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Sample records for areas mediating motion-induced

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  3. The effects of area postrema lesions and selective vagotomy on motion-induced conditioned taste aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Sutton, R. L.; Mckenna, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is one of several behaviors which was suggested as a putative measure of motion sickness in rats. A review is made of studies which used surgical disruption of area postrema or the vagus nerve to investigate whether CTA and vomiting induced by motion may depend on common neural pathways or structures. When the chemoreceptive function of the area postrema (AP) is destroyed by complete ablation, rats develop CTA and cats and monkeys develop CTA and vomit. Thus the AP is not crucially involved in either CTA or vomiting induced by motion. However, after complete denervation of the stomach or after labyrinthectomy rats do not develop CTA when motion is used as the unconditioned stimulus. Studies of brainstem projections of the vagus nerve, the area postrema, the periaqueductal grey, and the vestibular system are used as the basis for speculation about regions which could mediate both motion-induced vomiting and behavioral food aversion.

  4. Visual motion induces synchronous oscillations in turtle visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Prechtl, J C

    1994-12-20

    In mammalian brains, multielectrode recordings during sensory stimulation have revealed oscillations in different cortical areas that are transiently synchronous. These synchronizations have been hypothesized to support integration of sensory information or represent the operation of attentional mechanisms, but their stimulus requirements and prevalence are still unclear. Here I report an analogous synchronization in a reptilian cortex induced by moving visual stimuli. The synchronization, as measured by the coherence function, applies to spindle-like 20-Hz oscillations recorded with multiple electrodes implanted in the dorsal cortex and the dorsal ventricular ridge of the pond turtle. Additionally, widespread increases in coherence are observed in the 1- to 2-Hz band, and widespread decreases in coherence are seen in the 10- and 30- to 45-Hz bands. The 20-Hz oscillations induced by the moving bar or more natural stimuli are nonstationary and can be sustained for seconds. Early reptile studies may have interpreted similar spindles as electroencephalogram correlates of arousal; however, the absence of these spindles during arousing stimuli in the dark suggests a more specific role in visual processing. Thus, visually induced synchronous oscillations are not unique to the mammalian cortex but also occur in the visual area of the primitive three-layered cortex of reptiles.

  5. Freezing motion-induced dephasing for single spin-state stored in atomic ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Jun, Rui; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Atomic-ensemble quantum memories are well considered as a promising approach of long-distance quantum communication and computation for strong light-matter interaction. While the storage lifetime is limited by the motion-induced dephasing. Spin-echo technique, increasing wavelength of spin-wave, as well as optical lattice are used commonly to overcome this dephasing process. However, these techniques either need extremely high fidelity of echo pulse or put high restriction on filter and experimental complexity. In this poster, we demonstrate a convenient technique to freeze the motion-induced dephasing without population inversion and can be used in large storage angles. Combined with ``clock states'', the lifetime is extended by one order of magnitude to the limit of the thermal expansion. What's more, high non-classical correlation above 20 has been achieved to guarantee the memory in quantum regime.By making the advance from passive engineering to coherent manipulation of single spin-wave states, our work enriches the experimental toolbox of harnessing atomic ensembles for high-performance quantum memories, especially for holographic quantum memories where many spin-waves with different wave-vectors are used.

  6. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired.

  7. Nonionic Brij surfactant-mediated synthesis of raspberry-like gold nanoparticles with high surface area.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Hoon; Kim, Jin Kyung; Yoo, Hyojong

    2012-05-01

    We report a rapid, simple, single-step, and high-yielding solution-phase synthesis of raspberry-like gold nanoparticles (Au RLNPs) with rich edges and high surface areas. Au RLNPs were synthesized through the reduction of HAuCl4 simply mediated by nonionic Brij surfactant in basic conditions without any other reducing agents or organic molecules. The synthesized nanoparticles possessed high surface areas and were stable in basic or neutral conditions, which are potentially useful structural factors for the applications. The unique, highly red-shifted surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) of Au RLNPS originate from their rough, raspberry-like surfaces. The sizes of Au RLNPs were controllable by varying the amounts of NaOH and HAuCl4. However, there are very few reported facile syntheses of size-controlled multi-branched gold nanoparticles simply mediated by surfactant without any other reducing agents or organic molecules.

  8. Calculation of motion induced eddy current forces in null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.; Morris, T.; Shaaf, J.; Rote, D.

    1995-11-01

    Time dependent motion induced eddy current forces can be quite difficult to compute. The movement of null flux coils between magnets is approached using a coupled boundary element-circuit approach to compute the forces on the structure. The technique involves treating the magnets as a separate circuit whose current is dictated by the product of the magnet thickness and the working coercivity. The mutual inductance between the windows of the moving null flux coil and the stationary equivalent magnet coil hold the key for predicting lift, guidance, and drag forces on the coil. The rate of change of these inductances with respect to position determines the forces and currents. A steady state approximation to these forces is derived in addition to a numerical simulation when the steady state assumption is invalid. The results compare favorably to laboratory results from a 4 ft. diameter experimental test wheel.

  9. Motion-induced interruptions and postural equilibrium in linear lateral accelerations.

    PubMed

    Matsangas, P; McCauley, M E; Gehl, G; Kiser, J; Bandstra, A; Blankenship, J; Pierce, E

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses lateral tipping motion-induced interruptions (MIIs) in a simulated motion environment. The objective is to revisit MII occurrence and sway motion relationship by focusing on the frequency and acceleration of the lateral motion stimulus. Results verify that MIIs increase with increasing peak sway acceleration, but the effect of sway frequency is not as clear as that of acceleration. Complex multidirectional motions create more tipping MIIs than unidirectional motion. Research should incorporate acceleration, frequency and motion complexity as factors influencing MII occurrence. To describe a temporary loss of balance without tipping, the term 'probable' MII is introduced. This term fills the gap between the theoretical definition and a human-centred perception of an MII where loss of balance is not a binary phenomenon. The 'probable' MIIs were 16-67% more common than the 'definite' MIIs. The developed mathematical model of MII occurrence versus sway acceleration (amplitude, frequency) approximated the observed MIIs with less than 9% difference.

  10. Motion-induced radiation from electrons moving in Maxwell's fish-eye

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangjie; Ang, L. K.

    2013-01-01

    In Čerenkov radiation and transition radiation, evanescent wave from motion of charged particles transfers into radiation coherently. However, such dissipative motion-induced radiations require particles to move faster than light in medium or to encounter velocity transition to pump energy. Inspired by a method to detect cloak by observing radiation of a fast-moving electron bunch going through it by Zhang et al., we study the generation of electron-induced radiation from electrons' interaction with Maxwell's fish-eye sphere. Our calculation shows that the radiation is due to a combination of Čerenkov radiation and transition radiation, which may pave the way to investigate new schemes of transferring evanescent wave to radiation. PMID:24166002

  11. Cross-modal prediction changes the timing of conscious access during the motion-induced blindness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Acer Y C; Kanai, Ryota; Seth, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence that perceptual predictions influence perceptual content, the relations between these predictions and conscious contents remain unclear, especially for cross-modal predictions. We examined whether predictions of visual events by auditory cues can facilitate conscious access to the visual stimuli. We trained participants to learn associations between auditory cues and colour changes. We then asked whether congruency between auditory cues and target colours would speed access to consciousness. We did this by rendering a visual target subjectively invisible using motion-induced blindness and then gradually changing its colour while presenting congruent or incongruent auditory cues. Results showed that the visual target gained access to consciousness faster in congruent than in incongruent trials; control experiments excluded potentially confounding effects of attention and motor response. The expectation effect was gradually established over blocks suggesting a role for extensive training. Overall, our findings show that predictions learned through cross-modal training can facilitate conscious access to visual stimuli.

  12. A plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area defines adhesion size and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Berge, Ulrich; Lock, John G.; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-06-01

    Cell-matrix adhesions are central mediators of mechanotransduction, yet the interplay between force and adhesion regulation remains unclear. Here we use live cell imaging to map time-dependent cross-correlations between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area, revealing a plastic, context-dependent relationship. Interestingly, while an expected positive cross-correlation dominated in mid-sized adhesions, small and large adhesions display negative cross-correlation. Furthermore, although large changes in adhesion complex area follow vinculin-mediated tension alterations, small increases in area precede vinculin-mediated tension dynamics. Modelling based on this mapping of the vinculin-mediated tension-adhesion complex area relationship confirms its biological validity, and indicates that this relationship explains adhesion size and lifetime limits, keeping adhesions focal and transient. We also identify a subpopulation of steady-state adhesions whose size and vinculin-mediated tension become stabilized, and whose disassembly may be selectively microtubule-mediated. In conclusion, we define a plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area that controls fundamental cell-matrix adhesion properties.

  13. Simulation by using the lattice Boltzmann method of microscopic particle motion induced by artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the simulation of particle motion induced by the fluid flow driven by an array of beating artificial cilia inside a micro-channel. A worm-like-chain model is used to simulate the elastic cilia, and the lattice Boltzmann equation is used to compute the fluid flow. We employ a harmonic force at the extreme tip of each cilium to actuate it. Our simulation methods are first validated by applying them to the motion of a single cilium and a freely falling sphere. After validation, we simulate the fluid flow generated by an array of beating cilia and find that a maximum flow rate is achieved at an optimum sperm number. Next, we simulate the motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle at this optimum sperm number by tracking the particle motion with a smoothed profile method. We address the effect of the following parameters on the particle velocity: the gap between cilia and particle, the particle size, the cilia density, and the presence of an array of intermediate particles.

  14. Fluctuations of visual awareness: Combining motion-induced blindness with binocular rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Lages, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Binocular rivalry (BR) and motion-induced blindness (MIB) are two phenomena of visual awareness where perception alternates between multiple states despite constant retinal input. Both phenomena have been extensively studied, but the underlying processing remains unclear. It has been suggested that BR and MIB involve the same neural mechanism, but how the two phenomena compete for visual awareness in the same stimulus has not been systematically investigated. Here we introduce BR in a dichoptic stimulus display that can also elicit MIB and examine fluctuations of visual awareness over the course of each trial. Exploiting this paradigm we manipulated stimulus characteristics that are known to influence MIB and BR. In two experiments we found that effects on multistable percepts were incompatible with the idea of a common oscillator. The results suggest instead that local and global stimulus attributes can affect the dynamics of each percept differently. We conclude that the two phenomena of visual awareness share basic temporal characteristics but are most likely influenced by processing at different stages within the visual system. PMID:25240063

  15. Fluctuations of visual awareness: combining motion-induced blindness with binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Lages, Martin

    2014-09-19

    Binocular rivalry (BR) and motion-induced blindness (MIB) are two phenomena of visual awareness where perception alternates between multiple states despite constant retinal input. Both phenomena have been extensively studied, but the underlying processing remains unclear. It has been suggested that BR and MIB involve the same neural mechanism, but how the two phenomena compete for visual awareness in the same stimulus has not been systematically investigated. Here we introduce BR in a dichoptic stimulus display that can also elicit MIB and examine fluctuations of visual awareness over the course of each trial. Exploiting this paradigm we manipulated stimulus characteristics that are known to influence MIB and BR. In two experiments we found that effects on multistable percepts were incompatible with the idea of a common oscillator. The results suggest instead that local and global stimulus attributes can affect the dynamics of each percept differently. We conclude that the two phenomena of visual awareness share basic temporal characteristics but are most likely influenced by processing at different stages within the visual system.

  16. Recovery of the vomiting reflex following area postrema ablation in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfar, S.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Fox, Robert A.; Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Daunton, Nancy G.; Coleman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the area postrema (AP) in motion-induced emesis was re-assessed recently in several different species. In a few of these studies, the role of the AP in motion-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was also addressed. The purpose was to extend this comparative study to the squirrel monkey, to evaluate further the role of AP in vomiting, and to investigate the dynamics of the recovery process. The AP was ablated bilaterally in 7 motion-susceptible squirrel monkeys which previously had been characterized in terms of their responses to various motion sickness-inducing stimuli. After recovery from surgery all animals were tested at 30-day intervals for a period of 11 months to determine the effects of AP ablations on susceptibility to the same sickness-inducing conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of motion in preducing CTA was evaluated. All pre-ablation motion tests involved stimulation for 30 min., while post-lesion tests were 60 min., in duration. All animals showed significant increases in latencies to vomiting after AP ablations. However, the latencies tended to decrease with time after ablation. All but one animal vomited on at least one of the 10 motion tests occurring after ablation of AP. In addition, CTA was produced by motion used in the conditioning sessions. These results suggest that structures other than AP, and processes other that those mediated through AP, may play an important role in motion-induced emesis.

  17. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  18. Strategies for reducing intra-fraction motion induced dosimetric effects in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li

    Intra-fraction respiration motion during radiation delivery presents a major challenge to radiation therapy. There has been a growing effort to characterize and manage internal organ motion in radiation therapy, however very few studies focus on tackling this issue in proton therapy. Current practice for treating lung tumors in proton therapy is still to apply population-based margins to account for internal tumor motion, which can lead to target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. This thesis explores the intra-fraction motion induced dosimetric effects from both computational treatment planning and experimental studies. Four-dimensional CT scans are used to analyze the patient-specific tumor motion characteristics. A feasible method to design the range compensator by using the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images is proposed. Results demonstrate that this MIP approach ensures adequate tumor coverage throughout the entire respiratory cycle whilst maintaining normal tissue dose under clinical constraints. Based on 4D-CT scans, dose convolution is used for assessing the accuracy of Gaussian probability density function for modeling the patient-specific respiratory motion on dose distribution. Non-negligible dose discrepancy is observed in comparisons of convolved dose distributions, and patient-specific respiration PDF is advocated. In addition, an experimental phantom study primarily focusing on the interplay effect between target motion and the scanning beam motion is implemented in two proton beam delivery systems: double scattering and uniform scanning. Measurement results suggest that dose blurring effect is dominant, and interplay effect is trivial in the uniform scanning system due to dose repainting.

  19. The Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area Mediates Alcohol-Seeking Behavior in Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Getachew, Bruk; Toalston, Jamie E.; Oster, Scott M.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2011-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system is involved in the rewarding process of drugs of abuse and is activated during the anticipation of drug availability. However, the neurocircuitry that regulates ethanol (EtOH)-seeking has not been adequately investigated. The objectives of the present study were to determine 1) whether the posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA) mediates EtOH-seeking, 2) whether microinjections of EtOH into the p-VTA could stimulate EtOH-seeking, and (3) the involvement of p-VTA DA neurons in EtOH-seeking. Alcohol-preferring rats were trained to self-administer 15% EtOH and water. After 10 weeks, rats underwent extinction training, followed by 2 weeks in their home cages. During the home-cage period, rats were then bilaterally implanted with guide cannulae aimed at the p-VTA or anterior ventral tegmental area (a-VTA). EtOH-seeking was assessed by the Pavlovian spontaneous recovery model. Separate experiments examined the effects of: 1) microinjection of quinpirole into the p-VTA, 2) EtOH microinjected into the p-VTA, 3) coadministration of EtOH and quinpirole into the p-VTA, 4) microinjection of quinpirole into the a-VTA, and 5) microinjection of EtOH into the a-VTA. Quinpirole microinjected into the p-VTA reduced EtOH-seeking. Microinjections of EtOH into the p-VTA increased EtOH-seeking. Pretreatment with both quinpirole and EtOH into the p-VTA reduced EtOH-seeking. Microinjections of quinpirole or EtOH into the a-VTA did not alter EtOH-seeking. Overall, the results suggest that the p-VTA is a neuroanatomical substrate mediating alcohol-seeking behavior and that activation of local DA neurons is involved. PMID:21148248

  20. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Yupeng

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

  1. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Liao, Zhongxing; Balter, Peter; Li, Yupeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique. Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration. Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle. Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients. PMID:24320498

  2. Hypoxia-induced hypothermia mediated by GABA in the rostral parapyramidal area of the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Osaka, T

    2014-05-16

    Hypoxia evokes a regulated decrease in the body core temperature (Tc) in a variety of animals. The neuronal mechanisms of this response include, at least in part, glutamatergic activation in the lateral preoptic area (LPO) of the hypothalamus. As the sympathetic premotor neurons in the medulla oblongata constitute a cardinal relay station in the descending neuronal pathway from the hypothalamus for thermoregulation, their inhibition can also be critically involved in the mechanisms of the hypoxia-induced hypothermia. Here, I examined the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced hypothermia is mediated by glutamate-responsive neurons in the LPO that activate GABAergic transmission in the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) and neighboring parapyramidal region (PPy) of the medulla oblongata in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats. Unilateral microinjection of GABA (15nmol) into the rRPa and PPy regions elicited a prompt increase in tail skin temperature (Ts) and decreases in Tc, oxygen consumption rate (VO2), and heart rate. Next, when the GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide (bicuculline methiodide (BMI), 10pmol) alone was microinjected into the rRPa, it elicited unexpected contradictory responses: simultaneous increases in Ts, VO2 and heart rate and a decrease in Tc. Then, when BMI was microinjected bilaterally into the PPy, no direct effect on Ts was seen; and thermogenic and tachycardic responses were slight. However, pretreatment of the PPy with BMI, but not vehicle saline, greatly attenuated the hypothermic responses evoked by hypoxic (10%O2-90%N2, 5min) ventilation or bilateral microinjections of glutamate (5nmol, each side) into the LPO. The results suggest that hypoxia-induced hypothermia was mediated, at least in part, by the activation of GABAA receptors in the PPy. PMID:24607346

  3. Role of the ventral tegmental area in methamphetamine extinction: AMPA receptor-mediated neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ting; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying drug extinction remain largely unknown, although a role for medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) glutamate neurons has been suggested. Considering that the mPFC sends glutamate efferents to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), we tested whether the VTA is involved in methamphetamine (METH) extinction via conditioned place preference (CPP). Among various METH-CPP stages, we found that the amount of phospho-GluR1/Ser845 increased in the VTA at behavioral extinction, but not the acquisition or withdrawal stage. Via surface biotinylation, we found that levels of membrane GluR1 were significantly increased during METH-CPP extinction, while no change was observed at the acquisition stage. Specifically, the number of dendritic spines in the VTA was increased at behavioral extinction, but not during acquisition. To validate the role of the mPFC in METH-CPP extinction, we lesioned the mPFC. Ibotenic acid lesioning of the mPFC did not affect METH-CPP acquisition, however, it abolished the extinction stage and reversed the enhanced phospho-GluR1/Ser845 levels as well as increases in VTA dendritic spines during METH-CPP extinction. Overall, this study demonstrates that the mPFC plays a critical role in METH-CPP extinction and identifies the VTA as an alternative target in mediating the extinction of drug conditioning.

  4. Collaborative Strategic Reading as a Means To Enhance Peer-Mediated Instruction for Reading Comprehension and Content-Area Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Klingner, Janette K.; Bryant, Diane P.

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes studies conducted with Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR), a program designed to enhance reading comprehension and content-area reading for diverse learners. It describes the stages of CSR development and discusses the role of peer-mediated learning in improving the social and academic outcomes of participating students.…

  5. A template-free solvent-mediated synthesis of high surface area boron nitride nanosheets for aerobic oxidative desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Zhu, Wenshuai; Chao, Yanhong; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhu, Huiyuan; Li, Changfeng; Chen, Zhigang; Li, Huaming; Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNs) with rather high specific surface area (SSA) are important two-dimensional layer-structured materials. Here, a solvent-mediated synthesis of h-BNNs revealed a template-free lattice plane control strategy that induced high SSA nanoporous structured h-BNNs with outstanding aerobic oxidative desulfurization performance. PMID:26502800

  6. The intrafraction motion induced dosimetric impacts in breast 3D radiation treatment: A 4DCT based study

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Li Xiang; Beriwal, Sushil; Heron, Dwight E.; Sontag, Marc R.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2007-07-15

    The question remains regarding the dosimetric impact of intrafraction motion in 3D breast treatment. This study was conducted to investigate this issue utilizing the 4DCT scan. The 4D and helical CT scan sets were acquired for 12 breast cancer patients. For each of these patients, based on the helical CT scan, a conventional 3D conformal plan was generated. The breast treatment was then simulated based on the 4DCT scan. In each phase of the 4DCT scan, dose distribution was generated with the same beam parameters as the conventional plan. A software package was developed to compute the cumulative dose distribution from all the phases. Since the intrafraction organ motion is reflected by the 4DCT images, the cumulative dose computed based on the 4DCT images should be closer to what the patient received during treatment. Various dosimetric parameters were obtained from the plan and 4D cumulative dose distribution for the target volume and heart, and were compared to deduce the motion-induced impacts. The studies were performed for both whole breast and partial breast treatment. In the whole breast treatment, the average intrafraction motion induced changes in D{sub 95}, D{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 95}, and V{sub 90} of the target volume were -5.4%, -3.1%, -13.4%, -5.1%, and -3.2%, respectively, with the largest values at -26.2%, -14.1%, -91.0%, -15.1%, and -9.0%, respectively. Motion had little impact on the D{sub max} of the target volume, but its impact on the D{sub min} of the target volume was significant. For left breast treatment, the motion-induced D{sub max} change to the heart could be negative or positive, with the largest increase at about 6 Gy. In partial breast treatment, the only non-insignificant impact was in the D{sub min} of the CTV (ranging from -15.2% to 11.7%). The results showed that the intrafraction motion may compromise target dose coverage in breast treatments and the degree of that compromise was correlated with motion magnitude. However

  7. The cortical surface area of the insula mediates the effect of DBH rs7040170 on novelty seeking.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Cui, Yue; Wu, Karen; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-08-15

    Novelty seeking (NS) is a personality trait important for adaptive functioning, but an excessive level of NS has been linked to psychiatric disorders such as ADHD and substance abuse. Previous research has investigated separately the neural and genetic bases of the NS trait, but results were mixed and neural and genetic bases have yet to be examined within the same study. In this study, we examined the interrelationships among the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene, brain structure, and the NS trait in 359 healthy Han Chinese subjects. We focused on the DBH gene because it encodes a key enzyme for dopamine metabolism, NS is believed to be related to the dopaminergic system and has been reported associated with DBH variation. Results showed a significant positive association between the cortical surface area of the left insula and NS score. Furthermore, the DBH genetic polymorphism at the SNP rs7040170 was strongly associated with both the surface area of the left insula and NS score, with G carriers having a larger left insula surface area and a higher NS score than AA homozygotes. Subsequent path analysis suggested that the insula partially mediated the association between the DBH gene and the NS trait. Our data provided the first evidence for the involvement of the insula in the dopamine-NS relationship. Future studies of molecular mechanisms underlying the NS personality trait and related psychiatric disorders should consider the mediation effect of the neural structure. PMID:26003854

  8. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bazylewski, Paul F; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P C; Hunt, Adrian H; McDermott, Eamon J G; Leedahl, Brett D; Kukharenko, Andrey I; Cholakh, Seif O; Kurmaev, Ernst Z; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications. PMID:26486966

  9. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Bazylewski, Paul F.; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P.C.; Hunt, Adrian H.; McDermott, Eamon J. G.; Leedahl, Brett D.; Kukharenko, Andrey I.; Cholakh, Seif O.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications. PMID:26486966

  10. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bazylewski, Paul F; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P C; Hunt, Adrian H; McDermott, Eamon J G; Leedahl, Brett D; Kukharenko, Andrey I; Cholakh, Seif O; Kurmaev, Ernst Z; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-10-21

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications.

  11. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylewski, Paul F.; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P. C.; Hunt, Adrian H.; McDermott, Eamon J. G.; Leedahl, Brett D.; Kukharenko, Andrey I.; Cholakh, Seif O.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-10-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications.

  12. Multi-Hazard Analysis for the Estimation of Ground Motion Induced by Landslides and Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Rubén; Koudogbo, Fifame; Ardizzone, Francesca; Mondini, Alessandro; Bignami, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors allow obtaining all-day all-weather terrain complex reflectivity images which can be processed by means of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) for the monitoring of displacement episodes with extremely high accuracy. In the work presented, different PSI strategies to measure ground surface displacements for multi-scale multi-hazard mapping are proposed in the context of landslides and tectonic applications. This work is developed in the framework of ESA General Studies Programme (GSP). The present project, called Multi Scale and Multi Hazard Mapping Space based Solutions (MEMpHIS), investigates new Earth Observation (EO) methods and new Information and Communications Technology (ICT) solutions to improve the understanding and management of disasters, with special focus on Disaster Risk Reduction rather than Rapid Mapping. In this paper, the results of the investigation on the key processing steps for measuring large-scale ground surface displacements (like the ones originated by plate tectonics or active faults) as well as local displacements at high resolution (like the ones related with active slopes) will be presented. The core of the proposed approaches is based on the Stable Point Network (SPN) algorithm, which is the advanced PSI processing chain developed by ALTAMIRA INFORMATION. Regarding tectonic applications, the accurate displacement estimation over large-scale areas characterized by low magnitude motion gradients (3-5 mm/year), such as the ones induced by inter-seismic or Earth tidal effects, still remains an open issue. In this context, a low-resolution approach based in the integration of differential phase increments of velocity and topographic error (obtained through the fitting of a linear model adjustment function to data) will be evaluated. Data from the default mode of Sentinel-1, the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode, will be considered for this application. Regarding landslides

  13. Role of the Ventral Tegmental Area in Methamphetamine Extinction: AMPA Receptor-Mediated Neuroplasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen Han-Ting; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying drug extinction remain largely unknown, although a role for medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) glutamate neurons has been suggested. Considering that the mPFC sends glutamate efferents to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), we tested whether the VTA is involved in methamphetamine (METH) extinction via conditioned…

  14. Areas of Left Perisylvian Cortex Mediate Auditory-Verbal Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenigs, Michael; Acheson, Daniel J.; Barbey, Aron K.; Solomon, Jeffrey; Postle, Bradley R.; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    A contentious issue in memory research is whether verbal short-term memory (STM) depends on a neural system specifically dedicated to the temporary maintenance of information, or instead relies on the same brain areas subserving the comprehension and production of language. In this study, we examined a large sample of adults with acquired brain…

  15. Detection of tissue harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force using pulse-echo ultrasound and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Shigao; Tan, Wei; Kinnick, Randall; Greenleaf, James F

    2007-02-01

    A method using pulse echo ultrasound and the Kalman filter is developed for detecting submicron harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force. The method estimates the amplitude and phase of the motion at desired locations within a tissue region with high sensitivity. The harmonic motion generated by the ultrasound radiation force is expressed as extremely small oscillatory Doppler frequency shifts in the fast time (A-line) of ultrasound echoes, which are difficult to estimate. In slow time (repetitive ultrasound echoes) of the echoes, the motion also is presented as oscillatory phase shifts, from which the amplitude and phase of the harmonic motion can be estimated with the least mean squared error by Kalman filter. This technique can be used to estimate the traveling speed of a harmonic shear wave by tracking its phase changes during propagation. The shear wave propagation speed can be used to solve for the elasticity and viscosity of tissue as reported in our earlier study. Validation and in vitro experiments indicate that the method provides excellent estimations for very small (submicron) harmonic vibrations and has potential for noninvasive and quantitative stiffness measurements of tissues such as artery.

  16. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST.

  17. Mediating effect of mental disorders in the pathway between life events and mental health services use: results from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area study.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Pallab K; Eaton, William W; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2010-03-01

    This study assessed the role of some common mental health conditions as mediators in the pathway between suffering life events and using mental health services. The participants were from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area cohort, interviewed in 1993 to 1996 and 2004 to 2005. Longitudinal data analysis was used to identify models with significant mediation. Only alcohol abuse/dependence disorder was a significant mediator in the pathway between suffering a life-threatening illness and using mental health services in a general medical setup. Female gender, being more than 65 years old, prior use of services and availability of health insurance were some of the factors that significantly predicted service use in that model. Some of other factors like social networks and social support, attitudes towards services, and stigma, may play a role in determining service use. Future research should investigate the role of such factors as mediators for mental health service use. PMID:20215995

  18. Glucoreceptors located in different areas mediate the hypoglycemia-induced release of growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenocorticotropin in man.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Tatár, P; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1990-03-01

    In young male volunteers, the changes in growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in response to insulin injection combined with the infusion of saline, glucose, and fructose were evaluated. Glucose infusion in a dose which prevented insulin hypoglycemia completely abolished endocrine responses. Infusion of fructose, which is known not to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), did not influence the GH release during hypoglycemia; however, it inhibited PRL secretion. The ACTH response was slightly attenuated and delayed, while the hypoglycemia-induced rise in cortisol levels was not modified by fructose infusion. These data indicate that the glucoreceptors mediating the signals for a complete counterregulatory neuroendocrine response are not located in a single brain structure. Stimuli for GH release are produced in areas of the central nervous system protected by the BBB, while those for PRL release are presumably present in structures not protected by the BBB. Glucoreceptors triggering ACTH release are located both inside and outside the BBB. PMID:2157998

  19. Joint correction of Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact in interleaved diffusion weighted EPI data using a composite two-dimensional phase correction procedure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obtained with interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence has great potential of characterizing brain tissue properties at high spatial-resolution. However, interleaved EPI based DWI data may be corrupted by various types of aliasing artifacts. First, inconsistencies in k-space data obtained with opposite readout gradient polarities result in Nyquist artifact, which is usually reduced with 1D phase correction in post-processing. When there exist eddy current cross terms (e.g., in oblique-plane EPI), 2D phase correction is needed to effectively reduce Nyquist artifact. Second, minuscule motion induced phase inconsistencies in interleaved DWI scans result in image-domain aliasing artifact, which can be removed with reconstruction procedures that take shot-to-shot phase variations into consideration. In existing interleaved DWI reconstruction procedures, Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact are typically removed subsequently in two stages. Although the two-stage phase correction generally performs well for non-oblique plane EPI data obtained from well-calibrated system, the residual artifacts may still be pronounced in oblique-plane EPI data or when there exist eddy current cross terms. To address this challenge, here we report a new composite 2D phase correction procedure, which effective removes Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion induced aliasing artifact jointly in a single step. Our experimental results demonstrate that the new 2D phase correction method can much more effectively reduce artifacts in interleaved EPI based DWI data as compared with the existing two-stage artifact correction procedures. The new method robustly enables high-resolution DWI, and should prove highly valuable for clinical uses and research studies of DWI.

  20. Real-Time Correction of Rigid-Body-Motion-Induced Phase Errors for Diffusion-Weighted Steady State Free Precession Imaging

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, R; Aksoy, M; Aboussouan, E; Peterson, E; Van, A; Bammer, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion contrast in diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI is generated through the constructive addition of signal from many coherence pathways. Motion-induced phase causes destructive interference which results in loss of signal magnitude and diffusion contrast. In this work, a 3D navigator-based real-time correction of the rigid-body-motion-induced phase errors is developed for diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI. Methods The efficacy of the real-time prospective correction method in preserving phase coherence of the steady-state is tested in 3D phantom experiments and 3D scans of healthy human subjects. Results In nearly all experiments, the signal magnitude in images obtained with proposed prospective correction was higher than the signal magnitude in images obtained with no correction. In the human subjects the mean magnitude signal in the data was up to 30 percent higher with prospective motion correction than without. Prospective correction never resulted in a decrease in mean signal magnitude in either the data or in the images. Conclusions The proposed prospective motion correction method is shown to preserve the phase coherence of the steady state in diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI, thus mitigating signal magnitude losses that would confound the desired diffusion contrast. PMID:24715414

  1. Cooperative-Motion-Induced Structural Evolution in Dusty-Plasma Liquids with Microheterogeneity: Rupture, Rotation, Healing, and Growth of Ordered Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi; Io, Chong-Wai; I, Lin

    2012-11-01

    The cooperative motion induced structural evolution of the liquid with microheterogeneity is investigated in quasi-2D dusty plasma liquids, through direct optical visualization. A novel bond-dynamics analysis is used to further classify the robust cooperative 2D clusters into static, rotating, and drifting patches, beyond the earlier findings of the cooperative hopping strings and bands. The relative motion between two adjacent clusters causes the formation of a fractal network with narrow shear strips along the cluster interface. The rotation of the large ordered patch through rupturing into multiple rotating patches followed by the healing process, and the growth to a larger ordered patch by aligning the different lattice orientations of the adjacent ordered domains through patch rupturing, rotation, drifting, and merging are the key processes for the microstructural evolution.

  2. Mutational Analysis of AREA, a Transcriptional Activator Mediating Nitrogen Metabolite Repression in Aspergillus nidulans and a Member of the “Streetwise” GATA Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Arst, Herbert N.

    1998-01-01

    Summary: The transcriptional activator AREA is a member of the GATA family of transcription factors and mediates nitrogen metabolite repression in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The nutritional versatility of A. nidulans and its amenability to classical and reverse genetic manipulations make the AREA DNA binding domain (DBD) a useful model for analyzing GATA family DBDs, particularly as structures of two AREA-DNA complexes have been determined. The 109 extant mutant forms of the AREA DBD surveyed here constitute one of the highest totals of eukaryotic transcription factor DBD mutants, are discussed in light of the roles of individual residues, and are compared to corresponding mutant sequence changes in other fungal GATA factor DBDs. Other topics include delineation of the DBD using both homology and mutational truncation, use of frameshift reversion to detect regions of tolerance to mutational change, the finding that duplication of the DBD can apparently enhance AREA function, and use of the AREA system to analyze a vertebrate GATA factor DBD. Some major points to emerge from work on the AREA DBD are (i) tolerance to sequence change (with retention of function) is surprisingly great, (ii) mutational changes in a transcription factor can have widely differing, even opposing, effects on expression of different structural genes so that monitoring expression of one or even several structural genes can be insufficient and possibly misleading, and (iii) a mutational change altering local hydrophobic packing and DNA binding target specificity can markedly influence the behavior of mutational changes elsewhere in the DBD. PMID:9729601

  3. Quantitative inference of population response properties across eccentricity from motion-induced maps in macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Wu, Si; Lu, Haidong D.; Roe, Anna W.

    2013-01-01

    Interpreting population responses in the primary visual cortex (V1) remains a challenge especially with the advent of techniques measuring activations of large cortical areas simultaneously with high precision. For successful interpretation, a quantitatively precise model prediction is of great importance. In this study, we investigate how accurate a spatiotemporal filter (STF) model predicts average response profiles to coherently drifting random dot motion obtained by optical imaging of intrinsic signals in V1 of anesthetized macaques. We establish that orientation difference maps, obtained by subtracting orthogonal axis-of-motion, invert with increasing drift speeds, consistent with the motion streak effect. Consistent with perception, the speed at which the map inverts (the critical speed) depends on cortical eccentricity and systematically increases from foveal to parafoveal. We report that critical speeds and response maps to drifting motion are excellently reproduced by the STF model. Our study thus suggests that the STF model is quantitatively accurate enough to be used as a first model of choice for interpreting responses obtained with intrinsic imaging methods in V1. We show further that this good quantitative correspondence opens the possibility to infer otherwise not easily accessible population receptive field properties from responses to complex stimuli, such as drifting random dot motions. PMID:23197457

  4. System and method of reducing motion-induced noise in the optical detection of an ultrasound signal in a moving body of material

    DOEpatents

    Habeger, Jr., Charles C.; LaFond, Emmanuel F.; Brodeur, Pierre; Gerhardstein, Joseph P.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a system and method to reduce motion-induced noise in the detection of ultrasonic signals in a moving sheet or body of material. An ultrasonic signal is generated in a sheet of material and a detection laser beam is moved along the surface of the material. By moving the detection laser in the same direction as the direction of movement of the sheet of material the amount of noise induced in the detection of the ultrasonic signal is reduced. The scanner is moved at approximately the same speed as the moving material. The system and method may be used for many applications, such in a paper making process or steel making process. The detection laser may be directed by a scanner. The movement of the scanner is synchronized with the anticipated arrival of the ultrasonic signal under the scanner. A photodetector may be used to determine when a ultrasonic pulse has been directed to the moving sheet of material so that the scanner may be synchronized the anticipated arrival of the ultrasonic signal.

  5. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnosis of Malaria Infections in an Area of Endemicity in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Han, Eun-Taek; Bantuchai, Sirasate

    2014-01-01

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method, developed by our group for diagnosis of four human malaria parasites, was evaluated on a large scale at a remote clinic in Thailand where malaria is endemic. A total of 899 febrile patients were analyzed in this study. LAMP was first evaluated in 219 patients, and the result was compared to those of two histidine-rich protein (HRP)-2 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and microscopy as a gold standard. LAMP DNA extraction was conducted by a simple boiling method, and the test results were assessed visually. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 95.7%, 100%, 100%, and 98%, respectively, for LAMP and 98.6%, 98%, 95.8%, and 99.3%, respectively, for RDTs. Since RDT-positive results were based on one out of two RDTs, the sensitivity of RDTs was slightly higher than that of LAMP. However, LAMP tended to be more specific than RDTs. LAMP next was evaluated in 680 patients, and the result was compared to that of microscopy as a gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and diagnostic accuracy of LAMP were 88.9%, 96.9%, 92.2%, 95.5%, and 94.6%, respectively. Nested PCR was used to confirm the discrepant results. Malaria LAMP in a remote clinic in Thailand achieved an acceptable result, indicating that LAMP malaria diagnosis is feasible in a field setting with limited technical resources. Additionally, the rapid boiling method for extracting DNA from dried blood spots proved to be simple, fast, and suitable for use in the field. PMID:24574279

  6. Overcrowding-mediated stress alters cell proliferation in key neuroendocrine areas during larval development in Rhinella arenarum.

    PubMed

    Distler, Mijal J; Jungblut, Lucas D; Ceballos, Nora R; Paz, Dante A; Pozzi, Andrea G

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to adverse environmental conditions can elicit a stress response, which results in an increase in endogenous corticosterone levels. In early life stages, it has been thoroughly demonstrated that amphibian larval growth and development is altered as a consequence of chronic stress by interfering with the metamorphic process, however, the underlying mechanisms involved have only been partially disentangled. We examined the effect of intraspecific competition on corticosterone levels during larval development of the toad Rhinella arenarum and its ultimate effects on cell proliferation in particular brain areas as well as the pituitary gland. While overcrowding altered the number of proliferating cells in the pituitary gland, hypothalamus, and third ventricle of the brain, no differences were observed in areas which are less associated with neuroendocrine processes, such as the first ventricle of the brain. Apoptosis was increased in hypothalamic regions but not in the pituitary. With regards to pituitary cell populations, thyrotrophs but not somatoatrophs and corticotrophs showed a decrease in the cell number in overcrowded larvae. Our study shows that alterations in growth and development, produced by stress, results from an imbalance in the neuroendocrine systems implicated in orchestrating the timing of metamorphosis.

  7. Expression of immunoregulatory genes and its relationship to lead exposure and lead-mediated oxidative stress in wild ungulates from an abandoned mining area.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; de la Lastra, José M Pérez; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Vidal, Dolors; Mateo, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    Lead (Pb) is a highly toxic metal that can induce oxidative stress and affect the immune system by modifying the expression of immunomodulator-related genes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between Pb exposure and the transcriptional profiles of some cytokines, as well as the relationship between Pb exposure and changes in oxidative stress biomarkers observed in the spleen of wild ungulates exposed to mining pollution. Red deer and wild boar from the mining area studied had higher spleen, liver, and bone Pb levels than controls, indicating a chronic exposure to Pb pollution. Such exposure caused a depletion of spleen glutathione levels in both species and disrupted the activity of antioxidant enzymes, suggesting the generation of oxidative stress conditions. Deer from the mining area also showed an induced T-helper (Th )-dependent immune response toward the Th 2 pathway, whereas boar from the mining area showed a cytokine profile suggesting an inclination of the immune response toward the Th 1 pathway. These results indicate that environmental exposure to Pb may alter immune responses in wild ungulates exposed to mining pollution. However, evidence of direct relationships between Pb-mediated oxidative stress and the changes detected in immune responses were not found. Further research is needed to evaluate the immunotoxic potential of Pb pollution, also considering the prevalence of chronic infectious diseases in wildlife in environments affected by mining activities.

  8. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system.

  9. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system. PMID:27192939

  10. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system. PMID:27192939

  11. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-05-19

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system.

  12. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  13. Plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants in Escherichia coli from community uncomplicated urinary tract infection in an area of high prevalence of quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Longhi, C; Conte, M P; Marazzato, M; Iebba, V; Totino, V; Santangelo, F; Gallinelli, C; Pallecchi, L; Riccobono, E; Schippa, S; Comanducci, A

    2012-08-01

    In Italy fluoroquinolones (FQs) are extensively prescribed in empirical therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) despite recommendations in national guidelines and widespread antibiotic resistance in community. To survey the dissemination of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in a peak area of FQs consumption, E. coli strains from 154 community and 41 local hospital patients were collected; low level ciprofloxacin resistance qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6)'-Ib-cr genes were screened by PCR and patterns of transferable resistances were determined. Clinical ciprofloxacin resistance in hospital doubled community value, while overall rates of FQ resistance genes were similar (31.6% and 27.8%). Prevalence of aac(6')-Ib-cr gene was 11% in outpatients (21%, inpatients) and risk of harbouring this variant was significantly associated with gentamicin resistance; linkage to ceftazidime resistance was significant (P=0.001) and six out of eight strains produced CTX-M-15 and TEM-1 beta lactamases. In transconjugants, the unique pattern ampicillin/kanamycin-gentamicin/ ESBL + was associated with aac(6')-Ib-cr gene presence and with an increase of ciprofloxacin MIC value. Data highlight the need to monitor the resistance risk factors in the local community to provide clinicians with well-grounded guidelines for UTI therapy.

  14. DOPAMINE D2 AND ACETYLCHOLINE α7 NICOTINIC RECEPTORS HAVE SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTIONS FAVORING MEDIATION OF CONVERGENT SIGNALING IN THE MOUSE VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA

    PubMed Central

    GARZÓN, M.; DUFFY, A. M.; CHAN, J.; LYNCH, M.-K.; MACKIE, K.; PICKEL, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) mediate nicotine-induced burst-firing of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a limbic brain region critically involved in reward and in dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)-related cortical dysfunctions associated with psychosis. The known presence of α7nAChRs and Gi-coupled D2Rs in dopamine neurons of the VTA suggests that these receptors are targeted to at least some of the same neurons in this brain region. To test this hypothesis, we used electron microscopic immunolabeling of antisera against peptide sequences of α7nACh and D2 receptors in the mouse VTA. Dual D2R and α7nAChR labeling was seen in many of the same somata (co-localization over 97%) and dendrites (co-localization over 49%), where immunoreactivity for each of the receptors was localized to endomembranes as well as to non-synaptic or synaptic plasma membranes often near excitatory-type synapses. In comparison with somata and dendrites, many more small axons and axon terminals were separately labeled for each of the receptors. Thus, single-labeled axon terminals were predominant for both α7nAChR (57.9%) and D2R (89.0%). The majority of the immunolabeled axonal profiles contained D2R-immunoreactivity (81.6%) and formed either symmetric or asymmetric synapses consistent with involvement in the release of both inhibitory and excitatory transmitters. Of 160 D2R-labeled terminals, 81.2% were presynaptic to dendrites that expressed α7nAChR alone or together with the D2R. Numerous glial processes inclusive of those enveloping either excitatory- or inhibitory-type synapses also contained single labeling for D2R (n = 152) and α7nAChR (n =561). These results suggest that classic antipsychotic drugs, all of which block the D2R, may facilitate α7nAChR-mediated burst-firing by elimination of D2R-dependent inhibition in neurons expressing both receptors as well as by indirect pre-synaptic and glial mechanisms. PMID:23954803

  15. Mediation and Counseling Services: A Viable Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Mediation has become common in many areas of society, including marital dissolution, community disputes, governmental agencies, and business and industry. Though higher education has been slower than society to adopt mediation services, campus mediation is becoming increasingly more common. This article explains why mediation is a viable…

  16. Boric acid-mediated B,N-codoped chitosan-derived porous carbons with a high surface area and greatly improved supercapacitor performance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zheng; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Mengdi; Fan, Xiaoming; Yu, Chang; Yang, Juan; Xiao, Nan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-03-12

    This work reports an efficient strategy to synthesize B,N-codoped porous carbons with a high specific surface area using chitosan as the carbon precursor with the help of boric acid, featuring a high specific capacitance, large operation voltage and excellent cycle stability for supercapacitors.

  17. Boric acid-mediated B,N-codoped chitosan-derived porous carbons with a high surface area and greatly improved supercapacitor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zheng; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Mengdi; Fan, Xiaoming; Yu, Chang; Yang, Juan; Xiao, Nan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-03-01

    This work reports an efficient strategy to synthesize B,N-codoped porous carbons with a high specific surface area using chitosan as the carbon precursor with the help of boric acid, featuring a high specific capacitance, large operation voltage and excellent cycle stability for supercapacitors.This work reports an efficient strategy to synthesize B,N-codoped porous carbons with a high specific surface area using chitosan as the carbon precursor with the help of boric acid, featuring a high specific capacitance, large operation voltage and excellent cycle stability for supercapacitors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, additional figures and tables see DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00081e

  18. Aversive behavior induced by optogenetic inactivation of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons is mediated by dopamine D2 receptors in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Danjo, Teruko; Yoshimi, Kenji; Funabiki, Kazuo; Yawata, Satoshi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2014-04-29

    Dopamine (DA) transmission from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is critical for controlling both rewarding and aversive behaviors. The transient silencing of DA neurons is one of the responses to aversive stimuli, but its consequences and neural mechanisms regarding aversive responses and learning have largely remained elusive. Here, we report that optogenetic inactivation of VTA DA neurons promptly down-regulated DA levels and induced up-regulation of the neural activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as evaluated by Fos expression. This optogenetic suppression of DA neuron firing immediately evoked aversive responses to the previously preferred dark room and led to aversive learning toward the optogenetically conditioned place. Importantly, this place aversion was abolished by knockdown of dopamine D2 receptors but not by that of D1 receptors in the NAc. Silencing of DA neurons in the VTA was thus indispensable for inducing aversive responses and learning through dopamine D2 receptors in the NAc.

  19. Emotional memory impairments induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Alvarsson, A; Caudal, D; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with extensive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons originating in the substantia nigra pars compacta, but neuronal loss is also found in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The VTA projects to areas involved in cognitive and emotional processes, including hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex, and has thus been proposed to play a role in emotional memory impairments in PD. Since the formation of α-synuclein inclusions throughout the central nervous system is a pathological hallmark of PD, we studied the progressive effects of α-synuclein overexpression in the VTA on motor functions, emotional behaviour and emotional memory. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding either human α-synuclein or green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected stereotactically into the VTA, and behaviour was monitored 3 and 8 weeks following AAV injection. At week 8, there was a 22% reduction of TH+ neurons in the VTA. We demonstrate that α-synuclein overexpression in dopaminergic neurons of the VTA induced mild motor deficits that appeared 3 weeks following AAV-α-synuclein injection and were aggravated at week 8. No depressive- or anxiety-like behaviours were found. To address emotional memory, we used the passive avoidance test, a one-trial associative learning paradigm based on contextual conditioning which requires minimal training. Interestingly, emotional memory impairments were found in α-synuclein overexpressing animals at week 8. These findings indicate that α-synuclein overexpression induces progressive memory impairments likely caused by a loss of function of mesolimbic dopaminergic projections.

  20. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated activities in road dust from a metropolitan area, Hanoi-Vietnam: contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, Le Huu; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Misaki, Kentaro; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-09-01

    Dioxin-Responsive Chemical-Activated LUciferase gene eXpression assay (DR-CALUX) was applied to assess the total toxic activity of the mixture of PAHs and related compounds as well as dioxin-related compounds in road dust from urban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam. Road dust from Hanoi contained significantly higher DR-CALUX activities (3 to 39, mean 20 ng CALUX-TEQ/g dw) than those from a rural site (2 to 13, mean 5 ng CALUX-TEQ/g dw). The total concentrations of 24 major PAHs (Σ24PAHs) in urban road dust (0.1 to 5.5, mean 2.5 μg/g dw) were also 6 times higher than those in rural road dust (0.08 to 1.5, mean 0.4 μg/g dw). Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated vehicular engine combustion as the major PAH emission source in both sites. PAHs accounted for 0.8 to 60% (mean 10%) and 2 to 76% (mean 20%) of the measured CALUX-TEQs in road dust for Hanoi the rural site, respectively. Benzo[b]-/benzo[k]fluoranthenes were the major TEQ contributors among PAHs, whereas DRCs contributed <0.1% to CALUX-TEQs for both rural and urban sites. These results suggest TEQ contribution of other aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists in road dust. Significant PAH concentrations in urban dust indicated high mutagenic and carcinogenic potencies. Estimated results of incremental life time cancer risk (ILCR) indicated that Vietnamese populations, especially those in urban areas such as Hanoi, are potentially exposed to high cancer risk via both dust ingestion and dermal contact. This is the first study on the exposure risk of AhR agonists, including PAHs and DRCs, in urban road dust from a developing country using a combined bio-chemical analytical approach.

  1. Curved apparent motion induced by amodal completion

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether amodal completion can bias apparent motion (AM) to deviate from its default straight path toward a longer curved path, which would violate the well-established principle that AM follows the shortest possible path. Observers viewed motion sequences of two alternating rectangular tokens positioned at the ends of a semicircular occluder, with varying interstimulus intervals (ISIs; 100–500 ms). At short ISIs, observers tended to report simple straight-path motion—that is, outside the occluder. But at long ISIs, they became increasingly likely to report a curved-path motion behind the occluder. This tendency toward reporting curved-path motion was influenced by the shape of tokens, display orientation, the gap between tokens and the occluder, and binocular depth cues. Our results suggest that the visual system tends to minimize unexplained absence of a moving object, as well as its path length, such that AM deviates from the shortest path when amodal integration of motion trajectory behind the curved occluder can account for the objective invisibility of the object during the ISI. PMID:22069082

  2. Examining Rotational Ground Motion Induced by Tornados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Elijah; Dunn, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Ring lasers are well known for their ability to detect rotation and to serve as replacements for mechanical gyroscopes. The sensitivity of large ring lasers to various forms of ground motion is less familiar. Since ring lasers preferentially measure rotational ground motion and a standard seismograph is designed to measure translational and vertical ground motion, each device responds to different aspects of ground movement. Therefore, the two instruments will be used to explore responses to microseisms, earthquake generated shear waves, and in particular tornado generated ground movement. On April 27, 2014 an EF4 tornado devastated Vilonia, AR a small town ~ 21 km from the Hendrix College ring laser. The proximity of the tornado's path to the ring laser interferometer and to a seismograph located in Vilonia provided the opportunity to examine the response of these instruments to tornadic generated ground motion. Our measurements suggest tornadic weather systems can produce both rotational and lateral ground motion. This contention is supported by an after the fact damage survey which found that the tornado flattened a forest in which trees were uprooted and laid down in a pair of converging arcs with the centerline pointed in the direction of the tornado's path.

  3. DECOHERENCE EFFECTS OF MOTION-INDUCED RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    P. NETO; D. DALVIT

    2000-12-01

    The radiation pressure coupling with vacuum fluctuations gives rise to energy damping and decoherence of an oscillating particle. Both effects result from the emission of pairs of photons, a quantum effect related to the fluctuations of the Casimir force. We discuss different alternative methods for the computation of the decoherence time scale. We take the example of a spherical perfectly-reflecting particle, and consider the zero and high temperature limits. We also present short general reviews on decoherence and dynamical Casimir effect.

  4. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  5. Mediator Deathwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic "therapist" [double arrow] "client" relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly presents the edited…

  6. Reassessment of area postrema's role in motion sickness and conditioned taste aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Crampton, G. H.; Damelio, F.; Elfar, S.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of classical studies on the role of the area psotrema (AP) in motion-induced emesis it was generally accepted that the AP is an essential structure for the production of vomiting in response to motion. However, in more recent studies it has been demonstrated that vomiting induced by motion can still occur in animals in which the AP has been destroyed bilaterally. It was inferred from some of these more recent studies that the AP plays no role in motion-induced emesis. From the standpoint of the current understanding of central nervous system (CNS) plasticity, redundancy, remodeling, unmasking, regeneration, and recovery of function, however, it is important to realize the limitations of using ablation procedures to determine the functional role of a given neural structure in a highly integrated, adaptable central nervous system (CNS). For example, the results of our recent investigations in cat and squirrel monkey on the role of the AP in emesis and conditioned taste aversion induced by motion indicate that while AP lesions do not prevent motion-induced emesis when animals are tested 30 days or more after surgery, the lesions do change the latency to emesis. Thus, contradictory findings from lesion studies must be evaluated not only in terms of species difference, differences in lesioning techniques and extent of lesions, and in stimulus parameters, but also in terms of duration of the recovery period, during which significant recovery of function may take place. In our judgment, inadequate consideration of the foregoing factors could lead to erroneous inferences about given structure's role in the behavior of the intact, nonablated animal.

  7. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ˜1 nm2 of water-exposed area.

  8. Radical-Mediated Fluoroalkylations.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Jin

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the development of eco-friendly radical processes has become of great interest in synthetic chemistry. In particular, visible-light photocatalysis has drawn tremendous attention for its environmental compatibility and versatility in promoting many synthetically important reactions. In addition, inorganic electrides as electron donors have emerged as new eco-friendly tools for radical transformations since they consist of non-toxic and naturally abundant main metals such as calcium. The design of new fluoroalkylation reactions has benefited greatly from recent advances in visible-light photocatalysis and the chemistry of inorganic electrides. Since adding fluoroalkyl groups can dramatically change the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, using these processes to promote eco-friendly radical fluoroalkylations will have a major impact in areas such as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and material sciences. This Personal Account reviews radical-mediated fluoroalkylations, such as trifluoromethylations and difluoroalkylations, recently developed in our laboratory. PMID:26497950

  9. The importance of mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nastri, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental mediation involving hazardous materials often includes a neutral, third party to assist other groups with resolving disputes or with negotiations. Most often, mediators facilitate discussion and suggest possible resolutions among parties, rather than advise as to what action must be taken to reach an agreement. There is opportunity for all sides to express grievances and frustrations as well as hearing possible solutions to resolve discrepancies. Most often, those involved with mediation attain a sense of confidence, competency, and satisfaction with the mediation process. An honest broker is an example of a third party mediator believed capable of assisting mediation in an unbiased manner. The opposing groups must be confident that an honest broker is credible and will provide his/her services to reach a satisfactory conclusion; therefore, the reputation of the mediator is crucial to the success of the mediation process.

  10. Bayesian Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ying; MacKinnon, David P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we propose Bayesian analysis of mediation effects. Compared with conventional frequentist mediation analysis, the Bayesian approach has several advantages. First, it allows researchers to incorporate prior information into the mediation analysis, thus potentially improving the efficiency of estimates. Second, under the Bayesian…

  11. Area postrema ablations in cats: Evidence for separate neural routes for motion- and xylazine-induced CTA and emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Fox, Robert A.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Crampton, G.; Daunton, Nancy G.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies on the role of the area postrema (AP) in vomiting induced in the cat by motion and drugs have shown that the AP is not essential for motion-induced vomiting, but is necessary for vomiting to apomorphine and xylazine. To confirm these findings and to determine the role of the AP in the formation of Conditioned Taste Aversion (CTA), the AP was ablated bilaterally in 10 adult female cats. With one exception, the ablated cats continued to vomit to the same motion that elicited emesis before the ablation. Doses of xylazine and apomorphine that elicit emesis in intact cats, failed to induce emesis in the ablated cats. Histological examination indicated that 8 cats had complete lesions and 2 had partial lesions. Investigations of effects of AP ablations on CTA revealed that cats with complete lesions did not form CTA to flavored milk paired with xylazine-induced CTA. Seven of the eigth completely lesioned cats developed motion-induced CTA, even though emesis was not consistently elicited by motion. These results suggest that there are multiple routes for inducing CTA and the emetic reflex, that CTA can form without eliciting emesis, and that CTA may be a sensitive measure of sub-emetic motion sickness.

  12. Teaching Mediated Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses approaches to teaching a mediated public relations course, emphasizing the World Wide Web. Outlines five course objectives, assignments and activities, evaluation, texts, and lecture topics. Argues that students mastering these course objectives will understand ethical issues relating to media use, using mediated technology in public…

  13. Pathways to Peer Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Dulcie

    Peer mediation programs in schools are an effective way for children to learn the cooperative skills of conflict solving. This paper outlines the implementation of an action research based mediation program within a primary school setting. It examines both the characteristics of successful implementation and the dilemmas of change agentry. A model…

  14. What Is Mediation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), Eugene, OR.

    This brief paper discusses the use of mediation as a method for resolving disagreements between schools or early intervention programs and parents of children with disabilities. It identifies benefits of mediation such as maintenance of an ongoing and positive relationship between the school and family, simple resolution of conflicts arising out…

  15. Action can amplify motion-induced illusory displacement

    PubMed Central

    Caniard, Franck; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Thornton, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Local motion is known to produce strong illusory displacement in the perceived position of globally static objects. For example, if a dot-cloud or grating drifts to the left within a stationary aperture, the perceived position of the whole aperture will also be shifted to the left. Previously, we used a simple tracking task to demonstrate that active control over the global position of an object did not eliminate this form of illusion. Here, we used a new iPad task to directly compare the magnitude of illusory displacement under active and passive conditions. In the active condition, participants guided a drifting Gabor patch along a virtual slalom course by using the tilt control of an iPad. The task was to position the patch so that it entered each gate at the direct center, and we used the left/right deviations from that point as our dependent measure. In the passive condition, participants watched playback of standardized trajectories along the same course. We systematically varied deviation from midpoint at gate entry, and participants made 2AFC left/right judgments. We fitted cumulative normal functions to individual distributions and extracted the point of subjective equality (PSE) as our dependent measure. To our surprise, the magnitude of displacement was consistently larger under active than under passive conditions. Importantly, control conditions ruled out the possibility that such amplification results from lack of motor control or differences in global trajectories as performance estimates were equivalent in the two conditions in the absence of local motion. Our results suggest that the illusion penetrates multiple levels of the perception-action cycle, indicating that one important direction for the future of perceptual illusions may be to more fully explore their influence during active vision. PMID:25628558

  16. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin's motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force. PMID:21797399

  17. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F

    2015-03-17

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light.

  18. Synchronized Intermittent Motion Induced by the Interaction between Camphor Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Nobuhiko J.; Tateno, Kurina; Nakata, Satoshi; Nishimori, Hiraku

    2015-03-01

    A new mode of collective motion was discovered in a system of camphor disks floating on the water surface in a circular chamber. The mode was induced by tuning the number of the disks. A single or few disks are known to continuously move on the water surface. Conversely, when many disks are present, motion comes to a stop and the disks form ordered spatial patterns by repulsive interaction. Here we found the third mode that emerged at an intermediate disk number, in which inactive and active motion phases alternated non-periodically. This new mode exhibited synchronization as the disk number increased.

  19. Elastic image registration via rigid object motion induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaofen; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we estimate the deformations induced on soft tissues by the rigid independent movements of hard objects and create an admixture of rigid and elastic adaptive image registration transformations. By automatically segmenting and independently estimating the movement of rigid objects in 3D images, we can maintain rigidity in bones and hard tissues while appropriately deforming soft tissues. We tested our algorithms on 20 pairs of 3D MRI datasets pertaining to a kinematic study of the flexibility of the ankle complex of normal feet as well as ankles affected by abnormalities in foot architecture and ligament injuries. The results show that elastic image registration via rigid object-induced deformation outperforms purely rigid and purely nonrigid approaches.

  20. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  1. A study of satellite motion-induced multipath phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allnutt, R. M.; Dissanayake, A.; Zaks, C.; Lin, K. T.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments have been undertaken at COMSAT Laboratories to determine some of the propagation effects likely to be encountered by handheld satellite communications devices. L-band pilot tones aboard geosynchronous satellites at 15 and 40 deg. elevations were used to examine diurnal signal variations measured by using a hemispherical antenna. It was found that the receiver with a hemispherical antenna suffered daily peak-to-peak signal level variations of up to 12 dB compared to only 2 to 3 dB for a receiver equipped with a directional antenna. These results were highly repeatable, and extensive tests were conducted to confirm the accuracy of the data. The results suggest that the diurnal variations were due to multipath effects caused by the motion of the satellite with respect to the receiver antenna. Noting that the orbit inclinations of the satellites used in the experiment were only on the order of 2 to 3 deg., the results also suggest a potentially serious signal variation problem for low-gain antenna-based communications systems using low earth orbit satellites, since the satellite elevation angles relative to earth change far more rapidly.

  2. Thermal diffusion by Brownian-motion-induced fluid stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Jennifer; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2007-08-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, the migration of a species due to a temperature gradient, has been extensively studied without a complete picture of its cause emerging. Here we investigate the dynamics of DNA and spherical particles subjected to a thermal gradient using a combination of Brownian dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. We observe that the DNA molecules will migrate to colder regions of the channel, an observation also made in experiments. In fact, the thermal diffusion coefficient found agrees quantitatively with the experimentally measured value. We also observe that the thermal diffusion coefficient decreases as the radius of the studied spherical particles increases. Furthermore, we observe that the thermal-fluctuation-fluid-momentum-flux coupling induces a gradient in the stress which leads to thermal migration in both systems.

  3. Thermal diffusion by Brownian-motion-induced fluid stress.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Jennifer; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2007-08-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, the migration of a species due to a temperature gradient, has been extensively studied without a complete picture of its cause emerging. Here we investigate the dynamics of DNA and spherical particles subjected to a thermal gradient using a combination of Brownian dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. We observe that the DNA molecules will migrate to colder regions of the channel, an observation also made in experiments. In fact, the thermal diffusion coefficient found agrees quantitatively with the experimentally measured value. We also observe that the thermal diffusion coefficient decreases as the radius of the studied spherical particles increases. Furthermore, we observe that the thermal-fluctuation-fluid-momentum-flux coupling induces a gradient in the stress which leads to thermal migration in both systems.

  4. Motion-induced synchronization in metapopulations of mobile agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Sinatra, Roberta; Latora, Vito

    2013-03-01

    We study the influence of motion on the emergence of synchronization in a metapopulation of random walkers moving on a heterogeneous network and subject to Kuramoto interactions at the network nodes. We discover a mechanism of transition to macroscopic dynamical order induced by the walkers’ motion. Furthermore, we observe two different microscopic paths to synchronization: depending on the rule of the motion, either low-degree nodes or the hubs drive the whole system towards synchronization. We provide analytical arguments to understand these results.

  5. Active motion induced break-up of colloidal gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakasits, Megan; Solomon, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We found that fractal gel networks of polystyrene colloids can be broken up by active motion of Janus colloids that have been incorporated into them. Janus particles were synthesized by electron beam deposition of platinum onto one micron carboxylate modified polystyrene particles. Through addition of the divalent salt magnesium chloride, an initially stable suspension of Janus and polystyrene colloids, present in equal proportion, underwent aggregation to yield a fractal gel. The Janus colloids were activated by addition of 30% v/v hydrogen peroxide through a porous hydrogel membrane. Changes in structure and dynamics were visualized by two channel confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). By means of image analysis, we calculated the mean squared displacement (MSD) and radial distribution function (RDF) for gel samples before and after addition of hydrogen peroxide. The MSD confirmed the Janus particles we synthesized undergo active motion. The RDF and cluster size distribution of gel samples before and after addition of peroxide demonstrate how active motion broke apart the gel network into smaller clusters.

  6. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  7. [Mediation in health].

    PubMed

    Decastello, Alice

    2008-02-10

    The author presents mediation as an alternative dispute resolution method. Mediation is a process where the parties are ready to settle their dispute out of court, by way of negotiation and with the involvement of an independent third person as mediator. In the mediation process the mediator shall not decide the dispute, nor examine the default or give legal advice or express his/her opinion - the mediator's duty is to help the parties bring their positions closer and come to a settlement agreement within a short time (120 days). The author gives a summary of the applications of the Hungarian Act on Mediation in Public Health and draws conclusions from the practical experience since entry into force of the legislation and illustrates the advantages of mediation over the court procedure (which may drag on for years). The primary advantages of mediation are that both the mediators and the parties are bound by the obligation of secrecy, the procedure is cheaper than the court proceedings, and the parties can "save their faces" because in mediation the winner-winner formula asserts itself - against lawsuits where the winner-loser positions are confronted. The author also analyses the specific data and information available so far. As for the future, the legislation needs to be amended at several points. It is particularly expedient to regulate the legal relationship between the insurance companies and the health service providers because the liability insurance may not cover the damages the courts adjudicate. And so some of the service providers may go bankrupt as the difference in excess of the upper limit of coverage - it might as well be up to HUF 5 million per case - shall be paid from own budget, to the charge of the upkeep costs. It is also required to review and amend the regulations on expert activities, just as it is inevitable to make data supply compulsory - otherwise it will be impossible to monitor the number of mediation procedures in health. At present

  8. [Mediation in health].

    PubMed

    Decastello, Alice

    2008-02-10

    The author presents mediation as an alternative dispute resolution method. Mediation is a process where the parties are ready to settle their dispute out of court, by way of negotiation and with the involvement of an independent third person as mediator. In the mediation process the mediator shall not decide the dispute, nor examine the default or give legal advice or express his/her opinion - the mediator's duty is to help the parties bring their positions closer and come to a settlement agreement within a short time (120 days). The author gives a summary of the applications of the Hungarian Act on Mediation in Public Health and draws conclusions from the practical experience since entry into force of the legislation and illustrates the advantages of mediation over the court procedure (which may drag on for years). The primary advantages of mediation are that both the mediators and the parties are bound by the obligation of secrecy, the procedure is cheaper than the court proceedings, and the parties can "save their faces" because in mediation the winner-winner formula asserts itself - against lawsuits where the winner-loser positions are confronted. The author also analyses the specific data and information available so far. As for the future, the legislation needs to be amended at several points. It is particularly expedient to regulate the legal relationship between the insurance companies and the health service providers because the liability insurance may not cover the damages the courts adjudicate. And so some of the service providers may go bankrupt as the difference in excess of the upper limit of coverage - it might as well be up to HUF 5 million per case - shall be paid from own budget, to the charge of the upkeep costs. It is also required to review and amend the regulations on expert activities, just as it is inevitable to make data supply compulsory - otherwise it will be impossible to monitor the number of mediation procedures in health. At present

  9. Metadata based mediator generation

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, T

    1998-03-01

    Mediators are a critical component of any data warehouse, particularly one utilizing partially materialized views; they transform data from its source format to the warehouse representation while resolving semantic and syntactic conflicts. The close relationship between mediators and databases, requires a mediator to be updated whenever an associated schema is modified. This maintenance may be a significant undertaking if a warehouse integrates several dynamic data sources. However, failure to quickly perform these updates significantly reduces the reliability of the warehouse because queries do not have access to the m current data. This may result in incorrect or misleading responses, and reduce user confidence in the warehouse. This paper describes a metadata framework, and associated software designed to automate a significant portion of the mediator generation task and thereby reduce the effort involved in adapting the schema changes. By allowing the DBA to concentrate on identifying the modifications at a high level, instead of reprogramming the mediator, turnaround time is reduced and warehouse reliability is improved.

  10. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  11. Phenomenologically Investigating Mediated "Nature"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Tony E.

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2001 I worked as a bartender in Wyoming, two miles east of Yellowstone National Park. This opportunity provided me with unique experiences of "the wilderness" and as a result, allowed me to become aware of intricacies of living within a primarily simulated and mass mediated culture, i.e., the United States. Following tenets of…

  12. Mediation and Legal Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    This study uses fieldwork to investigate the sponsorship of legal literacy within a court mediation program. This examination of institutional involvement in literacy sponsorship demonstrates the ideological nature of literacy by showing the importance of context, investigating literacy-based relationships, and uncovering the intertwined nature of…

  13. Axionic mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shuntaro; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    Although mirage mediation is one of the most plausible mediation mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking, it suffers from two crucial problems. One is the {mu}/B{mu} problem, and the second is the cosmological one. The former stems from the fact that the B parameter tends to be comparable with the gravitino mass, which is 2 orders of magnitude larger than the other soft masses. The latter problem is caused by the decay of the modulus whose branching ratio into the gravitino pair is sizable. In this paper, we propose a model of mirage mediation, in which Peccei-Quinn symmetry is incorporated. In this axionic mirage mediation, it is shown that the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale is dynamically determined around 10{sup 10} GeV to 10{sup 12} GeV due to the supersymmetry breaking effects, and the {mu} problem can be solved naturally. Furthermore, in our model, the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is the axino, that is, the superpartner of the axion. The overabundance of the LSPs due to decays of the modulus/gravitino, which is the most serious cosmological difficulty in the mirage mediation, can be avoided if the axino is sufficiently light. The next-LSPs (NLSPs) produced by the gravitino decay eventually decay into the axino LSPs, yielding the dominant component of the axinos remaining today. It is shown that the axino with a mass of O(100) MeV is naturally realized, which can constitute the dark matter of the Universe, with a free-streaming length of the order of 0.1 Mpc. The saxion, the real scalar component of the axion supermultiplet, can also be cosmologically harmless due to the dilution of the modulus decay. The lifetime of the NLSP is relatively long, but much shorter than 1 sec, when the big-bang nucleosynthesis commences. The decay of the NLSP would provide intriguing collider signatures.

  14. Mediating Divorce Disputes: Mediator Behaviors, Styles and Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderkooi, Lois; Pearson, Jessica

    1983-01-01

    Reviews 35 cases involving contested child custody and visitation and generalizes about the techniques used by experienced divorce mediators to help couples reach resolutions to their differences. Discusses different ways mediators orient couples to mediation, gain their commitment, identify the issues, overcome emotional obstacles and generate…

  15. Mediation in Separation and Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebe, Sarah Childs

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the fast growing profession of mediation for couples undergoing separation and divorce. Discusses questions of consumers concerning how the process works, how long it takes, and its costs and questions of professionals, concerning the process, the qualifications of mediators, and referral for mediation. (Author/ABB)

  16. [Mediation in schools].

    PubMed

    Mickley, Angela

    2006-01-01

    In this article the guiding questions concern the objectives and effectiveness of introducing mediation into an existing school culture of dominance, competition and selection. In addition the necessity will be shown of combining conflict resolution with organisational development and the introduction of a consensual ethics and behaviour code to attain sustainable results in creating a constructive and healthy school environment. Given scarce resources and little time the decisive role of artistic methods will be looked at in providing young people with flexible methods of expressing and negotiating their interests in a changing environment of values and power structures. Some aspects of the development of nonviolent communication, conflict resolution and mediation methods in schools in Germany will be focused on with special emphasis on the type of intervention used and its long term sustainable effects. PMID:17152896

  17. Immune mediated liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capacity. Direct damage and immune-mediated liver injury are two major factors involved in this process. Increasing evidence has suggested the essential role of immune-mediated liver injury in the pathogenesis of liver failure. Here, we review the evolved concepts concerning the mechanisms of immune-mediated liver injury in liver failure from human and animal studies. Both innate and adaptive immunity, especially the interaction of various immune cells and molecules as well as death receptor signaling system are discussed. In addition, we highlight the concept of “immune coagulation”, which has been shown to be related to the disease progression and liver injury exacerbation in HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:26417328

  18. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  19. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-09-24

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  20. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation.

  1. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  2. An Alternative Framework for Defining Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Linda M.; Graham, John W.; Flaherty, Brian P.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an alternative framework for evaluating mediated relationships. The distinguishing feature of mediation is that mediation involves a chain reaction. The definition presented emphasizes the intra-individual, time-ordered nature of mediation. (SLD)

  3. Merlin Mediation System

    2001-10-16

    Merlin Mediation System (a.k.a., Merlin) is a set of reusable software components that provide seamless integration of information contained in multiple, heterogeneous data sources located across many computers. These software components utilize a combination of mediator and expert system technologies to provide intelligence for understanding and integrating data. Merlin provides a virtual database independent of operating systems, platforms, and user applications. Merlin in an implementation of "intelligent middleware" that solves data access and integration issues.more » Merlin resides between user applications and their independent data sources. a user application may be invoked via a Web browser or reside on an individual's workstation. The data sources can reside on multiple separate heterogeneous computer polatforms and may be recorded in a variety of formats (e.g., relational databases, flat files, object-oriented databases). Merlin creates a "virtual object database" so that the user application sees the data retrieved from the various sources as though it wre returned from a single, integrated database. In addition, Merlin provides advanced data instance integration capabilities such as object unification and fusion, abstraction, aggregation, and data and schema translations. It is important to note that Merlin is not bound to any single user application nor to any specific data source. Merlin's software components utilize a combination of mediator and expert system technologies to assure their adaptability for use by various disciplines. These software components accept domain-specific details (e.g., schema, mappings, expert system rules) as data from a "knowledge base". This enables the same software to be used for a variety of domains and user applications with no source code modifications or recompilations required.« less

  4. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  5. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  6. Ferrofluid mediated nanocytometry.

    PubMed

    Kose, Ayse Rezzan; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We present a low-cost, flow-through nanocytometer that utilizes a colloidal suspension of non-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for label-free manipulation and separation of microparticles. Our size-based separation is mediated by angular momentum transfer from magnetically excited ferrofluid particles to microparticles. The nanocytometer is capable of rapidly sorting and focusing two or more species, with up to 99% separation efficiency and a throughput of 3 × 10(4) particles/s per mm(2) of channel cross-section. The device is readily scalable and applicable to live cell sorting with biocompatible ferrofluids, offering competitive cytometer performance in a simple and inexpensive package. PMID:22076536

  7. Gaugomaly mediation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Arpit; Kaplan, David E.; Zorawski, Tom

    2013-11-01

    Most generic models of hidden sector supersymmetry breaking do not feature singlets, and gauginos obtain masses from anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking. If one desires a natural model, then the dominant contribution to scalar masses should be of the same order, i.e. also from AMSB. However, pure AMSB models suffer from the tachyonic slepton problem. Moreover, there is a large splitting between the gluino and the wino LSP masses resulting in tight exclusion limits from typical superpartner searches. We introduce messenger fields into this framework to obtain a hybrid theory of gauge and anomaly mediation, solving both problems simultaneously. Specifically, we find any number of vector-like messenger fields (allowed by GUT unification) compress the predicted gaugino spectrum when their masses come from the Giudice-Masiero mechanism. This more compressed spectrum is less constrained by LHC searches and allows for lighter gluinos. In addition to the model, we present gaugino pole mass equations that differ from (and correct) the original literature.

  8. Interpreter-mediated dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Susan; Drew, Paul; Zayts, Olga; McGrath, Colman; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Wong, H M; Au, T K F

    2015-05-01

    The global movements of healthcare professionals and patient populations have increased the complexities of medical interactions at the point of service. This study examines interpreter mediated talk in cross-cultural general dentistry in Hong Kong where assisting para-professionals, in this case bilingual or multilingual Dental Surgery Assistants (DSAs), perform the dual capabilities of clinical assistant and interpreter. An initial language use survey was conducted with Polyclinic DSAs (n = 41) using a logbook approach to provide self-report data on language use in clinics. Frequencies of mean scores using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS) indicated that the majority of DSAs spoke mainly Cantonese in clinics and interpreted for postgraduates and professors. Conversation Analysis (CA) examined recipient design across a corpus (n = 23) of video-recorded review consultations between non-Cantonese speaking expatriate dentists and their Cantonese L1 patients. Three patterns of mediated interpreting indicated were: dentist designated expansions; dentist initiated interpretations; and assistant initiated interpretations to both the dentist and patient. The third, rather than being perceived as negative, was found to be framed either in response to patient difficulties or within the specific task routines of general dentistry. The findings illustrate trends in dentistry towards personalized care and patient empowerment as a reaction to product delivery approaches to patient management. Implications are indicated for both treatment adherence and the education of dental professionals. PMID:25828074

  9. Interpreter-mediated dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Susan; Drew, Paul; Zayts, Olga; McGrath, Colman; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Wong, H M; Au, T K F

    2015-05-01

    The global movements of healthcare professionals and patient populations have increased the complexities of medical interactions at the point of service. This study examines interpreter mediated talk in cross-cultural general dentistry in Hong Kong where assisting para-professionals, in this case bilingual or multilingual Dental Surgery Assistants (DSAs), perform the dual capabilities of clinical assistant and interpreter. An initial language use survey was conducted with Polyclinic DSAs (n = 41) using a logbook approach to provide self-report data on language use in clinics. Frequencies of mean scores using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS) indicated that the majority of DSAs spoke mainly Cantonese in clinics and interpreted for postgraduates and professors. Conversation Analysis (CA) examined recipient design across a corpus (n = 23) of video-recorded review consultations between non-Cantonese speaking expatriate dentists and their Cantonese L1 patients. Three patterns of mediated interpreting indicated were: dentist designated expansions; dentist initiated interpretations; and assistant initiated interpretations to both the dentist and patient. The third, rather than being perceived as negative, was found to be framed either in response to patient difficulties or within the specific task routines of general dentistry. The findings illustrate trends in dentistry towards personalized care and patient empowerment as a reaction to product delivery approaches to patient management. Implications are indicated for both treatment adherence and the education of dental professionals.

  10. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  11. Colistin-mediated neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Subeer; Tran, Betty

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 51-year-old man who developed renal and neural toxicity after the administration of colistin. He developed respiratory apnoea, neuromuscular blockade and severe comatose encephalopathy with the lack of brainstem reflexes. After discontinuation of the antibiotic, he made a prompt recovery to his baseline neurological function. The case illustrates the importance of recognising the toxicities associated with colistin. Although recent literature details its nephrotoxicity, current data have been discordant with the rare cases of respiratory apnoea or neuromuscular blockade once cited over 30 years ago. Additionally, no cases have ever described the profound encephalopathy with lack of brainstem function described here. The awareness of colistin's potentially fatal effects must be kept in mind when administering this antibiotic. Vigilance of the encephalopathic picture can also facilitate the diagnosis of colistin-mediated neurotoxicity in a patient with altered mental status of otherwise unknown aetiology. PMID:25199193

  12. Microbially mediated phosphine emission.

    PubMed

    Roels, Joris; Huyghe, Gwen; Verstraete, Willy

    2005-02-15

    There is still a lot of controversy in literature concerning the question whether a biochemical system exists enabling micro-organisms to reduce phosphate to phosphine gas. The search for so-called 'de novo synthesised' phosphine is complicated by the fact that soils, slurries, sludges, etc., which are often used as inocula, usually contain matrix bound phosphine (MBP). Matrix bound phosphine is a general term used to indicate non-gaseous reduced phosphorus compounds that are transformed into phosphine gas upon reaction with bases or acids. A study was carried out to compare the different digestion methods, used to transform matrix bound phosphine into phosphine gas. It was demonstrated that caustic and acidic digestion methods should be used to measure the matrix bound phosphine of the inoculum prior to inoculation to avoid false positive results concerning de novo synthesis. This is especially true if anthropogenically influenced inocula possibly containing minute steel or aluminium particles are used. The comparative study on different digestion methods also revealed that the fraction of phosphorus in mild steel, converted to phosphine during acid corrosion depended on the temperature. Following these preliminary studies, anaerobic growth experiments were set up using different inocula and media to study the emission of phosphine gas. Phosphine was detected in the headspace gases and its quantity and timeframe of emission depended on the medium composition, suggesting microbially mediated formation of the gas. The amount of phosphine emitted during the growth experiments never exceeded the bound phosphine present in inocula, prior to inoculation. Hence, de novo synthesis of phosphine from phosphate could not be demonstrated. Yet, microbially mediated conversion to phosphine of hitherto unknown reduced phosphorus compounds in the inoculum was evidenced. PMID:15713333

  13. Endosome-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kondylis, Vangelis; van Nispen tot Pannerden, Hezder E.; van Dijk, Suzanne; ten Broeke, Toine; Wubbolts, Richard; Geerts, Willie J.; Seinen, Cor; Mutis, Tuna; Heijnen, Harry F.G.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of TLR signaling has been shown to induce autophagy in antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Using high-resolution microscopy approaches, we show that in LPS-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), autophagosomes emerge from MHC class II compartments (MIICs) and harbor both the molecular machinery for antigen processing and the autophagosome markers LC3 and ATG16L1. This ENdosome-Mediated Autophagy (ENMA) appears to be the major type of autophagy in DCs, as similar structures were observed upon established autophagy-inducing conditions (nutrient deprivation, rapamycin) and under basal conditions in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Autophagosome formation was not significantly affected in DCs expressing ATG4BC74A mutant and atg4b−/− bone marrow DCs, but the degradation of the autophagy substrate SQSTM1/p62 was largely impaired. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the previously described DC aggresome-like LPS-induced structures (DALIS) contain vesicular membranes, and in addition to SQSTM1 and ubiquitin, they are positive for LC3. LC3 localization on DALIS is independent of its lipidation. MIIC-driven autophagosomes preferentially engulf the LPS-induced SQSTM1-positive DALIS, which become later degraded in autolysosomes. DALIS-associated membranes also contain ATG16L1, ATG9 and the Q-SNARE VTI1B, suggesting that they may represent (at least in part) a membrane reservoir for autophagosome expansion. We propose that ENMA constitutes an unconventional, APC-specific type of autophagy, which mediates the processing and presentation of cytosolic antigens by MHC class II machinery, and/or the selective clearance of toxic by-products of elevated ROS/RNS production in activated DCs, thereby promoting their survival. PMID:23481895

  14. Natural supersymmetric spectrum in mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masaki; Higaki, Tetsutaro

    2012-08-01

    The current results of LHC experiments exclude a large area of the light new particle region, namely, natural parameter space, in supersymmetric extension models. One of the possibilities for achieving the correct electroweak symmetry breaking naturally is the low-scale messenger scenario. Actually, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model with TeV scale mirage mediation realizes the natural electroweak symmetry breaking with various mass spectra. In this paper, we show the possible mass spectrum in the scenario, e.g., the degenerate and/or hierarchical mass spectrum, and discuss these features.

  15. Peer Mediation in Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angaran, Sally; Beckwith, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    Minor disagreements can quickly escalate when a child feels threatened with losing face or fears retaliation. Peer-mediation programs can help students refocus their energies while learning communication skills they can use in other situations. The benefits of an Oregon elementary school's peer-mediation program are discussed. (MLH)

  16. Moral Functioning as Mediated Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tappan, Mark B.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that it is quite useful, both theoretically and empirically, to adopt a socio-cultural approach to the study of moral development. This entails viewing "moral functioning" as a form of mediated action, and moral development as the process by which persons gradually appropriate a variety of "moral mediational means". Mediated…

  17. Symbolic Mediation in Cognitive Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veraksa, Alexander N.

    2011-01-01

    This article used two studies to investigate sign and symbol mediation in children aged 8-11 years. In role play, children exist at one at the same time in objective reality and their representation of reality. We cannot observe their mental representation directly, but the issue of whether signs or symbols mediate early role play is an important…

  18. 34 CFR 81.13 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 81.13 Section 81.13 Education Office of the... Mediation. (a) Voluntary mediation is available for proceedings that are pending before the OALJ. (b) A... mediation by filing a motion with the ALJ assigned to the case. The OALJ arranges for a mediator if...

  19. 24 CFR 3288.35 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 3288.35 Section 3288.35...-Administered States § 3288.35 Mediation. (a) Mediator. The dispute resolution provider will provide for the... identifies any other party that should be included in the mediation, the mediator will contact the...

  20. 29 CFR 35.32 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mediation. (a) Referral to mediation. CRC will promptly refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service or the mediation agency designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services under 45 CFR part... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mediation. 35.32 Section 35.32 Labor Office of the...

  1. 29 CFR 1202.1 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 1202.1 Section 1202.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD RULES OF PROCEDURE § 1202.1 Mediation. The mediation..., or where conferences are refused. The National Mediation Board may proffer its services in case...

  2. 29 CFR 1203.1 - Mediation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation services. 1203.1 Section 1203.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD APPLICATIONS FOR SERVICE § 1203.1 Mediation services. Applications for the mediation services of the National Mediation Board under section 5, First, of the...

  3. 22 CFR 143.33 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 143.33 Section 143.33 Foreign... Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. The agency will refer to the Federal Mediation and... participate in the mediation process to the extent necessary to reach an agreement or make an...

  4. A Mediating Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuszka, Peter

    2009-01-01

    For a suburban area of Washington, D.C., Southern Maryland has remained unusually "Southern." Its rolling tobacco fields, former slave quarters and lonesome two-lane roads through piney woods seem more reminiscent of the Deep South than the nation's capital. So, too, have its attitudes on race. That became evident on Dec. 6, 2004, when five men…

  5. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  6. Program Evaluation Tools for Campus Conflict Resolution & Mediation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Katherine N.; Warters, William C.; Borshuk, Catherine; Hill, Michelle; Macfarlane, Julie; Kmitta, Daniel; Hedeen, Timothy; Jackman, Scott

    2001-01-01

    A modular campus conflict management evaluation toolkit prepared by the Conflict Management in Higher Education Resource Center. Topic areas covered include a general orientation to evaluation research, special resources related to mediation evaluation, and sample tools for Needs Assessment, Process Monitoring, Summative Evaluation and the…

  7. Computer-Mediated Negotiated Interaction and Lexical Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a paired-groups experimental study, which tests the Interaction Hypothesis in a computer-mediated communicative environment. Pairs of intermediate-level nonnative speakers of English (n = 24) interacted with one another in a synchronous mode over a local area network while attempting to jointly complete jigsaw and…

  8. Implementing Computer Mediated Communication in the College Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay-Warner, Jody; Marsh, Kristin

    2000-01-01

    Examines the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in the college classroom using survey data from 89 undergraduate sociology students. Discusses advantages and disadvantages of conferencing systems, either through local area networks or Internet-based systems; preferred uses of CMC; and results of regression analyses. (Author/LRW)

  9. Nanoparticle mediated micromotor motion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Gao, Wenlong; Su, Miaoda; Ge, Ya; Shi, Lili; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y

    2015-03-21

    In this paper, we report the utilization of nanoparticles to mediate the motion of a polymer single crystal catalytic micromotor. Micromotors have been fabricated by directly self-assembling functional nanoparticles (platinum and iron oxide nanoparticles) onto one or both sides of two-dimensional polymer single crystals. We show that the moving velocity of these micromotors in fluids can be readily tuned by controlling the nanoparticles' surface wettability and catalytic activity. A 3 times velocity increase has been achieved for a hydrophobic micromotor as opposed to the hydrophilic ones. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of platinum nanoparticles inside the micromotor can be enhanced by their synergetic interactions with iron oxide nanoparticles and an electric field. Both strategies lead to dramatically increased moving velocities, with the highest value reaching ∼200 μm s(-1). By decreasing the nanoparticles' surface wettability and increasing their catalytic activity, a maximum of a ∼10-fold increase in the moving speed of the nanoparticle based micromotor can be achieved. Our results demonstrate the advantages of using nanoparticles in micromotor systems.

  10. Relationship of area postrema to three putative measures of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R.; Fox, Robert A.; Daunton, Nancy G.

    1991-01-01

    Although the rat has an incomplete emetic reflex, several species-specific responses to motion were proposed as measures of 'motion sickness' in rats. The purpose was to determine the dependence of these responses on one of several neural structures known to be essential to motion-induced vomiting in species with a complete emetic reflex. The Area Postrema (AP) was shown to play an important role in the production of motion sickness in vomiting species. The effects of thermo-cautery ablations of the AP on three different responses supposedly reflecting motion sickness in the rat were compared: conditioned taste aversion (CTA); drinking suppression; and fecal boli. Efficacy of the ablations was determined by subjecting ablated, sham-operated, and unoperated control animals to a CTA test which is known to require a functional AP. Animals with AP ablations failed to form CTA when 0.15 M LiCl was paired with a 10 percent sucrose solution, while sham-operated control subjects conditioned as well as the unoperated control subjects. The extent of the ablations was evaluated histologically at the end of the experiment. To determine the effects of the ablations on the measures of motion sickness, all animals were subjected to rotation for 30 min or 90 min on a platform displaced 20 deg from earth horizontal. Results indicate that ablation of AP in the rat has no effect on the formation of CTA to a 4 percent solution of cider paired with motion, on the suppression of drinking immediately after exposure to motion, or on the frequency of fecal boli during exposure to motion. This failure of AP ablations to eliminate the effects of motion on any of these responses discourages their use as equivalents of motion-induced vomiting. The appropriateness of other suggested measures, e.g., pica, remains untested but the dependence of such measures on stimulation more severe than commonly used in motion sickness research and the absence of a demonstration of their dependence on neural

  11. Mediator-Generated Pressure Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Joseph F.

    1978-01-01

    Two examples of bluff pressures (as opposed to real pressures) used by mediators to effect contract settlements are presented, along with advice to negotiators on avoiding or minimizing such tactics. (Author/IRT)

  12. Inflammatory mediators in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M; Brady, M; Shokuhi, S; Christmas, S; Neoptolemos, J P; Slavin, J

    2000-02-01

    Inflammatory mediators play a key role in acute pancreatitis and the resultant multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, which is the primary cause of death in this condition. Recent studies have confirmed the critical role played by inflammatory mediators such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, PAF, IL-10, C5a, ICAM-1, and substance P. The systemic effects of acute pancreatitis have many similarities to those of other conditions such as septicaemia, severe burns, and trauma. The delay between the onset of inflammation in the pancreas and the development of the systemic response makes acute pancreatitis an ideal experimental and clinical model with which to study the role of inflammatory mediators and to test novel therapies. Elucidation of the key mediators involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis will facilitate the development of clinically effective anti-inflammatory therapy.

  13. Lipid mediators in life science.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    "Lipid mediators" represent a class of bioactive lipids that are produced locally through specific biosynthetic pathways in response to extracellular stimuli. They are exported extracellularly, bind to their cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to transmit signals to target cells, and are then sequestered rapidly through specific enzymatic or non-enzymatic processes. Because of these properties, lipid mediators can be regarded as local hormones or autacoids. Unlike proteins, whose information can be readily obtained from the genome, we cannot directly read out the information of lipids from the genome since they are not genome-encoded. However, we can indirectly follow up the dynamics and functions of lipid mediators by manipulating the genes encoding a particular set of proteins that are essential for their biosynthesis (enzymes), transport (transporters), and signal transduction (receptors). Lipid mediators are involved in many physiological processes, and their dysregulations have been often linked to various diseases such as inflammation, infertility, atherosclerosis, ischemia, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. In this article, I will give an overview of the basic knowledge of various lipid mediators, and then provide an example of how research using mice, gene-manipulated for a lipid mediator-biosynthetic enzyme, contributes to life science and clinical applications.

  14. 43 CFR 17.332 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Enforcement Procedures § 17.332 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. DOI will... it. The FMCS shall send the agreement to DOI. DOI, however, retains the right to monitor the... process without prior approval of the head of the mediation agency. (e) DOI will use the mediation...

  15. 7 CFR 900.108 - Mediator's report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediator's report. 900.108 Section 900.108 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Mediator's report. The mediator, upon the completion of mediation proceedings, shall submit to...

  16. 45 CFR 1156.16 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mediation. 1156.16 Section 1156.16 Public Welfare... Procedures § 1156.16 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. The Endowment will promptly refer all complaints to the agency designated by the Secretary of HHS to manage the mediation process...

  17. 10 CFR 1040.89-6 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Enforcement Procedures § 1040.89-6 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. DOE will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, in accordance with 45 CFR 90.43(c)(3), all complaints that: (1... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 1040.89-6 Section 1040.89-6 Energy...

  18. 7 CFR 780.9 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 780.9 Section 780.9 Agriculture Regulations... PROGRAMS APPEAL REGULATIONS § 780.9 Mediation. (a) Any request for mediation must be submitted after... once: (1) If resolution of an adverse decision is not achieved in mediation, a participant may...

  19. 38 CFR 18.543 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 18.543 Section... Enforcement Procedures § 18.543 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. VA will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that: (1) Fall within the jurisdiction of...

  20. 24 CFR 146.35 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 146.35 Section 146.35... ASSISTANCE Investigation, Settlement, and Enforcement Procedures § 146.35 Mediation. (a) HUD shall refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, a mediation agency designated by the Secretary...

  1. Mediation in Schools: Tapping the Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the developing role of mediation as a conflict resolution process in schools. It gives an accepted definition and clarifies the purposes of mediation, outlining the range of contexts in and beyond schools in which mediation is already offered as a formal intervention. The typical process of mediation itself is described. The…

  2. 22 CFR 218.33 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 218.33 Section 218.33 Foreign... § 218.33 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. The agency will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that: (1) fall within the jurisdiction of...

  3. 14 CFR 1252.402 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 1252.402 Section 1252.402... Procedures § 1252.402 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. NASA will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that: (1) Fall within the jurisdiction of the Act...

  4. 15 CFR 930.111 - OCRM mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false OCRM mediation. 930.111 Section 930... FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Secretarial Mediation § 930.111 OCRM mediation. The availability of mediation does not preclude use by the parties of alternative means...

  5. 10 CFR 4.333 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 4.333 Section 4.333 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Investigation, Conciliation, and Enforcement Procedures § 4.333 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. NRC will refer to a mediation agency designated by the Secretary of the Department of Health...

  6. 15 CFR 20.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 20.12 Section 20.12... Procedures § 20.12 Mediation. (a) DOC will refer to a mediation service designated by the Secretary all... further processing. (b) Both the complainant and the recipient shall participate in the mediation...

  7. 45 CFR 91.43 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mediation. 91.43 Section 91.43 Public Welfare... Enforcement Procedures § 91.43 Mediation. (a) HHS will promptly refer to a mediation agency designated by the... mediation process to the extent necessary to reach an agreement or make an informed judgment that...

  8. 34 CFR 110.32 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 110.32 Section 110.32 Education Regulations..., Conciliation, and Enforcement Procedures § 110.32 Mediation. (a) ED promptly refers to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service or to the mediation agency designated by the Secretary of Health and...

  9. 7 CFR 900.108 - Mediator's report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mediator's report. 900.108 Section 900.108 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Mediator's report. The mediator, upon the completion of mediation proceedings, shall submit to...

  10. Mediators of Change for Multisystemic Therapy with Juvenile Sexual Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Letourneau, Elizabeth J.; Chapman, Jason E.; Borduin, Charles M.; Schewe, Paul A.; McCart, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The mediators of favorable multisystemic therapy (MST) outcomes achieved at 12 months post recruitment were examined within the context of a randomized effectiveness trial with 127 juvenile sexual offenders and their families. Outcome measures assessed youth delinquency, substance use, externalizing symptoms, and deviant sexual interest/risk behaviors; and hypothesized mediators included measures of parenting and peer relations. Data were collected at pretreatment, 6 months post recruitment, and 12 months post recruitment. Consistent with the MST theory of change and the small extant literature in this area of research, analyses showed that favorable MST effects on youth antisocial behavior and deviant sexual interest/risk behaviors were mediated by increased caregiver follow-through on discipline practices as well as decreased caregiver disapproval of and concern about the youth's bad friends during the follow-up. These findings have important implications for the community-based treatment of juvenile sexual offenders. PMID:19485587

  11. CNS Dopamine Transmission Mediated by Noradrenergic Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Caroline C.; Greene, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The pre-synaptic source of dopamine in the CA1 field of dorsal hippocampus is uncertain due to an anatomical mismatch between dopaminergic terminals and receptors. We show, in an in vitro slice preparation from C57BL6 male mice, that a dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) mediated enhancement in glutamate synaptic transmission occurs following release of endogenous DA with amphetamine exposure. It is assumed DA is released from terminals innervating from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) even though DA transporter (DAT) positive fibers are absent in hippocampus, a region with abundant D1Rs. It has been suggested this results from a lack of DAT expression on VTA terminals rather than a lack of these terminals per se. Neither a knockdown of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the VTA by THsiRNA, delivered locally, by adeno-associated viral vector, nor localized pharmacological blockade of DAT to prevent amphetamine uptake into DA terminals, has any effect on the D1R synaptic, enhancement response to amphetamine. However, either a decrease in TH expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) or a blockade of the norepinephrine (NE) transporter prevents the DA mediated response, indicating LC terminals can release both NE and DA. These findings suggest noradrenergic fibers may be the primary source of DA release in hippocampus and corresponding DA mediated increase in synaptic transmission. Accordingly, these data imply the LC may have a role in DA transmission in the CNS in response to drugs of abuse, and potentially, under physiological conditions. PMID:22553014

  12. Area contingency plan Chicago area. (COTP Chicago)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Chicago Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Chicago Coastal Zone.

  13. Area contingency plan Wisconsin area. (COTP Milwaukee)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-30

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Eastern Wisconsin Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Milwaukee Coastal Zone.

  14. Health Service Areas (HSAs) - Small Area Estimates

    Cancer.gov

    Health Service Areas (HSAs) are a compromise between the 3000 counties and the 50 states. An HSA may be thought of as an area that is relatively self-contained with respect to hospital care and may cross over state boundries.

  15. Mediation Analysis in Psychosomatic Medicine Research

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Ginger; MacKinnon, David P.; Ohlrich, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of statistical mediation analysis and its application to psychosomatic medicine research. The article begins with a description of the major approaches to mediation analysis and an evaluation of the strengths and limits of each. Emphasis is placed on longitudinal mediation models, and an application using latent growth modeling is presented. The article concludes with a description of recent developments in mediation analysis and suggestions for the use of mediation for future work in psychosomatic medicine research. PMID:21148809

  16. Conflict Resolution in Special Education and Section 504 through Mediation. Mediators Manual [and] School Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copenhaver, John

    This manual is designed to familiarize mediators with the mediation process and what will occur during a mediation session. Information is provided on the following topics: (1) mediation in special education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; (2) advantages of mediation;…

  17. Nursing as textually mediated reality.

    PubMed

    Cheek, J; Rudge, T

    1994-11-01

    Nursing and nursing practice both construct and are in turn constructed by the context in which they operate. Texts plays a central part in that construction. As such, nursing and nursing practice can be considered to represent a reality that is textually mediated. This paper explores the notion of nursing as a textually mediated reality and offers the reader the possibility of engaging in reflection on what implications this has for nursing and their own nursing practice. The analyses provided draw on aspects of the work of both Foucault and Derrida. Foucault's notion of discourse provides a vehicle for the exploration of nursing as textually mediated, as does Derrida's concept of binary oppositions. The paper thus illustrates some of the possibilities afforded nursing by poststructural analyses. In particular it does this by exploring one of the central textual constructions, impacting on the way that nursing and nursing practice are conceptualized, the mind/body binary opposition. PMID:7850620

  18. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  19. Gauge mediated mini-split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple model of split supersymmetry from gauge mediation. This model features gauginos that are parametrically a loop factor lighter than scalars, accommodates a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, and incorporates a simple solution to the μ- b μ problem. The gaugino mass suppression can be understood as resulting from collective symmetry breaking. Imposing collider bounds on μ and requiring viable electroweak symmetry breaking implies small a-terms and small tan β — the stop mass ranges from 105 to 108 GeV. In contrast with models with anomaly + gravity mediation (which also predict a one-loop loop suppression for gaugino masses), our gauge mediated scenario predicts aligned squark masses and a gravitino LSP. Gluinos, electroweakinos and Higgsinos can be accessible at the LHC and/or future colliders for a wide region of the allowed parameter space.

  20. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  1. Fracture healing and lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J Patrick; Manigrasso, Michaele B; Kim, Brian D; Subramanian, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Lipid mediators regulate bone regeneration during fracture healing. Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are well-known lipid mediators that regulate inflammation and are synthesized from the Ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase (COX-1 or COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyze the initial enzymatic steps in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, respectively. Inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing in animal models. Genetic ablation of COX-1 does not affect the fracture callus strength in mice, suggesting that COX-2 activity is primarily responsible for regulating fracture healing. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is performed clinically to reduce heterotopic ossification, although clinical evidence that NSAID treatment impairs fracture healing remains controversial. In contrast, inhibition or genetic ablation of 5-LO activity accelerates fracture healing in animal models. Even though prostaglandins and leukotrienes regulate inflammation, loss of COX-2 or 5-LO activity appears to primarily affect chondrogenesis during fracture healing. Prostaglandin or prostaglandin analog treatment, prostaglandin-specific synthase inhibition and prostaglandin or leukotriene receptor antagonism also affect callus chondrogenesis. Unlike the Ω-6-derived lipid mediators, lipid mediators derived from Ω-3 fatty acids, such as resolvin E1 (RvE1), have anti-inflammatory activity. In vivo, RvE1 can inhibit osteoclastogenesis and limit bone resorption. Although Ω-6 and Ω-3 lipid mediators have clear-cut effects on inflammation, the role of these lipid mediators in bone regeneration is more complex, with apparent effects on callus chondrogenesis and bone remodeling. PMID:24795811

  2. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  3. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  4. WHETSTONE ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wrucke, Chester T.; McColly, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey conducted has shown that areas in and adjacent to the Whetstone Roadless Area, Arizona have a substantiated resource potential for copper, lead, gold, silver, and quartz, and a probable mineral-resource potential for copper silver, lead, gold, molybdenum, tungsten, uranium, and gypsum. Copper and silver occur in a small vein deposit in the southwestern part of the roadless area. Copper, lead, silver, gold, and molybdenum are known in veins associated with a porphyry copper deposit in a reentrant near the southern border of the roadless area. Vein deposits of tungsten and uranium are possible in the northeast part of the roadless area near areas of known production of these commodities. Demonstrated resources of quartz for smelter flux extend into the roadless area from the Ricketts mine. Areas of probable potential for gypsum resources also occur within the roadless area. No potential for fossil fuel resources was identified in the study.

  5. CUCAMONGA ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Peters, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys and an investigation of mines, prospects, and mineralized areas, the Cucamonga Roadless Areas in California have two areas of probable mineral-resource potential. An area of probable mineral-resource potential for low-grade tungsten and gold resources is located in the northern part of the roadless areas, and an area of similar potential for small deposits of silver, lead, and zinc is located in the southwestern part of the roadless areas. An interpretation of an aeromagnetic survey of the Cucamonga Roadless Areas showed magnetic anomalies and patterns closely related to magnetic variation in rock units, but indicated no unknown areas of mineral-resource potential.

  6. Eicosanoids mediate insect hemocyte migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemocyte chemotaxis toward infection and wound sites is an essential component of insect defense reactions, although the biochemical signal mechanisms responsible for mediating chemotaxis in insect cells are not well understood. Here we report on the outcomes of experiments designed to test the hyp...

  7. Re/Mediating Adolescent Literacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, John, Ed.; Luke, Allan, Ed.

    Suggesting that teaching in New Times requires that educators read and re/mediate the social relations, the cultural knowledges, and the relationships of power between adolescents and their social, biological, and semiotic universes, this collection of essays offers new ways of seeing and talking about adolescents and their literacies. Most of the…

  8. Mediated Modeling in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halloun, Ibrahim A.

    2007-01-01

    Following two decades of corroboration, modeling theory is presented as a pedagogical theory that promotes mediated experiential learning of model-laden theory and inquiry in science education. Students develop experiential knowledge about physical realities through interplay between their own ideas about the physical world and particular patterns…

  9. Mediation and the Electronic World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, John; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss the issue of the mediator's role in the library of the electronic age. Topics addressed include computer-assisted instruction; online catalogs; computer networks; professional identity; reference service and bibliographic instruction; CD-ROMs; online systems; personal home microcomputers; Internet and list servers;…

  10. Counterpoint: Response to Mediator Caraway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Gordon A.; Heinen, Mark

    1991-01-01

    In the Fall 1989 issue, Caraway discussed the advantages of grievance mediation, compared with arbitration. This article reexamines the issue from the viewpoint of the individual grievant and points to recent conflicting developments in the National Labor Relations Board's deferral doctrine. An introduction by Perry A. Zirkel summarizes the…

  11. Mediation: A Violence Prevention Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conflict Resolution Unlimited, Inc., Bellevue, WA.

    Young people need help in learning alternative dispute resolution skills. A program that aims to do this, set in a context of preventing violent behavior, is presented here. It is structured into sixteen 45-minute sessions which can be presented by one teacher. The training is organized around the following seven themes: The Mediation Process,…

  12. Divorce Mediator: A New Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, John M.

    1978-01-01

    In response to soaring divorce rates and liberalized divorce laws, the author proposes a new role for social workers--divorce mediator. Social work skills can be used to lessen the pain couples who are dissolving marriage at the same time that husband and wife are helped to face the future. (Author)

  13. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; McColly, Robert

    1984-01-01

    There is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area, Arizona, as judged from field studies. Significant concentrations of minerals within the roadless area are not indicated by geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, or aeromagnetic studies. Basalt, volcanic cinders, sand and gravel, and sandstone that may be suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but are more readily accessible outside the roadless area boundary.

  14. Developing Environmental Study Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan M.

    This publication is designed to help the teacher in developing environmental study areas. Numerous examples of study areas, including airports, lakes, shopping centers, and zoos, are listed. A current definition of environmental study areas is given and guidelines for their development and identification are included. The appendix, which comprises…

  15. Mediation Works: An Action Research Study Evaluating the Peer Mediation Program from the Eyes of Mediators and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jacqueline Yvonne; Boes, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to understand how mediators and faculty view a Peer Mediation Program (PMP). The review identified four subgroups: mediators, teachers, administrators, and school counselors as well as their views on the success or lack of success of PMPs. The research also reflects how to best engage stakeholders in the mediation…

  16. Ratio-of-Mediator-Probability Weighting for Causal Mediation Analysis in the Presence of Treatment-by-Mediator Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Guanglei; Deutsch, Jonah; Hill, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional methods for mediation analysis generate biased results when the mediator--outcome relationship depends on the treatment condition. This article shows how the ratio-of-mediator-probability weighting (RMPW) method can be used to decompose total effects into natural direct and indirect effects in the presence of treatment-by-mediator…

  17. Developing Illustrative Descriptors of Aspects of Mediation for the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR): A Council of Europe Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Brian; Piccardo, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    The notion of mediation has been the object of growing interest in second language education in recent years. The increasing awareness of the complex nature of the process of learning--and teaching--stretches our collective reflection towards less explored areas. In mediation, the immediate focus is on the role of language in processes like…

  18. Nodal-mediated epigenesis requires dynamin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Robin P.; Robertson, Anthony J.; Saunders, Diane; Coffman, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Nodal proteins are diffusible morphogens that drive pattern formation via short-range feedback activation coupled to long-range Lefty-mediated inhibition. In the sea urchin embryo, specification of the secondary (oral-aboral) axis occurs via zygotic expression of nodal, which is localized to the prospective oral ectoderm at early blastula stage. In mid-blastula stage embryos treated with low micromolar nickel or zinc, nodal expression expands progressively beyond the confines of this localized domain to encompass the entire equatorial circumference of the embryo, producing radialized embryos lacking an oral-aboral axis. RNAseq analysis of embryos treated with nickel, zinc or cadmium (which does not radialize embryos) showed that several genes involved in endocytosis were similarly perturbed by nickel and zinc but not cadmium. Inhibiting dynamin, a GTPase required for receptor-mediated endocytosis, phenocopies the effects of nickel and zinc, suggesting that dynamin-mediated endocytosis is required as a sink to limit the range of Nodal signaling. PMID:21337468

  19. Women's Facial Redness Increases Their Perceived Attractiveness: Mediation Through Perceived Healthiness.

    PubMed

    Pazda, Adam D; Thorstenson, Christopher A; Elliot, Andrew J; Perrett, David I

    2016-07-01

    In the present research, we investigated whether the red-attraction relation that has been observed for men viewing women may also be observed with regard to women's facial redness. We manipulated facial redness by slightly increasing or decreasing the redness on the faces of baseline pictures of target women, and then had men judge the attractiveness of the women. We also examined healthiness perceptions as a mediator of the redness-attraction relation, along with several other candidate mediator variables. A series of experiments showed that increased redness led to increased ratings of attractiveness, and decreased redness led to decreased ratings of attractiveness. Perceived healthiness was documented as a mediator of the influence of female facial redness on male perceptions of attractiveness, and this mediation was independent of other candidate mediator variables. The findings highlight the importance of attending to facial coloration as an attraction-relevant cue and point to interesting areas for subsequent research.

  20. Women's Facial Redness Increases Their Perceived Attractiveness: Mediation Through Perceived Healthiness.

    PubMed

    Pazda, Adam D; Thorstenson, Christopher A; Elliot, Andrew J; Perrett, David I

    2016-07-01

    In the present research, we investigated whether the red-attraction relation that has been observed for men viewing women may also be observed with regard to women's facial redness. We manipulated facial redness by slightly increasing or decreasing the redness on the faces of baseline pictures of target women, and then had men judge the attractiveness of the women. We also examined healthiness perceptions as a mediator of the redness-attraction relation, along with several other candidate mediator variables. A series of experiments showed that increased redness led to increased ratings of attractiveness, and decreased redness led to decreased ratings of attractiveness. Perceived healthiness was documented as a mediator of the influence of female facial redness on male perceptions of attractiveness, and this mediation was independent of other candidate mediator variables. The findings highlight the importance of attending to facial coloration as an attraction-relevant cue and point to interesting areas for subsequent research. PMID:26908567

  1. An Adviser Agent for Mediator Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Katagami, Daisuke; Nitta, Katsumi

    This paper describes an agent that shows advices for supporting mediator on our online mediation support system. The purpose of the advice is an education of mediator, and the agent presents it instead of the teacher. In this research, at first, we defined a mediation model that is an argumentation model between 3 people. Then, we defined some advice models based on the mediation model. The advice models create advice elements. The adviser agent monitors the mediation, gathers advice elements referring to advice models, and creates advice from elements according to the mediation scene. As a result, it becomes possible that is advising instead of the teacher according to the situation, education purpose and learner's level. We inspected the effectiveness of the advice by the experiment of moot mediation.

  2. CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Welsh, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

  3. TROUBLESOME ROADLESS AREA, KENTUCKY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigleo, W.R.; Hammack, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey identified resources of coal, oil and gas, sandstone, and shale in the Troublesome Roadless Area, Kentucky. Demonstrated resources of approximately 429,100 short tons of coal in an area of substantiated resource potential are contained in two major coal beds more than 28 in. thick and the area also contains an additional 483,900 short tons of coal in beds between 14 and 28 in. thick. A probable potential for oil and gas is assigned to the entire area as these fuels may be present in underlying rocks of Mississippian age. Sandstone for silica sand, construction sand, and dimension stone, and shale for structural clay products occur in the area, but these commodities also occur in abundance outside the roadless area. A geochemical survey indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources in the roadless area.

  4. Methods for Mediation Analysis with Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Despite wide applications of both mediation models and missing data techniques, formal discussion of mediation analysis with missing data is still rare. We introduce and compare four approaches to dealing with missing data in mediation analysis including list wise deletion, pairwise deletion, multiple imputation (MI), and a two-stage maximum…

  5. Axino dark matter in mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shuntaro; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2009-04-17

    The mirage mediation of supersymmetry breaking is a phenomenologically quite interesting possibility, however, it suffers from two major problems: the moduli-induced gravitino problem and the {mu}-B{mu} problem. In this paper, we propose that the axionic extension of mirage mediation, axionic mirage mediation can solve both problems simultaneously. We address the cosmological consequences of the scenario extensively.

  6. Special Education Mediation: A Guide for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), Eugene, OR.

    Designed for parents of students with disabilities living in Oregon, this brochure describes the general mediation process that parents can use to resolve special education services disputes with schools. It begins by discussing what mediation is and the characteristics of a trained mediator. It addresses the requirement for making mediation…

  7. 7 CFR 205.663 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Administrative Compliance § 205.663 Mediation. Any dispute with respect... a qualified mediator mutually agreed upon by the parties to the mediation. If a State...

  8. Causal Mediation Analysis: Warning! Assumptions Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keele, Luke

    2015-01-01

    In policy evaluations, interest may focus on why a particular treatment works. One tool for understanding why treatments work is causal mediation analysis. In this essay, I focus on the assumptions needed to estimate mediation effects. I show that there is no "gold standard" method for the identification of causal mediation effects. In…

  9. Single-Level and Multilevel Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofighi, Davood; Thoemmes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a statistical approach used to examine how the effect of an independent variable on an outcome is transmitted through an intervening variable (mediator). In this article, we provide a gentle introduction to single-level and multilevel mediation analyses. Using single-level data, we demonstrate an application of structural…

  10. 41 CFR 101-8.717 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mediation. 101-8.717... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.717 Mediation. (a) GSA promptly refers to the mediation agency designated by the Secretary, HHS, all sufficient complaints...

  11. 7 CFR 400.94 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 400.94 Section 400.94 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Appeal Procedure § 400.94 Mediation. For adverse decisions only: (a) Appellants have the right to seek mediation or other forms of alternative dispute resolution...

  12. 45 CFR 617.10 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mediation. 617.10 Section 617.10 Public Welfare... OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM NSF § 617.10 Mediation. (a) NSF will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that fall...

  13. 7 CFR 900.109 - Mediation agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation agreement. 900.109 Section 900.109 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... Mediation agreement. An agreement arrived at by mediation shall not become effective until approved by...

  14. 13 CFR 117.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 117.12 Section 117.12... Mediation. (a) SBA shall, after ensuring that the complaint falls within the coverage of this Act and all... clearly within an exception, promptly refer the complaint to the Federal Mediation and...

  15. 34 CFR 300.506 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 300.506 Section 300.506 Education... DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards Due Process Procedures for Parents and Children § 300.506 Mediation. (a... due process complaint, to resolve disputes through a mediation process. (b) Requirements....

  16. Vernalization-mediated chromatin changes.

    PubMed

    Zografos, Brett R; Sung, Sibum

    2012-07-01

    Proper flowering time is vital for reproductive fitness in flowering plants. In Arabidopsis, vernalization is mediated primarily through the repression of a MADS box transcription factor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The induction of a plant homeodomain-containing protein, VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3), by vernalizing cold is required for proper repression of FLC. One of a myriad of changes that occurs after VIN3 is induced is the establishment of FLC chromatin at a mitotically repressed state due to the enrichment of repressive histone modifications. VIN3 induction by cold is the earliest known event during the vernalization response and includes changes in histone modifications at its chromatin. Here, the current understanding of the vernalization-mediated chromatin changes in Arabidopsis is discussed, with a focus on the roles of shared chromatin-modifying machineries in regulating VIN3 and FLC gene family expression during the course of vernalization.

  17. General gauge mediation and deconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarrie, Moritz

    2010-11-01

    We locate a supersymmetry breaking hidden sector and supersymmetric standard model on different lattice points of an orbifold moose. The hidden sector is encoded in a set of current correlators and the effects of the current correlators are mediated by the lattice site gauge groups with "lattice hopping" functions and through the bifundamental matter that links the lattice sites together. We show how the gaugino mass, scalar mass and Casimir energy of the lattice can be computed for a general set of current correlators and then give specific formulas when the hidden sector is specified to be a generalised messenger sector. The results reproduce the effect of five dimensional gauge mediation from a purely four dimensional construction.

  18. Sequestered gravity in gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Benakli, Karim; Quiros, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel mechanism of supersymmetry breaking embeddable in string theory and simultaneously sharing the main advantages of (sequestered) gravity and gauge mediation. It is driven by a Scherk-Schwarz deformation along a compact extra dimension, transverse to a brane stack supporting the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. This fixes the magnitude of the gravitino mass, together with that of the gauginos of a bulk gauge group, at a scale as high as 10^{10} GeV. Supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the observable sector dominantly by gauge interactions using massive messengers transforming non-trivially under the bulk and Standard Model gauge groups and leading to a neutralino LSP as dark matter candidate. The Higgsino mass μ and soft Higgs-bilinear B_μ term could be generated at the same order of magnitude as the other soft terms by effective supergravity couplings as in the Giudice-Masiero mechanism.

  19. RNA-mediated gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  20. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  1. Astrocyte-mediated ischemic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yuri; Ikeda-Matsuo, Yuri; Notomi, Shoji; Enaida, Hiroshi; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2015-03-01

    Preconditioning (PC) using a preceding sublethal ischemic insult is an attractive strategy for protecting neurons by inducing ischemic tolerance in the brain. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms have been extensively studied, almost all studies have focused on neurons. Here, using a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in mice, we show that astrocytes play an essential role in the induction of brain ischemic tolerance. PC caused activation of glial cells without producing any noticeable brain damage. The spatiotemporal pattern of astrocytic, but not microglial, activation correlated well with that of ischemic tolerance. Interestingly, such activation in astrocytes lasted at least 8 weeks. Importantly, inhibiting astrocytes with fluorocitrate abolished the induction of ischemic tolerance. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we focused on the P2X7 receptor as a key molecule in astrocyte-mediated ischemic tolerance. P2X7 receptors were dramatically upregulated in activated astrocytes. PC-induced ischemic tolerance was abolished in P2X7 receptor knock-out mice. Moreover, our results suggest that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, a well known mediator of ischemic tolerance, is involved in P2X7 receptor-mediated ischemic tolerance. Unlike previous reports focusing on neuron-based mechanisms, our results show that astrocytes play indispensable roles in inducing ischemic tolerance, and that upregulation of P2X7 receptors in astrocytes is essential. PMID:25740510

  2. Male-mediated developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Diana; Schmid, Thomas E; Baumgartner, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    Male-mediated developmental toxicity has been of concern for many years. The public became aware of male-mediated developmental toxicity in the early 1990s when it was reported that men working at Sellafield might be causing leukemia in their children. Human and animal studies have contributed to our current understanding of male-mediated effects. Animal studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggested that genetic damage after radiation and chemical exposure might be transmitted to offspring. With the increasing understanding that there is histone retention and modification, protamine incorporation into the chromatin and DNA methylation in mature sperm and that spermatozoal RNA transcripts can play important roles in the epigenetic state of sperm, heritable studies began to be viewed differently. Recent reports using molecular approaches have demonstrated that DNA damage can be transmitted to babies from smoking fathers, and expanded simple tandem repeats minisatellite mutations were found in the germline of fathers who were exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster. In epidemiological studies, it is possible to clarify whether damage is transmitted to the sons after exposure of the fathers. Paternally transmitted damage to the offspring is now recognized as a complex issue with genetic as well as epigenetic components. PMID:24369136

  3. Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fejerskov, Betina; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT) as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s) into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol), β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose – dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:23152927

  4. Male-mediated developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Diana; Schmid, Thomas E; Baumgartner, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    Male-mediated developmental toxicity has been of concern for many years. The public became aware of male-mediated developmental toxicity in the early 1990s when it was reported that men working at Sellafield might be causing leukemia in their children. Human and animal studies have contributed to our current understanding of male-mediated effects. Animal studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggested that genetic damage after radiation and chemical exposure might be transmitted to offspring. With the increasing understanding that there is histone retention and modification, protamine incorporation into the chromatin and DNA methylation in mature sperm and that spermatozoal RNA transcripts can play important roles in the epigenetic state of sperm, heritable studies began to be viewed differently. Recent reports using molecular approaches have demonstrated that DNA damage can be transmitted to babies from smoking fathers, and expanded simple tandem repeats minisatellite mutations were found in the germline of fathers who were exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster. In epidemiological studies, it is possible to clarify whether damage is transmitted to the sons after exposure of the fathers. Paternally transmitted damage to the offspring is now recognized as a complex issue with genetic as well as epigenetic components. PMID:24369136

  5. Mediators and Metaphorical Analysis: A Phenomenological Study of Florida Family Court Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storrow, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Florida family court mediation programs have typically been assessed with quantitative analysis. To understand the complexity of the experience of being a family mediator, it was necessary to explore how mediators practiced through qualitative research. Metaphors have been considered to be representations of mediators' mental models regarding…

  6. Regulation of T cell receptor complex-mediated signaling by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Samantha F; Deason-Towne, Francina; Peterson, Lisa K; Berger, Allison J; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications are a dynamic method of regulating protein function in response to environmental signals. As with any cellular process, T cell receptor (TCR) complex-mediated signaling is highly regulated, since the strength and duration of TCR-generated signals governs T cell development and activation. While regulation of TCR complex-mediated signaling by phosphorylation has been well studied, regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers is still an emerging area of investigation. This review will examine how ubiquitin, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and other ubiquitin-like modifications such as SUMO and NEDD8 regulate TCR complex-mediated signaling. PMID:25628960

  7. Regulation of T cell receptor complex-mediated signaling by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications.

    PubMed

    Friend, Samantha F; Deason-Towne, Francina; Peterson, Lisa K; Berger, Allison J; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications are a dynamic method of regulating protein function in response to environmental signals. As with any cellular process, T cell receptor (TCR) complex-mediated signaling is highly regulated, since the strength and duration of TCR-generated signals governs T cell development and activation. While regulation of TCR complex-mediated signaling by phosphorylation has been well studied, regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers is still an emerging area of investigation. This review will examine how ubiquitin, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and other ubiquitin-like modifications such as SUMO and NEDD8 regulate TCR complex-mediated signaling.

  8. Regulation of T cell receptor complex-mediated signaling by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications.

    PubMed

    Friend, Samantha F; Deason-Towne, Francina; Peterson, Lisa K; Berger, Allison J; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications are a dynamic method of regulating protein function in response to environmental signals. As with any cellular process, T cell receptor (TCR) complex-mediated signaling is highly regulated, since the strength and duration of TCR-generated signals governs T cell development and activation. While regulation of TCR complex-mediated signaling by phosphorylation has been well studied, regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers is still an emerging area of investigation. This review will examine how ubiquitin, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and other ubiquitin-like modifications such as SUMO and NEDD8 regulate TCR complex-mediated signaling. PMID:25628960

  9. A new navigational mechanism mediated by ant ocelli.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Sebastian; Wystrach, Antoine; Cheng, Ken

    2011-12-23

    Many animals rely on path integration for navigation and desert ants are the champions. On leaving the nest, ants continuously integrate their distance and direction of travel so that they always know their current distance and direction from the nest and can take a direct path to home. Distance information originates from a step-counter and directional information is based on a celestial compass. So far, it has been assumed that the directional information obtained from ocelli contribute to a single global path integrator, together with directional information from the dorsal rim area (DRA) of the compound eyes and distance information from the step-counter. Here, we show that ocelli mediate a distinct compass from that mediated by the compound eyes. After travelling a two-leg outbound route, untreated foragers headed towards the nest direction, showing that both legs of the route had been integrated. In contrast, foragers with covered compound eyes but uncovered ocelli steered in the direction opposite to the last leg of the outbound route. Our findings suggest that, unlike the DRA, ocelli cannot by themselves mediate path integration. Instead, ocelli mediate a distinct directional system, which buffers the most recent leg of a journey.

  10. Protected area management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagre, Daniel B.; Prato, Tony; Wang, Yeqiao

    2014-01-01

    Designated protected areas are diverse in scope and purpose and have expanded from Yellowstone National Park in the United States, the world’s first national park, to 157,897 parks and protected areas distributed globally. Most are publicly owned and serve multiple needs that reflect regional or national cultures. With ever-increasing threats to the integrity of protected areas, managers are turning to flexible management practices such as scenario planning and adaptive management.

  11. SUGARLOAF ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and a survey of mines, quarries, and prospects the Sugarloaf Roadless Area, California, has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or energy resources. Units of carbonate rock and graphitic schist have demonstrated resources of magnesian marble and graphite. Sand, gravel, and construction stone other than carbonate rock are present in the roadless area, but similar or better quality materials are abundant and more accessible outside the area.

  12. CORNPLANTER ROADLESS AREA, PENNSYLVANIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Welsh, Robert A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The Cornplanter Roadless Area is on the west shore of Allegheny Reservoir, Pennsylvania, in an area containing flat-lying sedimentary rocks of Devonian and Mississippian age. Based on mineral-resource studies, these rocks have a substantiated potential for natural gas and a probable potential for oil in the roadless area. Other identified mineral resources include various rocks suitable for crushed rock, conglomeratic sandstone suitable for high silica uses, and shale suitable for production of clay products.

  13. SAVANNAH ROADLESS AREA, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Savannah Roadless Area in Florida was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. The commodities identified in the area are deposits of sand and gravel; however, they are deeply buried, far from potential markets, and more readily accessible material exists outside the roadless area. The possibility that oil and gas might occur in the Jurassic Smackover Formation or in other formations at depth cannot be ruled out.

  14. Optimizing your reception area.

    PubMed

    Lachter, Jesse; Raldow, Ann; Molin, Niki

    2012-01-01

    Through the optimization of reception areas (waiting rooms), physicians can improve the medical experiences of their patients. A qualitative investigation identified issues relevant to improving the quality of the reception area and was used to develop a thorough questionnaire. Most patients were satisfied with accessibility, reception area conditions, and performance of doctors and nurses. The main reasons for dissatisfaction were due to remediable points. No correlations were found between patient satisfaction and age, sex, or religion. A 36-item checklist for satisfaction with reception areas is offered as a useful tool for health quality self-assessment.

  15. SCODIES ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Capstick, Donald O.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and geochemical studies carried out in the Scodies Roadless Area California indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources within the area. Tungsten has been mined from tactite in pre-Cretaceous roof pendants in the Weldon tungsten district a few miles to the west and in the Indian Wells Canyon district to the northeast. Small outcrops of similar roof pendants occur in the Scodies Roadless Area, but no tungsten resource potential was identified. Three quartz veins occurring within the roadless area may be utilized for decorative stone.

  16. Northwest Area Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuentes, Tracy L.; van Heeswijk, Marijke; Grossman, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    Northwest Area Facts * Population about 12 million * 43 federally recognized Tribes * Hydropower provides about two-thirds of electricity supply * 78 federally listed threatened and endangered species * 12 active or potentially active volcanoes * Columbia River system drains more than 260,000 square miles, an area about the size of Texas * More than 175 square miles covered by glaciers * More than 900 miles of Pacific Ocean coastline * More than 2,300 miles of greater Puget Sound coastline * Some forests store more carbon per unit area than any other area in the world, including the tropics * 51 percent federal lands * Significant lead, zinc, silver, and phosphate deposits

  17. Phoenix Lander Work Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm work area with an overlay. The pink area is available for digging, the green area is reserved for placing the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) instrument. Soil can be dumped in the violet area.

    Images were displayed using NASA Ames 'Viz' visualization software.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. KSC Technology Area 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Tracking, Timing, Communications and Navigation are critical to all NASA missions. Accurate weather prediction is critical to KSC launch activities. KSC is involved with and in several cases leading research and development in many exciting areas and with partners. We welcome new partners in all of these areas!

  19. Cleaning Physical Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses techniques to help create clean and inviting school locker rooms. Daily, weekly or monthly, biannual, and annual cleaning strategies for locker room showers are highlighted as are the specialized maintenance needs for aerobic and dance areas, running tracks, and weight training areas. (GR)

  20. Creative Outdoor Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Considering the creation of proper play areas for children (school sites, municipal and mini parks, private homes and backyards, shopping centers, apartment complexes, recreational areas, roadside parks, nursery schools, churches, summer camps, and drive-in theaters) as one of today's major challenges, the author recommends that professional…

  1. Area Ratios of Quadrilaterals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David R.; Arcidiacono, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Shows that the ratio of the area of the quadrilateral formed by joining the kth points to the area of the original quadrilateral is constant whether it is convex or concave quadrilateral. Presents many geoboard or dot paper diagrams and geometrical expresssions. (YP)

  2. PYRAMID ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey was conducted in the Pyramid Roadless Area, California. The area contains mineral showings, but no mineral-resource potential was identified during our studies. Three granodiorite samples on the west side of the roadless area contained weakly anomalous concentrations of uranium. Two samples of roof-pendant rocks, one metasedimentary rock and one metavolcanic rock, contain low concentrations of copper, and of copper and molybdenum, respectively. Although none was identified, the geologic terrane is permissive for mineral occurrences and large-scale, detailed geologic mapping of the areas of metasedimentary and metavolcanic roof pendants in the Pyramid Roadless Area could define a mineral-resource potential for tungsten and precious metals.

  3. OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Neumann, Terry R.

    1984-01-01

    The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

  4. Hydrological models are mediating models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, L. V.; Karssenberg, D.

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of models in hydrological research and decision-making processes, only few accounts of the nature and function of models exist in hydrology. Earlier considerations have traditionally been conducted while making a clear distinction between physically-based and conceptual models. A new philosophical account, primarily based on the fields of physics and economics, transcends classes of models and scientific disciplines by considering models as "mediators" between theory and observations. The core of this approach lies in identifying models as (1) being only partially dependent on theory and observations, (2) integrating non-deductive elements in their construction, and (3) carrying the role of instruments of scientific enquiry about both theory and the world. The applicability of this approach to hydrology is evaluated in the present article. Three widely used hydrological models, each showing a different degree of apparent physicality, are confronted to the main characteristics of the "mediating models" concept. We argue that irrespective of their kind, hydrological models depend on both theory and observations, rather than merely on one of these two domains. Their construction is additionally involving a large number of miscellaneous, external ingredients, such as past experiences, model objectives, knowledge and preferences of the modeller, as well as hardware and software resources. We show that hydrological models convey the role of instruments in scientific practice by mediating between theory and the world. It results from these considerations that the traditional distinction between physically-based and conceptual models is necessarily too simplistic and refers at best to the stage at which theory and observations are steering model construction. The large variety of ingredients involved in model construction would deserve closer attention, for being rarely explicitly presented in peer-reviewed literature. We believe that devoting

  5. The evolution of inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Andrew F.

    1996-01-01

    Invertebrates do not display the level of sophistication in immune reactivity characteristic of mammals and other ‘higher’ vertebrates. Their great number and diversity of forms, however, reflect their evolutionary success and hence they must have effective mechanisms of defence to deal with parasites and pathogens and altered self tissues. Inflammation appears to be an important first line defence in all invertebrates and vertebrates. This brief review deals with the inflammatory responses of invertebrates and fish concentrating on the cell types involved and the mediators of inflammation, in particular, eicosanoids, cytokines and adhesion molecules. PMID:18475690

  6. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here, we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins, such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature-coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins.

  7. Mediation designs for tobacco prevention research

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Taborga, Marcia P.; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes research designs and statistical analyses to investigate how tobacco prevention programs achieve their effects on tobacco use. A theoretical approach to program development and evaluation useful for any prevention program guides the analysis. The theoretical approach focuses on action theory for how the program affects mediating variables and on conceptual theory for how mediating variables are related to tobacco use. Information on the mediating mechanisms by which tobacco prevention programs achieve effects is useful for the development of efficient programs and provides a test of the theoretical basis of prevention efforts. Examples of these potential mediating mechanisms are described including mediated effects through attitudes, social norms, beliefs about positive consequences, and accessibility to tobacco. Prior research provides evidence that changes in social norms are a critical mediating mechanism for successful tobacco prevention. Analysis of mediating variables in single group designs with multiple mediators are described as well as multiple group randomized designs which are the most likely to accurately uncover important mediating mechanisms. More complicated dismantling and constructive designs are described and illustrated based on current findings from tobacco research. Mediation analysis for categorical outcomes and more complicated statistical methods are outlined. PMID:12324176

  8. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Poss, Zachary C.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module. PMID:24088064

  9. Protected areas and poverty

    PubMed Central

    Brockington, Daniel; Wilkie, David

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are controversial because they are so important for conservation and because they distribute fortune and misfortune unevenly. The nature of that distribution, as well as the terrain of protected areas themselves, have been vigorously contested. In particular, the relationship between protected areas and poverty is a long-running debate in academic and policy circles. We review the origins of this debate and chart its key moments. We then outline the continuing flashpoints and ways in which further evaluation studies could improve the evidence base for policy-making and conservation practice. PMID:26460124

  10. RUBICON ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwood, David S.; Cather, Eric E.

    1984-01-01

    The Rubicon Roadless Area encompasses about 8 sq mi along the lower reaches of the Rubicon River, a major tributary of the Middle Fork of the American River that drains the west slope of the Sierra Nevada in eastern California. Based on mineral-resource surveys the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic or energy resources. A very small demonstrated gold resource occurs at the Pigeon Roost mine. Glacial deposits, which occur in the eastern part of the area, are too bouldery and too small to be of value as construction materials.

  11. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  12. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  13. Detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Ghanei, Hamed; Holyoake, John; Bishop, Russell E; Privé, Gilbert G; Pomès, Régis

    2013-04-01

    Because detergents are commonly used to solvate membrane proteins for structural evaluation, much attention has been devoted to assessing the conformational bias imparted by detergent micelles in comparison to the native environment of the lipid bilayer. Here, we conduct six 500-ns simulations of a system with >600,000 atoms to investigate the spontaneous self assembly of dodecylphosphocholine detergent around multiple molecules of the integral membrane protein PagP. This detergent formed equatorial micelles in which acyl chains surround the protein's hydrophobic belt, confirming existing models of the detergent solvation of membrane proteins. In addition, unexpectedly, the extracellular and periplasmic apical surfaces of PagP interacted with the headgroups of detergents in other micelles 85 and 60% of the time, respectively, forming complexes that were stable for hundreds of nanoseconds. In some cases, an apical surface of one molecule of PagP interacted with an equatorial micelle surrounding another molecule of PagP. In other cases, the apical surfaces of two molecules of PagP simultaneously bound a neat detergent micelle. In these ways, detergents mediated the non-specific aggregation of folded PagP. These simulation results are consistent with dynamic light scattering experiments, which show that, at detergent concentrations ≥600 mM, PagP induces the formation of large scattering species that are likely to contain many copies of the PagP protein. Together, these simulation and experimental results point to a potentially generic mechanism of detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

  14. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance. PMID:23613592

  15. Deuterosome-mediated centriole biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Klos Dehring, Deborah A; Vladar, Eszter K; Werner, Michael E; Mitchell, Jennifer W; Hwang, Peter; Mitchell, Brian J

    2013-10-14

    The ability of cells to faithfully duplicate their two centrioles once per cell cycle is critical for proper mitotic progression and chromosome segregation. Multiciliated cells represent an interesting variation of centriole duplication in that these cells generate greater than 100 centrioles, which form the basal bodies of their motile cilia. This centriole amplification is proposed to require a structure termed the deuterosome, thought to be capable of promoting de novo centriole biogenesis. Here, we begin to molecularly characterize the deuterosome and identify it as a site for the localization of Cep152, Plk4, and SAS6. Additionally we identify CCDC78 as a centriole-associated and deuterosome protein that is essential for centriole amplification. Overexpression of Cep152, but not Plk4, SAS6, or CCDC78, drives overamplification of centrioles. However, in CCDC78 morphants, Cep152 fails to localize to the deuterosome and centriole biogenesis is impaired, indicating that CCDC78-mediated recruitment of Cep152 is required for deuterosome-mediated centriole biogenesis.

  16. Do Quiet Areas Afford Greater Health-Related Quality of Life than Noisy Areas?

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel; Welch, David; Dirks, Kim N.; McBride, David

    2013-01-01

    People typically choose to live in quiet areas in order to safeguard their health and wellbeing. However, the benefits of living in quiet areas are relatively understudied compared to the burdens associated with living in noisy areas. Additionally, research is increasingly focusing on the relationship between the human response to noise and measures of health and wellbeing, complementing traditional dose-response approaches, and further elucidating the impact of noise and health by incorporating human factors as mediators and moderators. To further explore the benefits of living in quiet areas, we compared the results of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaire datasets collected from households in localities differentiated by their soundscapes and population density: noisy city, quiet city, quiet rural, and noisy rural. The dose-response relationships between noise annoyance and HRQOL measures indicated an inverse relationship between the two. Additionally, quiet areas were found to have higher mean HRQOL domain scores than noisy areas. This research further supports the protection of quiet locales and ongoing noise abatement in noisy areas. PMID:23535280

  17. Neural networks mediating sentence reading in the deaf

    PubMed Central

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A.; Dye, Matthew W. G.; Hauser, Peter C.; Supalla, Ted R.; Bavelier, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    The present work addresses the neural bases of sentence reading in deaf populations. To better understand the relative role of deafness and spoken language knowledge in shaping the neural networks that mediate sentence reading, three populations with different degrees of English knowledge and depth of hearing loss were included—deaf signers, oral deaf and hearing individuals. The three groups were matched for reading comprehension and scanned while reading sentences. A similar neural network of left perisylvian areas was observed, supporting the view of a shared network of areas for reading despite differences in hearing and English knowledge. However, differences were observed, in particular in the auditory cortex, with deaf signers and oral deaf showing greatest bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) recruitment as compared to hearing individuals. Importantly, within deaf individuals, the same STG area in the left hemisphere showed greater recruitment as hearing loss increased. To further understand the functional role of such auditory cortex re-organization after deafness, connectivity analyses were performed from the STG regions identified above. Connectivity from the left STG toward areas typically associated with semantic processing (BA45 and thalami) was greater in deaf signers and in oral deaf as compared to hearing. In contrast, connectivity from left STG toward areas identified with speech-based processing was greater in hearing and in oral deaf as compared to deaf signers. These results support the growing literature indicating recruitment of auditory areas after congenital deafness for visually-mediated language functions, and establish that both auditory deprivation and language experience shape its functional reorganization. Implications for differential reliance on semantic vs. phonological pathways during reading in the three groups is discussed. PMID:24959127

  18. Hemichannel-mediated release of lactate

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Anastassios; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Hadjihambi, Anna; Hosford, Patrick S; Kasparov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    In the central nervous system lactate contributes to the extracellular pool of readily available energy substrates and may also function as a signaling molecule which mediates communication between glial cells and neurons. Monocarboxylate transporters are believed to provide the main pathway for lactate transport across the membranes. Here we tested the hypothesis that lactate could also be released via opening of pannexin and/or functional connexin hemichannels. In acute slices prepared from the brainstem, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cortex of adult rats, enzymatic amperometric biosensors detected significant tonic lactate release inhibited by compounds, which block pannexin/connexin hemichannels and facilitated by lowering extracellular [Ca2+] or increased PCO2. Enhanced lactate release triggered by hypoxia was reduced by ∼50% by either connexin or monocarboxylate transporter blockers. Stimulation of Schaffer collateral fibers triggered lactate release in CA1 area of the hippocampus, which was facilitated in conditions of low extracellular [Ca2+], markedly reduced by blockade of connexin hemichannels and abolished by lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor oxamate. These results indicate that lactate transport across the membranes may occur via mechanisms other than monocarboxylate transporters. In the central nervous system, hemichannels may function as a conduit of lactate release, and this mechanism is recruited during hypoxia and periods of enhanced neuronal activity. PMID:26661210

  19. MicroRNA-mediated somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-02-01

    Since the first report of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), much focus has been placed on iPSCs due to their great therapeutic potential for diseases such as abnormal development, degenerative disorders, and even cancers. Subsequently, Takahashi and Yamanaka took a novel approach by using four defined transcription factors to generate iPSCs in mice and human fibroblast cells. Scientists have since been trying to refine or develop better approaches to reprogramming, either by using different combinations of transcription factors or delivery methods. However, recent reports showed that the microRNA expression pattern plays a crucial role in somatic cell reprogramming and ectopic introduction of embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs revert cells back to an ESC-like state, although, the exact mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. This review describes recent work that has focused on microRNA-mediated approaches to somatic cell reprogramming as well as some of the pros and cons to these approaches and a possible mechanism of action. Based on the pivotal role of microRNAs in embryogenesis and somatic cell reprogramming, studies in this area must continue in order to gain a better understanding of the role of microRNAs in stem cells regulation and activity. PMID:22961769

  20. 'Reverse gear' cellular movement mediated by chemokines.

    PubMed

    Zlatopolskiy, A; Laurence, J

    2001-08-01

    We sought to model the mechanism by which leucocytes may be actively repulsed by a beta-chemokine signal. This model is used to interpret an apparent paradox in chemokine biology, whereby high levels of a T-cell chemoattractant, stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), are present in bone marrow and thymic tissues despite a paucity of mature T lymphocytes in these areas. We postulate the differential involvement in cell migration of the two binding sites on SDF-1 for its sole receptor, CXCR4, depending on whether high or low concentrations of SDF-1 are encountered by the cell. Site choice would be mediated by divergent affinities of the two binding interactions. We also propose differential signalling following SDF-1/CXCR4 interactions on the plasma membrane versus ligand/receptor complexes in endocytic vesicles. Preliminary data showing divergent susceptibility to kinase inhibitors depending on whether a cell is attracted to or repulsed by SDF-1, are consistent with this model. In terms of physical movement toward or away from a chemokine gradient, we compare the cycling of surface receptors during migration to the caterpillar drive of a tractor, which can change direction simply by altering the direction of rotation of its threads. Finally, the potential clinical implications of concentration-dependent, chemokine-based cell attraction and repulsion are discussed. PMID:11488980

  1. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  2. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  3. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black

  4. The future of intercultural mediation in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Nierkens, Vera; Krumeich, Anja; de Ridder, Ri; van Dongen, Martien

    2002-04-01

    Intercultural mediation was developed to solve problems between western (Belgian) health professionals and Turkish, Moroccan and Italian clients. The need for intercultural mediation in Belgium Health Care was measured by asking intercultural mediators to complete a questionnaire about situations in which language, culture, social-economic and personal circumstances cause difficulties. Results show that the profession 'intercultural mediator' continues to be important in improving the quality and accessibility of the Belgian health care for ethnic minorities. Even if clients speak Flemish fluently, there are still difficulties between health professional and client caused by culture, social-economic and personal circumstances. PMID:11932124

  5. 34 CFR 303.419 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards Mediation and Due Process Procedures for Parents and Children §...

  6. Inferior Prefrontal Cortex Mediates the Relationship between Phosphatidylcholine and Executive Functions in Healthy, Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zamroziewicz, Marta K.; Zwilling, Chris E.; Barbey, Aron K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the neural mechanisms that mediate the relationship between phosphatidylcholine and executive functions in cognitively intact older adults. We hypothesized that higher plasma levels of phosphatidylcholine are associated with better performance on a particular component of the executive functions, namely cognitive flexibility, and that this relationship is mediated by gray matter structure of regions within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that have been implicated in cognitive flexibility. Methods: We examined 72 cognitively intact adults between the ages of 65 and 75 in an observational, cross-sectional study to investigate the relationship between blood biomarkers of phosphatidylcholine, tests of cognitive flexibility (measured by the Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System Trail Making Test), and gray matter structure of regions within the PFC. A three-step mediation analysis was implemented using multivariate linear regressions and we controlled for age, sex, education, income, depression status, and body mass index. Results: The mediation analysis revealed that gray matter thickness of one region within the PFC, the left inferior PFC (Brodmann’s Area 45), mediates the relationship between phosphatidylcholine blood biomarkers and cognitive flexibility. Conclusion: These results suggest that particular nutrients may slow or prevent age-related cognitive decline by influencing specific structures within the brain. This report demonstrates a novel structural mediation between plasma phosphatidylcholine levels and cognitive flexibility. Future work should examine the potential mechanisms underlying this mediation, including phosphatidylcholine-dependent cell membrane integrity of the inferior PFC and phosphatidylcholine-dependent cholinergic projections to the inferior PFC. PMID:27733825

  7. 5 CFR 591.205 - Which areas are nonforeign areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Which areas are nonforeign areas? 591.205... ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances and Post Differentials § 591.205 Which areas are nonforeign areas? (a) The nonforeign areas...

  8. 5 CFR 591.205 - Which areas are nonforeign areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Which areas are nonforeign areas? 591.205... ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances and Post Differentials § 591.205 Which areas are nonforeign areas? (a) The nonforeign areas...

  9. 5 CFR 591.207 - Which areas are COLA areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Which areas are COLA areas? 591.207... ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.207 Which areas are COLA areas? OPM has established the following COLA areas: (a) City...

  10. 5 CFR 591.205 - Which areas are nonforeign areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Which areas are nonforeign areas? 591.205... ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances and Post Differentials § 591.205 Which areas are nonforeign areas? (a) The nonforeign areas...

  11. 5 CFR 591.207 - Which areas are COLA areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Which areas are COLA areas? 591.207... ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.207 Which areas are COLA areas? OPM has established the following COLA areas: (a) City...

  12. 5 CFR 591.207 - Which areas are COLA areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Which areas are COLA areas? 591.207... ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.207 Which areas are COLA areas? OPM has established the following COLA areas: (a) City...

  13. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2000-03-15

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area.

  14. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine tumors, there is now increasing interest in pursuing a similar approach with Bn receptors. In the last few years then have been more than 200 studies in this area. In the present paper, the in vitro and in vivo results, as well as results of human studies from many of these studies are reviewed and the current state of Bn receptor-mediated imaging or cytotoxicity is discussed. Both Bn receptor-mediated imaging studies as well as Bn receptor-mediated tumoral cytotoxic studies using radioactive and non-radioactive Bn-based ligands are covered. PMID:21034419

  15. Protein-mediated enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-06-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principels of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties and the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth.

  16. Lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the impact of the tau and bottom Yukawa couplings on the transport dynamics for electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. Although it has generally been assumed in the literature that all Yukawa interactions except those involving the top quark are negligible, we find that the tau and bottom Yukawa interaction rates are too fast to be neglected. We identify an illustrative 'lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis' scenario in which the baryon asymmetry is induced mainly through the presence of a left-handed leptonic charge. We derive analytic formulas for the computation of the baryon asymmetry that, in light of these effects, are qualitatively different from those in the established literature. In this scenario, for fixed CP-violating phases, the baryon asymmetry has opposite sign compared to that calculated using established formulas.

  17. Protooncogenes as mediators of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Teng, C S

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis has been well established as a vital biological phenomenon that is important in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Three major protooncogene families and their encoded proteins function as mediators of apoptosis in various cell types and are the subject of this chapter. Protooncogenic proteins such as c-Myc/Max, c-Fos/c-Jun, and Bcl-2/Bax utilize a synergetic effect to enhance their roles in the pro- or antiapoptotic action. These family members activate and repress the expression of their target genes, control cell cycle progression, and execute programmed cell death. Repression or overproduction of these protooncogenic proteins induces apoptosis, which may vary as a result of either cell type specificity or the nature of the apoptotic stimuli. The proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins exert their effects in the membrane of cellular organelles. Here they generate cell-type-specific signals that activate the caspase family of proteases and their regulators for the execution of apoptosis.

  18. Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sha; Leach, John C.; Ye, Kaiming

    Nonviral gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. Although the efficacy of DNA transfection, which is a major concern, is low in nonviral vector-mediated gene transfer compared with viral ones, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to prepare, less immunogenic and oncogenic, and have no potential of virus recombination and no limitation on the size of a transferred gene. The ability to incorporate genetic materials such as plasmid DNA, RNA, and siRNA into functionalized nanoparticles with little toxicity demonstrates a new era in pharmacotherapy for delivering genes selectively to tissues and cells. In this chapter, we highlight the basic concepts and applications of nonviral gene delivery using super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized silica nanoparticles. The experimental protocols related to these topics are described in the chapter.

  19. Mediated electrochemical hazardous waste destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, R.G.; Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.

    1991-08-01

    There are few permitted processes for mixed waste (radioactive plus chemically hazardous) treatment. We are developing electrochemical processes that convert the toxic organic components of mixed waste to water, carbon dioxide, an innocuous anions such as chloride. Aggressive oxidizer ions such as Ag{sup 2+} or Ce{sup +4} are produced at an anode. These can attack the organic molecules directly. They can also attack water which yields hydroxyl free radicals that in turn attack the organic molecules. The condensed (i.e., solid and/or liquid) effluent streams contain the inorganic radionuclide forms. These may be treated with existing technology and prepared for final disposal. Kinetics and the extent of destruction of some toxic organics have been measured. Depending on how the process is operated, coulombic efficiency can be nearly 100%. In addition, hazardous organic materials are becoming very expensive to dispose of and when they are combined with transuranic radioactive elements no processes are presently permitted. Mediated electrochemical oxidation is an ambient-temperature aqueous-phase process that can be used to oxidize organic components of mixed wastes. Problems associated with incineration, such as high-temperature volatilization of radionuclides, are avoided. Historically, Ag (2) has been used as a mediator in this process. Fe(6) and Co(3) are attractive alternatives to Ag(2) since they form soluble chlorides during the destruction of chlorinated solvents. Furthermore, silver itself is a toxic heavy metal. Quantitative data has been obtained for the complete oxidation of ethylene glycol by Fe(6) and Co(3). Though ethylene glycol is a nonhalogenated organic, this data has enabled us to make direct comparisons of activities of Fe(6) and Co(3) with Ag(2). Very good quantitative data for the oxidation of ethylene glycol by Ag(2) had already been collected. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Detergent-mediated protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Chris; Ghanei, Hamed; Holyoake, John; Bishop, Russell E.; Privé, Gilbert G.; Pomès, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Because detergents are commonly used to solvate membrane proteins for structural evaluation, much attention has been devoted to assessing the conformational bias imparted by detergent micelles in comparison to the native environment of the lipid bilayer. Here, we conduct six 500-ns simulations of a system with >600,000 atoms to investigate the spontaneous self assembly of dodecylphosphocholine detergent around multiple molecules of the integral membrane protein PagP. This detergent formed equatorial micelles in which acyl chains surround the protein’s hydrophobic belt, confirming existing models of the detergent solvation of membrane proteins. In addition, unexpectedly, the extracellular and periplasmic apical surfaces of PagP interacted with the headgroups of detergents in other micelles 85 and 60% of the time, respectively, forming complexes that were stable for hundreds of nanoseconds. In some cases, an apical surface of one molecule of PagP interacted with an equatorial micelle surrounding another molecule of PagP. In other cases, the apical surfaces of two molecules of PagP simultaneously bound a neat detergent micelle. In these ways, detergents mediated the non-specific aggregation of folded PagP. These simulation results are consistent with dynamic light scattering experiments, which show that, at detergent concentrations ≥600 mM, PagP induces the formation of large scattering species that are likely to contain many copies of the PagP protein. Together, these simulation and experimental results point to a potentially generic mechanism of detergent-mediated protein aggregation. PMID:23466535

  1. RNA mediated assembly of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, Jessica Lynn

    The first chapter of this work presents a comprehensive look at RNA mediated nanoparticle formation. The overall goal of this research is to gain a deeper understanding of the RNA-particle formation mechanism and the basic properties of the materials selected by modified RNA molecules. Understanding such RNA-substrate interactions and how they translate into the physical and chemical characteristics of the nanoparticles they create are important fundamental concepts when considering these biotemplated materials as potential chemical catalysts. The RNA sequences discussed in the first chapter (referred to as Pdases) were discovered using RNA in vitro selection techniques. These Pdases were found to be capable of forming inorganic palladium (Pd) containing nanoparticles with impressive control over an individual particle's size and shape, despite incubation with the same organometallic precursor. This discovery held exciting implications for inorganic nanoparticle design while also generating numerous questions regarding the mechanism of RNA mediated particle growth. The central question that arose after this initial discovery was how could a biomolecule be used to tailor the physical size and shape of inorganic materials? Starting with a chemical proof designed to uncover the composition of the nanoparticles formed by RNA mediation, this chapter investigates the basic material properties of the nanoparticles while also introducing surprising results regarding the effect of multiple sequences on nanoparticle growth outcomes. In the second chapter, the experiments shift to developing methods to investigate nanoparticle growth mechanisms by fluorescence spectroscopy. A fluorescence polarization anisotropy (FPA) assay is presented in which the strengths of the technique are adapted for studying the formation of RNA mediated Pd nanoparticles in real time. This is a unique application of FPA, as it has been adapted to encompass both the biochemical and materials analysis

  2. Microbiome as mediator: Do systemic infections start in the gut?

    PubMed

    Latorre, Melissa; Krishnareddy, Suneeta; Freedberg, Daniel E

    2015-10-01

    The intestinal microbiome is emerging as a crucial mediator between external insults and systemic infections. New research suggests that our intestinal microorganisms contribute to critical illness and the development of non-gastrointestinal infectious diseases. Common pathways include a loss of fecal intestinal bacterial diversity and a disproportionate increase in toxogenic bacterial species. Therapeutic interventions targeting the microbiome - primarily probiotics - have yielded limited results to date. However, knowledge in this area is rapidly expanding and microbiome-based therapy such as short-chain fatty acids may eventually become a standard strategy for preventing systemic infections in the context of critical illness.

  3. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a complement-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    DeZern, Amy E; Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is manifests with a chronic hemolytic anemia from uncontrolled complement activation, a propensity for thrombosis and marrow failure. The hemolysis is largely mediated by the alternative pathway of complement. Clinical manifestations result from the lack of specific cell surface proteins, CD55 and CD59, on PNH cells. Complement inhibition by eculizumab leads to dramatic clinical improvement. While this therapeutic approach is effective, there is residual complement activity resulting from specific clinical scenarios as well as from upstream complement components that can account for suboptimal responses in some patients. Complement inhibition strategies are an area of active research.

  4. Grief Resolution of Birthmothers in Confidential, Time-Limited Mediated, Ongoing Mediated, and Fully Disclosed Adoptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Cinda L.; McRoy, Ruth G.; Grotevant, Harold D.; Bryant, Chalandra M.

    1997-01-01

    Examined grief resolution issues for birthmothers who placed infants for adoption. Found that birthmothers in fully disclosed adoptions had better resolution than with confidential and time-limited mediated adoptions, and those in ongoing mediated had better resolution than with time-limited mediated adoptions. Findings pose implications for…

  5. Tests of Mediation: Paradoxical Decline in Statistical Power as a Function of Mediator Collinearity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, T. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the correlation between the independent variable and the mediator ("a" coefficient) increases the effect size ("ab") for mediation analysis; however, increasing a by definition increases collinearity in mediation models. As a result, the standard error of product tests increase. The variance inflation caused by…

  6. Forms of Mediation: The Case of Interpreter-Mediated Interactions in Medical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baraldi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the forms of mediation in interlinguistic interactions performed in Italian healthcare services and in contexts of migration. The literature encourages dialogic transformative mediation, empowering participants' voices and changing cultural presuppositions in social systems. It may be doubtful, however, whether mediation can…

  7. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications.

  8. Motion-induced magnetic resonance of Rb atoms in a periodic magnetostatic field.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, A; Enomoto, Y; Komaki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate that transitions between Zeeman-split sublevels of Rb atoms are resonantly induced by the motion of the atoms (velocity: approximately 100 m/s) in a periodic magnetostatic field (period: 1 mm) when the Zeeman splitting corresponds to the frequency of the magnetic field experienced by the moving atoms. A circularly polarized laser beam polarizes Rb atoms with a velocity selected using the Doppler effect and detects their magnetic resonance in a thin cell, to which the periodic field is applied with the arrays of parallel current-carrying wires.

  9. Soliton-like magnetic domain wall motion induced by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Yoko; Kim, Kab-Jin; Taniguchi, Takuya; Tono, Takayuki; Ueda, Kohei; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Moriyama, Takahiro; Yamada, Keisuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Ono, Teruo

    2016-02-01

    Topological defects such as magnetic solitons, vortices and skyrmions have started to play an important role in modern magnetism because of their extraordinary stability, which can be exploited in the production of memory devices. Recently, a type of antisymmetric exchange interaction, namely the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI; refs ,), has been uncovered and found to influence the formation of topological defects. Exploring how the DMI affects the dynamics of topological defects is therefore an important task. Here we investigate the dynamics of the magnetic domain wall (DW) under a DMI by developing a real time DW detection scheme. For a weak DMI, the DW velocity increases with the external field and reaches a peak velocity at a threshold field, beyond which it abruptly decreases. For a strong DMI, on the other hand, the velocity reduction is completely suppressed and the peak velocity is maintained constant even far above the threshold field. Such a distinct trend of the velocity can be explained in terms of a magnetic soliton, the topology of which is protected during its motion. Our results therefore shed light on the physics of dynamic topological defects, which paves the way for future work in topology-based memory applications.

  10. Soliton-like magnetic domain wall motion induced by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Teruo

    Topological defects such as magnetic solitons, vortices, Bloch lines, and skyrmions start to play an important role in modern magnetism due to their extraordinary stability which can be hailed as future memory devices. Recently, novel type of antisymmetric exchange interaction, namely the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), has been uncovered and found to influence on the formation of topological defects. Exploring how the DMI affects the dynamics of topological defects is therefore an important task. Here we investigate the dynamics of the magnetic domain wall (DW) under a DMI by developing a time-of-flight measurement scheme which allows us to measure the DW velocity for magnetic fields up to 0.3T. For a weak DMI, the trend of DW velocity follows the Walker's model which predicts that the velocity of DW increases with field up to a threshold (Walker field) and decreases abruptly. On the other hand, for a strong DMI, velocity breakdown is completely suppressed and the DW keeps its maximum velocity even far above the Walker field. Such a distinct trend of the DW velocity, which has never been predicted, can be explained in terms of magnetic soliton, of which topology can be protected by the DMI. Importantly, such a soliton-like DW motion is only observed in two dimensional systems, implying that the vertical Bloch lines (VBLs) creating inside of the magnetic domain-wall play a crucial role. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 15H05702, 26870300, 26870304, 26103002, 25.4251, Collaborative Research Program of the Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, and R & D Project for ICT Key Technology of MEXT from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

  11. One-degree-of-freedom motion induced by modeled vortex shedding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, L. A.; Unal, A.; Szady, M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1989-01-01

    The motion of an elastically supported cylinder forced by a nonlinear, quasi-static, aerodynamic model with the unusual feature of a motion-dependent forcing frequency was studied. Numerical solutions for the motion and the Lyapunov exponents are presented for three forcing amplitudes and two frequencies (1.0 and 1.1 times the Strouhal frequency). Initially, positive Lyapunov exponents occur and the motion can appear chaotic. After thousands of characteristic times, the motion changes to a motion (verified analytically) that is periodic and damped. This periodic, damped motion was not observed experimentally, thus raising questions concerning the modeling.

  12. DNA motion induced by electrokinetic flow near an Au coated nanopore surface as voltage controlled gate.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Kato, Yuta; Ishida, Kentaro; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-13

    We used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the diffusion and drift motion of λ DNA molecules on an Au-coated membrane surface near nanopores, prior to their translocation through solid-state nanopores. With the capability of controlling electric potential at the Au surface as a gate voltage, Vgate, the motions of DNA molecules, which are presumably generated by electrokinetic flow, vary dramatically near the nanopores in our observations. We carefully investigate these DNA motions with different values of Vgate in order to alter the densities and polarities of the counterions, which are expected to change the flow speed or direction, respectively. Depending on Vgate, our observations have revealed the critical distance from a nanopore for DNA molecules to be attracted or repelled-DNA's anisotropic and unsteady drifting motions and accumulations of DNA molecules near the nanopore entrance. Further finite element method (FEM) numerical simulations indicate that the electrokinetic flow could qualitatively explain these unusual DNA motions near metal-collated gated nanopores. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of controlling the speed and direction of DNA motion near or through a nanopore, as in the case of recapturing a single DNA molecule multiple times with alternating current voltages on the Vgate. PMID:25611963

  13. Enhanced perceptions of control and predictability reduce motion-induced nausea and gastric dysrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Max E; Stern, Robert M; Koch, Kenneth L

    2014-08-01

    Nausea is a debilitating condition that is typically accompanied by gastric dysrhythmia. The enhancement of perceived control and predictability has generally been found to attenuate the physiological stress response. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of these psychosocial variables in the context of nausea, motion sickness, and gastric dysrhythmia. A 2x2, independent-groups, factorial design was employed in which perceived control and predictability were each provided at high or low levels to 80 participants before exposure to a rotating optokinetic drum. Ratings of nausea were obtained throughout a 6-min baseline period and a 16-min drum rotation period. Noninvasive recordings of the electrical activity of the stomach called electrogastrograms were also obtained throughout the study. Nausea scores were significantly lower among participants with high control than among those with low control, and were significantly lower among participants with high predictability than among those with low predictability. Estimates of gastric dysrhythmia obtained from the EGG during drum rotation were significantly lower among participants with high predictability than among those with low predictability. A significant interaction effect of control and predictability on gastric dysrhythmia was also observed, such that high control was only effective for arresting the development of gastric dysrhythmia when high predictability was also available. Stronger perceptions of control and predictability may temper the development of nausea and gastric dysrhythmia during exposure to provocative motion. Psychosocial interventions in a variety of nausea contexts may represent an alternative means of symptom control. PMID:24748483

  14. Drop motion induced by repeated stretching and relaxation on a gradient surface with hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Longley, Jonathan E; Dooley, Erin; Givler, Douglas M; Napier, William J; Chaudhury, Manoj K; Daniel, Susan

    2012-10-01

    The motion of a droplet can be induced by periodically compressing and extending it between two similar gradient surfaces possessing significant wetting hysteresis. The shape fluctuation of the drop during repeated compression-extension cycles leads to its ratchetlike motion toward the region of higher wettability. A simple model requiring the volume preservation of the drop during the compression-extension cycles is sufficient to account for the effect and predict drop velocity across the surface when drop size and cycle frequency are specified. In connection with this study, we also report a variation of the standard vapor phase adsorption method of preparing a chemically graded surface that allows for good control over the steepness and the length of the active zone. The method can be used to produce a linear or a radial gradient, both of which are employed here to drive droplet motion along these patterns. This type of discrete droplet motion can be used to move drops on surfaces to transport materials within miniaturized digital fluidic devices. PMID:22950893

  15. Enhanced perceptions of control and predictability reduce motion-induced nausea and gastric dysrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Max E; Stern, Robert M; Koch, Kenneth L

    2014-08-01

    Nausea is a debilitating condition that is typically accompanied by gastric dysrhythmia. The enhancement of perceived control and predictability has generally been found to attenuate the physiological stress response. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of these psychosocial variables in the context of nausea, motion sickness, and gastric dysrhythmia. A 2x2, independent-groups, factorial design was employed in which perceived control and predictability were each provided at high or low levels to 80 participants before exposure to a rotating optokinetic drum. Ratings of nausea were obtained throughout a 6-min baseline period and a 16-min drum rotation period. Noninvasive recordings of the electrical activity of the stomach called electrogastrograms were also obtained throughout the study. Nausea scores were significantly lower among participants with high control than among those with low control, and were significantly lower among participants with high predictability than among those with low predictability. Estimates of gastric dysrhythmia obtained from the EGG during drum rotation were significantly lower among participants with high predictability than among those with low predictability. A significant interaction effect of control and predictability on gastric dysrhythmia was also observed, such that high control was only effective for arresting the development of gastric dysrhythmia when high predictability was also available. Stronger perceptions of control and predictability may temper the development of nausea and gastric dysrhythmia during exposure to provocative motion. Psychosocial interventions in a variety of nausea contexts may represent an alternative means of symptom control.

  16. On the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices: Vortex motions induced by wall roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip; Seddougui, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The receptivity problem for Goertler vortices induced by wall roughness is investigated. The roughness is modelled by small amplitude perturbations to the curved wall over which the flow takes place. The amplitude of these perturbations is taken to be sufficiently small for the induced Goertler vortices to be described by linear theory. The roughness is assumed to vary in the spanwise direction on the boundary layer lengthscale, while in the flow direction the corresponding variation is on the lengthscale over which the wall curvature varies. In fact the latter condition can be relaxed to allow for a faster streamwise roughness variation so long as the variation does not become as fast as that in the spanwise direction. The function which describes the roughness is assumed to be such that its spanwise and streamwise dependences can be separated; this enables progress by taking Fourier or Laplace transforms where appropriate. The cases of isolated and distributed roughness elements are investigated and the coupling coefficient which relates the amplitude of the forcing and the induced vortex amplitude is found asymptotically in the small wavelength limit. It is shown that this coefficient is exponentially small in the latter limit so that it is unlikely that this mode can be stimulated directly by wall roughness. The situation at 0(1) wavelengths is quite different and this is investigated numerically for different forcing functions. It is found that an isolated roughness element induces a vortex field which grows within a wedge at a finite distance downstream of the element. However, immediately downstream of the obstacle the disturbed flow produced by the element decays in amplitude. The receptivity problem at larger Goertler numbers appropriate to relatively large wall curvature is discussed in detail.

  17. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications. PMID:24856718

  18. DNA Motion Induced by Electrokinetic Flow near an Au Coated Nanopore Surface as Voltage Controlled Gate

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Kato, Yuta; Ishida, Kentaro; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion and drift motion of λ DNA molecules on Au coated membrane surface near nanopores prior to their translocation through solid-state nanopores are investigated using fluorescence microscopy. With the capability of controlling electric potential at the Au surface as a gate voltage, Vgate, the motions of DNA molecules vary dramatically near the nanopores in our observations, presumably generated by electrokinetic flow. We carefully investigate theses DNA motions with different values of Vgate in order to alter the densities and polarities of counterions; which are expected to change the flow speed or direction, respectively. Depending on Vgate, our observations have revealed the critical distance from a nanopore for DNA molecules to be attracted or to be repelled, DNA’s anisotropic and unsteady drifting motions and accumulations of DNA molecules near the nanopore entrance. Further finite element method (FEM) numerical simulations indicate that the electrokinetic flow could explain these unusual DNA motions near metal collated gated nanopores qualitatively. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility to control the speed and direction of DNA motion near or through a nanopore, for example, recapturing a single DNA molecule multiple times with AC voltages on the Vgate. PMID:25611963

  19. The motion induced between a rotating plate and a radially stretching or shrinking plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick D.; Perocco, Enrico L. M.

    2016-02-01

    The flow induced between parallel plates separated by a distance h executing different types of in-plane motion is investigated. The upper plate radially stretches at strain rate a and the lower plate rotates at angular velocity Ω about a common axis. A similarity solution form reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a coupled pair of ordinary differential equations in two parameters: R = |a| h2/ν and σ = Ω/|a|, where ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. Solutions are obtained for both stretching and shrinking upper plates and numerical results for pressure gradient and wall shear stress parameters are found and compared with low-R series solutions and large-R asymptotic behaviors. Sample radial and azimuthal velocity profiles reveal regions of zero radial and azimuthal wall shear stress which are studied in detail. This work represents the first study of the flow induced between parallel plates for which each plate executes a different type of in-plane motion.

  20. Electron motion induced by magnetic pulse in a bilayer quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider theoretical stimulation of electron motion in a quantum wire by means of ultrashort magnetic pulses of time duration between several and a few tens of picoseconds. In our considerations, an electron is confined in a nanowire which consists of two vertically stacked tunnel-coupled layers. If a magnetic pulse pierces this nanowire and its direction is parallel to the plane established by the layers, and additionally, it is perpendicular to the wire's axis, then the eigenstates of a single electron energy operator for vertical direction are hybridized by the off-diagonal terms of the full Hamiltonian. These terms depend linearly on the momentum operator, which means that such magnetically forced hybridization may induce electron motion in a nanowire. The classical counterpart of this quantum-mechanical picture is a situation in which the rotational electric field generated by a time-varying magnetic field pushes the charge densities localized in the upper and lower layers in opposite directions. We have found, however, that for an asymmetric vertical confinement in a bilayer nanowire, the major part of the single electron density starts to move in the direction of the local electric field in its layer forcing the minority part to move in this direction as well. It results in coherent motion of both densities in a particular direction. We analyze the dynamics of such motion in dependence on the time characteristics of a magnetic pulse and discuss potential applications of this effect in the construction of a magnetic valve.

  1. Cytoplasmic motion induced by cytoskeleton stretching and its effect on cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T

    2011-09-01

    Cytoplasmic motion assumed as a steady state laminar flow induced by cytoskeleton stretching in a cell is determined and its effect on the mechanical behavior of the cell under externally applied forces is demonstrated. Non-Newtonian fluid is assumed for the multiphase cytoplasmic fluid and the analytical velocity field around the macromolecular chain is obtained by solving the reduced nonlinear momentum equation using homotopy technique. The entropy generation by the fluid internal friction is calculated and incorporated into the entropic elasticity based 8-chain constitutive relations. Numerical examples showed strengthening behavior of cells in response to externally applied mechanical stimuli. The spatial distribution of the stresses within a cell under externally applied fluid flow forces were also studied. PMID:21977515

  2. Time evolution of domain-wall motion induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Logunov, M. V.; Spirin, A. V.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.; Tokman, I. D.

    2016-07-01

    The time evolution of the magnetization normal component change in a garnet film with a labyrinthine domain structure under the action of circularly and linearly polarized laser pump pulses (the pulse duration is 5 ns; the wavelength is 527 nm) has been studied. The dynamic state of the magnetic film was registered using an induction method with a time resolution of 1 ns. It was found that for the initial state of the magnetic film with an equilibrium domain structure, the form of the photomagnetization pulse reflects the time evolution of a domain-wall motion. The domain-wall motion initiated by the circularly polarized laser pump pulse continues in the same direction for a time more than an order of magnitude exceeding the laser pulse duration. In general, the time evolution of the domain-wall movement occurs in three stages. The separation of the contributions to the photomagnetization from the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects was carried out. The photomagnetization pulses that reflect the contributions by the aforementioned effects differ by form, and more than two orders of magnitude by duration. Their form doesn't change under a magnetic bias field change, only the photomagnetization pulse amplitude does: for the polarization-dependent contribution, it's an even function of the field, and for the polarization-independent contribution, it's an odd function. The interconnection between the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects, on the one hand, and the domain-wall displacement and the change of the film's saturation magnetization, on the other hand, was identified and described.

  3. SELKIRK ROADLESS AREA, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Fred K.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of mineral-resource surveys the Selkirk Roadless Area, Idaho has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Molybdenum, lead, uranium, thorium, chromium, tungsten, zirconium, and several rare-earth elements have been detected in panned concentrates from samples of stream sediment, but no minerals containing the first five elements were found in place, nor were any conditions conducive to their concentration found. Zirconium, thorium, and the rare earths occur in sparsely disseminated accessory minerals in granitic rocks and no resource potential is identified. There is no history of mining in the roadless area and there are no oil, gas, mineral, or geothermal leases or current claims.

  4. OLED area illumination source

    DOEpatents

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Nealon, William Francis; Bortscheller, Jacob Charles

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  5. Explosively activated egress area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bailey, J. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A lightweight, add on structure which employs linear shaped pyrotechnic charges to smoothly cut an airframe along an egress area periphery is provided. It compromises reaction surfaces attached to the exterior surface of the airframe's skin and is designed to restrict the skin deflection. That portion of the airframe within the egress area periphery is jettisoned. Retention surfaces and sealing walls are attached to the interior surface of the airframe's skin and are designed to shield the interior of the aircraft during detonation of the pyrotechnic charges.

  6. Requirement of TGFβ Signaling for SMO-mediated Carcinogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qipeng; He, Miao; Sheng, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Zhao, Xingbo; Xie, Jingwu

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, via the key signal transducer Smoothened (SMO) and Gli transcription factors, is essential for embryonic development and carcinogenesis. At present, the molecular mechanism of Hh signaling-mediated carcinogenesis is not completely understood. Using a mouse model (K14cre/R26SmoM2) of SMO-mediated basal cell carcinoma development, we identified TGFβ2 as a major Hh-regulated gene. TGFβ2 expression was high in the keratinocytes, with activated TGFβ signaling (indicated by elevated expression of phosphorylated SMAD2/3) detected in both tumor and stroma. The significance of TGFβ signaling for SMO function was demonstrated in two assays. Down-regulation of TGFβ2 expression prevented Hh signaling-dependent osteoblast differentiation and motor neuron differentiation. Furthermore, inhibition of TGFβ signaling by TGFβ receptor I inhibitor SD208 significantly reduced tumor area in K14cre/R26SmoM2 mice. Tumor shrinkage in mice was associated with an increased number of lymphocytes, suggesting an immune suppression role of TGFβ signaling. The relevance of our results to human cancer is reflected by the fact that human basal cell carcinomas, which almost always harbor activated Hh signaling, have activated TGFβ signaling, as indicated by high levels of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD3 in tumor and stroma. Together, our data indicate that TGFβ signaling is critical for Hh signaling-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:20858897

  7. Pure P2P mediation system: A mappings discovery approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    selma, El yahyaoui El idrissi; Zellou, Ahmed; Idri, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The information integration systems consist in offering a uniform interface to provide access to a set of autonomous and distributed information sources. The most important advantage of this system is that it allows users to specify what they want, rather than thinking about how to get the responses. The works realized in this area have particular leads to two major classes of integration systems: the mediation systems based on the paradigm mediator / adapter and peer to peer systems (P2P). The combination of both systems has led to a third type; is the mediation P2P systems. The P2P systems are large-scale systems, self-organized and distributed. They allow the resource management in a completely decentralized way. However, the integration of structured information sources, heterogeneous and distributed proves to be a complex problem. The objective of this work is to propose an approach to resolve conflicts and establish a mapping between the heterogeneous elements. This approach is based on clustering; the latter is to group similar Peers that share common information in the same subnet. Thus, to facilitate the heterogeneity, we introduced three additional layers of our hierarchy of peers: internal schema, external schema and Schema directory peer. We used linguistic techniques, and precisely the name correspondence technique, that is based on the similarity of names to propose a correspondence.

  8. 7 CFR 614.11 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 614.11 Section 614.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS NRCS APPEAL PROCEDURES § 614.11 Mediation. (a) A participant who wishes...

  9. 34 CFR 303.431 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mediation. 303.431 Section 303.431 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards Mediation...

  10. 45 CFR 617.10 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mediation. 617.10 Section 617.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS... mediator shall prepare a written statement of the agreement and have the complainant and recipient sign...

  11. Families and Schools: Resolving Disputes through Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), Eugene, OR.

    This publication attempts to answer common questions that parents, teachers, administrators, and others have about mediation as a means of resolving conflicts between parents of a child with a disability and the school district. Four real life stories are used to show how experienced mediators use a variety of methods to help participants work out…

  12. Parent Mediation Empowers Sibling Conflict Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Hildy S.; Lazinski, Marysia J.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: For the current study, formal mediation procedures were adapted for families and parents were trained and asked to mediate their children's disputes; control group parents intervened as they normally would. Conflict negotiations with parents and their children (ages 3½-11 years) occurring 3 and 7 weeks following training,…

  13. Que Es la Mediacion? (What Is Mediation?).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), Eugene, OR.

    This brief paper, in Spanish, discusses the use of mediation as a method for resolving disagreements between schools or early intervention programs and parents of children with disabilities. It identifies benefits of mediation such as maintenance of an ongoing and positive relationship between the school and family, simple resolution of conflicts…

  14. 45 CFR 16.18 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mediation. 16.18 Section 16.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES OF THE DEPARTMENTAL GRANT APPEALS BOARD § 16.18 Mediation. (a) In cases pending before the Board. If the Board decides that...

  15. 45 CFR 16.18 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mediation. 16.18 Section 16.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES OF THE DEPARTMENTAL GRANT APPEALS BOARD § 16.18 Mediation. (a) In cases pending before the Board. If the Board decides that...

  16. 45 CFR 16.18 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mediation. 16.18 Section 16.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES OF THE DEPARTMENTAL GRANT APPEALS BOARD § 16.18 Mediation. (a) In cases pending before the Board. If the Board decides that...

  17. The Mediator Role in Social Work Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Ruth J.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that mediation as problem-solving intervention in social work became widely used in child custody and divorce cases, child-parent conflicts, and family disputes. Argues that mediator role is inherent in social work, and examines context for and assumptions underlying it. Discusses nature of conflicts, issue of neutrality within social work…

  18. Giftedness as a Function of Right Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosemarin, Shoshana

    1999-01-01

    This article applies the concept of mediation to pupils who are or may be gifted as well as to motivational and psychological functions. It uses Feuerstein's theory of Mediated Learning Experience to analyze Renzulli's Enrichment Model for the gifted including underachieving and disabled gifted students and concludes that correct mediation…

  19. Mediation Training for Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conflict Resolution Unlimited, Inc., Bellevue, WA.

    Young people need help in learning how to use alternative dispute resolution skills at school. Methods for teaching these skills are presented in this manual. The training centers on the following major themes: The Mediation Process, Cultural Diversity, Communication Skills, Feelings, Mediation Techniques, Dealing with Difficult Situations, and…

  20. Elaborative Retrieval: Do Semantic Mediators Improve Memory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Melissa; Karpicke, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The elaborative retrieval account of retrieval-based learning proposes that retrieval enhances retention because the retrieval process produces the generation of semantic mediators that link cues to target information. We tested 2 assumptions that form the basis of this account: that semantic mediators are more likely to be generated during…

  1. 7 CFR 400.94 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: (a) Appellants have the right to seek mediation or other forms of alternative dispute resolution in... without resolution. If a new adverse decision that raises new matters or relies on different grounds is... in certified States that are not currently offering mediation on the subject in dispute. An...

  2. Verbal Mediation and Satiation in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Harold; Smothergill, Daniel

    The study demonstrates: (1) the occurrence of verbal mediation with its facilitory effect, and (2) the interfering effect of verbal satiation on mediational processes in a three-state chaining paradigm. 40 preschool children were randomly assigned to either a control (no satiation) or an experimental (satiation) group. The subjects in the control…

  3. Integrating Mediators and Moderators in Research Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, David P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe mediating variables and moderating variables and provide reasons for integrating them in outcome studies. Separate sections describe examples of moderating and mediating variables and the simplest statistical model for investigating each variable. The strengths and limitations of incorporating mediating…

  4. Intercultural Conflict and Mediation: An Intergroup Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenfeld, Sara; Clement, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the role of components of intercultural competence in the use of intercultural mediation behaviors. Through the use of the Revised Intercultural Mediation Measure, an instrument revised by the authors, 291 Anglophone and 161 Francophone participants in Canada were asked to indicate their likelihood of employing various…

  5. Semiotic Mediation within an AT Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maracci, Mirko; Mariotti, Maria Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    This article is meant to present a specific elaboration of the notion of mediation in relation to the use of artefacts to enhance mathematics teaching and learning: the elaboration offered by the Theory of Semiotic Mediation. In particular, it provides an explicit model--consistent with the activity-actions-operations framework--of the actions…

  6. Sociocultural Theory and the Mediated Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozulin, Alex

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the two theories that have contributed most to the development of the mediational approach to learning, Vygotskian sociocultural theory and Feuerstein's theory of Mediated Learning Experience. Both theories emphasize the importance of sociocultural forces in shaping a child's development and learning, and have generated a number of…

  7. Areas of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, John

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the recommendations made by the Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum (the Rose Report in 2009) that the curriculum should be organised into areas of learning. The implications for teachers are considered. By drawing upon past experience some major weaknesses and strengths implicit in the approach are identified and…

  8. LOCATING AREAS OF CONCERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple method to locate changes in vegetation cover, which can be used to identify areas under stress. The method only requires inexpensive NDVI data. The use of remotely sensed data is far more cost-effective than field studies and can be performed more quickly. Local knowledg...

  9. Areas and Brownies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, C. Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that connects area with cutting brownies which are in different shapes for different numbers, uses algebraic equations, and fixes the exact dimensions of brownies. Concludes with four different solutions from six people for the class of 16 and a trapezoidal brownie. (ASK)

  10. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Kenneth E.; Nielsen, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Discusses cabling that is needed in local area networks (LANs). Types of cables that may be selected are described, including twisted pair, coaxial cables (or ethernet), and fiber optics; network topologies, the manner in which the cables are laid out, are considered; and cable installation issues are discussed. (LRW)

  11. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  12. Area Handbook for Guatemala.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, John; And Others

    This volume is one of a series of handbooks prepared by Foreign Area Studies of American University designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of various countries. Chapters focus on: (1) the general character…

  13. Area Handbook for Uganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Allison Butler; And Others

    One of a series of handbooks prepared by Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of The American University, this book is an attempt to provide a comprehensive study of the dominant social, political, and economic aspects of Ugandan society, to present its strengths and weaknesses, and to identify the patterns of behavior characteristics of its members.…

  14. Tangrams and Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charlotte

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity for demonstrating the area of five geometric figures--the square, the rectangle, the parallelogram, the triangle, and the trapezoid--that is based on a simple tangram puzzle. Suggests ways in which this activity can be used at several different levels. (ASK)

  15. Content Area Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Students' vocabulary knowledge is a significant predictor of their overall comprehension. The Common Core State Standards are raising the expectations for word learning and there are now 4 distinct standards related to vocabulary as well as expectations in other standards, including content areas. To address these expectations, teachers need…

  16. EDUCATION IN METROPOLITAN AREAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAVIGHURST, ROBERT J.

    THIS BOOK DISCUSSES THE EFFECT OF METROPOLITANISM ON EDUCATION. METROPOLITANISM IS VIEWED BOTH AS A SET OF "EVENTS" AND AS A SET OF "GOALS" OR "TASKS" WHICH CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY SHOULD ACHIEVE. ONE PART OF THE BOOK DISCUSSES THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND GROWTH OF METROPOLITAN AREAS AND THE OPERATION OF METROPOLITAN SCHOOL SYSTEMS. SUCH ISSUES AS…

  17. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, David

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of word processors, micro- and minicomputer systems, and other digital office equipment is causing major design changes in existing networks. Local Area Networks (LANs) which have adequately served terminal users in the past must now be redesigned. Implementation at Clemson is described. (MLW)

  18. Area Handbook for Laos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Donald P.; And Others

    The volume on Laos is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of the American University. It is designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, military institutions and practices of Laos. An objective description of the…

  19. Area Handbook for Iraq.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Harvey H.; And Others

    This volume is one of a series of handbooks prepared by Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of The American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political and military institutions and practices of various countries. This particular handbook…

  20. Area Handbook for Ecuador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Thomas E.; And Others

    This volume on Ecuador is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of the American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of various countries. The emphasis is on…

  1. Education in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picot, Cynthia, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter presents information concerning the building and management of educational facilities in rural areas. The Programme on Educational Building (PEB) operates within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (Paris, France) and consists of members from 17 countries that promote the exchange of ideas, information,…

  2. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  3. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  4. Area Handbook for Syria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyrop, Richard; And Others

    This volume on Syria is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of the American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of various countries. The emphasis is on…

  5. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasatir, Marilyn; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four papers discuss LANs (local area networks) and library applications: (1) "Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers Standards..." (Charles D. Brown); (2) "Facilities Planning for LANs..." (Gail Persky); (3) "Growing up with the Alumni Library: LAN..." (Russell Buchanan); and (4) "Implementing a LAN...at the Health Sciences Library"…

  6. Integrating Mediators and Moderators in Research Design

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe mediating variables and moderating variables and provide reasons for integrating them in outcome studies. Separate sections describe examples of moderating and mediating variables and the simplest statistical model for investigating each variable. The strengths and limitations of incorporating mediating and moderating variables in a research study are discussed as well as approaches to routinely including these variables in outcome research. The routine inclusion of mediating and moderating variables holds the promise of increasing the amount of information from outcome studies by generating practical information about interventions as well as testing theory. The primary focus is on mediating and moderating variables for intervention research but many issues apply to nonintervention research as well. PMID:22675239

  7. Integrating Mediators and Moderators in Research Design.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, David P

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe mediating variables and moderating variables and provide reasons for integrating them in outcome studies. Separate sections describe examples of moderating and mediating variables and the simplest statistical model for investigating each variable. The strengths and limitations of incorporating mediating and moderating variables in a research study are discussed as well as approaches to routinely including these variables in outcome research. The routine inclusion of mediating and moderating variables holds the promise of increasing the amount of information from outcome studies by generating practical information about interventions as well as testing theory. The primary focus is on mediating and moderating variables for intervention research but many issues apply to nonintervention research as well.

  8. Meta-data based mediator generation

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlaw, T

    1998-06-28

    Mediators are a critical component of any data warehouse; they transform data from source formats to the warehouse representation while resolving semantic and syntactic conflicts. The close relationship between mediators and databases requires a mediator to be updated whenever an associated schema is modified. Failure to quickly perform these updates significantly reduces the reliability of the warehouse because queries do not have access to the most current data. This may result in incorrect or misleading responses, and reduce user confidence in the warehouse. Unfortunately, this maintenance may be a significant undertaking if a warehouse integrates several dynamic data sources. This paper describes a meta-data framework, and associated software, designed to automate a significant portion of the mediator generation task and thereby reduce the effort involved in adapting to schema changes. By allowing the DBA to concentrate on identifying the modifications at a high level, instead of reprogramming the mediator, turnaround time is reduced and warehouse reliability is improved.

  9. Pure Mediated Priming: A Retrospective Semantic Matching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lara L.

    2010-01-01

    Mediated priming refers to the activation of a target (e.g., "stripes") by a prime (e.g., "lion") that is related indirectly via a connecting mediator (e.g., tiger). In previous mediated priming studies (e.g., McNamara & Altarriba, 1988), the mediator was associatively related to the prime. In contrast, pure mediated priming (e.g., "spoon" [right…

  10. 7 CFR 785.5 - Fees for mediation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees for mediation services. 785.5 Section 785.5... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS CERTIFIED STATE MEDIATION PROGRAM § 785.5 Fees for mediation services. A requirement that non-USDA parties who elect to participate in mediation pay a fee for mediation services...

  11. Elder Mediation in Theory and Practice: Study Results From a National Caregiver Mediation Demonstration Project

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Mediation is a process through which a third party facilitates discussion among disputing parties to help them identify interests and ideally reach an amicable solution. Elder mediation is a growing subspecialty to address conflicts involving older adults, primarily involving caregiving or finances. Mediation is theorized to empower participants but critics argue that it can exacerbate power imbalances among parties and coerce consensus. These contested claims are examined through study of a national caregiver mediation demonstration project. Study implications underscore the importance of gerontological social work expertise to ensure the empowerment of vulnerable older adults in mediation sessions. PMID:23767767

  12. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  13. Personality Types and Megabytes: Student Attitudes toward Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) in the Language Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauvois, Margaret Healy; Eledge, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Describes the results of a pilot study to examine the attitudes of university students toward the use of computer-mediated communication in their French conversation and composition course. Results indicate that both introvert and extrovert personality types generally perceive the use of a local area network as a beneficial experience. (15…

  14. Maintaining Pedagogical Integrity of a Computer Mediated Course Delivery in Social Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelley; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming a face to face course to a computer mediated format in social foundations (interdisciplinary field in education), while maintaining pedagogical integrity, involves strategic collaboration between instructional technologists and content area experts. This type of planned partnership requires open dialogue and a mutual respect for prior…

  15. Role of Transformational Leadership in Effective Organizational Knowledge Creation Practices: Mediating Effects of Employees' Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Ji Hoon; Kolb, Judith A.; Lee, Ung Hee; Kim, Hye Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Engagement as an area of increasing interest has been discussed in terms of a wide array of organizational policies, practices, and outcomes. This study focuses on a specific aspect of work engagement and its relationship with leadership practices and the outcome of knowledge creation. The mediating effect of employees' work engagement level was…

  16. Individualized/Mediated Curriculum Materials Development for Vocational Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Shirley; Young, Amy

    The Media Center at State Fair Community College and State Fair Area Vocational-Technical School worked to develop a set of individualized/mediated curriculum for use in eight different vocational-technical programs in Missouri. The team developed, produced, evaluated, revised, and duplicated 28 videotape and 10 slide/tape individualized and group…

  17. Social Capital as a Mediating Factor in Emergency Preparedness and Concerns about Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausman, Alice J.; Hanlon, Alexandra; Seals, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how social capital might be instrumental in mediating concerns about terrorism and promoting appropriate responses for emergency preparedness. Results are presented from a random-digit dialed survey of a metropolitan area measuring individual characteristics as well as community-level characteristics as…

  18. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966... GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.4 Production area and regulated area. (a) Production area means the counties of Pinellas, Hillsborough, Polk, Osceola, and Brevard in the State...

  19. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966... GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.4 Production area and regulated area. (a) Production area means the counties of Pinellas, Hillsborough, Polk, Osceola, and Brevard in the State...

  20. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966... GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.4 Production area and regulated area. (a) Production area means the counties of Pinellas, Hillsborough, Polk, Osceola, and Brevard in the State...

  1. Sulphur bacteria mediated formation of Palaeoproterozoic phosphorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosu, Lauri; Lepland, Aivo; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2014-05-01

    Modern phosphorite formation is typically associated with high productivity in upwelling areas where apatite (Ca-phosphate) precipitation is mediated by sulphur oxidising bacteria [1]. They inhabit the oxic/anoxic interface within the upper few centimetres of sediment column, accumulating phosphate in their cells under oxic conditions and releasing it rapidly when conditions become anoxic. Sulphur bacteria are known to live in close association with a consortium of anaerobic methane oxidising archaea and syntrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria. Paleoproterozoic, c. 2.0 Ga Zaonega Formation in Karelia, Russia contains several P-rich intervals in the upper part of 1500 m thick succession of organic-rich sedimentary rocks interlayered with mafic tuffs and lavas. Apatite in these P-rich intervals forms impure laminae, lenses and round-oval nodules which diameters typically range from 300 to 1000 μm. Individual apatite particles in P-rich laminae and nodules commonly occur as cylinders that are 1-8 μm long and have diameters of 0.5-4 μm. Cross-sections of best preserved cylindrical apatite particles reveal a thin outer rim whereas the internal parts consist of small anhedral elongated crystallites, intergrown with carbonaceous material. During recrystallization the outer rim thickens towards interior and cylinders may attain hexagonal crystal habit, but their size and shape remains largely unchanged [2]. The sizes of Zaonega nodules are similar to giant sulphide-oxidising bacteria known from modern and ancient settings [3, 4]. Individual apatite cylinders and aggregates have shapes and sizes similar to the methanotrophic archaea that inhabit microbial mats in modern seep/vent areas where they operate in close associations with sulphur-oxidising microbial communities [5]. Seep/vent influence during the Zaonega phosphogenesis is indicated by variable, though positive Eu anomaly, expected in magmatically active sedimentary environment experiencing several lava flows

  2. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shu-Ching; Claffey, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying oxygen sensing in mammalian cells has been extensively investigated in the areas of glucose transport, glycolysis, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and catecholamine metabolism. Expression of functionally operative representative proteins in these specific areas, such as the glucose transporter 1, glycolytic enzymes, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and tyrosine hydroxylase are all induced by hypoxia. Recent studies demonstrated that both transcriptional activation and post-transcriptional mechanisms are important to the hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression. In this article, the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in the transcriptional activation of gene expression will be reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization will also be addressed. We will discuss whether these two processes of regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes are mechanistically linked and co-operative in nature. PMID:10319016

  3. Mediating chemical reactions using polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Lauren E.

    We have studied the NaBH4-mediated hydrogenation of select alkenes catalyzed by polysaccharide-stabilized nanoparticles. We compared the catalytic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles or Au/Co-based nanoparticles on the hydrogenation of cinnamic acid, cinnamide, cinnamyl alcohol, and ethyl cinnamate. We evaluated the possibility that the type of stabilizing polysaccharide surrounding the nanoparticle may affect the selectivity towards the alkene compounds that undergo the hydrogenation reaction. We found that the hydrogenation of cinnamide or ethyl cinnamate proceeded readily to 100% completion independent of the type of polysaccharide stabilizing the nanoparticle. However, the extent of the hydrogenation of cinnamyl alcohol and cinnamic acid varied greatly depending on the type of polysaccharide stabilizing the nanoparticle. In the course of these studies, we observed that some polysaccharides by themselves promoted the hydrolysis of ethyl cinnamate. Thus, we have raised the hypothesis that some polysaccharides may act as "esterases" and explored the interaction between select polysaccharides and a variety of ester compounds.

  4. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  5. Bacterially mediated mineralization of vaterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Rodriguez-Gallego, Manuel

    2007-03-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a common soil bacterium, plays an active role in the formation of spheroidal vaterite. Bacterial production of CO 2 and NH 3 and the transformation of the NH 3 to NH4+ and OH -, thus increasing solution pH and carbonate alkalinity, set the physicochemical conditions (high supersaturation) leading to vaterite precipitation in the microenvironment around cells, and directly onto the surface of bacterial cells. In the latter case, fossilization of bacteria occurs. Vaterite crystals formed by aggregation of oriented nanocrystals with c-axis normal to the bacterial cell-wall, or to the core of the spherulite when bacteria were not encapsulated. While preferred orientation of vaterite c-axis appears to be determined by electrostatic affinity (ionotropic effect) between vaterite crystal (0001) planes and the negatively charged functional groups of organic molecules on the bacterium cell-wall or on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), analysis of the changes in the culture medium chemistry as well as high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations point to polymorph selection by physicochemical (kinetic) factors (high supersaturation) and stabilization by organics, both connected with bacterial activity. The latter is in agreement with inorganic precipitation of vaterite induced by NH 3 and CO 2 addition in the protein-rich sterile culture medium. Our results as well as recent studies on vaterite precipitation in the presence of different types of bacteria suggest that bacterially mediated vaterite precipitation is not strain-specific, and could be more common than previously thought.

  6. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Herrera, Samantha; Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Flores-Gutierrez, Enrique Octavio; Quintero-Fabián, Saray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), has modulatory functions at the systemic level. The peripheral and central nervous systems have independent dopaminergic system (DAS) that share mechanisms and molecular machinery. In the past century, experimental evidence has accumulated on the proteins knowledge that is involved in the synthesis, reuptake, and transportation of DA in leukocytes and the differential expression of the D1-like (D1R and D5R) and D2-like receptors (D2R, D3R, and D4R). The expression of these components depends on the state of cellular activation and the concentration and time of exposure to DA. Receptors that are expressed in leukocytes are linked to signaling pathways that are mediated by changes in cAMP concentration, which in turn triggers changes in phenotype and cellular function. According to the leukocyte lineage, the effects of DA are associated with such processes as respiratory burst, cytokine and antibody secretion, chemotaxis, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. In clinical conditions such as schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, Tourette syndrome, and multiple sclerosis (MS), there are evident alterations during immune responses in leukocytes, in which changes in DA receptor density have been observed. Several groups have proposed that these findings are useful in establishing clinical status and clinical markers. PMID:27795960

  7. Physiological mechanisms mediating aspartame-induced satiety.

    PubMed

    Hall, W L; Millward, D J; Rogers, P J; Morgan, L M

    2003-04-01

    Aspartame has been previously shown to increase satiety. This study aimed to investigate a possible role for the satiety hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in this effect. The effects of the constituents of aspartame, phenylalanine and aspartic acid, were also examined. Six subjects consumed an encapsulated preload consisting of either 400 mg aspartame, 176 mg aspartic acid+224 mg phenylalanine, or 400 mg corn flour (control), with 1.5 g paracetamol dissolved in 450 ml water to measure gastric emptying. A 1983-kJ liquid meal was consumed 60 min later. Plasma CCK, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucose, and insulin were measured over 0-120 min. Gastric emptying was measured from 0 to 60 min. Plasma GLP-1 concentrations decreased following the liquid meal (60-120 min) after both the aspartame and amino acids preloads (control, 2096.9 pmol/l min; aspartame, 536.6 pmol/l min; amino acids, 861.8 pmol/l min; incremental area under the curve [AUC] 60-120 min, P<.05). Desire to eat was reduced from 60 to 120 min following the amino acids preload (control, -337.1 mm min; aspartame, -505.4 mm min; amino acids, -1497.1 mm min; incremental AUC 60-120 min, P<.05). However, gastric emptying rates, plasma CCK, GIP, insulin, and glucose concentrations were unaffected. There was a correlation between the increase in plasma phenylalanine and decrease in desire to eat after the liquid meal following the constituent amino acids (r=-.9774, P=.004). In conclusion, it is unlikely that aspartame increases satiety via CCK- or GLP-1-mediated mechanisms, but small changes in circulating phenylalanine concentrations may influence appetite.

  8. Hanford Area 2000 Population

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas B.; Scott, Michael J.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2004-05-28

    This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office, Surface Environmental Surveillance Project, to provide demographic data required for ongoing environmental assessments and safety analyses at the DOE Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This document includes 2000 Census estimates for the resident population within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the Hanford Site. Population distributions are reported relative to five reference points centered on meteorological stations within major operating areas of the Hanford Site - the 100 F, 100 K, 200, 300, and 400 Areas. These data are presented in both graphical and tabular format, and are provided for total populations residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the reference points, as well as for Native American, Hispanic and Latino, total minority, and low-income populations.

  9. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  10. 3. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF PICNIC AREA WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF PICNIC AREA WITH COMMUNITY KITCHEN IN BACKGROUND. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  11. Frostbites in circumpolar areas

    PubMed Central

    Ikäheimo, Tiina Maria; Hassi, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    Circumpolar areas are associated with prolonged cold exposure where wind, precipitation, and darkness further aggravate the environmental conditions and the associated risks. Despite the climate warming, cold climatic conditions will prevail in circumpolar areas and contribute to adverse health effects. Frostbite is a freezing injury where localized damage affects the skin and other tissues. It occurs during occupational or leisure-time activities and is common in the general population among men and women of various ages. Industries of the circumpolar areas where frostbite occurs frequently include transportation, mining, oil, and gas industry, construction, agriculture, and military operations. Cold injuries may also occur during leisure-time activities involving substantial cold exposure, such as mountaineering, skiing, and snowmobiling. Accidental situations (occupational, leisure time) often contribute to adverse cooling and cold injuries. Several environmental (temperature, wind, wetness, cold objects, and altitude) and individual (behavior, health, and physiology) predisposing factors are connected with frostbite injuries. Vulnerable populations include those having a chronic disease (cardiovascular, diabetes, and depression), children and the elderly, or homeless people. Frostbite results in sequelae causing different types of discomfort and functional limitations that may persist for years. A frostbite injury is preventable, and hence, unacceptable from a public health perspective. Appropriate cold risk management includes awareness of the adverse effects of cold, individual adjustment of cold exposure and clothing, or in occupational context different organizational and technical measures. In addition, vulnerable population groups need customized information and care for proper prevention of frostbites. PMID:21994485

  12. High surface area calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. N.; Andersson, M. P.; Dalby, K. N.; Müter, D.; Okhrimenko, D. V.; Fordsmand, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2013-05-01

    Calcite (CaCO3) is important in many fields—in nature, because it is a component of aquifers, oil reservoirs and prospective CO2 storage sites, and in industry, where it is used in products as diverse as paper, toothpaste, paint, plastic and aspirin. It is difficult to obtain high purity calcite with a high surface area but such material is necessary for industrial applications and for fundamental calcite research. Commercial powder is nearly always contaminated with growth inhibitors such as sugars, citrate or pectin and most laboratory synthesis methods deliver large precipitates, often containing vaterite or aragonite. To address this problem, we (i) adapted the method of carbonating a Ca(OH)2 slurry with CO2 gas to develop the first simple, cheap, safe and reproducible procedure using common laboratory equipment, to obtain calcite that reproducibly had a surface area of 14-17 m2/g and (ii) conducted a thorough characterization of the product. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed nanometer scale, rhombohedral crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed highly crystalline, pure calcite that more closely resembles the dimensions of the biogenic calcite produced by algae in coccoliths than other methods for synthesizing calcite. We suggest that this calcite is useful when purity and high surface area are important.

  13. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression.

    PubMed

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2016-05-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents' reduced neural activation when rating their parents' emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents' past aggression and adolescents' subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning proximate to the second of two assessments of the family environment. At Time 1 (when youth were on average 15.51 years old) we measured parents' aggressive marital and parent-child conflict behaviors, and at Time 2 (≈2 years later), we measured youth aggression directed toward parents. Youth from more aggressive families showed relatively less activation to parent stimuli in brain areas associated with salience and socioemotional processing, including the insula and limbic structures. Activation patterns in these same areas were also associated with youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression. The association between parents' aggression and youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression was statistically mediated by signal change coefficients in the insula, right amygdala, thalamus, and putamen. These signal change coefficients were also positively associated with scores on a mentalizing measure. Hypoarousal of the emotional brain to family stimuli may support the intergenerational transmission of family aggression.

  14. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression

    PubMed Central

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-01-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents’ reduced neural activation when rating their parents’ emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents’ past aggression and adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning proximate to the second of two assessments of the family environment. At Time 1 (when youth were on average 15.51 years old) we measured parents’ aggressive marital and parent–child conflict behaviors, and at Time 2 (≈2 years later), we measured youth aggression directed toward parents. Youth from more aggressive families showed relatively less activation to parent stimuli in brain areas associated with salience and socioemotional processing, including the insula and limbic structures. Activation patterns in these same areas were also associated with youths’ subsequent parent-directed aggression. The association between parents’ aggression and youths’ subsequent parent-directed aggression was statistically mediated by signal change coefficients in the insula, right amygdala, thalamus, and putamen. These signal change coefficients were also positively associated with scores on a mentalizing measure. Hypoarousal of the emotional brain to family stimuli may support the intergenerational transmission of family aggression. PMID:26073067

  15. Hydroxyl radical mediated DNA base modification by manmade mineral fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Leanderson, P; Söderkvist, P; Tagesson, C

    1989-01-01

    Manmade mineral fibres (MMMFs) were examined for their ability to hydroxylate 2-deoxyguanosine (dG) to 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), a reaction that is mediated by hydroxyl radicals. It appeared that (1) catalase and the hydroxyl radical scavengers, dimethylsulphoxide and sodium benzoate, inhibited the hydroxylation, whereas Fe2+ and H2O2 potentiated it; (2) pretreatment of MMMFs with the iron chelator, deferoxamine, or with extensive heat (200-400 degrees C), attenuated the hydroxylation; (3) the hydroxylation obtained by various MMMFs varied considerably; (4) there was no apparent correlation between the hydroxylation and the surface area of different MMMFs, although increasing the surface area of a fibre by crushing it increased its hydroxylating capacity; and (5) there was good correlation between the hydroxylation of dG residues in DNA and the hydroxylation of pure dG in solution for the 16 different MMMFs investigated. These findings indicate that MMMFs cause a hydroxyl radical mediated DNA base modification in vitro and that there is considerable variation in the reactivity of different fibre species. The DNA modifying ability seems to depend on physical or chemical characteristics, or both, of the fibre. PMID:2765416

  16. 76 FR 19310 - Information Collection; Certified State Mediation Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection; Certified State Mediation Program AGENCY: Farm Service... Mediation Program. The information collection is necessary to ensure the grant program is being administered... following methods: Mail: Carol Wagner, Certified State Mediation Program Manager, USDA, FSA, Appeals...

  17. Immune-mediated disorders of cats.

    PubMed

    Werner, L L; Gorman, N T

    1984-09-01

    Immune-mediated disorders in cats share many clinical and pathologic similarities with their counterparts in other species. Cats, however, are unique among domestic animals owing to the involvement of feline leukemia virus. In addition, a number of other infectious organisms can produce immune-mediated sequelae--that is, FIP virus, FeSFV, and H. felis. Therefore, the diagnostic and therapeutic aims in the management of feline immune-mediated disorders must take into account the probability of a primary or underlying disease process. PMID:6149649

  18. [Role of internal mediators in surgical stress].

    PubMed

    Endo, Shigeatsu; Sato, Nobuhiro

    2003-12-01

    In surgical stress, internal mediators include cytokines released locally as well as into the circulation; activation of neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells, platelets and other cells; activation of plasma protein cascade systems such the complement, coagulation, fibrinolytic and contact systems the release of tissue-damaging proteinases; the formation of lipid mediators such as eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor; and the generation of oxygen and nitrogen radicals. In addition, during host defense rections, a number of agents are released that blunt the inflammatory response, such as anti-inflamatory cytokines, soluble cytokine receptors, acute-phase proteins including proteinase inhibitors and stress hormones. In this paper, we explain such internal mediators.

  19. Gauge - Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking in String Compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Diaconescu, Duiliu-Emanuel; Florea, Bogdan; Kachru, Shamit; Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    We provide string theory examples where a toy model of a SUSY GUT or the MSSM is embedded in a compactification along with a gauge sector which dynamically breaks supersymmetry. We argue that by changing microscopic details of the model (such as precise choices of flux), one can arrange for the dominant mediation mechanism transmitting SUSY breaking to the Standard Model to be either gravity mediation or gauge mediation. Systematic improvement of such examples may lead to top-down models incorporating a solution to the SUSY flavor problem.

  20. Child custody mediation and litigation: custody, contact, and coparenting 12 years after initial dispute resolution.

    PubMed

    Emery, R E; Laumann-Billings, L; Waldron, M C; Sbarra, D A; Dillon, P

    2001-04-01

    Long-term follow-up data were obtained on families who had been randomly assigned to mediate or litigate their child custody disputes. In comparison with families who litigated custody, nonresidential parents who mediated were more involved in multiple areas of their children's lives, maintained more contact with their children, and had a greater influence in coparenting 12 years after the resolution of their custody disputes. The increased involvement of nonresidential parents who mediated did not lead to an associated increase in coparenting conflict. Parents who mediated also made more changes in their children's living arrangements over the years. For the most part, the changes apparently reflect increased cooperation and flexibility. Satisfaction declined for parents (especially fathers) in both groups over time, but fathers remained much more satisfied if they mediated rather than litigated custody. Few differences in satisfaction were found between mothers in the 2 groups. The 12-year follow-up data indicate that, even in contested cases. mediation encourages both parents to remain involved in their children's lives after divorce without increasing coparenting conflict.

  1. Electroporation-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer L; Dean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation has been used extensively to transfer DNA to bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells in culture for the past 30 years. Over this time, numerous advances have been made, from using fields to facilitate cell fusion, delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to cells and tissues, and most importantly, gene and drug delivery in living tissues from rodents to man. Electroporation uses electrical fields to transiently destabilize the membrane allowing the entry of normally impermeable macromolecules into the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, at the appropriate field strengths, the application of these fields to tissues results in little, if any, damage or trauma. Indeed, electroporation has even been used successfully in human trials for gene delivery for the treatment of tumors and for vaccine development. Electroporation can lead to between 100 and 1000-fold increases in gene delivery and expression and can also increase both the distribution of cells taking up and expressing the DNA as well as the absolute amount of gene product per cell (likely due to increased delivery of plasmids into each cell). Effective electroporation depends on electric field parameters, electrode design, the tissues and cells being targeted, and the plasmids that are being transferred themselves. Most importantly, there is no single combination of these variables that leads to greatest efficacy in every situation; optimization is required in every new setting. Electroporation-mediated in vivo gene delivery has proven highly effective in vaccine production, transgene expression, enzyme replacement, and control of a variety of cancers. Almost any tissue can be targeted with electroporation, including muscle, skin, heart, liver, lung, and vasculature. This chapter will provide an overview of the theory of electroporation for the delivery of DNA both in individual cells and in tissues and its application for in vivo gene delivery in a number of animal models. PMID:25620008

  2. Electroporation-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer L; Dean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation has been used extensively to transfer DNA to bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells in culture for the past 30 years. Over this time, numerous advances have been made, from using fields to facilitate cell fusion, delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to cells and tissues, and most importantly, gene and drug delivery in living tissues from rodents to man. Electroporation uses electrical fields to transiently destabilize the membrane allowing the entry of normally impermeable macromolecules into the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, at the appropriate field strengths, the application of these fields to tissues results in little, if any, damage or trauma. Indeed, electroporation has even been used successfully in human trials for gene delivery for the treatment of tumors and for vaccine development. Electroporation can lead to between 100 and 1000-fold increases in gene delivery and expression and can also increase both the distribution of cells taking up and expressing the DNA as well as the absolute amount of gene product per cell (likely due to increased delivery of plasmids into each cell). Effective electroporation depends on electric field parameters, electrode design, the tissues and cells being targeted, and the plasmids that are being transferred themselves. Most importantly, there is no single combination of these variables that leads to greatest efficacy in every situation; optimization is required in every new setting. Electroporation-mediated in vivo gene delivery has proven highly effective in vaccine production, transgene expression, enzyme replacement, and control of a variety of cancers. Almost any tissue can be targeted with electroporation, including muscle, skin, heart, liver, lung, and vasculature. This chapter will provide an overview of the theory of electroporation for the delivery of DNA both in individual cells and in tissues and its application for in vivo gene delivery in a number of animal models.

  3. Effect of stimulus size and luminance on the rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflex.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason C; McAnany, J Jason

    2015-01-01

    This study determined if the pupillary light reflex (PLR) driven by brief stimulus presentations can be accounted for by the product of stimulus luminance and area (i.e., corneal flux density, CFD) under conditions biased toward the rod, cone, and melanopsin pathways. Five visually normal subjects participated in the study. Stimuli consisted of 1-s short- and long-wavelength flashes that spanned a large range of luminance and angular subtense. The stimuli were presented in the central visual field in the dark (rod and melanopsin conditions) and against a rod-suppressing short-wavelength background (cone condition). Rod- and cone-mediated PLRs were measured at the maximum constriction after stimulus onset whereas the melanopsin-mediated PLR was measured 5-7 s after stimulus offset. The rod- and melanopsin-mediated PLRs were well accounted for by CFD, such that doubling the stimulus luminance had the same effect on the PLR as doubling the stimulus area. Melanopsin-mediated PLRs were elicited only by short-wavelength, large (>16°) stimuli with luminance greater than 10 cd/m(2), but when present, the melanopsin-mediated PLR was well accounted for by CFD. In contrast, CFD could not account for the cone-mediated PLR because the PLR was approximately independent of stimulus size but strongly dependent on stimulus luminance. These findings highlight important differences in how stimulus luminance and size combine to govern the PLR elicited by brief flashes under rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated conditions.

  4. Driver's Education for the Information Super Highway: Computer Mediated Communication on a Local Area Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Beverly M.

    This document describes a project whereby a researcher spent time in a fifth-grade classroom teaching students to use electronic mail. For two 40-minute periods each week over a period of 18 weeks, 28 students received instruction on mechanics such as sending and reading mail, attaching and retrieving files, and forwarding messages with their own…

  5. A school peer mediation program as a context for exploring therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ): Can a peer mediation program inform the law?

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Nicky

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports an exploratory study of a school peer mediation program implemented as an alternative way to manage bullying and other destructive conflict. The study explores the effects of the program on the well-being of members of the school community by examining perceptions of students, staff and a sample of parents and former students. Drawing on therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) the study explores whether the component parts of the program, separately or together, promote intended or unintended therapeutic effects. The preliminary findings of the study emphasise the importance of peer mediation training and suggest that existing scholarship in the area of school conflict resolution and peer mediation, when viewed through a TJ lens, may provide valuable insights into how to optimally configure programs for development and adoption in schools and other community settings. The study highlights the lack of attention paid by the legal system to valuable scholarship in the area of school conflict resolution and peer mediation, which may have implications for the understanding and development of legal processes and the law in general.

  6. Acetylcholine mediates behavioral and neural post-error control.

    PubMed

    Danielmeier, Claudia; Allen, Elena A; Jocham, Gerhard; Onur, Oezguer A; Eichele, Tom; Ullsperger, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Humans often commit errors when they are distracted by irrelevant information and no longer focus on what is relevant to the task at hand. Adjustments following errors are essential for optimizing goal achievement. The posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC), a key area for monitoring errors, has been shown to trigger such post-error adjustments by modulating activity in visual cortical areas. However, the mechanisms by which pMFC controls sensory cortices are unknown. We provide evidence for a mechanism based on pMFC-induced recruitment of cholinergic projections to task-relevant sensory areas. Using fMRI in healthy volunteers, we found that error-related pMFC activity predicted subsequent adjustments in task-relevant visual brain areas. In particular, following an error, activity increased in those visual cortical areas involved in processing task-relevant stimulus features, whereas activity decreased in areas representing irrelevant, distracting features. Following treatment with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist biperiden, activity in visual areas was no longer under control of error-related pMFC activity. This was paralleled by abolished post-error behavioral adjustments under biperiden. Our results reveal a prominent role of acetylcholine in cognitive control that has not been recognized thus far. Regaining optimal performance after errors critically depends on top-down control of perception driven by the pMFC and mediated by acetylcholine. This may explain the lack of adaptivity in conditions with reduced availability of cortical acetylcholine, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  8. Dark matter prospects in deflected mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael; Nelson, Brent D. E-mail: b.nelson@neu.edu

    2009-07-01

    The recently introduced deflected mirage mediation (DMM) model is a string-motivated paradigm in which all three of the major supersymmetry-breaking transmission mechanisms are operative. We begin a systematic exploration of the parameter space of this rich model context, paying special attention to the pattern of gaugino masses which arise. In this work we focus on the dark matter phenomenology of the DMM model as such signals are the least influenced by the model-dependent scalar masses. We find that a large portion of the parameter space in which the three mediation mechanisms have a similar effective mass scale of 1 TeV or less will be probed by future direct and indirect detection experiments. Distinguishing deflected mirage mediation from the mirage model without gauge mediation will prove difficult without collider input, though we indicate how gamma ray signals may provide an opportunity for distinguishing between the two paradigms.

  9. Programmable DNA-Mediated Multitasking Processor.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qi-Wen; Yong, Kian-Yan; Shao, Fangwei; Lee, Kee Jin

    2015-04-30

    Because of DNA appealing features as perfect material, including minuscule size, defined structural repeat and rigidity, programmable DNA-mediated processing is a promising computing paradigm, which employs DNAs as information storing and processing substrates to tackle the computational problems. The massive parallelism of DNA hybridization exhibits transcendent potential to improve multitasking capabilities and yield a tremendous speed-up over the conventional electronic processors with stepwise signal cascade. As an example of multitasking capability, we present an in vitro programmable DNA-mediated optimal route planning processor as a functional unit embedded in contemporary navigation systems. The novel programmable DNA-mediated processor has several advantages over the existing silicon-mediated methods, such as conducting massive data storage and simultaneous processing via much fewer materials than conventional silicon devices.

  10. 7 CFR 205.663 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Administrative Compliance § 205.663 Mediation. Any dispute with...

  11. Selecting a model of supersymmetry breaking mediation

    SciTech Connect

    AbdusSalam, S. S.; Allanach, B. C.; Dolan, M. J.; Feroz, F.; Hobson, M. P.

    2009-08-01

    We study the problem of selecting between different mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric standard model using current data. We evaluate the Bayesian evidence of four supersymmetry breaking scenarios: mSUGRA, mGMSB, mAMSB, and moduli mediation. The results show a strong dependence on the dark matter assumption. Using the inferred cosmological relic density as an upper bound, minimal anomaly mediation is at least moderately favored over the CMSSM. Our fits also indicate that evidence for a positive sign of the {mu} parameter is moderate at best. We present constraints on the anomaly and gauge mediated parameter spaces and some previously unexplored aspects of the dark matter phenomenology of the moduli mediation scenario. We use sparticle searches, indirect observables and dark matter observables in the global fit and quantify robustness with respect to prior choice. We quantify how much information is contained within each constraint.

  12. Genesis and intersubjectivity: levels of mediation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2012-09-01

    I will make a brief comment on the thesis of José C. Loredo-Narciandi and José C. Sánchez-González (2012) "Neither Dichotomies Nor Dualism; Simply Genesis". Denying any reductionism and reification, they insists the importance of inseparable relation between subject and object, then discuss about genesis. I pointed out that their argument lacks an important element, i.e., mediator that differ from mere physical object. After discussing mediators nature, I discriminate the three level of interaction which mediated by mediator. The first is the pre-interaction level, the second is physical interaction level and the third is sign or language interaction level. The last argument of mine is about how we can solve the problem of reification and reductionism. In the argument it is pointed out that intersubjectivity is key concept for understanding and solving the problem appropriately. PMID:22628155

  13. Programmable DNA-Mediated Multitasking Processor.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qi-Wen; Yong, Kian-Yan; Shao, Fangwei; Lee, Kee Jin

    2015-04-30

    Because of DNA appealing features as perfect material, including minuscule size, defined structural repeat and rigidity, programmable DNA-mediated processing is a promising computing paradigm, which employs DNAs as information storing and processing substrates to tackle the computational problems. The massive parallelism of DNA hybridization exhibits transcendent potential to improve multitasking capabilities and yield a tremendous speed-up over the conventional electronic processors with stepwise signal cascade. As an example of multitasking capability, we present an in vitro programmable DNA-mediated optimal route planning processor as a functional unit embedded in contemporary navigation systems. The novel programmable DNA-mediated processor has several advantages over the existing silicon-mediated methods, such as conducting massive data storage and simultaneous processing via much fewer materials than conventional silicon devices. PMID:25874653

  14. Upscaling of Bio-mediated Soil Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    J. T. DeJong; B. C. Martinez; B. M. Mortensen; D. C. Nelson; J. T. Waller; M. H. Weil; T. R. Ginn; T. Weathers; T. Barkouki; Y. Fujita; G. Redden; C. Hunt; D. Major; B. Tunyu

    2009-10-01

    As demand for soil improvement continues to increase, new, sustainable, and innocuous methods are needed to alter the mechanical properties of soils. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of bio-mediated soil improvement for geotechnical applications (DeJong et al. 2006, Whiffin et al. 2007). Upscaling the bio-mediated treatment process for in situ implementation presents a number of challenges to be addressed, including soil and pore fluid interactions, bioaugmentation versus biostimulation of microbial communities, controlled distribution of mediated calcite precipitation, and permanence of the cementation. Current studies are utilizing large-scale laboratory experiments, non-destructive geophysical measurements, and modeling, to develop an optimized and predictable bio-mediated treatment method.

  15. Confronting Conflict Peacefully: Peer Mediation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutrona, Cheryl; Guerin, Diane

    1994-01-01

    Suggests peer mediation as an alternative dispute resolution approach. Indicates the need to shift the focus from crisis intervention to prevention and to integrate dispute resolution skills into the school environment. (JOW)

  16. Genesis and intersubjectivity: levels of mediation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2012-09-01

    I will make a brief comment on the thesis of José C. Loredo-Narciandi and José C. Sánchez-González (2012) "Neither Dichotomies Nor Dualism; Simply Genesis". Denying any reductionism and reification, they insists the importance of inseparable relation between subject and object, then discuss about genesis. I pointed out that their argument lacks an important element, i.e., mediator that differ from mere physical object. After discussing mediators nature, I discriminate the three level of interaction which mediated by mediator. The first is the pre-interaction level, the second is physical interaction level and the third is sign or language interaction level. The last argument of mine is about how we can solve the problem of reification and reductionism. In the argument it is pointed out that intersubjectivity is key concept for understanding and solving the problem appropriately.

  17. Area Community College and Area Vocational School Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines.

    The purpose of this guideline is to assist in the planning process, to encourage good school plant design, and to serve as criteria in the evaluation of area community college and area vocational school plans. It is divided into the following five sections--(1) area plant planning, (2) area sites, (3) physical facilities, (4) service systems, and…

  18. Uncratered Area on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A dark, smooth, relatively uncratered area on Mercury was photographed (FDS 226) two hours after Mariner 10 flew by the planet on March 29 from a range of 86,000 kilometers (54,000 miles). Above and to the left of center is a surface similar to the mane material of Earth's moon. It embays and covers rougher, older, heavily cratered topography like that, which can be seen in both upper corners of this picture. The history of heavy cratering seems to be followed by volcanic filling, similar to the process on the Moon. The prominent, sharp crater with a central peak (center) is 30 kilometers (19 miles) across. It is located on the upper left edge of a very bright surface area. The bright crater, to its right is 10 kilometers (6 miles) in diameter. The sun is from the right.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  19. Redefining the role of Broca’s area in speech

    PubMed Central

    Flinker, Adeen; Korzeniewska, Anna; Shestyuk, Avgusta Y.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Dronkers, Nina F.; Knight, Robert T.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2015-01-01

    For over a century neuroscientists have debated the dynamics by which human cortical language networks allow words to be spoken. Although it is widely accepted that Broca’s area in the left inferior frontal gyrus plays an important role in this process, it was not possible, until recently, to detail the timing of its recruitment relative to other language areas, nor how it interacts with these areas during word production. Using direct cortical surface recordings in neurosurgical patients, we studied the evolution of activity in cortical neuronal populations, as well as the Granger causal interactions between them. We found that, during the cued production of words, a temporal cascade of neural activity proceeds from sensory representations of words in temporal cortex to their corresponding articulatory gestures in motor cortex. Broca’s area mediates this cascade through reciprocal interactions with temporal and frontal motor regions. Contrary to classic notions of the role of Broca’s area in speech, while motor cortex is activated during spoken responses, Broca’s area is surprisingly silent. Moreover, when novel strings of articulatory gestures must be produced in response to nonword stimuli, neural activity is enhanced in Broca’s area, but not in motor cortex. These unique data provide evidence that Broca’s area coordinates the transformation of information across large-scale cortical networks involved in spoken word production. In this role, Broca’s area formulates an appropriate articulatory code to be implemented by motor cortex. PMID:25730850

  20. Redefining the role of Broca's area in speech.

    PubMed

    Flinker, Adeen; Korzeniewska, Anna; Shestyuk, Avgusta Y; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Dronkers, Nina F; Knight, Robert T; Crone, Nathan E

    2015-03-01

    For over a century neuroscientists have debated the dynamics by which human cortical language networks allow words to be spoken. Although it is widely accepted that Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus plays an important role in this process, it was not possible, until recently, to detail the timing of its recruitment relative to other language areas, nor how it interacts with these areas during word production. Using direct cortical surface recordings in neurosurgical patients, we studied the evolution of activity in cortical neuronal populations, as well as the Granger causal interactions between them. We found that, during the cued production of words, a temporal cascade of neural activity proceeds from sensory representations of words in temporal cortex to their corresponding articulatory gestures in motor cortex. Broca's area mediates this cascade through reciprocal interactions with temporal and frontal motor regions. Contrary to classic notions of the role of Broca's area in speech, while motor cortex is activated during spoken responses, Broca's area is surprisingly silent. Moreover, when novel strings of articulatory gestures must be produced in response to nonword stimuli, neural activity is enhanced in Broca's area, but not in motor cortex. These unique data provide evidence that Broca's area coordinates the transformation of information across large-scale cortical networks involved in spoken word production. In this role, Broca's area formulates an appropriate articulatory code to be implemented by motor cortex. PMID:25730850

  1. Socially mediated learning in male Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, P M

    1986-09-01

    Seven experiments showed that in the absence of social stimulation male Siamese fighting fish would approach any of several visual and spatial cues that had previously been paired with the animals' mirror images. These findings demonstrate that learned modifications of swimming mediated by social stimuli are possible in Bettas. The present results also suggest that territorial defense in some teleosts may, in part, be mediated by the association of social cues with visual and spatial stimuli.

  2. Gazetteer Brokering through Semantic Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobona, G.; Bermudez, L. E.; Brackin, R.

    2013-12-01

    web technologies, including ontologies and a semantic mediator. The semantically-enhanced SPEGG allowed a client to submit a single query (e.g. ';hills') and to retrieve data from two separate gazetteers with different vocabularies (e.g. where one refers to ';summits' another refers to ';hills'). Supporting the SPEGG was a SPARQL server that held the ontologies and processed queries on them. Earth Science surveys and forecast always have a place on Earth. Being able to share the information about a place and solve inconsistencies about that place from different sources will enable geoscientists to better do their research. In the advent of mobile geo computing and location based services (LBS), brokering gazetteers will provide geoscientists with access to gazetteer services rich with information and functionality beyond that offered by current generic gazetteers.

  3. Ecological immunology mediated by diet in herbivorous insects.

    PubMed

    Singer, Michael S; Mason, Peri A; Smilanich, Angela M

    2014-11-01

    A rapidly advancing area of ecological immunology concerns the effects of diet on animals' immunological responses to parasites and pathogens. Here, we focus on diet-mediated ecological immunology in herbivorous insects, in part because these organisms commonly experience nutritional limitations from their diets of plants. Nutritional immunology highlights nutrient-based trade-offs between immunological and other physiological processes as well as trade-offs among distinct immunological processes. This field reveals that nutrition influences the quality and quantity of immunological defense in herbivorous insects, and conversely that nutritional intake by herbivorous insects can be an adaptive response to the specific types of immune-challenge they face in the context of other physiological processes. Because the diets of herbivores challenge them physiologically with plants' secondary metabolites, another area of study analyzes constraints on immunological defense imposed by secondary metabolites of plants in the diets of herbivorous insects. Alternatively, some herbivores can use secondary metabolites as medicine against parasites or pathogens. Animal-medication theory makes an important contribution to ecological immunology by distinguishing prophylactic and therapeutic mechanisms of anti-parasite defense. Integrating ideas from animal-medication and nutritional immunology, we outline a conceptual framework in which the immunological role of the diet consists of mechanisms of prophylaxis, therapy, compensation, and combinations thereof. Then, we use this framework to organize findings from our own research on diet-mediated ecological immunology of woolly bear caterpillars. We show evidence that the woolly bear caterpillar, Grammia incorrupta (Hy. Edwards) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, and Arctiinae), can employ both diet-mediated prophylaxis and therapy. First, increased consumption of carbohydrate-biased food prior to immune-challenge increased its melanization

  4. SPERTI Control Area. Contextual view of desert from control area ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I Control Area. Contextual view of desert from control area to reactor pit and terminal building area 1/2 mile away. A four-inch water line is being installed between the two areas. Photographer: R.G. Larsen. Date: April 22, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-999 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Wide area sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Nix, Tricia; Junker, Robert; Brentano, Josef; Khona, Dhiren

    2006-05-01

    The technical concept for this project has existed since the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A host of Eastern European nations have developed countrywide grid of sensors to monitor airborne radiation. The objective is to build a radiological sensor network for real-time monitoring of environmental radiation levels in order to provide data for warning, and consequentially the assessment of a nuclear event. A network of radiation measuring equipment consisting of gamma, neutron, alpha, and beta counters would be distributed over a large area (preferably on fire station roof tops) and connected by a wireless network to the emergency response center. The networks would be deployed in urban environments and would supply first responders and federal augmentation teams (including those from the U.S. Departments of Energy, Defense, Justice, and Homeland Security) with detailed, accurate information regarding the transport of radioactive environmental contaminants, so the agencies can provide a safe and effective response. A networked sensor capability would be developed, with fixed sensors deployed at key locations and in sufficient numbers, to provide adequate coverage for early warning, and input to post-event emergency response. An overall system description and specification will be provided, including detector characteristics, communication protocols, infrastructure and maintenance requirements, and operation procedures. The system/network can be designed for a specifically identified urban area, or for a general urban area scalable to cities of specified size. Data collected via the network will be transmitted directly to the appropriate emergency response center and shared with multiple agencies via the Internet or an Intranet. The data collected will be managed using commercial off - the - shelf Geographical Information System (GIS). The data will be stored in a database and the GIS software will aid in analysis and management of the data. Unique features of the

  6. Phoenix Work Area Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This animation from Sol 1 shows a mosaic of the Phoenix digging area in the Martian terrain. Phoenix scientists are very pleased with this view as the terrain features few rocks an optimal place for digging. The mast of the camera looks disjointed because the photos that comprise this mosaic were taken at different times of day. This video also show some of the lander's instrumentation.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Variable area exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, E. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle for a gas turbine engine comprises a number of arcuate flaps pivotally connected to the trailing edge of a cylindrical casing which houses the engine. Seals disposed within the flaps are spring biased and extensible beyond the side edges of the flaps. The seals of adjacent flaps are maintained in sealing engagement with each other when the flaps are adjusted between positions defining minimum nozzle flow area and the cruise position. Extensible, spring biased seals are also disposed within the flaps adjacent to a supporting pylon to thereby engage the pylon in a sealing arrangement. The flaps are hinged to the casing at the central portion of the flaps' leading edges and are connected to actuators at opposed outer portions of the leading edges to thereby maximize the mechanical advantage in the actuation of the flaps.

  8. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  9. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  10. The Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Michelson, Peter F.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL

    2007-11-13

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy pair-conversion telescope, covering the energy range from {approx}20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT is being built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. The scientific objectives the LAT will address include resolving the high-energy gamma-ray sky and determining the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources and the origin of the apparently isotropic diffuse emission observed by EGRET; understanding the mechanisms of particle acceleration in celestial sources, including active galactic nuclei, pulsars, and supernovae remnants; studying the high-energy behavior of gamma-ray bursts and transients; using high-energy gamma-rays to probe the early universe to z {ge} 6; and probing the nature of dark matter. The components of the LAT include a precision silicon-strip detector tracker and a CsI(Tl) calorimeter, a segmented anticoincidence shield that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large field-of-view and ensuring that nearly all pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. This paper includes a description of each of these LAT subsystems as well as a summary of the overall performance of the telescope.

  11. CLOUD PEAK PRIMITIVE AREA AND ADJACENT AREAS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey of the Cloud Peak Primitive Area and adjacent areas in Wyoming indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There are some prospect workings, particularly in the northern part of the area, but in none of them were there indications that ore had been mined. Samples from the workings, from nearby rocks and sediments from streams that drain the area did not yield any metal values of significance. The crystalline rocks that underlie the area do not contain oil and gas or coal, products that are extracted from the younger rocks that underlie basins on both sides of the study area.

  12. 75 FR 52054 - Assessment of Mediation and Arbitration Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... matters relating to the use of mediation and arbitration as effective means of resolving disputes that are... mediation and arbitration in the resolution of disputes. If so, the proposed changes or new rules would be... mediation and arbitration of matters subject to its jurisdiction. The Board's mediation rules are set...

  13. Estimating and Testing Mediation Effects with Censored Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated influences of censored data on mediation analysis. Mediation effect estimates can be biased and inefficient with censoring on any one of the input, mediation, and output variables. A Bayesian Tobit approach was introduced to estimate and test mediation effects with censored data. Simulation results showed that the Bayesian…

  14. Surveying Parental Mediation: Connections, Challenges and Questions for Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines three strategies of parental mediation--coviewing, restrictive mediation, and active mediation--in order to make connections, challenge, and raise questions for media literacy. Coviewing, whether it is intentional practice, or whether it functions to promote media literacy, is explored. Restrictive mediation, how it connects to…

  15. The Peacekeepers: Students Use Mediation Skills to Resolve Conflicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Examines the use of mediation skills in elementary and secondary education. Discusses the rise in school violence; and describes mediation techniques, the rationale for their use, school programs to introduce mediation, peer mediators, and long-term benefits to students and the school community. Offers resources. (JB)

  16. Mediation...An Alternative That Works. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Albie

    A 5-part handbook provides elementary and secondary educators and community organizations with background information and resources for teaching mediation strategies. An introduction (part I) provides a rationale for mediation as a form of dispute resolution and for mediation programs in the schools. Part II seeks to define mediation by describing…

  17. Reducing Levels of Elementary School Violence with Peer Mediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, Rita Cantrell; Parks-Savage, Agatha; Rehfuss, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of an existing peer mediation program in a diverse, suburban elementary school was examined. Peer mediation was available to all students (N = 825). Three-year longitudinal data showed significant reductions in the school's out-of-school suspensions after implementation of the peer mediation program. Mediation training also…

  18. A State Space Modeling Approach to Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Fei; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Ferrer, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Mediation is a causal process that evolves over time. Thus, a study of mediation requires data collected throughout the process. However, most applications of mediation analysis use cross-sectional rather than longitudinal data. Another implicit assumption commonly made in longitudinal designs for mediation analysis is that the same mediation…

  19. 15 CFR 930.115 - Termination of mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Termination of mediation. 930.115... MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Secretarial Mediation § 930.115 Termination of mediation. Mediation shall terminate: (a) At any time the Federal and State agencies agree to...

  20. 29 CFR 1207.2 - Requests for Mediation Board action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests for Mediation Board action. 1207.2 Section 1207.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD ESTABLISHMENT OF SPECIAL ADJUSTMENT BOARDS § 1207.2 Requests for Mediation Board action. (a) Requests for the National Mediation...

  1. Therapeutic Potential of IL-17-Mediated Signaling Pathway in Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Lleo, Ana; Ma, Xiong; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence reveals that various cytokines and tissue microenvironments contribute to liver inflammation and autoimmunity, and IL-17 family is one of highlights acknowledged. Although the implication of IL-17 family in most common autoimmune diseases (such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and rheumatoid arthritis) has been extensively characterized, the role of this critical family in pathophysiology of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) still needs to be clarified. In the review, we look into the intriguing biology of IL-17 family and further dissect on the intricate role of IL-17-mediated pathway in AILD. Considering encouraging data from preclinical and clinical trials, IL-17 targeted therapy has shown promises in several certain autoimmune conditions. However, blocking IL-17-mediated pathway is just beginning, and more fully investigation and reflection are required. Taking together, targeting IL-17-mediated responses may open up new areas of potential clinical treatment for AILD. PMID:26146463

  2. Health psychology as a context for massage therapy: a conceptual model with CAM as mediator.

    PubMed

    Hymel, Glenn M; Rich, Grant J

    2014-04-01

    Health psychology represents a context within which massage therapy research, education, and practice can be positioned for the mutual benefit of both. Furthermore, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) more often than not plays a mediating role in relating massage therapy to health psychology. On occasion, though, the linkage between health psychology and massage therapy can be quite direct without the mediating influence of CAM. This paper, accordingly, advances a conceptual model via both flowchart and Venn diagram displays for viewing the health psychology context for massage therapy with the possibility of CAM as a mediating factor. Attention is also given to the broad range of issues constituting contemporary health psychology as well as its correspondence to an equally diverse array of client populations and health conditions addressed in massage therapy research. Future directions in the areas of health psychology, CAM, and massage therapy are proposed with a view toward a mutual and reciprocal benefit accruing to these behavioral and health science arenas.

  3. Examining sexual assault survival of adult women: responses, mediators, and current theories.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science of sexual assault research to direct future research in three key areas: responses, mediators, and current theory with a religious or spiritual focus addressing recovery. Three research questions guided the investigation of literature and the formation of this article: (a) What are common survivor responses to, and long-term effects of, sexual assault?; (b) What are mediators for recovery after sexual assault?; and (c) What theory with a religious or spiritual focus exists to address recovery from sexual assault? This research identifies significant gaps in the literature underscoring the importance of future research that examines responses to and long-term effects of sexual assault, need for mediators during recovery, and need to develop theory using religious and spiritual tenets aiding in recovery from sexual assault. Further research is necessary to develop this science, expand understanding, and support sexual assault survivors on their recovery journey.

  4. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  5. AREA RADIATION MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

    1962-06-12

    S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

  6. Global protected area impacts.

    PubMed

    Joppa, Lucas N; Pfaff, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    Protected areas (PAs) dominate conservation efforts. They will probably play a role in future climate policies too, as global payments may reward local reductions of loss of natural land cover. We estimate the impact of PAs on natural land cover within each of 147 countries by comparing outcomes inside PAs with outcomes outside. We use 'matching' (or 'apples to apples') for land characteristics to control for the fact that PAs very often are non-randomly distributed across their national landscapes. Protection tends towards land that, if unprotected, is less likely than average to be cleared. For 75 per cent of countries, we find protection does reduce conversion of natural land cover. However, for approximately 80 per cent of countries, our global results also confirm (following smaller-scale studies) that controlling for land characteristics reduces estimated impact by half or more. This shows the importance of controlling for at least a few key land characteristics. Further, we show that impacts vary considerably within a country (i.e. across a landscape): protection achieves less on lands far from roads, far from cities and on steeper slopes. Thus, while planners are, of course, constrained by other conservation priorities and costs, they could target higher impacts to earn more global payments for reduced deforestation.

  7. EAGLE ROCK ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Johnson, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of geologic, geochemical, aeromagnetic, and mine and prospect investigations define the mineral-resource potential of the Eagle Rock Roadless Area of north-central Washington. The area has probable and substantiated resource potential for base and precious metals where the eastern part of the Index mining district extends into the roadless area; the Sunset mine, 400 ft outside the area, has inferred copper resources, and 10 other properties in the roadless area have demonstrated resources for base and precious metals. The resource potential in the area is related to the Index batholith, which makes up the western part of the roadless area, and rocks to the east in the roadless area that are intruded by the Index batholith. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources in the roadless area.

  8. What Do Grievants Think of Grievance Mediation: A Riposte to "Counterpoint: Response to Mediator Caraway."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jascourt, Hugh D.

    1992-01-01

    In a previous article, Gordon A. Gregory and Mark Heinen criticized John M. Caraway's article describing recent successful experiences with the use of mediation in place of arbitration for failing to note the perception of the grievants. A reexamination of the data show that 80 percent of the grievants were satisfied with the mediation procedure.…

  9. 203. ATTIC, AREA OVER WOOD SHOP AND STORAGE AREA LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    203. ATTIC, AREA OVER WOOD SHOP AND STORAGE AREA LOOKING NORTH. ELEVATOR SHAFT IS AGAINST FAR WALL. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  10. 5. INTERIOR, LOBBY AREA IN SOUTHEAST AREA OF BUILDING, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR, LOBBY AREA IN SOUTHEAST AREA OF BUILDING, FROM SOUTHWESTERN WALL, EAST OF ENTRY, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Administrative Offices, On Seventh Street East of Maritime Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  11. CANNIBAL PLATEAU ROADLESS AREA AND POWDERHORN WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, William N.; Lane, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Cannibal Plateau Roadless Area and the adjoining Powderhorn Wilderness study area are on the Gunnison-Hinsdale County boundary, approximately 50 mi southwest of Gunnison and a few miles east of Lake City. Part of the area has been known as the Powderhorn Primitive Area. The mineral-resource potential involved a basic geologic study, a geophysical survey, and a geochemical survey. No mining districts exist within the two areas, but the Lake City mining district adjoins the Cannibal Plateau Roadless Area at the southwest edge. The mineral-resource survey indicates that the southwest part of the Cannibal Plateau Roadless Area has probable mineral-resource potential, for gold, silver, and molybdenum. There is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources for the remainder of the areas.

  12. A neural mediator of human anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ben J; Fullana, Miquel A; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Via, Esther; Pujol, Jesus; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Tinoco-Gonzalez, Daniella; Davey, Christopher G; López-Solà, Marina; Pérez Sola, Victor; Menchón, José M; Cardoner, Narcís

    2015-10-01

    Advances in the neuroscientific understanding of bodily autonomic awareness, or interoception, have led to the hypothesis that human trait anxiety sensitivity (AS)-the fear of bodily autonomic arousal-is primarily mediated by the anterior insular cortex. Despite broad appeal, few experimental studies have comprehensively addressed this hypothesis. We recruited 55 individuals exhibiting a range of AS and assessed them with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during aversive fear conditioning. For each participant, three primary measures of interest were derived: a trait Anxiety Sensitivity Index score; an in-scanner rating of elevated bodily anxiety sensations during fear conditioning; and a corresponding estimate of whole-brain functional activation to the conditioned versus nonconditioned stimuli. Using a voxel-wise mediation analysis framework, we formally tested for 'neural mediators' of the predicted association between trait AS score and in-scanner anxiety sensations during fear conditioning. Contrary to the anterior insular hypothesis, no evidence of significant mediation was observed for this brain region, which was instead linked to perceived anxiety sensations independently from AS. Evidence for significant mediation was obtained for the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex-a finding that we argue is more consistent with the hypothesized role of human cingulofrontal cortex in conscious threat appraisal processes, including threat-overestimation. This study offers an important neurobiological validation of the AS construct and identifies a specific neural substrate that may underlie high AS clinical phenotypes, including but not limited to panic disorder. PMID:26147233

  13. Architecture of the Mediator head module

    SciTech Connect

    Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Calero, Guillermo; Cai, Gang; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yamada, Kentaro; Cardelli, Francesco; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Berger, Imre; Kornberg, Guy Lorch; Asturias, Francisco J.; Kornberg, Roger D.; Takagi, Yuichiro

    2011-09-06

    Mediator is a key regulator of eukaryotic transcription, connecting activators and repressors bound to regulatory DNA elements with RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator comprises 25 subunits with a total mass of more than one megadalton (refs 5, 6) and is organized into three modules, called head, middle/arm and tail. Our understanding of Mediator assembly and its role in regulating transcription has been impeded so far by limited structural information. Here we report the crystal structure of the essential Mediator head module (seven subunits, with a mass of 223 kilodaltons) at a resolution of 4.3 angstroms. Our structure reveals three distinct domains, with the integrity of the complex centred on a bundle of ten helices from five different head subunits. An intricate pattern of interactions within this helical bundle ensures the stable assembly of the head subunits and provides the binding sites for general transcription factors and Pol II. Our structural and functional data suggest that the head module juxtaposes transcription factor IIH and the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest subunit of Pol II, thereby facilitating phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of Pol II. Our results reveal architectural principles underlying the role of Mediator in the regulation of gene expression.

  14. A neural mediator of human anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ben J; Fullana, Miquel A; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Via, Esther; Pujol, Jesus; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Tinoco-Gonzalez, Daniella; Davey, Christopher G; López-Solà, Marina; Pérez Sola, Victor; Menchón, José M; Cardoner, Narcís

    2015-10-01

    Advances in the neuroscientific understanding of bodily autonomic awareness, or interoception, have led to the hypothesis that human trait anxiety sensitivity (AS)-the fear of bodily autonomic arousal-is primarily mediated by the anterior insular cortex. Despite broad appeal, few experimental studies have comprehensively addressed this hypothesis. We recruited 55 individuals exhibiting a range of AS and assessed them with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during aversive fear conditioning. For each participant, three primary measures of interest were derived: a trait Anxiety Sensitivity Index score; an in-scanner rating of elevated bodily anxiety sensations during fear conditioning; and a corresponding estimate of whole-brain functional activation to the conditioned versus nonconditioned stimuli. Using a voxel-wise mediation analysis framework, we formally tested for 'neural mediators' of the predicted association between trait AS score and in-scanner anxiety sensations during fear conditioning. Contrary to the anterior insular hypothesis, no evidence of significant mediation was observed for this brain region, which was instead linked to perceived anxiety sensations independently from AS. Evidence for significant mediation was obtained for the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex-a finding that we argue is more consistent with the hypothesized role of human cingulofrontal cortex in conscious threat appraisal processes, including threat-overestimation. This study offers an important neurobiological validation of the AS construct and identifies a specific neural substrate that may underlie high AS clinical phenotypes, including but not limited to panic disorder.

  15. A default Bayesian hypothesis test for mediation.

    PubMed

    Nuijten, Michèle B; Wetzels, Ruud; Matzke, Dora; Dolan, Conor V; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2015-03-01

    In order to quantify the relationship between multiple variables, researchers often carry out a mediation analysis. In such an analysis, a mediator (e.g., knowledge of a healthy diet) transmits the effect from an independent variable (e.g., classroom instruction on a healthy diet) to a dependent variable (e.g., consumption of fruits and vegetables). Almost all mediation analyses in psychology use frequentist estimation and hypothesis-testing techniques. A recent exception is Yuan and MacKinnon (Psychological Methods, 14, 301-322, 2009), who outlined a Bayesian parameter estimation procedure for mediation analysis. Here we complete the Bayesian alternative to frequentist mediation analysis by specifying a default Bayesian hypothesis test based on the Jeffreys-Zellner-Siow approach. We further extend this default Bayesian test by allowing a comparison to directional or one-sided alternatives, using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques implemented in JAGS. All Bayesian tests are implemented in the R package BayesMed (Nuijten, Wetzels, Matzke, Dolan, & Wagenmakers, 2014).

  16. Light mediators in dark matter direct detections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai; Miao, Sen; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2015-03-17

    In an extended effective operator framework, we investigate in detail the effects of light mediators on the event spectra of dark matter (DM)-nucleus scatterings. The presence of light mediators changes the interpretation of the current experimental data, especially the determination of DM particle mass. We show by analytic and numerical illustrations that in general for all the operators relevant to spin-independent scatterings, the DM particle mass allowed by a given set of experimental data increases significantly when the mediator particle becomes lighter. For instance, in the case of CDMS-II-Si experiment, the allowed DM particle mass can reach ∼50 (100) GeV at 68% (90%) confidence level, which is much larger than ∼10 GeV in the case with contact interactions. The increase of DM particle mass saturates when the mediator mass is below O(10) MeV. The upper limits from other experiments such as SuperCDMS, CDMSlite, CDEX, XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX etc. all tend to be weaker toward high DM mass regions. In a combined analysis, we show that the presence of light mediators can partially relax the tension in the current results of CDMS-II-Si, SuperCDMS and LUX.

  17. Light mediators in dark matter direct detections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai; Miao, Sen; Zhou, Yu-Feng E-mail: miaosen@itp.ac.cn

    2015-03-01

    In an extended effective operator framework, we investigate in detail the effects of light mediators on the event spectra of dark matter (DM)-nucleus scatterings. The presence of light mediators changes the interpretation of the current experimental data, especially the determination of DM particle mass. We show by analytic and numerical illustrations that in general for all the operators relevant to spin-independent scatterings, the DM particle mass allowed by a given set of experimental data increases significantly when the mediator particle becomes lighter. For instance, in the case of CDMS-II-Si experiment, the allowed DM particle mass can reach ∼ 50 (100)  GeV at 68% (90%) confidence level, which is much larger than 0∼ 1 GeV in the case with contact interactions. The increase of DM particle mass saturates when the mediator mass is below O(10) MeV . The upper limits from other experiments such as SuperCDMS, CDMSlite, CDEX, XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX etc. all tend to be weaker toward high DM mass regions. In a combined analysis, we show that the presence of light mediators can partially relax the tension in the current results of CDMS-II-Si, SuperCDMS and LUX.

  18. An Exponential Decay Model for Mediation

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Mediation analysis is often used to investigate mechanisms of change in prevention research. Results finding mediation are strengthened when longitudinal data are used because of the need for temporal precedence. Current longitudinal mediation models have focused mainly on linear change, but many variables in prevention change nonlinearly across time. The most common solution to nonlinearity is to add a quadratic term to the linear model, but this can lead to the use of the quadratic function to explain all nonlinearity, regardless of theory and the characteristics of the variables in the model. The current study describes the problems that arise when quadratic functions are used to describe all nonlinearity and how the use of nonlinear functions, such as exponential decay, addresses many of these problems. In addition, nonlinear models provide several advantages over polynomial models including usefulness of parameters, parsimony, and generalizability. The effects of using nonlinear functions for mediation analysis are then discussed and a nonlinear growth curve model for mediation is presented. An empirical example using data from a randomized intervention study is then provided to illustrate the estimation and interpretation of the model. Implications, limitations, and future directions are also discussed. PMID:23625557

  19. Immunity: plants as effective mediators.

    PubMed

    Sultan, M Tauseef; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Qayyum, Mir M Nasir; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul

    2014-01-01

    In the domain of nutrition, exploring the diet-health linkages is major area of research. The outcomes of such interventions led to widespread acceptance of functional and nutraceutical foods; however, augmenting immunity is a major concern of dietary regimens. Indeed, the immune system is incredible arrangement of specific organs and cells that enabled humans to carry out defense against undesired responses. Its proper functionality is essential to maintain the body homeostasis. Array of plants and their components hold immunomodulating properties. Their possible inclusion in diets could explore new therapeutic avenues to enhanced immunity against diseases. The review intended to highlight the importance of garlic (Allium sativum), green tea (Camellia sinensis), ginger (Zingiber officinale), purple coneflower (Echinacea), black cumin (Nigella sativa), licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Astragalus and St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) as natural immune boosters. These plants are bestowed with functional ingredients that may provide protection against various menaces. Modes of their actions include boosting and functioning of immune system, activation and suppression of immune specialized cells, interfering in several pathways that eventually led to improvement in immune responses and defense system. In addition, some of these plants carry free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities that are helpful against cancer insurgence. Nevertheless, interaction between drugs and herbs/botanicals should be well investigated before recommended for their safe use, and such information must be disseminated to the allied stakeholders.

  20. Tuberculoventral neurons project to the multipolar cell area but not to the octopus cell area of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wickesberg, R E; Whitlon, D; Oertel, D

    1991-11-15

    Tuberculoventral neurons in the deep layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) provide frequency-specific inhibition to neurons in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) of the mouse (Wickesberg and Oertel, '88, '90). The present experiments examine the projection from the deep DCN to the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections into the PVCN reveal that the multipolar cell area, but not the octopus cell area, is innervated by neurons in the deep layer of the DCN. Injections into the multipolar cell area, in the rostral and ventral PVCN, labeled neurons across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the deep DCN. The labeled tuberculoventral neurons generally lay within the band of labeled auditory nerve terminals in the DCN. Injections of HRP into the octopus cell area, in the dorsal caudal PVCN, labeled almost no cells within the band of auditory nerve fiber terminals that were labeled by the same injection. The inhibition from tuberculoventral neurons onto ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neurons is likely to be mediated by glycine (Wickesberg and Oertel, '90). Slices of the cochlear nuclear complex were immunolabeled by an antibody against glycine conjugated with glutaraldehyde to bovine serum albumin (Wenthold et al., '87). Glycine-like immunoreactivity was found throughout the DCN, the AVCN and the multipolar cell area, but there was little labeling in the octopus cell area. This finding provides independent evidence that tuberculoventral neurons do not innervate the octopus cell area and indicates that the octopus cell area is anatomically and functionally distinct.

  1. Surmounting elusive barriers: the case for bioethics mediation.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    This article describes, analyzes, and advocates for management of clinical healthcare conflict by a process commonly referred to as bioethics mediation. Section I provides a brief introduction to classical mediation outside the realm of clinical healthcare. Section II highlights certain distinguishing characteristics of bioethics mediation. Section III chronicles the history of bioethics mediation and references a number of seminal writings on the subject. Finally, Section IV analyzes barriers that have, thus far, limited the widespread implementation of bioethics mediation.

  2. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria–material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces. PMID:26372264

  3. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-10-14

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  4. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  5. Carbon nanotubes as cancer therapeutic carriers and mediators

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kuk Hui; Hong, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received increasing attention in biomedical fields because of their unique structures and properties, including high aspect ratios, large surface areas, rich surface chemical functionalities, and size stability on the nanoscale. Particularly, they are attractive as carriers and mediators for cancer therapy. Through appropriate functionalization, CNTs have been used as nanocarriers for anticancer drugs including doxorubicin, camptothecin, carboplatin, cisplatin, paclitaxel, Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and genes including plasmid DNA, small-interfering RNA, oligonucleotides, and RNA/DNA aptamers. CNTs can also deliver proteins and immunotherapy components. Using combinations of light energy, they have also been applied as mediators for photothermal therapy and photodynamic therapy to directly destroy cancer cells without severely damaging normal tissue. If limitations such as a long-term cytotoxicity in the body, lack of size uniformity during the synthetic process, loading deviations for drug–CNT complexes, and release controllability at the target point are overcome, CNTs will become one of the strongest tools that are available for various other biomedical fields as well as for cancer therapy. PMID:27785021

  6. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-10-14

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces. PMID:26372264

  7. 14. INTERIOR, IN TRIANGULAR STORAGE AREA, IN SOUTHEAST AREA OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR, IN TRIANGULAR STORAGE AREA, IN SOUTHEAST AREA OF BUILDING (EAST OF LOCKER/OFFICE/HEAD AREA), LOOKING EAST-NORTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Pier Transit Shed, South of D Street between First & Second Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. 75. Rocky Knob Recreation area picnic area. View of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. Rocky Knob Recreation area picnic area. View of the picnic tables set amongst the area's rock fins and the narrow service road. Looking north-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. Social cognition as a mediator of cognition and outcome among deaf and hearing people with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Horton, Heather K; Silverstein, Steven M

    2008-10-01

    It has been suggested in the research literature that facial affect processing (FAP) and theory of mind (ToM) are both potential mediators of the well-established relationship between cognition and functional outcome among people with schizophrenia. The current project tests the mediating potency of these two domains of social cognition among deaf and hearing people with schizophrenia. Sixty-five people (34 deaf, 31 hearing) were assessed using measures of verbal and visual memory, attention, visual processing, FAP, and ToM. The results suggest that each domain of cognition, save vigilance, exerts an effect on functional outcome indirectly through its influence on social cognition. The patterns of mediation varied when the samples were broken down by hearing status and analyzed separately. Namely, the cognitive tasks directly involving linguistic ability (early visual processing [EVP] and word memory) were best mediated by social cognition for hearing subjects. For deaf subjects, the nonlinguistic cognitive tasks (e.g., visual-spatial memory-recall and copy [VSM-recall and VSM-copy]) were best mediated by social cognition. While FAP and ToM were equally effective as mediators for hearing subjects, FAP was a more potent mediator than ToM for deaf subjects. This study extends prior work in the area of social cognition and schizophrenia and indicates that the development of cognitive rehabilitation strategies should include not only interventions targeting specific cognitive abilities, such as attention and memory, but should include an emphasis on social-cognitive domains, including FAP and ToM. Further, deaf and hearing subjects may benefit from interventions addressing aspects of cognition that support linguistic ability, especially as they relate to social cognition.

  10. Tau pathology-mediated presynaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Morfini, G; Buitrago, L; Ujlaki, G; Choi, S; Yu, E; Moreira, J E; Avila, J; Brady, S T; Pant, H; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R

    2016-06-14

    Brain tauopathies are characterized by abnormal processing of tau protein. While somatodendritic tau mislocalization has attracted considerable attention in tauopathies, the role of tau pathology in axonal transport, connectivity and related dysfunctions remains obscure. We have previously shown using the squid giant synapse that presynaptic microinjection of recombinant human tau protein (htau42) results in failure of synaptic transmission. Here, we evaluated molecular mechanisms mediating this effect. Thus, the initial event, observed after htau42 presynaptic injection, was an increase in transmitter release. This event was mediated by calcium release from intracellular stores and was followed by a reduction in evoked transmitter release. The effect of htau42 on synaptic transmission was recapitulated by a peptide comprising the phosphatase-activating domain of tau, suggesting activation of phosphotransferases. Accordingly, findings indicated that htau42-mediated toxicity involves the activities of both GSK3 and Cdk5 kinases. PMID:27012611

  11. Intercellular Lipid Mediators and GPCR Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Im, Dong-Soon

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are the largest superfamily of receptors responsible for signaling between cells and tissues, and because they play important physiological roles in homeostasis, they are major drug targets. New technologies have been developed for the identification of new ligands, new GPCR functions, and for drug discovery purposes. In particular, intercellular lipid mediators, such as, lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate have attracted much attention for drug discovery and this has resulted in the development of fingolimod (FTY-720) and AM095. The discovery of new intercellular lipid mediators and their GPCRs are discussed from the perspective of drug development. Lipid GPCRs for lysophospholipids, including lysophosphatidylserine, lysophosphatidylinositol, lysophosphatidylcholine, free fatty acids, fatty acid derivatives, and other lipid mediators are reviewed. PMID:24404331

  12. Revisiting R-invariant direct gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Harigaya, Keisuke; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-03-01

    We revisit a special model of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, the " R-invariant direct gauge mediation." We pay particular attention to whether the model is consistent with the minimal model of the μ-term, i.e., a simple mass term of the Higgs doublets in the superpotential. Although the incompatibility is highlighted in view of the current experimental constraints on the superparticle masses and the observed Higgs boson mass, the minimal μ-term can be consistent with the R-invariant gauge mediation model via a careful choice of model parameters. We derive an upper limit on the gluino mass from the observed Higgs boson mass. We also discuss whether the model can explain the 3 σ excess of the Z + jets + E T miss events reported by the ATLAS collaboration.

  13. Therapeutic strategies for tau mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Lee, Virginia M Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Based on the amyloid hypothesis, controlling β-amyloid protein (Aβ) accumulation is supposed to suppress downstream pathological events, tau accumulation, neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. However, in recent clinical trials, Aβ removal or reducing Aβ production has shown limited efficacy. Moreover, while active immunisation with Aβ resulted in the clearance of Aβ, it did not prevent tau pathology or neurodegeneration. This prompts the concern that it might be too late to employ Aβ targeting therapies once tau mediated neurodegeneration has occurred. Therefore, it is timely and very important to develop tau directed therapies. The pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration are unclear but hyperphosphorylation, oligomerisation, fibrillisation and propagation of tau pathology have been proposed as the likely pathological processes that induce loss of function or gain of toxic function of tau, causing neurodegeneration. Here we review the strategies for tau directed treatments based on recent progress in research on tau and our understanding of the pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23085937

  14. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baohong

    2013-01-01

    There are many methods and techniques that can be used to transfer foreign genes into cells. In plant biotechnology, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a widely used traditional method for inserting foreign genes into plant genome and obtaining transgenic plants, particularly for dicot plant species. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of cotton involves several important and also critical steps, which includes coculture of cotton explants with Agrobacterium, induction and selection of stable transgenic cell lines, recovery of plants from transgenic cells majorly through somatic embryogenesis, and detection and expression analysis of transgenic plants. In this chapter, we describe a detailed step-by-step protocol for obtaining transgenic cotton plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

  15. The algal lift: Buoyancy-mediated sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Federlein, Laura L.; Knie, Matthias; Mutz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The role of benthic algae as biostabilizers of sediments is well-known, however, their potential to lift and transport sediments remains unclear. Under low-flow conditions, matured algal mats may detach from the bed and may lift up sediment, thereby causing disturbance to the uppermost streambed sediment. We tested the potential of algal mats to lift sediments in 12 indoor flumes filled with sand (0.2 - 0.8 mm), gravel (2 - 8 mm) or a sand-gravel mixture (25/75% mass). After four weeks, the algal mats covered about 50% of the flumes area. Due to the accumulation of oxygen gas bubbles in the mats, that developed from high primary production at 4.5 weeks, about half of the algal mats detached from the bed carrying entangled sediments. Both the area covered by algal mats and detached area were similar among sediment types, but the amount of sediment transported tended to be higher for sand and sand-gravel mixture compared to gravel. Our results reveal that biologically mediated sediment transport mainly depends on the development of a dense filamentous algal matrix, that traps gas bubbles, increasing the mats buoyancy. This novel mechanism of sediment transport will occur in shallow ecosystems during low-flow periods, with the highest impact for sandy sediments.

  16. Effectiveness of cognitive mediation and behaviour modification with hospitalized hyperactives.

    PubMed

    Konstantareas, M M; Homatidis, S

    1983-10-01

    This study examined the efficacy of behaviour modification and cognitive mediation in treating two groups of hyperactive boys in day treatment. The study marks a departure from other research in two main areas: a) the severity of the children's symptomatology was such that it necessitated their removal from school; b) the interventions employed were intensive and of long duration (10 months), as opposed to the brief, short-term efforts commonly reported. Multiple outcome measures were employed to assess the effectiveness of each of the behavioural treatments. The children were administered a battery of tests shortly after their admission and again prior to discharge, 10 months later. Six main areas, considered relevant to the syndrome of hyperactivity, were tapped. These were: impulsivity, motor activity, sustained attention, self-concept, field-dependence/independence, and an overall hyperactivity rating independently assessed by a clinician. Results indicated that the two groups of children made comparable gains in each of the main areas studied. Moreover, the children of both groups were considered sufficiently improved by their clinical team to be discharged back to the regular school system.

  17. The Role of AGE/RAGE Signaling in Diabetes-Mediated Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AGE/RAGE signaling has been a well-studied cascade in many different disease states, particularly diabetes. Due to the complex nature of the receptor and multiple intersecting pathways, the AGE/RAGE signaling mechanism is still not well understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight key areas of AGE/RAGE mediated vascular calcification as a complication of diabetes. AGE/RAGE signaling heavily influences both cellular and systemic responses to increase bone matrix proteins through PKC, p38 MAPK, fetuin-A, TGF-β, NFκB, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in both hyperglycemic and calcification conditions. AGE/RAGE signaling has been shown to increase oxidative stress to promote diabetes-mediated vascular calcification through activation of Nox-1 and decreased expression of SOD-1. AGE/RAGE signaling in diabetes-mediated vascular calcification was also attributed to increased oxidative stress resulting in the phenotypic switch of VSMCs to osteoblast-like cells in AGEs-induced calcification. Researchers found that pharmacological agents and certain antioxidants decreased the level of calcium deposition in AGEs-induced diabetes-mediated vascular calcification. By understanding the role the AGE/RAGE signaling cascade plays diabetes-mediated vascular calcification will allow for pharmacological intervention to decrease the severity of this diabetic complication. PMID:27547766

  18. Particle-mediated gene transfer into murine livers using a newly developed gene gun.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, S; Mitoro, A; Tsujinoue, H; Nakatani, T; Yoshiji, H; Tsujimoto, T; Yamazaki, M; Fukui, H

    2000-07-01

    Although particle-mediated gene transfer using gene gun technology has been applied for gene transfer into epidermis, applications of this technology to visceral tissues have not been well investigated. Although all helium gas-driven gene gun instruments have used macrocarriers to discharge DNA-coated microprojectiles so far, we used a newly developed gene gun instrument, in which a hammering bullet is used to discharge microprojectiles. With the gene gun, gold particles coated with lacZ expression plasmid were discharged to murine livers. LacZ expression was induced much more profoundly in the liver by particle-mediated gene transfer than by simple plasmid injection and electroporation-mediated gene transfer. LacZ expression was broadly and randomly distributed throughout the bombarded livers, indicating that particle-mediated gene transfer can induce transgene expression even at relatively distant areas from the surface of the bombarded tissue. Furthermore, although transgene expression was at its peak on day 2 after the bombardment, it was still detectable even on day 28. These results indicate that particle-mediated gene transfer with a newly developed gene gun may provide a new approach to gene therapy for human diseases.

  19. Does drinking refusal self-efficacy mediate the impulsivity-problematic alcohol use relation?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Angela K; Littlefield, Andrew K; Blanchard, Brittany E; Talley, Amelia E; Brown, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    There is consistent evidence that impulsivity-like traits relate to problematic alcohol involvement; however, identifying mechanisms that account for this relation remains an important area of research. Drinking refusal self-efficacy (or a person's ability to resist alcohol; DRSE) has been shown to predict alcohol use among college students and may be a relevant mediator of the impulsivity-alcohol relation. The current study examined the indirect effect of various constructs related to impulsivity (i.e., urgency, sensation seeking, and deficits in conscientiousness) via several facets of DRSE (i.e., social pressure, opportunistic, and emotional relief) on alcohol-related problems among a large sample of college students (N=891). Overall, results indicated that certain DRSE facets were significant mediators of the relation between impulsivity-related constructs and alcohol problems. More specifically, emotional-relief DRSE was a mediator for the respective relations between urgency and deficits in conscientiousness and alcohol problems, whereas social-DRSE was a significant mediator of the respective relations between urgency and sensation seeking with alcohol problems. Results from this study suggest particular types of DRSE are important mediators of the relations between specific impulsivity constructs and alcohol-related problems. These findings support prevention and intervention efforts that seek to enhance drinking refusal self-efficacy skills of college students, particularly those high in certain personality features, in order to reduce alcohol-related problems among this population.

  20. Does drinking refusal self-efficacy mediate the impulsivity-problematic alcohol use relation?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Angela K; Littlefield, Andrew K; Blanchard, Brittany E; Talley, Amelia E; Brown, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    There is consistent evidence that impulsivity-like traits relate to problematic alcohol involvement; however, identifying mechanisms that account for this relation remains an important area of research. Drinking refusal self-efficacy (or a person's ability to resist alcohol; DRSE) has been shown to predict alcohol use among college students and may be a relevant mediator of the impulsivity-alcohol relation. The current study examined the indirect effect of various constructs related to impulsivity (i.e., urgency, sensation seeking, and deficits in conscientiousness) via several facets of DRSE (i.e., social pressure, opportunistic, and emotional relief) on alcohol-related problems among a large sample of college students (N=891). Overall, results indicated that certain DRSE facets were significant mediators of the relation between impulsivity-related constructs and alcohol problems. More specifically, emotional-relief DRSE was a mediator for the respective relations between urgency and deficits in conscientiousness and alcohol problems, whereas social-DRSE was a significant mediator of the respective relations between urgency and sensation seeking with alcohol problems. Results from this study suggest particular types of DRSE are important mediators of the relations between specific impulsivity constructs and alcohol-related problems. These findings support prevention and intervention efforts that seek to enhance drinking refusal self-efficacy skills of college students, particularly those high in certain personality features, in order to reduce alcohol-related problems among this population. PMID:26547044

  1. Development of mediated BOD biosensor system of flow injection mode for shochu distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Oota, Shinichi; Hatae, Yuta; Amada, Kei; Koya, Hidekazu; Kawakami, Mitsuyasu

    2010-09-15

    Although microbial biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensors utilizing redox mediators have attracted much attention as a rapid BOD measurement method, little attempts have been made to apply the mediated BOD biosensors to the flow injection analysis system. In this work, a mediated BOD sensor system of flow injection mode, constructed by combining an immobilized microbial reactor with an electrochemical flow cell of three electrodes configuration, has been developed to estimate BOD of shochu distillery wastewater (SDW). It was demonstrated consequently that the mediated sensing was realized by employing phosphate buffer containing potassium hexacyanoferrate as the carrier. The output current was found to yield a peak with a sample injection, and to result from reoxidation of reduced mediator at the electrode. By employing the peak area as the sensor response, the effects of flow rate and pH of the carrier on the sensitivity were investigated. The sensor system using a microorganism of high SDW-assimilation capacity showed good performance and proved to be available for estimation of BOD of SDW.

  2. Development of mediated BOD biosensor system of flow injection mode for shochu distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Oota, Shinichi; Hatae, Yuta; Amada, Kei; Koya, Hidekazu; Kawakami, Mitsuyasu

    2010-09-15

    Although microbial biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensors utilizing redox mediators have attracted much attention as a rapid BOD measurement method, little attempts have been made to apply the mediated BOD biosensors to the flow injection analysis system. In this work, a mediated BOD sensor system of flow injection mode, constructed by combining an immobilized microbial reactor with an electrochemical flow cell of three electrodes configuration, has been developed to estimate BOD of shochu distillery wastewater (SDW). It was demonstrated consequently that the mediated sensing was realized by employing phosphate buffer containing potassium hexacyanoferrate as the carrier. The output current was found to yield a peak with a sample injection, and to result from reoxidation of reduced mediator at the electrode. By employing the peak area as the sensor response, the effects of flow rate and pH of the carrier on the sensitivity were investigated. The sensor system using a microorganism of high SDW-assimilation capacity showed good performance and proved to be available for estimation of BOD of SDW. PMID:20638832

  3. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  4. STUDY AREAS CONTIGUOUS TO THE UNCOMPAHGRE PRIMITIVE AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Thomas A.; Bieniewski, Carl L.

    1984-01-01

    Important mineral deposits of several ages have been exploited at many places in the western San Juan Mountains, including the originally studied Uncompahgre Primitive Area, Colorado. Although the three contiguous areas - western, central, and eastern - considered here are largely outside the more productive mining areas, a mineral study indicated that there are areas of probable resource potential for base and precious metals near the margins of the areas. Results of this study indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of fossil fuels and geothermal energy.

  5. COMBUSTION AREA SOURCES: DATA SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies, documents, and evaluates data sources for stationary area source emissions, including solid waste and agricultural burning. Area source emissions of particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, reactive volatile organic compounds, and carbon mon...

  6. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  7. Spatial interplay of plant competition and consumer foraging mediate plant coexistence and drive the invasion ratchet.

    PubMed

    Orrock, John L; Baskett, Marissa L; Holt, Robert D

    2010-11-01

    Indirect effects may play an important role in structuring plant communities. Using a spatially explicit model of consumer foraging and plant competition, we demonstrate how the relationship between the spatial area over which plants compete and the spatial scale of consumer behaviour can determine the outcome of competition when one plant species provides a refuge for mobile consumers (i.e. refuge-mediated apparent competition). Once an initial population of the invader is established, complete invasion may be inevitable because of an ever-advancing invasion front ratchets forward driven by a feeding front of mobile consumers. Because the spatial extent of apparent competition determines the area available for colonization, consumers may also dictate the rate at which an invasion occurs. We find that, as long as refuge-mediated apparent competition is sufficiently localized, invasion is possible even in systems characterized by low overall levels of consumer pressure. Moreover, we show that a stable equilibrium can result in which both resident and invading plants coexist, suggesting that spatial heterogeneity created by refuge-mediated apparent competition may be important in mediating coexistence in plant communities. The spatial interplay of consumer behaviour and plant competition may be an underappreciated mechanism affecting the composition, diversity and spatial pattern of plant communities.

  8. Transition to whistler mediated magnetic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandt, M. E.; Denton, R. E.; Drake, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    The transition in the magnetic reconnection rate from the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime where the Alfen wave controls reconnection to a regime in which the ions become unmagnetized and the whistler wave mediates reconnection is explored with 2-D hybrid simulations. In the whistler regime the electrons carry the currents while the ions provide a neutralizing background. A simple physical picture is presented illustrating the role of the whistler mediated reconnection is calculated analytically. The development of an out-of-plane component of the magnetic field is an observable signature of whistler driven reconnection.

  9. Magnetically mediated thermoacoustic imaging toward deeper penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaohua; Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2013-08-01

    Magnetically mediated thermo-acoustic effect is predicted in theory and demonstrated in phantom studies in this letter. By applying transient current to a compact magnetically resonant coil at radio frequency below 20 MHz, large electric field is inducted by magnetic field inside conductive objects which then undergoes joule heating and emanates acoustic signal thermo-elastically. The magnetic mediation approach with low radio frequency can provide deeper penetration into conductive objects which may extend thermoacoustic imaging to deep laid human organs. Both incoherent time domain and coherent frequency domain approaches are discussed with the latter demonstrated potential for portable imaging system.

  10. Barley Transformation Using Agrobacterium-Mediated Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Wendy A.; Bartlett, Joanne G.; Alves, Silvia C.; Perry, Matthew; Smedley, Mark A.; Leyland, Nicola; Snape, John W.

    Methods for the transformation of barley using Agrobacterium-mediated techniques have been available for the past 10 years. Agrobacterium offers a number of advantages over biolistic-mediated techniques in terms of efficiency and the quality of the transformed plants produced. This chapter describes a simple system for the transformation of barley based on the infection of immature embryos with Agrobacterium tumefaciens followed by the selection of transgenic tissue on media containing the antibiotic hygromycin. The method can lead to the production of large numbers of fertile, independent transgenic lines. It is therefore ideal for studies of gene function in a cereal crop system.

  11. Exosomes: mediators of neurodegeneration, neuroprotection and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Alka; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-02-01

    Exosomes have emerged as prominent mediators of neurodegenerative diseases where they have been shown to carry disease particles such as beta amyloid and prions from their cells of origin to other cells. Their simple structure and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier allow great opportunity to design a "makeup" with drugs and genetic elements, such as siRNA or miRNA, and use them as delivery vehicles for neurotherapeutics. Their role in neuroprotection is evident by the fact that they are involved in the regeneration of peripheral nerves and repair of neuronal injuries. This review is focused on the role of exosomes in mediating neurodegeneration and neuroprotection.

  12. A security mediator for health care information.

    PubMed Central

    Wiederhold, G.; Bilello, M.; Sarathy, V.; Qian, X.

    1996-01-01

    The TIHI (Trusted Interoperation of Healthcare Information) project addresses a security issue that arises when some information is being shared among collaborating enterprises, although not all enterprise information is sharable. It assumes that protection exists to prevent intrusion by adversaries through secure transmission and firewalls. The TIHI system design provides a gateway, owned by the enterprise security officer, to mediate queries and responses. The latter are typically transmitted via the Internet. The enterprise policy is determined by rules provided to the mediator. We show examples of typical rules. The problem and our solution, although developed in a healthcare context, is equally valid among collaborating enterprises. PMID:8947640

  13. Simultaneous backward conditioned inhibition and mediated conditioning.

    PubMed

    Graham, Steven; Jie, Hans Lee; Chan, Hui-Minn; McLaren, I P L; Wills, Andy J

    2011-04-01

    Demonstrations of retrospective revaluation suggest that remembered stimuli undergo a reduction in association with the unconditioned stimulus (US) present during learning. Conversely, demonstrations of mediated conditioning in flavor-conditioning experiments with rats suggest that remembered stimuli undergo an increase in association with the US present during learning. In a food allergy prediction task with 23 undergraduates, we demonstrated simultaneous backward conditioned inhibition and mediated conditioning effects. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that the direction of change (decrease or increase) in associative strength depends on whether the remembered stimulus was of a different category (conditioned stimulus/antecedent) or the same category (US/outcome) as the presented US. PMID:21319913

  14. DINKEY LAKES ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Federspiel, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Dinkey Lakes Roadless Area occupies an area of about 184 sq mi on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, California. The results of a mineral survey show that parts of the area have substantiated resource potential for tungsten and marble and probable resource potential for quartz crystal gemstones. A probable resource potential for geothermal energy exists in one small area. No potential for other metallic mineral or energy resources was identified in this study.

  15. Crab-mediated phenotypic changes in Spartina densiflora Brong.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolus, Alejandro; Laterra, Pedro; Iribarne, Oscar

    2004-01-01

    Although plant phenotypic plasticity has been historically studied as an important adaptive strategy to overcome herbivory and environmental heterogeneity, there are several aspects of its ecological importance that remain controversial. The burrowing crab Chasmagnathus granulata eats Spartina densiflora, and also causes several geomorphologic changes that indirectly affect Spartina growth. Here we evaluate if this crab affects the sexual reproductive effort of S. densiflora by mediating changes in plant phenotypic plasticity (i.e., shape of leaves and spikes) while affecting aboveground production, and if these effects interact with disturbance intensity. We conducted local and regional surveys and two-year field experiments manipulating the density of crabs in a mature Spartina marsh where we clipped at ground level different 1×1 m marsh areas to create and compare crab's effect on young (plants growing after the clipping) and mature (unclipped) Spartina stands. Our results suggest that crabs mediate the phenotypic plasticity of sexual reproductive structures of Spartina. Crabs induced an increase in seed production (up to 721%) and seed viability, potentially favoring Spartina dispersal and colonization of distant sites. This effect appears to be maximal when combined with the experimental clipping disturbance. Crabs also exerted a strong effect on clipped plants by increasing the number of standing dead stems and decreasing the photosynthetic area and leaf production. These effects disappear in about two years if no other disturbance occurs. An a posteriori regional field survey agreed with our experimental results corroborating the prediction that plants in old undisturbed marshes have lower sexual reproductive effort than plants in highly disturbed marshes populated by burrowing-herbivore crabs. All these phenotypic changes have important taxonomic and macro-ecological implications that should not be ignored in discussions of applied ecology and

  16. Public Services in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Kenneth D.

    The paper examines issues in the delivery of public services in rural areas. The importance of access to urban areas in identifying differences in rural delivery problems is emphasized. It is no longer accurate to equate "rural" with agriculture and farming, drawing a distinction between those who have easy access to an urban area and those who…

  17. Finding Areas on Dot Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2007-01-01

    This article contains investigative activities to assist students in constructing formulas out of an understanding of the area of geometric shapes. Included with this article are a "Finding Areas on Square Dot Paper Activity Sheet" and a "Finding Areas on Triangle Dot Paper Activity Sheet." (Contains 1 table and 11 figures.)

  18. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  19. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  20. Bioethics mediation: the role and importance of nursing advocacy.

    PubMed

    Schlairet, Maura C

    2009-01-01

    Ethics consultations are utilized in health care to identify and manage conflict, difficult decision-making, and ethical issues. In bioethics mediation, a more updated approach using interpersonal, mediative, conflict management, and dispute resolution skills is merged with ethical principles to manage dilemmas arising in healthcare settings. This article argues, based on a professional obligation to advocate for the good of the client, that nurses must assume leadership roles in mediation processes. Nurses can initiate and fully participate in formal bioethics mediation and other mediative interventions. Nurse administrators can work to evolve existing ethics consult models to mediation models. Nonetheless, mediative efforts of individual nurses must be grounded in realization of the multifactorial nature of conflict and dilemma in healthcare settings. Multidisciplinary mediative interventions, framed by sound institutional policies, may best serve the complex needs of ethically vulnerable clients. To best advocate for these at-risk clients, nurses must assume various leadership roles in mediation processes. PMID:19631060

  1. KANAB CREEK ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, the Kanab Creek Roadless Area in north-central Arizona has a probable mineral-resource potential for uranium and copper in four small areas around five collapse structures. Gypsum is abundant in layers along the canyon rim of Snake Gulch, but it is a fairly common mineral in the region outside the roadless area. There is little promise for the occurence of fossil fuels in the area. Studies of collapse structures in surrounding adjacent areas might reveal significant mineralization at depth, such as the recent discovery of the uranium ore body at depth in the Pigeon Pipe.

  2. Fractal cartography of urban areas

    PubMed Central

    Encarnação, Sara; Gaudiano, Marcos; Santos, Francisco C.; Tenedório, José A.; Pacheco, Jorge M.

    2012-01-01

    In a world in which the pace of cities is increasing, prompt access to relevant information is crucial to the understanding and regulation of land use and its evolution in time. In spite of this, characterization and regulation of urban areas remains a complex process, requiring expert human intervention, analysis and judgment. Here we carry out a spatio-temporal fractal analysis of a metropolitan area, based on which we develop a model which generates a cartographic representation and classification of built-up areas, identifying (and even predicting) those areas requiring the most proximate planning and regulation. Furthermore, we show how different types of urban areas identified by the model co-evolve with the city, requiring policy regulation to be flexible and adaptive, acting just in time. The algorithmic implementation of the model is applicable to any built-up area and simple enough to pave the way for the automatic classification of urban areas worldwide. PMID:22829981

  3. Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, E.W.; Light, T.D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in 1980 in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas.

  4. Fractal cartography of urban areas.

    PubMed

    Encarnação, Sara; Gaudiano, Marcos; Santos, Francisco C; Tenedório, José A; Pacheco, Jorge M

    2012-01-01

    In a world in which the pace of cities is increasing, prompt access to relevant information is crucial to the understanding and regulation of land use and its evolution in time. In spite of this, characterization and regulation of urban areas remains a complex process, requiring expert human intervention, analysis and judgment. Here we carry out a spatio-temporal fractal analysis of a metropolitan area, based on which we develop a model which generates a cartographic representation and classification of built-up areas, identifying (and even predicting) those areas requiring the most proximate planning and regulation. Furthermore, we show how different types of urban areas identified by the model co-evolve with the city, requiring policy regulation to be flexible and adaptive, acting just in time. The algorithmic implementation of the model is applicable to any built-up area and simple enough to pave the way for the automatic classification of urban areas worldwide.

  5. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  6. Nonthermal dark matter in mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Minoru; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2007-12-15

    In mirage-mediation models there exists a modulus field whose mass is O(1000) TeV and its late decay may significantly change the standard thermal relic scenario of the dark matter. We study nonthermal production of the dark matter directly from the modulus decay, and find that for some parameter regions nonthermally produced neutralinos can become the dark matter.

  7. Comments: Causal Interpretations of Mediation Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Booil; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors thank Dr. Lindsay Page for providing a nice illustration of the use of the principal stratification framework to define causal effects, and a Bayesian model for effect estimation. They hope that her well-written article will help expose education researchers to these concepts and methods, and move the field of mediation analysis in…

  8. 34 CFR 300.506 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mediation. 300.506 Section 300.506 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards Due...

  9. Cell-mediated Protection in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul G.; Keating, Rachael; Hulse-Post, Diane J.

    2006-01-01

    Current vaccine strategies against influenza focus on generating robust antibody responses. Because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains over the course of a year, vaccine strains must be reformulated specifically for each influenza season. The time delay from isolating the pandemic strain to large-scale vaccine production would be detrimental in a pandemic situation. A vaccine approach based on cell-mediated immunity that avoids some of these drawbacks is discussed here. Specifically, cell-mediated responses typically focus on peptides from internal influenza proteins, which are far less susceptible to antigenic variation. We review the literature on the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity in influenza infection and the available data on the role of these responses in protection from highly pathogenic influenza infection. We discuss the advantages of developing a vaccine based on cell-mediated immune responses toward highly pathogenic influenza virus and potential problems arising from immune pressure. PMID:16494717

  10. Proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, B; Burgess, D H; Schlegel, J; Pörn, M I; Vanags, D; Orrenius, S

    1997-01-01

    Involvement of a unique family of cysteine proteases in the multistep apoptotic process has been documented. Cloning of several mammalian genes identifies some components of this cellular response. However, it is currently unclear which protease plays a role as a signal and/or effector of apoptosis. We summarize contributions to the data concerning proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  11. Computer Mediated Communication: Online Instruction and Interactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavooy, Maria J.; Newlin, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the different forms and potential applications of computer mediated communication (CMC) for Web-based and Web-enhanced courses. Based on their experiences with three different Web courses (Research Methods in Psychology, Statistical Methods in Psychology, and Basic Learning Processes) taught repeatedly over the last five years, the…

  12. 10 CFR 1040.89-6 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, in accordance with 45 CFR 90.43(c)(3), all complaints that: (1... of Civil Rights and Diversity, will accept a judgment that an agreement is not possible. However, the... Director, Office of Civil Rights and Diversity, DOE. DOE will take no further action on the...

  13. 10 CFR 1040.89-6 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, in accordance with 45 CFR 90.43(c)(3), all complaints that: (1... of Civil Rights and Diversity, will accept a judgment that an agreement is not possible. However, the... Director, Office of Civil Rights and Diversity, DOE. DOE will take no further action on the...

  14. 10 CFR 1040.89-6 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, in accordance with 45 CFR 90.43(c)(3), all complaints that: (1... of Civil Rights and Diversity, will accept a judgment that an agreement is not possible. However, the... Director, Office of Civil Rights and Diversity, DOE. DOE will take no further action on the...

  15. 10 CFR 1040.89-6 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, in accordance with 45 CFR 90.43(c)(3), all complaints that: (1... of Civil Rights and Diversity, will accept a judgment that an agreement is not possible. However, the... Director, Office of Civil Rights and Diversity, DOE. DOE will take no further action on the...

  16. Teaching Responsibly with Technology-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltsos, Jennifer R.; Veltsos, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Technology-mediated communication, or "new media," such as blogs, Twitter, wikis, and social network sites, can be an endless source of ideas for activities or inspiration for classroom discussion. Many instructors ask students to monitor current events by following keywords and industry leaders on Twitter and reading both corporate and trade…

  17. A Comparison of Three Tests of Mediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warbasse, Rosalia E.

    2009-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate the performance of three tests of mediation: the bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap (Efron & Tibshirani, 1993), the asymmetric confidence limits test (MacKinnon, 2008), and a multiple regression approach described by Kenny, Kashy, and Bolger (1998). The evolution of these methods is reviewed and…

  18. Learning Style Theory and Computer Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Hilary; Moore, David; Sharpe, Simon; Hobbs, Dave

    This paper looks at the low participation rates in computer mediated conferences (CMC) and argues that one of the causes of this may be an incompatibility between students' learning styles and the style adopted by CMC. Curry's Onion Model provides a well-established framework within which to view the main learning style theories (Riding and…

  19. Instructional Components of Mediational Dynamic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Sonya E.; Vye, Nancy J.

    The instructional components of mediation, a teaching technique used in dynamic assessment, were evaluated with 100 four-year-old children attending daycare or preschools in London, Ontario. The effects of familiarization with task materials, task-specific rule teaching, and elaborated feedback were assessed using a pretest-posttest design.…

  20. Deflected anomaly mediation and neutralino dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cesarini, Alessandro; Fucito, Francesco; Lionetto, Andrea

    2007-01-15

    This is a study of the phenomenology of the neutralino dark matter in the so called deflected anomaly mediation scenario. This scheme is obtained from the minimal anomaly-mediated scenario by introducing a gauge-mediated sector with N{sub f} messenger fields. Unlike the former scheme the latter has no tachyons. We find that the neutralino is still the LSP in a wide region of the parameter space: it is essentially a pure bino in the scenario with N{sub f}=1 while it can also be a pure Higgsino for N{sub f}>1. This is very different from the naive anomaly-mediated scenario which predicts a wino like neutralino. Moreover we do not find any tachyonic scalars in this scheme. After computing the relic density (considering all the possible coannihilations) we find that there are regions in the parameter space with values compatible with the latest WMAP results with no need to consider moduli fields that decay in the early universe.

  1. Conflict Resolution and Mediation for Peer Helpers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Don L.

    This book explores conflict resolution strategies and presents a systematic approach to mediation for peer helpers. The first part examines conflict resolution. Internal and external sources of conflict are considered. Irritations, inappropriate expectations, and unknown sources of external conflict are examined. A section on looking inside…

  2. Web-Mediated Knowledge Synthesis for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSchryver, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous and instant access to information on the Web is challenging what constitutes 21st century literacies. This article explores the notion of Web-mediated knowledge synthesis, an approach to integrating Web-based learning that may result in generative synthesis of ideas. This article describes the skills and strategies that may support…

  3. MEDIATORS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR CHANGE

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Melissa A.; Papandonatos, George D.; Lewis, Beth A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Williams, David M.; King, Abby C.; Bock, Beth C.; Pinto, Bernardine; Marcus, Bess H.

    2009-01-01

    Using a multivariate extension of the Baron and Kenny (1986) mediation framework, we examined the simultaneous effect of psychosocial variables hypothesized to mediate the relationship between a motivationally-tailored physical activity intervention, and 6-month physical activity behavior in 239 healthy, under-active adults (mean age=47.5; 82% women). Participants were randomly assigned to 1) Print-based feedback; 2) Telephone-based feedback; or 3) Contact Control. All mediation criteria were satisfied for both intervention arms. In terms of effect size, a moderate indirect effect of Print (0.39, 95% CI=0.21, 0.57) was due to increases in behavioral processes (0.54, 95% CI= 0.29, 0.80) being attenuated by decreases due to cognitive processes (-0.17, 95%CI= -0.31,-.03). A moderate indirect effect was observed for Telephone (0.47, 95% CI=0.28, 0.66), with increases due to behavioral processes (0.61, 95% CI=0.34, 0.87) attenuated by decreases due to cognitive processes (0.15, 95% CI=-0.27, -0.02); self-efficacy and decisional balance mediational paths did not attain statistical significance. These findings highlight the importance of studies that deconstruct the theoretical components of interventions to determine which combination produces the greatest behavior changes at the lowest cost. PMID:18642998

  4. Factors Mediating the Adjustment to Involuntary Childlessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatelli, Ronald M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Explored stressors that accompany experience of involuntary childlessness and examined mediators of adjustment to infertility in married individuals. Data showed deleterious effect that coping with infertility can have on couple's sexual relationship. Findings suggest important relationship between self-esteem, marital commitment, and positive…

  5. 15 CFR 923.54 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... an appropriate forum for conflict resolution. (b) State-Federal differences should be addressed... parties agree to a resolution of the serious disagreement, (2) If one of the parties withdraws from mediation, (3) In the event the parties fail to reach a resolution of the serious disagreement within...

  6. 15 CFR 923.54 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... an appropriate forum for conflict resolution. (b) State-Federal differences should be addressed... parties agree to a resolution of the serious disagreement, (2) If one of the parties withdraws from mediation, (3) In the event the parties fail to reach a resolution of the serious disagreement within...

  7. Maternally-Mediated Effects on Development*

    EPA Science Inventory

    In standard Segment II mammalian bioassays for developmental toxicity, it is the pregnant animal that is exposed to the test article, so in this sense, all in utero developmental toxicity is mediated by the mother. This will include absorption, distribution, metabolism and excret...

  8. Computer-Mediated Communication on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Susan C.

    2002-01-01

    This review of computer-mediated communication (CMC) on the Internet focuses on empirical research in noninstitutional and nonorganizational contexts. Highlights include modes of CMC; appropriate uses; social effects; effects on language and communication; freedom of expression; community; personal impacts; privacy; ethics; democracy;…

  9. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-07-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best facilitated to make their practice more inquiry based if they are provided with a mediating artifact. In this study the artifact is a model 5E, which is a conceptual way of thinking, to help teachers reflect on their practice. The aim is to encourage teachers to make changes themselves, by applying extended use of inquiry into their practice. This mediated artifact could thus be used across different national contexts. The main research question is; how can the 5E model as a mediating artifact enhance TPD? The article addresses the processes of the use of the 5E model and its influence on teachers' perception of the model. This is in order for teachers to conceptualize their goals related to inquiry and scientific thinking, and to solve the problems involved in achieving those goals in their own contexts. The study concludes that, after the intervention, the teachers' approaches and strategies demonstrate greater emphasis on learning.

  10. Proteinaceous Molecules Mediating Bifidobacterium-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Delgado, Susana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract. Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics, and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization, or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota, and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27536282

  11. Excursion-Set-Mediated Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    Excursion-set-mediated genetic algorithm (ESMGA) is embodiment of method of searching for and optimizing computerized mathematical models. Incorporates powerful search and optimization techniques based on concepts analogous to natural selection and laws of genetics. In comparison with other genetic algorithms, this one achieves stronger condition for implicit parallelism. Includes three stages of operations in each cycle, analogous to biological generation.

  12. 7 CFR 205.663 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mediation. 205.663 Section 205.663 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...

  13. 7 CFR 205.663 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mediation. 205.663 Section 205.663 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...

  14. Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The current study reports on a meta-analysis of the relative effectiveness of interaction in synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) and face-to-face (FTF) contexts. The primary studies included in the analysis were journal articles and dissertations completed between 1990 and 2012 (k = 14). Results demonstrate that interaction in SCMC…

  15. Conversation Analysis of Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Lloret, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The potential of computer-mediated communication (CMC) for language learning resides mainly in the possibility that learners have to engage with other speakers of the language, including L1 speakers. The inclusion of CMC in the L2 classroom provides an opportunity for students to utilize authentic language in real interaction, rather than the more…

  16. Mediation Training for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conflict Resolution Unlimited, Inc., Bellevue, WA.

    Young people need help in learning alternative dispute resolution skills at school. Teaching high school students how to understand conflict and then develop effective ways to deal with it is the purpose of this program. Designed for five 3-hour sessions using two trainers, it is organized around seven major themes: The Mediation Process, Cultural…

  17. Mediators of Preschoolers' Early Mathematics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berghout Austin, Ann M.; Blevins-Knabe, Belinda; Ota, Carrie; Rowe, Trevor; Knudsen Lindauer, Shelley L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend existing research relative to the predictors of early mathematics skills. Using Vygotskian theory as a framework, our primary goal was to determine whether social skills or letter awareness skills served as better mediators between receptive language and early mathematics concepts. The secondary goal was to…

  18. Integrating Computer-Mediated Communication Strategy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Communication strategies (CSs) play important roles in resolving problematic second language interaction and facilitating language learning. While studies in face-to-face contexts demonstrate the benefits of communication strategy instruction (CSI), there have been few attempts to integrate computer-mediated communication and CSI. The study…

  19. 32 CFR 776.38 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mediation, including the advantages and risks involved, and the effect on the attorney-client... little risk of material prejudice to the interests of any of the individuals if the contemplated... individual concerning the decisions to be made and the considerations relevant in making them, so that...

  20. Proteinaceous Molecules Mediating Bifidobacterium-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lorena; Delgado, Susana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract. Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics, and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization, or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota, and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27536282