this way, our method expresses the vulnerability with units, which makes it possible the comparison from one system to another. In addition, previous or new tracer tests can be used as a validation of the map for the same hydrological conditions. Even if this methodology is not limited to karsts hydrosystems, this seems particularly suitable for these complex environments for which understanding the origin of accidental contamination is crucial.

  17. A graphical algorithm for fast computation of identity coefficients and generalized kinship coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Abney, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Computing the probability of identity by descent sharing among n genes given only the pedigree of those genes is a computationally challenging problem, if n or the pedigree size is large. Here, I present a novel graphical algorithm for efficiently computing all generalized kinship coefficients for n genes. The graphical description transforms the problem from doing many recursion on the pedigree to doing a single traversal of a structure referred to as the kinship graph. Availability: The algorithm is implemented for n = 4 in the software package IdCoefs at http://home.uchicago.edu/abney/Software.html. Contact: abney@bsd.uchicago.edu Supplementary Information:Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19359355

  18. Calculation of fusion product angular correlation coefficients for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1987-08-01

    The angular correlation coefficients for fusion products are calculated in the cases of Maxwellian and beam-target plasmas. Measurement of these coefficients as a localized ion temperature or fast-ion diagnostic is discussed. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Delimiting Coefficient a from Internal Consistency and Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    I discuss the contribution by Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love (2015) in which they relate reliability represented by coefficient a to formal definitions of internal consistency and unidimensionality, both proposed by Cronbach (1951). I argue that coefficient a is a lower bound to reliability and that concepts of internal consistency and…

  20. Temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Dubtsov, S. N.; Baklanov, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles in gases has been experimentally studied. It is established that this dependence significantly differs from that predicted by various correlations, in particular, by the Cunningham-Millikan-Davies correlation that is used as an instrumental basis for virtually all methods of measurement of the diffusion coefficient in aerosols.

  1. Amide temperature coefficients in the protein G B1 domain.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Jennifer H; Williamson, Mike P

    2012-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured for backbone amide (1)H and (15)N nuclei in the B1 domain of protein G (GB1), using temperatures in the range 283-313 K, and pH values from 2.0 to 9.0. Many nuclei display pH-dependent coefficients, which were fitted to one or two pK(a) values. (1)H coefficients showed the expected behaviour, in that hydrogen-bonded amides have less negative values, but for those amides involved in strong hydrogen bonds in regular secondary structure there is a negative correlation between strength of hydrogen bond and size of temperature coefficient. The best correlation to temperature coefficient is with secondary shift, indicative of a very approximately uniform thermal expansion. The largest pH-dependent changes in coefficient are for amides in loops adjacent to sidechain hydrogen bonds rather than the amides involved directly in hydrogen bonds, indicating that the biggest determinant of the temperature coefficient is temperature-dependent loss of structure, not hydrogen bonding. Amide (15)N coefficients have no clear relationship with structure.

  2. Analysis of a heat transfer device for measuring film coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medrow, R. A.; Johnson, R. L.; Loomis, W. R.; Wedeven, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A heat transfer device consisting of a heated rotating cylinder in a bath was analyzed for its effectiveness to determine heat transfer coefficient of fluids. A time dependent analysis shows that the performance is insensitive to the value of heat transfer coefficient with the given rig configuration.

  3. Micro- and macroscale coefficients of friction of cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang, Kejin

    2013-12-15

    Millions of metric tons of cementitious materials are produced, transported and used in construction each year. The ease or difficulty of handling cementitious materials is greatly influenced by the material friction properties. In the present study, the coefficients of friction of cementitious materials were measured at the microscale and macroscale. The materials tested were commercially-available Portland cement, Class C fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag. At the microscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from the interaction forces between cementitious particles using an Atomic Force Microscope. At the macroscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from stresses on bulk cementitious materials under direct shear. The study indicated that the microscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.020 to 0.059, and the macroscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. The fly ash studied had the highest microscale coefficient of friction and the lowest macroscale coefficient of friction. -- Highlights: •Microscale (interparticle) coefficient of friction (COF) was determined with AFM. •Macroscale (bulk) COF was measured under direct shear. •Fly ash had the highest microscale COF and the lowest macroscale COF. •Portland cement against GGBFS had the lowest microscale COF. •Portland cement against Portland cement had the highest macroscale COF.

  4. Testing the Difference of Correlated Agreement Coefficients for Statistical Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwet, Kilem L.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of testing the difference between two correlated agreement coefficients for statistical significance. A number of authors have proposed methods for testing the difference between two correlated kappa coefficients, which require either the use of resampling methods or the use of advanced statistical modeling…

  5. A method for obtaining coefficients of compositional inverse generating functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruchinin, Dmitry V.; Shablya, Yuriy V.; Kruchinin, Vladimir V.; Shelupanov, Alexander A.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how to obtain expressions for coefficients of compositional inverse generating functions in explicit way. The method is based on the Lagrange inversion theorem and composita of generating functions. Also we give a method of obtaining expressions for coefficients of reciprocal generating functions and consider some examples.

  6. Visualising the Roots of Quadratic Equations with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a natural extension of the root visualisation techniques first presented by Bardell (2012) for quadratic equations with real coefficients. Consideration is now given to the familiar quadratic equation "y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c" in which the coefficients "a," "b," "c" are generally…

  7. Connection coefficients between orthogonal polynomials and the canonical sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroni, P.; Da Rocha, Z.

    2008-03-01

    We deal with the problem of obtaining closed formulas for the connection coefficients between orthogonal polynomials and the canonical sequence. We use a recurrence relation fulfilled by these coefficients and symbolic computation with the Mathematica language. We treat the cases of Gegenbauer, Jacobi and a new semi-classical sequence.

  8. On the coefficients of differentiated expansions of ultraspherical polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karageorghis, Andreas; Phillips, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    A formula expressing the coefficients of an expression of ultraspherical polynomials which has been differentiated an arbitrary number of times in terms of the coefficients of the original expansion is proved. The particular examples of Chebyshev and Legendre polynomials are considered.

  9. Factor Scores, Structure and Communality Coefficients: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odum, Mary

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to present an easy-to-understand primer on three important concepts of factor analysis: Factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Given that statistical analyses are a part of a global general linear model (GLM), and utilize weights as an integral part of analyses (Thompson, 2006;…

  10. Crop coefficient development and application to an evapotranspiration network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop coefficients derived from properly designed, operated, and maintained lysimeters provide the most accurate values throughout the growing season and are critical in the computation of hourly and daily,regionally based, crop evapotranspiration (ET) values. Multi-stage crop coefficients can be der...

  11. Extracting electron backscattering coefficients from backscattered electron micrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Zupanic, F.

    2010-12-15

    Electron backscattering micrographs possess the so-called Z-contrast, carrying information about the chemical compositions of phases present in microstructures. The intensity at a particular point in the backscattered electron micrograph is proportional to the signal detected at a corresponding point in the scan raster, which is, in turn, proportional to the electron backscattering coefficient of a phase at that point. This article introduces a simple method for extracting the electron backscattering coefficients of phases present in the microstructure, from the backscattered electron micrographs. This method is able to convert the micrograph's greyscale to the backscattering-coefficient-scale. The prerequisite involves the known backscattering coefficients for two phases in the micrograph. In this way, backscattering coefficients of other phases can be determined. The method is unable to determine the chemical compositions of phases or the presence of an element only from analysing the backscattered electron micrograph. Nevertheless, this method was found to be very powerful when combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and the calculations of backscattering coefficients. - Research Highlights: {yields}A simple method for extracting the electron backscattering coefficients {yields}The prerequisite is known backscattering coefficients for two phases {yields}The information is complementary to the EDS-results. {yields}This method is especially useful when a phase contains a light element (H, Li, Be, and B)

  12. Crop Coefficients of Some Selected Crops of Andhra Pradesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. Chandrasekhar; Arunajyothy, S.; Mallikarjuna, P.

    2015-06-01

    Precise information on crop coefficients for estimating crop evapotranspiration (ETc) for regional scale irrigation planning is a major impediment in many regions. Crop coefficients suggested based on lysimeter data by earlier investigators have to be locally calibrated to account for the differences in the crop canopy under given climatic conditions. In the present study crop coefficients were derived based on reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) estimated from Penman-Monteith equation and lysimeter measured ETc for groundnut, paddy, tobacco, sugarcane and castor crops at Tirupati, Nellore, Rajahmundry, Anakapalli and Rajendranagar centers of Andhra Pradesh respectively. Crop coefficients derived were compared with those recommended by FAO-56. The mean crop coefficients at different stages of growth were significantly different from those of FAO-56 curve though a similar trend was observed. A third order polynomial crop coefficient model has therefore been developed as a function of time (days after sowing the crop) for deriving suitable crop coefficients. The crop coefficient models suggested may be adopted to estimate crop evapotranspiration in the study area with reasonable degree of accuracy.

  13. Graphical Solution of the Monic Quadratic Equation with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many geometrical approaches to the solution of the quadratic equation with real coefficients. In this article it is shown that the monic quadratic equation with complex coefficients can also be solved graphically, by the intersection of two hyperbolas; one hyperbola being derived from the real part of the quadratic equation and one from…

  14. REE and Strontium Partition Coefficients for Nakhla Pyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oe, K.; McKay, G.; Le, L.

    2001-01-01

    We present new partition coefficients for REE and Sr determined using a synthetic melt that crystallizes pyroxenes very similar in composition to Nakhla pyroxene cores. We believe these are the most appropriate partition coefficients to use in studying Nakhla Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  15. The Use of Structure Coefficients in Regression Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Lucille N.

    It is recognized that parametric methods (e.g., t-tests, discriminant analysis, and methods based on analysis of variance) are special cases of canonical correlation analysis. In canonical correlation it has been argued that structure coefficients must be computed to correctly interpret results. It follows that structure coefficients may be useful…

  16. The Importance of Structure Coefficients in Parametric Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrich, Katherine R.

    The recognition that all parametric methods are interrelated, coupled with the notion that structure coefficients are often vital in factor and canonical analyses, suggests that structure coefficients may be important in univariate analysis as well. Using a small, heuristic data set, this paper discusses the importance of structure coefficients…

  17. Direct Extraction of One-loop Integral Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Darren

    2007-04-16

    We present a general procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted by considering two-particle and triple unitarity cuts of the corresponding bubble and triangle integral functions. After choosing a specific parameterization of the cut loop momentum we can uniquely identify the coefficients of the desired integral functions simply by examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. In this way we can produce compact forms for scalar integral coefficients. Applications of this method are presented for both QCD and electroweak processes, including an alternative form for the recently computed three-mass triangle coefficient in the six-photon amplitude A{sub 6}(1{sup -}, 2{sup +}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup -}, 6{sup +}). The direct nature of this extraction procedure allows for a very straightforward automation of the procedure.

  18. Diffusion and viscosity coefficients for helium. [in astrophysical gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1982-01-01

    The first order Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation is solved numerically to obtain diffusion and viscosity coefficients for a ternary gas mixture composed of electron, protons, and helium. The coefficients are tabulated for five He/H abundances ranging from 0.01 to 10 and for both He II and He III. Comparison with Burgers's thermal diffusion coefficients reveals a maximum difference of 9-10% for both He II and He III throughout the range of helium abundances considered. The viscosity coefficients are compared to those of Chapman and Cowling and show a maximum difference of only 5-6% for He II but 15-16% for He III. For the astrophysically important gas mixtures, it is concluded that the results of existing studies which employed Burgers's or Chapman and Cowling's coefficients will remain substantially unaltered.

  19. A new correlation coefficient for bivariate time-series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Orhan; Ceyhan, Elvan; Varli, Yusuf

    2014-11-01

    The correlation in time series has received considerable attention in the literature. Its use has attained an important role in the social sciences and finance. For example, pair trading in finance is concerned with the correlation between stock prices, returns, etc. In general, Pearson’s correlation coefficient is employed in these areas although it has many underlying assumptions which restrict its use. Here, we introduce a new correlation coefficient which takes into account the lag difference of data points. We investigate the properties of this new correlation coefficient. We demonstrate that it is more appropriate for showing the direction of the covariation of the two variables over time. We also compare the performance of the new correlation coefficient with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (DCCA) via simulated examples.

  20. [Characteristics and Parameterization for Atmospheric Extinction Coefficient in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-na; Zhao, Pu-sheng; He, Di; Dong, Fan; Zhao, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the characteristics of atmospheric extinction coefficient in Beijing, systematic measurements had been carried out for atmospheric visibility, PM2.5 concentration, scattering coefficient, black carbon, reactive gases, and meteorological parameters from 2013 to 2014. Based on these data, we compared some published fitting schemes of aerosol light scattering enhancement factor [ f(RH)], and discussed the characteristics and the key influence factors for atmospheric extinction coefficient. Then a set of parameterization models of atmospheric extinction coefficient for different seasons and different polluted levels had been established. The results showed that aerosol scattering accounted for more than 94% of total light extinction. In the summer and autumn, the aerosol hygroscopic growth caused by high relative humidity had increased the aerosol scattering coefficient by 70 to 80 percent. The parameterization models could reflect the influencing mechanism of aerosol and relative humidity upon ambient light extinction, and describe the seasonal variations of aerosol light extinction ability. PMID:26841588

  1. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  2. [Characteristics and Parameterization for Atmospheric Extinction Coefficient in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-na; Zhao, Pu-sheng; He, Di; Dong, Fan; Zhao, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the characteristics of atmospheric extinction coefficient in Beijing, systematic measurements had been carried out for atmospheric visibility, PM2.5 concentration, scattering coefficient, black carbon, reactive gases, and meteorological parameters from 2013 to 2014. Based on these data, we compared some published fitting schemes of aerosol light scattering enhancement factor [ f(RH)], and discussed the characteristics and the key influence factors for atmospheric extinction coefficient. Then a set of parameterization models of atmospheric extinction coefficient for different seasons and different polluted levels had been established. The results showed that aerosol scattering accounted for more than 94% of total light extinction. In the summer and autumn, the aerosol hygroscopic growth caused by high relative humidity had increased the aerosol scattering coefficient by 70 to 80 percent. The parameterization models could reflect the influencing mechanism of aerosol and relative humidity upon ambient light extinction, and describe the seasonal variations of aerosol light extinction ability.

  3. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  4. Identity Coefficients in Finite Populations. I. Evolution of Identity Coefficients in a Random Mating Diploid Dioecious Population

    PubMed Central

    Chevalet, C.; Gillois, M.; Nassar, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Properties of identity relation between genes are discussed, and a derivation of recurrent equations of identity coefficients in a random mating, diploid dioecious population is presented. Computations are run by repeated matrix multiplication. Results show that for effective population size (Ne) larger than 16 and no mutation, a given identity coefficient at any time t can be expressed approximately as a function of (1—f), (1—f)3 and (1— f)6, where f is the mean inbreeding coefficient at time t. Tables are presented, for small Ne values and extreme sex ratios, showing the pattern of change in the identity coefficients over time. The pattern of evolution of identity coefficients is also presented and discussed with respect to N eu, where u is the mutation rate. Applications of these results to the evolution of genetic variability within and between inbred lines are discussed. PMID:892430

  5. Filtration coefficients and osmotic reflexion coefficients of the walls of single frog mesenteric capillaries.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, C C

    1980-01-01

    1. Single capillaries in the mesentery of pithed frogs were perfused with frog Ringer solutions containing various concentrations of bovine serum albumin and myoglobin. Filtration coefficients (Lp) of the capillary wall were determined from measurements of fluid filtration rate at a series of different capillary pressures (Michel, Mason, Curry & Tooke, 1974). The osmotic reflexion coefficients (sigma) to albumin and myoglobin were determined by comparing the effective osmotic pressure exerted by these solutes across the capillary walls with their osmotic pressures in a membrane osmometer. 2. Lp and sigma to albumin were measured in eighteen vessels at different sites in the capillary bed with the tissue temperature in the range of 20-24 degrees C. Lp varied from 1.5 x 10(-3) to 15 x 10(-3) micrometer sec-1 cm H2O-1 having a higher mean value in nine venous capillaries (11.33 x 10(-3) micrometer sec-1 cm H2O-1) than in nine arterial and mid-capillaries (4.83 x 10(-3) micrometer sec-1 cm H2O-1). For all eighteen vessels sigma to albumin had a mean value of 0.816 (S.E. of mean +/- 0.027). There was no correlation between Lp and sigma. The mean value of sigma for the venous capillaries was 0.841 (S.E. of mean +/- 0.04) and the other nine vessels 0.802 (S.E. of mean +/- 0.034). 3. The osmotic reflexion coefficient to myoglobin was measured in seven different capillaries and found to have a mean value of 0.348 (S.E. of mean +/- 0.012) at 20-24 degrees C. The Lp of the capillaries varied from 3.0 x 10(-3) to 10.5 x 10(-3) micrometer sec-1 cm H2O-1. There was no correlation between sigma for myoglobin and Lp. 4. The method of Curry, Mason & Michel (1976) was used to measure sigma for urea in eight capillaries at 20-24 degrees C (sigma for albumin was also measured in two of these vessels). The mean value of sigma for urea was 0.061 (S.E. of mean +/- 0.012). The exclusive water channel (Curry et al. 1976) was calculated to have a value of 0.209 x 10(-3) micrometer sec-1 H2O

  6. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods.

  7. An analytical solution for quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabetoglu, S.; Sisman, A.; Ozturk, Z. F.

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous experimental and numerical studies about quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient. In contrast, in this study, we obtain analytical expressions for Seebeck coefficient under quantum size effects. Seebeck coefficient of a Fermi gas confined in a rectangular domain is considered. Analytical expressions, which represent the size dependency of Seebeck coefficient explicitly, are derived in terms of confinement parameters. A fundamental form of Seebeck coefficient based on infinite summations is used under relaxation time approximation. To obtain analytical results, summations are calculated using the first two terms of Poisson summation formula. It is shown that they are in good agreement with the exact results based on direct calculation of summations as long as confinement parameters are less than unity. The analytical results are also in good agreement with experimental and numerical ones in literature. Maximum relative errors of analytical expressions are less than 3% and 4% for 2D and 1D cases, respectively. Dimensional transitions of Seebeck coefficient are also examined. Furthermore, a detailed physical explanation for the oscillations in Seebeck coefficient is proposed by considering the relative standard deviation of total variance of particle number in Fermi shell.

  8. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods. PMID:24010703

  9. Transparent composite model for DCT coefficients: design and analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, En-Hui; Yu, Xiang; Meng, Jin; Sun, Chang

    2014-03-01

    The distributions of discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients of images are revisited on a per image base. To better handle, the heavy tail phenomenon commonly seen in the DCT coefficients, a new model dubbed a transparent composite model (TCM) is proposed and justified for both modeling accuracy and an additional data reduction capability. Given a sequence of the DCT coefficients, a TCM first separates the tail from the main body of the sequence. Then, a uniform distribution is used to model the DCT coefficients in the heavy tail, whereas a different parametric distribution is used to model data in the main body. The separate boundary and other parameters of the TCM can be estimated via maximum likelihood estimation. Efficient online algorithms are proposed for parameter estimation and their convergence is also proved. Experimental results based on Kullback-Leibler divergence and χ(2) test show that for real-valued continuous ac coefficients, the TCM based on truncated Laplacian offers the best tradeoff between modeling accuracy and complexity. For discrete or integer DCT coefficients, the discrete TCM based on truncated geometric distributions (GMTCM) models the ac coefficients more accurately than pure Laplacian models and generalized Gaussian models in majority cases while having simplicity and practicality similar to those of pure Laplacian models. In addition, it is demonstrated that the GMTCM also exhibits a good capability of data reduction or feature extraction-the DCT coefficients in the heavy tail identified by the GMTCM are truly outliers, and these outliers represent an outlier image revealing some unique global features of the image. Overall, the modeling performance and the data reduction feature of the GMTCM make it a desirable choice for modeling discrete or integer DCT coefficients in the real-world image or video applications, as summarized in a few of our further studies on quantization design, entropy coding design, and image understanding

  10. The resistance coefficient of commercial round wire grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, B; Pfluger, F

    1942-01-01

    The resistance coefficients of commercial types of round wire grids were examined for the purpose of obtaining the necessary data on supercharger test stands for throttling the inducted air to a pressure corresponding to a desired air density. The measurements of the coefficients ranged up to Reynolds numbers of 1000. In the arrangement of two grids in tandem, which was necessary in order to obtain high resistance coefficients with the solidity, that is, mesh density of grid, was found to be accompanied by a further relationship with the mutual spacing of the individual grids.

  11. Maxwell boundary condition and velocity dependent accommodation coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2013-11-15

    A modification of Maxwell's boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation is developed that allows to incorporate velocity dependent accommodation coefficients into the microscopic description. As a first example, it is suggested to consider the wall-particle interaction as a thermally activated process with three parameters. A simplified averaging procedure leads to jump and slip boundary conditions for hydrodynamics. Coefficients for velocity slip, temperature jump, and thermal transpiration flow are identified and compared with those resulting from the original Maxwell model and the Cercignani-Lampis model. An extension of the model leads to temperature dependent slip and jump coefficients.

  12. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  13. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric coefficients for ferroelectric crystals with polarizable molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Taylor, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    Expressions for piezoelectric and pyroelectric coefficients for a crystal of polarizable point dipoles are derived. The effect of crystal structure on the local electric field acting to polarize the molecules is included via the Lorentz-factor formalism. The derived expressions for the piezo- and pyroelectric coefficients are found to contain terms dependent on derivatives of the Lorentz factors. These terms reflect the changing of molecular dipole moments in response to the changing local electric field in the strained crystal. Inclusion of this effect results in predictions of coefficients substantially different from those obtained using the Lorentz field approximation.

  14. Risk assessment of distribution coefficient from 137Cs measurements.

    PubMed

    Külahci, Fatih; Sen, Zekai

    2009-02-01

    Classically distribution coefficient is defined as the ratio of solid total element concentration to surface water total concentration. This coefficient is obtained from the ion measurements in the Keban Dam, Turkey, which supplies water for domestic, irrigation and hydroelectric energy generation purposes. The measurements of 137Cs are carried out in 40 different sites and the general risk formulation and application is achieved for the distribution coefficient. The models are of exponential type and the spatial independence of the data is considered. Various charts are prepared for a set of risk levels as 5%, 10%, 20%, 25%, and 50%.

  15. Network clustering coefficient without degree-correlation biases.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Sara Nadiv; Vázquez, Alexei

    2005-05-01

    The clustering coefficient quantifies how well connected are the neighbors of a vertex in a graph. In real networks it decreases with the vertex degree, which has been taken as a signature of the network hierarchical structure. Here we show that this signature of hierarchical structure is a consequence of degree-correlation biases in the clustering coefficient definition. We introduce a definition in which the degree-correlation biases are filtered out, and provide evidence that in real networks the clustering coefficient is constant or decays logarithmically with vertex degree.

  16. Averaged particle dose conversion coefficients in air crew dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Roesler, S; Schraube, H

    2004-01-01

    The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to calculate energy-dependent fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for neutrons, protons, electrons, photons, charged pions and muons. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the spectral particle fluences of secondary cosmic rays for different altitudes, and for different combinations of solar modulation and vertical cut-off rigidity parameters. The energy-averaged fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were obtained by folding the particle fluence spectra with the conversion coefficients for effective dose and ambient dose equivalent. They show a slight dependence on altitude, solar activity and location in the geomagnetic field.

  17. Universal statistics of the scattering coefficient of chaotic microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Antonsen, Thomas M. Jr.; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M.

    2005-05-01

    We consider the statistics of the scattering coefficient S of a chaotic microwave cavity coupled to a single port. We remove the nonuniversal effects of the coupling from the experimental S data using the radiation impedance obtained directly from the experiments. We thus obtain the normalized scattering coefficient whose probability density function (PDF) is predicted to be universal in that it depends only on the loss (quality factor) of the cavity. We compare experimental PDFs of the normalized scattering coefficients with those obtained from random matrix theory (RMT), and find excellent agreement. The results apply to scattering measurements on any wave chaotic system.

  18. Cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient in interplanetary space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleeson, L. J.; Urch, I. H.

    1972-01-01

    The authors of three recent papers reporting cosmic-ray electron differential intensities near the earth during 1966 and 1968 in the rigidity range above 500 MV have concluded that the observations are not compatible with a diffusion coefficient that can be written as a product of a rigidity-dependent part and a part that is a function of heliocentric distance. It is shown in this paper that, with an interstellar electron spectrum and a near-earth spectrum given, a diffusion coefficient of the above form can always be determinedand the conclusion noted above cannot be sustained. Diffusion coefficients appropriate to the observations are given.

  19. Combined diffusion coefficients for a mixture of three ionized gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. N.; Murphy, A. B.; Li, H. P.; Xia, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    The combined diffusion coefficient method has been demonstrated to greatly simplify the treatment of diffusion in the modelling of thermal plasmas in gas mixtures without loss of accuracy. In this paper, an extension of this method to allow treatment of diffusion of a three-gas mixture has been achieved, provided that the gases are homonuclear and do not react with each other, and satisfy local chemical equilibrium. Formulas for the combined diffusion coefficients are presented, and combined diffusion coefficients for different mixtures of helium, argon and carbon at temperatures up to 30 000 K and at atmosphere pressure are calculated as an example.

  20. Kubo Formulas for Second-Order Hydrodynamic Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Guy D.; Sohrabi, Kiyoumars A.

    2011-03-25

    At second order in gradients, conformal relativistic hydrodynamics depends on the viscosity {eta} and on five additional ''second-order'' hydrodynamical coefficients {tau}{sub {Pi}}, {kappa}, {lambda}{sub 1}, {lambda}{sub 2}, and {lambda}{sub 3}. We derive Kubo relations for these coefficients, relating them to equilibrium, fully retarded three-point correlation functions of the stress tensor. We show that the coefficient {lambda}{sub 3} can be evaluated directly by Euclidean means and does not in general vanish.

  1. Averaged particle dose conversion coefficients in air crew dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Roesler, S; Schraube, H

    2004-01-01

    The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to calculate energy-dependent fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for neutrons, protons, electrons, photons, charged pions and muons. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the spectral particle fluences of secondary cosmic rays for different altitudes, and for different combinations of solar modulation and vertical cut-off rigidity parameters. The energy-averaged fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were obtained by folding the particle fluence spectra with the conversion coefficients for effective dose and ambient dose equivalent. They show a slight dependence on altitude, solar activity and location in the geomagnetic field. PMID:15353676

  2. Orientation and velocity dependence of the nonequilibrium partition coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, K. M.; Jackson, K. A.

    1995-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations based on a Spin-1 Ising Model for binary alloys have been used to investigate the non-equilibrium partition coefficient (k(sub neq)) as a function of solid-liquid interface velocity and orientation. In simulations of Si with a second component k(sub neq) is greater in the [111] direction than the [100] direction in agreement with experimental results reported by Azlz et al. The simulated partition coefficient scales with the square of the step velocity divided by the diffusion coefficient of the secondary component in the liquid.

  3. Fractional crystallization of iron meteorites: Constant versus changing partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses of magmatic iron meteorites, plotted on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams, often form linear arrays. Traditionally, this linearity has been ascribed to fractional crystallization under the assumption of constant partition coefficients (i.e., Rayleigh fractionation). Paradoxically, however, partition coefficients in the Fe-Ni-S-P system are decidedly not constant. This contribution provides a rationale for understanding how trends on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams can be linear, even when partition coefficients are changing rapidly.

  4. Universal statistics of the scattering coefficient of chaotic microwave cavities.

    PubMed

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2005-05-01

    We consider the statistics of the scattering coefficient S of a chaotic microwave cavity coupled to a single port. We remove the nonuniversal effects of the coupling from the experimental S data using the radiation impedance obtained directly from the experiments. We thus obtain the normalized scattering coefficient whose probability density function (PDF) is predicted to be universal in that it depends only on the loss (quality factor) of the cavity. We compare experimental PDFs of the normalized scattering coefficients with those obtained from random matrix theory (RMT), and find excellent agreement. The results apply to scattering measurements on any wave chaotic system.

  5. Electron and proton damage coefficients in low-resistivity silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srour, J. R.; Othmer, S.; Chiu, K. Y.

    1975-01-01

    The electron and proton damage coefficients for low resistivity p-type boron-doped silicon were determined from minority-carrier lifetime measurements on bulk material and diffusion length measurements on solar cells. The bulk samples were irradiated with electrons at three energy levels (0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 MeV) using a Dynamitron. Lifetime measurements were made with a steady-state photoconductivity apparatus, and comparison measurements of diffusion length were obtained using the steady-state surface photovoltage method (Goodman, 1961). The diffusion-length damage coefficients increased with decreasing resistivity for boron-doped silicon; this dependence can be qualitatively accounted for using a two-level Hall-Shockley-Read model. The damage coefficients for solar cells were larger than for their bulk-material counterparts. The damage coefficient was apparently independent of the dislocation density in the 0.1 ohm-cm bulk samples and solar cells investigated.

  6. Determination of Catalytic Coefficient for a First-Order Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, E. R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose is used to determine the catalytic coefficient of the hydronium ion, the catalyst in this reaction. (MLH)

  7. A New Adaptive Image Denoising Method Based on Neighboring Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Mantosh; Om, Hari

    2016-03-01

    Many good techniques have been discussed for image denoising that include NeighShrink, improved adaptive wavelet denoising method based on neighboring coefficients (IAWDMBNC), improved wavelet shrinkage technique for image denoising (IWST), local adaptive wiener filter (LAWF), wavelet packet thresholding using median and wiener filters (WPTMWF), adaptive image denoising method based on thresholding (AIDMT). These techniques are based on local statistical description of the neighboring coefficients in a window. These methods however do not give good quality of the images since they cannot modify and remove too many small wavelet coefficients simultaneously due to the threshold. In this paper, a new image denoising method is proposed that shrinks the noisy coefficients using an adaptive threshold. Our method overcomes these drawbacks and it has better performance than the NeighShrink, IAWDMBNC, IWST, LAWF, WPTMWF, and AIDMT denoising methods.

  8. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  9. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  10. [Electroencephalogram Feature Selection Based on Correlation Coefficient Analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinzhi; Tang, Xiaofang

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of classification with small amount of motor imagery training data on the development of brain-computer interface (BCD systems, we proposed an analyzing method to automatically select the characteristic parameters based on correlation coefficient analysis. Throughout the five sample data of dataset IV a from 2005 BCI Competition, we utilized short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and correlation coefficient calculation to reduce the number of primitive electroencephalogram dimension, then introduced feature extraction based on common spatial pattern (CSP) and classified by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Simulation results showed that the average rate of classification accuracy could be improved by using correlation coefficient feature selection method than those without using this algorithm. Comparing with support vector machine (SVM) optimization features algorithm, the correlation coefficient analysis can lead better selection parameters to improve the accuracy of classification. PMID:26710441

  11. Virial coefficients and demixing in the Asakura-Oosawa model.

    PubMed

    López de Haro, Mariano; Tejero, Carlos F; Santos, Andrés; Yuste, Santos B; Fiumara, Giacomo; Saija, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The problem of demixing in the Asakura-Oosawa colloid-polymer model is considered. The critical constants are computed using truncated virial expansions up to fifth order. While the exact analytical results for the second and third virial coefficients are known for any size ratio, analytical results for the fourth virial coefficient are provided here, and fifth virial coefficients are obtained numerically for particular size ratios using standard Monte Carlo techniques. We have computed the critical constants by successively considering the truncated virial series up to the second, third, fourth, and fifth virial coefficients. The results for the critical colloid and (reservoir) polymer packing fractions are compared with those that follow from available Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. Limitations and perspectives of this approach are pointed out. PMID:25573578

  12. Virial coefficients and demixing in the Asakura-Oosawa model.

    PubMed

    López de Haro, Mariano; Tejero, Carlos F; Santos, Andrés; Yuste, Santos B; Fiumara, Giacomo; Saija, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The problem of demixing in the Asakura-Oosawa colloid-polymer model is considered. The critical constants are computed using truncated virial expansions up to fifth order. While the exact analytical results for the second and third virial coefficients are known for any size ratio, analytical results for the fourth virial coefficient are provided here, and fifth virial coefficients are obtained numerically for particular size ratios using standard Monte Carlo techniques. We have computed the critical constants by successively considering the truncated virial series up to the second, third, fourth, and fifth virial coefficients. The results for the critical colloid and (reservoir) polymer packing fractions are compared with those that follow from available Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. Limitations and perspectives of this approach are pointed out.

  13. A database of selected transport coefficients for combustion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1993-08-01

    COYOTE and similar combustion programs based on the multicomponent Navier-Stokes equations require the mixture viscosity, thermal conductivity, and species transport coefficients as input. This report documents a significant improvement to the calculation of these molecular transport coefficients in COYOTE and provides a self-contained and easy-to-use source of such data in a format suitable for use by such programs. We present the data for various species in two forms. The first is a simple functional fit to the transport coefficients. The second is the use of tabulated Lennard-Jones parameters in simple theoretical expressions for the gas-phase transport coefficients. Tables are given for a number of chemical species.

  14. Using two coefficients modeling of nonsubsampled Shearlet transform for despeckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Saeed; Ghofrani, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are inherently affected by multiplicative speckle noise. Two approaches based on modeling the nonsubsampled Shearlet transform (NSST) coefficients are presented. Two-sided generalized Gamma distribution and normal inverse Gaussian probability density function have been used to model the statistics of NSST coefficients. Bayesian maximum a posteriori estimator is applied to the corrupted NSST coefficients in order to estimate the noise-free NSST coefficients. Finally, experimental results, according to objective and subjective criteria, carried out on both artificially speckled images and the true SAR images, demonstrate that the proposed methods outperform other state of art references via two points of view, speckle noise reduction and image quality preservation.

  15. How To Prepare Materials With a Desired Refraction Coefficient?

    SciTech Connect

    Ramm, A. G.

    2010-05-21

    In this talk a method is described for preparing materials with a desired refraction coefficient. The method consists of embedding into a material with known refraction coefficient many small particles of size a. The number of particles per unit volume around any point is prescribed, the distance between neighboring particles is O(a{sup (2-kappa/3)}) as a->0, 00. The refraction coefficient is the coefficient n{sup 2}(x) in the wave equation [nabla{sup 2}+kappa{sup 2}n{sup 2}(x)]u = 0.

  16. Transfer having a coupling coefficient higher than its active material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A. (Inventor); Davis, Christopher L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coupling coefficient is a measure of the effectiveness with which a shape-changing material (or a device employing such a material) converts the energy in an imposed signal to useful mechanical energy. Device coupling coefficients are properties of the device and, although related to the material coupling coefficients, are generally different from them. This invention describes a class of devices wherein the apparent coupling coefficient can, in principle, approach 1.0, corresponding to perfect electromechanical energy conversion. The key feature of this class of devices is the use of destabilizing mechanical pre-loads to counter inherent stiffness. The approach is illustrated for piezoelectric and thermoelectrically actuated devices. The invention provides a way to simultaneously increase both displacement and force, distinguishing it from alternatives such as motion amplification, and allows transducer designers to achieve substantial performance gains for actuator and sensor devices.

  17. An instrumental variable random-coefficients model for binary outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chesher, Andrew; Rosen, Adam M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study a random-coefficients model for a binary outcome. We allow for the possibility that some or even all of the explanatory variables are arbitrarily correlated with the random coefficients, thus permitting endogeneity. We assume the existence of observed instrumental variables Z that are jointly independent with the random coefficients, although we place no structure on the joint determination of the endogenous variable X and instruments Z, as would be required for a control function approach. The model fits within the spectrum of generalized instrumental variable models, and we thus apply identification results from our previous studies of such models to the present context, demonstrating their use. Specifically, we characterize the identified set for the distribution of random coefficients in the binary response model with endogeneity via a collection of conditional moment inequalities, and we investigate the structure of these sets by way of numerical illustration. PMID:25798048

  18. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  19. Correlation equation for the marine drag coefficient and wave steepness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Richard J.; Emeis, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    This work questions, starting from dimensional considerations, the generality of the belief that the marine drag coefficient levels off with increasing wind speed. Dimensional analysis shows that the drag coefficient scales with the wave steepness as opposed to a wave-age scaling. A correlation equation is employed here that uses wave steepness scaling at low aspect ratios (inverse wave steepnesses) and a constant drag coefficient at high aspect ratios. Invoked in support of the correlation are measurements sourced from the literature and at the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. The correlation equation is then applied to measurements recorded from buoys during the passage of hurricanes Rita, Katrina (2005) and Ike (2008). Results show that the correlation equation anticipates the expected levelling off in deeper water, but a drag coefficient more consistent with a Charnock type relation is also possible in more shallower water. Some suggestions are made for proceeding with a higher-order analysis than that conducted here.

  20. Effect of applied mechanical stress on absorption coefficient of compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Gurinderjeet; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Kahlon, K. S.

    2015-08-28

    The absorption coefficient of given materials is the parameter required for the basic information. The measurement of absorption coefficient of compounds Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, ZnO{sub 2}, SmO{sub 2} and PbO has been taken at different incident photon energies 26, 59.54, 112, 1173, 1332keV. The studies involve the measurements of absorption coefficient of the self supporting samples prepared under different mechanical stress. This mechanical stress is render in terms of pressure up to 0-6 ton by using hydraulic press. Measurements shows that absorption coefficient of a material is directly proportional to applied mechanical stress on it up to some extent then become independent. Experimentally measured results are in fairly good agreement with in theoretical values obtained from WinXCOM.

  1. Seal assembly for materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion

    DOEpatents

    Minford, Eric

    2009-09-01

    Seal assembly comprising (a) two or more seal elements, each element having having a coefficient of thermal expansion; and (b) a clamping element having a first segment, a second segment, and a connecting segment between and attached to the first and second segments, wherein the two or more seal elements are disposed between the first and second segments of the clamping element. The connecting segment has a central portion extending between the first segment of the clamping element and the second segment of the clamping element, and the connecting segment is made of a material having a coefficient of thermal expansion. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the material of the connecting segment is intermediate the largest and smallest of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the materials of the two or more seal elements.

  2. Constraining the Drag Coefficients of Meteors in Dark Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, R. T.; Jandir, P. S.; Kress, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Based on data in the aeronautics literature, we have derived functions for the drag coefficients of spheres and cubes as a function of Mach number. Experiments have shown that spheres and cubes exhibit an abrupt factor-of-two decrease in the drag coefficient as the object slows through the transonic regime. Irregularly shaped objects such as meteorites likely exhibit a similar trend. These functions are implemented in an otherwise simple projectile motion model, which is applicable to the non-ablative dark flight of meteors (speeds less than .+3 km/s). We demonstrate how these functions may be used as upper and lower limits on the drag coefficient of meteors whose shape is unknown. A Mach-dependent drag coefficient is potentially important in other planetary and astrophysical situations, for instance, in the core accretion scenario for giant planet formation.

  3. A Comparison of Composite Reliability Estimators: Coefficient Omega Confidence Intervals in the Current Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Coefficient omega and alpha are both measures of the composite reliability for a set of items. Unlike coefficient alpha, coefficient omega remains unbiased with congeneric items with uncorrelated errors. Despite this ability, coefficient omega is not as widely used and cited in the literature as coefficient alpha. Reasons for coefficient omega's…

  4. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  5. Higher order matrix differential equations with singular coefficient matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Fragkoulis, V. C.; Kougioumtzoglou, I. A.; Pantelous, A. A.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-03-10

    In this article, the class of higher order linear matrix differential equations with constant coefficient matrices and stochastic process terms is studied. The coefficient of the highest order is considered to be singular; thus, rendering the response determination of such systems in a straightforward manner a difficult task. In this regard, the notion of the generalized inverse of a singular matrix is used for determining response statistics. Further, an application relevant to engineering dynamics problems is included.

  6. Black holes, information, and the universal coefficient theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrascu, Andrei T.

    2016-07-01

    General relativity is based on the diffeomorphism covariant formulation of the laws of physics while quantum mechanics is based on the principle of unitary evolution. In this article, I provide a possible answer to the black hole information paradox by means of homological algebra and pairings generated by the universal coefficient theorem. The unitarity of processes involving black holes is restored by the demanding invariance of the laws of physics to the change of coefficient structures in cohomology.

  7. Coefficient of variation calculated from the range for skewed distributions.

    PubMed

    Rhiel, G Steven

    2006-02-01

    In this research a coefficient of variation (CVS(high.low)) is developed that is calculated from the highest and lowest values in a set of data for samples from skewed distributions. A correction factor is determined such that CVS(high-low) is a dose estimate of the population coefficient of variation when sampling from three skewed chi-squared distributions and three skewed empirical distributions. The empirical distributions are from "real-world" data sets in psychology and education.

  8. The temperature variation of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of temperature for a few metal alloys using an electrochemical evolution technique. Results from these measurements are compared to those obtained by the time-lag method. In all cases, diffusion coefficients obtained by the electrochemical method are larger than those by the time-lag method by an order of magnitude or more. These differences are attributed mainly to hydrogen trapping.

  9. The Joule-Thomson expansion coefficient by formula manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Y.; Kitazawa, T. ); Yoshida, T. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-07-01

    By use of formula manipulation, practical programs used to estimate the Joule-Thomson coefficients are presented in this paper. The available equations of state used include the following: van der Waals, Virial, BWR, RK, and SRK. The Joule-Thomson coefficients for nitrogen and ethane are estimated by the proposed programs, and their ability to reproduce experimental values is tested. It is found that the RK equation yields the best results for nitrogen and ethane despite its simplicity.

  10. Altitude-dependent dose conversion coefficients in EPCARD.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Leuthold, G

    2007-01-01

    Conversion coefficients that depend on altitude, cutoff rigidity and solar activity were developed and introduced in the European Program Package for the Calculation of Aviation Route Doses (EPCARD). A set of specially chosen long-distance flights were used to compare the new particle effective doses and ambient dose equivalents with those calculated using the previous averaged constant conversion coefficients. The data show very good agreement to each other. The dose differences for the chosen flights are <11%, for typical civil flight levels.

  11. Calculating rotordynamic coefficients of seals by finite-difference techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1987-01-01

    For modelling the turbulent flow in a seal the Navier-Stokes equations in connection with a turbulence (kappa-epsilon) model are solved by a finite-difference method. A motion of the shaft round the centered position is assumed. After calculating the corresponding flow field and the pressure distribution, the rotor-dynamic coefficients of the seal can be determined. These coefficients are compared with results obtained by using the bulk flow theory of Childs and with experimental results.

  12. Unitarity cuts with massive propagators and algebraic expressions for coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Ruth; Feng Bo

    2007-05-15

    In the first part of this paper, we extend the d-dimensional unitarity cut method of Anastasiou et al. to cases with massive propagators. We present formulas for integral reduction with which one can obtain coefficients of all pentagon, box, triangle and massive bubble integrals. In the second part of this paper, we present a detailed study of the phase space integration for unitarity cuts. We carry out spinor integration in generality and give algebraic expressions for coefficients, intended for automated evaluation.

  13. Red Cell Membrane Permeability Deduced from Bulk Diffusion Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Redwood, W. R.; Rall, E.; Perl, W.

    1974-01-01

    The permeability coefficients of dog red cell membrane to tritiated water and to a series of[14C]amides have been deduced from bulk diffusion measurements through a "tissue" composed of packed red cells. Red cells were packed by centrifugation inside polyethylene tubing. The red cell column was pulsed at one end with radiolabeled solute and diffusion was allowed to proceed for several hours. The distribution of radioactivity along the red cell column was measured by sequential slicing and counting, and the diffusion coefficient was determined by a simple plotting technique, assuming a one-dimensional diffusional model. In order to derive the red cell membrane permeability coefficient from the bulk diffusion coefficient, the red cells were assumed to be packed in a regular manner approximating closely spaced parallelopipeds. The local steady-state diffusional flux was idealized as a one-dimensional intracellular pathway in parallel with a one-dimensional extracellular pathway with solute exchange occurring within the series pathway and between the pathways. The diffusion coefficients in the intracellular and extracellular pathways were estimated from bulk diffusion measurements through concentrated hemoglobin solutions and plasma, respectively; while the volume of the extracellular pathway was determined using radiolabeled sucrose. The membrane permeability coefficients were in satisfactory agreement with the data of Sha'afi, R. I., C. M. Gary-Bobo, and A. K. Solomon (1971. J. Gen. Physiol. 58:238) obtained by a rapid-reaction technique. The method is simple and particularly well suited for rapidly permeating solutes. PMID:4443795

  14. Attenuation Coefficient Estimation of the Healthy Human Thyroid In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, J.; Cueva, T.; Portal, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Lavarello, R.

    Previous studies have demonstrated that attenuation coefficients can be useful towards characterizing thyroid tissues. In this work, ultrasonic attenuation coefficients were estimated from healthy human thyroids in vivo using a clinical scanner. The selected subjects were five young, healthy volunteers (age: 26 ± 6 years old, gender: three females, two males) with no reported history of thyroid diseases, no palpable thyroid nodules, no smoking habits, and body mass index less than 30 kg/m2. Echographic examinations were conducted by a trained sonographer using a SonixTouch system (Ultrasonix Medical Corporation, Richmond, BC) equipped with an L14-5 linear transducer array (nominal center frequency of 10 MHz, transducer footprint of 3.8 cm). Radiofrequency data corresponding to the collected echographic images in both transverse and longitudinal views were digitized at a sampling rate of 40 MHz and processed with Matlab codes (MathWorks, Natick, MA) to estimate attenuation coefficients using the spectral log difference method. The estimation was performed using an analysis bandwidth spanning from 4.0 to 9.0 MHz. The average value of the estimated ultrasonic attenuation coefficients was equal to 1.34 ± 0.15 dB/(cm.MHz). The standard deviation of the estimated average attenuation coefficient across different volunteers suggests a non-negligible inter-subject variability in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of the human thyroid.

  15. Atmospheric Density Corrections Estimated from Fitted Drag Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, C. A.; Lechtenberg, T. F.; Mance, S. R.; Mehta, P.

    2010-12-01

    Fitted drag coefficients estimated using GEODYN, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Precision Orbit Determination and Geodetic Parameter Estimation Program, are used to create density corrections. The drag coefficients were estimated for Stella, Starlette and GFZ using satellite laser ranging (SLR) measurements; and for GEOSAT Follow-On (GFO) using SLR, Doppler, and altimeter crossover measurements. The data analyzed covers years ranging from 2000 to 2004 for Stella and Starlette, 2000 to 2002 and 2005 for GFO, and 1995 to 1997 for GFZ. The drag coefficient was estimated every eight hours. The drag coefficients over the course of a year show a consistent variation about the theoretical and yearly average values that primarily represents a semi-annual/seasonal error in the atmospheric density models used. The atmospheric density models examined were NRLMSISE-00 and MSIS-86. The annual structure of the major variations was consistent among all the satellites for a given year and consistent among all the years examined. The fitted drag coefficients can be converted into density corrections every eight hours along the orbit of the satellites. In addition, drag coefficients estimated more frequently can provide a higher frequency of density correction.

  16. Temperature dependence of Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qieni; Han, Jinxin; Dai, Haitao; Ge, Baozhen; Zhao, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    We measure temperature dependence on Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal simultaneously in this work, based on digital holographic interferometry (DHI). And the spatial distribution of the field-induced refractive index change can also be visualized and estimated by numerically retrieving sequential phase maps of Mn:Fe:KTN crystal from recording digital holograms in different states. The refractive indices decrease with increasing temperature and quadratic polarized optical coefficient is insensitive to temperature. The experimental results suggest that the DHI method presented here is highly applicable in both visualizing the temporal and spatial behavior of the internal electric field and accurately measuring electro-optic coefficient for electrooptical media.

  17. Identification of a positive-Seebeck-coefficient exohedral fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almutlaq, Nasser; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Bailey, Steven; Lambert, Colin J.

    2016-07-01

    If fullerene-based thermoelectricity is to become a viable technology, then fullerenes exhibiting both positive and negative Seebeck coefficients are needed. C60 is known to have a negative Seebeck coefficient and therefore in this paper we address the challenge of identifying a positive-Seebeck-coefficient fullerene. We investigated the thermoelectric properties of single-molecule junctions of the exohedral fullerene C50Cl10 connected to gold electrodes and found that it indeed possesses a positive Seebeck coefficient. Furthermore, in common with C60, the Seebeck coefficient can be increased by placing more than one C50Cl10 in series. For a single C50Cl10, we find S = +8 μV K-1 and for two C50Cl10's in series we find S = +30 μV K-1. We also find that the C50Cl10 monomer and dimer have power factors of 0.5 × 10-5 W m-1 K-2 and 6.0 × 10-5 W m-1 K-2 respectively. These results demonstrate that exohedral fullerenes provide a new class of thermoelectric materials with desirable properties, which complement those of all-carbon fullerenes, thereby enabling the boosting of the thermovoltage in all-fullerene tandem structures.If fullerene-based thermoelectricity is to become a viable technology, then fullerenes exhibiting both positive and negative Seebeck coefficients are needed. C60 is known to have a negative Seebeck coefficient and therefore in this paper we address the challenge of identifying a positive-Seebeck-coefficient fullerene. We investigated the thermoelectric properties of single-molecule junctions of the exohedral fullerene C50Cl10 connected to gold electrodes and found that it indeed possesses a positive Seebeck coefficient. Furthermore, in common with C60, the Seebeck coefficient can be increased by placing more than one C50Cl10 in series. For a single C50Cl10, we find S = +8 μV K-1 and for two C50Cl10's in series we find S = +30 μV K-1. We also find that the C50Cl10 monomer and dimer have power factors of 0.5 × 10-5 W m-1 K-2 and 6.0 × 10-5 W m-1

  18. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  19. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied. PMID:26651684

  20. Temperature coefficients of reactivity for the SRS Mark 22 assembly

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.L.; Frost, R.L. )

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are unique in design and operation. In contrast to commercial power reactors, the SRS reactors were designed for isotope production rather than power generation. The SRS reactors are cooled and moderated by heavy water at near-atmospheric pressure, and the fuel assemblies consist of concentric annualar tubes rather than the solid pins typically found in power reactors. These and other factors make the neutronic behavior of SRS reactors unique. Temperature coefficients of reactivity are a measure of the change in core reactivity resulting from a change in the temperature of the reactor components. These coefficients are used in safety analyses and for prediction of reactivity changes with control rod moves during reactor operations. This paper presents the results of an investigation of temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 assembly currently charged to the K Reactor. The Mark 22 assembly is the tritium-producing assembly currently in use at SRS. This assembly contains two concentric fuel tubes of enriched uranium-aluminum alloy located between two concentric target tubes of lithium-aluminum alloy. There are three active coolant channels (cooling both sides of each fuel tube) and two low-flow dead spaces at the center and outside of the assembly. Heavy water flows down the three coolant channels in the Mark 22 assemblies and then jets out into the moderator space (the heavy water region bewteen assemblies). Six regional temperature coefficients are calculated at SRS: fuel, target, coolant, dead space, moderator upflow, and moderator downflow. The first four coefficients correspond to regions of the assembly and are calculated using the GLASS infinite lattice transport code. The two moderator coefficients correspond to reactor core regions and are calculated using the GRIMHX three-dimensional finite lattice diffusion theory code. Assembly coefficients calculated by GLASS have been experimentally verified.

  1. Identification of a positive-Seebeck-coefficient exohedral fullerene.

    PubMed

    Almutlaq, Nasser; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Bailey, Steven; Lambert, Colin J

    2016-07-14

    If fullerene-based thermoelectricity is to become a viable technology, then fullerenes exhibiting both positive and negative Seebeck coefficients are needed. C60 is known to have a negative Seebeck coefficient and therefore in this paper we address the challenge of identifying a positive-Seebeck-coefficient fullerene. We investigated the thermoelectric properties of single-molecule junctions of the exohedral fullerene C50Cl10 connected to gold electrodes and found that it indeed possesses a positive Seebeck coefficient. Furthermore, in common with C60, the Seebeck coefficient can be increased by placing more than one C50Cl10 in series. For a single C50Cl10, we find S = +8 μV K(-1) and for two C50Cl10's in series we find S = +30 μV K(-1). We also find that the C50Cl10 monomer and dimer have power factors of 0.5 × 10(-5) W m(-1) K(-2) and 6.0 × 10(-5) W m(-1) K(-2) respectively. These results demonstrate that exohedral fullerenes provide a new class of thermoelectric materials with desirable properties, which complement those of all-carbon fullerenes, thereby enabling the boosting of the thermovoltage in all-fullerene tandem structures. PMID:27357101

  2. Viscosity Coefficient Curve Fits for Ionized Gas Species Grant Palmer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viscosity coefficient curve fits for neutral gas species are available from many sources. Many do a good job of reproducing experimental and computational chemistry data. The curve fits are usually expressed as a function of temperature only. This is consistent with the governing equations used to derive an expression for the neutral species viscosity coefficient. Ionized species pose a more complicated problem. They are subject to electrostatic as well as intermolecular forces. The electrostatic forces are affected by a shielding phenomenon where electrons shield the electrostatic forces of positively charged ions beyond a certain distance. The viscosity coefficient for an ionized gas species is a function of both temperature and local electron number density. Currently available curve fits for ionized gas species, such as those presented by Gupta/Yos, are a function of temperature only. What they did was to assume an electron number density. The problem is that the electron number density they assumed was unrealistically high. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the proper expression for determining the viscosity coefficient of an ionized species as a function of both temperature and electron number density will be presented. Then curve fit coefficients will be developed using the more realistic assumption of an equilibrium electron number density. The results will be compared against previous curve fits and against highly accurate computational chemistry data.

  3. Penalized spline estimation for functional coefficient regression models

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanrong; Lin, Haiqun; Wu, Tracy Z.

    2011-01-01

    The functional coefficient regression models assume that the regression coefficients vary with some “threshold” variable, providing appreciable flexibility in capturing the underlying dynamics in data and avoiding the so-called “curse of dimensionality” in multivariate nonparametric estimation. We first investigate the estimation, inference, and forecasting for the functional coefficient regression models with dependent observations via penalized splines. The P-spline approach, as a direct ridge regression shrinkage type global smoothing method, is computationally efficient and stable. With established fixed-knot asymptotics, inference is readily available. Exact inference can be obtained for fixed smoothing parameter λ, which is most appealing for finite samples. Our penalized spline approach gives an explicit model expression, which also enables multi-step-ahead forecasting via simulations. Furthermore, we examine different methods of choosing the important smoothing parameter λ: modified multi-fold cross-validation (MCV), generalized cross-validation (GCV), and an extension of empirical bias bandwidth selection (EBBS) to P-splines. In addition, we implement smoothing parameter selection using mixed model framework through restricted maximum likelihood (REML) for P-spline functional coefficient regression models with independent observations. The P-spline approach also easily allows different smoothness for different functional coefficients, which is enabled by assigning different penalty λ accordingly. We demonstrate the proposed approach by both simulation examples and a real data application. PMID:21516260

  4. Theoretical approximations and experimental extinction coefficients of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P; Valle-González, Elba R; Ferreira-Gómez, David; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    UV spectrophotometric measurement is a widely accepted and standardized routine analysis for quantitation of highly purified proteins; however, the reliability of the results strictly depends on the accuracy of the employed extinction coefficients. In this work, an experimental estimation of the differential refractive index (dn/dc), based on dry weight measurements, was performed in order to determine accurate extinction coefficients for four biotherapeutic proteins and one synthetic copolymer after separation in a size-exclusion ultra-performance liquid chromatograph coupled to an ultraviolet, multiangle light scattering and refractive index (SE-UPLC-UV-MALS-RI) multidetection system. The results showed small deviations with respect to theoretical values, calculated from the specific amino acid sequences, for all the studied immunoglobulins. Nevertheless, for proteins like etanercept and glatiramer acetate, several considerations, such as glycan content, partial specific volume, polarizability, and higher order structure, should be considered to properly calculate theoretical extinction coefficient values. Herein, these values were assessed with simple approximations. The precision of the experimentally obtained extinction coefficients, and its convergence towards the theoretical values, makes them useful for characterization and comparability exercises. Also, these values provide insight into the absorbance and scattering properties of the evaluated proteins. Overall, this methodology is capable of providing accurate extinction coefficients useful for development studies.

  5. Multicomponent NAPL source dissolution: evaluation of mass-transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael A; Widdowson, Mark A; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2012-09-18

    Mass transfer rate coefficients were quantified by employing an inverse modeling technique to high-resolution aqueous phase concentration data observed following an experimental release of a multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at a field site. A solute transport model (SEAM3D) was employed to simulate advective-dispersive transport over time coupled to NAPL dissolution. Model calibration was demonstrated by accurately reproducing the observed breakthrough times and peak concentrations at multiple observation points, observed mass discharge at pumping wells, and the reported mass depletions for three soluble NAPL constituents. Vertically variable NAPL mass transfer coefficients were derived for each constituent using an optimized numerical solute transport model, ranging from 0.082 to 2.0 day(-1) across all constituents. Constituent-specific coefficients showed a positive correlation with liquid-phase diffusion coefficients. Application of a time-varying mass transfer coefficient as NAPL mass depleted showed limited sensitivity during which over 80% of the most soluble NAPL constituent dissolved from the source. Long-term simulation results, calibrated to the experimental data and rendered in terms of mass discharge versus source mass depletion, exhibited multistage behavior.

  6. [Biodegradation Coefficients of Typical Pollutants in the Plain Rivers Network].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuai; Li, Xu-yongl; Deng, Jian-cai

    2016-05-15

    Biodegradation is a significant part of pollutant integrated degradation, the process rate of which is represented by the biodegradation coefficient. To investigate the biodegradation law of typical pollutants in the plain rivers network located in the upstream of the Lake Taihu, experiments were conducted in site in September 2015, one order kinetics model was used to measure the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients were also analyzed. The results showed that the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 0.008 3-0.126 4 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.213 8 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.090 5 d⁻¹ and 0.011 0- 0.152 8 d⁻¹, respectively. The influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index were permanganate index and pH; those for ammonia were ammonia concentration and pH; those for total nitrogen were inorganic nitrogen concentration, total dissolved solid concentration and nitrite concentration; and those for total phosphorus were background concentration and pH. The research results were of important guiding significance for pollutants removal and ecological restoration of the plain rivers network located in the unstream of the Lake Taihu. PMID:27506025

  7. Improved diffusion coefficients generated from Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, B. R.; Forget, B.; Smith, K.; Aviles, B. N.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo codes are becoming more widely used for reactor analysis. Some of these applications involve the generation of diffusion theory parameters including macroscopic cross sections and diffusion coefficients. Two approximations used to generate diffusion coefficients are assessed using the Monte Carlo code MC21. The first is the method of homogenization; whether to weight either fine-group transport cross sections or fine-group diffusion coefficients when collapsing to few-group diffusion coefficients. The second is a fundamental approximation made to the energy-dependent P1 equations to derive the energy-dependent diffusion equations. Standard Monte Carlo codes usually generate a flux-weighted transport cross section with no correction to the diffusion approximation. Results indicate that this causes noticeable tilting in reconstructed pin powers in simple test lattices with L2 norm error of 3.6%. This error is reduced significantly to 0.27% when weighting fine-group diffusion coefficients by the flux and applying a correction to the diffusion approximation. Noticeable tilting in reconstructed fluxes and pin powers was reduced when applying these corrections. (authors)

  8. [Biodegradation Coefficients of Typical Pollutants in the Plain Rivers Network].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuai; Li, Xu-yongl; Deng, Jian-cai

    2016-05-15

    Biodegradation is a significant part of pollutant integrated degradation, the process rate of which is represented by the biodegradation coefficient. To investigate the biodegradation law of typical pollutants in the plain rivers network located in the upstream of the Lake Taihu, experiments were conducted in site in September 2015, one order kinetics model was used to measure the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients were also analyzed. The results showed that the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 0.008 3-0.126 4 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.213 8 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.090 5 d⁻¹ and 0.011 0- 0.152 8 d⁻¹, respectively. The influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index were permanganate index and pH; those for ammonia were ammonia concentration and pH; those for total nitrogen were inorganic nitrogen concentration, total dissolved solid concentration and nitrite concentration; and those for total phosphorus were background concentration and pH. The research results were of important guiding significance for pollutants removal and ecological restoration of the plain rivers network located in the unstream of the Lake Taihu.

  9. Measurement of reaeration coefficients for selected Florida streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampson, P.S.; Coffin, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 29 separate reaeration coefficient determinations were performed on 27 subreaches of 12 selected Florida streams between October 1981 and May 1985. Measurements performed prior to June 1984 were made using the peak and area methods with ethylene and propane as the tracer gases. Later measurements utilized the steady-state method with propane as the only tracer gas. The reaeration coefficients ranged from 1.07 to 45.9 days with a mean estimated probable error of +/16.7%. Ten predictive equations (compiled from the literature) were also evaluated using the measured coefficients. The most representative equation was one of the energy dissipation type with a standard error of 60.3%. Seven of the 10 predictive additional equations were modified using the measured coefficients and nonlinear regression techniques. The most accurate of the developed equations was also of the energy dissipation form and had a standard error of 54.9%. For 5 of the 13 subreaches in which both ethylene and propane were used, the ethylene data resulted in substantially larger reaeration coefficient values which were rejected. In these reaches, ethylene concentrations were probably significantly affected by one or more electrophilic addition reactions known to occur in aqueous media. (Author 's abstract)

  10. A Thermal Transport Coefficient for L-Mode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Bruno; Daughton, William

    1998-11-01

    Starting from an analysis of the transport properties of the plasmas produced by the Alcator C-Mod machine, a novel form of a thermal transport coefficient which reproduces both ohmic and auxiliary heated L-mode discharges has been identified. This thermal transport coefficient involves the difference of two terms, one representing the normal outward diffusion of thermal energy and the other corresponding to a process reducing the outward flux. There are in fact theoretical arguments in support of a composite transport coefficient based on the symmetry properties of an appropriate transport matrix. The coefficient includes the constraint of profile consistency and is inspired by the properties of the toroidal ion and electron temperature gradient modes. In a series of transport simulations for plasmas produced by the Alcator C-Mod machine, the thermal transport coefficient is shown to reproduce the observed electron temperature profile, stored energy and loop voltage. The relevant scaling for the energy confinement time is also composed of two terms. The L-mode database assembled for the ITER project is used to compare DIII-D, JET, JT60, PDX, TFTR, FTU, and Alcator C-Mod with this analysis. With the exception of PDX, the comparison is substantially better than standard L-mode power law scalings.

  11. Identifying Bearing Rotodynamic Coefficients Using an Extended Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brad A.; Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter's performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

  12. Identifying Bearing Rotordynamic Coefficients using an Extended Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brad A.; Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    An Extended Kalman Filter is developed to estimate the linearized direct and indirect stiffness and damping force coefficients for bearings in rotor-dynamic applications from noisy measurements of the shaft displacement in response to imbalance and impact excitation. The bearing properties are modeled as stochastic random variables using a Gauss-Markov model. Noise terms are introduced into the system model to account for all of the estimation error, including modeling errors and uncertainties and the propagation of measurement errors into the parameter estimates. The system model contains two user-defined parameters that can be tuned to improve the filter s performance; these parameters correspond to the covariance of the system and measurement noise variables. The filter is also strongly influenced by the initial values of the states and the error covariance matrix. The filter is demonstrated using numerically simulated data for a rotor-bearing system with two identical bearings, which reduces the number of unknown linear dynamic coefficients to eight. The filter estimates for the direct damping coefficients and all four stiffness coefficients correlated well with actual values, whereas the estimates for the cross-coupled damping coefficients were the least accurate.

  13. Empirical evidence for site coefficients in building code provisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Site-response coefficients, Fa and Fv, used in U.S. building code provisions are based on empirical data for motions up to 0.1 g. For larger motions they are based on theoretical and laboratory results. The Northridge earthquake of 17 January 1994 provided a significant new set of empirical data up to 0.5 g. These data together with recent site characterizations based on shear-wave velocity measurements provide empirical estimates of the site coefficients at base accelerations up to 0.5 g for Site Classes C and D. These empirical estimates of Fa and Fnu; as well as their decrease with increasing base acceleration level are consistent at the 95 percent confidence level with those in present building code provisions, with the exception of estimates for Fa at levels of 0.1 and 0.2 g, which are less than the lower confidence bound by amounts up to 13 percent. The site-coefficient estimates are consistent at the 95 percent confidence level with those of several other investigators for base accelerations greater than 0.3 g. These consistencies and present code procedures indicate that changes in the site coefficients are not warranted. Empirical results for base accelerations greater than 0.2 g confirm the need for both a short- and a mid- or long-period site coefficient to characterize site response for purposes of estimating site-specific design spectra.

  14. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  15. On the distribution of seismic reflection coefficients and seismic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, S.; Paterson, L.; Beresford, G.

    1995-07-01

    Reflection coefficient sequences from 14 wells in Australia have a statistical character consistent with a non-Gaussian scaling noise model based on the Levy-stable family of probability distributions. Experimental histograms of reflection coefficients are accurately approximated by symmetric Levy-stable probability density functions with Levy index between 0.99 and 1.43. These distributions have the same canonical role in mathematical statistics as the Gaussian distribution, but they have slowly decaying tails and infinite moments. The distribution of reflection coefficients is independent of the spatial scale (statistically self-similar), and the reflection coefficient sequences have long-range dependence. These results suggest that the logarithm of seismic impedance can be modeled accurately using fractional Levy motion, which is a generalization of fractional Brownian motion. Synthetic seismograms produced from the authors` model for the reflection coefficients also have Levy-stable distributions. These isolations include transmission losses, the effects of reverberations, and the loss of resolution caused by band-limited wavelets, and suggest that actual seismic amplitudes with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio should also have a Levy-stable distribution. This prediction is verified using post-stack seismic data acquired in the Timor Sea and in the continental USA. However, prestack seismic amplitudes from the Timor Sea are nearly Gaussian. They attribute the difference between prestack and poststack data to the high level of measurement noise in the prestack data.

  16. Higher-order virial coefficients of water models.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Kenneth M; Singh, Jayant K; Schultz, Andrew J; Kofke, David A

    2007-10-01

    We use the Mayer sampling method, with both direct and overlap sampling, to calculate and compare classical virial coefficients up to B6 for various water models (SPC, SPC/E, MSPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P). The precision of the computed values ranges from 0.1% for B2 to an average of 25% for B6. When expressed in a form scaled by the critical properties, the values of the coefficients for SPC water are observed to greatly exceed the magnitude of corresponding coefficients for the simple Lennard-Jones model. We examine the coefficients in the context of the equation of state and the Joule-Thomson coefficient. Comparisons of these properties are made both to established molecular simulation data for each respective model and to real water. For all models, the virial series up to B5 describes the equation of state along the saturated vapor line better than the series that includes B6. At supercritical temperatures, however, the sixth-order series often describes pressure-volume-temperature behavior better than the fifth-order series. For example, the sixth-order virial equation of state for SPC/E water predicts the 673 K isotherm within 8% of published molecular simulation values up to a density of 9 mol/L (roughly half the critical density of SPC/E water).

  17. Identification of Bayesian posteriors for coefficients of chaos expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnst, M. Ghanem, R.; Soize, C.

    2010-05-01

    This article is concerned with the identification of probabilistic characterizations of random variables and fields from experimental data. The data used for the identification consist of measurements of several realizations of the uncertain quantities that must be characterized. The random variables and fields are approximated by a polynomial chaos expansion, and the coefficients of this expansion are viewed as unknown parameters to be identified. It is shown how the Bayesian paradigm can be applied to formulate and solve the inverse problem. The estimated polynomial chaos coefficients are hereby themselves characterized as random variables whose probability density function is the Bayesian posterior. This allows to quantify the impact of missing experimental information on the accuracy of the identified coefficients, as well as on subsequent predictions. An illustration in stochastic aeroelastic stability analysis is provided to demonstrate the proposed methodology.

  18. The determination of longitudinal dispersion coefficients in rivers.

    PubMed

    Palancar, María C; Aragón, José M; Sánchez, Fernando; Gil, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The dispersion coefficient of several sections of two Spanish rivers (Tagus and Ebro) is calculated using different methods. The aim of the study is to accurately know the effects of accidental leaks from two nuclear power plants that are placed upstream. Experimental data from tracer injections as well as data from hydraulic parameters were used to calculate the dispersion coefficient. Two methods based on tracer curves fit the experimental data well. One method is based on the time at which the tracer concentration is half the maximum concentration; the other method is based on the variance of the tracer curve distribution. An alternative method based on governmental data of velocity profiles and correlations of hydraulic parameters was also used. The results of this method are strongly sensitive to small variations in the stream flowrate. A new correlation is proposed to predict the dispersion coefficient with an error smaller than the one provided by other correlations in the literature.

  19. Microchip for the Measurement of Seebeck Coefficients of Single Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völklein, F.; Schmitt, M.; Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.

    2009-07-01

    Bismuth nanowires were electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Micromachining and microlithography were employed to realize a newly developed microchip for Seebeck coefficient measurements on individual nanowires. By anisotropic etching of a (100) Si wafer, an 800-nm-thick SiO2/Si3N4 membrane was prepared in the chip center. The low thermal conductivity of the membrane is crucial to obtain the required temperature difference Δ T along the nanowire. The wire is electrically contacted to thin metal pads which are patterned by a new method of microscopic exposure of photoresist and a lift-off process. A Δ T between the two pairs of contact pads, located on the membrane, is established by a thin-film heater. Applying the known Seebeck coefficient of a reference film, the temperature difference at this gap is determined. Using Δ T and the measured Seebeck voltage U of the nanowire, its Seebeck coefficient can be calculated.

  20. The relation between salt and ionic transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Kedem, O; Leaf, A

    1966-03-01

    The reflection coefficient was originally introduced by Staverman to describe the movement of nonelectrolytes through membranes. When this coefficient is extended to salts, one has a choice of defining this term for the whole salt moving as a single electrically neutral component or for the individual ions of the salt. The latter definition is meaningful only in the absence of an electric field across the permeability barrier. This condition may be achieved with the voltage clamp or short-circuit technique and is especially useful in dealing with biological systems in which one rarely has only a single salt or even equal concentrations of the major anion and cation. The relations between the transport coefficients for the salt and its individual ions are derived. The special conditions which may result in negative osmosis through a charged membrane in the presence of a salt are discussed. PMID:5943607

  1. Geologic and climatic controls on the radon emanation coefficient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumann, R.R.; Gundersen, L.C.S.; ,

    1997-01-01

    Geologic, pedologic, and climatic factors, including radium content, grain size, siting of radon parents within soil grains or on grain coatings, and soil moisture conditions, determine a soil's emanating power and radon transport characteristics. Data from field studies indicate that soils derived from similar parent rocks in different regions have significantly different emanation coefficients due to the effects of climate on these soil characteristics. An important tool for measuring radon source strength (i.e., radium content) is ground-based and aerial gamma radioactivity measurements. Regional correlations between soil radium content, determined by gamma spectrometry, and soil-gas or indoor radon concentrations can be traced to the influence of climatic and geologic factors on intrinsic permeability and radon emanation coefficients. Data on soil radium content, permeability, and moisture content, when combined with data on emanation coefficients, can form a framework for development of quantitative predictive models for radon generation in rocks and soils.

  2. The Inertia Coefficients of an Airship in a Frictionless Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, H.

    1979-01-01

    The apparent inertia of an airship hull is examined. The exact solution of the aerodynamical problem is studied for hulls of various shapes with special attention given to the case of an ellipsoidal hull. So that the results for the ellipsoidal hull may be readily adapted to other cases, they are expressed in terms of the area and perimeter of the largest cross section perpendicular to the direction of motion by means of a formula involving a coefficient kappa which varies only slowly when the shape of the hull is changed, being 0.637 for a circular or elliptic disk, 0.5 for a sphere, and about 0.25 for a spheroid of fineness ratio. The case of rotation of an airship hull is investigated and a coefficient is defined with the same advantages as the corresponding coefficient for rectilinear motion.

  3. Modification of Einstein A Coefficient in Dissipative Gas Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Cao, Hui; Qin, Ke-Cheng

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous radiation in dissipative gas medium such as plasmas is investigated by Langevin equations and the modified Weisskopf-Wigner approximation. Since the refractive index of gas medium is expected to be nearly unity, we shall first neglect the medium polarization effect. We show that absorption in plasmas may in certain case modify the Einstein A coefficient significantly and cause a pit in the A coefficient-density curves for relatively low temperature plasmas and also a pit in the A coefficient-temperature curves. In the next, the effect of medium polarization is taken into account in addition. To our surprise, its effect in certain case is quite significant. The dispersive curves show different behaviors in different region of parameters.

  4. The determination of longitudinal dispersion coefficients in rivers.

    PubMed

    Palancar, María C; Aragón, José M; Sánchez, Fernando; Gil, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The dispersion coefficient of several sections of two Spanish rivers (Tagus and Ebro) is calculated using different methods. The aim of the study is to accurately know the effects of accidental leaks from two nuclear power plants that are placed upstream. Experimental data from tracer injections as well as data from hydraulic parameters were used to calculate the dispersion coefficient. Two methods based on tracer curves fit the experimental data well. One method is based on the time at which the tracer concentration is half the maximum concentration; the other method is based on the variance of the tracer curve distribution. An alternative method based on governmental data of velocity profiles and correlations of hydraulic parameters was also used. The results of this method are strongly sensitive to small variations in the stream flowrate. A new correlation is proposed to predict the dispersion coefficient with an error smaller than the one provided by other correlations in the literature. PMID:12934826

  5. Optimization of Power Coefficient of Wind Turbine Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, Sappani; Ravindran, Durairaj; Sivakumar, Mahalingam; Venkatachalam, Gopalan; Muthukumar, Shunmugavelu

    2016-06-01

    In the design of a wind turbine, the goal is to attain the highest possible power output under specified atmospheric conditions. The optimization of power coefficient of horizontal axis wind turbine has been carried out by integration of blade element momentum method and genetic algorithm (GA). The design variables considered are wind velocity, angle of attack and tip speed ratio. The objective function is power coefficient of wind turbine. The different combination of design variables are optimized using GA and then the Power coefficient is optimized. The optimized design variables are validated with the experimental results available in the literature. By this optimization work the optimum design variables of wind turbine can be found economically than experimental work. NACA44XX series airfoils are considered for this optimization work.

  6. Determination of stream reaeration coefficients by use of tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Rathbun, R.E.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Parker, G.W.; DeLong, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Stream reaeration is the physical absorption of oxygen from the atmosphere by a flowing stream. This is the primary process by which a stream replenishes the oxygen consumed in the biodegradation of organic wastes. Prior to 1965, reaeration rate coefficients could be estimated only by indirect methods. In 1965, a direct method of measuring stream reaeration coefficients was developed in which a radioactive tracer gas was injected into a stream--the tracer gas being desorbed from the stream inversely to how oxygen would be absorbed. The technique has since been modified by substituting hydrocarbon gases for the radioactive tracer gas. The slug-injection and constant-rate injection methods of performing gas tracer desorption measurements are described. Emphasis is on the use of rhodamine WT dye as a relatively conservative tracer and propane as the nonconservative gas tracer, on planning field tests, methods of injection, sampling and analysis, and computational techniques to compute desorption and reaeration coefficients. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Broadband computation of the scattering coefficients of infinite arbitrary cylinders.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Cédric; Guizal, Brahim; Felbacq, Didier

    2012-07-01

    We employ a time-domain method to compute the near field on a contour enclosing infinitely long cylinders of arbitrary cross section and constitution. We therefore recover the cylindrical Hankel coefficients of the expansion of the field outside the circumscribed circle of the structure. The recovered coefficients enable the wideband analysis of complex systems, e.g., the determination of the radar cross section becomes straightforward. The prescription for constructing such a numerical tool is provided in great detail. The method is validated by computing the scattering coefficients for a homogeneous circular cylinder illuminated by a plane wave, a problem for which an analytical solution exists. Finally, some radiation properties of an optical antenna are examined by employing the proposed technique.

  8. Mutual diffusion coefficients in systems containing the nickel ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Ana C. F.; Veríssimo, Luis V. M. M.; Gomes, Joselaine C. S.; Santos, Cecilia I. A. V.; Barros, Marisa C. F.; Lobo, Victor M. M.; Sobral, Abílio J. F. N.; Esteso, Miguel A.; Leaist, Derek G.

    2013-04-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients of nickel chloride in water have been measured at 293.15 K and 303.15 K and at concentrations between 0.020 mol dm-3 and 0.100 mol dm-3, using a conductimetric cell. The experimental mutual diffusion coefficients are discussed on the basis of the Onsager-Fuoss model. The equivalent conductances at infinitesimal concentration of the nickel ion in these solutions at those temperatures have been estimated using these results. In addition, from these data, we have estimated some transport and structural parameters, such as limiting diffusion coefficient, ionic conductance at infinitesimal concentration, hydrodynamic radii and activation energy, contributing this way to a better understanding of the structure of these systems and of their thermodynamic behavior in aqueous solution at different concentrations.

  9. Molar extinction coefficients of some carbohydrates in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K.; Sandhu, G. K.; Lark, B. S.; Sud, S. P.

    2002-03-01

    Molar extinction coefficients of some carbohydrates viz. L-arabinose (C5H10O5), D-glucose (C6H12O6), D-mannose (C6H12O6), D-galactose (C6H12O6), D(-) fructose (C6H12O6) and maltose (C12H24O12) in aqueous solutions have been determined at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV by gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. These coefficients have been found to depend upon the photon energy following a 4-parameter polynomial. These extinction coefficients for different sugars having the same molecular formula have same values varying within experimental uncertainty. Within concentration ranges studied, Beer--Lambert law is obeyed very well.

  10. Protein osmotic pressure gradients and microvascular reflection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Drake, R E; Dhother, S; Teague, R A; Gabel, J C

    1997-08-01

    Microvascular membranes are heteroporous, so the mean osmotic reflection coefficient for a microvascular membrane (sigma d) is a function of the reflection coefficient for each pore. Investigators have derived equations for sigma d based on the assumption that the protein osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane (delta II) does not vary from pore to pore. However, for most microvascular membranes, delta II probably does vary from pore to pore. In this study, we derived a new equation for sigma d. According to our equation, pore-to-pore differences in delta II increase the effect of small pores and decrease the effect of large pores on the overall membrane osmotic reflection coefficient. Thus sigma d for a heteroporous membrane may be much higher than previously derived equations indicate. Furthermore, pore-to-pore delta II differences increase the effect of plasma protein osmotic pressure to oppose microvascular fluid filtration. PMID:9277520

  11. NASA Glenn Coefficients for Calculating Thermodynamic Properties of Individual Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBride, Bonnie J.; Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the library of thermodynamic data used with the NASA Glenn computer program CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications). This library, containing data for over 2000 solid, liquid, and gaseous chemical species for temperatures ranging from 200 to 20,000 K, is available for use with other computer codes as well. The data are expressed as least-squares coefficients to a seven-term functional form for C((sup o)(sub p)) (T) / R with integration constants for H (sup o) (T) / RT and S(sup o) (T) / R. The NASA Glenn computer program PAC (Properties and Coefficients) was used to calculate thermodynamic functions and to generate the least-squares coefficients. PAC input was taken from a variety of sources. A complete listing of the database is given along with a summary of thermodynamic properties at 0 and 298.15 K.

  12. Determination of decay coefficients for combustors with acoustic absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. E.; Espander, W. R.; Baer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique for the calculation of linear decay coefficients in combustors with acoustic absorbers is presented. Tuned circumferential slot acoustic absorbers were designed for the first three transverse modes of oscillation, and decay coefficients for these absorbers were found as a function of backing distance for seven different chamber configurations. The effectiveness of the absorbers for off-design values of the combustion response and acoustic mode is also investigated. Results indicate that for tuned absorbers the decay coefficient increases approximately as the cube of the backing distance. For most off-design situations the absorber still provides a damping effect. However, if an absorber designed for some higher mode of oscillation is used to damp lower mode oscillations, a driving effect is frequently found.

  13. Turbulent MHD transport coefficients - An attempt at self-consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.; Montgomery, D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, some multiple scale perturbation calculations of turbulent MHD transport coefficients begun in earlier papers are first completed. These generalize 'alpha effect' calculations by treating the velocity field and magnetic field on the same footing. Then the problem of rendering such calculations self-consistent is addressed, generalizing an eddy-viscosity hypothesis similar to that of Heisenberg for the Navier-Stokes case. The method also borrows from Kraichnan's direct interaction approximation. The output is a set of integral equations relating the spectra and the turbulent transport coefficients. Previous 'alpha effect' and 'beta effect' coefficients emerge as limiting cases. A treatment of the inertial range can also be given, consistent with a -5/3 energy spectrum power law. In the Navier-Stokes limit, a value of 1.72 is extracted for the Kolmogorov constant. Further applications to MHD are possible.

  14. The determination of transpiration efficiency coefficient for common bean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogindo, H. O.; Walker, S.

    A number of studies have been conducted to determine species specific transpiration efficiency coefficient. Although the value is available for some C3 legumes, no value has been determined for common beans within the semi-arid tropics. The coefficient is useful in modelling crop water use as it has been found to be conservative over a range of climates when differences in vapour pressure deficits are accounted for. The objective of the experiment was to determine the transpiration efficiency coefficient for common beans for use in modelling within the semi-arid region of South Africa. Common bean ( Phaseoulus vulgaris L.) was grown on a weighing lysimeter during the 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 seasons. Transpiration was measured on hourly basis using the weighing lysimeter and the data integrated over the growing season to determine the seasonal transpiration for the crop. At the same time hourly measurement of canopy vapour pressure deficit was made using wet and dry bulb resistance thermometers housed in mini-shelters at 200-400 mm height. Wet and dry bulb temperature data was also collected at the nearby standard automatic weather station and used to normalize the transpiration efficiency. Transpiration efficiency for the common bean was 1.33 and 1.93 g kg -1 which when normalized and root adjusted, gave a transpiration efficiency coefficient of 3.02 and 3.51 g kPa kg -1 for the 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 seasons respectively. A mean transpiration efficiency coefficient of 3.26 ± 0.25 g kPa kg -1 was adopted for the two seasons. This value is fairly consistent with those obtained for other C3 legumes species, confirming the conservativeness of the coefficient and therefore its usefulness as modelling parameter.

  15. Van der Waals coefficients beyond the classical shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jianmin; Fang, Yuan; Hao, Pan; Scuseria, G. E.; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P.

    2015-01-14

    Van der Waals (vdW) coefficients can be accurately generated and understood by modelling the dynamic multipole polarizability of each interacting object. Accurate static polarizabilities are the key to accurate dynamic polarizabilities and vdW coefficients. In this work, we present and study in detail a hollow-sphere model for the dynamic multipole polarizability proposed recently by two of the present authors (JT and JPP) to simulate the vdW coefficients for inhomogeneous systems that allow for a cavity. The inputs to this model are the accurate static multipole polarizabilities and the electron density. A simplification of the full hollow-sphere model, the single-frequency approximation (SFA), circumvents the need for a detailed electron density and for a double numerical integration over space. We find that the hollow-sphere model in SFA is not only accurate for nanoclusters and cage molecules (e.g., fullerenes) but also yields vdW coefficients among atoms, fullerenes, and small clusters in good agreement with expensive time-dependent density functional calculations. However, the classical shell model (CSM), which inputs the static dipole polarizabilities and estimates the static higher-order multipole polarizabilities therefrom, is accurate for the higher-order vdW coefficients only when the interacting objects are large. For the lowest-order vdW coefficient C{sub 6}, SFA and CSM are exactly the same. The higher-order (C{sub 8} and C{sub 10}) terms of the vdW expansion can be almost as important as the C{sub 6} term in molecular crystals. Application to a variety of clusters shows that there is strong non-additivity of the long-range vdW interactions between nanoclusters.

  16. Application of distribution coefficients to radiological assessment models

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, W.R.; Sanchez, A.L.; Underhill, D.W.; Thomas, E.

    1985-01-01

    A field and laboratory investigation of the transport of fallout radionuclides in natural, organic rich ecosystems has been initiated. Mountain-top peat bogs in Pennsylvania, New York and Virginia were sampled by coring, dated by Pb-210 methods and measured for bomb-produced Sr-90, Pu-239, 240, and Cs-137; laboratory measurements of the distribution coefficients for Cs-137, Sr-85, Ru-106, Am-241, and Co-57 by the constant shaking method have been made. These natural terrestrial ecosystems are labeled with fallout radionuclides from nuclear weapons tests which are environmental tracers of element transport. To explain the differences between the input from fallout and the distribution of Cs-137 in peat cores, a simple ''theoretical plate'' transport model has been used. Each year of growth is assumed to be a ''theoretical plate'' and Cs-137 deposited is transferred between plates by advection and mixing processes. The annual deposition of Cs-137 occurs on the (then) uppermost layer and is proportional to the atmospheric input. The theoretical plate model finds values of the advection and mixing coefficients which give the best fit between Cs-137 profile in the bog and the atmospherically-derived Cs-137. For the three bogs tested so far, the advection coefficients indicate an upward movement of Cs-137 as well as downward transport. Values for the diffusion coefficient range from 10E/sup -7/ to 10E/sup -9/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ depending on organic content and porosity. The mass transport values from the model are compared to laboratory measurements of distribution coefficients in simulated acid rain conditions. Based on the diffusion coefficients calculated from the model, a thickness of 8 to 20 cm of peat surrounding a leaking cannister of Cs-137 would not allow the radionuclide to enter an aquifer for 300 years from a low level waste disposal site.

  17. Scattering and absorption coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Tang, Jiaqi; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Alumina-based aerogels are especially useful in many applications due to their excellent stability at high temperatures. This study experimentally analyzed the radiative properties of silica-doped alumina aerogels through spectral directional-hemispherical measurements for wavelengths of 0.38-25 μm. The silica-doped alumina aerogel samples were prepared with a 1.4∶1 molar ratio of silica to alumina. A two-flux model was used to describe the radiation propagation in a 1D scattering absorbing sample to derive expressions for the normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances based on the transport approximation. The normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances were measured at various spectral wavelengths and sample thicknesses using the integrating sphere method. The spectral absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels were then determined from the measured normal-hemispherical data. The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels are (0.1  cm-1, 36  cm-1) and (0.1  cm-1, 112  cm-1) for wavelengths of 0.38-8.0 μm. The spectral transport scattering coefficient varies in the opposite direction from the spectral absorption coefficient for various wavelengths. The radiative properties for silica and alumina aerogels were quite different for the absorption coefficient for wavelengths of 2.5-8.0 μm and for the transport scattering coefficient for wavelengths of 0.38-2.5 and 3.5-6.0 μm. The measured radiative properties were used to predict the spectral normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the silica-doped alumina aerogels for various sample thicknesses and wavelengths. The predicted values do not change for the sample thicknesses greater than a critical value. The analysis provides valuable reference data for alumina aerogels for high-temperature applications. PMID:26836071

  18. Measuring the Soret coefficient of nanoparticles in a dilute suspension

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chao; Fu, Jinxin; Oztekin, Alparslan; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-01

    Thermophoresis is an efficient process for the manipulation of molecules and nanoparticles due to the strong force it generates on the nanoscale. Thermophoresis is characterized by the Soret coefficient. Conventionally, the Soret coefficient of nanosized species is obtained by fitting the concentration profile under a temperature gradient at the steady state to a continuous phase model. However, when the number density of the target is ultralow and the dispersed species cannot be treated as a continuous phase, the bulk concentration fluctuates spatially, preventing extraction of temperature-gradient induced concentration profile. The present work demonstrates a strategy to tackle this problem by superimposing snapshots of nanoparticle distribution. The resulting image is suitable for the extraction of the Soret coefficient through the conventional data fitting method. The strategy is first tested through a discrete phase model that illustrates the spatial fluctuation of the nanoparticle concentration in a dilute suspension in response to the temperature gradient. By superimposing snapshots of the stochastic distribution, a thermophoretic depletion profile with low standard error is constructed, indicative of the Soret coefficient. Next, confocal analysis of nanoparticle distribution in response to a temperature gradient is performed using polystyrene nanobeads down to 1e-5% (v/v). The experimental results also reveal that superimposing enhances the accuracy of extracted Soret coefficient. The critical particle number density in the superimposed image for predicting the Soret coefficient is hypothesized to depend on the spatial resolution of the image. This study also demonstrates that the discrete phase model is an effective tool to study particle migration under thermophoresis in the liquid phase. PMID:25221433

  19. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest. PMID:26871141

  20. [Influencing factors in measuring absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-long; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2013-05-01

    Absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters in natural water is one of the key parameters in ocean color remote sensing. In order to study the influencing factors that affect the measurement, a series of experiments were designed to measure samples using transmittance method (T method), transmittance-reflectance method (T-R method) and absorptance method (A method). The results shows that absorption coefficient measured by the A method has a much lower error compared to the T method and T-R method due to influencing factors,such as filter-to-filter variations, water content of the filter, and homogeneity of filter load and so on. Another factor influence absorption coefficient is path-length amplification induced by multiple scattering inside the filter. To determine the path-length amplification, the true absorption was measured by AC-s (WetLabs). The linear fitting result shows that the mean path-length amplification is much higher for the A method than that of the T-R method and the T method (4.01 versus 2.20 and 2.32), and the corresponding correlation coefficient are 0.90, 0.87 and 0.80. For the A method and the T-R method, higher correlation coefficients are calculated when using polynomial fitting, and the value are 0.95 and 0.94. Analysis of the mean relative error caused by different influencing factors indicates that path-length amplification is the largest error source in measuring the absorption coefficient.

  1. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D.; Hrenya, Christine M.; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η* (shear viscosity), κ* (thermal conductivity), and μ* (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ* characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η* and μ* is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ* is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  2. Coefficients of Productivity for Yellowstone's Grizzly Bear Habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, David John; Barber, Kim; Maw, Ralene; Renkin, Roy

    2004-01-01

    This report describes methods for calculating coefficients used to depict habitat productivity for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem. Calculations based on these coefficients are used in the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Cumulative Effects Model to map the distribution of habitat productivity and account for the impacts of human facilities. The coefficients of habitat productivity incorporate detailed information that was collected over a 20-year period (1977-96) on the foraging behavior of Yellowstone's bears and include records of what bears were feeding on, when and where they fed, the extent of that feeding activity, and relative measures of the quantity consumed. The coefficients also incorporate information, collected primarily from 1986 to 1992, on the nutrient content of foods that were consumed, their digestibility, characteristic bite sizes, and the energy required to extract and handle each food. Coefficients were calculated for different time periods and different habitat types, specific to different parts of the Yellowstone ecosystem. Stratifications included four seasons of bear activity (spring, estrus, early hyperphagia, late hyperphagia), years when ungulate carrion and whitebark pine seed crops were abundant versus not, areas adjacent to (<100 m) or far away from forest/nonforest edges, and areas inside or outside of ungulate winter ranges. Densities of bear activity in each region, habitat type, and time period were incorporated into calculations, controlling for the effects of proximity to human facilities. The coefficients described in this report and associated estimates of grizzly bear habitat productivity are unique among many efforts to model the conditions of bear habitat because calculations include information on energetics derived from the observed behavior of radio-marked bears.

  3. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  4. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  5. Discharge coefficients of cooling holes with radiused and chamfered inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, N.; Spencer, A.

    1991-06-01

    The flow of cooling air within the internal passages of gas turbines is controlled and metered using holes in disks and casings. The effects of inlet radiusing and chamfering of these holes on the discharge coefficient are discussed. Experimental results for a range of radiusing and chamfering ratios for holes of different length to diameter ratios are presented, covering the range of pressure ratios of practical interest. The results indicate that radiusing and chamfering are both beneficial in increasing the discharge coefficient. Increases of 10-30 percent are possible. Chamfered holes give the more desirable performance characteristics in addition to being easier to produce than radiused holes.

  6. Lidar effective multiple-scattering coefficients in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, F O; Bissonnette, L R; Flamant, P H

    1997-05-20

    We delimit a regime, valid for most ground-based lidar probings of cirrus clouds, in which the field-of-view dependence of multiple scattering reaches a plateau. In this regime and assuming the phase function to be constant around pi, we formally demonstrate Platt's modification of the single-scattering lidar equation, with a parameter eta(P) accounting for the reduction of the effective scattering coefficient defined so that (1 - eta(P)) is the amount of energy scattered in the forward peak. Then, to cope with nonconstant backscattering functions, we discuss the introduction of an effective backscattering coefficient that is an average of the scattering probabilities around pi.

  7. Extinction coefficient measurements on clear atmospheres and thin cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A

    1968-12-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to determine possible differences in visible light extinction properties of continental and maritime air. Urban, desert, and oceanic atmospheres were probed by means of a stable photodiode radiometer using direct sunlight as the source. No major differences were found for the three locations. Experimental coefficients generally lie slightly below model data, though significantly higher than would be expected from purely molecular scattering. Day-to-day variations of up to 40% were found to be nearly constant over the entire visible spectrum. Results of similar extinction measurements on thin cirrus clouds show a slight increase in scattering coefficient in going from 4000 A to 7000 A wavelength.

  8. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  9. General linear mode conversion coefficient in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, Robert G.; Flynn, William G.

    1993-03-01

    A general formula is presented for the mode conversion coefficient for linear mode conversion in one dimension, in terms of an arbitrary 2 x 2 reduced dispersion matrix describing the coupling of the modes. The mode conversion coefficient has three invariance properties which are discussed, namely, invariance under scaling transformations, canonical transformations, and a certain kind of Lorentz transformation. Formulas for the S matrix of mode conversion are also presented. The example of the conversion of electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in the ionosphere is used to illustrate the formulas.

  10. General linear mode conversion coefficient in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, Robert G.; Flynn, William G.

    1993-03-01

    A general formula is presented for the mode conversion coefficient for linear mode conversion in one dimension, in terms of an arbitrary 2×2 reduced dispersion matrix describing the coupling of the modes. The mode conversion coefficient has three invariance properties which are discussed, namely, invariance under scaling transformations, canonical transformations, and a certain kind of Lorentz transformation. Formulas for the S matrix of mode conversion are also presented. The example of the conversion of electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in the ionosphere is used to illustrate the formulas.

  11. The virial coefficients of hard hypersphere binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enciso, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Bermejo, F. J.

    The third, fourth and fifth virial coefficients of hard hypersphere binary mixtures with dimensionality d = 4, 5 have been calculated for size ratios R ≥0.1, R ı σ22 / σ11 , where σ ii is the diameter of component i . The composition independent partial virial coefficients have been evaluated by Monte Carlo integration of the corresponding Mayer modified star diagrams. The results are compared with the predictions of Santos, S., Yuste, S. B., and Lopez de Haro, M., 1999, Molec. Phys ., 96 , 1 of the equation of state of a multicomponent mixture of hard hyperspheres, and the good agreement gives strong support to the validity of that recipe.

  12. Tilting pad journal bearings - Measured and predicted stiffness coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, D.W.; Horner, D. Michell Bearings, Newcastle-upon-Tyne )

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents measured and calculated characteristics of a tilting pad journal bearing suitable for high speed machinery. Descriptions are given of the experimental techniques used with this variety of bearing and the theoretical model for predicting performance. Measured values of pad temperature, eccentricity, attitude angle, and the four stiffness coefficients are given for a range of loads and rotational speeds. Data are given for both load on pad and between pad configurations, the two principal loading arrangements. Comparisons are made between the measured and predicted bearing temperatures and stiffness coefficients over a wide range of values. 11 refs.

  13. The Influence of Particle Charge on Heterogeneous Reaction Rate Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of particle charge on heterogeneous reaction rates are presented. Many atmospheric particles, whether liquid or solid are charged. This surface charge causes a redistribution of charge within a liquid particle and as a consequence a perturbation in the gaseous uptake coefficient. The amount of perturbation is proportional to the external potential and the square of the ratio of debye length in the liquid to the particle radius. Previous modeling has shown how surface charge affects the uptake coefficient of charged aerosols. This effect is now included in the heterogeneous reaction rate of an aerosol ensemble. Extension of this analysis to ice particles will be discussed and examples presented.

  14. Estimation of octanol/water partition coefficients using LSER parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Hickey, James P.; Godbole, Kalpana A.; Rogers, Tony N.

    1998-01-01

    The logarithms of octanol/water partition coefficients, logKow, were regressed against the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) parameters for a training set of 981 diverse organic chemicals. The standard deviation for logKow was 0.49. The regression equation was then used to estimate logKow for a test of 146 chemicals which included pesticides and other diverse polyfunctional compounds. Thus the octanol/water partition coefficient may be estimated by LSER parameters without elaborate software but only moderate accuracy should be expected.

  15. RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF Be-LIKE Si

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, I.; Boehm, S.; Schuch, R.; Loch, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    Recombination of Be-like Si{sup 10+} over the 0-43 eV electron-ion energy range is measured at the CRYRING electron cooler. In addition to radiative and dielectronic recombination, the recombination spectrum also shows strong contributions from trielectronic recombination. Below 100 meV, several very strong resonances associated with a spin-flip of the excited electron dominate the spectrum and also dominate the recombination in the photoionized plasma. The resonant plasma rate coefficients corrected for the experimental field ionization are in good agreement with calculated results by Gu and with AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. All other calculations significantly underestimate the plasma rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  16. Heat transfer coefficients of dilute flowing gas-solids suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. S.; Pfeffer, R.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients of air-glass, argon-glass, and argon-aluminum suspensions were measured in horizontal and vertical tubes. The glass, 21.6 and 36.0 micron diameter particles, was suspended at gas Reynolds numbers between 11,000 and 21,000 and loading ratios between 0 and 2.5. The presence of particles generally reduced the heat transfer coefficient. The circulation of aluminum powder in the 0.870 inch diameter closed loop system produced tenacious deposits on protuberances into the stream. In the vertical test section, the Nusselt number reduction was attributed to viscous sublayer thickening; in the horizontal test section to particle deposition.

  17. Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpinsky, E.

    1996-03-01

    Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

  18. Solutal diffusion coefficient for liquid PbTe-SnTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, I. O.; Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Crouch, R. K.; Brewer, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    The solutal diffusion coefficient has been determined for liquid lead telluride-tin telluride using a modified shear cell technique. Postdiffusion concentration profiles are presented for several diffusion couples. The best analytical curve fit to the data gives a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of (/3/7/ to the C power) x 0.00014 sq cm/sec, where C is the PbTe concentration. In addition, data are presented to show the importance of solutal convection in the lead-tin-telluride system.

  19. Calculation of self-diffusion coefficients in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Baohua

    2014-01-15

    On the basis of available P-V-T equation of state of iron, the temperature and pressure dependence of self-diffusion coefficients in iron polymorphs (α, δ, γ and ε phases) have been successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data by means of a thermodynamical model that interconnects point defects parameters with bulk properties. The calculated diffusion parameters, such as self-diffusion coefficient, activation energy and activation volume over a broad temperature range (500-2500 K) and pressure range (0-100 GPa), compare favorably well with experimental or theoretical ones when the uncertainties are considered.

  20. Electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, H.; Ohtsuki, Y. H.; Kubo, K.

    1986-12-01

    A new local electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling is derived on the basis of the fundamental method. To reveal detailed effects of electron states, numerical calculations are performed with use of the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock atomic wave functions. It is found that the Lindhard's formula of the electronic diffusion coefficient, which is proportional to the local electron density, is only a simple approximation of our rigorous formula and that this ``local-density approximation'' is not always sufficient, especially for metal targets.

  1. Electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, H.; Ohtsuki, Y.H.; Kubo, K.

    1986-12-01

    A new local electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling is derived on the basis of the fundamental method. To reveal detailed effects of electron states, numerical calculations are performed with use of the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock atomic wave functions. It is found that the Lindhard's formula of the electronic diffusion coefficient, which is proportional to the local electron density, is only a simple approximation of our rigorous formula and that this ''local-density approximation'' is not always sufficient, especially for metal targets.

  2. Conversion coefficients of the isomeric state in {sup 72}Br

    SciTech Connect

    Briz, J. A.; Borge, M. J. G.; Maira, A.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Estevez, E.; Nacher, E.; Rubio, B.; Fraile, L. M.; Deo, A.; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Podolyak, Z.

    2010-04-26

    In order to determine the Gamow-Teller strength distribution for the N Z nucleus {sup 72}Kr an experiment was performed with a Total Absorption Gamma Spectrometer. To fully accomplish this task it is crucial to determine the multipolarity of the low energy transitions as the spin-parity of the daughter ground state has been debated. This is done by experimental determination of the conversion coefficients. Preliminary results for the multipolarity and conversion coefficients of the transition connecting the isomeric state at 101 keV with the {sup 72}Br ground state are presented.

  3. Determination of the heat transfer coefficients in transient heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho Hào, Dinh; Thanh, Phan Xuan; Lesnic, D.

    2013-09-01

    The determination of the space- or time-dependent heat transfer coefficient which links the boundary temperature to the heat flux through a third-kind Robin boundary condition in transient heat conduction is investigated. The reconstruction uses average surface temperature measurements. In both cases of the space- or time-dependent unknown heat transfer coefficient the inverse problems are nonlinear and ill posed. Least-squares penalized variational formulations are proposed and new formulae for the gradients are derived. Numerical results obtained using the nonlinear conjugate gradient method combined with a boundary element direct solver are presented and discussed.

  4. Lattice-structures and constructs with designed thermal expansion coefficients

    DOEpatents

    Spadaccini, Christopher; Hopkins, Jonathan

    2014-10-28

    A thermal expansion-managed lattice structure having a plurality of unit cells each having flexure bearing-mounted tabs supported on a base and actuated by thermal expansion of an actuator having a thermal expansion coefficient greater than the base and arranged so that the tab is inwardly displaced into a base cavity. The flexure bearing-mounted tabs are connected to other flexure-bearing-mounted tabs of adjacent unit cells so that the adjacent unit cells are spaced from each other to accommodate thermal expansion of individual unit cells while maintaining a desired bulk thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice structure as a whole.

  5. Viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, H. J. M.; Mccarty, R. D.; Sengers, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Equations and tables are presented for the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen at temperatures between 80 K and 400 K for pressures up to 200 atm. and at temperatures between 80 K and 2000 K for the dilute gas. A description of the anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity in the critical region is included. The tabulated coefficients are reliable to within about 15% except for a region in the immediate vicinity of the critical point. Some possibilities for future improvements of this reliability are discussed.

  6. Local carbon diffusion coefficient measurement in the S-1 spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, R.M.; Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Chu, T.K.; Paul, S.F.; Yamada, M.

    1988-10-01

    The local carbon diffusion coefficient was measured in the S - 1 spheromak by detecting the radial spread of injected carbon impurity. The radial impurity density profile is determined by the balance of ionization and diffusion. Using measured local electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/, the ionization rate is determined from which the particle diffusion coefficient is inferred. The results found in this work are consistent with Bohm diffusion. The absolute magnitude of D/sub /perpendicular// was determined to be (4/approximately/6) /times/ D/sub Bohm/. 25 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Tilting pad journal bearings - Measured and predicted stiffness coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkins, D. W.; Horner, D.

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents measured and calculated characteristics of a tilting pad journal bearing suitable for high speed machinery. Descriptions are given of the experimental techniques used with this variety of bearing and the theoretical model for predicting performance. Measured values of pad temperature, eccentricity, attitude angle, and the four stiffness coefficients are given for a range of loads and rotational speeds. Data are given for both load on pad and between pad configurations, the two principal loading arrangements. Comparisons are made between the measured and predicted bearing temperatures and stiffness coefficients over a wide range of values.

  8. Ionization coefficient approach to modeling breakdown in nonuniform geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Nicolaysen, Scott D.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the work on breakdown modeling in nonuniform geometries by the ionization coefficient approach. Included are: (1) fits to primary and secondary ionization coefficients used in the modeling; (2) analytical test cases for sphere-to-sphere, wire-to-wire, corner, coaxial, and rod-to-plane geometries; a compilation of experimental data with source references; comparisons between code results, test case results, and experimental data. A simple criterion is proposed to differentiate between corona and spark. The effect of a dielectric surface on avalanche growth is examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The presence of a clean dry surface does not appear to enhance growth.

  9. Measurement of Impact Ionization Coefficients in Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Ayse Merve

    2011-12-01

    GaN has been recognized as a potential semiconductor for high temperature, high frequency and high power applications. Due to its wide bandgap, GaN exhibits high critical electric fields, which are suitable to sustain high breakdown voltages in power electronic devices. In order to obtain a good understanding of the breakdown characteristics of a power device, it is important to know the impact ionization coefficients of electrons and holes as a function of the electric field in the semiconductor. In this work, electron and hole impact ionization coefficients have been accurately measured in both GaN epitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates and GaN epitaxial layers grown on Sapphire substrates using the pulsed electron beam induced current technique. Using Chynoweth's equation (alpha = a e-b/E), measurements for GaN epitaxial layer grown on bulk GaN substrates gave an aN value of 1.5x105 cm-1 and a bN value of 1.413x107 V/cm for the impact ionization coefficient of electrons in GaN at room temperature. For the impact ionization coefficients of holes in GaN, the values of aP and bP were found to be 6.4x105 cm-1 and 1.454x107 V/cm, respectively. An analytical solution of the form alpha = mEn for the variation of the impact ionization coefficients as a function of the electric field was derived, which is useful for analytical calculation of the breakdown voltages in GaN. For Chynoweth's equation (alpha = a e-b/E), measurements for GaN epitaxial layers grown on Sapphire substrates gave an aN value of 9.17x105 cm-1 and a bN value of 1.722x107 V/cm for the impact ionization coefficient for electrons at room temperature. For the impact ionization coefficients for holes at room temperature, the values of aP and bP were found to be 8.7x105 cm-1 and 1.464x107 V/cm, respectively. The values for both coefficients are larger than those measured for GaN grown on GaN substrates. The temperature dependence of the electron and hole impact ionization coefficients as a function

  10. Retrieve the soil moisture from radar backscattering coefficient using ALOS/PALSAR polarization (HH/VV) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buho, Hoshino; Ruichen, Jia; Nawata, Hiroshi; Abdelaziz, Karamalla; Yoda, Kiyotsugu; Abdel, Babiker

    Mesquite (Prosopis spp) are ever green leguminous trees or shrubs. These species are native to North and South America. They were introduced to Sudan in 1917 from South Africa and Egypt and planted in Khartoum state in central Sudan (Broun and Massey, 1929). Mesquite was originally favored as sand dunes stabilizer and as fodder for livestock. However, sparse stands will often form impenetrable thickets formations that hinder movement of humans and animals. Many infestations are along waterways, both natural and constructed, however, plants can grow also well in drier areas away from water sites. Even in natural rangelands it is an aggressive competitor and can quickly invade upland country. Mesquite thickets can out-compete other vegetation, interfere with mustering and block access to watering places. The sharp thorns can injure animals and puncture vehicle tyres. Seeds can stay dormant for years, and therefore seedlings can re-appear in areas that have been previously cleared. The main objective of Remote Sensing Method for Mesquite Control (RSMMC) is to identify pattern and extend of mesquite spread along spatial and temporal variations using remote sensing means, as main part of mesquite control. Estimation of soil moisture by inversion of SAR data can be performed using physical or semi-empirical approaches. The physical approach uses backscattering models that are capable of reproducing the radar backscattering coefficient from the sensor configuration (wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle) and soil parameters (soil moisture and surface roughness for bare soils). This study adopted calculation of PALSAR L-band radar backscattering coefficient (dB), to estimate soil moisture distribution area based on TDR soil moisture ground measurement data. To retrieve soil moisture (mv) from a single radar configuration, it is necessary to establish a relationship between the radar backscattering coefficient (dB) and soil moisture (mv) measurement.

  11. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  12. A correlation for heat transfer coefficients in food extruders.

    PubMed

    Levine, L; Rockwood, J

    1986-06-01

    A dimensionless correlation of heat transfer coefficient for heat flow between the extruder barrel wall and extrudate is presented. The standard error of estimate of the correlation is 12.4%. The correlation is useful for the design and scale-up of food extruders and the design of associated temperature control systems.

  13. Trace element distribution coefficients in alkaline series. [Titanites; bitite

    SciTech Connect

    Lemarchand, F.; Villemant, B.; Calas, G.

    1987-05-01

    Mineral/groundmass partition coefficients for U, Th, Zr, Hf, Ta, Rb, REE, Co and Sc have been systematically measured in olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, Ti-magnetites, titanite, zircon and feldspars, in basaltic to trachytic lavas from alkaline series (Velay, Chaine des Puys: Massif Central, France and Fayal: Azores). Average partition coefficients are defined within the experimental uncertainty for limited compositional ranges (basalt-hawaiite, mugearites, benmoreite-trachyte), and are useful for trace element modelling. The new results for U, Th, Ta, Zr and Hf partition coefficients show contrasting behaviour. They can thus be used as ''key elements'' for identifying fractionating mineral phases in differentiation processes (e.g. Ta and Th for amphibole and mica). Partition coefficient may be calculated using the two-lattice model suggested by NIELSEN (1985). Such values show a considerably reduced chemical dependence in natural systems, relative to weight per cent D values. The residual variations may be accounted for by temperature or volatile influence. This calculation greatly enhances modelling possibilities using trace elements for comparing differentiation series as well as for predicting the behaviour of elements during magmatic differentiation.

  14. Fitting Partially Nonlinear Random Coefficient Models as SEMs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Cudeck, Robert; du Toit, Stephen H. C.

    2006-01-01

    The nonlinear random coefficient model has become increasingly popular as a method for describing individual differences in longitudinal research. Although promising, the nonlinear model it is not utilized as often as it might be because software options are still somewhat limited. In this article we show that a specialized version of the model…

  15. Vapor pressures and gas-film coefficients for ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of handbook vapor pressures for seven ketones with more recent literature data showed large differences for four of the ketones. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of these ketones from water determined by two different methods were in reasonable agreement. ?? 1987.

  16. Re-examination of Mars Pathfinder parachute drag coefficient estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, P.; Schofield, T.; Lisano, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission utilizes the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) parachute design. The MPF parachute drag coefficient is a driver for the MER entry, descent, and landing (EDL) design. As a result, a good estimate of the performance of the MPF parachute at Mars is required.

  17. Proximal versus Distal Validity Coefficients for Teacher Observational Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the use of measures of student learning computed using end-of-year assessments (distal measures) versus measures of student learning associated with a single lesson (proximal measures) as criterion scores for the validity of observations of teachers' pedagogical skills. The validity coefficients computed using distal…

  18. A Note on a Geometric Interpretation of the Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Edmond

    1982-01-01

    An alternate geometric interpretation of the correlation coefficient to that given in most statistics texts for psychology and education is presented. This interpretation is considered to be more consistent with the statistical model for the data, and richer in geometric meaning. (Author)

  19. Cautions in the Interpretation of the Partial Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachar, Jane

    1980-01-01

    The partial correlation coefficient is derived analytically under exemplary factor patterns. In these patterns, variables are described as an additive composition of a set of orthogonal factors, including general, common, and specific factors. Viewed in this framework, it is evident that the partial correlation may yield spurious results.…

  20. Simplified Models for the Drag Coefficient of a Pitched Baseball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David; Nathan, Alan M.

    2014-05-01

    The classic experiment to measure the drag coefficient involves dropping coffee filters. Wouldn't it be more fun to try something different? In fact, an experiment on the drag force is conducted nearly 4000 times a day during the baseball season and you have free access to this PITCHf/x data!2

  1. Simplified Models for the Drag Coefficient of a Pitched Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David; Nathan, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The classic experiment to measure the drag coefficient involves dropping coffee filters. Wouldn't it be more fun to try something different? In fact, an experiment on the drag force is conducted nearly 4000 times a day during the baseball season and you have free access to this PITCHf/x data!

  2. A Simple Method for Calculating Clebsch-Gordan Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klink, W. H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for calculating Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for the tensor product of two unitary irreducible representations (UIRs) of the rotation group. The method also works for multiplicity-free irreducible representations appearing in the tensor product of any number of UIRs of the rotation group. The generalization to…

  3. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  4. Visualising the Complex Roots of Quadratic Equations with Real Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2012-01-01

    The roots of the general quadratic equation y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c (real a, b, c) are known to occur in the following sets: (i) real and distinct; (ii) real and coincident; and (iii) a complex conjugate pair. Case (iii), which provides the focus for this investigation, can only occur when the values of the real coefficients a, b, and c are…

  5. SCALE Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.; Martin, William R.

    2016-02-25

    Sensitivity coefficients describe the fractional change in a system response that is induced by changes to system parameters and nuclear data. The Tools for Sensitivity and UNcertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) code within the SCALE code system makes use of eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, including quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different critical systems, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications has motivated the developmentmore » of a methodology for calculating sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo applications. The Contributon-Linked eigenvalue sensitivity/Uncertainty estimation via Tracklength importance CHaracterization (CLUTCH) and Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) eigenvalue sensitivity methods were recently implemented in the CE-KENO framework of the SCALE code system to enable TSUNAMI-3D to perform eigenvalue sensitivity calculations using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. This work provides a detailed description of the theory behind the CLUTCH method and describes in detail its implementation. This work explores the improvements in eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient accuracy that can be gained through the use of continuous-energy sensitivity methods and also compares several sensitivity methods in terms of computational efficiency and memory requirements.« less

  6. Coefficient of variation in flow cytometry of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa-Yamamoto, K; Odashima, S

    1987-01-01

    Fluorescence histograms of V79 Chinese hamster lung cells containing phagocytized fluorescent microspheres were measured by flow cytometry. In the fluorescence histograms, the coefficient of variation (CV) of the peak for cells ingesting microspheres was not constant. Rather, it decreased with the number of microspheres ingested by the cells.

  7. Consumptive Water Use and Crop Coefficients of Irrigated Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semi-arid environments, the use of irrigation is necessary for sunflower production to reach its maximum potential. The aim of this study was to quantify the consumptive water use and crop coefficients of irrigated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) without soil water limitations during two growing...

  8. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  9. Detection of community structure in networks based on community coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hu; Wei, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Determining community structure in networks is fundamental to the analysis of the structural and functional properties of those networks, including social networks, computer networks, and biological networks. Modularity function Q, which was proposed by Newman and Girvan, was once the most widely used criterion for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. However, modularity Q is subject to a serious resolution limit. In this paper, we propose a new function for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. This is called community coefficient C. Using community coefficient C, we can automatically identify the ideal number of communities in the network, without any prior knowledge. We demonstrate that community coefficient C is superior to the modularity Q and does not have a resolution limit. We also compared the two widely used community structure partitioning methods, the hierarchical partitioning algorithm and the normalized cuts (Ncut) spectral partitioning algorithm. We tested these methods on computer-generated networks and real-world networks whose community structures were already known. The Ncut algorithm and community coefficient C were found to produce better results than hierarchical algorithms. Unlike several other community detection methods, the proposed method effectively partitioned the networks into different community structures and indicated the correct number of communities.

  10. Inferential Procedures for Correlation Coefficients Corrected for Attenuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakstian, A. Ralph; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A model and computation procedure based on classical test score theory are presented for determination of a correlation coefficient corrected for attenuation due to unreliability. Delta and Monte Carlo method applications are discussed. A power analysis revealed no serious loss in efficiency resulting from correction for attentuation. (TJH)

  11. Modeling NAPL dissolution fingering with upscaled mass transfer rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Farthing, Matthew W.; Miller, Cass T.

    2003-10-01

    The dissolution of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) at residual saturation in porous media has sometimes resulted in the development of preferential dissolution pathways or NAPL dissolution fingers. While NAPL dissolution fingering may be modeled using numerical simulators with fine discretization, this approach is computational intensive. We derived an expression for an upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient that accounts for the growth of dissolution fingers within porous media contaminated uniformly with residual NAPL. This expression was closely related to the lengthening of the dissolution front. Data from physical experiments and numerical simulations in two dimensions were used to examine the growth of the dissolution front and the corresponding upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient. Using this upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient, the time when dissolution fingering results in a reduction in the overall mass transfer rate and thus controls the rate of NAPL dissolution was determined. This crossover time is a convenient parameter for assessing the influence of dissolution fingering on NAPL removal. For the physical experiments and numerical simulations analyzed in this study, the crossover time to dissolution fingering control always occurred before the dissolution front had moved 14 cm within NAPL-contaminated porous media, which is small compared to the scale of typical systems of concern. To verify the utility of this approach, data from a three-dimensional physical experiment were predicted reasonably well using an upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient that was determined independently from this experiment.

  12. Dissociation and Mass Transfer Coefficients for Ammonia Volatilization Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficients for ammonia volatilization from media of buffered ammon...

  13. PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR METALS IN SURFACE WATER, SOIL, AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents metal partition coefficients for the surface water pathway and for the source model used in the Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partition ...

  14. Velocity space scattering coefficients with applications in antihydrogen recombination studies

    PubMed

    Chang; Ordonez

    2000-12-01

    An approach for calculating velocity space friction and diffusion coefficients with Maxwellian field particles is developed based on a kernel function derived in a previous paper [Y. Chang and C. A. Ordonez, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2947 (1999)]. The original fivefold integral expressions for the coefficients are reduced to onefold integrals, which can be used for any value of the Coulomb logarithm. The onefold integrals can be further reduced to standard analytical expressions by using a weak coupling approximation. The integral expression for the friction coefficient is used to predict a time scale that describes the rate at which a reflecting antiproton beam slows down within a positron plasma, while both species are simultaneously confined by a nested Penning trap. The time scale is used to consider the possibility of achieving antihydrogen recombination within the trap. The friction and diffusion coefficients are then used to derive an expression for calculating the energy transfer rate between antiprotons and positrons. The expression is employed to illustrate achieving antihydrogen recombination while taking into account positron heating by the antiprotons. The effect of the presence of an electric field on recombination is discussed.

  15. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids.

    PubMed

    Sehnem, A L; Figueiredo Neto, A M; Aquino, R; Campos, A F C; Tourinho, F A; Depeyrot, J

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient S(T)(T) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence. PMID:26565244

  16. High expansion coefficient glasses can be sealed to common metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, F. E.; Champman, J. W.; Hirayama, C.

    1970-01-01

    New series of high expansion coefficient glasses can be sealed by fusion onto hot surfaces of metals and alloys. Glasses have relatively low working temperatures, good chemical durability, and can be used in electrical insulators and feedthroughs to fluid or vacuum systems.

  17. An Iterative Method for Solving Variable Coefficient ODEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeba, Elias; Yoon, Jeong-Mi; Zafiris, Vasilis

    2003-01-01

    In this classroom note, the authors present a method to solve variable coefficients ordinary differential equations of the form p(x)y([squared])(x) + q(x)y([superscript 1])(x) + r(x)y(x) = 0. They propose an iterative method as an alternate method to solve the above equation. This iterative method is accessible to an undergraduate student studying…

  18. Determination of the coefficient of friction using spinning motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaci, S.; Ciornei, F. C.; Filote, C.; Romanu, I. C.; Nastaca, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a method for accurate determination of the coefficient of dynamic friction between two different materials. The principle of the method consists in evaluation of angular deceleration of a body of revolution that rotates positioned on another revolution body. The main advantages of the approach consist in high precision and reduced dimensions of the involved bodies.

  19. Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Sensible heat models

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpinsky, E.

    1995-12-01

    Transient models for sensible heat were developed to assess the thermal performance of agitated vessels with coils and jackets. Performance is quantified with the computation of heat-transfer coefficients by introducing vessel heating and cooling data into model equations. Of the two model categories studied, differential and macroscopic, the latter is preferred due to mathematical simplicity and lower sensitivity to experimental data variability.

  20. Modeling Concordance Correlation Coefficient for Longitudinal Study Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yan; Tang, Wan; Yu, Qin; Tu, X. M.

    2010-01-01

    Measures of agreement are used in a wide range of behavioral, biomedical, psychosocial, and health-care related research to assess reliability of diagnostic test, psychometric properties of instrument, fidelity of psychosocial intervention, and accuracy of proxy outcome. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a popular measure of…

  1. Estimating the radon emanation coefficient from crystalline rocks into groundwater.

    PubMed

    Przylibski, T A

    2000-09-01

    A simple method is proposed to estimate the coefficient of radon emanation from crystalline rocks into underground waters. In these cases, the crystalline rock seems as both the source and the reservoir of the radon. The calculations are based on a formula proposed by Maché for determining the concentration of radon in underground waters. Due to the inaccuracy of estimating some parameters (e.g. porosity), the results have a significant error. The advantage of this method is its simplicity and the possibility of obtaining results in a relatively short time. The estimated values of the emanation coefficient for selected crystalline rocks of the Sudety Mountains (SW Poland) vary from 7 to 41%, and after considering the error resulting from the estimation of rock porosity, saturation and density, the values range from 5 to 60%. The highest values of emanation coefficient (41, 33 and 21%) have been obtained for rocks in areas of tectonic dislocations and the lowest ones are for rocks outside dislocation zones (9 and 7%). The calculations imply that the emanation coefficient of rocks may have a greater influence on radon concentration in underground waters than the contents of radium in the reservoir rocks.

  2. n-Alcohol/Water Partition Coefficients for Decachlorobiphenyl (PCB 209)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow) for highly hydrophobic chemicals are extremely difficult and are rarely made, in part due to the large volumes of water typically needed to quantify these compounds in the aqueous phase. An extrapolation approach using ...

  3. Temperature and Strain Coefficient of Velocity for Langasite SAW Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave sensors on Langasite substrates are being investigated for aerospace applications. Characterization of the Langasite material properties must be performed before sensors can be installed in research vehicles. The coefficients of velocity for both strain and temperature have been determined. These values have also been used to perform temperature compensation of the strain measurements.

  4. A Simple Measurement of the Sliding Friction Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Defrancesco, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple computer-aided experiment for investigating Coulomb's law of sliding friction in a classroom. It provides a way of testing the possible dependence of the friction coefficient on various parameters, such as types of materials, normal force, apparent area of contact and sliding velocity.

  5. Determination of the Static Friction Coefficient from Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s[superscript-1], and the…

  6. Determination of effective thermal expansion coefficients of unidirectional fibrous nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ming; Schiavone, Peter; Gao, Cun-Fa

    2016-10-01

    We present an efficient numerical scheme (based on complex variable techniques) to calculate the effective thermal expansion coefficients of a composite containing unidirectional periodic fibers. Moreover, the mechanical behavior of the fibers incorporates interface effects allowing the ensuing analytical model of the composite to accommodate deformations at the nanoscale. The resulting `nanocomposite' is subjected to a uniform temperature variation which leads to periodic deformations within the plane perpendicular to the fibers and uniform deformations along the direction of the fibers. These deformation fields are determined by analyzing a representative unit cell of the composite subsequently leading to the corresponding effective thermal expansion coefficients. Numerical results are illustrated via several physical examples. We find that the influence of interface effects on the effective thermal expansion coefficients (in particular that corresponding to the transverse direction in the plane perpendicular to the fibers) decays rapidly as the fibers become harder. In addition, by comparing the results obtained here with those from effective medium theories, we show that the latter may induce significant errors in the determination of the effective transverse thermal expansion coefficient when the fibers are much softer than the matrix and the fiber volume fraction is relatively high.

  7. METHOD FOR MEASURING AIR-IMMISCIBLE LIQUID PARTITION COEFFICIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this work was to measure nonaqueous phase liquid-air partition coefficients for various gas tracer compounds. Known amounts of trichloroethene (TCE) and tracer, as neat compounds, were introduced into glass vials and allowed to equilibrate. The TCE and ...

  8. Uptake coefficients for biosolids-amended dryland winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biosolids regulations developed in the United States employed risk assessment impacts of trace element additions on plant uptake. The US Environmental Protection Agency adapted the uptake coefficient (ratio of plant concentration to quantity of element added) when developing limitations on selected...

  9. A novel method for measuring polymer-water partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tengyi; Jafvert, Chad T; Fu, Dafang; Hu, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) often is used as the sorbent material in passive sampling devices to estimate the average temporal chemical concentration in water bodies or sediment pore water. To calculate water phase chemical concentrations from LDPE concentrations accurately, it is necessary to know the LDPE-water partition coefficients (KPE-w) of the chemicals of interest. However, even moderately hydrophobic chemicals have large KPE-w values, making direct measurement experimentally difficult. In this study we evaluated a simple three phase system from which KPE-w can be determined easily and accurately. In the method, chemical equilibrium distribution between LDPE and a surfactant micelle pseudo-phase is measured, with the ratio of these concentrations equal to the LDPE-micelle partition coefficient (KPE-mic). By employing sufficient mass of polymer and surfactant (Brij 30), the mass of chemical in the water phase remains negligible, albeit in equilibrium. In parallel, the micelle-water partition coefficient (Kmic-w) is determined experimentally. KPE-w is the product of KPE-mic and Kmic-w. The method was applied to measure values of KPE-w for 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 37 polychlorinated biphenyls, and 9 polybrominated diphenylethers. These values were compared to literature values. Mass fraction-based chemical activity coefficients (γ) were determined in each phase and showed that for each chemical, the micelles and LDPE had nearly identical affinity.

  10. Estimation of coefficients and boundary parameters in hyperbolic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Murphy, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Semi-discrete Galerkin approximation schemes are considered in connection with inverse problems for the estimation of spatially varying coefficients and boundary condition parameters in second order hyperbolic systems typical of those arising in 1-D surface seismic problems. Spline based algorithms are proposed for which theoretical convergence results along with a representative sample of numerical findings are given.

  11. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  12. Solving Second-Order Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmer, A., III; Costa, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed in which an analytical solution is obtained for certain classes of second-order differential equations with variable coefficients. By the use of transformations and by repeated iterated integration, a desired solution is obtained. This alternative method represents a different way to acquire a solution from classic power…

  13. Assessing Dimensionality by Maximizing "H" Coefficient-Based Objective Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Abswoude, Alexandra A. H.; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Hemker, Bas T.

    2007-01-01

    Mokken scale analysis can be used for scaling under nonparametric item response theory models. The results may, however, not reflect the underlying dimensionality of data. Various features of Mokken scale analysis--the H coefficient, Mokken scale conditions, and algorithms--may explain this result. In this article, three new H-based objective…

  14. Using Plasticine (TM) to Measure the Rolling Friction Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellvi, Francesc; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment that makes manifest the energy lost to friction of an iron ball moving along an inclined iron rail, which allows students to compute the rolling friction coefficient. Uses a method based on measurement of deformation produced in a piece of Plasticine by an inelastic collision with the ball and combines mechanical concepts…

  15. Thermal coefficients of technology assimilation by natural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Estimates of thermal coefficients of the rates of technology assimilation processes was made. Consideration of such processes as vegetation and soil recovery and pollution assimilation indicates that these processes proceed ten to several hundred times more slowly in earth's cold regions than in temperate regions. It was suggested that these differential assimilation rates are important data in planning for technological expansion in Arctic regions.

  16. Measuring the Coefficient of Restitution Using a Digital Oscilloscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new method of determining the coefficient of restitution (COR) of a ball-surface combination by using the sound produced by the impact/collision of the ball with the surface. Using a digital electronic circuit, the electrical signal is amplified and fed to a digital storage oscilloscope through a relay circuit for measuring the time…

  17. Inbreeding and relatedness coefficients: what do they measure?

    PubMed

    Rousset, F

    2002-05-01

    This paper reviews and discusses what is known about the relationship between identity in state, allele frequency, inbreeding coefficients, and identity by descent in various uses of these terms. Generic definitions of inbreeding coefficients are given, as ratios of differences of probabilities of identity in state. Then some of their properties are derived from an assumption in terms of differences between distributions of coalescence times of different genes. These inbreeding coefficients give an approximate measurement of how much higher the probability of recent coalescence is for some pair of genes relative to another pair. Such a measure is in general not equivalent to identity by descent; rather, it approximates a ratio of differences of probabilities of identity by descent. These results are contrasted with some other formulas relating identity, allele frequency, and inbreeding coefficients. Additional assumptions are necessary to obtain most of them, and some of these assumptions are not always correct, for example when there is localized dispersal. Therefore, definitions based on such formulas are not always well-formulated. By contrast, the generic definitions are both well-formulated and more broadly applicable.

  18. The Importance of Structure Coefficients in Interpreting Regression Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidgerken, Amanda D.

    The paper stresses the importance of consulting beta weights and structure coefficients in the interpretation of regression results. The effects of multilinearity and suppressors and their effects on interpretation of beta weights are discussed. It is concluded that interpretations based on beta weights only can lead the unwary researcher to…

  19. Optimality Conditions for Semilinear Hyperbolic Equations with Controls in Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bo; Lou Hongwei

    2012-06-15

    An optimal control problem for semilinear hyperbolic partial differential equations is considered. The control variable appears in coefficients. Necessary conditions for optimal controls are established by method of two-scale convergence and homogenized spike variation. Results for problems with state constraints are also stated.

  20. On Polynomial Solutions of Linear Differential Equations with Polynomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Si, Do Tan

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates a method for solving linear differential equations with polynomial coefficients based on the fact that the operators z and D + d/dz are known to be Hermitian conjugates with respect to the Bargman and Louck-Galbraith scalar products. (MLH)

  1. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  2. ROVIBRATIONAL QUENCHING RATE COEFFICIENTS OF HD IN COLLISIONS WITH He

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, J. L.; Stancil, P. C.; Lee, T.-G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C. E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu E-mail: naduvala@unlv.nevada.edu

    2012-01-01

    Along with H{sub 2}, HD has been found to play an important role in the cooling of the primordial gas for the formation of the first stars and galaxies. It has also been observed in a variety of cool molecular astrophysical environments. The rate of cooling by HD molecules requires knowledge of collisional rate coefficients with the primary impactors, H, He, and H{sub 2}. To improve knowledge of the collisional properties of HD, we present rate coefficients for the He-HD collision system over a range of collision energies from 10{sup -5} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} cm{sup -1}. Fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations were performed for initial HD rovibrational states of j = 0 and 1 for v = 0-17 which utilized accurate diatom rovibrational wave functions. Rate coefficients of all {Delta}v = 0, -1, and -2 transitions are reported. Significant discrepancies with previous calculations, which adopted a small basis and harmonic HD wave functions for excited vibrational levels, were found for the highest previously considered vibrational state of v = 3. Applications of the He-HD rate coefficients in various astrophysical environments are briefly discussed.

  3. Upscaling the overland flow resistance coefficient for vegetated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Katopodes, N.

    2011-12-01

    Estimation of hydraulic resistance for overland flows plays a crucial role in modeling rainfall-runoff, flood routing, and soil erosion processes. The resistance affects not only the accurate calculations of flow variables, but also the predictions of their derivative outcomes. In particular, resistance is highly spatially variable and controlled by local flow conditions and bed characteristics in hillslopes vegetated with patches of shrubs or woody plants. Numerous studies sought general ways of relating hydraulic resistance to roughness coefficients. A typical approach in determining the Darcy-Weisbach friction factor (f) is to relate it to the Reynolds number (Re). The case is applicable when flow completely submerges roughness elements. On the other hand, when the surface covered with stones, organic litter, or vegetation is not fully submerged by the flow, the f-Re relationship does not hold. Flow dimensionless variables other than Re may become predominant in determining the resistance. There is little information on how to determine the roughness coefficient of vegetated hillslopes of arbitrary scale as a function of flow variables and bed characteristics. Although many field or laboratory studies have attempted to address the problem, most of them were carried out in channels and over a limited range of possible flow conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the upscaling properties of the resistance coefficient by resolving the details of the flow process at an extremely fine-scale. The domain was conceptualized as a sloped plane with a number of "obstacles" of centimeter scale (i.e., representing vegetation stems) that have infinitely long height. A number of simulations were designed with a numerical model resolving the two-dimensional form of Saint-Venant equations representing the propagation of dynamic wave. The simulations explored how the resistance coefficient varied with different vegetation covers, domain slopes, flow rates and

  4. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2010-09-27

    The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on

  5. Process controls on regional flood frequency: Coefficient of variation and basin scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BlöSchl, Günter; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    1997-12-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) of maximum annual floods is examined to understand the effects of process controls and catchment size. A derived flood frequency model is used to interpret data from 489 catchments in Austria. At the core of process controls appears to be the interaction of catchment response time and storm duration, but the magnitude is not large, and often this interaction is hidden by other processes. The dependence of rainfall intensity and duration is clearly very important and reduces CV significantly. Increasing channel travel times with catchment scale tend to translate into decreasing CVs with area for small catchments while they tend to translate into increasing CVs with area for larger catchments. Nonlinear runoff processes, including threshold effects, is the main mechanism for increasing CV. They give rise to complex patterns in the relationship between CV and area. Base flow has been used as a surrogate for a number of processes, such as seasonality of streamflow. It always decreases CV and, in particular, leads to a significant decrease of CV with area. Both the observed tendency of CV to decrease with area and the scatter in the data are the result of a complex interplay of a number of processes which allows various alternative interpretations. Depending on which processes dominate under a particular hydrologic regime, different patterns arise. It appears that the explanations of the relationship between CV and catchment scale suggested in the literature are too simplistic. The case is made for using the concept of hydrologic regimes and process studies of the type presented here to help delineate homogeneous regions for regional flood frequency analyses in a physically consistent way.

  6. Drag and energy accommodation coefficients during sunspot maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano; Moe, Kenneth; Moe, Mildred M.

    A hundred years of laboratory measurements have shown that gas-surface interactions depend not only on the chemistry and energy of the incident particles but also on the degree of surface contamination. The conditions appropriate to gas-surface interaction in space have not been successfully duplicated in the laboratory. Consequently, knowledge of satellite drag coefficients has been dependent upon opportunities to compare theoretical models with observations of satellite decay. From such studies it is now known that the great majority of molecules which strike satellite surfaces are reemitted in a diffuse angular distribution with an energy loss given by the energy accommodation coefficient, α. Although a few measurements of α were made in the past, none was made near sunspot maximum. In the present study, we take advantage of the increasing data base to compare theoretical determinations of satellite drag coefficients with the history of satellite orbital decay during sunspot maximum. An example is the SNOE satellite which was in a circular orbit with an initial perigee altitude of 515 km during dates from October 1999 to December 2002. SNOE had a cylinder-like shape with a hexagonal cross section. It was attitude stabilized so that it maintained a constant aspect relative to the incident velocity vector, a feature which facilitated the computation of its drag coefficient as a function of α. The satellite drag coefficient was obtained by fitting, in a least squares sense, the semi-major axis decay inferred from the historical two-line elements acquired by the US Space Surveillance Network. All the principal orbital perturbations, namely geopotential harmonics up to the 16th degree and order, third body attraction of the Moon and the Sun, direct solar radiation pressure (with eclipses), and aerodynamic drag were included, using the Jacchia Bowman 2006 (JB2006) model to describe the atmospheric density. The average drag coefficient (fitted to JB2006), calculated

  7. Bulk viscosity coefficients due to phonons in superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, Cristina; Tolos, Laura; Tarrús, Jaume E-mail: tarrus@ecm.ub.edu

    2013-07-01

    We calculate the three bulk viscosity coefficients as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state of the system. The solution of the dynamical evolution of the phonon number density allows us to calculate the bulk viscosity coefficients as function of the phonon collisional rate and the phonon dispersion law, which depends on the neutron pairing gap. Our method of computation is rather general, and could be used for different superfluid systems, provided they share the same underlying symmetries. We find that the behavior with temperature of the bulk viscosity coefficients is dominated by the contributions coming from the collinear regime of the 2↔3 phonon processes. For typical star radial pulsation frequencies of ω ∼ 10{sup 4}s{sup −1}, we obtain that the bulk viscosity coefficients at densities n∼>4n{sub 0} are within 10% from its static value for T∼<10{sup 9} K and for the case of strong neutron superfluidity in the core with a maximum value of the {sup 3}P{sub 2} gap above 1 MeV, while, otherwise, the static solution is not a valid approximation to the bulk viscosity coefficients. Compared to previous results from Urca and modified Urca reactions, we conclude that at T ∼ 10{sup 9}K phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars, except for n ∼ 2n{sub 0} when the opening of the Urca processes takes place.

  8. Second-degree Stokes coefficients from multi-satellite SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Müller, Horst; Gerstl, Michael; Štefka, Vojtěch; Bouman, Johannes; Göttl, Franziska; Horwath, Martin

    2015-09-01

    The long wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field can be determined, with varying accuracy, from satellite laser ranging (SLR). In this study, we investigate the combination of up to ten geodetic SLR satellites using iterative variance component estimation. SLR observations to different satellites are combined in order to identify the impact of each satellite on the estimated Stokes coefficients. The combination of satellite-specific weekly or monthly arcs allows to reduce parameter correlations of the single-satellite solutions and leads to alternative estimates of the second-degree Stokes coefficients. This alternative time series might be helpful for assessing the uncertainty in the impact of the low-degree Stokes coefficients on geophysical investigations. In order to validate the obtained time series of second-degree Stokes coefficients, a comparison with the SLR RL05 time series of the Center of Space Research (CSR) is done. This investigation shows that all time series are comparable to the CSR time series. The precision of the weekly/monthly and coefficients is analyzed by comparing mass-related equatorial excitation functions with geophysical model results and reduced geodetic excitation functions. In case of , the annual amplitude and phase of the DGFI solution agrees better with three of four geophysical model combinations than other time series. In case of , all time series agree very well to each other. The impact of on the ice mass trend estimates for Antarctica are compared based on CSR GRACE RL05 solutions, in which different monthly time series are used for replacing. We found differences in the long-term Antarctic ice loss of Gt/year between the GRACE solutions induced by the different SLR time series of CSR and DGFI, which is about 13 % of the total ice loss of Antarctica. This result shows that Antarctic ice mass loss quantifications must be carefully interpreted.

  9. Seebeck Coefficient Metrology: Do Contemporary Protocols Measure Up?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Green, Martin L.

    2015-06-01

    Comparative measurements of the Seebeck coefficient are challenging due to the diversity of instrumentation and measurement protocols. With the implementation of standardized measurement protocols and the use of Standard Reference Materials (SRMs®), for example, the recently certified National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SRM® 3451 ``Low Temperature Seebeck Coefficient Standard (10-390 K)'', researchers can reliably analyze and compare data, both intra- and inter-laboratory, thereby accelerating the development of more efficient thermoelectric materials and devices. We present a comparative overview of commonly adopted Seebeck coefficient measurement practices. First, we examine the influence of asynchronous temporal and spatial measurement of electric potential and temperature. Temporal asynchronicity introduces error in the absolute Seebeck coefficient of the order of ≈10%, whereas spatial asynchronicity introduces error of the order of a few percent. Second, we examine the influence of poor thermal contact between the measurement probes and the sample. This is especially critical at high temperature, wherein the prevalent mode of measuring surface temperature is facilitated by pressure contact. Each topic will include the comparison of data measured using different measurement techniques and using different probe arrangements. We demonstrate that the probe arrangement is the primary limit to high accuracy, wherein the Seebeck coefficients measured by the 2-probe arrangement and those measured by the 4-probe arrangement diverge with the increase in temperature, approaching ≈14% at 900 K. Using these analyses, we provide recommended measurement protocols to guide members of the thermoelectric materials community in performing more accurate measurements and in evaluating more comprehensive uncertainty limits.

  10. Theoretical and observational determinations of the ionization coefficient of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William

    1997-07-01

    We examine the problem of the determination of the ionization coefficient beta from both the theoretical and observational points of view. In the past, theoretical evaluations of beta in terms of the relevant scattering cross-sections have used the Massey-Sida formula, which we show to give results which are plainly incorrect. We derive an integral equation for beta and compare the results of its application to copper and iron with laboratory simulations. Agreement for the variation of the ionization coefficient with velocity is good. The ionization coefficient has been determined observationally by Verniani & Hawkins from a comparison of radar and visual observations, employing the luminous efficiency tau also obtained observationally by Verniani. However, this determination of tau would appear to be invalidated by fragmentation. There is good evidence that the radiation of cometary meteors is dominated by that of iron in the visual range, and we have accordingly re-analysed the data of Verniani & Hawkins using the luminous efficiency of iron obtained in simulation experiments. However, it is not possible to choose an iron concentration which gives agreement between the determination of the ionization coefficient by this means and its determination from the theoretical equation in terms of either scattering coefficients or simulation methods. The observational ionization coefficients are much lower than predicted by the present theory and we provisionally explain this as a consequence of transfer of charge from the meteoric ion to a molecule of the air. It is now possible for the meteoric atom to be re-ionized, but it is also possible at sufficiently high initial line densities for significant dissociative recombination of the electrons and nitrogen or oxygen to take place. This recombination will not take place in meteor trains simulated in an ionization chamber. We thus conclude that the present theory is limited to faint radio meteors at lower velocities (v<~35

  11. Is tendon stiffness correlated to the dissipation coefficient?

    PubMed

    Fouré, A; Cornu, C; Nordez, A

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of Achilles tendon mechanical properties in vivo has received much attention in the literature. Many studies investigated mechanical properties by assessing tendon stiffness. Despite tendon dissipative properties being representative of a storage-recoil process, its determination has received minimal attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine if Achilles tendon stiffness is associated with dissipative properties. The cross-sectional area, stiffness and dissipation coefficient of the Achilles tendon were measured in 35 subjects. No significant correlation was found between stiffness and the dissipation coefficient, irrespective of stiffness normalization with cross-sectional area (P > 0.05). Thus, it appears that both stiffness and dissipative properties must be assessed to determine the storage-recoil process capacities of the Achilles tendon in order to precisely characterize changes in the tendon mechanical properties after chronic interventions or rehabilitation programs.

  12. Discharge coefficients of holes angled to the flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, N.; Henshall, S. E.; Manning, A.

    1992-06-01

    In the cooling passages of gas turbine blades, branches are often angled to the direction of the internal flow. This is particularly the case with film cooling holes. Accurate knowledge of the discharge coefficient of such holes at the design stage is vital so that the holes are correctly sized thus avoiding wastage of coolant and the formation of hot spots on the blade. This paper describes an experimental investigation to determine the discharge coefficient of 30 deg inclined holes with various degrees of inlet radiusing and with the axis of the hole at various orientation angles to the direction of the flow. Results are given for nominal main flow Mach numbers of 0, 0.15 and 0.3. The effects of radiusing, orientation and cross flow Mach number are quantified in the paper, the general trends are described, and the criteria for optimum performance are identified.

  13. The evaluation of the power coefficient of a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, A.; Botrini, M.; Brun, R.; Beguier, C.

    1983-03-01

    Measurements of the pressure variations and the blade drag on a Savonius rotor with partially overlapping blades set at different angles of attack are employed to develop a model for the power coefficient. The data were taken in a wind tunnel with probes placed on the interior and exterior surfaces of a blade from the leading edge to the trailing edge in a series of seven trials with each angle of attack. Two rotationary regimes were noted, the first, motoring, which lasted up to an angle of attack of 145 deg, and a resistant mode, which lasted up to 180 deg. A two-dimensional model is developed for a horizontal slice of the Savonius, taking into account the aerodynamic forces on the retreating and advancing blades. It is found that the drag increase with the rotation speed, eventually providing an upper limit to the power available. A maximum power coefficient of 0.17 is projected.

  14. Stiffness Coefficients Measurement of Cylindrical Rods by Laser Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Rossignol, C.; Audoin, B.

    2004-02-01

    A non-contact laser-ultrasonic technique is applied to the nondestructive measurement of the stiffness properties of cylindrical rods. Acoustic waves generated in a cylinder by a laser line source under thermoelastic regime are identified by the comparison between experiment and theory. Two stiffness coefficients c11 and c12 are determined by measuring the arrival time of the reflected longitudinal wave (LL) and that of the head wave (HW). The effects of laser beamwidth and time duration on the measurement are found by numerical simulations. For such an application, a radius of 0.3 mm appears as a minimum limit for the sample size using a laser source of 0.1 mm beamwidth and 20 ns time duration. Stiffness coefficients of three aluminum rods are experimentally measured with good accuracy.

  15. Onsager coefficients of a finite-time Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2009-08-01

    We study a finite-time Carnot cycle of a weakly interacting gas which we can regard as a nearly ideal gas in the limit of Th-Tc→0 where Th and Tc are the temperatures of the hot and cold heat reservoirs, respectively. In this limit, we can assume that the cycle is working in the linear-response regime and can calculate the Onsager coefficients of this cycle analytically using the elementary molecular kinetic theory. We reveal that these Onsager coefficients satisfy the so-called tight-coupling condition and this fact explains why the efficiency at the maximal power ηmax of this cycle can attain the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency from the viewpoint of the linear-response theory.

  16. Onsager coefficients of a finite-time Carnot cycle.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2009-08-01

    We study a finite-time Carnot cycle of a weakly interacting gas which we can regard as a nearly ideal gas in the limit of T(h)-T(c) --> 0 where T(h) and T(c) are the temperatures of the hot and cold heat reservoirs, respectively. In this limit, we can assume that the cycle is working in the linear-response regime and can calculate the Onsager coefficients of this cycle analytically using the elementary molecular kinetic theory. We reveal that these Onsager coefficients satisfy the so-called tight-coupling condition and this fact explains why the efficiency at the maximal power eta(max) of this cycle can attain the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency from the viewpoint of the linear-response theory. PMID:19792091

  17. Determination of the heat transfer coefficients in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, L.V.

    1994-06-01

    The process of transpiration cooling is considered. Methods are suggested for estimating the volumetric coefficient of heat transfer with the use of a two-temperature model and the surface heat transfer coefficient at entry into a porous wall. The development of new technology under conditions of increasing heat loads puts the search for effective methods of heat transfer enhancement in the forefront of theoretical investigations. One of the promising trends in the solution of this problem is the use of porous materials (PM) in the elements of power units. For thermal protection against convective or radiative heat fluxes, the method of transpiration cooling is successfully used. The mechanism operative in the thermal protection involves the injection of a coolant through a porous medium to produce a screen over the contour of a body in a flow for removing heat energy from the skeleton of the porous material.

  18. Mechanism of drag coefficient saturation at strong wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Komori, Satoru; Suzuki, Naoya; Iwano, Koji; Kurose, Ryoichi

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the saturation of drag coefficients at strong wind speeds. But the mechanism behind this saturation has not yet been fully clarified. In this study, at normal and strong wind speeds, we use a wind-wave tank for investigating the peak enhancement factor of the wind-sea spectrum, which is an appropriate wave parameter for representing interfacial flatness. We measured the water-level fluctuation using wave gauges. At strong wind speeds, the result shows that the peak enhancement factor of the wind-sea spectrum decreases with decreasing inverse wave age and with increasing wind speed. This suggests that the distinctive wind-wave breaking occurs at strong wind speeds. It also suggests that this distinctive breaking of wind waves causes the saturation of drag coefficients at strong wind speeds.

  19. Using the range to calculate the coefficient of variation.

    PubMed

    Rhiel, G Steven

    2004-12-01

    In this research a coefficient of variation (CVhigh-low) is calculated from the highest and lowest values in a set of data. Use of CVhigh-low when the population is normal, leptokurtic, and skewed is discussed. The statistic is the most effective when sampling from the normal distribution. With the leptokurtic distributions, CVhigh-low works well for comparing the relative variability between two or more distributions but does not provide a very "good" point estimate of the population coefficient of variation. With skewed distributions CVhigh-low works well in identifying which data set has the more relative variation but does not specify how much difference there is in the variation. It also does not provide a "good" point estimate.

  20. Stochastic method for modeling of the rarefied gas transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya; Lezhnev, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for computation of the transport coefficients of rarefied gas, which is based on stochastic modeling of phase trajectories considered molecular system. The hard spheres potential is used. The number of operations is proportional to the number of used molecules. Naturally in this algorithm the conservation laws are performed. The efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated by the calculation of the viscosity and diffusion coefficients of several noble gases (argon, neon, xenon, krypton). It was shown that the algorithm accuracy of the order of 1-2% can be obtained by using a relatively small number of molecules. The accuracy dependence on the number of used molecules, statistics (number of the used phase trajectories) and calculation time was analyzed.

  1. Absorption-coefficient-determination method for particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, J D; Douglass, R E; Garvey, D M

    1994-07-01

    A method is presented for determining the optical absorption coefficient, or the imaginary refractive index, of particulate material that has been collected from aerosols or hydrosols by means of filtration. The method, based on the Kubelka-Munk theory of diffuse reflectance, is nondestructive and requires no other knowledge of the sample than the amount present, the specific gravity, and an estimate of the real index of refraction. The theoretical development of the method is discussed along with an analysis of photometric and gravimetric errors. We test the method by comparing results obtained for powdered didymium glass with measurements made before the glass was crushed. An example of the method's application to the determination of the absorption coefficient of atmospheric dust at UV, visible, and near-IR wavelengths is also presented.

  2. Second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones potential.

    PubMed

    González-Calderón, Alfredo; Rocha-Ichante, Adrián

    2015-01-21

    We present an exact analytical solution for the second virial coefficient of a generalized Lennard-Jones type of pair potential model. The potential can be reduced to the Lennard-Jones, hard-sphere, and sticky hard-sphere models by tuning the potential parameters corresponding to the width and depth of the well. Thus, the second virial solution can also regain the aforementioned cases. Moreover, the obtained expression strongly resembles the one corresponding to the Kihara potential. In fact, the Fk functions are the same. Furthermore, for these functions, the complete expansions at low and high temperature are given. Additionally, we propose an alternative stickiness parameter based on the obtained second virial coefficient.

  3. The Elusive Coefficients of Thermal Expansion in PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    C.B. Skidmore; T.A. Butler; C.W. Sandoval

    2003-05-01

    PBX 9502 has been in war reserve service for over two decades. Ninety-five percent of the solid phase of this insensitive high explosive is composed of energetic crystallites designated as TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), held together by the remaining solid fraction--an inert, polymeric binder named Kel-F 800. The unusual combination of extreme insensitivity and adequate performance characteristics is not the only enigmatic feature of such TATB-based materials. In this report, we describe the difficulty and progress to date in reliably determining the coefficients of thermal expansion for consolidated components of PBX 9502. We provide bulk linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values for PBX 9502 consolidated to a density of approximately 1.890 g/cm{sup 3} and offer a simple set of equations for calculating dimensional changes for temperatures from 218 to 347 K (-55 C to 74 C).

  4. Comprehensive analysis of the optical Kerr coefficient of graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-08-25

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the nonlinear optical Kerr effect in graphene. We directly solve the S-matrix element to calculate the absorption rate, utilizing the Volkov-Keldysh-type crystal wave functions. We then convert to the nonlinear refractive index coefficients through the Kramers-Kronig relation. In this formalism, the source of Kerr nonlinearity is the interplay of optical fields that cooperatively drive the transition from valence to conduction band. This formalism makes it possible to identify and compute the rates of distinct nonlinear processes that contribute to the Kerr nonlinear refractive index coefficient. The four identified mechanisms are two-photon absorption, Raman transition,more » self-coupling, and quadratic ac Stark effect. As a result, we present a comparison of our theory with recent experimental and theoretical results.« less

  5. Mass transfer coefficients determination from linear gradient elution experiments.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A procedure to estimate mass transfer coefficients in linear gradient elution chromatography is presented and validated by comparison with experimental data. Mass transfer coefficients are traditionally estimated experimentally through the van Deemter plot, which represents the HETP as a function of the fluid velocity. Up to now, the HETP was obtained under isocratic elution conditions. Unfortunately, isocratic elution experiments are often not suitable for large biomolecules which suffer from severe mass transfer hindrances. Yamamoto et al. were the first to propose a semi-empirical equation to relate HETPs measured from linear gradient elution experiments to those obtained under isocratic conditions [7]. Based on his pioneering work, the approach presented in this work aims at providing an experimental procedure supported by simple equations to estimate reliable mass transfer parameters from linear gradient elution chromatographic experiments. From the resolution of the transport model, we derived a rigorous analytical expression for the HETP in linear gradient elution chromatography.

  6. Robust stability of diamond families of polynomials with complex coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Zhong Ling

    1993-01-01

    Like the interval model of Kharitonov, the diamond model proves to be an alternative powerful device for taking into account the variation of parameters in prescribed ranges. The robust stability of some kinds of diamond polynomial families with complex coefficients are discussed. By exploiting the geometric characterizations of their value sets, we show that, for the family of polynomials with complex coefficients and both their real and imaginary parts lying in a diamond, the stability of eight specially selected extreme point polynomials is necessary as well as sufficient for the stability of the whole family. For the so-called simplex family of polynomials, four extreme point and four exposed edge polynomials of this family need to be checked for the stability of the entire family. The relations between the stability of various diamonds are also discussed.

  7. Triplet extinction coefficients of some laser dyes I

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlopoulos, T.G.; Golich, D.J.

    1988-07-15

    We measured the triplet extinction coefficients epsilon/sub T/ over the laser action spectral region of Rhodamine 6G; Rhodamine B; Rhodamine 110; Fluorol-7GA; Coumarin 540A; Coumarin 522; Coumarin 1; Coumarin 120; 4,4'-diphenyl stilbene; and 2,7-bis-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-9,9-dipropylfluorene. We employed the different lines from an argon ion cw laser for excitation. McClure's method was used to obtain the triplet extinction coefficients epsilon/sub T/. The method requires the measurement of triplet optical densities OD/sub T/ as a function of different cw laser excitation intensities (powers) I/sub ex/ . The importance of triplet-state losses on dye laser efficiency is reviewed. The laser action properties of the laser dyes we studied are briefly discussed as they relate to the measured epsilon/sub T/ values.

  8. Determination of the static friction coefficient from circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s-1, and the videos are analyzed using Tracker video-analysis software, allowing the students to dynamically model the motion of the coin. The students have to obtain the static friction coefficient by comparing the centripetal and maximum static friction forces. The experiment only requires simple and inexpensive materials. The dynamics of circular motion and static friction forces are difficult for many students to understand. The proposed laboratory exercise addresses these topics, which are relevant to the physics curriculum.

  9. Onsager coefficients of a finite-time Carnot cycle.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2009-08-01

    We study a finite-time Carnot cycle of a weakly interacting gas which we can regard as a nearly ideal gas in the limit of T(h)-T(c) --> 0 where T(h) and T(c) are the temperatures of the hot and cold heat reservoirs, respectively. In this limit, we can assume that the cycle is working in the linear-response regime and can calculate the Onsager coefficients of this cycle analytically using the elementary molecular kinetic theory. We reveal that these Onsager coefficients satisfy the so-called tight-coupling condition and this fact explains why the efficiency at the maximal power eta(max) of this cycle can attain the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency from the viewpoint of the linear-response theory.

  10. A Bayesian test for the intraclass correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, V. A.; Singer, J. M.; Tanaka, N. I.; Pedroso-de-Lima, A. C.

    2012-10-01

    To decide if it is worth taking multiple measurements to reduce the length of confidence intervals for the mean, we must have information on whether the intraclass correlation coefficient is smaller than a certain constant. Under Normal model exact tests are available for the corresponding hypothesis, but in many practical settings they must rely on small pilot studies and therefore may have little power. We propose a Bayesian test that allows the incorporation of previous information on the variance components used in the definition of the intraclass correlation coefficients and may be generalized to situations where normality does not hold. We develop computational algorithms to implement the proposed method and present an example based on data from the food industry.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of the optical Kerr coefficient of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the nonlinear optical Kerr effect in graphene. We directly solve the S -matrix element to calculate the absorption rate, utilizing the Volkov-Keldysh-type crystal wave functions. We then convert to the nonlinear refractive index coefficients through the Kramers-Kronig relation. In this formalism, the source of Kerr nonlinearity is the interplay of optical fields that cooperatively drive the transition from valence to conduction band. This formalism makes it possible to identify and compute the rates of distinct nonlinear processes that contribute to the Kerr nonlinear refractive index coefficient. The four identified mechanisms are two-photon absorption, Raman transition, self-coupling, and quadratic ac Stark effect. We also present a comparison of our theory with recent experimental and theoretical results.

  12. Measurement of electron longitudinal diffusion coefficient in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yichen; Tang, Wei; Qian, Xin

    2016-03-01

    The electron longitudinal diffusion coefficients in Liquid Argon (LAr) are measured for a range of electric fields from 0.05 to 2.0 kV/cm up to a maximum drift distance of 120 mm using the two experimental setups at BNL. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. Our result represents the world's best measurement of electron longitudinal coefficients in this range. The measured longitudinal diffusion results are directly applicable to the existing experiments such as MicroBooNE and are essential for the future LAr based experiment detector design such as SBN and DUNE. We also report the performance of the gas purification system, which is important for the design of the purification system of future large LArTPCs.

  13. Limits on ion radial diffusion coefficients in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paonessa, M.; Cheng, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    The development of upper and lower limits for the rate of radial diffusion of energetic ions in Saturn's inner magnetosphere is discussed. Improved calculations of the satellite-sweeping rate and phase space density profiles for a wide range of ion invariants are utilized to determine the limits. The lower limit for the radial diffusion coefficient is established by requiring the rate of inward diffusion to be large enough to balance satellite sweeping losses; the upper limit is obtained by requiring the rate of inward diffusion to be less than the observable ultraviolet aurora on plasma torus L shell. It is concluded that the radial diffusion coefficient for ions in Saturn's inner magnetosphere is calculated to about two orders of magnitude.

  14. An ion-beam technique for measuring surface diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, P. M.; Labanda, J. G. C.; Barnett, S. A.

    1999-03-01

    The effective surface diffusion coefficient of Ga along the [110] direction on vicinal GaAs(001)2×4 surfaces during molecular-beam epitaxy was measured using specular ion current measurements. In this technique, 3 keV Ar ions were impinged upon the surface at a glancing angle (typically 3°), and the specularly scattered ion current was measured. Since specular reflections require a locally flat surface, adatoms cause a decrease in the measured current, allowing an average adatom density measurement. The time dependence of the Ga adatom population was measured during and after Ga deposition. Diffusion coefficients, obtained from the adatom lifetimes using a simple model of diffusion to the step edges, were fit well by the expression D=2×10-9 exp(-0.73 eV/kT)cm2/s from 400 to 600 °C.

  15. Ion beam technique for the measurement of deuterium diffusion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Farrell, K.

    1980-05-15

    This letter describes how a combination of the techniques of nuclear microanalysis and cathodic hydrogenation has been used to determine the diffusion coefficient of dueterium in austenitic stainless steel at room temperature. Samples charged in deuterated acid solutions to levels of about 20 at. % deuterium were quickly transferred to a scattering chamber where a depth profile of the near-surface deuterium was measured. For charging times much longer than the transfer plus anlyzing time, the deuterium profile could be described by an error function at the specimen surface. A diffusion coefficient was determined by a chi-squared test fitting procedure and shown to be consistent with values reported for other methods measured at higher temperatures.

  16. Diffusion coefficients for three major ions in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quegan, S.; Bailey, G. J.; Moffett, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    Published experimental data on ion composition in the topside ionosphere are examined. For certain features (the light ion trough, the high-latitude trough, the high-latitude hole and the mid-latitude total ion concentration trough) it is pointed out that the number of major ions present may be three or more. Transport equations derived by Schunk et al. (1975, 1977, 1979) are extended to include the case of the three major ions in the topside ionosphere. Specific calculations are made for the O(+), H(+) and He(+) ions and the behavior of the diffusion coefficients is discussed. From a model of the high-latitude ionization hole, described by Heelis et al. (1981), representative concentration and temperature profiles are obtained. These profiles are used to demonstrate further the behavior of the ion diffusion coefficients.

  17. Multigrid methods for differential equations with highly oscillatory coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engquist, Bjorn; Luo, Erding

    1993-01-01

    New coarse grid multigrid operators for problems with highly oscillatory coefficients are developed. These types of operators are necessary when the characters of the differential equations on coarser grids or longer wavelengths are different from that on the fine grid. Elliptic problems for composite materials and different classes of hyperbolic problems are practical examples. The new coarse grid operators can be constructed directly based on the homogenized differential operators or hierarchically computed from the finest grid. Convergence analysis based on the homogenization theory is given for elliptic problems with periodic coefficients and some hyperbolic problems. These are classes of equations for which there exists a fairly complete theory for the interaction between shorter and longer wavelengths in the problems. Numerical examples are presented.

  18. Absorption-coefficient-determination method for particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, J D; Douglass, R E; Garvey, D M

    1994-07-01

    A method is presented for determining the optical absorption coefficient, or the imaginary refractive index, of particulate material that has been collected from aerosols or hydrosols by means of filtration. The method, based on the Kubelka-Munk theory of diffuse reflectance, is nondestructive and requires no other knowledge of the sample than the amount present, the specific gravity, and an estimate of the real index of refraction. The theoretical development of the method is discussed along with an analysis of photometric and gravimetric errors. We test the method by comparing results obtained for powdered didymium glass with measurements made before the glass was crushed. An example of the method's application to the determination of the absorption coefficient of atmospheric dust at UV, visible, and near-IR wavelengths is also presented. PMID:20935789

  19. Temperature dependence of impact ionization coefficients in InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kenko; Torikai, Toshitaka; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Makita, Kikuo; Ishihara, Hisahiro

    1986-01-01

    Impact ionization coefficients for electrons and holes in InP were measured experimentally at 25-175 °C in the 400-600 kV/cm electric field range with planar avalanche photodiodes, in which the n-InP avalanche region was separated from the light absorbing InGaAs and/or InGaAsP layers. α and β monotonically decreased with elevated temperatures; β/α slightly decreased with increasing temperature. Comparison of the experimental results with Okuto-Crowell formula on the impact ionization coefficient gave the phonon energy ERO=46 meV and the phonon scattering mean free path λ0=41.7 Å for electron impact ionization and ERO=36 meV and λ0=41.3 Å for hole impact ionization, respectively. Curves calculated by using these parameters agree with the experimental results quite satisfactorily at each temperature.

  20. A high absorption coefficient DL-MPP imitating owl skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lijun; Zhao, Zhan; Kong, Deyi; Wu, Shaohua; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a high absorption coefficient micro-perforated panel (MPP) imitating owl skin structure for acoustic noise reduction. Compared to the traditional micro-perforated panel, this device has two unique characteristics-simulating the owl skin structure, its radius of perforated apertures even can be as small as 55μ, and its material is silicon and fabricated by micro-electrical mechanical system (MEMS) technology; So that its absorption coefficients of acoustic noise for normal incidence sound wave whose frequencies arrange from 1.5 kHz to 6.0 kHz are all above 0.8 which is the owl's hunts sensitivity frequency band. Double leaf MPP fabricated by MEMS technology is an absolutely bionic success in functional-imitation.

  1. [Solving resolution of diffraction gratings using coefficients of Zernike polynomials].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-li; Qi, Xiang-dong; Bayanheshig; Tang, Yu-guo

    2012-01-01

    It is hard and costly to test resolution directly, because the focal length of testing equipment could be nearly ten meters. Solving resolution by diffraction wavefront aberration indirectly is an effective solution to this problem. A normalization model of solving resolution using fitting coefficients of Zernike polynomials was established based on the spectral imaging theory of Fourier optics. The relationship between resolution and wavefront aberration of diffraction gratings was illustrated by this model. Finally, a new method of testing resolution using fitting coefficients of Zernike polynomials was proposed. According to this method, the resolution of a grating is tested by ZYGO interferometer indirectly. Compared with direct method, results indicate that the error of indirect method is less than 4.22%, and this method could be an effective way to avoid the difficulty of direct method to solve resolution. Meanwhile, this method can be used in ZYGO interferometer to solve resolution by wavefront testing easily.

  2. Neural Network Prediction of New Aircraft Design Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgaard, Magnus; Jorgensen, Charles C.; Ross, James C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses a neural network tool for more effective aircraft design evaluations during wind tunnel tests. Using a hybrid neural network optimization method, we have produced fast and reliable predictions of aerodynamical coefficients, found optimal flap settings, and flap schedules. For validation, the tool was tested on a 55% scale model of the USAF/NASA Subsonic High Alpha Research Concept aircraft (SHARC). Four different networks were trained to predict coefficients of lift, drag, moment of inertia, and lift drag ratio (C(sub L), C(sub D), C(sub M), and L/D) from angle of attack and flap settings. The latter network was then used to determine an overall optimal flap setting and for finding optimal flap schedules.

  3. Investigation of Drag Coefficient for Rigid Ballute-like Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel; Mastromarino, Anthony

    2014-11-01

    One common method of decelerating an object during atmospheric entry, descent, and landing is the use of parachutes. Another deceleration technology is the ballute - a combination of balloon and parachute. A CFD study was conducted using commercially available software to investigate the flow-field and the coefficient of drag for various rigid ballute-like shapes at varying Reynolds numbers. The impact of size and placement of the burble-fence as well as number, size, and shape of inlets was considered. Recent experimental measurements conducted during NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator program revealed a much higher coefficient of drag (Cd) for ballutes than previously encountered. Using atmospheric drag to slow down and land reduces the need for heavy fuel and rocket engines and thus, high values of drag are desired. Funding for this work, in part, provided by the CT Space Grant Consortium.

  4. Design of ophthalmic lens by using optimized aspheric surface coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming-Wen; Sun, Wen-Shing; Tien, Chuen-Lin

    1998-09-01

    Coddington's equations can be used to eliminate the oblique astigmatic error in the design of ophthalmic lens of spherical or other conicoidal surfaces. But it is difficult to get satisfactory result in the designing of the nonconic aspheric ophthalmic lens. In this paper we present an efficient approach based on optimization of aspheric coefficients, which enables the design program to obtain the minimum aberrations. Many higher order coefficients of aspheric surfaces can easily result in inflection point, which increases the difficulty in manufacturing. We solved the problem by taking it as one of the optimization constraints. The design of nonconic aspheric ophthalmic lens could also make the spectacle lenses well thinner in thickness and well flatter in shape than the design of spherical ophthalmic lens and other conicoidal ophthalmic lens. Damped least square methods are used in our design. Aspherical myopia ophthalmic lenses, aspherical hypermetropic lenses and cataract lenses were designed. Comparisons of design examples' results are given.

  5. Large Seebeck coefficient in frustrated doped Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, André-Marie

    2011-03-01

    Since calculations based on the standard Kubo formula have proven extremely difficult for electric and thermal transport, Shastry and co-workers suggested two novel approximate ways to obtain the thermopower (S) in interacting systems. One method is based on the high-frequency limit. The other, based on ideas of Kelvin, is purely thermodynamical. With these we study the Hubbard model on a 3d FCC lattice, a frustrated lattice. The high dimensionality of the problem justifies the use of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). CTQMC in the hybridization expansion and the fast IPT are the impurity solver. The Seebeck coefficient is obtained as a function of doping and temperature for different U. Within DMFT, vertex corrections vanish for transports coefficients, hence the bubble suffices. This enables us to further assess how both approximate methods compare with each other and with the DC Kubo approach. At low T, results can be interpreted in terms of effective Fermi temperatures and carrier number.

  6. Effects of vegetation canopy on the radar backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Blanchard, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne L- and C-band scatterometer data, taken over both vegetation-covered and bare fields, were systematically analyzed and theoretically reproduced, using a recently developed model for calculating radar backscattering coefficients of rough soil surfaces. The results show that the model can reproduce the observed angular variations of radar backscattering coefficient quite well via a least-squares fit method. Best fits to the data provide estimates of the statistical properties of the surface roughness, which is characterized by two parameters: the standard deviation of surface height, and the surface correlation length. In addition, the processes of vegetation attenuation and volume scattering require two canopy parameters, the canopy optical thickness and a volume scattering factor. Canopy parameter values for individual vegetation types, including alfalfa, milo and corn, were also determined from the best-fit results. The uncertainties in the scatterometer data were also explored.

  7. Computing connection coefficients of compactly supported wavelets on bounded intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, C.H.; Peyton, B.W.

    1997-04-01

    Daubechies wavelet basis functions have many properties that make them desirable as a basis for a Galerkin approach to solving PDEs: they are orthogonal, with compact support, and their connection coefficients can be computed. The method developed by Latto et al. to compute connection coefficients does not provide the correct inner product near the endpoints of a bounded interval, making the implementation of boundary conditions problematic. Moreover, the highly oscillatory nature of the wavelet basis functions makes standard numerical quadrature of integrals near the boundary impractical. The authors extend the method of Latto et al. to construct and solve a linear system of equations whose solution provides the exact computation of the integrals at the boundaries. As a consequence, they provide the correct inner product for wavelet basis functions on a bounded interval.

  8. Exact solutions of forced Burgers equations with time variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyükaşık, Şirin A.; Pashaev, Oktay K.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a forced Burgers equation with time variable coefficients of the form Ut+(μ˙(t)/μ(t))U+UUx=(1/2μ(t))Uxx-ω2(t)x, and obtain an explicit solution of the general initial value problem in terms of a corresponding second order linear ordinary differential equation. Special exact solutions such as generalized shock and multi-shock waves, triangular wave, N-wave and rational type solutions are found and discussed. Then, we introduce forced Burgers equations with constant damping and an exponentially decaying diffusion coefficient as exactly solvable models. Different type of exact solutions are obtained for the critical, over and under damping cases, and their behavior is illustrated explicitly. In particular, the existence of inelastic type of collisions is observed by constructing multi-shock wave solutions, and for the rational type solutions the motion of the pole singularities is described.

  9. Coefficient of restitution of sports balls: A normal drop test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, Adli; Ismail, K. A.

    2012-09-01

    Dynamic behaviour of bodies during impact is investigated through impact experiment, the simplest being a normal drop test. Normally, a drop test impact experiment involves measurement of kinematic data; this includes measurement of incident and rebound velocity in order to calculate a coefficient of restitution (COR). A high speed video camera is employed for measuring the kinematic data where speed is calculated from displacement of the bodies. Alternatively, sensors can be employed to measure speeds, especially for a normal impact where there is no spin of the bodies. This paper compares experimental coefficients of restitution (COR) for various sports balls, namely golf, table tennis, hockey and cricket. The energy loss in term of measured COR and effects of target plate are discussed in relation to the material and construction of these sports balls.

  10. Water sorption and diffusion coefficient through an experimental dental resin.

    PubMed

    Costella, A M; Trochmann, J L; Oliveira, W S

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric composites have been widely used as dental restorative materials. A fundamental knowledge and understanding of the behavior of these materials in the oral cavity is essential to improve their properties and performance. In this paper we computed the data set of water absorption through an experimental dental resin blend using specimen discs of different thicknesses to estimate the diffusion coefficient. The resins were produced using Bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate, Bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate and Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate monomers. The water sorption test method was based on International Standard ISO 4049 "Dentistry-Polymer-based filling materials". Results show a diffusion coefficient around 6.38 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s, within a variance of 0.01%, which is in good agreement with the values reported in the literature and represents a very suitable value.

  11. Band structures in transmission coefficients generated by Dirac comb potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharani, M.; Shastry, C. S.

    2016-11-01

    Using the threshold conditions and bound state energies investigated earlier by us as a critical input we systematically study the nature of band formation in the transmission coefficient generated by Dirac comb potentials having equispaced (i) attractive, (ii) repulsive and (iii) alternating attractive and repulsive delta terms having same strength and confined within a fixed range. We find that positions of the peaks of transmission coefficient generated by a combination of one attractive and one repulsive delta terms having same strength and separated by gap a is independent of the potential strength and coincide with the energy eigenvalues of 1D box of range a. We further study analytically and numerically the transmission across Dirac comb potentials containing two or three delta terms and these results are useful in the analysis of the transmission in the general case. In the case of Dirac comb potentials containing Na attractive delta terms we find that the nature of the first band and higher bands of the transmission coefficient are different, and if such a potential generates Nb number of bound states, the first band in the transmission coefficient generated by the potential has NT1 =Na -Nb peaks. In the case of higher bands generated by delta comb potential having N delta terms each band has N - 1 peaks. Further we systematically study the behavior of band gaps and band spread as a function of potential strength and number of terms in the Dirac comb. The results obtained by us provide a relation between bound state spectrum, number of delta terms in the Dirac comb and the band pattern which can be explored for potential applications.

  12. Tracer diffusion coefficients in a sheared inelastic Maxwell gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the transport properties of an impurity in a sheared granular gas, in the framework of the Boltzmann equation for inelastic Maxwell models. We investigate here the impact of a nonequilibrium phase transition found in such systems, where the tracer species carries a finite fraction of the total kinetic energy (ordered phase). To this end, the diffusion coefficients are first obtained for a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. In this situation, the set of coupled Boltzmann equations are solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-like expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions for each species, thereby retaining all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate a. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, three tensorial quantities D ij , D p,ij , and D T,ij are required to describe the mass transport process instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled algebraic equations, which can be exactly solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution {αsr} and the parameters of the mixture (masses and composition). Once the forms of D ij , D p,ij , and D T,ij are obtained for arbitrary mole fraction {{x}1}={{n}1}/≤ft({{n}1}+{{n}2}\\right) (where n r is the number density of species r), the tracer limit ({{x}1}\\to 0 ) is carefully considered for the above three diffusion tensors. Explicit forms for these coefficients are derived showing that their shear rate dependence is significantly affected by the order-disorder transition.

  13. Numerical study of vertical pneumatic conveying: Effect of friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Kuang, S. B.; Zou, R. P.; Pan, R. H.; Yu, A. B.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of vertical pneumatic conveying by a combined approach of computational fluid dynamics for gas phase and discrete element method for solid phase. The effects of friction coefficient on the flows in regard with particle flow patterns and their transition, reverse flow, and gas pressure behavior are qualified. The forces acting on particles are analyzed in detail to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Stochastic partial differential equations with unbounded and degenerate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xicheng

    In this article, using DiPerna-Lions theory (DiPerna and Lions, 1989) [1], we investigate linear second order stochastic partial differential equations with unbounded and degenerate non-smooth coefficients, and obtain several conditions for existence and uniqueness. Moreover, we also prove the L-integrability and a general maximal principle for generalized solutions of SPDEs. As applications, we study nonlinear filtering problem and also obtain the existence and uniqueness of generalized solutions for a degenerate nonlinear SPDE.

  15. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M

    2009-08-14

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, K{sub d} is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log K{sub D}). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log K{sub d} values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide K{sub d} values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each

  16. Variations of Roughness Coefficients with Flow Depth of Grassed Swale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaffa, N.; Ahmad, N. A.; Razi, M. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Grassed swales are the best management practice (BMP), which has been widely used to reduce the peak flow, reduce water pollution through vegetated filtration, and improve the groundwater recharge. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) is using the approach of grassed swales recommended by the Department of Irrigation and Drainage Malaysia (DID) for reducing the risk of flooding and controlling the water pollution. This paper investigates the variations of roughness coefficients with the flow depth of grassed swales in the campus of UTHM. Fieldwork was carried out on the grassed swale to collect the hydraulic data, which including the levelling work, measuring the flow depth and flow velocity of the swale. The flow depth of swale was taken at three points divided along the width of swale and the flow velocity is captured three times at each of the point. The variations of roughness coefficients of grassed swales are presented in Manning's equation, and the results reveal that the n value increases with the increasing of flow depth. Manning's coefficient value found in this study is in the range of 0.110 to 0.756, which are higher than the value proposed by the Urban Stormwater Management Manual for Malaysia (MSMA). The relationships of flow depth and velocity at each section of the swale are portrayed in graphs, which show that the velocity increases with the decreasing of flow depth. The outcomes of this study can be concluded that the variation of Manning's coefficient value is influenced by the swale profile, flow depth, flow velocity, and as well as the vegetation used in the grassed swale concerned.

  17. Effective elasticity coefficients of native rocks and consolidated granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Beatrix M.; Schulz, Michael

    2008-05-01

    The elastic coefficients of binary heterogeneous materials, such as several native rock materials or consolidated granular matter will be determined in terms of a perturbation expansion. Furthermore, in order to check the validity of the obtained results, these are compared with numerical investigations using Boole's model of randomly distributed spheres. Finally, we apply the results on several classes of native rocks and consolidated granular materials.

  18. A visual detection model for DCT coefficient quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Watson, Andrew B.

    1994-01-01

    The discrete cosine transform (DCT) is widely used in image compression and is part of the JPEG and MPEG compression standards. The degree of compression and the amount of distortion in the decompressed image are controlled by the quantization of the transform coefficients. The standards do not specify how the DCT coefficients should be quantized. One approach is to set the quantization level for each coefficient so that the quantization error is near the threshold of visibility. Results from previous work are combined to form the current best detection model for DCT coefficient quantization noise. This model predicts sensitivity as a function of display parameters, enabling quantization matrices to be designed for display situations varying in luminance, veiling light, and spatial frequency related conditions (pixel size, viewing distance, and aspect ratio). It also allows arbitrary color space directions for the representation of color. A model-based method of optimizing the quantization matrix for an individual image was developed. The model described above provides visual thresholds for each DCT frequency. These thresholds are adjusted within each block for visual light adaptation and contrast masking. For given quantization matrix, the DCT quantization errors are scaled by the adjusted thresholds to yield perceptual errors. These errors are pooled nonlinearly over the image to yield total perceptual error. With this model one may estimate the quantization matrix for a particular image that yields minimum bit rate for a given total perceptual error, or minimum perceptual error for a given bit rate. Custom matrices for a number of images show clear improvement over image-independent matrices. Custom matrices are compatible with the JPEG standard, which requires transmission of the quantization matrix.

  19. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Improved measurements of partition coefficients for polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2011-02-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of widely used brominated flame retardants with strong hydrophobicity. Due to their strong affinity for organic matter, accurate measurement of adsorption coefficients for PBDEs using conventional batch methods can be confounded by biases caused by their sorption to dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In this study, sorption isotherms were constructed for BDE-47 and BDE-99 in sediments by using different methods to measure the aqueous phase concentration Cw. Upon centrifugation, Cw measured by automated solid-phase microextraction (Cw-SPME) was consistently smaller than by liquid-liquid extraction (Cw-LLE), suggesting substantial association of PBDEs with DOC. Significant underestimations (1.2-106-fold) of sediment-water partition coefficient Kd occurred when Cw was measured by LLE. The log KDOC values derived from the SPME measurements ranged from 5.10 to 8.02 for eight congeners from BDE-28 to BDE-183, suggesting a strong tendency for PBDEs to complex with DOC. This study showed that PBDE congeners have larger sorption coefficients than would be measured by the conventional method. The high affinity to DOC also means a potential for DOC-facilitated transport, thus enhancing the environmental mobility of PBDEs. PMID:21210679

  1. Some Considerations on Horizontal Displacement and Horizontal Displacement Coefficient B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajduś, Krzysztof; Tajduś, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Mining-induced deformations of the ground surface and within the rock mass may pose danger not only for surface constructions but also for underground objects (e.g., tunnels, underground storages, garages), diverse types of pipelines, electric cables, etc. For a proper evaluation of hazard for surface and underground objects, such parameters as horizontal displacement and horizontal deformations, especially their maximum values, are of crucial importance. The paper is an attempt at a critical review of hitherto accomplished studies and state of the art of predicting horizontal displacement u, in particular the coefficient B, whose value allows determination of the value of maximum displacement if the value of maximum slope is known, or the value of maximum deformation if the value of maximum trough slope is recognized. Since the geodesic observations of fully developed subsidence troughs suggest that the value of the coefficient depends on the depth H, radius of main influences range r and properties of overburden rock, in particular the occurrence of sub-eras Paleogene and Neogene layers (old name: Quaternary and Tertiary) with low strength parameters, therefore a formula is provided in the present paper allowing for the estimation of the influence of those factors on the value of coefficient B.

  2. Simulating river meandering processes using stochastic bank erosion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, Ari J.; Duan, Jennifer G.

    2012-08-01

    This study first compares the first order analytical solutions for flow field by Ikeda et. al. (1981) and Johanesson and Parker (1989b). Ikeda et. al.'s (1981) linear model of bank erosion was implemented to predict the rate of bank erosion in which the bank erosion coefficient is treated as a stochastic variable that varies with physical properties of the bank (e.g. cohesiveness, stratigraphy, vegetation density). The developed model was used to predict the evolution of meandering planforms. Then, the modeling results were analyzed and compared to the observed data. Because the migration of meandering channels consists of downstream translation, lateral expansion, and downstream or upstream rotations, several measures are formulated to determine which of the resulting planform is closest to the experimental measured one. Results from the deterministic model highly depend on the calibrated erosion coefficient. Because field measurements are always limited, the stochastic model yielded more realistic predictions of meandering planform evolutions. Because the coefficient of bank erosion is a random variable, the meandering planform evolution is a stochastic process that can only be accurately predicted by a stochastic model.

  3. Operation of the breeze tunnel to determine mass extinction coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.; Bonfante, R.; Catalano, E.; Rouse, W.G.; Banks, D.R.

    1993-06-01

    The breeze tunnel at the Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center (ERDEC) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is a unique facility for determining the efficacy of released smoke/obscurants in flowing air as a function of controlling variables. Optimum material feed characteristics and generator operating conditions can be determined. The facility allows investigation of the effects of different generator operating variables, airborne concentrations, and airborne particle sizes on mass extinction coefficients. The breeze tunnel is now available for Department of Defense (DoD) trials. During trials in the breeze tunnel, obscurants have been released from the compact-disc-generator, the IR-Log generator, and the XM56 generator. Obscurant release rates have ranged from an instantaneous puff to a continuous release of 10 lb/min. Extinction can be measured in the visual, infrared, and millimeter ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. Experimental conditions allow calculation of mass extinction coefficients as a function of generator variables, including material release rates. Average mass extinction coefficients address attenuation from obscurants, both single primary particles and aggregates.

  4. Comparison of Thermal Coefficients for Two Microwave Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were performed to compare the thermal coefficients of two microwave detectors that might be used for direct detection in L-band radiometers. In particular it was desired to compare the performance of a new-technology flash ADC (analog-to-digital converter) against that of an older-technology diode detector in series with a VFC (voltage-to-frequency converter). The outputs of two state-of-the-art detectors were recorded as a constant 1.414-GHz signal was input and the physical temperatures of the detectors were varied over a range of 10 C. As a further experiment, each detector was tested with a noise diode source and with a sine wave synthesizer source. Thermal coefficients were computed in terms of W/C and in terms of ppt/C at nominal operating temperatures reasonable for the individual devices. Finally, thermal coefficients were calculated in K/C to indicate the change in brightness temperature seen by a theoretical sea surface salinity radiometer employing each detector. The K/C for the flash ADC was determined to be about 2.8 times that of the diode/VFC. Different reactions of the ADC to a noise input and a sine wave input indicated that ADC tests for radiometric purposes, such as this one, should be performed using a noise input.

  5. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Morrow, Liam C.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems. PMID:26064648

  6. Determination of diffusion coefficient in disordered organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Varsha; Sharma, Akanksha; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    Charge carrier transport in organic semiconductors is dominated by positional and energetic disorder in Gaussian density of states (GDOS) and is characterized by hopping through localized states. Due to the immobilization of charge carriers in these localized states, significant non-uniform carrier distribution exists, resulting diffusive transport. A simple, nevertheless powerful technique to determine diffusion coefficient D in disordered organic semiconductors has been presented. Diffusion coefficients of charge carriers in two technologically important organic molecular semiconductors, Pentacene and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) have been measured from current-voltage (J-V) characteristics of Al/Pentacene/Au and Al/CuPc/Au based Schottky diodes. Ideality factor g and carrier mobility μ have been calculated from the exponential and space charge limited region respectively of J-V characteristics. Classical Einstein relation is not valid in organic semiconductors due to energetic disorders in DOS. Using generalized Einstein relation, diffusion coefficients have been obtained to be 1.31×10-6 and 1.73×10-7 cm2/s for Pentacene and CuPc respectively.

  7. Determination of stream reaeration coefficients by use of tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Rathbun, R.E.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Parker, G.W.; DeLong, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    Stream reaeration is the physical absorption of oxygen from the atmosphere by a flowing stream. This is the primary process by which a stream replenishes the oxygen consumed in the biodegradation of organic wastes. Prior to 1965, reaeration rate coefficients could be estimated only by indirect methods. In 1965, a direct method of measuring stream reaeration coefficients was developed whereby a radioactive tracer gas was injected into a stream-the principle being that the tracer gas would be desorbed from the stream inversely to how oxygen would be absorbed. The technique has since been modified by substituting hydrocarbon gases for the radioactive tracer gas. This manual describes the slug-injection and constant-rate-injection methods of measuring gas-tracer desorption. Emphasis is on the use of rhodamine WT dye as a relatively conservative tracer and propane as the nonconservative gas tracer, on planning field tests, on methods of injection, sampling, and analysis, and on techniques for computing desorption and reaeration coefficients.

  8. Effect of slugging phenomena on drag coefficient in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiyarov, S.I.; Overfelt, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Slugging is an abnormality in which gas bubbles increase to the diameter of the fluidization chamber. The slugs of solid particles will move upward in a pistonlike manner, reach a certain height, and then rain through the gas phase in the form of aggregates or as individual particles. The effect of slugging phenomenon on drag coefficient in fluidized beds is assessed by developing theoretical and experimental analyses of this problem. The theoretical analysis of the slugging in fluidized beds was based on a momentum balance equation for the axial flow of gas around a slug and Meshchersky`s differential equation of motion of a slug having variable mass. To predict the flow rate of the gas flow through the slug the authors used the Blake-Kozeny-Carman equation. From the analytical solution of the problem, the expressions for the pressure drop and the drag coefficient as functions of the Reynolds number, slug porosity, gas viscosity and chamber sizes have been developed. Experiments were run in a fluidization chamber with foundry sand of 2.593 g/cc average density and 30--270 mesh size at three different values of the fixed bed height. The results of simulations demonstrate that both the drag coefficient and the resistance factor decrease with increasing the Reynolds number and increasing the porosity of slug. A comparison of the results obtained in the experiments demonstrates a qualitative agreement with the theoretical model simulations.

  9. Ion diffusion coefficient measurements in nanochannels at various concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junrong; Zhang, Li; Xue, Jianming; Hu, Guoqing

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion is one of the most fundamental properties of ionic transport in solutions. Here, we present experimental studies and theoretical analysis on the ion diffusion in nanochannels. Based on Fick's second law, we develop a current monitoring method to measure ion diffusion coefficient of high solution concentrations in nanochannels. This method is further extended to the cases at medium and low concentrations. Through monitoring ionic current during diffusion, we obtain diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride solution at different concentrations in nanochannels. These diffusion coefficients within the confined space are close to theirs bulk values. It is also found that the apparent ion diffusion equilibrium in the present experiments is very slow at low concentration, which we attribute to the slow equilibrium of the nanochannel surface charge. Finally, we get a primary acknowledge of the equilibrium rate between the nanochannel surface charge and electrolyte solution. The results in this work have improved the understanding of nanoscale diffusion and nanochannel surface charge and may be useful in nanofluidic applications such as ion-selective transport, energy conversion, and nanopore biosensors. PMID:24803967

  10. Ion diffusion coefficient measurements in nanochannels at various concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junrong; Zhang, Li; Xue, Jianming; Hu, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion is one of the most fundamental properties of ionic transport in solutions. Here, we present experimental studies and theoretical analysis on the ion diffusion in nanochannels. Based on Fick's second law, we develop a current monitoring method to measure ion diffusion coefficient of high solution concentrations in nanochannels. This method is further extended to the cases at medium and low concentrations. Through monitoring ionic current during diffusion, we obtain diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride solution at different concentrations in nanochannels. These diffusion coefficients within the confined space are close to theirs bulk values. It is also found that the apparent ion diffusion equilibrium in the present experiments is very slow at low concentration, which we attribute to the slow equilibrium of the nanochannel surface charge. Finally, we get a primary acknowledge of the equilibrium rate between the nanochannel surface charge and electrolyte solution. The results in this work have improved the understanding of nanoscale diffusion and nanochannel surface charge and may be useful in nanofluidic applications such as ion-selective transport, energy conversion, and nanopore biosensors. PMID:24803967

  11. Fluctuation of Ultrafiltration Coefficient of Hemodialysis Membrane During Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Idam; Christin

    2010-12-01

    Hemodialysis treatment for patient with kidney failure is to regulate body fluid and to excrete waste products of metabolism. The patient blood and the dialyzing solution (dialysate) are flowed counter currently in a dialyzer to allow volume flux of fluid and diffusion of solutes from the blood to the dialysate through a semipermiable membrane. The volume flux of fluid depends on the hydrostatic and the osmotic pressure difference between the blood and the dialysate. It also depends on the membrane parameter that represents how the membrane allows the fluid and the solutes to move across as a result of the pressure difference, known as the ultrafiltration coefficient Kuf. The coefficient depends on the number and the radius of membrane pores for the movement of the fluids and the solutes across the membrane. The measured membrane ultrafiltration coefficient of reused dialyzer shows fluctuation between one uses to another without any significant trend of change. This indicates that the cleaning process carried out before reuse does not cause perfect removal of clots that happen in the previous use. Therefore the unblocked pores are forced to work hardly to obtain targeted volume flux in a certain time of treatment. This may increase the unblocked pore radius. Reuse is stopped when there is indication of blood leakage during the hemodialysis treatment.

  12. Composite Transport Coefficients and Novel Scalings for Well Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.; Daughton, W.

    1997-11-01

    Starting from an analysis of the transport properties of the plasmas produced by the Alcator C-Mod machine over a rather wide variety of conditions, a novel form of a thermal transport coefficient which reproduces both ohmic and auxiliary heated L-mode discharges [1] has been identified. This coefficient involves the difference of two terms, one representing the normal outward diffusion of thermal energy and the other corresponding to a process reducing the outward flux. There are in fact theoretical arguments [2] in support of a composite transport coefficient based on the symmetry properties of an appropriate transport matrix. The relevant scaling for the energy confinement time is also composed of two terms and the L-mode database including D3D, JET, JT60, PDX, TFTR, FTU, Alcator C-Mod is used to construct a general scaling law that is shown to be more comprehensive and accurate than the standard L-mode scaling, particularly for high field experiments. [1] B. Coppi A. Airoldi, F. Bombarda et al., IAEA Conference, F1-CN-64/BP-14 (1996) [2] B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Phys. Fluids B 3 2582 (1991)

  13. Fusion Reaction Rate Coefficient for Different Beam and Target Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Wei; Zeng, Xian-Jun; Deng, Bai-Quan; Gou, Fu-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Fusion power output is proportional not only to the fuel particle number densities participating in reaction but also to the fusion reaction rate coefficient (or reactivity), which is dependent on reactant velocity distribution functions. They are usually assumed to be dual Maxwellian distribution functions with the same temperature for thermal nuclear fusion circumstances. However, if high power neutral beam injection and minority ion species ICRF plasma heating, or multi-pinched plasma beam head-on collision, in a converging region are required and investigated in future large scale fusion reactors, then the fractions of the injected energetic fast ion tail resulting from ionization or charge exchange will be large enough and their contribution to the non-Maxwellian distribution functions is not negligible, hence to the fusion reaction rate coefficient or calculation of fusion power. In such cases, beam-target, and beam-beam reaction enhancement effect contributions should play very important roles. In this paper, several useful formulae to calculate the fusion reaction rate coefficient for different beam and target combination scenarios are derived in detail.

  14. Piezo-Hall coefficients of n-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Haelg, B.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of uniaxial mechanical stress on the Hall coefficient of n-type silicon has been measured for various crystallographic orientations, and piezo-Hall coefficients P/sub 12/ and P/sub 11/-P/sub 44/ have been derived for electron concentrations n between 10/sup 14/ and 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and temperatures ranging from -80 to +100 /sup 0/C. In this range the piezo-Hall effect is found to be as important as the piezoresistance effect which is understood in terms of the many-valley band structure of silicon with anisotropic energy minima. For Hall plates in the (100) and the (110) plane of silicon the resulting longitudinal and transverse piezo-Hall coefficients at room temperature are plotted as a function of their orientation in the plane. It turns out that the piezo-Hall as well as the piezoresistance effects are minimized for a Hall plate in the (110) plane with the current flow roughly parallel to <11-bar1>.

  15. New calculations of neutron kerma coefficients and dose equivalent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhou; Chen, Jinxiang

    2008-06-01

    For neutron energies ranging from 1 keV to 20 MeV, the kerma coefficients for elements H, C, N, O, light water, and ICRU tissue were deduced respectively from microscopic cross sections and Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP code). The results are consistent within admitted uncertainties with values evaluated by an international group (Chadwick et al 1999 Med. Phys. 26 974-91). The ambient dose equivalent generated in the ISO-recommended neutron field for an Am-Be neutron source (ISO 8529-1: 2001(E)) was obtained from the kerma coefficients and Monte Carlo calculation. In addition, it was calculated directly by multiplying the neutron fluence by the fluence-to-ambient dose conversion coefficients recommended by ICRP (ICRP 1996 ICRP Publication 74 (Oxford: Pergamon)). The two results agree well with each other. The main feature of this work is our Monte Carlo simulation design and the treatments differing from the work of others in the calculation of neutron energy transfer in non-elastic processes. PMID:18495982

  16. Friction coefficient of faults inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, Alfio; Ranalli, Giorgio; Andreis, Daniele; Martin, Silvana; Rigon, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    In earthquake mechanics and structural geology the static friction coefficient is usually assumed to have the laboratory value (μ = 0.6-0.8) according to the Coulomb-Byerlee's law. Estimates from deep boreholes and/or natural faults generally confirm this hypothesis but in some cases friction coefficients can be significantly lower, suggesting the existence of weak faults able to be activated by lower effective stress than theoretically expected. We apply a modified version of the method proposed by Yin and Ranalli (1995, Journal of Structural Geology, vol. 17, pp. 1327-1335), where the average friction coefficient of a set of n faults is estimated. This method is based on minimization of the sum of squares of the misfit ratios, where the misfit ratio of each fault is given dividing the misfit stress difference (i.e. the misfit between normalized stress difference and average normalized stress difference) by the average normalized stress difference. The normalized stress difference is defined as the critical stress difference divided by the effective overburden pressure, while the average stress difference is obtained considering the entire fault dataset. Input data are (i) the orientation of faults, (ii) the stress field orientation, and (iii) the stress ratio. The latter two must be independently estimated. A uniform stress field and a similar normalized critical stress difference for the fault dataset are assumed. The procedure has been extended to apply to fault plane solutions by considering both nodal planes of a set of n focal mechanisms and estimating the range of acceptable average friction coefficients from all possible combination of planes (2n number of combinations). The amount of calculation can be considerably reduced if independent information makes it possible to select which one of the nodal planes of each focal mechanism is the true fault plane (for example when aftershocks delineate the fault geometry at depth), resulting in only n combinations

  17. GYutsis: heuristic based calculation of general recoupling coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyck, D.; Fack, V.

    2003-08-01

    General angular momentum recoupling coefficients can be expressed as a summation formula over products of 6- j coefficients. Yutsis, Levinson and Vanagas developed graphical techniques for representing the general recoupling coefficient as a cubic graph and they describe a set of reduction rules allowing a stepwise generation of the corresponding summation formula. This paper is a follow up to [Van Dyck and Fack, Comput. Phys. Comm. 151 (2003) 353-368] where we described a heuristic algorithm based on these techniques. In this article we separate the heuristic from the algorithm and describe some new heuristic approaches which can be plugged into the generic algorithm. We show that these new heuristics lead to good results: in many cases we get a more efficient summation formula than our previous approach, in particular for problems of higher order. In addition the new features and the use of our program GYutsis, which implements these techniques, is described both for end users and application programmers. Program summaryTitle of program: CycleCostAlgorithm, GYutsis Catalogue number: ADSA Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSA Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Users may obtain the program also by downloading either the compressed tar file gyutsis.tgz (for Unix and Linux) or the zip file gyutsis.zip (for Windows) from our website ( http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/). An applet version of the program is also available on our website and can be run in a web browser from the URL http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/GYutsisApplet.html. Licensing provisions: none Computers for which the program is designed: any computer with Sun's Java Runtime Environment 1.4 or higher installed. Programming language used: Java 1.2 (Compiler: Sun's SDK 1.4.0) No. of lines in program: approximately 9400 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 544 117 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of

  18. Electron Transport Coefficients and Effective Ionization Coefficients in SF6-O2 and SF6-Air Mixtures Using Boltzmann Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Linsheng; Xu, Min; Yuan, Dingkun; Zhang, Yafang; Hu, Zhaoji; Tan, Zhihong

    2014-10-01

    The electron drift velocity, electron energy distribution function (EEDF), density-normalized effective ionization coefficient and density-normalized longitudinal diffusion velocity are calculated in SF6-O2 and SF6-Air mixtures. The experimental results from a pulsed Townsend discharge are plotted for comparison with the numerical results. The reduced field strength varies from 40 Td to 500 Td (1 Townsend=10-17 V·cm2) and the SF6 concentration ranges from 10% to 100%. A Boltzmann equation associated with the two-term spherical harmonic expansion approximation is utilized to gain the swarm parameters in steady-state Townsend. Results show that the accuracy of the Boltzmann solution with a two-term expansion in calculating the electron drift velocity, electron energy distribution function, and density-normalized effective ionization coefficient is acceptable. The effective ionization coefficient presents a distinct relationship with the SF6 content in the mixtures. Moreover, the E/Ncr values in SF6-Air mixtures are higher than those in SF6-O2 mixtures and the calculated value E/Ncr in SF6-O2 and SF6-Air mixtures is lower than the measured value in SF6-N2. Parametric studies conducted on these parameters using the Boltzmann analysis offer substantial insight into the plasma physics, as well as a basis to explore the ozone generation process.

  19. Experimental method development for estimating solid-phase diffusion coefficients and material/air partition coefficients of SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Roache, Nancy F.

    2014-06-01

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material/air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to estimate parameters Dm and Kma. The SVOCs chosen for study were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, including PCB-52, PCB-66, PCB-101, PCB-110, and PCB-118. The test materials included polypropylene, high density polyethylene, low density polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyether ether ketone, glass, stainless steel and concrete. Two 53-L environmental chambers were connected in series, with the relatively stable SVOCs source in the source chamber and the test materials, made as small “buttons”, in the test chamber. Prior to loading the test chamber with the test materials, the test chamber had been dosed with SVOCs for 12 days to “coat” the chamber walls. During the tests, the material buttons were removed from the test chamber at different exposure times to determine the amount of SVOC absorbed by the buttons. SVOC concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the test chamber were also monitored. The data were used to estimate the partition and diffusion coefficients by fitting a sink model to the experimental data. The parameters obtained were employed to predict the accumulation of SVOCs in the sink materials using an existing mass transfer model. The model prediction agreed reasonably well with the experimental data.

  20. Interpretation of Structure Coefficients Can Prevent Erroneous Conclusions about Regression Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Jean S.

    The increased use of multiple regression analysis in research warrants closer examination of the coefficients produced in these analyses, especially ones which are often ignored, such as structure coefficients. Structure coefficients are bivariate correlation coefficients between a predictor variable and the synthetic variable. When predictor…