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Sample records for arf6-independent gpi-anchored protein-enriched

  1. GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored protein expression in PMM2-CDG patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in PMM2 impair phosphomannomutase-2 activity and cause the most frequent congenital disorder of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG. Mannose-1-phosphate, that is deficient in this disorder, is also implicated in the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchors. Objective To evaluate whether GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored proteins are defective in PMM2-CDG patients. Methods The expression of GPI-anchor and seven GPI-anchored proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry in different cell types from twelve PMM2-CDG patients. Additionally, neutrophil CD16 and plasma hepatic proteins were studied by Western blot. Transferrin glycoforms were evaluated by HPLC. Results Patients and controls had similar surface expression of GPI-anchor and most GPI-anchored proteins. Nevertheless, patients displayed a significantly diminished binding of two anti-CD16 antibodies (3G8 and KD1) to neutrophils and also of anti-CD14 (61D3) to monocytes. Interestingly, CD16 immunostaining and asialotransferrin levels significantly correlated with patients’ age. Analysis by flow cytometry of CD14 with MΦP9, and CD16 expression in neutrophils by Western blot using H-80 ruled out deficiencies of these antigens. Conclusions PMM2 mutations do not impair GPI-anchor or GPI-anchored protein expression. However, the glycosylation anomalies caused by PMM2 mutations might affect the immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies and lead to incorrect conclusions about the expression of different proteins, including GPI-anchored proteins. Neutrophils and monocytes are sensitive to PMM2 mutations, leading to abnormal glycosylation in immune receptors, which might potentially affect their affinity to their ligands, and contribute to infection. This study also confirms less severe hypoglycosylation defects in older PMM2-CDG patients. PMID:24139637

  2. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  3. Mutational analysis of the variant surface glycoprotein GPI-anchor signal sequence in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Ulrike; Cross, George A M

    2002-02-15

    The variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) of Trypanosoma brucei are anchored to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. All GPI-anchored proteins are synthesized with a C-terminal signal sequence, which is replaced by a GPI-anchor in a rapid post-translational transamidation reaction. VSG GPI signal sequences are extraordinarily conserved. They contain either 23 or 17 amino acids, a difference that distinguishes the two major VSG classes, and consist of a spacer sequence followed by a more hydrophobic region. The omega amino acid, to which GPI is transferred, is either Ser, Asp or Asn, the omega+2 amino acid is always Ser, and the omega+7 amino acid is almost always Lys. In order to determine whether this high conservation is necessary for GPI anchoring, we introduced several mutations into the signal peptide. Surprisingly, changing the most conserved amino acids, at positions omega+1, omega+2 and omega+7, had no detectable effect on the efficiency of GPI-anchoring or on protein abundance. Several more extensive changes also had no discernable impact on GPI-anchoring. Deleting the entire 23 amino-acid signal sequence or the 15 amino-acid hydrophobic region generated proteins that were not anchored. Instead of being secreted, these truncated proteins accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum prior to lysosomal degradation. Replacing the GPI signal sequence with a proven cell-surface membrane-spanning domain reduced expression by about 99% and resulted not in cell surface expression but in accumulation close to the flagellar pocket and in non-lysosomal compartments. These results indicate that the high conservation of the VSG GPI signal sequence is not necessary for efficient expression and GPI attachment. Instead, the GPI anchor is essential for surface expression of VSG. However, because the VSG is a major virulence factor, it is possible that small changes in the efficiency of GPI anchoring, undetectable in our experiments, might have

  4. Labeling cell surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins through cell metabolic engineering with artificial inositol derivatives**

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    Protein GPI anchorage to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. This paper developed an effective strategy for metabolic engineering of cell surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins on live cells were then tagged with biotin via click reaction and with a fluorescent molecule. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies. PMID:26102235

  5. Biosynthesis of GPI-anchored proteins: special emphasis on GPI lipid remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Taroh; Fujita, Morihisa

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) act as membrane anchors of many eukaryotic cell surface proteins. GPIs in various organisms have a common backbone consisting of ethanolamine phosphate (EtNP), three mannoses (Mans), one non-N-acetylated glucosamine, and inositol phospholipid, whose structure is EtNP-6Manα-2Manα-6Manα-4GlNα-6myoinositol-P-lipid. The lipid part is either phosphatidylinositol of diacyl or 1-alkyl-2-acyl form, or inositol phosphoceramide. GPIs are attached to proteins via an amide bond between the C-terminal carboxyl group and an amino group of EtNP. Fatty chains of inositol phospholipids are inserted into the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. More than 150 different human proteins are GPI anchored, whose functions include enzymes, adhesion molecules, receptors, protease inhibitors, transcytotic transporters, and complement regulators. GPI modification imparts proteins with unique characteristics, such as association with membrane microdomains or rafts, transient homodimerization, release from the membrane by cleavage in the GPI moiety, and apical sorting in polarized cells. GPI anchoring is essential for mammalian embryogenesis, development, neurogenesis, fertilization, and immune system. Mutations in genes involved in remodeling of the GPI lipid moiety cause human diseases characterized by neurological abnormalities. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has >60 GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). GPI is essential for growth of yeast. In this review, we discuss biosynthesis of GPI-APs in mammalian cells and yeast with emphasis on the lipid moiety. PMID:26563290

  6. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin.

    PubMed

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-11-05

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24-37 °C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an "active actin-membrane composite" cell surface.

  7. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T.; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24–37°C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an “active actin-membrane composite” cell surface. PMID:26378258

  8. TFPIβ is the GPI-anchored TFPI isoform on human endothelial cells and placental microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Thomas J.; Tuley, Elodee

    2012-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) produces factor Xa-dependent feedback inhibition of factor VIIa/tissue factor-induced coagulation. Messages for 2 isoforms of TFPI have been identified. TFPIα mRNA encodes a protein with an acidic N-terminus, 3 Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domains and a basic C-terminus that has been purified from plasma and culture media. TFPIβ mRNA encodes a form in which the Kunitz-3 and C-terminal domains of TFPIα are replaced with an alternative C-terminus that directs the attachment of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, but whether TFPIβ protein is actually expressed is not clear. Moreover, previous studies have suggested that the predominant form of TFPI released from cells by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PIPLC) treatment is TFPIα, implying it is bound at cell surfaces to a separate GPI-anchored coreceptor. Our studies show that the form of TFPI released by PIPLC treatment of cultured endothelial cells and placental microsomes is actually TFPIβ based on (1) migration on SDS-PAGE before and after deglycosylation, (2) the lack of a Kunitz-3 domain, and (3) it contains a GPI anchor. Immunoassays demonstrate that, although endothelial cells secrete TFPIα, greater than 95% of the TFPI released by PIPLC treatment from the surface of endothelial cells and from placental microsomes is TFPIβ. PMID:22144186

  9. Hypomorphic Mutations in PGAP2, Encoding a GPI-Anchor-Remodeling Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M.; Bennett, Eric P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability with elevated ALP. GPI-anchor deficiencies can be interpreted within the concept of a disease family, and we propose that the severity of the phenotype is dependent on the location of the altered protein in the biosynthesis chain. PMID:23561846

  10. Single-Molecule Imaging of Signal Transduction via GPI-Anchored Receptors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been drawing extensive attention as a signaling platform. To investigate molecular interactions in lipid rafts, we often need to observe molecules in the plasma membranes of living cells because chemical fixation and subsequent immunostaining with divalent or multivalent antibodies may change the location of the target molecules. In this chapter, we describe how to examine dynamics of raft-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored receptors and interactions of the receptors with downstream signaling molecules by single-particle tracking or single-molecule imaging techniques.

  11. Expression of GPI anchored human recombinant erythropoietin in CHO cells is devoid of glycosylation heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Devasahayam, Mercy; Devi, Sobita

    2015-04-01

    Erythropoietin is a glycohormone involved in the regulation of the blood cell levels. It is a 166 amino acid protein having 3 N-glycosylation and one O-linked glycosylation sites, and is used to treat anaemia related illness. Though human recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) is produced in CHO cells, the loss in quality control is 80% due to incomplete glycosylation of the rEPO with low levels of fully glycosylated active rEPO. Here, we describe the expression from CHO cells of fully glycosylated human rEPO when expressed as a GPI anchored molecule (rEPO-g). The results demonstrated the production of a homogenous completely glycosylated human rEPO-g as a 42 kD band without any low molecular weight glycoform variants as shown by affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE and anti-human EPO specific western blot. The western blot using specific monoclonal antibody is the available biochemical technique to prove the presence of homogeneity in the expressed recombinant protein. The GPI anchor can be removed during the purification process to yield a therapeutically relevant recombinant erythropoietin molecule cells with a higher in vivo biological activity due to its high molecular weight of 40 kD. This is possibly the first report on the production of a homogenous and completely glycosylated human rEPO from CHO cells for efficient therapy.

  12. Raft-based interactions of gangliosides with a GPI-anchored receptor.

    PubMed

    Komura, Naoko; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Ando, Hiromune; Konishi, Miku; Koikeda, Machi; Imamura, Akihiro; Chadda, Rahul; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Tsuboi, Hisae; Sheng, Ren; Cho, Wonhwa; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Ishida, Hideharu; Kusumi, Akihiro; Kiso, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Gangliosides, glycosphingolipids containing one or more sialic acid(s) in the glyco-chain, are involved in various important physiological and pathological processes in the plasma membrane. However, their exact functions are poorly understood, primarily because of the scarcity of suitable fluorescent ganglioside analogs. Here, we developed methods for systematically synthesizing analogs that behave like their native counterparts in regard to partitioning into raft-related membrane domains or preparations. Single-fluorescent-molecule imaging in the live-cell plasma membrane revealed the clear but transient colocalization and codiffusion of fluorescent ganglioside analogs with a fluorescently labeled glycosylphosphatidylinisotol (GPI)-anchored protein, human CD59, with lifetimes of 12 ms for CD59 monomers, 40 ms for CD59's transient homodimer rafts in quiescent cells, and 48 ms for engaged-CD59-cluster rafts, in cholesterol- and GPI-anchoring-dependent manners. The ganglioside molecules were always mobile in quiescent cells. These results show that gangliosides continually and dynamically exchange between raft domains and the bulk domain, indicating that raft domains are dynamic entities.

  13. Effects of GPI-anchored TNAP on the dynamic structure of model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, A. F.; Simão, A. M. S.; Bolean, M; Hoylaerts, M. F.; Millán, J. L.; Ciancaglini, P; Costa-Filho, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) plays a crucial role during skeletal mineralization, and TNAP deficiency leads to the soft bone disease hypophosphatasia. TNAP is anchored to the external surface of the plasma membranes by means of a GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor. Membrane-anchored and solubilized TNAP displays different kinetic properties against physiological substrates, indicating that membrane anchoring influences the enzyme function. Here, we used Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements along with spin labeled phospholipids to probe the possible dynamic changes prompted by the interaction of GPI-anchored TNAP with model membranes. The goal was to systematically analyze the ESR data in terms of line shape changes and of alterations in parameters such as rotational diffusion rates and order parameters obtained from non-linear least-squares simulations of the ESR spectra of probes incorporated into DPPC liposomes and proteoliposomes. Overall, the presence of TNAP increased the dynamics and decreased the ordering in the three distinct regions probed by the spin labeled lipids DOPTC (headgroup), and 5- and 16-PCSL (acyl chains). The largest change was observed for 16-PCSL, thus suggesting that GPI-anchored TNAP can give rise to long reaching modifications that could influence membrane processes halfway through the bilayer. PMID:26389140

  14. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  15. Kinetics of endocytosis and recycling of the GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Engstler, Markus; Thilo, Lutz; Weise, Frank; Grünfelder, Christoph G; Schwarz, Heinz; Boshart, Michael; Overath, Peter

    2004-03-01

    The dense coat of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) covering parasitic African trypanosomes is essential for survival in mammalian hosts. VSG is internalised and recycled exclusively via a specialised part of the plasma membrane, the flagellar pocket. Direct measurement of the kinetics of VSG endocytosis and recycling shows that the VSG cell-surface pool is turned over within 12 minutes. Correspondingly, the turnover of the intracellular pool (9+/-4% of total VSG) requires only 1 minute, and this is an exceptionally high rate considering that endocytosis and exocytosis are limited to only 5% of the cell surface area. Kinetic 3D co-localisation analysis using biotinylated VSG and a panel of compartmental markers provides consistent evidence for the itinerary of VSG through the cell: VSG is endocytosed in large clathrin-coated vesicles, which bud from the flagellar pocket membrane at a rate of 6-7 vesicles per second, and is then delivered to RAB5-positive early endosomes. From there, VSG is recycled to RAB11-positive recycling endosomes at two stages, either directly or via RAB7-positive, late endosomes. Small clathrin-coated vesicles carrying fluid-phase cargo and being depleted of VSG bud from early and recycling endosomes. These vesicles are postulated to deliver their content to late endosomes and/or the lysosome. The recycling endosomes give rise to RAB11-positive exocytic carriers that fuse with the flagellar pocket and thereby return VSG to the cell surface. VSG recycling provides an interesting model for studies on the cellular trafficking and sorting of GPI-anchored proteins.

  16. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  17. Mutations in PGAP3 impair GPI-anchor maturation, causing a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Malcolm F; Murakami, Yoshiko; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Daumer-Haas, Cornelia; Fischer, Björn; Hecht, Jochen; Keays, David A; Knight, Samantha J L; Kölsch, Uwe; Krüger, Ulrike; Leiz, Steffen; Maeda, Yusuke; Mitchell, Daphne; Mundlos, Stefan; Phillips, John A; Robinson, Peter N; Kini, Usha; Taylor, Jenny C; Horn, Denise; Kinoshita, Taroh; Krawitz, Peter M

    2014-02-06

    Glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins play important roles in many biological processes, and mutations affecting proteins involved in the synthesis of the GPI anchor are reported to cause a wide spectrum of intellectual disabilities (IDs) with characteristic additional phenotypic features. Here, we describe a total of five individuals (from three unrelated families) in whom we identified mutations in PGAP3, encoding a protein that is involved in GPI-anchor maturation. Three siblings in a consanguineous Pakistani family presented with profound developmental delay, severe ID, no speech, psychomotor delay, and postnatal microcephaly. A combination of autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a 13.8 Mb region harboring a homozygous c.275G>A (p.Gly92Asp) variant in PGAP3 region 17q11.2-q21.32. Subsequent testing showed elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a GPI-anchored enzyme, in all three affected children. In two unrelated individuals in a cohort with developmental delay, ID, and elevated ALP, we identified compound-heterozygous variants c.439dupC (p.Leu147Profs(∗)16) and c.914A>G (p.Asp305Gly) and homozygous variant c.314C>G (p.Pro105Arg). The 1 bp duplication causes a frameshift and nonsense-mediated decay. Further evidence supporting pathogenicity of the missense mutations c.275G>A, c.314C>G, and c.914A>G was provided by the absence of the variants from ethnically matched controls, phylogenetic conservation, and functional studies on Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. Taken together with recent data on PGAP2, these results confirm the importance of the later GPI-anchor remodelling steps for normal neuronal development. Impairment of PGAP3 causes a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with ID, a congenital disorder of glycosylation that is also referred to as Mabry syndrome.

  18. Transcript Expression Analysis of Putative Trypanosoma brucei GPI-Anchored Surface Proteins during Development in the Tsetse and Mammalian Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Amy F.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Regmi, Sandesh; Wu, Yineng; El Sayed, Najib M.; Aksoy, Serap

    2012-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis is a devastating disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Trypanosomes live extracellularly in both the tsetse fly and the mammal. Trypanosome surface proteins can directly interact with the host environment, allowing parasites to effectively establish and maintain infections. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring is a common posttranslational modification associated with eukaryotic surface proteins. In T. brucei, three GPI-anchored major surface proteins have been identified: variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP or procyclins), and brucei alanine rich proteins (BARP). The objective of this study was to select genes encoding predicted GPI-anchored proteins with unknown function(s) from the T. brucei genome and characterize the expression profile of a subset during cyclical development in the tsetse and mammalian hosts. An initial in silico screen of putative T. brucei proteins by Big PI algorithm identified 163 predicted GPI-anchored proteins, 106 of which had no known functions. Application of a second GPI-anchor prediction algorithm (FragAnchor), signal peptide and trans-membrane domain prediction software resulted in the identification of 25 putative hypothetical proteins. Eighty-one gene products with hypothetical functions were analyzed for stage-regulated expression using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of most of these genes were found to be upregulated in trypanosomes infecting tsetse salivary gland and proventriculus tissues, and 38% were specifically expressed only by parasites infecting salivary gland tissues. Transcripts for all of the genes specifically expressed in salivary glands were also detected in mammalian infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, suggesting a possible role for these putative proteins in invasion and/or establishment processes in the mammalian host. These results represent the first large-scale report of the differential expression of

  19. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-04-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  20. Structure and dynamics of the conserved protein GPI anchor core inserted into detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Franck; Lopez-Prados, Javier; Groves, Patrick; Perez, Serge; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2006-10-01

    A suitable approach which combines nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study the structure and the dynamics of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor Manalphal-2Manalpha1-6Manalphal -4GlcNalpha1-6myo-inositol-1-OPO(3)-sn-1,2-dimyristoylglycerol (1) incorporated into dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) micelles. The results have been compared to those previously obtained for the products obtainable from (1) after phospholipase cleavage, in aqueous solution. Relaxation and diffusion NMR experiments were used to establish the formation of stable aggregates and the insertion of (1) into the micelles. MD calculations were performed including explicit water, sodium and chloride ions and using the Particle Mesh Ewald approach for the evaluation of the electrostatic energy term. The MD predicted three dimensional structure and dynamics were substantiated by nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) measurements and relaxation data. The pseudopentasaccharide structure, which was not affected by incorporation of (1) into the micelle, showed a complex dynamic behaviour with a faster relative motion at the terminal mannopyranose unit and decreased mobility close to the micelle. This motion may be better described as an oscillation relative to the membrane rather than a folding event.

  1. Characterization of the GPI-anchored lipid transfer proteins in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Edstam, Monika M; Laurila, Maiju; Höglund, Andrey; Raman, Amitha; Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A; Edqvist, Johan; Blomqvist, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are characterized by a compact structure with a central hydrophobic cavity very suitable for binding hydrophobic ligands, such as lipids. The nsLTPs are encoded by large gene families in all land plant lineages, but seem to be absent from green algae. The nsLTPs are classified to different types based on molecular weight, sequence similarity, intron position or spacing between the cysteine residues. The Type G nsLTPs (LTPGs) have a GPI-anchor in the C-terminal region which may attach the protein to the exterior side of the plasma membrane. Here, we present the first characterization of nsLTPs from an early diverged plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss LTPGs were heterologously produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. The purified moss LTPGs were found to be extremely heat stable and showed a binding preference for unsaturated fatty acids. Structural modeling implied that high alanine content could be important for the heat stability. Lipid profiling revealed that cutin monomers, such as C16 and C18 mono- and di-hydroxylated fatty acids, could be identified in P. patens. Expression of a moss LTPG-YFP fusion revealed localization to the plasma membrane. The expressions of many of the moss LTPGs were found to be upregulated during drought and cold treatments.

  2. Tetraspan cargo adaptors usher GPI-anchored proteins into multivesicular bodies

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Chris; Stamnes, Mark A; Katzmann, David J; Piper, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitinated membrane proteins are sorted into intralumenal endosomal vesicles on their way for degradation in lysosomes. Here we summarize the discovery of the Cos proteins, which work to organize and segregate ubiquitinated cargo prior to its incorporation into intralumenal vesicles of the multivesicular body (MVB). Importantly, cargoes such as GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) that cannot undergo ubiquitination, rely entirely on Cos proteins for sorting into intralumenal vesicles using the same pathway that depends on ESCRTs and ubiquitin ligases that typical polytopic membrane proteins do. Here we show Cos proteins provide functions as not only adaptor proteins for ubiquitin ligases, but also as cargo carriers that can physically usher a variety of other proteins into the MVB pathway. We then discuss the significance of this new sorting model and the broader implications for this cargo adaptor mechanism, whereby yeast Cos proteins, and their likely animal analogs, provide a ubiquitin sorting signal in trans to enable sorting of a membrane protein network into intralumenal vesicles. PMID:26505929

  3. Phospholipase C from two bacterial strains acts differently on pure phospholipids and membrane bound glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Arshi; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Pereira, Ben M J

    2005-04-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) was purified to homogeneity from the culture filtrate of Bacillus cereus (65-fold, 540 U/mg protein) and B. thuringiensis (76-fold, 306 U/mg protein) by conventional techniques of enzyme purification. The purified enzymes have the molecular mass of 34 kDa and 38 kDa respectively, as determined by SDS-PAGE. Both the PLCs exhibited identical sensitivity to pH, temperature, cations, anions and inhibitors like glutathione and p-chloromercuribenzoate. PLC-Bc showed a preference for phosphatidylinositol, while PLC-Bt favoured phosphatidylcholine as the substrate. Although both the enzymes were able to hydrolyze pure phosphatidylinositol, distinct differences were observed in their activity on phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. PLC-Bc cleaved and released alkaline phosphatase, a GPI-anchored marker enzyme from microsomal membranes to a greater extent, than PLC-Bt. Experiments with sperm membranes, followed by SDS-PAGE revealed that the pattern of proteins released from their GPI-anchors by PLC-Bc and PLC-Bt were dissimilar. Although some proteins were cleaved in common by both PLCs, some others including a prominent 57 kDa protein were resistant to PLC-Bt, but sensitive to cleavage by PLC-Bc. The type of modification in the GPI anchor, special environment on membranes, and relative charge of host plasma membrane to the charge of PLC may be the factors that are responsible for the differential action of two enzymes.

  4. GPI anchor transamidase of Trypanosoma brucei: in vitro assay of the recombinant protein and VSG anchor exchange.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuedong; Szallies, Alexander; Rawer, Marc; Echner, Hartmut; Duszenko, Michael

    2002-06-15

    GPI8 from Trypanosoma brucei was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. TbGPI8 encodes a 37 kDa protein (35 kDa after removal of the putative signal sequence) with a pI of 5.5. It contains one potential N-glycosylation site near the N-terminus but no C-terminal hydrophobic region. Enzyme activity assays using trypanosomal lysates or recombinant TbGpi8 exhibited cleavage of the synthetic peptide acetyl-S-V-L-N-aminomethyl-coumarine, indicating that TbGpi8 is indeed directly involved in the proteolytic processing of the GPI anchoring signal. Intracellular localization of TbGpi8 within tubular structures, such as the endoplasmic reticulum, was observed by using specific anti-TbGpi8 antibodies. The transamidase mechanism of GPI anchoring was studied in bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei using media containing hydrazine or biotinylated hydrazine. In the presence of the latter nucleophile, part of the newly formed VSG was linked to this instead of the GPI anchor and was not transferred to the cell surface. VSG-hydrazine-biotin was detected by streptavidin in western blots and intracellularly in Golgi-like compartments.

  5. Functional convergence of signalling by GPI-anchored and anchorless forms of a salamander protein implicated in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blassberg, Robert A; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Janmohamed, Azara; Gates, Phillip B; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2011-01-01

    The GPI-anchor is an established determinant of molecular localisation and various functional roles have been attributed to it. The newt GPI-anchored three-finger protein (TFP) Prod1 is an important regulator of cell behaviour during limb regeneration, but it is unclear how it signals to the interior of the cell. Prod1 was expressed by transfection in cultured newt limb cells and activated transcription and expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) by a pathway involving ligand-independent activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling and phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). This was dependent on the presence of the GPI-anchor and critical residues in the α-helical region of the protein. Interestingly, Prod1 in the axolotl, a salamander species that also regenerates its limbs, was shown to activate ERK1/2 signalling and MMP9 transcription despite being anchorless, and both newt and axolotl Prod1 co-immunoprecipitated with the newt EGFR after transfection. The substitution of the axolotl helical region activated a secreted, anchorless version of the newt molecule. The activity of the newt molecule cannot therefore depend on a unique property conferred by the anchor. Prod1 is a salamander-specific TFP and its interaction with the phylogenetically conserved EGFR has implications for our view of regeneration as an evolutionary variable.

  6. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  7. GPI anchor attachment is required for Gas1p transport from the endoplasmic reticulum in COP II vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Doering, T L; Schekman, R

    1996-01-01

    Inositol starvation of auxotrophic yeast interrupts glycolipid biosynthesis and prevents lipid modification of a normally glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked protein, Gas1p. The unanchored Gas1p precursor undergoes progressive modification in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but is not modified by Golgi-specific glycosylation. Starvation-induced defects in anchor assembly and protein processing are rapid, and occur without altered maturation of other proteins. Cells remain competent to manufacture anchor components and to process Gas1p efficiently once inositol is restored. Newly synthesized Gas1p is packaged into vesicles formed in vitro from perforated yeast spheroplasts incubated with either yeast cytosol or the purified Sec proteins (COP II) required for vesicle budding from the ER. In vitro synthesized vesicles produced by inositol-starved membranes do not contain detectable Gas1p. These studies demonstrate that COP II components fulfill the soluble protein requirements for packaging a GPI-anchored protein into ER-derived transport vesicles. However, GPI anchor attachment is required for this packaging to occur. Images PMID:8598201

  8. A GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is a functional midgut receptor of Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti larvae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Luisa E.; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2005-01-01

    A 65 kDa GPI (glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol)-anchored ALP (alkaline phosphatase) was characterized as a functional receptor of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti midgut cells. Two (a 100 kDa and a 65 kDa) GPI-anchored proteins that bound Cry11Aa toxin were preferentially extracted after treatment of BBMV (brush boder membrane vesicles) from Ae. aegypti midgut epithelia with phospholipase C. The 65 kDa protein was further purified by toxin affinity chromatography. The 65 kDa protein showed ALP activity. The peptide-displaying phages (P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV) that bound to the 65 kDa GPI–ALP (GPI-anchored ALP) and competed with the Cry11Aa toxin to bind to BBMV were isolated by selecting BBMV-binding peptide-phages by biopanning. GPI–ALP was shown to be preferentially distributed in Ae. aegypti in the posterior part of the midgut and in the caeca, by using P1.BBMV binding to fixed midgut tissue sections to determine the location of GPI–ALP. Cry11Aa binds to the same regions of the midgut and competed with P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV to bind to BBMV. The importance of this interaction was demonstrated by the in vivo attenuation of Cry11Aa toxicity in the presence of these phages. Our results shows that GPI–ALP is an important receptor molecule involved in Cry11Aa interaction with midgut cells and toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae. PMID:16255715

  9. Cold acclimation is accompanied by complex responses of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation results in changes of the plasma membrane (PM) composition. The PM is considered to contain specific lipid/protein-enriched microdomains which can be extracted as detergent-resistant plasma membrane (DRM). Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) can be targeted to microdomains and/or the apoplast. However, the functional significance of GPI-APs during cold acclimation in plants is not yet fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the responsiveness of GPI-APs to cold acclimation treatment in Arabidopsis. We isolated the PM, DRM, and apoplast fractions separately and, in addition, GPI-AP-enriched fractions were prepared from the PM preparation. Label-free quantitative shotgun proteomics identified a number of GPI-APs (163 proteins). Among them, some GPI-APs such as fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins and glycerophosphoryldiester phosphodiesterase-like proteins predominantly increased in PM- and GPI-AP-enriched fractions while the changes of GPI-APs in the DRM and apoplast fractions during cold acclimation were considerably different from those of other fractions. These proteins are thought to be associated with cell wall structure and properties. Therefore, this study demonstrated that each GPI-AP responded to cold acclimation in a different manner, suggesting that these changes during cold acclimation are involved in rearrangement of the extracellular matrix including the cell wall towards acquisition of freezing tolerance. PMID:27471282

  10. Monomer–dimer dynamics and distribution of GPI-anchored uPAR are determined by cell surface protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Caiolfa, Valeria R.; Zamai, Moreno; Malengo, Gabriele; Andolfo, Annapaola; Madsen, Chris D.; Sutin, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Blasi, Francesco; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    To search for functional links between glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein monomer–oligomer exchange and membrane dynamics and confinement, we studied urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR), a GPI receptor involved in the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Using a functionally active fluorescent protein–uPAR in live cells, we analyzed the effect that extracellular matrix proteins and uPAR ligands have on uPAR dynamics and dimerization at the cell membrane. Vitronectin directs the recruitment of dimers and slows down the diffusion of the receptors at the basal membrane. The commitment to uPA–plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1–mediated endocytosis and recycling modifies uPAR diffusion and induces an exchange between uPAR monomers and dimers. This exchange is fully reversible. The data demonstrate that cell surface protein assemblies are important in regulating the dynamics and localization of uPAR at the cell membrane and the exchange of monomers and dimers. These results also provide a strong rationale for dynamic studies of GPI-anchored molecules in live cells at steady state and in the absence of cross-linker/clustering agents. PMID:18056417

  11. Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA) binds human erythrocytes independent of Duffy antigen status

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Lu, Feng; Wang, Bo; Li, Jian; Han, Jin-Hee; Ito, Daisuke; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Jiang, Lubin; Wu, Jian; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Jun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Desai, Sanjay A.; Miller, Louis H.; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, a major agent of malaria in both temperate and tropical climates, has been thought to be unable to infect humans lacking the Duffy (Fy) blood group antigen because this receptor is critical for erythrocyte invasion. Recent surveys in various endemic regions, however, have reported P. vivax infections in Duffy-negative individuals, suggesting that the parasite may utilize alternative receptor-ligand pairs to complete the erythrocyte invasion. Here, we identified and characterized a novel parasite ligand, Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA), that bound human erythrocytes regardless of Duffy antigen status. PvGAMA was localized at the microneme in the mature schizont-stage parasites. The antibodies against PvGAMA fragments inhibited PvGAMA binding to erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The erythrocyte-specific binding activities of PvGAMA were significantly reduced by chymotrypsin treatment. Thus, PvGAMA may be an adhesion molecule for the invasion of Duffy-positive and -negative human erythrocytes. PMID:27759110

  12. Targeting of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel α2δ-1 Subunit to Lipid Rafts Is Independent from a GPI-Anchoring Motif

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Philip; Etheridge, Sarah; Song, Lele; Shah, Riddhi; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Owen T.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav) exist as heteromultimers comprising a pore-forming α1 with accessory β and α2δ subunits which modify channel trafficking and function. We previously showed that α2δ-1 (and likely the other mammalian α2δ isoforms - α2δ-2, 3 and 4) is required for targeting Cavs to lipid rafts, although the mechanism remains unclear. Whilst originally understood to have a classical type I transmembrane (TM) topology, recent evidence suggests the α2δ subunit contains a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor that mediates its association with lipid rafts. To test this notion, we have used a strategy based on the expression of chimera, where the reported GPI-anchoring sequences in the gabapentinoid-sensitive α2δ-1 subunit have been substituted with those of a functionally inert Type I TM-spanning protein – PIN-G. Using imaging, electrophysiology and biochemistry, we find that lipid raft association of PIN-α2δ is unaffected by substitution of the GPI motif with the TM domain of PIN-G. Moreover, the presence of the GPI motif alone is not sufficient for raft localisation, suggesting that upstream residues are required. GPI-anchoring is susceptible to phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) cleavage. However, whilst raft localisation of PIN-α2δ is disrupted by PI-PLC treatment, this is assay-dependent and non-specific effects of PI-PLC are observed on the distribution of the endogenous raft marker, caveolin, but not flotillin. Taken together, these data are most consistent with a model where α2δ-1 retains its type I transmembrane topology and its targeting to lipid rafts is governed by sequences upstream of the putative GPI anchor, that promote protein-protein, rather than lipid-lipid interactions. PMID:21695204

  13. Correctly sorted molecules of a GPI-anchored protein are clustered and immobile when they arrive at the apical surface of MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are sorted to the apical surface of many epithelial cell types. To better understand the mechanism for apical segregation of these proteins, we analyzed the lateral mobility and molecular associations of a model GPI-anchored protein, herpes simplex virus gD1 fused to human decay accelerating factor (gD1-DAF) (Lisanti, M. P., I. W. Caras, M. A. Davitz, and E. Rodriguez-Boulan. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2145-2156) shortly after arrival and after long-term residence at the surface of confluent, polarized MDCK cells. FRAP measurements of lateral diffusion showed that the mobile fraction of newly arrived gD1-DAF molecules was much less than the mobile fraction of long-term resident molecules (40 vs. 80-90%). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements showed that the newly arrived molecules were clustered, while resident molecules were not. Newly delivered gD1-DAF molecules were clustered but not immobilized in mutant, Concanavalin A-resistant MDCK cells that failed to sort gD1-DAF. Our results indicate that GPI-anchored proteins in MDCK cells are clustered before delivery to the surface. However, clustering alone does not target molecules for apical delivery. The immobilization observed when gD1-DAF is correctly sorted suggests that the clusters must associate some component of the cell's cytoplasm. PMID:8380601

  14. Nonpolar substitution at C-terminus of the prion protein, a mimic of GPI anchor, partially impairs amyloid fibrils formation

    PubMed Central

    Breydo, Leonid; Sun, Ying; Makarava, Natallia; Lee, Cheng-I; Novitskaia, Vera; Bocharova, Olga; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to most amyloidogenic proteins or peptides that do not contain any significant post-translational modifications, the prion protein (PrP) is modified with either one or two polysaccharides and a GPI anchor which attaches PrP to the plasma membrane. Like other amyloidogenic proteins, however, PrP adopts a fibrillar shape when converted to a disease-specific conformation. Therefore, PrP polymerization offers a unique opportunity to examine the effects of biologically relevant non-peptidic modifications on conversion to the amyloid conformation. To test the extent to which a long hydrophobic chain at the C-terminus affects the intrinsic amyloidogenic propensity of PrP, we modified recombinant PrP with a N-myristoylamido-maleimidyl group, which can serve as a membrane anchor. We show that while this modification increases the affinity of PrP for the cell membrane, it does not alter the structure of the protein. Myristoylation of PrP affected amyloid formation in two ways: (i) it substantially decreased the extent of fibrillation, presumably due to off-pathway aggregation, and (ii) it prohibited assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils by preventing their lateral association. The negative effect on lateral association was abolished if the myristoylated moiety at the C-terminus was replaced by a polar group of similar size or by a hydrophobic group of smaller size. When preformed PrP fibrils were provided as seeds, myristoylated PrP supported fibril elongation and formation of higher-order fibrils composed of several filaments. Our studies illustrate that, despite a bulky hydrophobic moiety at C-terminus, myristoylated PrP can still incorporate into fibrillar structure, and that the C-terminal hydrophobic substitution does not affect the size of the proteinase K resistant core, but controls the mode of lateral assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils. PMID:17223707

  15. Propagation of RML prions in mice expressing PrP devoid of GPI anchor leads to formation of a novel, stable prion strain.

    PubMed

    Mahal, Sukhvir Paul; Jablonski, Joseph; Suponitsky-Kroyter, Irena; Oelschlegel, Anja Maria; Herva, Maria Eugenia; Oldstone, Michael; Weissmann, Charles

    2012-01-01

    PrP(C), a host protein which in prion-infected animals is converted to PrP(Sc), is linked to the cell membrane by a GPI anchor. Mice expressing PrP(C) without GPI anchor (tgGPI⁻ mice), are susceptible to prion infection but accumulate anchorless PrP(Sc) extra-, rather than intracellularly. We investigated whether tgGPI⁻ mice could faithfully propagate prion strains despite the deviant structure and location of anchorless PrP(Sc). We found that RML and ME7, but not 22L prions propagated in tgGPI⁻ brain developed novel cell tropisms, as determined by the Cell Panel Assay (CPA). Surprisingly, the levels of proteinase K-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(res)) in RML- or ME7-infected tgGPI⁻ brain were 25-50 times higher than in wild-type brain. When returned to wild-type brain, ME7 prions recovered their original properties, however RML prions had given rise to a novel prion strain, designated SFL, which remained unchanged even after three passages in wild-type mice. Because both RML PrP(Sc) and SFL PrP(Sc) are stably propagated in wild-type mice we propose that the two conformations are separated by a high activation energy barrier which is abrogated in tgGPI⁻ mice.

  16. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Photon Counting Histogram on membrane proteins: Functional dynamics of the GPI-anchored Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malengo, Gabriele; Andolfo, Annapaola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Gratton, Enrico; Zamai, Moreno; Caiolfa, Valeria R

    2009-01-01

    The oligomerization of GPI-anchored proteins is thought to regulate their association with membrane microdomains, sub-cellular sorting and activity. However, these mechanisms need to be comprehensively explored in living, unperturbed cells, without artificial clustering agents, and using fluorescent protein-tagged chimeras that are fully biologically active. We expressed in HEK293 cells a biologically active chimera of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), the uPAR-mEGFP-GPI. We also produced HEK293/D2D3-mEGFP-GPI cells expressing the truncated form of the receptor, lacking biological activity. We studied the dynamics and oligomerization of the two proteins, combining FCS and PCH analyses, and using subclones with homogenously low expression levels. Overall, the mobile fractions of the two proteins, constituted by monomers and dimers, had comparable diffusion coefficients. However, only for the active receptor the diffusion coefficient decreased in monomer-enriched fractions, suggesting that uPAR monomers might be preferentially engaged in multi-protein transmembrane signaling complexes. Our approach helps in limiting the alteration of the data due to out-of-focus, and minimizing the overestimation of the molecular brightness. Joint to a careful design of the cellular model, it gives reliable estimates of diffusion coefficients and oligomerization of GPI-anchored proteins, in steady state conditions, at low expression levels, and in live, unperturbed cells. PMID:18601539

  17. Nanobiotechnologic approach to a promising vaccine prototype for immunisation against leishmaniasis: a fast and effective method to incorporate GPI-anchored proteins of Leishmania amazonensis into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Colhone, Marcelle Carolina; Silva-Jardim, Izaltina; Stabeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes are known to be a potent adjuvant for a wide range of antigens, as well as appropriate antigen carriers for antibody generation response in vivo. In addition, liposomes are effective vehicles for peptides and proteins, thus enhancing their immunogenicity. Considering these properties of liposomes and the antigenicity of the Leishmania membrane proteins, we evaluated if liposomes carrying glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins of Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes could induce protective immunity in BALB/c mice. To assay protective immunity, BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with liposomes, GPI-protein extract (EPSGPI) as well as with the proteoliposomes carrying GPI-proteins. Mice inoculated with EPSGPI and total protein present in constitutive proteoliposomes displayed a post-infection protection of about 70% and 90%, respectively. The liposomes are able to work as adjuvant in the EPSGPI protection. These systems seem to be a promising vaccine prototype for immunisation against leishmaniasis.

  18. The molecular size of the extra-membrane domain influences the diffusion of the GPI-anchored VSG on the trypanosome plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Andreas J W; Glogger, Marius; Guigas, Gernot; Jones, Nicola G; Fenz, Susanne F; Weiss, Matthias; Engstler, Markus

    2015-06-11

    A plethora of proteins undergo random and passive diffusion in biological membranes. While the contribution of the membrane-embedded domain to diffusion is well established, the potential impact of the extra-membrane protein part has been largely neglected. Here, we show that the molecular length influences the diffusion coefficient of GPI-anchored proteins: smaller proteins diffuse faster than larger ones. The distinct diffusion properties of differently sized membrane proteins are biologically relevant. The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of African trypanosomes, for example, is sized for an effective diffusion-driven randomization on the cell surface, a process that is essential for parasite virulence. We propose that the molecular sizes of proteins dominating the cell surfaces of other eukaryotic pathogens may also be related to diffusion-limited functions.

  19. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  20. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition

    PubMed Central

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  1. The human NKG2D ligand ULBP2 can be expressed at the cell surface with or without a GPI anchor and both forms can activate NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Messina, Lola; Ashiru, Omodele; Agüera-González, Sonia; Reyburn, Hugh T.; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2011-01-01

    The activating immune receptor NKG2D binds to several stress-induced ligands that are structurally different. MHC-class-I-related chain (MIC) A/B molecules have a transmembrane domain, whereas most UL16 binding proteins (ULBPs) are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked molecules. The significance of this variability in membrane anchors is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ULBP2, but not ULBP1 or ULBP3, can reach the cell surface without the GPI modification. Several proteins are expressed at the cell surface as both transmembrane and GPI-linked molecules, either via alternative splicing or by the expression of linked genes. However, to our knowledge, ULBP2 is the first single mammalian cDNA that can be expressed as either a transmembrane or a GPI-anchored protein. The rate of maturation and the levels of cell surface expression of the non-GPI-linked form were lower than those of the GPI-linked ULBP2. Nonetheless, non-GPI ULBP2 was recognised by NKG2D and triggered NK cell cytotoxicity. These data show that differences in membrane attachment by NKG2D ligands are more important for regulation of their surface expression than for cytotoxic recognition by NKG2D and emphasise that detailed characterisation of the cell biology of individual NKG2D ligands will be necessary to allow targeted modulation of this system. PMID:21224393

  2. Enhanced response of T lymphocytes from Pgap3 knockout mouse: Insight into roles of fatty acid remodeling of GPI anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hidekazu; Wang, Yetao; Hasuwa, Hidetoshi; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2012-01-27

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a complex glycolipid that serves as a membrane anchor for many cell-surface proteins, such as Thy-1 and CD48. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) play important roles in many biological processes, such as signal transduction and cell-cell interaction, through their association with lipid rafts. Fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs in the Golgi apparatus is required for their efficient association with lipid rafts, i.e., the unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the PI moiety is exchanged for the saturated fatty acid by PGAP2 and PGAP3. To investigate the immunological role of the fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs, we generated a Pgap3 knockout mouse. In this mouse, GPI-APs are expressed on the cell surface without fatty acid remodeling, and fail to associate with lipid rafts. Male Pgap3 knockout mice were born alive at a ratio lower than expected from Mendel's law, whereas the number of female mice followed Mendel's law. All mice exhibited growth retardation and abnormal reflexes such as limb grasping. We focused T cell function in these mice and found that T cell development in the absence of Pgap3 was normal. However, the response of T cells was enhanced in Pgap3 knockout mice in both in vitro and in vivo studies, including alloreactive response, antigen-specific immune response, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Cross-linking of Thy-1 in wild-type cells inhibited the signal transduced by the T cell receptor (TCR), whereas cross-linking of Thy-1 in Pgap3 knockout cells enhanced the TCR signal. These results suggest that GPI-APs localized in lipid rafts may modulate signaling through the TCR.

  3. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yijun; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Song, Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Gang

    2012-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 ({omega} - 2, where {omega} is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 ({omega} - 1), and M162 ({omega} + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide-anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

  4. The human E48 antigen, highly homologous to the murine Ly-6 antigen ThB, is a GPI-anchored molecule apparently involved in keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The E48 antigen, a putative human homologue of the 20-kD protein present in desmosomal preparations of bovine muzzle, and formerly called desmoglein III (dg4), is a promising target antigen for antibody- based therapy of squamous cell carcinoma in man. To anticipate the effect of high antibody dose treatment, and to evaluate the possible biological involvement of the antigen in carcinogenesis, we set out to molecularly characterize the antigen. A cDNA clone encoding the E48 antigen was isolated by expression cloning in COS cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the clone contained an open reading frame of 128 amino acids, encoding a core protein of 13,286 kD. Database searching showed that the E48 antigen has a high level of sequence similarity with the mouse ThB antigen, a member of the Ly-6 antigen family. Phosphatidylinositol-specific (PI-specific) phospholipase-C treatment indicated that the E48 antigen is glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) to the plasma membrane. The gene encoding the E48 antigen is a single copy gene, located on human chromosome 8 in the 8q24-qter region. The expression of the gene is confined to keratinocytes and squamous tumor cells. The putative mouse homologue, the ThB antigen, originally identified as an antigen on cells of the lymphocyte lineage, was shown to be highly expressed in squamous mouse epithelia. Moreover, the ThB expression level is in keratinocytes, in contrast to that in lymphocytes, not mouse strain related. Transfection of mouse SV40-polyoma transformed mouse NIH/3T3 cells with the E48 cDNA confirmed that the antigen is likely to be involved in cell-cell adhesion. PMID:7790363

  5. Protein enrichment of potato processing waste through yeast fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, P; Barrette, J

    2007-03-01

    Potato starch obtained from waste waters of chips manufacturing was used as a fermentation substrate for yeast protein enrichment. Among 18 yeast strains, 6 strains were screened according to their biomass yield and protein content after fermentation for 16 h at 30 degrees C in an aerated glucose-based liquid media (4.5 Ls). Using concentrated media (25% solids) made from potato starch pre-hydrolyzed with malt flour and batch-fermented for 20 h at 26 degrees C under aerobic conditions, Candida utilis ATCC 9256 was the most efficient protein-forming strain. Scaled-up at the 100 Ls level, the aerobic batch process was improved under fed-batch conditions with molasses supplementation. After drying, fermented starch contained 11-12% protein, including 7-8% yeast protein.

  6. Significance of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Protein Enrichment in Lipid Rafts for the Control of Autoimmunity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yetao; Murakami, Yoshiko; Yasui, Teruhito; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Maeda, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPI) are complex glycolipids that are covalently linked to the C terminus of proteins as a post-translational modification and tether proteins to the plasma membrane. One of the most striking features of GPI-anchored proteins (APs) is their enrichment in lipid rafts. The biosynthesis of GPI and its attachment to proteins occur in the endoplasmic reticulum. In the Golgi, GPI-APs are subjected to fatty acid remodeling, which replaces an unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the phosphatidylinositol moiety with a saturated fatty acid. We previously reported that fatty acid remodeling is critical for the enrichment of GPI-APs in lipid rafts. To investigate the biological significance of GPI-AP enrichment in lipid rafts, we generated a PGAP3 knock-out mouse (PGAP3−/−) in which fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs does not occur. We report here that a significant number of aged PGAP3−/− mice developed autoimmune-like symptoms, such as increased anti-DNA antibodies, spontaneous germinal center formation, and enlarged renal glomeruli with deposition of immune complexes and matrix expansion. A possible cause for this was the impaired engulfment of apoptotic cells by resident peritoneal macrophages in PGAP3−/− mice. Mice with conditional targeting of PGAP3 in either B or T cells did not develop such autoimmune-like symptoms. In addition, PGAP3−/− mice exhibited the tendency of Th2 polarization. These data demonstrate that PGAP3-dependent fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs has a significant role in the control of autoimmunity, possibly by the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance and Th1/Th2 balance. PMID:23864655

  7. Knowledge, perceptions and preferences of elderly regarding protein-enriched functional food.

    PubMed

    van der Zanden, Lotte D T; van Kleef, Ellen; de Wijk, René A; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2014-09-01

    Promoting protein consumption in the elderly population may contribute to improving the quality of their later years in life. Our study aimed to explore knowledge, perceptions and preferences of elderly consumers regarding protein-enriched food. We conducted three focus groups with independently living (ID) elderly (N = 24, Mage = 67 years) and three with elderly living in a residential home (RH) (N = 18, Mage = 83 years). Both the ID and RH elderly were predominantly sceptical about functional food in general. Confusion, distrust and a perceived lack of personal relevance were main perceived barriers to purchasing and consuming these products, although a majority of the participants did report occasionally consuming at least one type of functional food. For the ID elderly, medical advice was an important facilitator that could overcome barriers to purchasing and consuming protein-enriched food, indicating the importance of personal relevance for this group. For the RH elderly, in contrast, sensory appeal of protein-enriched foods was a facilitator. Carrier preferences were similar for the two groups; the elderly preferred protein-enriched foods based on healthy products that they consumed frequently. Future studies should explore ways to deal with the confusion and distrust regarding functional food within the heterogeneous population of elderly.

  8. Oxalic acid complexes: promising draw solutes for forward osmosis (FO) in protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-03-21

    Highly soluble oxalic acid complexes (OACs) were synthesized through a one-pot reaction. The OACs exhibit excellent performance as draw solutes in FO processes with high water fluxes and negligible reverse solute fluxes. Efficient protein enrichment was achieved. The diluted OACs can be recycled via nanofiltration and are promising as draw solutes.

  9. Insight into Early-Stage Unfolding of GPI-Anchored Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Emilia L.; Qi, Yifei; Park, Soohyung; Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) converted from a normal host cellular prion protein (PrPC). Experimental studies suggest that PrPC is enriched with α-helical structure, whereas PrPSc contains a high proportion of β-sheet. In this study, we report the impact of N-glycosylation and the membrane on the secondary structure stability utilizing extensive microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that the HB (residues 173 to 194) C-terminal fragment undergoes conformational changes and helix unfolding in the absence of membrane environments because of the competition between protein backbone intramolecular and protein-water intermolecular hydrogen bonds as well as its intrinsic instability originated from the amino acid sequence. This initiation of the unfolding process of PrPC leads to a subsequent increase in the length of the HB-HC loop (residues 195 to 199) that may trigger larger rigid body motions or further unfolding around this region. Continuous interactions between prion protein and the membrane not only constrain the protein conformation but also decrease the solvent accessibility of the backbone atoms, thereby stabilizing the secondary structure, which is enhanced by N-glycosylation via additional interactions between the N-glycans and the membrane surface. PMID:26588568

  10. DRAGON, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, inhibits BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts via binding to cell surface receptors. Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) have been identified as BMP co-receptors. We report here that DRAGON/RGMb, a member of the RGM family, suppressed BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts via a novel mechanism. All RGMs were expressed in C2C12 cells that were differentiated into myocytes and osteoblastic cells, but RGMc was not detected in immature cells. In C2C12 cells, only DRAGON suppressed ALP and Id1 promoter activities induced by BMP-4 or by constitutively activated BMP type I receptors. This inhibition by DRAGON was dependent on the secretory form of the von Willbrand factor type D domain. DRAGON even suppressed BMP signaling induced by constitutively activated Smad1. Over-expression of neogenin did not alter the inhibitory capacity of DRAGON. Taken together, these findings indicate that DRAGON may be an inhibitor of BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts. We also suggest that a novel molecule(s) expressed on the cell membrane may mediate the signal transduction of DRAGON in order to suppress BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

  11. Aridopsis COBRA-LIKE 10, a GPI-anchored protien, mediates directional growth of pollen tubes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful reproduction of flowering plants requires constant communication between female tissues and growing pollen tubes. Female cells secrete molecules and peptides as nutrients or guidance cues for fast and directional tube growth, which is executed by dynamic changes of intracellular activitie...

  12. Effects of exercise on leukocyte death: prevention by hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Levada-Pires, Adriana C; Folador, Alessandra; Gorjão, Renata; Alba-Loureiro, Tatiana C; Hirabara, Sandro M; Peres, Fabiano P; Silva, Paulo R S; Curi, Rui; Pithon-Curi, Tania C

    2008-06-01

    Lymphocyte and neutrophil death induced by exercise and the role of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide (Gln) supplementation was investigated. Nine triathletes performed two exhaustive exercise trials with a 1-week interval in a randomized, double blind, crossover protocol. Thirty minutes before treadmill exhaustive exercise at variable speeds in an inclination of 1% the subjects ingested 50 g of maltodextrin (placebo) or 50 g of maltodextrin plus 4 tablets of 700 mg of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with 175 mg of glutamine dipeptide dissolved in 250 mL water. Cell viability, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined in lymphocytes and neutrophils. Exhaustive exercise decreased viable lymphocytes but had no effect on neutrophils. A 2.2-fold increase in the proportion of lymphocytes and neutrophils with depolarized mitochondria was observed after exhaustive exercise. Supplementation of maltodextrin plus Gln (MGln) prevented the loss of lymphocyte membrane integrity and the mitochondrial membrane depolarization induced by exercise. Exercise caused an increase in ROS production by neutrophils, whereas supplementation of MGln had no additional effect. MGln supplementation partially prevented lymphocyte apoptosis induced by exhaustive exercise possibly by a protective effect on mitochondrial function.

  13. Protein enrichment of brewery spent grain from Rhizopus oligosporus by solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Canedo, Marianny Silva; de Paula, Fernanda Gomes; da Silva, Flávio Alves; Vendruscolo, Francielo

    2016-07-01

    Brewery spent grain represents approximately 85 % of total by-products generated in a brewery. Consisting of carbohydrates, fiber, minerals and low amounts of protein, the use of brewery spent grain is limited to the feeding of ruminants; however, its potential use should be investigated. The reuse of this by-product using microorganisms by solid-state fermentation process as the case of protein enrichment by single-cell protein incorporation is an alternative to ensure sustainability and generate commercially interesting products. In this context, the aim of this study was to grow Rhizopus oligosporus in brewery spent grain under different initial moisture contents and nitrogen sources to increase the protein content of the fermented material. After 7 days of fermentation, increase of 2-4 times in the crude protein and soluble protein content was verified, respectively, compared to unfermented brewery spent grain. The kinetics of protein enrichment demonstrated the possibility of application of this technique, which can be a great alternative for use in diets for animals.

  14. Process for protein enrichment of cassava by solid substrate fermentation in rural conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Daubresse, P.; Ntibashirwa, S.; Gheysen, A.; Meyer, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    An artisanal static process for protein enrichment of cassava by solid-state fermentation, developed in laboratory and tested on pilot units in Burundi (Central Africa), provides enriched cassava containing 10.7% of dry matter protein versus 1% before fermentation. Cassava chips, processed into granules of 2-4-mm diameter, are moistened (40% water content) and steamed. After cooling to 40 degrees C, cassava is mixed with a nutritive solution containing the inoculum (Rhizopus oryzae, strain MUCL 28627) and providing the following per 100 g dry matter: 3.4 g urea, 1.5 g KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, O.8 g MgSO/sub 4/.7H/sub 2/O, and 22.7 g citric acid. For the fermentation, cassava, with circa 60% moisture content, is spread in a thin layer (2-3 cm thick) on perforated trays and slid into an aerated humidified enclosure. The incubation lasts more or less 65 hours. The production of protein enriched cassava is 3.26 kg dry matter/square m tray. The effects of the variation of the nutritive solution composition and the inoculum conservation period on the protein production are equally discussed. (Refs. 37).

  15. Click-MS: Tagless Protein Enrichment Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry for Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smits, Arne H; Borrmann, Annika; Roosjen, Mark; van Hest, Jan C M; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-12-16

    Epitope-tagging is an effective tool to facilitate protein enrichment from crude cell extracts. Traditionally, N- or C-terminal fused tags are employed, which, however, can perturb protein function. Unnatural amino acids (UAAs) harboring small reactive handles can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins, thus serving as a potential alternative for conventional protein tags. Here, we introduce Click-MS, which combines the power of site-specific UAA incorporation, bioorthogonal chemistry, and quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to specifically enrich a single protein of interest from crude mammalian cell extracts. By genetic encoding of p-azido-l-phenylalanine, the protein of interest can be selectively captured using copper-free click chemistry. We use Click-MS to enrich proteins that function in different cellular compartments, and we identify protein-protein interactions, showing the great potential of Click-MS for interaction proteomics workflows.

  16. A specific protein-enriched enteral formula decreases cortisolemia and improves plasma albumin and amino acid concentrations in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Old age is associated with an involuntary and progressive but physiological loss of muscle mass. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exclusive consumption for 6 months of a protein-enriched enteral diet with a relatively high content of branched-chain amino acids on albuminemia, cortisolemia, plasma amino acids, insulin resistance, and inflammation biomarkers in elderly patients. Methods Thirty-two patients from the Clinical Nutrition Outpatient Unit at our hospital exclusively consumed a protein-enriched enteral diet for 6 months. Data were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months on anthropometric and biochemical parameters and on plasma concentrations of amino acids, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, urea, creatinine, insulin resistance, and inflammation biomarkers. Results The percentage of patients with albumin concentration below normal cut-off values decreased from 18% to 0% by the end of the study. At 6 months, concentrations of total plasma (p = 0.008) and essential amino acids (p = 0.011), especially branched-chain amino acids (p = 0.031), were higher versus baseline values, whereas 3-methylhistidine (p = 0.001), cortisol (p = 0.001) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (p = 0.004) levels were lower. Conclusions Regular intake of specific protein-enriched enteral formula increases plasma essential amino acids, especially branched-chain amino acids, and decreases cortisol and 3-methylhistidine, while plasma urea and creatinine remain unchanged. PMID:20626909

  17. Determinants of GPI-PLC localisation to the flagellum and access to GPI-anchored substrates in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sunter, Jack; Webb, Helena; Carrington, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) is a virulence factor that releases variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) from dying cells. In live cells, GPI-PLC is localised to the plasma membrane where it is concentrated on the flagellar membrane, so activity or access must be tightly regulated as very little VSG is shed. Little is known about regulation except that acylation within a short internal motif containing three cysteines is necessary for GPI-PLC to access VSG in dying cells. Here, GPI-PLC mutants have been analysed both for subcellular localisation and for the ability to release VSG from dying cells. Two sequence determinants necessary for concentration on the flagellar membrane were identified. First, all three cysteines are required for full concentration on the flagellar membrane. Mutants with two cysteines localise predominantly to the plasma membrane but lose some of their flagellar concentration, while mutants with one cysteine are mainly localised to membranes between the nucleus and flagellar pocket. Second, a proline residue close to the C-terminus, and distant from the acylated cysteines, is necessary for concentration on the flagellar membrane. The localisation of GPI-PLC to the plasma but not flagellar membrane is necessary for access to the VSG in dying cells. Cellular structures necessary for concentration on the flagellar membrane were identified by depletion of components. Disruption of the flagellar pocket collar caused loss of concentration whereas detachment of the flagellum from the cell body after disruption of the flagellar attachment zone did not. Thus, targeting to the flagellar membrane requires: a titratable level of acylation, a motif including a proline, and a functional flagellar pocket. These results provide an insight into how the segregation of flagellar membrane proteins from those present in the flagellar pocket and cell body membranes is achieved.

  18. N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding threshold

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Andreas J. W.; Glogger, Marius; Jones, Nicola G.; Abuillan, Wasim; Batram, Christopher; Hermann, Anne; Fenz, Susanne F.; Tanaka, Motomu; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The protein density in biological membranes can be extraordinarily high, but the impact of molecular crowding on the diffusion of membrane proteins has not been studied systematically in a natural system. The diversity of the membrane proteome of most cells may preclude systematic studies. African trypanosomes, however, feature a uniform surface coat that is dominated by a single type of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). Here we study the density-dependence of the diffusion of different glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored VSG-types on living cells and in artificial membranes. Our results suggest that a specific molecular crowding threshold (MCT) limits diffusion and hence affects protein function. Obstacles in the form of heterologous proteins compromise the diffusion coefficient and the MCT. The trypanosome VSG-coat operates very close to its MCT. Importantly, our experiments show that N-linked glycans act as molecular insulators that reduce retarding intermolecular interactions allowing membrane proteins to function correctly even when densely packed. PMID:27641538

  19. An apparent association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and a sphingolipid in Tetrahymena mimbres.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Thompson, G A

    1997-01-01

    Sphingolipids are thought to stabilize glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein-rich membrane domains of yeast and polarized higher animal cells during the processing and targeting of these proteins to the plasma membrane. A widely used criterion for identifying the stable sphingolipid- and GPI-anchored protein-enriched membrane domains is the resistance of these lipid-modified proteins to solubilization by the detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) at low temperature. Surprisingly, there have been no reports of sphingolipid/GPI-anchored protein association in protozoans, despite the fact that these cells contain considerably higher levels of GPI-anchored proteins than does any other organism. We report here the presence in Tetrahymena mimbres of a significant pool of GPI-anchored proteins which resisted extraction by 1% TX-100 at 4 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. Of the total cellular complement of GPI-anchored proteins, which together accounted for more than 2% of whole-cell protein and were especially enriched in surface membranes, 10% of the major 63kDa component (gpi63) and 23% of a somewhat less abundant component (gpi23) were insoluble in TX-100 at 4 degrees C. A substantial proportion of the cell's only abundant sphingolipid, ceramideaminoethylphosphonate (CAEP), was also insoluble in 1% TX-100 at 4 degrees C. Radiolabelling studies involving [3H]leucine incorporation into proteins and [3H]palmitic acid incorporation into lipids revealed that the TX-100-resistant gpi63, gpi23 and CAEP molecules were all metabolically distinct from their TX-100-soluble counterparts in other compartments of the cell. The presence of detergent-resistant sphingolipid/GPI-anchored protein domains in non-polarized ciliate and trypanosomatid cells was probably obscured in previous studies by the profusion of accompanying detergent-soluble molecules. PMID:9173882

  20. An Easy and Fast Protocol for Affinity Bead-Based Protein Enrichment and Storage of Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Maaß, S; Bonn, F; Büttner, K; Becher, D

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of dilute protein samples is a challenging task for scientific and industrial labs all over the world. Although there are different methods available that allow for protein enrichment from various biological sources, all of them have serious limitations apart from their advantages. In order to perform highly reproducible and sensitive protein analysis of lowest concentrated samples, we optimized a method to enrich proteins on affinity beads (StrataClean) recently. This chapter describes the general protocol of this strategy, thereby discussing the power as well as the limits of this technique for qualitative and quantitative proteomic studies. Moreover, additional application and protocol variants will be discussed, expanding the number of compatible up- and downstream processing techniques compared to the originally published method. Hence, we evaluated the reduction of time for sample preparation by use of preprimed affinity beads and shorter incubation durations as well as the influence of high concentration of salts or urea in the sample buffer.

  1. Protein-enriched meal replacements do not adversely affect liver, kidney or bone density: an outpatient randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is concern that recommending protein-enriched meal replacements as part of a weight management program could lead to changes in biomarkers of liver or renal function and reductions in bone density. This study was designed as a placebo-controlled clinical trial utilizing two isocaloric meal plans utilizing either a high protein-enriched (HP) or a standard protein (SP) meal replacement in an outpatient weight loss program. Subjects/methods 100 obese men and women over 30 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) between 27 to 40 kg/m2 were randomized to one of two isocaloric weight loss meal plans 1). HP group: providing 2.2 g protein/kg of lean body mass (LBM)/day or 2). SP group: providing 1.1 g protein/kg LBM/day. Meal replacement (MR) was used twice daily (one meal, one snack) for 3 months and then once a day for 9 months. Body weight, lipid profiles, liver function, renal function and bone density were measured at baseline and 12 months. Results Seventy subjects completed the study. Both groups lost weight (HP -4.29 ± 5.90 kg vs. SP -4.66 ± 6.91 kg, p < 0.01) and there was no difference in weight loss observed between the groups at one year. There was no significant change noted in liver function [AST (HP -2.07 ± 10.32 U/L, p = 0.28; SP 0.27 ± 6.67 U/L, p = 0.820), ALT (HP -1.03 ± 10.08 U/L, p = 0.34; SP -2.6 ± 12.51 U/L, p = 0.24), bilirubin (HP 0.007 ± 0.33, U/L, p = 0.91; SP 0.07 ± 0.24 U/L, p = 0.120), alkaline phosphatase (HP 2.00 ± 9.07 U/L, p = 0.240; SP -2.12 ± 11.01 U/L, p = 0.280)], renal function [serum creatinine (HP 0.31 ± 1.89 mg/dL, p = 0.380; SP -0.05 ± 0.15 mg/dL, p = 0.060), urea nitrogen (HP 1.33 ± 4.68 mg/dL, p = 0.130; SP -0.24 ± 3.03 mg/dL, p = 0.650), 24 hour urine creatinine clearance (HP -0.02 ± 0.16 mL/min, p = 0.480; SP 1.18 ± 7.53 mL/min, p = 0.400), and calcium excretion (HP -0.41 ± 9.48 mg/24 hours, p = 0.830; SP -0.007 ± 6.76 mg/24 hours, p = 0.990)] or in bone mineral density by DEXA (HP 0.04

  2. A controlled trial of protein enrichment of meal replacements for weight reduction with retention of lean body mass

    PubMed Central

    Treyzon, Leo; Chen, Steve; Hong, Kurt; Yan, Eric; Carpenter, Catherine L; Thames, Gail; Bowerman, Susan; Wang, He-Jing; Elashoff, Robert; Li, Zhaoping

    2008-01-01

    Background While high protein diets have been shown to improve satiety and retention of lean body mass (LBM), this study was designed to determine effects of a protein-enriched meal replacement (MR) on weight loss and LBM retention by comparison to an isocaloric carbohydrate-enriched MR within customized diet plans utilizing MR to achieve high protein or standard protein intakes. Methods Single blind, placebo-controlled, randomized outpatient weight loss trial in 100 obese men and women comparing two isocaloric meal plans utilizing a standard MR to which was added supplementary protein or carbohydrate powder. MR was used twice daily (one meal, one snack). One additional meal was included in the meal plan designed to achieve individualized protein intakes of either 1) 2.2 g protein/kg of LBM per day [high protein diet (HP)] or 2) 1.1 g protein/kg LBM/day standard protein diet (SP). LBM was determined using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Body weight, body composition, and lipid profiles were measured at baseline and 12 weeks. Results Eighty-five subjects completed the study. Both HP and SP MR were well tolerated, with no adverse effects. There were no differences in weight loss at 12 weeks (-4.19 ± 0.5 kg for HP group and -3.72 ± 0.7 kg for SP group, p > 0.1). Subjects in the HP group lost significantly more fat weight than the SP group (HP = -1.65 ± 0.63 kg; SP = -0.64 ± 0.79 kg, P = 0.05) as estimated by BIA. There were no significant differences in lipids nor fasting blood glucose between groups, but within the HP group a significant decrease in cholesterol and LDL cholesterol was noted at 12 weeks. This was not seen in the SP group. Conclusion Higher protein MR within a higher protein diet resulted in similar overall weight loss as the standard protein MR plan over 12 weeks. However, there was significantly more fat loss in the HP group but no significant difference in lean body mass. In this trial, subject compliance with both the standard and

  3. Protein enrichment of an Opuntia ficus-indica cladode hydrolysate by cultivation of Candida utilis and Kluyveromyces marxianus

    PubMed Central

    Akanni, Gabriel B; du Preez, James C; Steyn, Laurinda; Kilian, Stephanus G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (prickly pear cactus) have a low protein content; for use as a balanced feed, supplementation with other protein sources is therefore desirable. We investigated protein enrichment by cultivation of the yeasts Candida utilis and Kluyveromyces marxianus in an enzymatic hydrolysate of the cladode biomass. RESULTS Dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of sun-dried cladodes resulted in a hydrolysate containing (per litre) 45.5 g glucose, 6.3 g xylose, 9.1 g galactose, 10.8 g arabinose and 9.6 g fructose. Even though K. marxianus had a much higher growth rate and utilized l-arabinose and d-galactose more completely than C. utilis, its biomass yield coefficient was lower due to ethanol and ethyl acetate production despite aerobic cultivation. Yeast cultivation more than doubled the protein content of the hydrolysate, with an essential amino acid profile superior to sorghum and millet grains. CONCLUSIONS This K. marxianus strain was weakly Crabtree positive. Despite its low biomass yield, its performance compared well with C. utilis. This is the first report showing that the protein content and quality of O. ficus-indica cladode biomass could substantially be improved by yeast cultivation, including a comparative evaluation of C. utilis and K. marxianus. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25371280

  4. An optimised version of the secretome protein enrichment with click sugars (SPECS) method leads to enhanced coverage of the secretome.

    PubMed

    Serdaroglu, Alperen; Müller, Stephan A; Schepers, Ute; Bräse, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik

    2017-03-01

    The secretome, the entirety of all soluble proteins either being secreted or proteolytically released by a cell, plays a key role in inter-cellular communication of multi-cellular organisms. Pathological alterations contribute to diseases such as hypertension, cancer, autoimmune disorders or neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, studying disease-related perturbations of the secretome and the secretome itself covers an important aspect of cellular physiology. We recently developed the secretome protein enrichment with click sugars (SPECS) method that enables the analysis of secretomes of in vitro cell cultures even in the presence of FCS with MS. So far, SPECS facilitated the identification of protease substrates of BACE1, SPPL3 and ADAM10. Though, the SPECS method has already enabled deep insights into secretome biology, we aimed to improve the SPECS protocol to obtain even more information from MS-based secretome analysis and reduce the amount of input material. Here, we optimised the reaction buffer, the pH and replaced Dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) PEG12-biotin with the more water-soluble variant DBCO-sulpho-biotin to finally provide an optimised protocol of the recently published SPECS protocol. Overall, the number of quantified glycoproteins and their average sequence coverage was increased by 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. Thus, the opzimised SPECS protocol allows reducing the input material by half without losing information. These improvements make the SPECS method more sensitive and more universal applicable to cell types with limited availability.

  5. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58–59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of salt (5% Na2SO4), compared to that of a reference strain. Our results strongly suggest that constitutive expression of the IoGAS1 gene in S. cerevisiae could be advantageous for several fermentation processes under these stress conditions. PMID:27589271

  6. Cell lysis induces redistribution of the GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein on both faces of the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Cardoso De Almeida, M L; Geuskens, M; Pays, E

    1999-12-01

    African trypanosomes are coated by 10 million copies of a single variant specific glycoprotein (VSG) which are anchored in the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). A GPI-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) triggers fast VSG release upon cell lysis but in vivo it is safely controlled and topologically concealed from its substrate by being intracellular. One enigmatic aspect of GPI-PLC action therefore consists of how it could gain access to the VSG in the exoplasmic leaflet of the membrane. The data presented herewith disclose an unexpected possible solution for this puzzle: upon cell rupture the VSG invades the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane which thus becomes double coated. This unusual VSG rearrangement was stable in ruptured plasma membrane from GPI-PLC null mutant trypanosomes but transiently preceded VSG release in wild-type parasites. The formation of double coat membrane (DCM) was independent of the presence or activation of GPI-PLC, occurred both at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C and was unaffected by the classical inhibitor of VSG release, p-choromercuryphenylsulfonic acid (PCM). DCMs conserved the same coat thickness and association with subpellicular microtubules as in intact cells and were prone to form vesicles following gradual detachment of the latter. Our data also demonstrate that: (i) GPI-PLC expressed by one trypanosome only targets its own plasma membrane, being unable to release VSG of another parasite; (ii) DCMs concomitantly formed from trypanosomes expressing different VSGs do not intermix, an indication that DCM might be refractory to membrane fusion.

  7. Effect of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-phospholipase D overexpression on GPI metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Karl J; Hepworth, Matthew R; Raikwar, Nandita S; Deeg, Mark A; Sevlever, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    GPI-PLD [glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-specific phospholipase D (PLD)] is a secreted mammalian enzyme that specifically cleaves GPI-anchored proteins. In addition, the enzyme has been shown to cleave GPI anchor intermediates in cell lysates. The biosynthesis of the GPI anchor is well characterized; however, the mechanisms by which the levels of GPI anchor intermediates are regulated are still unknown. To investigate whether GPI-PLD plays a role in this regulation, we isolated stable HeLa cells overexpressing the enzyme. GPI-PLD-HeLa (GPI-PLD-transfected HeLa) cells showed a 3-fold increase in intracellular GPI-PLD activity and drastically decreased the levels of GPI-anchored proteins when compared with untransfected HeLa controls. Intracellular cleavage of GPI-anchored proteins has been suggested to occur early in the secretory pathway and, in agreement with this proposal, GPI-PLD activity in GPI-PLD-HeLa cells was detected not only in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, but also in the plasma membrane. The enzyme was also active in lipid rafts, membrane microdomains in which GPI-anchored proteins and GPI anchor intermediates are concentrated, indicating that intracellular GPI-PLD cleavage may also occur in this compartment. Pulse-chase paradigms revealed the turnover rate of the last intermediate of the GPI anchor pathway in GPI-PLD-HeLa cells to be accelerated compared with the controls. Furthermore, 1,10-phenanthroline, a GPI-PLD inhibitor, reversed this effect. Our studies demonstrated that GPI-PLD can cleave not only GPI-anchored proteins, but also GPI anchor intermediates intracellularly. This observation opens the possibility that GPI-PLD can influence the steady-state levels of GPI-anchored proteins by hydrolysing the anchor before and after its attachment to proteins. PMID:14611645

  8. The Glycophosphatidylinositol Anchor of the MCMV Evasin, m157, Facilitates Optimal Cell Surface Expression and Ly49 Receptor Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Lindsey E.; Guseva, Natalya V.; Shey, Michael R.; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Heusel, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus-encoded protein m157 is a cognate ligand for both inhibitory and activating receptors expressed by natural killer cells. Additionally, m157 is expressed on the surface of infected cells by a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Although endogenous GPI-anchored proteins are known to be ligands for the NK cell receptor, NKG2D, the contribution of the GPI anchor for viral m157 ligand function is unknown. To determine whether the GPI anchor for m157 is dispensable for m157 function, we generated m157 variants expressed as transmembrane fusion proteins and tested cells expressing transmembrane m157 for the capacity to activate cognate Ly49 receptors. We found that the GPI anchor is required for high-level cell surface expression of m157, and that the transmembrane m157 ligand retains the capacity to activate reporter cells and NK cells expressing Ly49H, as well as Ly49I129 reporter cells, but with reduced potency. Importantly, target cells expressing the transmembrane form of m157 were killed less efficiently and failed to mediate Ly49H receptor downregulation on fresh NK cells compared to targets expressing GPI-anchored m157. Taken together, these results show that the GPI anchor for m157 facilitates robust cell surface expression, and that NK cells are sensitive to the altered cell surface expression of this potent viral evasin. PMID:23840655

  9. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS OF GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL ANCHORS

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Benjamin M.; Guo, Zhongwu

    2013-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cell-surface proteins and glycoproteins are anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs), a family of glycolipids that are post-translationally attached to proteins at their C-termini. GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins play important roles in many biological and pathological events, such as cell recognition and adhesion, signal transduction, host defense, and acting as receptors for viruses and toxins. Chemical synthesis of structurally defined GPI anchors and GPI derivatives is a necessary step toward understanding the properties and functions of these molecules in biological systems and exploring their potential therapeutic applications. In the first part of this comprehensive article on the chemical synthesis of GPIs, classic syntheses of naturally occurring GPI anchors from protozoan parasites, yeast, and mammals are covered. The second part of the article focuses on recent diversity-oriented strategies for the synthesis of GPI anchors containing unsaturated lipids, “click chemistry” tags, and highly branched and modified structures. PMID:22794184

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Mabry syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... PGAP2 gene result in the production of an incomplete GPI anchor that cannot attach to proteins or ... PN. Identity-by-descent filtering of exome sequence data identifies PIGV mutations in hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome. ...

  11. Determination of the non-ionic detergent insolubility and phosphoprotein associations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins expressed on T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Mallory, M A; Finberg, R W

    1998-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are poorly solublized in non-ionic detergents such as Triton X-100 and Nonidet P40, but are easily solublized by detergents with high critical micelle concentrations such as octylglucoside. This solubility profile has been suggested to be due to the localization of GPI-anchored proteins to lipid microdomains rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Additionally, GPI-anchored proteins expressed on haemopoietic cells have been shown to associate with src-family tyrosine kinases and heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite these observations, the non-ionic detergent insolubility of GPI-anchored proteins on haemopoietic cells has not been quantified nor has a relationship between the non-ionic detergent insolubility of these proteins and their association with signal-transduction molecules been identified. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins found on T-cell tumours and activated T cells, although significantly more insoluble then transmembrane proteins, are not uniform in their detergent insolubility. Whereas CD59 was between 4% and 13% soluble, CD48 was between 13% and 25% soluble, CD55 was between 20% and 30% soluble, and CD109 was between 34% and 75% soluble. The ability of these GPI-anchored proteins to associate with phosphoproteins was correlated with their detergent insolubility: the more detergent-insoluble that a GPI-anchored protein was, the greater the level of phosphoprotein associations. These experiments reveal a relationship between non-ionic detergent insolubility and association with signal-transduction molecules and suggest a cause-and-effect relationship between these two properties. In total, these experiments support the hypothesis that the association of GPI-anchored proteins with signalling molecules is due to their sorting to lipid microdomains. PMID:9716490

  12. The presence of GPI-linked protein(s) in an archaeobacterium, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, closely related to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Nishizaki, R; Ikezawa, H

    1997-02-11

    GPI-anchored proteins are distributed ubiquitously in eukaryotes, but not in procaryotes. By metabolic-labeling of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells, 14C-radiolabeled precursors of GPI and caldarchaetidylinositol were incorporated into 120, 143 and 185 kDa proteins. The 185 kDa protein was specifically solubilized by bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Therefore, Sulfolobus proved to contain at least one GPI-anchored proteins.

  13. PIGF — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: This gene encodes a protein involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis. The GPI-anchor, a glycolipid containing three mannose molecules in its core backbone, is found on many blood cells where it serves to anchor proteins to the cell surface. The encoded protein and another GPI synthesis protein, PIGO, function in the transfer of ethanolaminephosphate to the third mannose in GPI. Alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been described. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008

  14. Determination of the non-ionic detergent insolubility and phosphoprotein associations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins expressed on T cells.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K R; Mallory, M A; Finberg, R W

    1998-09-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are poorly solublized in non-ionic detergents such as Triton X-100 and Nonidet P40, but are easily solublized by detergents with high critical micelle concentrations such as octylglucoside. This solubility profile has been suggested to be due to the localization of GPI-anchored proteins to lipid microdomains rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Additionally, GPI-anchored proteins expressed on haemopoietic cells have been shown to associate with src-family tyrosine kinases and heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite these observations, the non-ionic detergent insolubility of GPI-anchored proteins on haemopoietic cells has not been quantified nor has a relationship between the non-ionic detergent insolubility of these proteins and their association with signal-transduction molecules been identified. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins found on T-cell tumours and activated T cells, although significantly more insoluble then transmembrane proteins, are not uniform in their detergent insolubility. Whereas CD59 was between 4% and 13% soluble, CD48 was between 13% and 25% soluble, CD55 was between 20% and 30% soluble, and CD109 was between 34% and 75% soluble. The ability of these GPI-anchored proteins to associate with phosphoproteins was correlated with their detergent insolubility: the more detergent-insoluble that a GPI-anchored protein was, the greater the level of phosphoprotein associations. These experiments reveal a relationship between non-ionic detergent insolubility and association with signal-transduction molecules and suggest a cause-and-effect relationship between these two properties. In total, these experiments support the hypothesis that the association of GPI-anchored proteins with signalling molecules is due to their sorting to lipid microdomains.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum localized PerA is required for cell wall integrity, azole drug resistance, and virulence in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dawoon; Thammahong, Arsa; Shepardson, Kelly M.; Blosser, Sara J.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary GPI-anchoring is a universal and critical post-translational protein modification in eukaryotes. In fungi, many cell wall proteins are GPI-anchored, and disruption of GPI-anchored proteins impairs cell wall integrity. After being synthesized and attached to target proteins, GPI anchors undergo modification on lipid moieties. In spite of its importance for GPI-anchored protein functions, our current knowledge of GPI lipid remodeling in pathogenic fungi is limited. In this study, we characterized the role of a putative GPI lipid remodeling protein, designated PerA, in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. PerA localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and loss of PerA leads to striking defects in cell wall integrity. A perA null mutant has decreased conidia production, increased susceptibility to triazole antifungal drugs, and is avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Interestingly, loss of PerA increases exposure of β-glucan and chitin content on the hyphal cell surface, but diminished TNF production by bone marrow derived macrophages relative to wild type. Given the structural specificity of fungal GPI-anchors, which is different from humans, understanding GPI lipid remodeling and PerA function in A. fumigatus is a promising research direction to uncover a new fungal specific antifungal drug target. PMID:24779420

  16. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins are preferentially targeted to the basolateral surface in Fischer rat thyroid epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) acts as an apical targeting signal in MDCK cells and other kidney and intestinal cell lines. In striking contrast with these model polarized cell lines, we show here that Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) epithelial cells do not display a preferential apical distribution of GPI-anchored proteins. Six out of nine detectable endogenous GPI-anchored proteins were localized on the basolateral surface, whereas two others were apical and one was not polarized. Transfection of several model GPI proteins, previously shown to be apically targeted in MDCK cells, also led to unexpected results. While the ectodomain of decay accelerating factor (DAF) was apically secreted, 50% of the native, GPI-anchored form, of this protein was basolateral. Addition of a GPI anchor to the ectodomain of Herpes simplex gD-1, secreted without polarity, led to basolateral localization of the fusion protein, gD1-DAF. Targeting experiments demonstrated that gD1-DAF was delivered vectorially from the Golgi apparatus to the basolateral surface. These results indicate that FRT cells have fundamental differences with MDCK cells with regard to the mechanisms for sorting GPI-anchored proteins: GPI is not an apical signal but, rather, it behaves as a basolateral signal. The "mutant" behavior of FRT cells may provide clues to the nature of the mechanisms that sort GPI-anchored proteins in epithelial cells. PMID:7684737

  17. Fermentation Methods for Protein Enrichment of Cassava and Corn with Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Edgard; Jouanneau, Françoise; Bertrand, Jean-Claude; Raphael, Alain; Janssens, Jacques; Lebeault, Jean Michel

    1980-01-01

    Candida tropicalis grows on soluble starch, corn, and cassava powders without requiring that these substrates be previously hydrolyzed. C. tropicalis possesses the enzyme needed to hydrolyze starch, namely, an α-amylase. That property has been used to develop a fermentation process whereby C. tropicalis can be grown directly on corn or cassava powders so that the resultant mixture of biomass and residual corn or cassava contains about 20% protein, which represents a balanced diet for either animal fodder or human food. The fact that no extra enzymes are required to hydrolyze starch results in a particularly efficient way of improving the nutritional value of amylaceous products, through a single-step fermentation process. PMID:16345495

  18. Proteomic analysis of the mouse brain following protein enrichment by preparative electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xixi, Elena; Dimitraki, Ploumisti; Vougas, Kostantinos; Kossida, Sofia; Lubec, Gert; Fountoulakis, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Proteomics is a powerful technology to study the identity and levels of brain proteins. Changes of protein levels as well as modifications that occur in neurological disorders may be informative for the pathogenesis of these disorders and could result in the identification of potential drug targets and disease markers. To increase the capability of characterizing complex protein profiles, protein mixtures should be separated into simpler fractions, thus increasing the likelihood of detecting low-abundance proteins. Considering that low-abundance proteins are thought to be involved in important biological processes, identification of those low-copy-number gene products appears to be a scientific challenge. In the present study, proteomic analysis of adult mouse brain tissue was performed following enrichment by preparative electrophoresis. This was performed using the PrepCell apparatus in the presence of 0.1% lithium dodecyl sulfate. Samples were electrophoresed in a cylindrical polyacrylamide gel and the proteins of the fractions collected were first analyzed by 1-D and then by 2-DE. Protein identification was performed by MALDI-TOF-MS. The present analysis resulted in the identification of 360 different gene products. Among those were transport proteins, transcription activators, signal transduction molecules as well as proteins with a number of other functions. Preparative electrophoresis is an efficient method for the enrichment of proteins of low molecular mass and may be useful in the investigation of disorders of the central nervous system.

  19. Migration behaviour of discontinuous buffers in capillary electrophoresis during protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Booker, Christina J; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2012-10-21

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is not only an effective separation technique, but can also serve as a sample preparation tool for enrichment and purification at sub-microliter sample volumes. Our approach is based on the use of a discontinuous buffer system consisting of an acid and a base (acetate and ammonium). Proteins and/or peptides with isoelectric points between the pH values of these two buffers will become stacked at the neutralization reaction boundary (NRB). To understand the mechanism of the NRB formation and the electrophoretic migration of various ions during the enrichment, we performed experiments using myoglobin and mesityl oxide to reveal the ion migration patterns at the buffer junction, and utilized Simul 5 to computer simulate the process. The simulated results closely resembled the experimental data, and together, they effectively revealed the characteristics of the discontinuous buffers. Importantly, the discovery allowed the manipulation of NRB behaviours by controlling the discontinuous buffer composition. To illustrate this, the removal of urea as an unwanted background molecule from the enriched protein sample was achieved based on the acquired information.

  20. Identification of Proteins Enriched in Rice Egg or Sperm Cells by Single-Cell Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Abiko, Mafumi; Furuta, Kensyo; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Fujita, Chiharu; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Okamoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, female gamete differentiation, fertilization, and subsequent zygotic development occur in embryo sacs deeply embedded in the ovaries. Despite their importance in plant reproduction and development, how the egg cell is specialized, fuses with the sperm cell, and converts into an active zygote for early embryogenesis remains unclear. This lack of knowledge is partly attributable to the difficulty of direct analyses of gametes in angiosperms. In the present study, proteins from egg and sperm cells obtained from rice flowers were separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and globally identified by highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy. Proteome analyses were also conducted for seedlings, callus, and pollen grains to compare their protein expression profiles to those of gametes. The proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000265. A total of 2,138 and 2,179 expressed proteins were detected in egg and sperm cells, respectively, and 102 and 77 proteins were identified as preferentially expressed in egg and sperm cells, respectively. Moreover, several rice or Arabidopsis lines with mutations in genes encoding the putative gamete-enriched proteins showed clear phenotypic defects in seed set or seed development. These results suggested that the proteomic data presented in this study are foundational information toward understanding the mechanisms of reproduction and early development in angiosperms. PMID:23936051

  1. Chemically modified diamond-like carbon (DLC) for protein enrichment and profiling by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, M; Rainer, M; Huck, C W; Ashiq, M N; Bonn, G K

    2012-08-01

    The development of new high throughput methods based on different materials with chemical modifications for protein profiling of complex mixtures leads towards biomarkers; used particularly for early diagnosis of a disease. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) is developed and optimized for serum protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This study is carried out in connection with a material-based approach, termed as material-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. DLC is selected as carrier surface which provides large surface to volume ratio and offers high sensitivity. DLC has a dual role of working as MALDI target while acting as an interface for protein profiling by specifically binding peptides and proteins out of serum samples. Serum constituents are bound through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) functionality, created through glycidyl methacrylate polymerization under ultraviolet light followed by further derivatization with iminodiacetic acid and copper ion loading. Scanning electron microscopy highlights the morphological characteristics of DLC surface. It could be demonstrated that IMAC functionalized DLC coatings represent a powerful material in trapping biomolecules for their further analysis by MALDI-MS resulting in improved sensitivity, specificity and capacity in comparison to other protein-profiling methods.

  2. Towards complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates by enzyme mixtures for protein enrichment: A modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Loman, Abdullah Al; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2016-05-01

    Soy protein is a well-known nutritional supplement in proteinaceous food and animal feed. However, soybeans contain complex carbohydrate. Selective carbohydrate removal by enzymes could increase the protein content and remove the indigestibility of soy products for inclusion in animal feed. Complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates is challenging due to the presence of proteins and different types of non-structural polysaccharides. This study is designed to guide complex enzyme mixture required for hydrolysis of all types of soy flour carbohydrates. Enzyme broths from Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus aculeatus and Trichoderma reesei fermentations were evaluated in this study for soy carbohydrate hydrolysis. The resultant hydrolysate was measured for solubilized carbohydrate by both total carbohydrate and reducing sugar analyses. Conversion data attained after 48h hydrolysis were first fitted with models to determine the maximum fractions of carbohydrate hydrolyzable by each enzyme group, i.e., cellulase, xylanase, pectinase and α-galactosidase. Kinetic models were then developed to describe the increasing conversions over time under different enzyme activities and process conditions. The models showed high fidelity in predicting soy carbohydrate hydrolysis over broad ranges of soy flour loading (5-25%) and enzyme activities: per g soy flour, cellulase, 0.04-30 FPU; xylanase, 3.5-618U; pectinase, 0.03-120U; and α-galactosidase, 0.01-60U. The models are valuable in guiding the development and production of optimal enzyme mixtures toward hydrolysis of all types of carbohydrates present in soy flour and in optimizing the design and operation of hydrolysis reactor and process.

  3. Ocsyn, a novel syntaxin-interacting protein enriched in the subapical region of inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Safieddine, S; Ly, C D; Wang, Y-X; Wang, C Y; Kachar, B; Petralia, R S; Wenthold, R J

    2002-06-01

    Sensory (hair) cells of the inner ear contain two specialized areas of membrane delivery. The first, located at the cell base, is the afferent synapse where rapid delivery of synaptic vesicles is required to convey information about auditory signals with exceedingly high temporal precision. The second area is at the apex. To accommodate the continuous movement of stereocilia and facilitate their repair, recycling of membrane components is required. Intense vesicular traffic is restricted to a narrow band of cytoplasm around the cuticular plate, which anchors stereocilia. Our previous analyses showed that SNARE proteins (syntaxin 1A/SNAP25/VAMP1) are concentrated at both poles of hair cells, consistent with their involvement in membrane delivery at both locations. To investigate further the molecules involved in membrane delivery at these two sites, we constructed a two-hybrid library of the organ of Corti and probed it with syntaxin 1A. Here we report the cloning of a novel syntaxin-binding protein that is concentrated in a previously uncharacterized organelle at the apex of inner hair cells.

  4. Identification of proteins enriched in rice egg or sperm cells by single-cell proteomics.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Mafumi; Furuta, Kensyo; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Fujita, Chiharu; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Okamoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, female gamete differentiation, fertilization, and subsequent zygotic development occur in embryo sacs deeply embedded in the ovaries. Despite their importance in plant reproduction and development, how the egg cell is specialized, fuses with the sperm cell, and converts into an active zygote for early embryogenesis remains unclear. This lack of knowledge is partly attributable to the difficulty of direct analyses of gametes in angiosperms. In the present study, proteins from egg and sperm cells obtained from rice flowers were separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and globally identified by highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy. Proteome analyses were also conducted for seedlings, callus, and pollen grains to compare their protein expression profiles to those of gametes. The proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000265. A total of 2,138 and 2,179 expressed proteins were detected in egg and sperm cells, respectively, and 102 and 77 proteins were identified as preferentially expressed in egg and sperm cells, respectively. Moreover, several rice or Arabidopsis lines with mutations in genes encoding the putative gamete-enriched proteins showed clear phenotypic defects in seed set or seed development. These results suggested that the proteomic data presented in this study are foundational information toward understanding the mechanisms of reproduction and early development in angiosperms.

  5. Quantitative proteomics reveal proteins enriched in tubular endoplasmic reticulum of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinbo; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Haicheng; Shui, Wenqing; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    The tubular network is a critical part of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The network is shaped by the reticulons and REEPs/Yop1p that generate tubules by inducing high membrane curvature, and the dynamin-like GTPases atlastin and Sey1p/RHD3 that connect tubules via membrane fusion. However, the specific functions of this ER domain are not clear. Here, we isolated tubule-based microsomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae via classical cell fractionation and detergent-free immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged Yop1p, which specifically localizes to ER tubules. In quantitative comparisons of tubule-derived and total microsomes, we identified a total of 79 proteins that were enriched in the ER tubules, including known proteins that organize the tubular ER network. Functional categorization of the list of proteins revealed that the tubular ER network may be involved in membrane trafficking, lipid metabolism, organelle contact, and stress sensing. We propose that affinity isolation coupled with quantitative proteomics is a useful tool for investigating ER functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23816.001 PMID:28287394

  6. Fabrication of an octadecylated silica monolith inside a glass microchip for protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Eman; Welham, Kevin

    2012-10-21

    Silica-based monolithic materials have shown great promise for use as sorbent materials due to their large surface area and bimodal pore size distribution. In this paper, a new process for the fabrication of a silica-based monolith inside a glass microchip and its modification with octadecylsilyl ligands was successfully developed for use in the microchip-based solid phase extraction of proteins. Monolithic porous silica without cracks was prepared by a sol-gel process, followed by placement of the monolithic silica disk inside the extraction chamber in the base plate of the microchip. The two plates of the glass microchip were then thermally bonded at 575 °C for 3 hours. The silica-based monolith was not affected by the thermal bonding of the two plates of the microchip. This process completely avoids the problem of shrinkage in the silica skeleton during preparation. The monolithic silica disk inside the glass microchip was subsequently modified with octadecylsilyl (C(18)) moieties for increased protein binding capacity. The performance of the microchip was evaluated using the extraction of six proteins varying in molecular weight and isoelectric point, namely insulin, cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, β-lactoglobulin, and hemoglobin at a concentration of 60 μM. The standard protein was mixed with a double concentration of the detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). The results show that the octadecylated silica monolith was permeable, has the ability to remove impurities, and achieved a high extraction recovery of the proteins (94.8-99.7%) compared with conventional octadecylated silica particles (48.3-91.3%). The chip-to-chip reproducibility was assessed by calculating the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the six proteins during extraction. The intra-batch and inter-batch RSDs were in the range of 2.0-4.5% and 2.9-6.4%, respectively. This new microfluidic device for protein extraction may find an application in the area of proteomic research.

  7. Defects in GPI biosynthesis perturb Cripto signaling during forebrain development in two new mouse models of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    McKean, David M; Niswander, Lee

    2012-09-15

    Holoprosencephaly is the most common forebrain defect in humans. We describe two novel mouse mutants that display a holoprosencephaly-like phenotype. Both mutations disrupt genes in the glycerophosphatidyl inositol (GPI) biosynthesis pathway: gonzo disrupts Pign and beaker disrupts Pgap1. GPI anchors normally target and anchor a diverse group of proteins to lipid raft domains. Mechanistically we show that GPI anchored proteins are mislocalized in GPI biosynthesis mutants. Disruption of the GPI-anchored protein Cripto (mouse) and TDGF1 (human ortholog) have been shown to result in holoprosencephaly, leading to our hypothesis that Cripto is the key GPI anchored protein whose altered function results in an HPE-like phenotype. Cripto is an obligate Nodal co-factor involved in TGFβ signaling, and we show that TGFβ signaling is reduced both in vitro and in vivo. This work demonstrates the importance of the GPI anchor in normal forebrain development and suggests that GPI biosynthesis genes should be screened for association with human holoprosencephaly.

  8. The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for Ly-6A/E- mediated T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Ly-6E, a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored murine alloantigen that can activate T cells upon antibody cross-linking, has been converted into an integral membrane protein by gene fusion. This fusion product, designated Ly-6EDb, was characterized in transiently transfected COS cells and demonstrated to be an integral cell surface membrane protein. Furthermore, the fusion antigen can be expressed on the surface of the BW5147 class "E" mutant cell line, which only expresses integral membrane proteins but not GPI-anchored proteins. The capability of this fusion antigen to activate T cells was examined by gene transfer studies in D10G4.1, a type 2 T cell helper clones. When transfected into D10 cells, the GPI-anchored Ly-6E antigen, as well as the endogenous GPI-anchored Ly-6A antigen, can initiate T cell activation upon antibody cross-linking. In contrast, the transmembrane anchored Ly-6EDb antigen was unable to mediate T cell activation. Our results demonstrate that the GPI-anchor is critical to Ly-6A/E-mediated T cell activation. PMID:1825084

  9. Decay-accelerating factor (CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored complement regulatory protein, is a receptor for several echoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bergelson, J M; Chan, M; Solomon, K R; St John, N F; Lin, H; Finberg, R W

    1994-01-01

    Echoviruses are human pathogens belonging to the picornavirus family. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface protein that protects cells from lysis by autologous complement. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibodies prevented echovirus 7 attachment to susceptible cells and protected cells from infection. HeLa cells specifically lost the capacity to bind echovirus 7 when treated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, indicating that the virus receptor, like DAF, is a GPI-anchored protein. Although Chinese hamster ovary cells do not bind echovirus 7, transfectants expressing human DAF bound virus efficiently, and binding was prevented by pretreatment with an anti-DAF monoclonal antibody. Anti-DAF antibodies prevented infection by at least six echovirus serotypes. These results indicate that DAF is the receptor mediating attachment and infection by several echoviruses. Images PMID:7517044

  10. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Skauli, Nadia; Wallace, Sean; Chiang, Samuel C. C.; Barøy, Tuva; Holmgren, Asbjørn; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Bryceson, Yenan T.; Strømme, Petter; Frengen, Eirik; Misceo, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3), characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val) in two brothers with several of the typical features of MCAHS3, but in addition, pyramidal tract neurological signs. Notably, they are the first patients with MCAHS3 without skeletal, cardiac, or genitourinary anomalies. PIGT encodes a crucial subunit of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) transamidase complex, which catalyzes the attachment of proteins to GPI-anchors, attaching the proteins to the cell membrane. In vitro studies in cells from the two brothers showed reduced levels of GPI-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface, supporting the pathogenicity of the novel PIGT variant. PMID:27916860

  11. The Sphingolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Is a Potential Target for Chemotherapy against Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koeller, Carolina Macedo; Heise, Norton

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of human Chagas disease, for which there currently is no cure. The life cycle of T. cruzi is complex, including an extracellular phase in the triatomine insect vector and an obligatory intracellular stage inside the vertebrate host. These phases depend on a variety of surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol-(GPI-) anchored glycoconjugates that are synthesized by the parasite. Therefore, the surface expression of GPI-anchored components and the biosynthetic pathways of GPI anchors are attractive targets for new therapies for Chagas disease. We identified new drug targets for chemotherapy by taking the available genome sequence information and searching for differences in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathways (SBPs) of mammals and T. cruzi. In this paper, we discuss the major steps of the SBP in mammals, yeast and T. cruzi, focusing on the IPC synthase and ceramide remodeling of T. cruzi as potential therapeutic targets for Chagas disease. PMID:21603271

  12. Post-translational modification of the NKG2D ligand RAET1G leads to cell surface expression of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked isoform.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Maki; Eagle, Robert A; Trowsdale, John

    2010-05-28

    NKG2D is an important activating receptor on lymphocytes. In human, it interacts with two groups of ligands: the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A/B (MICA/B) family and the UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family, also known as retinoic acid early transcript (RAET1). MIC proteins are membrane-anchored, but all of the ULBP/RAET1 proteins, except for RAET1E and RAET1G, are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored. To address the reason for these differences we studied the association of RAET1G with the membrane. Using epitope-tagged RAET1G protein in conjunction with antibodies to different parts of the molecule and in pulse-chase experiments, we showed that the C terminus of the protein was cleaved soon after protein synthesis. Endoglycosidase H and peptide N-glycosidase treatment and cell surface immunoprecipitation indicated that most of the protein stayed in the endoplasmic reticulum, but some of the cleaved form was modified in the Golgi and transported to the cell surface. We examined the possibility of GPI anchoring of the protein in three ways: (i) Phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C released the PI-linked form of the protein. (ii) The surface expression pattern of RAET1G decreased in cells defective in GPI anchoring through mutant GPI-amidase. (iii) Site-directed mutagenesis, to disrupt residues predicted to facilitate GPI-anchoring, resulted in diminished surface expression of RAET1G. Thus, a form of RAET1G is GPI-anchored, in line with most other ULBP/RAET1 family proteins. The cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane domains appear to result from gene duplication and frameshift mutation. Together with our previous results, our data suggest that RAET1G is regulated post-translationally to produce a GPI-anchored isoform.

  13. Post-translational Modification of the NKG2D Ligand RAET1G Leads to Cell Surface Expression of a Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked Isoform*

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Maki; Eagle, Robert A.; Trowsdale, John

    2010-01-01

    NKG2D is an important activating receptor on lymphocytes. In human, it interacts with two groups of ligands: the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A/B (MICA/B) family and the UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family, also known as retinoic acid early transcript (RAET1). MIC proteins are membrane-anchored, but all of the ULBP/RAET1 proteins, except for RAET1E and RAET1G, are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored. To address the reason for these differences we studied the association of RAET1G with the membrane. Using epitope-tagged RAET1G protein in conjunction with antibodies to different parts of the molecule and in pulse-chase experiments, we showed that the C terminus of the protein was cleaved soon after protein synthesis. Endoglycosidase H and peptide N-glycosidase treatment and cell surface immunoprecipitation indicated that most of the protein stayed in the endoplasmic reticulum, but some of the cleaved form was modified in the Golgi and transported to the cell surface. We examined the possibility of GPI anchoring of the protein in three ways: (i) Phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C released the PI-linked form of the protein. (ii) The surface expression pattern of RAET1G decreased in cells defective in GPI anchoring through mutant GPI-amidase. (iii) Site-directed mutagenesis, to disrupt residues predicted to facilitate GPI-anchoring, resulted in diminished surface expression of RAET1G. Thus, a form of RAET1G is GPI-anchored, in line with most other ULBP/RAET1 family proteins. The cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane domains appear to result from gene duplication and frameshift mutation. Together with our previous results, our data suggest that RAET1G is regulated post-translationally to produce a GPI-anchored isoform. PMID:20304922

  14. Effect of ingredients on rheological, nutritional and quality characteristics of fibre and protein enriched baked energy bars.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Neelam; Darappa, Indrani

    2015-05-01

    Effect of substitution of brown flour (BF) with fiber rich ingredient mixture, FRIM (banana flour, psyllium husk, partially defatted coconut flour and oats) and protein rich ingredient mixture, PRIM (chickpea flour, sesame, soya protein isolate and whey protein concentrate) at the levels of 25, 50 and 75 % on the rheological, nutritional and quality characteristics of baked energy bars (BEB) were studied. Use of increasing amount of FRIM increased farinograph water absorption and amylograph peak viscosity while PRIM decreased the aforementioned parameters. Addition of FRIM or PRIM increased the bar dough hardness and decreased cohesiveness and springiness. The overall quality score of BEB increased only up to the substitution of 50 % of BF with FRIM or PRIM. The BEB with 50 % FRIM and PRIM remained chemically stable during storage up to 3 months and showed 9 times increase in dietary fiber content and about 2 times increase in protein content respectively.

  15. Proteomic Identification of VEGF-dependent Protein Enrichment to Membrane Caveolar-raft Microdomains in Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chillà, Anastasia; Magherini, Francesca; Margheri, Francesca; Laurenzana, Anna; Gamberi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Bianchi, Laura; Danza, Giovanna; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Serratì, Simona; Modesti, Alessandra; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell caveolar-rafts are considered functional platforms that recruit several pro-angiogenic molecules to realize an efficient angiogenic program. Here we studied the differential caveolar-raft protein composition of endothelial colony-forming cells following stimulation with VEGF, which localizes in caveolae on interaction with its type-2 receptor. Endothelial colony-forming cells are a cell population identified in human umbilical blood that show all the properties of an endothelial progenitor cell and a high proliferative rate. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis was coupled with mass spectrometry to identify candidate proteins. The twenty-eight differentially expressed protein spots were grouped according to their function using Gene Ontology classification. In particular, functional categories relative to cell death inhibition and hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes resulted enriched. In these categories, Peroxiredoxin-2 and 6, that control hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes, are the main enriched molecules together with the anti-apoptotic 78 kDa glucose regulated protein. Some of the proteins we identified had never before identified as caveolar-raft components. Other identified proteins include calpain small subunit-1, known to mediates angiogenic response to VEGF, gelsolin, which regulates stress fiber assembly, and annexin A3, an angiogenic mediator that induces VEGF production. We validated the functional activity of the above proteins, showing that the siRNA silencing of these resulted in the inhibition of capillary morphogenesis. Overall, our data show that VEGF stimulation triggers the caveolar-raft recruitment of proteins that warrant a physiological amount of reactive oxygen species to maintain a proper angiogenic function of endothelial colony-forming cells and preserve the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23572564

  16. Proteomic identification of VEGF-dependent protein enrichment to membrane caveolar-raft microdomains in endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chillà, Anastasia; Magherini, Francesca; Margheri, Francesca; Laurenzana, Anna; Gamberi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Bianchi, Laura; Danza, Giovanna; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Serratì, Simona; Modesti, Alessandra; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2013-07-01

    Endothelial cell caveolar-rafts are considered functional platforms that recruit several pro-angiogenic molecules to realize an efficient angiogenic program. Here we studied the differential caveolar-raft protein composition of endothelial colony-forming cells following stimulation with VEGF, which localizes in caveolae on interaction with its type-2 receptor. Endothelial colony-forming cells are a cell population identified in human umbilical blood that show all the properties of an endothelial progenitor cell and a high proliferative rate. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis was coupled with mass spectrometry to identify candidate proteins. The twenty-eight differentially expressed protein spots were grouped according to their function using Gene Ontology classification. In particular, functional categories relative to cell death inhibition and hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes resulted enriched. In these categories, Peroxiredoxin-2 and 6, that control hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes, are the main enriched molecules together with the anti-apoptotic 78 kDa glucose regulated protein. Some of the proteins we identified had never before identified as caveolar-raft components. Other identified proteins include calpain small subunit-1, known to mediates angiogenic response to VEGF, gelsolin, which regulates stress fiber assembly, and annexin A3, an angiogenic mediator that induces VEGF production. We validated the functional activity of the above proteins, showing that the siRNA silencing of these resulted in the inhibition of capillary morphogenesis. Overall, our data show that VEGF stimulation triggers the caveolar-raft recruitment of proteins that warrant a physiological amount of reactive oxygen species to maintain a proper angiogenic function of endothelial colony-forming cells and preserve the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton.

  17. Step-by-step strategy for protein enrichment and proteome characterisation of extracellular polymeric substances in wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana F; Carvalho, Gilda; Soares, Renata; Coelho, Ana V; Barreto Crespo, M Teresa

    2012-08-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are keys in biomass aggregation and settleability in wastewater treatment systems. In membrane bioreactors (MBR), EPS are an important factor as they are considered to be largely responsible for membrane fouling. Proteins were shown to be the major component of EPS produced by activated sludge and to be correlated with the properties of the sludge, like settling, hydrophobicity and cell aggregation. Previous EPS proteomic studies of activated sludge revealed several problems, like the interference of other EPS molecules in protein analysis. In this study, a successful strategy was outlined to identify the proteins from soluble and bound EPS extracted from activated sludge of a lab-scale MBR. EPS samples were first subjected to pre-concentration through lyophilisation, centrifugal ultrafiltration or concentration with a dialysis membrane coated by a highly absorbent powder of polyacrylate-polyalcohol, preceded or not by a dialysis step. The highest protein concentration factors were achieved with the highly absorbent powder method without previous dialysis step. Four protein precipitation methods were then tested: acetone, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), perchloric acid and a commercial kit. Protein profiles were compared in 4-12 % sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. Both acetone and TCA should be applied for the highest coverage for soluble EPS proteins, whereas TCA was the best method for bound EPS proteins. All visible bands of selected profiles were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. A high number of proteins (25-32 for soluble EPS and 17 for bound EPS) were identified. As a conclusion of this study, a workflow is proposed for the successful proteome characterisation of soluble and bound EPS from activated sludge samples.

  18. Chemical composition and protein enrichment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp after fermentation by two Trichoderma species.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, F; Zamiri, M J; Khorvash, M; Banihashemi, Z; Bayat, A R

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment aimed at increasing orange peel and sugar beet pulp protein content through solid-state fermentation by Trichoderma reesei and Trichoderma viride. In vitro digestibility and changes in the chemical composition of the fermented products were determined after seven days of fungal cultivation using gas production tests. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on orange peels decreased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and increased cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents (P<0.01). Changes in fiber fractions were found to be more pronounced with T. viride. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on sugar beet pulp increased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and decreased cellulose and hemicellulose contents (P<0.01). These changes were more pronounced with T. reesei. The cultivation of T. reesei or T. viride on orange peels or sugar beet pulp increased crude protein content (P<0.01) compared with the unfermented materials; however, the increase was more pronounced for orange peels fermented with T. viride when corrected for weight loss (P<0.05). After 24 and 48 h of incubation, significant decreases in cumulative gas production (P<0.01) were observed in fermented sugar beet pulp and orange peels compared with the unfermented materials. Fungal treatment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp reduced the digestibility of in vitro organic matter, metabolizable energy and average fermentation and gas production rates (P<0.01). The data showed that seven days of solid-state fermentation of orange peels and sugar beet pulp by T. reesei or T. viride can increase their crude protein content.

  19. ORGANIC INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO REDUCED PREOPERATIVE FASTING TIME, WITH A CARBOHYDRATE AND PROTEIN ENRICHED SOLUTION; A RANDOMIZED TRIAL.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Gagheggi Ravanini, Guilherme; Portari Filho, Pedro Eder; Abrantes Luna, Renato; Almeida de Oliveira, Vinicius

    2015-08-01

    Introducción: El objetivo de este estudio es la evaluación de la respuesta inflamatoria orgánica a la colecistectomía laparoscópica mediante vídeo con una reducción del tiempo de ayuno preoperatorio a 2h y empleando una solución enriquecida con carbohidratos y proteínas. Métodos: Se trata de un estudio aleatorizado, prospectivo con pacientes divididos en los dos grupos siguientes: grupo A, ayuno convencional y grupo B, ayuno abreviado de 2h con ingesta oral de una solución enriquecida con carbohidratos y proteínas. Antes de la ingesta de la solución, se hicieron mediciones de glucosa sérica, insulina, interleucina 1y TNF-α; también se realizaron mediciones durante la inducción de la anestesia y 4h después de la intervención quirúrgica. Resultados: Treinta y ocho pacientes completaron el estudio sin presentar complicaciones pulmonares relacionadas con el broncoaspirado. La varianza HOMA-IR postoperatoria fue superior en el grupo A (p = 0,001). Conclusión: La reducción del tiempo de ayuno preoperatorio a 2h, empleando soluciones enriquecidas con carbohidratos y proteínas, es segura, reduce la resistencia a la insulina, y no aumenta el riesgo de broncoaspirado.

  20. Stable binding of alternative protein-enriched food matrices with concentrated cranberry bioflavonoids for functional food applications.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary H; Guzman, Ivette; Roopchand, Diana E; Moskal, Kristin; Cheng, Diana M; Pogrebnyak, Natasha; Raskin, Ilya; Howell, Amy; Lila, Mary Ann

    2013-07-17

    Defatted soy flour (DSF), soy protein isolate (SPI), hemp protein isolate (HPI), medium-roast peanut flour (MPF), and pea protein isolate (PPI) stably bind and concentrate cranberry (CB) polyphenols, creating protein/polyphenol-enriched matrices. Proanthocyanidins (PAC) in the enriched matrices ranged from 20.75 mg/g (CB-HPI) to 10.68 mg/g (CB-SPI). Anthocyanins (ANC) ranged from 3.19 mg/g (CB-DSF) to 1.68 mg/g (CB-SPI), whereas total phenolics (TP) ranged from 37.61 mg/g (CB-HPI) to 21.29 mg/g (CB-SPI). LC-MS indicated that the enriched matrices contained all identifiable ANC, PAC, and flavonols present in CB juice. Complexation with SPI stabilized and preserved the integrity of the CB polyphenolic components for at least 15 weeks at 37 °C. PAC isolated from enriched matrices demonstrated comparable antiadhesion bioactivity to PAC isolated directly from CB juice (MIC 0.4-0.16 mg/mL), indicating their potential utility for maintenance of urinary tract health. Approximately 1.0 g of polyphenol-enriched matrix delivered the same amount of PAC available in 1 cup (300 mL) of commercial CB juice cocktail, which has been shown clinically to be the prophylactic dose for reducing recurring urinary tract infections. CB-SPI inhibited Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial growth. Nutritional and sensory analyses indicated that the targeted CB-matrix combinations have high potential for incorporation in functional food formulations.

  1. Novel value-added uses for sweet potato juice and flour in polyphenol- and protein-enriched functional food ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blackcurrant, blueberry, and muscadine grape juices were efficiently sorbed, concentrated, and stabilized into dry granular ingredient matrices which combined anti-inflammatory and antioxidant fruit polyphenols with sweet potato functional constituents (carotenoids, vitamins, polyphenols, fibers). T...

  2. Amino Acid Composition of Protein-Enriched Dried Pasta:
Is It Suitable for a Low-Carbohydrate Diet?

    PubMed Central

    Vidrih, Rajko

    2015-01-01

    Summary Today, obesity is one of the major health problems, a so-called epidemic of the developed world. Obesity arises through an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, so it is important for products to have a balanced nutritional composition. The aim of this study is to prepare high-protein pasta with high nutritional quality, with emphasis on its amino acid composition, as ordinary durum pasta lacks lysine and threonine. Ordinary durum wheat pasta contains, on average, 77% carbohydrate, and can have even less than 10% protein. It is therefore often excluded from normal energy-restricted diets, and especially from low-carbohydrate diets. In this study pasta that can satisfy the nutritional requirements of a low-carbohydrate diet and is suitable for daily use was developed and evaluated. Protein-enhanced pasta was produced by adding high amounts of plant protein extract (40% dry matter) without (plain high-protein pasta) or with 3% dried spinach powder (high-protein spinach pasta) to durum wheat semolina. According to the sensory analysis data, the addition of 40% of plant protein extract satisfied sensory and nutritional requirements, allowing further development and evaluation for possible marketing. This analysis shows that these high-protein neutral and spinach pasta contain 36.4 and 39.6 g of protein per 100 g of dry mass, 12.07 and 14.70 g of total essential amino acids per 100 g of dry mass, and a high content of branched-chain amino acids, i.e. 5.54 and 6.65 g per 100 g of dry mass, respectively. This therefore represents a true alternative to durum wheat pasta for low-carbohydrate diets. PMID:27904361

  3. Novel value-added uses for sweet potato juice and flour in polyphenol- and protein-enriched functional food ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Mary H; Truong, An N; Truong, Van-Den; Raskin, Ilya; Lila, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Blackcurrant, blueberry, and muscadine grape juices were efficiently sorbed, concentrated, and stabilized into dry granular ingredient matrices which combined anti-inflammatory and antioxidant fruit polyphenols with sweet potato functional constituents (carotenoids, vitamins, polyphenols, fibers). Total phenolics were highest in blackcurrant-orange sweet potato ingredient matrices (34.03 mg/g), and lowest in muscadine grape-yellow sweet potato matrices (10.56 mg/g). Similarly, anthocyanins were most concentrated in blackcurrant-fortified orange and yellow sweet potato matrices (5.40 and 6.54 mg/g, respectively). Alternatively, other protein-rich edible matrices (defatted soy flour, light roasted peanut flour, and rice protein concentrate) efficiently captured polyphenols (6.09–9.46 mg/g) and anthocyanins (0.77–1.27 mg/g) from purple-fleshed sweet potato juice, with comparable efficiency. Antioxidant activity correlated well with total phenolic content. All formulated ingredient matrices stabilized and preserved polyphenols for up to 24 weeks, even when stored at 37°C. Complexation with juice-derived polyphenols did not significantly alter protein or carbohydrate profiles of the matrices. Sensory evaluation of the ingredient matrices suggested potential uses for a wide range of functional food products. PMID:26405527

  4. Ultra sensitive affinity chromatography on avidin-functionalized PMMA microchip for low abundant post-translational modified protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Murray, Kermit; Soper, Steven; Feng, June

    2012-02-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins play essential roles in cellular physiology and disease. The identification of protein substrates and detection of modification site helps understand PTM-mediated regulation in essential biological pathways and functions in various diseases. However, PTM proteins are typically present only at trace levels, making them difficult to identify in mass spectrometry based proteomics. In this paper, we report a novel and sensitive affinity chromatography on the avidin-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchip for enrichment of nanogram (ng) amount of PTMs. The chemical modification of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces yield avidin-terminated PMMA surfaces after UV radiation and consecutive EDC mediated coupling (amide reaction). This functionalized PMMA micro-device was developed to identify and specifically trap biotinylated PTM proteins of low abundance from complex protein mixture. Here we selected carbonylated protein as a representative PTM to illustrate the wide application of this affinity microchip for any PTMs converted into a tractable tag after derivatization. The surface topography, surface functional group mapping and elemental composition changes after each modification step of the treatment process were systematically measured qualitatively and quantitatively by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative study of biotinlated carbonylated protein capture recovery and elution efficiency of the device was also studied. We also envision that this subproteome enrichment micro-device can be assembled with other lab-on-a-chip components for follow-up protein analysis.

  5. The synthesis of magnetic lysozyme-imprinted polymers by means of distillation-precipitation polymerization for selective protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiali; Zhang, Xihao; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-02-01

    A protein imprinting approach for the synthesis of core-shell structure nanoparticles with a magnetic core and molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) shell was developed using a simple distillation-precipitation polymerization method. In this work, Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were first synthesized through a solvothermal method and then were conveniently surface-modified with 3-(methacryloyloxy)propyltrimethoxylsilane as anchor molecules to donate vinyl groups. Next a high-density MIP shell was coated onto the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles by the copolymerization of functional monomer acrylamide (AAm), cross-linking agent N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), the initiator azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN), and protein in acetonitrile heated at reflux. The morphology, adsorption, and recognition properties of the magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and rebinding experiments. The resulting MIP showed a high adsorption capacity (104.8 mg g(-1)) and specific recognition (imprinting factor=7.6) to lysozyme (Lyz). The as-prepared Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 320 nm were coated with an MIP shell that was 20 nm thick, which enabled Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP to easily reach adsorption equilibrium. The high magnetization saturation (40.35 emu g(-1)) endows the materials with the convenience of magnetic separation under an external magnetic field and allows them to be subsequently reused. Furthermore, Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP could selectively extract a target protein from real egg-white samples under an external magnetic field.

  6. Protein enrichment of grain sorghum by submerged culture of the amylolytic yeastsSchwanniomyces occidentalis andLipomyces kononenkoae.

    PubMed

    Horn, C H; du Preez, J C; Kilian, S G

    1992-07-01

    Cultivation of aSchwanniomyces occidentalis derepressed mutant in a 10% (w/v) gelatinized grain sorghum slurry increased the crude protein content of the biomass from an initial value of 12% to 41% (dry) within 20 h, with no detectable residual starch. Co-cultivation ofCandida utilis with theS. occidentalis mutant improved the final crude protein content to 47% within 18 h, whereas a co-culture ofC. utilis with aLipomyces kononenkoae mutant resulted in a cultivation time of 50 h with a significantly lower protein content and a low final α-amylase activity. In a 15% (w/v) grain sorghum slurry aC. utilis/S. occidentalis co-culture increased the protein content to about 44% within 30 h. Yeast cultivation increased the lysine and threonine content of the final biomass considerably.

  7. Chemical composition and protein enrichment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp after fermentation by two Trichoderma species

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, F; Zamiri, M. J.; Khorvash, M; Banihashemi, Z; Bayat, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment aimed at increasing orange peel and sugar beet pulp protein content through solid-state fermentation by Trichoderma reesei and Trichoderma viride. In vitro digestibility and changes in the chemical composition of the fermented products were determined after seven days of fungal cultivation using gas production tests. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on orange peels decreased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and increased cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents (P<0.01). Changes in fiber fractions were found to be more pronounced with T. viride. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on sugar beet pulp increased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and decreased cellulose and hemicellulose contents (P<0.01). These changes were more pronounced with T. reesei. The cultivation of T. reesei or T. viride on orange peels or sugar beet pulp increased crude protein content (P<0.01) compared with the unfermented materials; however, the increase was more pronounced for orange peels fermented with T. viride when corrected for weight loss (P<0.05). After 24 and 48 h of incubation, significant decreases in cumulative gas production (P<0.01) were observed in fermented sugar beet pulp and orange peels compared with the unfermented materials. Fungal treatment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp reduced the digestibility of in vitro organic matter, metabolizable energy and average fermentation and gas production rates (P<0.01). The data showed that seven days of solid-state fermentation of orange peels and sugar beet pulp by T. reesei or T. viride can increase their crude protein content. PMID:27175146

  8. In silico predicted conserved B-cell epitopes in the Merozoite Surface Antigen -2 family of B. bovis are neutralization-sensitive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Merozoite Surface Antigens-2 of Babesia bovis conform a family of GPI-anchored glycoproteins located at the parasite cell surface, that contain neutralization-sensitive B-cell epitopes, thus constituting putative vaccine candidates for bovine babesiosis. It was previously shown that (i) the MSA-...

  9. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein repertoire of babesia bovis and its significance for erythrocyte invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycosylphosphatidyl-anchored proteins are particularly abundant on the surface of pathogenic protozoans and might play an important role for parasite survival. In the present work the relevance of GPI-anchored proteins for erythrocyte invasion of Babesia bovis, one of the tick-transmitted causative...

  10. Circulating promyelocytes and low levels of CD16 expression on polymorphonuclear leukocytes accompany early-onset periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, E; Nakamura, M; Shoji, S; Horiuchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Early-onset periodontitis (EOP) is characterized by rapidly progressive alveolar bone loss, chemotactic defects of neutrophils, and significant familial aggregation. We found immature myeloid lineage cells, defined as promyelocytes, in the peripheral blood in patients with EOP. A hematological examination of peripheral blood cells showed normal reference values regarding cell proportions. Flow cytometry revealed significantly lower expression of CD16, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, on peripheral neutrophils in patients compared with those in age- and sex-matched healthy controls, whereas the levels of CD11a and CD11b expression were similar. The chemotactic response of neutrophils was lower toward not only formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine but also complement fragment C5a than that of healthy controls. The expression of another GPI-anchored protein, CD14, was equally expressed by controls and patients. Therefore, the low level of CD16 expression was not due to the incomplete synthesis of the GPI anchor. GPI anchors of CD16 on neutrophils from controls and patients were both partially resistant to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. The presence of promyelocytes in peripheral blood, low expression of CD16, and low chemotactic response of neutrophils suggest that patients with EOP have an abnormal maturation system in myeloid lineage cells in the bone marrow, which may be associated with the onset and course of EOP. PMID:9284170

  11. VIP21/caveolin, glycosphingolipid clusters and the sorting of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zurzolo, C; van't Hof, W; van Meer, G; Rodriguez-Boulan, E

    1994-01-01

    We studied the role of the association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters in apical targeting using gD1-DAF, a GPI-anchored protein that is differentially sorted by three epithelial cell lines. Differently from MDCK cells, where both gD1-DAF and glucosylceramide (GlcCer) are sorted to the apical membrane, in MDCK Concanavalin A-resistant cells (MDCK-ConAr) gD1-DAF was mis-sorted to both surfaces, but GlcCer was still targeted to the apical surface. In both MDCK and MDCK-ConAr cells, gD1-DAF became associated with TX-100-insoluble GSL clusters during transport to the cell surface. In dramatic contrast with MDCK cells, the Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cell line targeted both gD1-DAF and GlcCer basolaterally. The targeting differences for GSLs in FRT and MDCK cells cannot be accounted for by a differential ability to form clusters because, in spite of major differences in the GSL composition, both cell lines assembled GSLs into TX-100-insoluble complexes with identical isopycnic densities. Surprisingly, in FRT cells, gD1-DAF did not form clusters with GSLs and, therefore, remained completely soluble. This clustering defect in FRT cells correlated with the lack of expression of VIP21/caveolin, a protein localized to both the plasma membrane caveolae and the trans Golgi network. This suggests that VIP21/caveolin may have an important role in recruiting GPI-anchored proteins into GSL complexes necessary for their apical sorting. However, since MDCK-ConAr cells expressed caveolin and clustered GPI-anchored proteins normally, yet mis-sorted them, our results also indicate that clustering and caveolin are not sufficient for apical targeting, and that additional factors are required for the accurate apical sorting of GPI-anchored proteins. Images PMID:8306971

  12. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-dependent secretory transport in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, M A; Ransom, D M; Bangs, J D

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors in forward secretory trafficking using African trypanosomes as a model system. Soluble GPI-minus forms of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), in which the C-terminal GPI-addition peptide signal is deleted, are secreted from transformed procyclic trypanosomes with 5-fold reduced kinetics, relative to matched GPI-anchored constructs. Cell fractionation and immunofluorescence localization studies indicate that the GPI-minus VSG reporters accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This transport defect is specific, since overexpression of GPI-minus VSG has no effect on the rate of transport of a second soluble secretory reporter (BiPN) when co-expressed in the same cells. Two results suggest that delayed forward transport cannot be accounted for by failure to fold/assemble in the absence of a GPI anchor, thereby leading to prolonged association with ER quality-control machinery. First, no evidence was found for elevated association of GPI-minus VSG with the ER molecular chaperone, BiP. Secondly, newly synthesized GPI-minus VSG is dimerized efficiently, as judged by velocity-sedimentation analysis. GPI-dependent transport is not confined to the VSG reporters, because a similar dependence is found with another trypanosomal GPI-anchored protein, trans-sialidase. These findings suggest that GPI structures act in a positive manner to mediate efficient forward transport of some, and perhaps all, GPI-anchored proteins in the early secretory pathway of trypanosomes. Possible mechanisms for GPI-dependent transport are discussed with respect to current models of vesicular trafficking. PMID:9794811

  13. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  14. Structural features affecting variant surface glycoprotein expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Böhme, Ulrike; Cross, George A M

    2003-05-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of Trypanosoma brucei is the most abundant GPI-anchored protein expressed on any cell, and is an essential virulence factor. To determine what structural features affect efficient expression of VSG, we made a series of mutations in two VSGs. Inserting 18 amino acids, between the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, reduced the expression of VSG 221 to about 3% of the wild-type level. When this insertion was combined with deletion of the single carboxy-terminal subdomain, expression was reduced a further three-fold. In VSG 117, which contains two carboxy-terminal subdomains, point mutation of the intervening N-glycosylation site reduced expression about 15-fold. Deleting the most carboxy-terminal subdomain and intervening region, including the N-glycosylation site, reduced expression to 15-20% of wild type VSG, and deletion of both subdomains reduced expression to <1%. Despite their low abundance, all VSG mutants were GPI anchored on the cell surface. Our results suggest that, for a protein to be efficiently displayed on the surface of bloodstream-form T. brucei, it is essential that it contains the conserved structural motifs of a T. brucei VSG. Serum resistance-associated protein (SRA), which confers human infectivity on T. brucei, strongly resembles a VSG deletion mutant. Expression of three epitope-tagged versions of SRA in T. brucei conferred total resistance to human serum. SRA possesses a canonical GPI signal sequence, but we were unable to obtain unequivocal evidence for the presence of a GPI anchor. SRA was not released during osmotic lysis, indicating that it is not GPI anchored on the cell surface.

  15. Erythrocyte-based Pig-a gene mutation assay: demonstration of cross-species potential.

    PubMed

    Phonethepswath, Souk; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2008-12-08

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors attach specific proteins to the cell surface of hematopoietic cells. Of the genes required to form GPI anchors, only Pig-a is located on the X-chromosome. Prior work with rats suggests that the GPI anchor deficient phenotype is a reliable indicator of Pig-a mutation [Bryce et al., Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 49 (2008) 256-264]. The current report extends this line of investigation by describing simplified blood handling procedures, and by testing the assay principle in a second species, Mus musculus. With this method, erythrocytes are isolated, incubated with anti-CD24-PE, and stained with SYTO 13. Flow cytometric analyses quantify GPI anchor-deficient erythrocytes and reticulocytes. After reconstruction experiments with mutant-mimicking cells demonstrated that the analytical performance of the method is high, CD-1 mice were treated on three occasions with 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 75 mg/kg/day) or ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU, 40 mg/kg/day). Two weeks after the final treatment, DMBA-treated mice were found to exhibit markedly elevated frequencies of GPI anchor deficient erythrocytes and reticulocytes. For the ENU experiment, blood specimens were collected at weekly intervals over a 5-week period. Whereas the frequencies of mutant reticulocytes were significantly elevated 1 week after the last administration, the erythrocyte population was unchanged until the second week. Thereafter, both populations exhibited persistently elevated frequencies for the duration of the experiment (mean frequency at termination=310x10(-6) and 523x10(-6) for erythrocyte and reticulocyte populations, respectively). These data provide evidence that Pig-a mutation does not convey an appreciable positive or negative cell survival advantage to affected erythroid progenitors, although they do suggest that affected erythrocytes have a reduced lifespan in circulation. Collectively, accumulated data support the hypothesis that flow cytometric

  16. Nanoliter-volume protein enrichment, tryptic digestion, and partial separation based on isoelectric points by CE for MALDI mass spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Chandra A; Jurcic, Kristina; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2008-01-01

    Sequence-specific proteolysis is an important part of protein identification by MS. Digestion of protein is commonly performed in-solution, in sample vials with volumes ranging from milli- to microliters. When digestion is performed with a sample volume below 1 microL, handling of solution and potential sample loss via adsorption become significant issues. In this report, a proof of concept for the digestion of a small volume protein solution inside a capillary was demonstrated using a discontinuous buffer system previously studied (Nesbitt, C. A., et al. J. Chromatogr. A 2005, 1073, 175-180). Upon voltage application, a pH junction was created by the discontinuous buffer. Using myoglobin as an example, the protein molecules were enriched at the junction with an estimated volume of a few nanoliters. A protease, trypsin, was then introduced to myoglobin at the junction by coenrichment to induce in-capillary digestion. The voltage application was then suspended to provide the necessary time (2 h) for the proteolysis to proceed. When completed, voltage application was resumed, and the discontinuous buffer reconcentrated the peptides formed from digestion. Importantly, the refocused peptides appeared to roughly elute according to their pIs, resulting in a partial separation. Direct sample deposition from capillary was performed to facilitate mass spectral analysis by MALDI. The partial separation, according to pI, offered the potential benefits of MALDI MS signal enhancement and provided supplementary pI information for peptide identity assignment.

  17. Structural remodeling, trafficking and functions of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2011-10-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid that is covalently attached to proteins as a post-translational modification. Such modification leads to the anchoring of the protein to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. Proteins that are decorated with GPIs have unique properties in terms of their physical nature. In particular, these proteins tend to accumulate in lipid rafts, which are critical for the functions and trafficking of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Recent studies mainly using mutant cells revealed that various structural remodeling reactions occur to GPIs present in GPI-APs as they are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. This review examines the recent progress describing the mechanisms of structural remodeling of mammalian GPI-anchors, such as inositol deacylation, glycan remodeling and fatty acid remodeling, with particular focus on their trafficking and functions, as well as the pathogenesis involving GPI-APs and their deficiency.

  18. GPI-AP release in cellular, developmental, and reproductive biology.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) contain a covalently linked GPI anchor located on outer cell membranes. GPI-APs are ubiquitously conserved from protozoa to vertebrates and are critical for physiological events such as development, immunity, and neurogenesis in vertebrates. Both membrane-anchored and soluble GPI-APs play a role in regulating their protein conformation and functional properties. Several pathways mediate the release of GPI-APs from the plasma membrane by vesiculation or cleavage. Phospholipases and putative substrate-specific GPI-AP-releasing enzymes, such as NOTUM, glycerophosphodiesterase 2, and angiotensin-converting enzyme, have been characterized in mammals. Here, the protein modifications resulting from the cleavage of the GPI anchor are discussed in the context of its physiological functions.

  19. Inositolphosphoglycan mediators structurally related to glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors: synthesis, structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lomas, M; Khiar, N; García, S; Koessler, J L; Nieto, P M; Rademacher, T W

    2000-10-02

    The preparation of the pseudopentasaccharide 1a, an inositol-phosphoglycan (IPG) that contains the conserved linear structure of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors (GPI anchors), was carried out by using a highly convergent 2+3-block synthesis approach which involves imidate and sulfoxide glycosylation reactions. The preferred solution conformation of this structure was determined by using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations prior to carrying out quantitative structure--activity relationship studies in connection with the insulin signalling process. The ability of 1a to stimulate lipogenesis in rat adipocytes as well as to inhibit cAMP dependent protein kinase and to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase was investigated. Compound 1a did not show any significant activity, which may be taken as a strong indication that the GPI anchors are not the precursors of the IPG mediators.

  20. Heterotrimeric G proteins physically associated with the lipopolysaccharide receptor CD14 modulate both in vivo and in vitro responses to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Kurt-Jones, E A; Saladino, R A; Stack, A M; Dunn, I F; Ferretti, M; Golenbock, D; Fleisher, G R; Finberg, R W

    1998-01-01

    Septic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggering of cytokine production from monocytes/macrophages is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The major monocyte/macrophage LPS receptor is the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein CD14. Here we demonstrate that CD14 coimmunoprecipitates with Gi/Go heterotrimeric G proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that heterotrimeric G proteins specifically regulate CD14-mediated, LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and cytokine production in normal human monocytes and cultured cells. We report here that a G protein binding peptide protects rats from LPS-induced mortality, suggesting a functional linkage between a GPI-anchored receptor and the intracellular signaling molecules with which it is physically associated. PMID:9835628

  1. Interplays Between Covalent Modifications in the Endoplasmic Reticulum Increase Conformational Diversity in Nascent Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP), the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it undergoes numerous covalent modifications. Here we investigate the interdependence and regulation of PrP oxidative folding, N-glycosylation and GPI addition in diverse ER conditions. Our results show that formation of the single disulphide bond is a pivotal event, essential for PrP transport, and can occur post-translationally. Retarding its formation enhances N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. In contrast, lowering ER Ca2+ concentration inhibits N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. These data reveal tight interplays between the different ER covalent modifications, which collectively increase of PrP conformational diversity and may be important for its propagation. PMID:19164910

  2. Identity-by-descent filtering of exome sequence data identifies PIGV mutations in hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krawitz, Peter M; Schweiger, Michal R; Rödelsperger, Christian; Marcelis, Carlo; Kölsch, Uwe; Meisel, Christian; Stephani, Friederike; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko; Bauer, Sebastian; Isau, Melanie; Fischer, Axel; Dahl, Andreas; Kerick, Martin; Hecht, Jochen; Köhler, Sebastian; Jäger, Marten; Grünhagen, Johannes; de Condor, Birgit Jonske; Doelken, Sandra; Brunner, Han G; Meinecke, Peter; Passarge, Eberhard; Thompson, Miles D; Cole, David E; Horn, Denise; Roscioli, Tony; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N

    2010-10-01

    Hyperphosphatasia mental retardation (HPMR) syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of mental retardation with distinct facial features and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed whole-exome sequencing in three siblings of a nonconsanguineous union with HPMR and performed computational inference of regions identical by descent in all siblings to establish PIGV, encoding a member of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway, as the gene mutated in HPMR. We identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in PIGV in three additional families.

  3. Cytodifferentiation in Tetrahymena vorax is linked to glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Ryals, P E

    1994-03-15

    The role of glycosyl-PtdIns (GPI)-anchored proteins in the cytodifferentiation of Tetrahymena vorax was examined. Labelling of cells with [3H]myristate or [3H]palmitate followed by electrophoresis showed an array of proteins carrying covalently bound lipids. Electrophoresis of protein from cells labelled with the GPI-anchor components [3H]Ins and [14C]ethanolamine revealed three polypeptides on fluorograms which have apparent molecular masses of approx. 28, 50 and 82 kDa. Labelled lipid associated with these polypeptides was susceptible to release by in vitro exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis PtdIns-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Using labelled fatty acids, cells induced to differentiate showed altered GPI-anchored protein-labelling patterns in comparison with undifferentiated control cells, with a heavily labelled 32 kDa band appearing upon differentiation. Pre-incubation of cells in 10 mM D-mannosamine, an inhibitor of GPI incorporation into protein, resulted in a reduction of the incorporation of label into the three GPI-anchored proteins, nearly complete inhibition of differentiation and a reduction in the rate of digestive vacuole formation. A 50% inhibition of differentiation was obtained using 500 microM mannosamine. The inhibitory impact of D-mannosamine on differentiation could be competitively and completely reversed by the inclusion of D-mannose, but not D-glucose. Neither glucosamine nor tunicamycin inhibited differentiation. Incubation of cells in PI-PLC (5 units/ml) plus the differentiation inducer resulted in an acceleration of differentiation and generally higher percentages of differentiated cells versus controls.

  4. Live-cell FRET imaging reveals clustering of the prion protein at the cell surface induced by infectious prions.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Paulo, Pedro M R; Tavares, Catarina; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P

    2014-07-01

    Prion diseases are associated to the conversion of the prion protein into a misfolded pathological isoform. The mechanism of propagation of protein misfolding by protein templating remains largely unknown. Neuroblastoma cells were transfected with constructs of the prion protein fused to both CFP-GPI-anchored and to YFP-GPI-anchored and directed to its cell membrane location. Live-cell FRET imaging between the prion protein fused to CFP or YFP was measured giving consistent values of 10±2%. This result was confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and indicates intermolecular interactions between neighbor prion proteins. In particular, considering that a maximum FRET efficiency of 17±2% was determined from a positive control consisting of a fusion CFP-YFP-GPI-anchored. A stable cell clone expressing the two fusions containing the prion protein was also selected to minimize cell-to-cell variability. In both, stable and transiently transfected cells, the FRET efficiency consistently increased in the presence of infectious prions - from 4±1% to 7±1% in the stable clone and from 10±2% to 16±1% in transiently transfected cells. These results clearly reflect an increased clustering of the prion protein on the membrane in the presence of infectious prions, which was not observed in negative control using constructs without the prion protein and upon addition of non-infected brain. Our data corroborates the recent view that the primary site for prion conversion is the cell membrane. Since our fluorescent cell clone is not susceptible to propagate infectivity, we hypothesize that the initial event of prion infectivity might be the clustering of the GPI-anchored prion protein.

  5. A cell-free assay for glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchoring in African trypanosomes. Demonstration of a transamidation reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D K; Vidugiriene, J; Bangs, J D; Menon, A K

    1999-06-04

    We established an in vitro assay for the addition of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors to proteins using procyclic trypanosomes engineered to express GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). The assay is based on the premise that small nucleophiles, such as hydrazine, can substitute for the GPI moiety and effect displacement of the membrane anchor of a GPI-anchored protein or pro-protein causing release of the protein into the aqueous medium. Cell membranes containing pulse-radiolabeled VSG were incubated with hydrazine, and the VSG released from the membranes was measured by carbonate extraction, immunoprecipitation, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/fluorography. Release of VSG was time- and temperature-dependent, was stimulated by hydrazine, and occurred only for VSG molecules situated in early compartments of the secretory pathway. No nucleophile-induced VSG release was seen in membranes prepared from cells expressing a VSG variant with a conventional transmembrane anchor (i.e. a nonfunctional GPI signal sequence). Pro-VSG was shown to be a substrate in the reaction by assaying membranes prepared from cells treated with mannosamine, a GPI biosynthesis inhibitor. When a biotinylated derivative of hydrazine was used instead of hydrazine, the released VSG could be precipitated with streptavidin-agarose, indicating that the biotin moiety was covalently incorporated into the protein. Hydrazine was shown to block the C terminus of the released VSG hydrazide because the released material, unlike a truncated form of VSG lacking a GPI signal sequence, was not susceptible to proteolysis by carboxypeptidases. These results firmly establish that the released material in our assay is VSG hydrazide and strengthen the proof that GPI anchoring proceeds via a transamidation reaction mechanism. The reaction could be inhibited with sulfhydryl alkylating reagents, suggesting that the transamidase enzyme contains a functionally important sulfhydryl

  6. Structure of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored domain from a trypanosome variant surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola G; Nietlispach, Daniel; Sharma, Reuben; Burke, David F; Eyres, Isobel; Mues, Marsilius; Mott, Helen R; Carrington, Mark

    2008-02-08

    The cell surface of African trypanosomes is covered by a densely packed monolayer of a single protein, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). The VSG protects the trypanosome cell surface from effector molecules of the host immune system and is the mediator of antigenic variation. The sequence divergence between VSGs that is necessary for antigenic variation can only occur within the constraints imposed by the structural features necessary to form the monolayer barrier. Here, the structures of the two domains that together comprise the C-terminal di-domain of VSG ILTat1.24 have been determined. The first domain has a structure similar to the single C-terminal domain of VSG MITat1.2 and provides proof of structural conservation in VSG C-terminal domains complementing the conservation of structure present in the N-terminal domain. The second domain, although based on the same fold, is a minimized version missing several structural features. The structure of the second domain contains the C-terminal residue that in the native VSG is attached to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that retains the VSG on the external face of the plasma membrane. The solution structures of this domain and a VSG GPI glycan have been combined to produce the first structure-based model of a GPI-anchored protein. The model suggests that the core glycan of the GPI anchor lies in a groove on the surface of the domain and that there is a close association between the GPI glycan and protein. More widely, the GPI glycan may be an integral part of the structure of other GPI-anchored proteins.

  7. A novel germline PIGA mutation in Ferro-Cerebro-Cutaneous syndrome: a neurodegenerative X-linked epileptic encephalopathy with systemic iron-overload.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, Kathryn J; Margraf, Rebecca L; Carey, John C; Zhou, Holly; Newcomb, Tara M; Coonrod, Emily; Durtschi, Jacob; Mallempati, Kalyan; Kumanovics, Attila; Katz, Ben E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Opitz, John M

    2014-01-01

    Three related males presented with a newly recognized x-linked syndrome associated with neurodegeneration, cutaneous abnormalities, and systemic iron overload. Linkage studies demonstrated that they shared a haplotype on Xp21.3-Xp22.2 and exome sequencing was used to identify candidate variants. Of the segregating variants, only a PIGA mutation segregated with disease in the family. The c.328_330delCCT PIGA variant predicts, p.Leu110del (or c.1030_1032delCTT, p.Leu344del depending on the reference sequence). The unaffected great-grandfather shared his X allele with the proband but he did not have the PIGA mutation, indicating that the mutation arose de novo in his daughter. A single family with a germline PIGA mutation has been reported; affected males had a phenotype characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and severe neurologic impairment resulting in infantile lethality. In contrast, affected boys in the family described here were born without anomalies and were neurologically normal prior to onset of seizures after 6 months of age, with two surviving to the second decade. PIGA encodes an enzyme in the GPI anchor biosynthesis pathway. An affected individual in the family studied here was deficient in GPI anchor proteins on granulocytes but not erythrocytes. In conclusion, the PIGA mutation in this family likely causes a reduction in GPI anchor protein cell surface expression in various cell types, resulting in the observed pleiotropic phenotype involving central nervous system, skin, and iron metabolism.

  8. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol molecules of the parasite and the host.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M A; Brimacombe, J S; Cottaz, S; Field, R A; Güther, L S; Homans, S W; McConville, M J; Mehlert, A; Milne, K G; Ralton, J E

    1994-01-01

    The glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein-membrane anchors are ubiquitous among the eukaryotes. However, while mammalian cells typically express in the order of 100 thousand copies of GPI-anchor per cell, the parasitic protozoa, particularly the kinetoplastids, express up to 10-20 million copies of GPI-anchor and/or GPI-related glycolipids per cell. Thus GPI-family members dominate the cell surface molecular architecture of these organisms. In several cases, GPI-anchored proteins, such as the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of the African trypanosomes, or GPI-related glycolipids, such as the lipophosphoglycan (LPG) of the Leishmania, are known to be essential for parasite survival and infectivity. The highly elevated levels and specialised nature of GPI metabolism in the kinetoplastid parasites suggest that the GPI biosynthetic pathways might be good targets for the development of chemotherapeutic agents. This article introduces the range of GPI structures found in protozoan parasites, and their mammalian hosts, and discusses some aspects of GPI biosynthesis.

  9. Two Membrane-Anchored Aspartic Proteases Contribute to Pollen and Ovule Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Zhang, Yinghui; Wang, Wanlei; Zhao, Keke; Liu, Chunmei; Bai, Lin; Li, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Aspartic proteases are a class of proteolytic enzymes with conserved aspartate residues, which are implicated in protein processing, maturation, and degradation. Compared with yeast and animals, plants possess a larger aspartic protease family. However, little is known about most of these enzymes. Here, we characterized two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored aspartic protease genes, A36 and A39, which are highly expressed in pollen and pollen tubes. a36 and a36 a39 mutants display significantly reduced pollen activity. Transmission electron microscopy and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assays further revealed that the unviable pollen in a36 a39 may undergo unanticipated apoptosis-like programmed cell death. The degeneration of female gametes also occurred in a36 a39. Aniline Blue staining, scanning electron microscopy, and semi in vitro guidance assays indicated that the micropylar guidance of pollen tubes is significantly compromised in a36 a39. A36 and A39 that were fused with green fluorescent protein are localized to the plasma membrane and display punctate cytosolic localization and colocalize with the GPI-anchored protein COBRA-LIKE10. Furthermore, in a36 a39, the abundance of highly methylesterified homogalacturonans and xyloglucans was increased significantly in the apical pollen tube wall. These results indicate that A36 and A39, two putative GPI-anchored aspartic proteases, play important roles in plant reproduction in Arabidopsis. PMID:27872247

  10. Differential subcellular distribution of four phospholipase C isoforms and secretion of GPI-PLC activity.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Emanuel; Ramasamy, Pathmanaban; Plattner, Helmut; Simon, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is an important enzyme of signal transduction pathways by generation of second messengers from membrane lipids. PLCs are also indicated to cleave glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors of surface proteins thus releasing these into the environment. However, it remains unknown whether this enzymatic activity on the surface is due to distinct PLC isoforms in higher eukaryotes. Ciliates have, in contrast to other unicellular eukaryotes, multiple PLC isoforms as mammals do. Thus, Paramecium represents a perfect model to study subcellular distribution and potential surface activity of PLC isoforms. We have identified distinct subcellular localizations of four PLC isoforms indicating functional specialization. The association with different calcium release channels (CRCs) argues for distinct subcellular functions. They may serve as PI-PLCs in microdomains for local second messenger responses rather than free floating IP3. In addition, all isoforms can be found on the cell surface and they are found together with GPI-cleaved surface proteins in salt/ethanol washes of cells. We can moreover show them in medium supernatants of living cells where they have access to GPI-anchored surface proteins. Among the isoforms we cannot assign GPI-PLC activity to specific PLC isoforms; rather each PLC is potentially responsible for the release of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface.

  11. Identification of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor-modifying β1-3 galactosyltransferase in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Luis; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Mehlert, Angela; Ferguson, Michael AJ

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and the cattle disease nagana.  Trypanosoma brucei is dependent on glycoproteins for its survival and infectivity throughout its life cycle. Here we report the functional characterization of TbGT3, a glycosyltransferase expressed in the bloodstream and procyclic form of the parasite. Bloodstream and procyclic form TbGT3 conditional null mutants were created and both exhibited normal growth under permissive and nonpermissive conditions. Under nonpermissive conditions, the normal glycosylation of the major glycoprotein of bloodstream form T. brucei, the variant surface glycoprotein and the absence of major alterations in lectin binding to other glycoproteins suggested that the major function of TbGT3 occurs in the procyclic form of the parasite. Consistent with this, the major surface glycoprotein of the procyclic form, procyclin, exhibited a marked reduction in molecular weight due to changes in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor side chains. Structural analysis of the mutant procyclin GPI anchors indicated that TbGT3 encodes a UDP-Gal: β-GlcNAc-GPI β1-3 Gal transferase. Despite the alterations in GPI anchor side chains, TbGT3 conditional null mutants remained infectious to tsetse flies under nonpermissive conditions. PMID:25467966

  12. Phosphatidylinositol-Glycan-Phospholipase D Is Involved in Neurodegeneration in Prion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jae-Kwang; Jang, Byungki; Jin, Hyoung Tae; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Jung, Cha-Gyun; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    PrPSc is formed from a normal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored prion protein (PrPC) by a posttranslational modification. Most GPI-anchored proteins have been shown to be cleaved by GPI phospholipases. Recently, GPI-phospholipase D (GPI-PLD) was shown to be a strictly specific enzyme for GPI anchors. To investigate the involvement of GPI-PLD in the processes of neurodegeneration in prion diseases, we examined the mRNA and protein expression levels of GPI-PLD in the brains of a prion animal model (scrapie), and in both the brains and cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of sporadic and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) patients. We found that compared with controls, the expression of GPI-PLD was dramatically down-regulated in the brains of scrapie-infected mice, especially in the caveolin-enriched membrane fractions. Interestingly, the observed decrease in GPI-PLD expression levels began at the same time that PrPSc began to accumulate in the infected brains and this decrease was also observed in both the brain and CSF of CJD patients; however, no differences in expression were observed in either the brains or CSF specimens from Alzheimer’s disease patients. Taken together, these results suggest that the down-regulation of GPI-PLD protein may be involved in prion propagation in the brains of prion diseases. PMID:25867459

  13. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Shang-Guan, Keke; Zhang, Baocai; Liu, Xiangling; Yan, Meixian; Zhang, Lanjun; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Mu; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1), a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs) function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  14. Rab11 regulates trafficking of trans-sialidase to the plasma membrane through the contractile vacuole complex of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Sayantanee; Mucci, Juan; Campetella, Oscar; Docampo, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Although this is not a free-living organism it has conserved a contractile vacuole complex (CVC) to regulate its osmolarity. This obligate intracellular pathogen is, in addition, dependent on surface proteins to invade its hosts. Here we used a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches to delineate the contribution of the CVC to the traffic of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins to the plasma membrane of the parasite and promote host invasion. While T. cruzi Rab11 (GFP-TcRab11) localized to the CVC, a dominant negative (DN) mutant tagged with GFP (GFP-TcRab11DN) localized to the cytosol, and epimastigotes expressing this mutant were less responsive to hyposmotic and hyperosmotic stress. Mutant parasites were still able to differentiate into metacyclic forms and infect host cells. GPI-anchored trans-sialidase (TcTS), mucins of the 60-200 KDa family, and trypomastigote small surface antigen (TcTSSA II) co-localized with GFP-TcRab11 to the CVC during transformation of intracellular amastigotes into trypomastigotes. Mucins of the gp35/50 family also co-localized with the CVC during metacyclogenesis. Parasites expressing GFP-TcRab11DN prevented TcTS, but not other membrane proteins, from reaching the plasma membrane, and were less infective as compared to wild type cells. Incubation of these mutants in the presence of exogenous recombinant active, but not inactive, TcTS, and a sialic acid donor, before infecting host cells, partially rescued infectivity of trypomastigotes. Taking together these results reveal roles of TcRab11 in osmoregulation and trafficking of trans-sialidase to the plasma membrane, the role of trans-sialidase in promoting infection, and a novel unconventional mechanism of GPI-anchored protein secretion.

  15. Phospholipase cleavage of D- and L-chiro-glycosylphosphoinositides asymmetrically incorporated into liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Julia B; Cid, M Belén; Contreras, F-Xabier; Goñi, Félix M; Martín-Lomas, Manuel

    2006-02-01

    The nature of chiro-inositol-containing inositolphosphoglycans (IPGs), reported to be putative insulin mediators, was studied by examination of the substrate specificities of the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase D (GPI-PLD) by using a series of synthetic D- and L-chiro-glycosylphosphoinositides. 3-O-alpha-D-Glucosaminyl- (3) and -galactosaminyl-2-phosphatidyl-L-chiro-inositol (4), which show the maximum stereochemical similarity to the 6-O-alpha-D-glucosaminylphosphatidylinositol pseudodisaccharide motifs of GPI anchors, were synthesized and asymmetrically incorporated into phospholipid bilayers in the form of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs). Similarly, 2-O-alpha-D-glucosaminyl- (5) and -galactosaminyl-1-phosphatidyl-D-chiro-inositol (6), which differ from the corresponding pseudodisaccharide motif of the GPI anchors only in the axial orientation of the phosphatidyl moiety, were also synthesized and asymmetrically inserted into LUVs. The cleavage of these synthetic molecules in the liposomal constructs by PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus and by GPI-PLD from bovine serum was studied with the use of 6-O-alpha-D-glucosaminylphosphatidylinositol (7) and the conserved GPI anchor structure (8) as positive controls. Although PI-PLC cleaved 3 and 4 with about the same efficiency as 7 and 8, this enzyme did not accept 5 or 6. GPI-PLD accepted both the L-chiro- (3 and 4) and the D-chiro- (5 and 6) glycosylinositolphosphoinositides. Therefore, IPGs containing L-chiro-inositol only are expected to be released from chiro-inositol-containing GPIs if the cleavage is effected by a PI-PLC, whereas GPI-PLD cleavage could result in both L-chiro- and D-chiro-inositol-containing IPGs.

  16. A Mutation in the Catalytic Subunit of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Transamidase Disrupts Growth, Fertility, and Stomata Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are essential for plant growth and development; knockout mutations in enzymes responsible for anchor biosynthesis or attachment are gametophyte or embryo lethal. In a genetic screen targeted to identify genes regulating stomata formation, we discovered a missense mutation in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of GPI8/PIG-K, a Cys protease that transfers an assembled GPI anchor to proteins. The Arabidopsis genome has a single copy of AtGPI8, and the atgpi8-1 mutation reduces the efficiency of this enzyme, leading to reduced accumulation of GPI-anchored proteins. While the atgpi8-1 mutation strongly disrupts plant growth, it is not lethal. Phenotypic analysis of atgpi8-1 mutants suggests that GPI-APs are important for root and shoot growth, stomata formation, apical dominance, transition to flowering, and male gametophyte viability. In addition, atgpi8-1 mutants accumulate higher levels of callose and have reduced plasmodesmata permeability. Genetic interactions of atgpi8-1 with mutations in ERECTA family (ERf) genes suggest the existence of a GPI-AP in a branch of the ERf signaling pathway that regulates stomata formation. Activation of the ERf signal transduction cascade by constitutively active YODA rescues stomata clustering in atgpi8-1, indicating that a GPI-AP functions upstream of the MAP kinase cascade. TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) is a receptor-like protein that is able to form heterodimers with ERfs. Our analysis demonstrates that tmm-1 is epistatic to atgpi8-1, indicating that either TMM is a GPI-AP or there is another GPI-AP regulating stomata development whose function is dependent upon TMM. PMID:27208238

  17. Autophagy competes for a common phosphatidylethanolamine pool with major cellular PE-consuming pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Zbinden, Caroline; dos Santos, Aline Xavier da Silveira; Stoffel-Studer, Ingrid; van der Vaart, Aniek; Hofmann, Kay; Reggiori, Fulvio; Riezman, Howard; Kraft, Claudine; Peter, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated pathway that selectively degrades cellular constituents such as protein aggregates and excessive or damaged organelles. This transport route is characterized by engulfment of the targeted cargo by autophagosomes. The formation of these double-membrane vesicles requires the covalent conjugation of the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8 to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). However, the origin of PE and the regulation of lipid flux required for autophagy remain poorly understood. Using a genetic screen, we found that the temperature-sensitive growth and intracellular membrane organization defects of mcd4-174 and mcd4-P301L mutants are suppressed by deletion of essential autophagy genes such as ATG1 or ATG7. MCD4 encodes an ethanolamine phosphate transferase that uses PE as a precursor for an essential step in the synthesis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor used to link a subset of plasma membrane proteins to lipid bilayers. Similar to the deletion of CHO2, a gene encoding the enzyme converting PE to phosphatidylcholine (PC), deletion of ATG7 was able to restore lipidation and plasma membrane localization of the GPI-anchored protein Gas1 and normal organization of intracellular membranes. Conversely, overexpression of Cho2 was lethal in mcd4-174 cells grown at restrictive temperature. Quantitative lipid analysis revealed that PE levels are substantially reduced in the mcd4-174 mutant but can be restored by deletion of ATG7 or CHO2. Taken together, these data suggest that autophagy competes for a common PE pool with major cellular PE-consuming pathways such as the GPI anchor and PC synthesis, highlighting the possible interplay between these pathways and the existence of signals that may coordinate PE flux.

  18. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  19. LY6G6C — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    LY6G6C, a cell membrane protein, is highly expressed at the leading edges of cells, on filopodia. The LY6G6C gene belongs to a cluster of leukocyte antigen-6 (LY6) genes located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region on chromosome 6. Members of the LY6 superfamily typically contain 70 to 80 amino acids, including 8 to 10 cysteines. LY6G6C is attached to the cell surface by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that is directly involved in signal transduction.

  20. Glycolipids: Occurrence, Significance, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, Otto

    This chapter focuses on the occurrence and the physicochemical properties of glycolipids in Nature. Owing to space limitations, the presented overview must be incomplete, and, thus, mainly publications of the past 15 years are included. However, all review articles cited herein inform the interested reader about earlier work. Although lipopolysaccharides (LPS), lipoarabinomannan (LAM), lipomannan, lipoglycans, and lipoteichoic acids are not understood as glycolipids per definition, their occurrence and properties are also described in this chapter. GPI-anchored lipids is a main topic of Chap. 7.4.

  1. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins at the Neurovascular Unit Supports Reduction and Reoxidation of Iron for Transport Through the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Annette; Skjørringe, Tina; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Siupka, Piotr; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Moos, Torben

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms for iron transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain a controversy. We analyzed for expression of mRNA and proteins involved in oxidation and transport of iron in isolated brain capillaries from dietary normal, iron-deficient, and iron-reverted rats. The expression was also investigated in isolated rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) and in immortalized rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells grown as monoculture or in hanging culture inserts with defined BBB properties. Transferrin receptor 1, ferrireductases Steap 2 and 3, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin, soluble and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored ceruloplasmin, and hephaestin were all expressed in brain capillaries in vivo and in isolated RBECs and RBE4 cells. Gene expression of DMT1, ferroportin, and soluble and GPI-anchored ceruloplasmin were significantly higher in isolated RBECs with induced BBB properties. Primary pericytes and astrocytes both expressed ceruloplasmin and hephaestin, and RBECs, pericytes, and astrocytes all exhibited ferrous oxidase activity. The coherent protein expression of these genes was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. The data show that brain endothelial cells provide the machinery for receptor-mediated uptake of ferric iron-containing transferrin. Ferric iron can then undergo reduction to ferrous iron by ferrireductases inside endosomes followed by DMT1-mediated pumping into the cytosol and subsequently cellular export by ferroportin. The expression of soluble ceruloplasmin by brain endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes that together form the neurovascular unit (NVU) provides the ferroxidase activity necessary to reoxidize ferrous iron once released inside the brain.

  2. Thy-1, the enigmatic extrovert on the neuronal surface.

    PubMed

    Morris, R

    1992-10-01

    Thy-1 is a small glycoprotein of 110 amino acids which, folded in the characteristic structure of an immunoglobulin variable domain, are enchored to the plasma membrane via a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) tail (Fig. 1). It is a major component of the surface of various cell types, including neurons, at certain stages of their development. These qualities doubtlessly appeal to certain cognoscenti, but it is not clear why they would raise Thy-1 to the status of a favourite molecule. Indeed, few scientists readily admit to having a favourite. We study individual molecules because science is rooted in specific observations; but we do so in order to discover mechanisms of general importance. A molecule's appeal is dependent on its ability to reveal novel aspects of how nature works. Thy-1 has been unusual in this respect. It was the first lymphocyte surface antigen shown to be restricted to a functional subset of lymphocytes (T cells in the mouse), a finding crucial to the development of cellular immunology; it was one of the first cell surface molecules to be sequenced and indicated the importance of immunoglobulin domains and GPI anchors as structural motifs; it has been pivotal in studies demonstrating that GPI-anchored molecules are able to signal across the membrane they do not span. Thy-1 has revealed this much, however, with the charm of an adroit stripper: it has always promised glimpses of things more exciting than that displayed. In particular, the function of this molecule has never emerged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Both Drosophila matrix metalloproteinases have released and membrane-tethered forms but have different substrates

    PubMed Central

    LaFever, Kimberly S.; Wang, Xiaoxi; Page-McCaw, Patrick; Bhave, Gautam; Page-McCaw, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular proteases that can cleave extracellular matrix and alter signaling pathways. They have been implicated in many disease states, but it has been difficult to understand the contribution of individual MMPs, as there are over 20 MMPs in vertebrates. The vertebrate MMPs have overlapping substrates, they exhibit genetic redundancy and compensation, and pharmacological inhibitors are non-specific. In contrast, there are only two MMP genes in Drosophila, DmMmp1 and DmMmp2, which makes Drosophila an attractive system to analyze the basis of MMP specificity. Previously, Drosophila MMPs have been categorized by their pericellular localization, as Mmp1 appeared to be secreted and Mmp2 appeared to be membrane-anchored, suggesting that protein localization was the critical distinction in this small MMP family. We report here that products of both genes are found at the cell surface and released into media. Additionally, we show that products of both genes contain GPI-anchors, and unexpectedly, that GPI-anchored MMPs promote cell adhesion when they are rendered inactive. Finally, by using new reagents and assays, we show that the two MMPs cleave different substrates, suggesting that this is the important distinction within this smallest MMP family. PMID:28300207

  4. Identification of a second catalytically active trans-sialidase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Fumiki; Morita, Yasu S; Ashida, Hisashi; Nagamune, Kisaburo; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2011-11-18

    The procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei is covered by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface proteins called procyclins. The procyclin GPI anchor contains a side chain of N-acetyllactosamine repeats terminated by sialic acids. Sialic acid modification is mediated by trans-sialidases expressed on the parasite's cell surface. Previous studies suggested the presence of more than one active trans-sialidases, but only one has so far been reported. Here we cloned and examined enzyme activities of four additional trans-sialidase homologs, and show that one of them, Tb927.8.7350, encodes another active trans-sialidase, designated as TbSA C2. In an in vitro assay, TbSA C2 utilized α2-3 sialyllactose as a donor, and produced an α2-3-sialylated product, suggesting that it is an α2-3 trans-sialidase. We suggest that TbSA C2 plays a role in the sialic acid modification of the trypanosome cell surface.

  5. Enhancement in motor learning through genetic manipulation of the Lynx1 gene.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Julie M; Walz, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The cholinergic system is a neuromodulatory neurotransmitter system involved in a variety of brain processes, including learning and memory, attention, and motor processes, among others. The influence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the cholinergic system are moderated by lynx proteins, which are GPI-anchored membrane proteins forming tight associations with nicotinic receptors. Previous studies indicate lynx1 inhibits nicotinic receptor function and limits neuronal plasticity. We sought to investigate the mechanism of action of lynx1 on nicotinic receptor function, through the generation of lynx mouse models, expressing a soluble version of lynx and comparing results to the full length overexpression. Using rotarod as a test for motor learning, we found that expressing a secreted variant of lynx leads to motor learning enhancements whereas overexpression of full-length lynx had no effect. Further, adult lynx1KO mice demonstrated comparable motor learning enhancements as the soluble transgenic lines, whereas previously, aged lynx1KO mice showed performance augmentation only with nicotine treatment. From this we conclude the motor learning is more sensitive to loss of lynx function, and that the GPI anchor plays a role in the normal function of the lynx protein. In addition, our data suggests that the lynx gene plays a modulatory role in the brain during aging, and that a soluble version of lynx has potential as a tool for adjusting cholinergic-dependent plasticity and learning mechanisms in the brain.

  6. Nano-domains of high viscosity and stiffness mapped in the cell membrane by thermal noise imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yunhsiang; Pralle, Arnd

    2012-02-01

    The cell membrane is thought to contain spatial domains, created by cholesterol-lipid clusters and by interactions with the membrane cytoskeleton. The influence of these domains on membrane protein mobility and cell signaling has clearly been demonstrate. Yet, due to their small size and transient nature, the cholesterol stabilized domains cannot be visualized directly. We show here that thermal noise imaging (TNI) which tracks the diffusion of a colloid labeled membrane protein with microsecond and nanometer precision, can visualize cholesterol stabilized domains, also know as lipid raft, in intact cells. Using TNI to confine a single membrane protein to diffuse for seconds in an area of 300nm x 300nm provides sufficient data for high resolutions maps of the local diffusion, local attraction potentials and membrane stiffness. Using a GPI-anchored GFP molecule to probe the membrane of PtK2 cells we detect domains of increased membrane stiffness, which also show increase viscosity and are the preferred location for the GPI-anchored protein. These domains are further stabilized by addition of ganglioside cross linking toxins and disappear after removal of the cholesterol.

  7. A novel mutation in PGAP2 gene causes developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly in consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Rasool, Mahmood; Jan, Mohammed M; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H

    2016-12-15

    PGAP2 (Post-GPI Attachment to Proteins 2) gene is involved in lipid remodeling steps of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor maturation. At the surface of the cell this gene is required for proper expression of GPI-anchored proteins. Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder usually characterized by severe mental retardation. Mutations in the PGAP2 gene cause hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome-3. We have identified a large consanguineous family from Saudi origin segregating developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings of the family. Data analysis in the patient revealed a novel missense mutation c.191C>T in PGAP2 gene resulting in Alanine to Valine substitution (Ala64Val). The mutation was reconfirmed and validated by subsequent Sanger sequencing method. The mutation was ruled out in 100 unrelated healthy controls. We suggest that this pathogenic mutation disrupts the proper function of the gene proteins resulting in the disease state.

  8. Interaction of syncollin with GP-2, the major membrane protein of pancreatic zymogen granules, and association with lipid microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Ina; Hodel, Alois; Koch, Annett; Kleene, Ralf; Edwardson, J Michael; Schrader, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Syncollin, a novel pancreatic zymogen granule protein, is present on the luminal side of the granule membrane. To address the function of syncollin, we searched for putative binding partners. Cross-linking experiments with purified syncollin, and granule content and membrane proteins revealed a direct interaction between syncollin and GP-2, a major glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane glycoprotein. An interaction was also observed when cross-linking was performed with recombinant GP-2. In addition, syncollin could be cross-linked to itself, supporting the suggestion that it exists as a homo-oligomer. Cleavage of the GPI anchor of GP-2 by treatment of granule membranes with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C had no effect on the membrane attachment of syncollin, indicating that it is not mediated exclusively via an interaction with GP-2. Syncollin was found to be associated with detergent-insoluble cholesterol/glycolipid-enriched complexes. These complexes floated to the lighter fractions of sucrose-density gradients and also contained GP-2, the lectin ZG16p, sulphated matrix proteoglycans and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) syntaxin 3 and synaptobrevin 2. Our results indicate that membrane-associated syncollin is a component of lipid rafts, where it interacts both with GP-2 and membrane lipids. We suggest that the syncollin-GP-2 complex might play a role in signal transduction across the granule membrane. PMID:11853552

  9. Human diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr adhesins that use human CD55 (decay-accelerating factor) as a receptor does not bind the rodent and pig analogues of CD55.

    PubMed

    Hudault, Sylvie; Spiller, O Brad; Morgan, B Paul; Servin, Alain L

    2004-08-01

    Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) bacteria that are responsible for recurrent urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections recognized as a receptor the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55) at the brush border of cultured human intestinal cells. Results show that Afa/Dr DAEC C1845 bacteria were poorly associated with the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract of infected mice. We conducted experiments with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with mouse (GPI or transmembrane forms), pig, or human CD55 or mouse Crry cDNAs or transfected with empty vector pDR2EF1 alpha. Recombinant E. coli AAEC185 bacteria expressing Dr or F1845 adhesins bound strongly to CHO cells expressing human CD55 but not to the CHO cells expressing mouse (transmembrane and GPI anchored), rat, or pig CD55 or mouse Crry. Positive clustering of CD55 around Dr-positive bacteria was observed in human CD55-expressing CHO cells but not around the rarely adhering Dr-positive bacteria randomly distributed at the cell surface of CHO cells expressing mouse, rat, or pig CD55.

  10. GPI-80, a beta2 integrin associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, concentrates on pseudopodia without association with beta2 integrin during neutrophil migration.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Takeda, Yuji; Nitto, Takeaki; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    Previously, we identified a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, designated GPI-80, present on human neutrophils and monocytes. GPI-80 is physically associated with beta2 integrin on the surface of human neutrophils and may be a regulator of neutrophil adherence and migration. However, it is not yet known how GPI-80 regulates cell adhesion and migration. To investigate the physiological role(s) of GPI-80, we examined the topological relationship of GPI-80 and the beta2 integrin subunit (CD18) on resting and migrating human neutrophils by confocal laser microscopy. On resting neutrophils, GPI-80 was evenly distributed on the cell surface and was associated with CD18. On the other hand, during the early phase of migration (5 - 30 minutes), GPI-80 was detected on cell bodies and also on pseudopodia, but CD18 was detected only on cell bodies, where it was associated with GPI-80. In the late phase of migration (60 minutes), GPI-80 was detected only on pseudopodia and its association with CD18 was hardly observed. Furthermore, some of the GPI-80 on pseudopodia of migrating neutrophils during the late phase was associated with urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a regulator of beta2 integrin-dependent adherence and migration. The distribution of GPI-80 on cell surfaces is similar to that of uPAR. These observations suggest that GPI-80 belongs to the beta2 integrin-associated GPI-anchored protein family, which has regulatory activity in cell adherence.

  11. A SIN lentiviral vector containing PIGA cDNA allows long-term phenotypic correction of CD34+-derived cells from patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Robert, David; Mahon, François-Xavier; Richard, Emmanuel; Etienne, Gabriel; de Verneuil, Hubert; Moreau-Gaudry, François

    2003-03-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder in which an acquired somatic mutation of the X-linked PIGA gene results in a deficiency in GPI-anchored surface proteins. Clinically, PNH is dominated by a chronic hemolytic anemia, often associated with recurrent nocturnal exacerbations, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic tendency. Allogenic bone marrow transplantation is the only potentially curative treatment for severe forms of PNH but is associated with a high treatment-related morbidity and mortality. HSC gene therapy could provide a new therapeutic option, especially when an HLA-matched donor is not available. To develop an efficient gene transfer approach, we have designed a new SIN lentiviral vector (TEPW) that contains the PIGA cDNA driven by the human elongation factor 1 alpha promoter, the central DNA flap of HIV-1, and the WPRE cassette. TEPW transduction led to a complete surface expression of the GPI anchor and CD59 in PIGA-deficient cell lines without any selection procedure. Moreover, efficient gene transfer was achieved in bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cells derived from two patients with severe PNH disease. This expression was stable during erythroid, myeloid, and megakaryocytic liquid culture differentiation. CD59 surface cell expression was fully restored during 5 weeks of long-term culture.

  12. IL-10-IFN-γ Double Producers CD4+ T Cells Are Induced by Immunization with an Amastigote Stage Specific Derived Recombinant Protein of Trypanosoma Cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Flores-García, Yevel; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    During the acute phase of infection, T. cruzi replicates extensively and releases immunomodulatory molecules that delay parasite-specific responses mediated by effector T cells. This mechanism of evasion allows the parasite to spread in the host. Parasite molecules that regulate the host immune response during Chagas'disease have not been fully identified. GPI-anchored mucins, glycoinositolphospholipids, and glycoproteins comprise some of the most abundant T. cruzi surface molecules. IL-10 IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ T cells are activated during chronic infections and are responsible for prolonged persistence of parasite and for host protection against severe inflammatory responses. In this work we evaluated the role of rMBP::SSP4 protein of T. cruzi, a recombinant protein derived from a GPI anchored antigen, SSP4, as an immunomodulator molecule, finding that it was able to induce high concentrations of IL-10 and IFN-γ both in vivo and in vitro; during this last condition, both cytokines were produced by IL-10-IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ T cells. PMID:21927578

  13. Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is caused by somatic mutations in the PIG-A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bessler, M; Mason, P J; Hillmen, P; Miyata, T; Yamada, N; Takeda, J; Luzzatto, L; Kinoshita, T

    1994-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH), an acquired clonal blood disorder, is caused by the absence of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface proteins due to a defect in a specific step of GPI-anchor synthesis. The cDNA of the X-linked gene, PIG-A, which encodes a protein required for this step has recently been isolated. We have carried out a molecular and functional analysis of the PIG-A gene in four cell lines deficient in GPI-linked proteins, obtained by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformation of affected B-lymphocytes from PNH patients. In all four cell lines transfection with PIG-A cDNA restored normal expression of GPI-linked proteins. In three of the four cell lines the primary lesion is a frameshift mutation. In two of these there is a reduction in the amount of full-length mRNA. The fourth cell line contains a missense mutation in PIG-A. In each case the mutation was present in the affected granulocytes from peripheral blood of the patients, but not in normal sister cell lines from the same patient. These data prove that PNH is caused in most patients by a single mutation in the PIG-A gene. The nature of the mutation can vary and most likely occurs on the active X-chromosome in an early haematopoietic stem cell. Images PMID:8306954

  14. Proteomics Analysis of Amyloid and Nonamyloid Prion Disease Phenotypes Reveals Both Common and Divergent Mechanisms of Neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting various mammals including humans. Prion diseases are characterized by a misfolding of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC) into a pathological isoform termed PrPSc. In wild-type mice, PrPC is attached to the plasma membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor and PrPSc typically accumulates in diffuse nonamyloid deposits with gray matter spongiosis. By contrast, when mice lacking the GPI anchor are infected with the same prion inoculum, PrPSc accumulates in dense perivascular amyloid plaques with little or no gray matter spongiosis. In order to evaluate whether different host biochemical pathways were implicated in these two phenotypically distinct prion disease models, we utilized a proteomics approach. In both models, infected mice displayed evidence of a neuroinflammatory response and complement activation. Proteins involved in cell death and calcium homeostasis were also identified in both phenotypes. However, mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis were implicated only in the nonamyloid form, whereas metal binding and synaptic vesicle transport were more disrupted in the amyloid phenotype. Thus, following infection with a single prion strain, PrPC anchoring to the plasma membrane correlated not only with the type of PrPSc deposition but also with unique biochemical pathways associated with pathogenesis. PMID:25140793

  15. Effect of molecular surface packing on the enzymatic activity modulation of an anchored protein on phospholipid Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Rafael G; Masui, Douglas C; Furriel, Rosa P M; Leone, Francisco A; Maggio, Bruno; Zaniquelli, M Elisabete D

    2005-04-26

    The catalytic activity of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored alkaline phosphatase has been studied in Langmuir phospholipid monolayers at different surface pressures. The enzyme substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, was injected into the subphase of mixed enzyme/lipid Langmuir monolayers. Its hydrolysis product was followed by monitoring the absorbance at 410 nm in situ in the monolayer subphase of the Langmuir trough. Several surface pressures, corresponding to different molecular surface densities, were attained by lateral compression of the monolayers. The morphology of the monolayers, observed by fluorescence microscopy, showed three different types of domains owing to the heterogeneous partition of the enzyme within the mixed enzyme/lipid film. The catalytic activity was modulated by the enzyme surface density, and it increased until a pressure of 18 mN/m was reached, but it decreased significantly when the equilibrium in-plane elasticity (surface compressional modulus) increased more noticeably, resulting in alterations in the interface morphology. A model for the modulation of the enzyme orientation and catalytic activity by lipid/enzyme surface morphology and enzyme surface packing at the air/liquid interface is proposed. The results might have an important impact on the comprehension of the enzymatic activity regulation of GPI-anchored proteins in biomembranes.

  16. Cellular prion protein is present in mitochondria of healthy mice

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Robert; Moore, Roger A.; Ward, Anne; Race, Brent; Dorward, David W.; Hollister, Jason R.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Priola, Suzette A.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a mammalian glycoprotein which is usually found anchored to the plasma membrane via a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. PrPC misfolds to a pathogenic isoform PrPSc, the causative agent of neurodegenerative prion diseases. The precise function of PrPC remains elusive but may depend upon its cellular localization. Here we show that PrPC is present in brain mitochondria from 6–12 week old wild-type and transgenic mice in the absence of disease. Mitochondrial PrPC was fully processed with mature N-linked glycans and did not require the GPI anchor for localization. Protease treatment of purified mitochondria suggested that mitochondrial PrPC exists as a transmembrane isoform with the C-terminus facing the mitochondrial matrix and the N-terminus facing the intermembrane space. Taken together, our data suggest that PrPC can be found in mitochondria in the absence of disease, old age, mutation, or overexpression and that PrPC may affect mitochondrial function. PMID:28148964

  17. Procyclin Null Mutants of Trypanosoma brucei Express Free Glycosylphosphatidylinositols on Their Surface

    PubMed Central

    Vassella, Erik; Bütikofer, Peter; Engstler, Markus; Jelk, Jennifer; Roditi, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    Procyclins are abundant, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins on the surface of procyclic (insect) form trypanosomes. To investigate whether trypanosomes are able to survive without a procyclin coat, all four procyclin genes were deleted sequentially. Bloodstream forms of the null mutant exhibited no detectable phenotype and were able to differentiate to procyclic forms. Initially, differentiated null mutant cells were barely able to grow, but after an adaptation period of 2 mo in culture they proliferated at the same rate as wild-type trypanosomes. Analysis of these culture-adapted null mutants revealed that they were covered by free GPIs. These were closely related to the mature procyclin anchor in structure and were expressed on the surface in numbers comparable with that of procyclin in wild-type cells. However, free GPIs were smaller than the procyclin anchor, indicative of a lower number of poly-N-acetyllactosamine repeats, and a proportion contained diacylphosphatidic acid. Free GPIs are also expressed by wild-type cells, although to a lesser extent. These have been overlooked in the past because they partition in a solvent fraction (chloroform/water/methanol) that is normally discarded when GPI-anchored proteins are purified. PMID:12686589

  18. Myristate exchange in glycolipid A and VSG of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, L U

    1994-02-01

    The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of T. brucei is anchored to the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor which is unique in that its fatty acids are exclusively myristate (a fourteen carbon saturated fatty acid). We showed that the myristate is added to the GPI precursor in a remodeling reaction involving deacylation and reacylation. We now demonstrate that trypanosomes have a second pathway of myristoylation for GPI anchors that we call "myristate exchange" which is distinct from the fatty acid remodeling pathway. We propose that this is an exchange of [3H]myristate into both sn-1 and sn-2 positions of glycolipid A, which already contains myristate, and have demonstrated this using inhibitors and a variety of other methods. We have partially characterized myristate exchange with respect to specificity and susceptibility to some inhibitors. The apparent Km for myristoyl CoA is 7 nM. This myristate-specific process may represent a proof-reading system to ensure that the fatty acids on VSG are exclusively myristate. Although myristate exchange was first discovered for glycolipid A, we now believe that VSG is the true substrate of this reaction. VSG is efficiently labeled by exchange in the presence of cycloheximide, which prevents anchoring of newly synthesized protein. Although its location is not yet known, we have evidence that exchange does not localize to either the endoplasmic reticulum or the plasma membrane. We will present data indicating that surface VSG may be internalized and undergo myristate exchange.

  19. Post-Golgi anterograde transport requires GARP-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Tetsuya; Fujita, Morihisa; Nakamura, Shota; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Murakami, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2015-09-01

    The importance of endosome-to-trans-Golgi network (TGN) retrograde transport in the anterograde transport of proteins is unclear. In this study, genome-wide screening of the factors necessary for efficient anterograde protein transport in human haploid cells identified subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, a tethering factor involved in endosome-to-TGN transport. Knockout (KO) of each of the four GARP subunits, VPS51-VPS54, in HEK293 cells caused severely defective anterograde transport of both glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins from the TGN. Overexpression of VAMP4, v-SNARE, in VPS54-KO cells partially restored not only endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport, but also anterograde transport of both GPI-anchored and transmembrane proteins. Further screening for genes whose overexpression normalized the VPS54-KO phenotype identified TMEM87A, encoding an uncharacterized Golgi-resident membrane protein. Overexpression of TMEM87A or its close homologue TMEM87B in VPS54-KO cells partially restored endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport and anterograde transport. Therefore GARP- and VAMP4-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport is required for recycling of molecules critical for efficient post-Golgi anterograde transport of cell-surface integral membrane proteins. In addition, TMEM87A and TMEM87B are involved in endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport.

  20. Chimeric virus-like particles containing influenza HA antigen and GPI-CCL28 induce long-lasting mucosal immunity against H3N2 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Teena; Berman, Zachary; Luo, Yuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Shelly; Compans, Richard W.; Wang, Bao-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with worldwide seasonal epidemics. The duration and quality of humoral immunity and generation of immunological memory to vaccines is critical for protective immunity. In the current study, we examined the long-lasting protective efficacy of chimeric VLPs (cVLPs) containing influenza HA and GPI-anchored CCL28 as antigen and mucosal adjuvant, respectively, when immunized intranasally in mice. We report that the cVLPs induced significantly higher and sustainable levels of virus-specific antibody responses, especially IgA levels and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers, more than 8-month post-vaccination compared to influenza VLPs without CCL28 or influenza VLPs physically mixed with sCCL28 (soluble) in mice. After challenging the vaccinated animals at month 8 with H3N2 viruses, the cVLP group also demonstrated strong recall responses. On day 4 post-challenge, we measured increased antibody levels, ASCs and HAI titers with reduced viral load and inflammatory responses in the cVLP group. The animals vaccinated with the cVLP showed 20% cross-protection against drifted (Philippines) and 60% protection against homologous (Aichi) H3N2 viruses. Thus, the results suggest that the GPI-anchored CCL28 induces significantly higher mucosal antibody responses, involved in providing long-term cross-protection against H3N2 influenza virus when compared to other vaccination groups. PMID:28067290

  1. Loss of Dfg5 glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein confers enhanced heat tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nasution, Olviyani; Lee, Jaok; Srinivasa, Kavitha; Choi, In-Geol; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Wankee

    2015-08-01

    The protein product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DFG5 gene is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored plasma membrane protein and a putative glycosidase/glycosyltransferase that links other GPI-anchored proteins to β-glucans in the cell wall. Upon exposure to heat (41°C), DFG5 deletion mutant dfg5Δ displayed significantly enhanced heat tolerance as well as lowered level of reactive oxygen species and decreased membrane permeability compared with those in the control (BY4741). Comparative transcriptome profiles of BY4741 and dfg5Δ revealed that 38 and 23 genes were up- and down-regulated in dfg5Δ respectively. Of the 23 down-regulated genes, 11 of 13 viable deletion mutants were identified to be tolerant to heat, suggesting that the down-regulation of those genes might have contributed to the enhanced heat tolerance in dfg5Δ. Deletion of DFG5 caused slight activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 in the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway and Slt2 in the cell wall integrity pathway. Therefore, a model is proposed on the signal transduction pathways associated with deletion of DFG5 upon heat stress.

  2. Effects of tunicamycin, mannosamine, and other inhibitors of glycoprotein processing on skeletal alkaline phosphatase in human osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Farley, J R; Magnusson, P

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal alkaline phosphatase (sALP) is a glycoprotein- approximately 20% carbohydrate by weight, with five presumptive sites for N-linked glycosylation, as well as a carboxy-terminal site for attachment of the glycolipid structure (glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI), which anchors sALP to the outer surface of osteoblasts. The current studies were intended to characterize the effects of inhibiting glycosylation and glycosyl-processing on the synthesis, plasma membrane attachment, cellular-extracellular distribution, and reaction kinetics of sALP in human osteosarcoma (SaOS-2) cells. sALP synthesis, glycosylation, and GPI-anchor attachment were assessed as total protein synthesis/immunospecific sALP synthesis, sialic acid content (i.e., wheat germ agglutinin precipitation), and insolubility (i.e., temperature-dependent phase-separation), respectively. sALP reaction kinetics were characterized by analysis of dose-dependent initial velocity data, with a phosphoryl substrate. The results of these studies revealed that the inhibition of either N-linked glycosylation or oligosaccharide synthesis for GPI-anchor addition could affect the synthesis and the distribution of sALP, but not the kinetics of the phosphatase reaction. Tunicamycin-which blocks N-linked glycosylation by inhibiting core oligosaccharide synthesis-decreased cell layer protein and the total amount of sALP in the cells, while increasing the relative level of sALP in the cell-conditioned culture medium (CM, i.e., the amount of sALP released). These effects were attributed to dose- and time-dependent decreases in sALP synthesis and N-linked glycosylation, and an increase in apoptotic cell death (P <0.001 for each). In contrast to the effects of tunicamycin on N-linked glycosylation, the effects of mannosamine, which inhibits GPI-anchor glycosylation/formation, included (1) an increase in cell layer protein; (2) decreases in sALP specific activity, in the cells and in the CM; and (3) increases in the

  3. Two human ULBP/RAET1 molecules with transmembrane regions are ligands for NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Louise; Eagle, Robert A; Meyer, Martina; Easom, Nicholas; Young, Neil T; Trowsdale, John

    2004-07-15

    We characterized two novel members of the RAET1/ULBP gene cluster, RAET1E and RAET1G. The encoded proteins were similar to the ULBP in their class I-like alpha1 and alpha2 domains, but differed in that, instead of being GPI-anchored, their sequences were type 1 membrane-spanning molecules. Both proteins were capable of being expressed at the cell surface. Both proteins bound the activating receptor NKG2D, and RAET1G bound the human CMV protein UL16. The expression of diverse NKG2D-binding molecules in different tissues and with different properties is consistent with multiple modes of infection- or stress-induced activation.

  4. GWT1 encoding an inositol acyltransferase homolog is required for laccase repression and stress resistance in the basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Wei, Dongsheng; Li, Zhongming; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Xudong

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional expression of laccase, which has been confirmed to contribute to the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans, is often repressed by a high concentration of glucose in many fungi, including C. neoformans. The underlying mechanism of the repression remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that a GWT1 gene that encodes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis-related protein is required for laccase repression by glucose in the basidiomycete C. neoformans. Disruption of GWT1 with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated T-DNA random insertional mutagenesis (ATMT) method resulted in constitutive expression of the laccase gene LAC1 and constant melanin formation. The loss of GWT1 also dramatically affected the cell membrane integrity and stress resistance. Our results revealed a GPI-dependent glucose repression mechanism in C. neoformans, and it may be helpful for understanding the virulence of C. neoformans.

  5. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  6. Cross-linking of GPI-80, a possible regulatory molecule of cell adhesion, induces up-regulation of CD11b/CD18 expression on neutrophil surfaces and shedding of L-selectin.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Takeda, Yuji; Nitto, Takeaki; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-02-01

    Previously, we described a novel glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein (designated GPI-80) on human neutrophils and monocytes that may regulate beta(2) integrin-dependent neutrophil adherence and migration. However, the mechanism regulating beta(2) integrin remains to be clarified. To study this, we examined changes in beta(2) integrin expression and function caused by cross-linking GPI-80. GPI-80 cross-linking induced up-regulation of CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) expression on neutrophil surfaces and shedding of L-selectin, which depends on tyrosine phosphorylation and cytoskeleton remodeling. Furthermore, the cross-linking enhanced fMLP-induced human neutrophil adherence. These results suggest that GPI-80 may be a regulator of beta(2) integrin in neutrophils.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum GPI toxin: a common foe for man and mosquito.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Romanico B G; Faye, Ingrid

    2010-06-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, which can be regarded as an endotoxin, plays a role in the induced pathology associated with severe malaria in humans. However, it is unclear whether the main mosquito vector, Anopheles gambiae, can specifically recognize, and respond to GPI from the malaria parasite. Recent data suggests that the malaria vector does mount a specific response against malaria GPI. In addition, following the strong immune response, mosquito fecundity is severely affected, resulting in a significant reduction in viable eggs produced. In this mini-review we look at the increased interest in understanding the way that malaria antigens are recognized in the mosquito, and how this relates to a better understanding of the interactions between the malaria parasite and both human and vector.

  8. Mode of action of mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis toxins.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; Fernández, Luisa E; Pérez, Claudia; Gill, Sarjeet S; Bravo, Alejandra

    2007-04-01

    Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used for insect control. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells. In lepidopteran insects, Cry1A monomeric toxins interact with a first receptor and this interaction triggers toxin oligomerization. The oligomeric structure interacts then with a second GPI-anchored receptor that induces insertion into membrane microdomains and larvae death. In the case of mosquitocidal Bt strains, two different toxins participate, Cry and Cyt. These toxins have a synergistic effect and Cyt1Aa overcomes Cry toxin-resistance. We will summarize recent findings on the identification of Cry receptors in mosquitoes and the mechanism of synergism: Cyt1Aa synergizes or suppresses resistance to Cry toxins by functioning as a Cry membrane-bound receptor.

  9. Biomedical applications of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Susanne; Dangerfield, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) use a unique posttranslational modification to link proteins to lipid bilayer membranes. The anchoring structure consists of both a lipid and carbohydrate portion and is highly conserved in eukaryotic organisms regarding its basic characteristics, yet highly variable in its molecular details. The strong membrane targeting property has made the anchors an interesting tool for biotechnological modification of lipid membrane-covered entities from cells through extracellular vesicles to enveloped virus particles. In this review, we will take a closer look at the mechanisms and fields of application for GPI-APs in lipid bilayer membrane engineering and discuss their advantages and disadvantages for biomedicine. PMID:27542385

  10. Pathophysiological relevance of the CD14 receptor in surgical patients: biological activity of endotoxin is regulated by the CD14 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hiki, N; Mimura, Y; Ogawa, T; Kojima, J; Hatao, F; Kaminishi, M

    2001-01-01

    Endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPSs) are potent bacterial poisons, and they are always present in the intestine in considerable numbers. Stress, such that as a resulting from multiple injuries, burns, hypovolemia, hypoxia, intestinal ischemia, and surgery can lead to a breakdown of the gut barrier, allowing endotoxins to enter the systemic circulation via translocation. However, estimating the biological activity of translocated circulating endotoxins and identification of the mechanisms regulating their biological activities remain complex problems. CD14 has been found to exist as a soluble protein in the serum and as a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein of myeloid lineage cells. It plays key roles in both LPS-induced activation and in LPS internalization by cells. In this article, we outline: (i) the biological activity of circulating endotoxin; and (ii) the role of membrane and/or soluble CD14 regulating the bioactivity of circulating endotoxin in a human model of postoperative endotoxemia.

  11. Targeting folate receptor alpha for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Debra H.; Ilieva, Kristina M.; Pellizzari, Giulia; Opzoomer, James; Bloomfield, Jacinta; Fittall, Matthew; Grigoriadis, Anita; Figini, Mariangela; Canevari, Silvana; Spicer, James F.; Tutt, Andrew N.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2016-01-01

    Promising targeted treatments and immunotherapy strategies in oncology and advancements in our understanding of molecular pathways that underpin cancer development have reignited interest in the tumor-associated antigen Folate Receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein. Its overexpression in tumors such as ovarian, breast and lung cancers, low and restricted distribution in normal tissues, alongside emerging insights into tumor-promoting functions and association of expression with patient prognosis, together render FRα an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize the role of FRα in cancer development, we consider FRα as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool, and we discuss different targeted treatment approaches with a specific focus on monoclonal antibodies. Renewed attention to FRα may point to novel individualized treatment approaches to improve the clinical management of patient groups that do not adequately benefit from current conventional therapies. PMID:27248175

  12. Restrictive glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis in cwh6/gpi3 yeast cells causes aberrant biogenesis of cell wall proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, J H; Müller, W H; Lipke, P N; Klis, F M

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported that the defects in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cwh6 Calcofluor white-hypersensitive cell wall mutant are caused by a mutation in SPT14/GPI3, a gene involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis. Here we describe the effect of cwh6/spt14/gpi3 on the biogenesis of cell wall proteins. It was found that the release of precursors of cell wall proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was retarded. This was accompanied by proliferation of ER structures. The majority of the cell wall protein precursors that eventually left the ER were not covalently incorporated into the cell wall but were secreted into the growth medium. Despite the inefficient incorporation of cell wall proteins, there was no net effect on the protein level in the cell wall. It is postulated that the availability of GPI-dependent cell wall proteins determines the rate of cell wall construction and limits growth rate. PMID:9079905

  13. PSF decomposition of nanoscopy images via Bayesian analysis unravels distinct molecular organization of the cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; van Zanten, Thomas S.; Saha, Suvrajit; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Mayor, Satyajit; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of membrane receptors at the nanoscale has major implications in cellular function and signaling. The advent of super-resolution techniques has greatly contributed to our understanding of the cellular membrane. Yet, despite the increased resolution, unbiased quantification of highly dense features, such as molecular aggregates, remains challenging. Here we describe an algorithm based on Bayesian inference of the marker intensity distribution that improves the determination of molecular positions inside dense nanometer-scale molecular aggregates. We tested the performance of the method on synthetic images representing a broad range of experimental conditions, demonstrating its wide applicability. We further applied this approach to STED images of GPI-anchored and model transmembrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells. The analysis revealed subtle differences in the organization of these receptors, emphasizing the role of cortical actin in the compartmentalization of the cell membrane. PMID:24619088

  14. Overview and perspectives the transcriptome of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Rosângela V; Da Silva, Silvana P; Torres, Fernando A G; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio José; Silva-Pereira, Ildenete; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Campos, Elida G; Moraes, Lídia Maria P; Jesuíno, Rosália S A; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia M A; Walter, Maria Emília M T; Carvalho, Maria Joseá A; Almeida, Nalvo F; Brigido, Marcelo M; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2005-12-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic and thermo-regulated fungus which is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, an endemic disease widespread in Latin America that affects 10 million individuals. Pathogenicity is assumed to be a consequence of the dimorphic transition from mycelium to yeast cells during human infection. This review shows the results of the P. brasiliensis transcriptome project which generated 6,022 assembled groups from mycelium and yeast phases. Computer analysis using the tools of bioinformatics revealed several aspects from the transcriptome of this pathogen such as: general and differential metabolism in mycelium and yeast cells; cell cycle, DNA replication, repair and recombination; RNA biogenesis apparatus; translation and protein fate machineries; cell wall; hydrolytic enzymes; proteases; GPI-anchored proteins; molecular chaperones; insights into drug resistance and transporters; oxidative stress response and virulence. The present analysis has provided a more comprehensive view of some specific features considered relevant for the understanding of basic and applied knowledge of P. brasiliensis.

  15. Interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with membrane-bound carboxypeptidase M (CPM) - a new function of ACE.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoou; Wiesner, Burkhard; Lorenz, Dorothea; Papsdorf, Gisela; Pankow, Kristin; Wang, Po; Dietrich, Nils; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Maul, Björn

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) demonstrates, besides its typical dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase activity, several unusual functions. Here, we demonstrate with molecular, biochemical, and cellular techniques that the somatic wild-type murine ACE (mACE), stably transfected in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, interacts with endogenous membranal co-localized carboxypeptidase M (CPM). CPM belongs to the group of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Here we report that ACE, completely independent of its known dipeptidase activities, has GPI-targeted properties. Our results indicate that the spatial proximity between mACE and the endogenous CPM enables an ACE-evoked release of CPM. These results are discussed with respect to the recently proposed GPI-ase activity and function of sperm-bound ACE.

  16. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  17. Solution structure of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchor glycan of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Homans, S.W.; Edge, C.J.; Ferguson, M.A.J.; Dwek, R.A.; Rademacher, T.W. )

    1989-04-04

    The average solution conformation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) has been determined by using a combination of two-dimensional {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H NMR methods together with molecular orbital calculations and restrained molecular dynamics simulations. This allows the generation of a model to describe the orientation of the glycan with respect to the membrane. This shows that the glycan exists in an extended configuration along the plane of the membrane and spans an area of 600 {angstrom}{sup 2}, which is similar to the cross-sectional area of a monomeric N-terminal VSG domain. Taken together, these observations suggest a possible space-filling role for the GPI anchor that may maintain the integrity of the VSG coat. The potential importance of the GPI glycan as a chemotherapeutic target is discussed in light of these observations.

  18. Domains of the TCR beta-chain required for early thymocyte development

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The T cell receptor beta (TCR beta) chain controls the developmental transition from CD4-CD8- to CD4+8+thymocytes. We show that the extracellular constant region and the transmembrane region, but not the variable domain or cytoplasmic tail of the TCR beta chain are required for this differentiation step. TCR beta mutant chains lacking the cytoplasmic tail can be found at the cell surface both in functional TCR/CD3 complexes and in a GPI-anchored monomeric form indicating that the cytoplasmic tail of the TCR beta chain functions as an ER retention signal. The concordance between cell surface expression of the mutant chains as TCR/CD3 complexes and their capacity to mediate thymocyte differentiation supports the CD3 mediated feedback model in which preTCR/CD3 complexes control the developmental transition from CD4-CD8- to CD4+CD8+thymocytes. PMID:8920871

  19. SRD5A3-CDG: Expanding the phenotype of a congenital disorder of glycosylation with emphasis on adult onset features

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Patricia G.; Ng, Bobby G.; Sanford, Laura; Sutton, V. Reid; Bartholomew, Dennis W.; Pastore, Matthew T.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Kircher, Martin; Buckingham, Kati J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) have been reported recently resulting in an expansion of the phenotypes associated with this group of disorders. SRD5A3 codes for polyprenol reductase which converts polyprenol to dolichol. This is a major pathway for dolichol biosynthesis for N-glycosylation, O-mannosylation, C-mannosylation, and GPI anchor synthesis. We present the features of five individuals (three children and two adults) with mutations in SRD5A3 focusing on the variable eye and skin involvement. We compare that to 13 affected individuals from the literature including five adults allowing us to delineate the features that may develop over time with this disorder including kyphosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and cataracts. PMID:27480077

  20. Cripto/GRP78 modulation of the TGF-β pathway in development and oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter C.; Vale, Wylie

    2013-01-01

    Cripto is a small, GPI-anchored signaling protein that regulates cellular survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration during normal developmental processes and tumorigenesis. Cripto functions as an obligatory co-receptor for the TGF-β ligands Nodal, GDF1 and GDF3 but attenuates signaling of others such as activin-A, activin-B and TGF-β1. Soluble, secreted forms of Cripto also activate Src, ras/raf/MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways via a mechanism that remains largely obscure. This review describes the biological roles and signaling mechanisms of Cripto, highlighting our identification of Glucose Regulated Protein 78 (GRP78) as a cell surface receptor/co-factor required for Cripto signaling via both TGF-β and Src/MAPK/PI3K pathways. We discuss emerging evidence indicating that Cripto/GRP78 signaling regulates normal somatic stem cells and their tumorigenic counterparts. PMID:22306319

  1. Chemistry of Natural Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycan microarrays have become indispensable tools for studying protein-glycan interactions. Along with chemo-enzymatic synthesis, glycans isolated from natural sources have played important roles in array development and will continue to be a major source of glycans. N- and O-glycans from glycoproteins, and glycans from glycosphingolipids can be released from corresponding glycoconjugates with relatively mature methods, although isolation of large numbers and quantities of glycans are still very challenging. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are less represented on current glycan microarrays. Glycan microarray development has been greatly facilitated by bifunctional fluorescent linkers, which can be applied in a “Shotgun Glycomics” approach to incorporate isolated natural glycans. Glycan presentation on microarrays may affect glycan binding by GBPs, often through multivalent recognition by the GBP. PMID:24487062

  2. Cloning and characterization of HEP21, a new member of the uPAR/Ly6 protein superfamily predominantly expressed in hen egg white.

    PubMed

    Nau, F; Guérin-Dubiard, C; Désert, C; Gautron, J; Bouton, S; Gribonval, J; Lagarrigue, S

    2003-02-01

    Using two-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, partial protein internal sequencing, and PCR with degenerate primers, we cloned a novel cDNA named HEP21 from hen egg white. The 0.5-kb cDNA encodes a 106 amino acid protein with a cysteine spacing pattern suggesting that HEP21 is a new member of the uPAR/CD59/Ly-6/ snake neurotoxin superfamily. The closest homology of HEP21 is to mouse Ly-6C. Unlike most members of this protein family, HEP21 is not glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored but is a secreted protein, as indicated by its localization and the presence of a signal peptide in its sequence. Moreover, HEP21 appears as an original member of this protein superfamily because it is predominantly expressed in a tissue, i.e., the oviduct, and especially the magnum where the egg white components are secreted.

  3. PrPC Undergoes Basal to Apical Transcytosis in Polarized Epithelial MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arkhipenko, Alexander; Syan, Sylvie; Victoria, Guiliana Soraya

    2016-01-01

    The Prion Protein (PrP) is an ubiquitously expressed glycosylated membrane protein attached to the external leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI). While the misfolded PrPSc scrapie isoform is the infectious agent of prion disease, the cellular isoform (PrPC) is an enigmatic protein with unclear function. Of interest, PrP localization in polarized MDCK cells is controversial and its mechanism of trafficking is not clear. Here we investigated PrP traffic in MDCK cells polarized on filters and in three-dimensional MDCK cysts, a more physiological model of polarized epithelia. We found that, unlike other GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs), PrP undergoes basolateral-to-apical transcytosis in fully polarized MDCK cells. Following this event full-length PrP and its cleavage fragments are segregated in different domains of the plasma membrane in polarized cells in both 2D and 3D cultures. PMID:27389581

  4. A fasciclin-domain containing gene, ZeFLA11, is expressed exclusively in xylem elements that have reticulate wall thickenings in the stem vascular system of Zinnia elegans cv Envy.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Preeti; Findlay, Kim; Roberts, Keith; McCann, Maureen C

    2006-05-01

    The vascular cylinder of the mature stem of Zinnia elegans cv Envy contains two anatomically distinct sets of vascular bundles, stem bundles and leaf-trace bundles. We isolated a full-length cDNA of ZeFLA11, a fasciclin-domain-containing gene, from a zinnia cDNA library derived from in vitro cultures of mesophyll cells induced to form tracheary elements. Using RNA in situ hybridization, we show that ZeFLA11 is expressed in the differentiating xylem vessels with reticulate type wall thickenings and adjacent parenchyma cells of zinnia stem bundles, but not in the leaf-trace bundles that deposit spiral thickenings. Our results suggest a function for this cell-surface GPI-anchored glycoprotein in secondary wall deposition during differentiation of metaxylem tissue with reticulate vessels.

  5. Efficient yeast cell-surface display of exo- and endo-cellulase using the SED1 anchoring region and its original promoter

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recombinant yeast strains displaying the heterologous cellulolytic enzymes on the cell surface using the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring system are considered promising biocatalysts for direct conversion of lignocellulosic materials to ethanol. However, the cellulolytic activities of the conventional cellulase-displaying yeast strains are insufficient for the hydrolysis of cellulose. In this study, we constructed novel gene cassettes for the efficient cellulose utilization by cellulase-displaying yeast strains. Results The novel gene cassettes for the cell-surface display of Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase (BGL1) and Trichoderma reeseii endoglucanase II (EGII) were constructed using the promoter and the GPI anchoring region derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae SED1. The gene cassettes were integrated into the S. cerevisiae genome, then the β-glucosidase activity of these recombinant strains was evaluated. We revealed that simultaneous utilization of the SED1 promoter and Sed1 anchoring domain in a gene cassette enabled highly-efficient enzyme integration into the cell wall. The β-glucosidase activity of recombinant yeast cells transduced with the novel gene cassette was 8.4-fold higher than that of a conventional strain. The novel EGII-displaying strain also achieved 106-fold higher hydrolysis activity against the water-insoluble cellulose than a conventional strain. Furthermore, direct ethanol production from hydrothermally processed rice straw was improved by the display of T. reeseii EGII using the novel gene cassette. Conclusions We have developed novel gene cassettes for the efficient cell-surface display of exo- and endo-type cellulolytic enzymes. The results suggest that this gene cassette has the wide applicability for cell-surface display and that cellulase-displaying yeasts have significant potential for cost-effective bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:24423072

  6. Phagocytosis of gram-negative bacteria by a unique CD14-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schiff, D E; Kline, L; Soldau, K; Lee, J D; Pugin, J; Tobias, P S; Ulevitch, R J

    1997-12-01

    THP-1-derived cell lines were stably transfected with constructs encoding glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored or transmembrane forms of human CD14. CD14 expression was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of serum (heat-inactivated)-opsonized Escherichia coli (opEc). Both the GPI-anchored and transmembrane forms of CD14 supported phagocytosis of opEc equally well. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) played a role in CD14-dependent phagocytosis as evidenced by inhibition of CD14-dependent phagocytosis of opEc with anti-LBP monoclonal antibody (mAb) and by enhanced phagocytosis of E. coli opsonized with purified LBP. CD14-dependent phagocytosis was inhibited by a phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase inhibitor (wortmannin) and a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor (tyrphostin 23) but not a protein kinase C inhibitor (bisindolyl-maleimide) or a divalent cation chelator (ethylenediaminetetraacetate). Anti-LBP mAb 18G4 and anti-CD14 mAb 18E12 were used to differentiate between the pathways involved in CD14-dependent phagocytosis and CD14-dependent cell activation. F(ab')2 fragments of 18G4, a mAb to LBP that does not block cell activation, inhibited ingestion of opEc by THP1-wtCD14 cells. 18E12 (an anti-CD14 mAb that does not block LPS binding to CD14 but does inhibit CD14-dependent cell activation) did not inhibit phagocytosis of LBP-opEc by THP1-wtCD14 cells. Furthermore, CD14-dependent phagocytosis was not inhibited by anti-CD18 (CR3 and CR4 beta-chain) or anti-Fcgamma receptor mAb.

  7. Characterization of PbPga1, an Antigenic GPI-Protein in the Pathogenic Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Valim, Clarissa X. R.; Basso, Luiz Roberto; dos Reis Almeida, Fausto B.; Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Arruda, Luisa Karla; Martinez, Roberto; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Coelho, Paulo Sergio Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), one of the most prevalent mycosis in Latin America. P. brasiliensis cell wall components interact with host cells and influence the pathogenesis of PCM. Cell wall components, such as glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-proteins play a critical role in cell adhesion and host tissue invasion. Although the importance of GPI-proteins in the pathogenesis of other medically important fungi is recognized, little is known about their function in P. brasiliensis cells and PCM pathogenesis. We cloned the PbPga1 gene that codifies for a predicted GPI-anchored glycoprotein from the dimorphic pathogenic fungus P. brasiliensis. PbPga1 is conserved in Eurotiomycetes fungi and encodes for a protein with potential glycosylation sites in a serine/threonine-rich region, a signal peptide and a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol attachment signal sequence. Specific chicken anti-rPbPga1 antibody localized PbPga1 on the yeast cell surface at the septum between the mother cell and the bud with stronger staining of the bud. The exposure of murine peritoneal macrophages to rPbPga1 induces TNF-α release and nitric oxide (NO) production by macrophages. Furthermore, the presence of O-glycosylation sites was demonstrated by β-elimination under ammonium hydroxide treatment of rPbPga1. Finally, sera from PCM patients recognized rPbPga1 by Western blotting indicating the presence of specific antibodies against rPbPga1. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the PbPga1gene codifies for a cell surface glycoprotein, probably attached to a GPI-anchor, which may play a role in P. brasiliensis cell wall morphogenesis and infection. The induction of inflammatory mediators released by rPbPga1 and the reactivity of PCM patient sera toward rPbPga1 imply that the protein favors the innate mechanisms of defense and induces humoral immunity during P. brasiliensis infection. PMID:23024763

  8. Tissue distribution of products of the mouse decay-accelerating factor (DAF) genes. Exploitation of a Daf1 knock-out mouse and site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Fukuoka, Y; Spicer, A; Ohta, R; Okada, N; Harris, C L; Emancipator, S N; Medof, M E

    2001-10-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a membrane regulator of C3 activation that protects self cells from autologous complement attack. In humans, DAF is uniformly expressed as a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored molecule. In mice, both GPI-anchored and transmembrane-anchored DAF proteins are produced, each of which can be derived from two different genes (Daf1 and Daf2). In this report, we describe a Daf1 gene knock-out mouse arising as the first product of a strategy for targeting one or both Daf genes. As part of the work, we characterize recently described monoclonal antibodies against murine DAF protein using deletion mutants synthesized in yeast, and then employ the monoclonal antibodies in conjunction with wild-type and the Daf1 knock-out mice to determine the tissue distribution of the mouse Daf1 and Daf2 gene products. To enhance the immunohistochemical detection of murine DAF protein, we utilized the sensitive tyramide fluorescence method. In wild-type mice, we found strong DAF labelling of glomeruli, airway and gut epithelium, the spleen, vascular endothelium throughout all tissues, and seminiferous tubules of the testis. In Daf1 knock-out mice, DAF labelling was ablated in most tissues, but strong labelling of the testis and splenic dendritic cells remained. In both sites, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses identified both GPI and transmembrane forms of Daf2 gene-derived protein. The results have relevance for studies of in vivo murine DAF function and of murine DAF structure.

  9. Identification and localization of the sperm CRISP family protein CiUrabin involved in gamete interaction in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Saito, Takako; Yamada, Lixy; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Harada, Yoshito; Sawada, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Ascidians are hermaphrodites, and most release sperm and eggs nearly simultaneously. Many species, including Halocynthia roretzi and Ciona intestinalis, are self-sterile. We previously reported that the interaction between a 12 EGF-like repeat-containing vitelline-coat (VC) protein, HrVC70, and a sperm GPI-anchored CRISP, HrUrabin, in lipid rafts plays a key role in self-/nonself-recognizable gamete interaction in H. roretzi. On the other hand, we recently identified two pairs of polymorphic genes responsible for self-incompatibility in C. intestinalis by positional cloning: The sperm polycystin 1-like receptors s-Themis-A/B and its fibrinogen-like ligand v-Themis-A/B on the VC. However, it is not known if the orthologs of HrVC70 and HrUrabin also participate in gamete interaction in C. intestinalis since they are from different orders. Here, we tested for a C. intestinalis ortholog (CiUrabin) of HrUrabin by searching the genome database and proteomes of sperm lipid rafts. The identified CiUrabin belongs to the CRISP family, with a PR domain and a GPI-anchor-attachment site. CiUrabin appears to be specifically expressed in the testis and localized at the surface of the sperm head, as revealed by Northern blotting and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The specific interaction between CiVC57, a C. intestinalis ortholog of HrVC70, and CiUrabin was confirmed by Far Western analysis, similarly to the interaction between HrVC70 and HrUrabin. The molecular interaction between CiVC57 and CiUrabin may be involved in the primary binding of sperm to the VC prior to the allorecognition process, mediated by v-Themis-A/B and s-Themis-A/B, during fertilization of C. intestinalis.

  10. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into disease-related isoforms (PrPSc). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrPC in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrPSc formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrPC. In contrast, PrPC containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrPC) was not converted to PrPSc. Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrPC inhibited the production of PrPSc within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrPC contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrPC. Desialylated PrPC was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrPC and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrPC in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrPC modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrPSc formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. PMID:26553874

  11. CD8+ T Cell Fate and Function Influenced by Antigen-Specific Virus-Like Nanoparticles Co-Expressing Membrane Tethered IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Wojta-Stremayr, Daniela; Neunkirchner, Alina; Srinivasan, Bharani; Trapin, Doris; Schmetterer, Klaus G.; Pickl, Winfried F.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of adjuvants fostering humoral immunity are known as of today. However, there is a lack of adjuvants or adjuvant strategies, which directly target T cellular effector functions and memory. We here determined whether systemically toxic cytokines such as IL-2 can be restricted to the site of antigen presentation and used as ‘natural adjuvants’. Therefore, we devised antigen-presenting virus-like nanoparticles (VNP) co-expressing IL-2 attached to different membrane-anchors and assessed their potency to modulate CD8+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Efficient targeting of IL-2 to lipid rafts and ultimately VNP was achieved by fusing IL-2 at its C-terminus to a minimal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor acceptor sequence. To identify optimal membrane-anchor dimensions we inserted one (1Ig), two (2Ig) or four (4Ig) immunoglobulin(Ig)-like domains of CD16b between IL-2 and the minimal GPI-anchor acceptor sequence of CD16b (GPI). We found that the 2IgGPI version was superior to all other evaluated IL-2 variants (IL-2v) in terms of its i) degree of targeting to lipid rafts and to the VNP surface, ii) biological activity, iii) co-stimulation of cognate T cells in the absence of bystander activation and iv) potency to induce differentiation and acquisition of CD8+ T cell effector functions in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the GPI version rather favored memory precursor cell formation. These results exemplify novel beneficial features of membrane-bound IL-2, which in addition to its mere T cell stimulatory capacity include the induction of differential effector and memory functions in CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:25946103

  12. Identification and Functional Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Genes That Encode Proteins of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana S.; Junqueira, Caroline; Trigueiro, Ricardo C.; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Macedo, Cristiana S.; Araújo, Patrícia R.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Martinelli, Patrícia M.; Kimmel, Jürgen; Stahl, Philipp; Niehus, Sebastian; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Previato, José O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is a protist parasite that causes Chagas disease. Several proteins that are essential for parasite virulence and involved in host immune responses are anchored to the membrane through glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) molecules. In addition, T. cruzi GPI anchors have immunostimulatory activities, including the ability to stimulate the synthesis of cytokines by innate immune cells. Therefore, T. cruzi genes related to GPI anchor biosynthesis constitute potential new targets for the development of better therapies against Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings In silico analysis of the T. cruzi genome resulted in the identification of 18 genes encoding proteins of the GPI biosynthetic pathway as well as the inositolphosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase gene. Expression of GFP fusions of some of these proteins in T. cruzi epimastigotes showed that they localize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Expression analyses of two genes indicated that they are constitutively expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. T. cruzi genes TcDPM1, TcGPI10 and TcGPI12 complement conditional yeast mutants in GPI biosynthesis. Attempts to generate T. cruzi knockouts for three genes were unsuccessful, suggesting that GPI may be an essential component of the parasite. Regarding TcGPI8, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the transamidase complex, although we were able to generate single allele knockout mutants, attempts to disrupt both alleles failed, resulting instead in parasites that have undergone genomic recombination and maintained at least one active copy of the gene. Conclusions/Significance Analyses of T. cruzi sequences encoding components of the GPI biosynthetic pathway indicated that they are essential genes involved in key aspects of host-parasite interactions. Complementation assays of yeast mutants with these T. cruzi genes resulted in yeast cell lines that can now be employed in high throughput screenings of drugs against this

  13. Compartmentalization of Proteins in Epididymosomes Coordinates the Association of Epididymal Proteins with the Different Functional Structures of Bovine Spermatozoa1

    PubMed Central

    Girouard, Julie; Frenette, Gilles; Sullivan, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Epididymosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by epithelial cells within the luminal compartment of the epididymis. In bovine, many proteins are associated with epididymosomes, and some of them, such as the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein P25b, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and aldose reductase (AKR1B1), are transferred to spermatozoa during the epididymal maturation process. P25b is associated with detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) domains of epididymal spermatozoa, whereas MIF and AKR1B1 are cytosolic proteins associated with detergent-soluble fractions. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DRM domains are also present in the epididymosomes and that P25b DRM-associated proteins in these vesicles are transferred to the DRMs of spermatozoa. The presence of DRMs in epididymosomes was confirmed by their insolubility in cold Triton X-100 and their low buoyant density in sucrose gradient. Furthermore, DRMs isolated from epididymosomes are characterized by the exclusive presence of ganglioside GM1 and by high levels of cholesterol and sphingomyelin. Biochemical analysis indicated that P25b is linked to DRM in epididymosomes, whereas MIF and AKR1B1 are completely excluded from these membrane domains. Proteolytic treatment of epididymosomes and immunoblotting studies showed that P25b is affected by trypsin or pronase proteolysis. In contrast, MIF and AKR1B1 are not degraded by proteases, suggesting that they are localized within epididymosomes. Interaction studies between epididymosomes and epididymal spermatozoa demonstrated that P25b is transferred from the DRM of epididymosomes to the DRM of the caput epididymal spermatozoa as a GPI-anchored protein. Together, these data suggest that specific localization and compartmentalization of proteins in the epididymosomes coordinate the association of epididymal proteins with the different functional structures of spermatozoa. PMID:19164173

  14. The affected gene underlying the class K glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) surface protein defect codes for the GPI transamidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianliang; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Knez, Jansen J.; Udenfriend, Sidney; Chen, Rui; Medof, M. Edward

    1997-01-01

    The final step in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of cell surface proteins consists of a transamidation reaction in which preassembled GPI donors are substituted for C-terminal signal sequences in nascent polypeptides. In previous studies we described a human K562 cell mutant, termed class K, that accumulates fully assembled GPI units but is unable to transfer them to N-terminally processed proproteins. In further work we showed that, unlike wild-type microsomes, microsomes from these cells are unable to support C-terminal interaction of proproteins with the small nucleophiles hydrazine or hydroxylamine, and that the cells thus are defective in transamidation. In this study, using a modified recombinant vaccinia transient transfection system in conjunction with a composite cDNA prepared by 5′ extension of an existing GenBank sequence, we found that the genetic element affected in these cells corresponds to the human homolog of yGPI8, a gene affected in a yeast mutant strain exhibiting similar accumulation of GPI donors without transfer. hGPI8 gives rise to mRNAs of 1.6 and 1.9 kb, both encoding a protein of 395 amino acids that varies in cells with their ability to couple GPIs to proteins. The gene spans ≈25 kb of DNA on chromosome 1. Reconstitution of class K cells with hGPI8 abolishes their accumulation of GPI precursors and restores C-terminal processing of GPI-anchored proteins. Also, hGPI8 restores the ability of microsomes from the mutant cells to yield an active carbonyl in the presence of a proprotein which is considered to be an intermediate in catalysis by a transamidase. PMID:9356492

  15. Selection and identification of malaria vaccine target molecule using bioinformatics and DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Shuaibu, M N; Kikuchi, M; Cherif, M S; Helegbe, G K; Yanagi, T; Hirayama, K

    2010-10-04

    Following a genome-wide search for a blood stage malaria DNA-based vaccine using web-based bioinformatic tools, 29 genes from the annotated Plasmodium yoelii genome sequence (www.PlasmoDB.org and www.tigr.org) were identified as encoding GPI-anchored proteins. Target genes were those with orthologues in P. falciparum, containing an N-terminal signal sequence containing hydrophobic amino acid stretch and signal P criteria, a transmembrane-like domain and GPI anchor motif. Focusing on the blood stage, we extracted mRNA from pRBCs, PCR-amplified 22 out of the 29 selected genes, and eventually cloned nine of these into a DNA vaccine plasmid, pVAX 200-DEST. Biojector-mediated delivery of the nine DNA vaccines was conducted using ShimaJET to C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 4 μg/mouse three times at an interval of 3 weeks. Two weeks after the second booster, immunized mice were challenged with P. y. yoelii 17XL-parasitized RBCs and the level of parasitaemia, protection and survival was assessed. Immunization with one gene (PY03470) resulted in 2-4 days of delayed onset and level of parasitaemia and was associated with increased survival compared to non-immunized mice. Antibody production was, however, low following DNA vaccination, as determined by immunofluorescence assay. Recombinant protein from this gene, GPI8p transamidase-related protein (rPyTAM) in PBS or emulsified with GERBU adjuvant was also used to immunize another set of C57BL/6 mice with 10-20 μg/mouse three times at 3-week interval. Higher antibody response was obtained as determined by ELISA with similar protective effects as observed after DNA vaccination.

  16. Cell painting with an engineered EPCR to augment the protein C system

    PubMed Central

    Bouwens, Eveline A. M.; Stavenuiter, Fabian; Mosnier, Laurent O.

    2016-01-01

    The protein C (PC) system conveys beneficial anticoagulant and cytoprotective effects in numerous in vivo disease models. The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a central role in these pathways as cofactor for PC activation and by enhancing activated protein C (APC)-mediated protease-activated receptor (PAR) activation. During inflammatory disease, expression of EPCR on cell membranes is often diminished thereby limiting PC activation and APC’s effects on cells. Here a caveolae-targeting glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored EPCR (EPCR-GPI) was engineered to restore EPCR’s bioavailability via “cell painting.” The painting efficiency of EPCR-GPI on EPCR-depleted endothelial cells was time- and dose-dependent. The EPCR-GPI bioavailability after painting was long lasting since EPCR surface levels reached 400% of wild-type cells after 2 hours and remained >200% for 24 hours. EPCR-GPI painting conveyed APC binding to EPCR-depleted endothelial cells where EPCR was lost due to shedding or shRNA. EPCR painting normalized PC activation on EPCR-depleted cells indicating that EPCR-GPI is functional active on painted cells. Caveolin-1 lipid rafts were enriched in EPCR after painting due to the GPI-anchor targeting caveolae. Accordingly, EPCR painting supported PAR1 and PAR3 cleavage by APC and augmented PAR1-dependent Akt phosphorylation by APC. Thus, EPCR-GPI painting achieved physiological relevant surface levels on endothelial cells, restored APC binding to EPCR-depleted cells, supported PC activation, and enhanced APC-mediated PAR cleavage and cytoprotective signaling. Therefore, EPCR-GPI provides a novel tool to restore the bioavailability and functionality of EPCR on EPCR-depleted and deficient cells. PMID:26272345

  17. Monitoring genotoxicity in patients receiving chemotherapy for cancer: application of the PIG-A assay.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Ukai, Akiko; Ishikawa, Shigeo; Sugano, Ayako; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-09-15

    The recently introduced Pig-a in vivo gene mutation assay measures endogeneous mutations of Pig-a (human, PIG-A), an X-linked gene that is conserved across species from rodents to humans. Flow cytometric analysis enables the enumeration of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor-deficient erythrocytes, resulting from a mutation in Pig-a/PIG-A, in only a few microliters of peripheral blood. Pig-a/PIG-A mutations appear to function in a neutral manner, allowing evaluation of the accumulated genotoxic effects of repeated exposures. To date, most Pig-a studies have been conducted in rodents; only a few reports regarding human applications of the PIG-A assay have been published. We have conducted a PIG-A assay in the context of human genotoxicity monitoring. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy human donors and chemotherapy-treated cancer patients at Yamagata University Hospital. To investigate the PIG-A mutant frequency (MF) induced by chemotherapy, red blood cells were analyzed via flow cytometry following staining with allophycocyanin-conjugated anti-CD235ab (erythrocyte specific) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti-CD59 antibodies (GPI-anchored protein specific). Reticulocyte frequencies (%RET) were also analyzed using a phycoerythrin-conjugated anti-CD71 antibody to monitor bone marrow suppression and reticulocytosis. Two of 27 patients exhibited a significantly elevated frequency of PIG-A mutants. Although we observed either a reduced or an increased %RET in all patients, no association was observed between this factor and the PIG-A MF. Unfortunately, we could not analyze blood samples collected before treatment during therapeutic processes. Additionally, the sampling time point for some patients was too short to express the PIG-A mutant phenotypes. Therefore, the possibility of natively high PIG-A MFs prior to treatment must be considered. The human PIG-A assay shows promise as a human genotoxicity monitoring method.

  18. In silico drug re-purposing against African sleeping sickness using GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase as an experimental target.

    PubMed

    Rashmi, Mayank; Swati, D

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness in humans. Many glycoconjugate compounds are present on the entire cell surface of Trypanosoma brucei to control the infectivity and survival of this pathogen. These gycoconjugates are anchored to the plasma membrane with the help of glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchors. This type of anchor is much more common in protozoans than in other eukaryotes. The second step of glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis is catalyzed by an enzyme, which is GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase. GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase has a conserved GPI domain, which is responsible for the functionality of this enzyme. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of the target is modelled by I-TASSER and the ligand is modelled by PRODRG server. It is found that the predicted active site residues of the GPI domain are ultra-conserved for the Trypanosomatidae family. The predicted active site residues are His41, Pro42, Asp43, Asp44, Met47, Phe48, Ser74, Arg80, His103, Val144, Ser145, His147 and His150. Two hydrogen bond acceptors and four hydrogen bond donors are found in the modelled pharmacophore. All compounds of the Drugbank database and twenty three known inhibitors have been considered for structure based virtual screening. This work is focused on approved drugs because they are already tested for safety and effectiveness in humans. After the structure-based virtual screening, seventeen approved drugs and two inhibitors are found, which interact with the ligand on the basis of the designed pharmacophore. The docking has been performed for the resultant seventeen approved drugs and two known inhibitors. Two approved drugs have negative binding energy and their pKa values are similar to the selected known inhibitors. The result of this study suggests that the approved drugs Ethambutol (DB00330) and Metaraminol (DB00610) may prove useful in the treatment of African sleeping sickness.

  19. Cryptosporidium hominis gene catalog: a resource for the selection of novel Cryptosporidium vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ifeonu, Olukemi O.; Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.; Sheoran, Abhineet S.; Daly, Maria C.; Felix, Victor; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Widmer, Giovanni; Levine, Myron M.; Tzipori, Saul; Silva, Joana C.

    2016-01-01

    Human cryptosporidiosis, caused primarily by Cryptosporidium hominis and a subset of Cryptosporidium parvum, is a major cause of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age in developing countries and can lead to nutritional stunting and death. Cryptosporidiosis is particularly severe and potentially lethal in immunocompromised hosts. Biological and technical challenges have impeded traditional vaccinology approaches to identify novel targets for the development of vaccines against C. hominis, the predominant species associated with human disease. We deemed that the existence of genomic resources for multiple species in the genus, including a much-improved genome assembly and annotation for C. hominis, makes a reverse vaccinology approach feasible. To this end, we sought to generate a searchable online resource, termed C. hominis gene catalog, which registers all C. hominis genes and their properties relevant for the identification and prioritization of candidate vaccine antigens, including physical attributes, properties related to antigenic potential and expression data. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified ∼400 C. hominis genes containing properties typical of surface-exposed antigens, such as predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor motifs, multiple transmembrane motifs and/or signal peptides targeting the encoded protein to the secretory pathway. This set can be narrowed further, e.g. by focusing on potential GPI-anchored proteins lacking homologs in the human genome, but with homologs in the other Cryptosporidium species for which genomic data are available, and with low amino acid polymorphism. Additional selection criteria related to recombinant expression and purification include minimizing predicted post-translation modifications and potential disulfide bonds. Forty proteins satisfying these criteria were selected from 3745 proteins in the updated C. hominis annotation. The immunogenic potential of a few of these is

  20. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  1. rPbPga1 from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Activates Mast Cells and Macrophages via NFkB

    PubMed Central

    Valim, Clarissa Xavier Resende; da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Assis, Mariana Aprigio; Fernandes, Fabricio Freitas; Coelho, Paulo Sergio Rodrigues; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2015-01-01

    Background The fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the leading etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic granulomatous disease that typically affects the lungs. Cell wall components of P. brasiliensis interact with host cells and influence the pathogenesis of PCM. In yeast, many glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are important in the initial contact with the host, mediating host-yeast interactions that culminate with the disease. PbPga1 is a GPI anchored protein located on the surface of the yeast P. brasiliensis that is recognized by sera from PCM patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Endogenous PbPga1 was localized to the surface of P. brasiliensis yeast cells in the lungs of infected mice using a polyclonal anti-rPbPga1 antibody. Furthermore, macrophages stained with anti-CD38 were associated with P. brasiliensis containing granulomas. Additionally, rPbPga1 activated the transcription factor NFkB in the macrophage cell line Raw 264.7 Luc cells, containing the luciferase gene downstream of the NFkB promoter. After 24 h of incubation with rPbPga1, alveolar macrophages from BALB/c mice were stimulated to release TNF-α, IL-4 and NO. Mast cells, identified by toluidine blue staining, were also associated with P. brasiliensis containing granulomas. Co-culture of P. Brasiliensis yeast cells with RBL-2H3 mast cells induced morphological changes on the surface of the mast cells. Furthermore, RBL-2H3 mast cells were degranulated by P. brasiliensis yeast cells, but not by rPbPga1, as determined by the release of beta-hexosaminidase. However, RBL-2H3 cells activated by rPbPga1 released the inflammatory interleukin IL-6 and also activated the transcription factor NFkB in GFP-reporter mast cells. The transcription factor NFAT was not activated when the mast cells were incubated with rPbPga1. Conclusions/Significance The results indicate that PbPga1 may act as a modulator protein in PCM pathogenesis and serve as a useful target for

  2. Engineering the prion protein using chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ball, H L; King, D S; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B; Baldwin, M A

    2001-11-01

    In recent years, the technology of solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) has improved to the extent that chemical synthesis of small proteins may be a viable complementary strategy to recombinant expression. We have prepared several modified and wild-type prion protein (PrP) polypeptides, of up to 112 residues, that demonstrate the flexibility of a chemical approach to protein synthesis. The principal event in prion disease is the conformational change of the normal, alpha-helical cellular protein (PrPc) into a beta-sheet-rich pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)). The ability to form PrP(Sc) in transgenic mice is retained by a 106 residue 'mini-prion' (PrP106), with the deletions 23-88 and 141-176. Synthetic PrP106 (sPrP106) and a His-tagged analog (sPrP106HT) have been prepared successfully using a highly optimized Fmoc chemical methodology involving DCC/HOBt activation and an efficient capping procedure with N-(2-chlorobenzyloxycarbonyloxy) succinimide. A single reversed-phase purification step gave homogeneous protein, in excellent yield. With respect to its conformational and aggregational properties and its response to proteinase digestion, sPrP106 was indistinguishable from its recombinant analog (rPrP106). Certain sequences that proved to be more difficult to synthesize using the Fmoc approach, such as bovine (Bo) PrP(90-200), were successfully prepared using a combination of the highly activated coupling reagent HATU and t-Boc chemistry. To mimic the glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor and target sPrP to cholesterol-rich domains on the cell surface, where the conversion of PrPc is believed to occur, a lipophilic group or biotin, was added to an orthogonally side-chain-protected Lys residue at the C-terminus of sPrP sequences. These groups enabled sPrP to be immobilized on either the cell surface or a streptavidin-coated ELISA plate, respectively, in an orientation analogous to that of membrane-bound, GPI-anchored PrPc. The chemical manipulation of such

  3. The Biological Function of the Prion Protein: A Cell Surface Scaffold of Signaling Modules

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The prion glycoprotein (PrPC) is mostly located at the cell surface, tethered to the plasma membrane through a glycosyl-phosphatydil inositol (GPI) anchor. Misfolding of PrPC is associated with the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), whereas its normal conformer serves as a receptor for oligomers of the β-amyloid peptide, which play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). PrPC is highly expressed in both the nervous and immune systems, as well as in other organs, but its functions are controversial. Extensive experimental work disclosed multiple physiological roles of PrPC at the molecular, cellular and systemic levels, affecting the homeostasis of copper, neuroprotection, stem cell renewal and memory mechanisms, among others. Often each such process has been heralded as the bona fide function of PrPC, despite restricted attention paid to a selected phenotypic trait, associated with either modulation of gene expression or to the engagement of PrPC with a single ligand. In contrast, the GPI-anchored prion protein was shown to bind several extracellular and transmembrane ligands, which are required to endow that protein with the ability to play various roles in transmembrane signal transduction. In addition, differing sets of those ligands are available in cell type- and context-dependent scenarios. To account for such properties, we proposed that PrPC serves as a dynamic platform for the assembly of signaling modules at the cell surface, with widespread consequences for both physiology and behavior. The current review advances the hypothesis that the biological function of the prion protein is that of a cell surface scaffold protein, based on the striking similarities of its functional properties with those of scaffold proteins involved in the organization of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Those properties are: the ability to recruit spatially restricted sets of binding molecules involved in specific signaling

  4. Recruitment of CD55 and CD66e brush border-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins by members of the Afa/Dr diffusely adhering family of Escherichia coli that infect the human polarized intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells.

    PubMed

    Guignot, J; Peiffer, I; Bernet-Camard, M F; Lublin, D M; Carnoy, C; Moseley, S L; Servin, A L

    2000-06-01

    The Afa/Dr family of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) includes bacteria expressing afimbrial adhesins (AFA), Dr hemagglutinin, and fimbrial F1845 adhesin. We show that infection of human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells by the Afa/Dr DAEC strains C1845 and IH11128 is followed by clustering of CD55 around adhering bacteria. Mapping of CD55 epitopes involved in CD55 clustering by Afa/Dr DAEC was conducted using CD55 deletion mutants expressed by stable transfection in CHO cells. Deletion in the short consensus repeat 1 (SCR1) domain abolished Afa/Dr DAEC-induced CD55 clustering. In contrast, deletion in the SCR4 domain does not modify Afa/Dr DAEC-induced CD55 clustering. We show that the brush border-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein CD66e (carcinoembryonic antigen) is recruited by the Afa/Dr DAEC strains C1845 and IH11128. This conclusion is based on the observations that (i) infection of Caco-2/TC7 cells by Afa/Dr DAEC strains is followed by clustering of CD66e around adhering bacteria and (ii) Afa/Dr DAEC strains bound efficiently to stably transfected HeLa cells expressing CD66e, accompanied by CD66e clustering around adhering bacteria. Inhibition assay using monoclonal antibodies directed against CD55 SCR domains, and polyclonal anti-CD55 and anti-CD66e antibodies demonstrate that CD55 and CD66e function as a receptors for the C1845 and IH11128 bacteria. Moreover, using structural draE gene mutants, we found that a mutant in which cysteine replaced aspartic acid at position 54 displayed conserved binding capacity but failed to induce CD55 and CD66e clustering. Taken together, these data give new insights into the mechanisms by which Afa/Dr DAEC induces adhesin-dependent cross talk in the human polarized intestinal epithelial cells by mobilizing brush border-associated GPI-anchored proteins known to function as transducing molecules.

  5. Early Vertebrate Evolution of the Host Restriction Factor Tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Heusinger, Elena; Kluge, Silvia F.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tetherin is an interferon-inducible restriction factor targeting a broad range of enveloped viruses. Its antiviral activity depends on an unusual topology comprising an N-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by an extracellular coiled-coil region and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. One of the two membrane anchors is inserted into assembling virions, while the other remains in the plasma membrane of the infected cell. Thus, tetherin entraps budding viruses by physically bridging viral and cellular membranes. Although tetherin restricts the release of a large variety of diverse human and animal viruses, only mammalian orthologs have been described to date. Here, we examined the evolutionary origin of this protein and demonstrate that tetherin orthologs are also found in fish, reptiles, and birds. Notably, alligator tetherin efficiently blocks the release of retroviral particles. Thus, tetherin emerged early during vertebrate evolution and acquired its antiviral activity before the mammal/reptile divergence. Although there is only limited sequence homology, all orthologs share the typical topology. Two unrelated proteins of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum also adopt a tetherin-like configuration with an N-terminal TMD and a C-terminal GPI anchor. However, these proteins showed no evidence for convergent evolution and failed to inhibit virion release. In summary, our findings demonstrate that tetherin emerged at least 450 million years ago and is more widespread than previously anticipated. The early evolution of antiviral activity together with the high topology conservation but low sequence homology suggests that restriction of virus release is the primary function of tetherin. IMPORTANCE The continuous arms race with viruses has driven the evolution of a variety of cell-intrinsic immunity factors that inhibit different steps of the viral replication cycle. One of these restriction factors, tetherin, inhibits the

  6. Synthesis of mannosylglucosaminylinositol phospholipids in normal but not paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria cells.

    PubMed

    Hirose, S; Ravi, L; Prince, G M; Rosenfeld, M G; Silber, R; Andresen, S W; Hazra, S V; Medof, M E

    1992-07-01

    To identify mannosyl (Man)-containing intermediates of the human glycoinositol phospholipid (GPI) anchor pathway and examine their expression in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), mannolipid products deriving from in vitro guanosine diphosphate [3H]Man labeling of HeLa cell microsomes were characterized. The defined GPI species were correlated with products deriving from in vivo [3H]Man labeling of normal and (GPI-anchor defective) affected leukocytes. In vitro analyses in HeLa cells showed dolichol-phosphoryl (Dol-P)-[3H]Man and a spectrum of [3H]Man lipids exhibiting TLC mobilities approximating those of Trypanosoma brucei (Tryp) GPI precursors. Iatrobead HPLC separations and partial characterizations of the major isolated [3H]Man species (designated H1-H8) showed that all but H1 (Dol-P-Man) were sensitive to HNO2 deamination and serum GPI-specific phospholipase D digestion but were resistant to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C digestion unless previously deacylated with mild alkali. [3H]Man label in H3, H4, and H6 but not in H5 or H7 was efficiently released into the aqueous phase by jack bean alpha-mannosidase digestion. BioGel P-4 and AX-5 sizing of the dephosphorylated core glycan fragments of H6 and H7 gave values that coincided precisely with the corresponding glycan fragments from the fully assembled Tryp anchor donor A' (P2). Affected leukocytes from four patients with PNH supported formation of GlcNAc- and GlcN-PI but all failed to express H6 and H7 as well as H8 and two showed complete absence of earlier Man-containing intermediates. These findings argue that human intracellular GPI mannolipids are built on acylated inositol phospholipids, that H6 and H7 contain differentially phosphoethanolamine-substituted Man3-GlcN-inositol cores, and that PNH cells are defective in conversion of GlcN-PI into these more mature mannolipid structures.

  7. Cholesterol balance in prion diseases and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hannaoui, Samia; Shim, Su Yeon; Cheng, Yo Ching; Corda, Erica; Gilch, Sabine

    2014-11-20

    Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative disorders of humans and animals. They are characterized by the accumulation of PrPSc, an aberrantly folded isoform of the cellular prion protein PrPC, in the brains of affected individuals. PrPC is a cell surface glycoprotein attached to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) anchor. Specifically, it is associated with lipid rafts, membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphinoglipids. It has been established that inhibition of endogenous cholesterol synthesis disturbs lipid raft association of PrPC and prevents PrPSc accumulation in neuronal cells. Additionally, prion conversion is reduced upon interference with cellular cholesterol uptake, endosomal export, or complexation at the plasma membrane. Altogether, these results demonstrate on the one hand the importance of cholesterol for prion propagation. On the other hand, growing evidence suggests that prion infection modulates neuronal cholesterol metabolism. Similar results were reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD): whereas amyloid β peptide formation is influenced by cellular cholesterol, levels of cholesterol in the brains of affected individuals increase during the clinical course of the disease. In this review, we summarize commonalities of alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and discuss consequences for neuronal function and therapy of prion diseases and AD.

  8. Expeditious chemoenzymatic synthesis of CD52 glycopeptide antigens

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xingyu; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2013-01-01

    CD52 is a GPI-anchored glycopeptide antigen found on sperm cells and human lymphocytes. Recent structural studies indicate that sperm-associated CD52 antigen carries both a complex type N-glycan and an O-glycan on the polypeptide backbone. To facilitate functional and immunological studies of distinct CD52 glycoforms, we report in this paper the first chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous CD52 glycoforms carrying both N- and O-glycans. The synthetic strategy consists of two key steps: monosaccharide primers GlcNAc and GalNAc were first installed at the pre-determined N- and O-glycosylation sites by a facile solid-phase peptide synthesis, and then the N- and O-glycans were extended by respective enzymatic glycosylations. It was found that the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation allowed efficient attachment of an intact N-glycan in a single step at the N-glycosylation site, while the recombinant human T-synthase could independently extend the O-linked GalNAc to form the core 1 O-glycan. This chemoenzymatic approach is highly convergent and permits easy construction of various homogeneous CD52 glycoforms from a common polypeptide precursor. In addition, the introduction of a latent thiol group in the form of protected cysteamine at the C-terminus of the CD52 glycoforms will enable site-specific conjugation to a carrier protein to provide immunogens for generating CD52 glycoform-specific antibodies for functional studies. PMID:20848033

  9. Leukocyte cell surface proteinases: regulation of expression, functions, and mechanisms of surface localization.

    PubMed

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: (1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinases by cells; (2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or (3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: (1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; (2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; (3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; (4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and (5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes.

  10. Loss of LORELEI function in the pistil delays initiation but does not affect embryo development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Palanivelu, Ravishankar

    2010-11-01

    Double fertilization, uniquely observed in plants, requires successful sperm cell delivery by the pollen tube to the female gametophyte, followed by migration, recognition and fusion of the two sperm cells with two female gametic cells. The female gametophyte not only regulates these steps but also controls the subsequent initiation of seed development. Previously, we reported that loss of LORELEI, which encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, in the female reproductive tissues causes a delay in initiation of seed development. From these studies, however, it was unclear if embryos derived from fertilization of lre-5 gametophytes continued to lag behind wild type during seed development. Additionally, it was not determined if the delay in initiation of seed development had any lingering effects during seed germination. Finally, it was not known if loss of LORELEI function affects seedling development given that LORELEI is expressed in eight-day-old seedlings. Here, we showed that despite a delay in initiation, lre-5/lre-5 embryos recover, becoming equivalent to the developing wild-type embryos beginning at 72 hours after pollination. Additionally, lre-5/lre-5 seed germination, and seedling and root development are indistinguishable from wild type indicating that loss of LORELEI is tolerated, at least under standard growth conditions, in vegetative tissues.

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of the COBRA-Like (COBL) Gene Family in Gossypium Identifies Two COBLs Potentially Associated with Fiber Quality.

    PubMed

    Niu, Erli; Shang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Chaoze; Bao, Jianghao; Zeng, Yanda; Cai, Caiping; Du, Xiongming; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    COBRA-Like (COBL) genes, which encode a plant-specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein, have been proven to be key regulators in the orientation of cell expansion and cellulose crystallinity status. Genome-wide analysis has been performed in A. thaliana, O. sativa, Z. mays and S. lycopersicum, but little in Gossypium. Here we identified 19, 18 and 33 candidate COBL genes from three sequenced cotton species, diploid cotton G. raimondii, G. arboreum and tetraploid cotton G. hirsutum acc. TM-1, respectively. These COBL members were anchored onto 10 chromosomes in G. raimondii and could be divided into two subgroups. Expression patterns of COBL genes showed highly developmental and spatial regulation in G. hirsutum acc. TM-1. Of them, GhCOBL9 and GhCOBL13 were preferentially expressed at the secondary cell wall stage of fiber development and had significantly co-upregulated expression with cellulose synthase genes GhCESA4, GhCESA7 and GhCESA8. Besides, GhCOBL9 Dt and GhCOBL13 Dt were co-localized with previously reported cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and the favorable allele types of GhCOBL9 Dt had significantly positive correlations with fiber quality traits, indicating that these two genes might play an important role in fiber development.

  12. The hematopoietic defect in PNH is not due to defective stroma, but is due to defective progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Ware, Russell E; Burnette, Angela; Pendleton, Andrew L; Kitano, Kiyoshi; Hirota, Toshiyuki; Machii, Takashi; Kitani, Teruo; Smith, Clay A; Rosse, Wendell F

    2002-01-01

    Although paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is often associated with aplastic anemia (AA), the nature of the pathogenetic link between PNH and AA remains unclear. Moreover, the PIG-A mutation appears to be necessary but not sufficient for the development of PNH, suggesting other factors are involved. The ability of PNH marrow cells to form in vitro hematopoietic colonies and the ability of PNH marrow to generate stroma that could support hematopoiesis of normal or PNH marrow in cross culture were investigated. PNH marrow from both post-Ficoll and post-lineage depleted hematopoietic progenitor cells grew similarly significantly fewer colonies than normal marrow. Sorting of CD59(+) and CD59(-) CD34(+) CD38(-) cells from patients with PNH showed similarly impaired clonogenic efficiency, indicating that the hematopoietic defect in PNH does not directly relate to GPI-anchored protein expression. PNH marrow readily grew stroma similar to marrow from normal donors. Cross culture experiments revealed that PNH stroma appears to function normally in vitro; it can support growth of normal marrow cells as well as normal stroma does, but neither PNH nor normal stroma could support the growth of PNH marrow cells. The hematopoietic defect in PNH is not due to defective stroma, but is due to defective progenitor cell growth related to additional unknown factors.

  13. Role of lipid rafts in neuronal differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Santacroce, Costantino; Tasciotti, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Piccoli, Luca; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Garofalo, Tina

    2015-12-10

    Human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) are characterized by a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They express specific markers for mesenchymal stem cells and are capable of differentiation into osteoblasts, adipoblasts and neurons in vitro. Previous studies showed that gangliosides are involved in the induction of early neuronal differentiation of hDPSCs. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of lipid rafts in this process. Lipid rafts are signaling microdomains enriched in glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, tyrosine kinase receptors, mono- or heterotrimeric G proteins and GPI-anchored proteins. We preliminary showed that established cells expressed multipotent mesenchymal stromal-specific surface antigens. Then, we analyzed the distribution of lipid rafts, revealing plasma membrane microdomains with GM2 and EGF-R enrichment. Following stimulation with EGF/bFGF, neuronal differentiation was observed. To analyze the functional role of lipid rafts in EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation, cells were preincubated with lipid raft affecting agents, i.e. [D]-PDMP or methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These compounds significantly prevented neuronal-specific antigen expression, as well as Akt and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, induced by EGF/bFGF, indicating that lipid raft integrity is essential for EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation. These results suggest that lipid rafts may represent specific chambers, where multimolecular signaling complexes, including lipids (gangliosides, cholesterol) and proteins (EGF-R), play a role in hDPSCs differentiation.

  14. Role of lipid rafts and GM1 in the segregation and processing of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Botto, Laura; Cunati, Diana; Coco, Silvia; Sesana, Silvia; Bulbarelli, Alessandra; Biasini, Emiliano; Colombo, Laura; Negro, Alessandro; Chiesa, Roberto; Masserini, Massimo; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrPC) is highly expressed within the nervous system. Similar to other GPI-anchored proteins, PrPC is found in lipid rafts, membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. PrPC raft association, together with raft lipid composition, appears essential for the conversion of PrPC into the scrapie isoform PrPSc, and the development of prion disease. Controversial findings were reported on the nature of PrPC-containing rafts, as well as on the distribution of PrPC between rafts and non-raft membranes. We investigated PrPC/ganglioside relationships and their influence on PrPC localization in a neuronal cellular model, cerebellar granule cells. Our findings argue that in these cells at least two PrPC conformations coexist: in lipid rafts PrPC is present in the native folding (α-helical), stabilized by chemico-physical condition, while it is mainly present in other membrane compartments in a PrPSc-like conformation. We verified, by means of antibody reactivity and circular dichroism spectroscopy, that changes in lipid raft-ganglioside content alters PrPC conformation and interaction with lipid bilayers, without modifying PrPC distribution or cleavage. Our data provide new insights into the cellular mechanism of prion conversion and suggest that GM1-prion protein interaction at the cell surface could play a significant role in the mechanism predisposing to pathology.

  15. Prdx4 is a compartment-specific H2O2 sensor that regulates neurogenesis by controlling surface expression of GDE2

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ye; Wladyka, Cynthia; Fujii, Junichi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2015-01-01

    Neural progenitors and terminally differentiated neurons show distinct redox profiles, suggesting that coupled-redox cascades regulate the initiation and progression of neuronal differentiation. Discrete cellular compartments have different redox environments and how they contribute to differentiation is unclear. Here we show that Prdx4, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enzyme that metabolizes H2O2, acts as a tunable regulator of neurogenesis via its compartmentalized thiol-oxidative function. Prdx4 ablation causes premature motor neuron differentiation and progenitor depletion, leading to imbalances in subtype-specific motor neurons. GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that induces differentiation by downregulating Notch signalling through surface cleavage of GPI-anchored proteins, is targeted by Prdx4 oxidative activity. Prdx4 dimers generated by H2O2 metabolism oxidize two cysteine residues within the GDE2 enzymatic domain, which blocks GDE2 trafficking to the plasma membrane and prevents GDE2 neurogeneic function. Thus, Prdx4 oxidative activity acts as a sensor to directly couple neuronal differentiation with redox environments in the ER. PMID:25943695

  16. In vitro biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Thierry; Smith, Terry K; Crossman, Arthur; Brimacombe, John S; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2004-12-07

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) represents a mechanism for the attachment of proteins to the plasma membrane found in all eukaryotic cells. GPI biosynthesis has been mainly studied in parasites, yeast, and mammalian cells. Aspergillus fumigatus, a filamentous fungus, produces GPI-anchored molecules, some of them being essential in the construction of the cell wall. An in vitro assay was used to study the GPI biosynthesis in the mycelium form of this organism. In the presence of UDP-GlcNAc and coenzyme A, the cell-free system produces the initial intermediates of the GPI biosynthesis: GlcNAc-PI, GlcN-PI, and GlcN-(acyl)PI. Using GDP-Man, two types of mannosylation are observed. First, one or two mannose residues are added to GlcN-PI. This mannosylation, never described in fungi, does not require dolichol phosphomannoside (Dol-P-Man) as the monosaccharide donor. Second, one to five mannose residues are added to GlcN-(acyl)PI using Dol-P-Man as the mannose donor. The addition of ethanolamine phosphate groups to the first, second, and third mannose residue is also observed. This latter series of GPI intermediates identified in the A. fumigatus cell-free system indicates that GPI biosynthesis in this filamentous fungus is similar to the mammalian or yeast systems. Thus, these biochemical data are in agreement with a comparative genome analysis that shows that all but 3 of the 21 genes described in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPI pathways are found in A. fumigatus.

  17. Cellular Prion Protein: From Physiology to Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Sei-ichi; Oliveira-Martins, José B.; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kikuchi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    The human cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored membrane glycoprotein with two N-glycosylation sites at residues 181 and 197. This protein migrates in several bands by Western blot analysis (WB). Interestingly, PNGase F treatment of human brain homogenates prior to the WB, which is known to remove the N-glycosylations, unexpectedly gives rise to two dominant bands, which are now known as C-terminal (C1) and N-terminal (N1) fragments. This resembles the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer disease (AD), which can be physiologically processed by α-, β-, and γ-secretases. The processing of APP has been extensively studied, while the identity of the cellular proteases involved in the proteolysis of PrPC and their possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the neurotoxicity caused by prion proteins and the blockade of their normal proteolysis. For example, expression of non-cleavable PrPC mutants in transgenic mice generates neurotoxicity, even in the absence of infectious prions, suggesting that PrPC proteolysis is physiologically and pathologically important. As many mouse models of prion diseases have recently been developed and the knowledge about the proteases responsible for the PrPC proteolysis is accumulating, we examine the historical experimental evidence and highlight recent studies that shed new light on this issue. PMID:23202518

  18. Loss of the membrane anchor of the target receptor is a mechanism of bioinsecticide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Darboux, Isabelle; Pauchet, Yannick; Castella, Claude; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Charles, Jean-François; Pauron, David

    2002-01-01

    The mosquitocidal activity of Bacillus sphaericus is because of a binary toxin (Bin), which binds to Culex pipiens maltase 1 (Cpm1), an α-glucosidase present in the midgut of Culex pipiens larvae. In this work, we studied the molecular basis of the resistance to Bin developed by a strain (GEO) of C. pipiens. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization experiments showed that Cpm1 was undetectable in the midgut of GEO larvae, although the gene was correctly transcribed. The sequence of the cpm1GEO cDNA differs from the sequence we previously reported for a susceptible strain (cpm1IP) by seven mutations: six missense mutations and a mutation leading to the premature termination of translation. When produced in insect cells, Cpm1IP was attached to the membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). In contrast, the premature termination of translation of Cpm1GEO resulted in the targeting of the protein to the extracellular compartment because of truncation of the GPI-anchoring site. The interaction between Bin and Cpm1GEO and the enzyme activity of the receptor were not affected. Thus, Bin is not toxic to GEO larvae because it cannot interact with the midgut cell membrane, even though its receptor site is unaffected. This mechanism contrasts with other known resistance mechanisms in which point mutations decrease the affinity of binding between the receptor and the toxin. PMID:11983886

  19. The essential neutral sphingomyelinase is involved in the trafficking of the variant surface glycoprotein in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon A; Smith, Terry K

    2010-01-01

    Sphingomyelin is the main sphingolipid in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the T. brucei neutral sphingomyelinase demonstrates that it is directly involved in sphingomyelin catabolism. Gene knockout studies in the bloodstream form of the parasite indicate that the neutral sphingomyelinase is essential for growth and survival, thus highlighting that the de novo biosynthesis of ceramide is unable to compensate for the loss of sphingomyelin catabolism. The phenotype of the conditional knockout has given new insights into the highly active endocytic and exocytic pathways in the bloodstream form of T. brucei. Hence, the formation of ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum affects post-Golgi sorting and rate of deposition of newly synthesized GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein on the cell surface. This directly influences the corresponding rate of endocytosis, via the recycling endosomes, of pre-existing cell surface variant surface glycoprotein. The trypanosomes use this coupled endocytic and exocytic mechanism to maintain the cell density of its crucial variant surface glycoprotein protective coat. TbnSMase is therefore genetically validated as a drug target against African trypanosomes, and suggests that interfering with the endocytic transport of variant surface glycoprotein is a highly desirable strategy for drug development against African trypanosomasis. PMID:20398210

  20. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  1. The disruption of GDP-fucose de novo biosynthesis suggests the presence of a novel fucose-containing glycoconjugate in Plasmodium asexual blood stages.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Sílvia; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Bandini, Giulia; Damerow, Sebastian; Absalon, Sabrina; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Samuelson, John; Izquierdo, Luis

    2016-11-16

    Glycosylation is an important posttranslational protein modification in all eukaryotes. Besides glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors and N-glycosylation, O-fucosylation has been recently reported in key sporozoite proteins of the malaria parasite. Previous analyses showed the presence of GDP-fucose (GDP-Fuc), the precursor for all fucosylation reactions, in the blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. The GDP-Fuc de novo pathway, which requires the action of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-L-fucose synthase (FS), is conserved in the parasite genome, but the importance of fucose metabolism for the parasite is unknown. To functionally characterize the pathway we generated a PfGMD mutant and analyzed its phenotype. Although the labelling by the fucose-binding Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) was completely abrogated, GDP-Fuc was still detected in the mutant. This unexpected result suggests the presence of an alternative mechanism for maintaining GDP-Fuc in the parasite. Furthermore, PfGMD null mutant exhibited normal growth and invasion rates, revealing that the GDP-Fuc de novo metabolic pathway is not essential for the development in culture of the malaria parasite during the asexual blood stages. Nonetheless, the function of this metabolic route and the GDP-Fuc pool that is generated during this stage may be important for gametocytogenesis and sporogonic development in the mosquito.

  2. The disruption of GDP-fucose de novo biosynthesis suggests the presence of a novel fucose-containing glycoconjugate in Plasmodium asexual blood stages

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Sílvia; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Bandini, Giulia; Damerow, Sebastian; Absalon, Sabrina; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Samuelson, John; Izquierdo, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is an important posttranslational protein modification in all eukaryotes. Besides glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors and N-glycosylation, O-fucosylation has been recently reported in key sporozoite proteins of the malaria parasite. Previous analyses showed the presence of GDP-fucose (GDP-Fuc), the precursor for all fucosylation reactions, in the blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. The GDP-Fuc de novo pathway, which requires the action of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-L-fucose synthase (FS), is conserved in the parasite genome, but the importance of fucose metabolism for the parasite is unknown. To functionally characterize the pathway we generated a PfGMD mutant and analyzed its phenotype. Although the labelling by the fucose-binding Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) was completely abrogated, GDP-Fuc was still detected in the mutant. This unexpected result suggests the presence of an alternative mechanism for maintaining GDP-Fuc in the parasite. Furthermore, PfGMD null mutant exhibited normal growth and invasion rates, revealing that the GDP-Fuc de novo metabolic pathway is not essential for the development in culture of the malaria parasite during the asexual blood stages. Nonetheless, the function of this metabolic route and the GDP-Fuc pool that is generated during this stage may be important for gametocytogenesis and sporogonic development in the mosquito. PMID:27849032

  3. Unraveling the neuroprotective mechanisms of PrPC in excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Franc; del Río, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the natural roles of cellular prion protein (PrPC) is essential to an understanding of the molecular basis of prion pathologies. This GPI-anchored protein has been described in synaptic contacts, and loss of its synaptic function in complex systems may contribute to the synaptic loss and neuronal degeneration observed in prionopathy. In addition, Prnp knockout mice show enhanced susceptibility to several excitotoxic insults, GABAA receptor-mediated fast inhibition was weakened, LTP was modified and cellular stress increased. Although little is known about how PrPC exerts its function at the synapse or the downstream events leading to PrPC-mediated neuroprotection against excitotoxic insults, PrPC has recently been reported to interact with two glutamate receptor subunits (NR2D and GluR6/7). In both cases the presence of PrPC blocks the neurotoxicity induced by NMDA and Kainate respectively. Furthermore, signals for seizure and neuronal cell death in response to Kainate in Prnp knockout mouse are associated with JNK3 activity, through enhancing the interaction of GluR6 with PSD-95. In combination with previous data, these results shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind the role of PrPC in excitotoxicity. Future experimental approaches are suggested and discussed. PMID:22437735

  4. Incorporation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Granulocyte- Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor or CD40 Ligand Enhances Immunogenicity of Chimeric Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Like Particles▿

    PubMed Central

    Skountzou, Ioanna; Quan, Fu-Shi; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Ye, Ling; Vzorov, Andrei; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Jacob, Joshy; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2007-01-01

    The rapid worldwide spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mandates the development of successful vaccination strategies. Since live attenuated HIV is not accepted as a vaccine due to safety concerns, virus-like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive safe alternative because they lack the viral genome yet they are perceived by the immune system as a virus particle. We hypothesized that adding immunostimulatory signals to VLPs would enhance their efficacy. To accomplish this we generated chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) VLPs containing either glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or CD40 ligand (CD40L) and investigated their biological activity and ability to enhance immune responses in vivo. Immunization of mice with chimeric SIV VLPs containing GM-CSF induced SIV Env-specific antibodies as well as neutralizing activity at significantly higher levels than those induced by standard SIV VLPs, SIV VLPs containing CD40L, or standard VLPs mixed with soluble GM-CSF. In addition, mice immunized with chimeric SIV VLPs containing either GM-CSF or CD40L showed significantly increased CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell responses to SIV Env, compared to standard SIV VLPs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the incorporation of immunostimulatory molecules enhances humoral and cellular immune responses. We propose that anchoring immunostimulatory molecules into SIV VLPs can be a promising approach to augmenting the efficacy of VLP antigens. PMID:17108046

  5. Cripto recruits Furin and PACE4 and controls Nodal trafficking during proteolytic maturation.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Marie-Hélène; Le Good, J Ann; Mesnard, Daniel; Oorschot, Viola; Baflast, Stéphane; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Klumperman, Judith; Constam, Daniel B

    2008-10-08

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteoglycan Cripto binds Nodal and its type I receptor Alk4 to activate Smad2,3 transcription factors, but a role during Nodal precursor processing has not been described. We show that Cripto also binds the proprotein convertases Furin and PACE4 and localizes Nodal processing at the cell surface. When coexpressed as in early embryonic cells, Cripto and uncleaved Nodal already associated during secretion, and a Cripto-interacting region in the Nodal propeptide potentiated the effect of proteolytic maturation on Nodal signalling. Disruption of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by brefeldin A blocked secretion, but export of Cripto and Nodal to the cell surface was not inhibited, indicating that Nodal is exposed to extracellular convertases before entering the TGN/endosomal system. Density fractionation and antibody uptake experiments showed that Cripto guides the Nodal precursor in detergent-resistant membranes to endocytic microdomains marked by GFP-Flotillin. We conclude that Nodal processing and endocytosis are coupled in signal-receiving cells.

  6. High polymorphism in Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-5 (MSP5).

    PubMed

    Gomez, A; Suarez, C F; Martinez, P; Saravia, C; Patarroyo, M A

    2006-12-01

    A key issue relating to developing multi-component anti-malarial vaccines, lies in studying Plasmodium vivax surface proteins' genetic variation. The present work was aimed at amplifying, cloning and sequencing the gene encoding P. vivax merozoite surface protein 5 (PvMSP5) in samples obtained from infected patients from Colombian areas having varying malaria transmission rates. Nucleotide sequence data reported in this paper are available in the GenBank, EMBL and DDBJ databases under Accessions numbers DQ341586 to DQ341601. Our results have revealed that PvMSP5 is one of the P. vivax surface proteins having greater polymorphism, this being restricted to specific protein regions. The intron and exon II (which includes the GPI anchor and EGF-like domain) were both highly conserved when compared to exon I; exon I displayed the greatest variation and most of the recombination events occurred within it. No geographical grouping was observed. The Nei-Gojobori test revealed significant positive selection in the samples analysed here, whereas Tajima and Fu and Li tests presented a neutral selection pattern. The results reflected a localized variation pattern, recombination between PvMSP5 alleles and also functional and immune pressures, where stronger selective forces might be acting on exon I than on exon II, suggesting that the latter could be an important region to be included in an anti-malarial vaccine.

  7. Semaphorin7A and its receptors: pleiotropic regulators of immune cell function, bone homeostasis, and neural development.

    PubMed

    Jongbloets, Bart C; Ramakers, Geert M J; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    Semaphorins form a large, evolutionary conserved family of cellular guidance signals. The semaphorin family contains several secreted and transmembrane proteins, but only one GPI-anchored member, Semaphorin7A (Sema7A). Although originally identified in immune cells, as CDw108, Sema7A displays widespread expression outside the immune system. It is therefore not surprising that accumulating evidence supports roles for this protein in a wide variety of biological processes in different organ systems and in disease. Well-characterized biological effects of Sema7A include those during bone and immune cell regulation, neuron migration and neurite growth. These effects are mediated by two receptors, plexinC1 and integrins. However, most of what is known today about Sema7A signaling concerns Sema7A-integrin interactions. Here, we review our current knowledge of Sema7A function and signaling in different organ systems, highlighting commonalities between the cellular effects and signaling pathways activated by Sema7A in different cell types. Furthermore, we discuss a potential role for Sema7A in disease and provide directions for further research.

  8. Assembly and deacetylation of N-acetylglucosaminyl-plasmanylinositol in normal and affected paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Shinichi; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Medof, M.D. ); Hazra, S.V. )

    1991-05-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is anchored in cell membranes by a glycosyl-plasmanylinositol (GPI) moiety that is transferred to it en bloc in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. To analyze the biochemical reactions involved in preassembly of this structure, a human hematopoietic cell-free system was employed. Incubation of cell extracts with UDP-({sup 3}H)GlcNAc and butanol partitioning of reaction mixtures yielded two products similar in TLC mobility to intermediates described in Trypanoxoma brucei. Both species were sensitive to Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, indicative of association of ({sup 3}H)GlcNAc label with a plasmanylinositol-containing acceptor. Kinetic and pulse-chase experiments indicated that the slower-migrating species was a product of the faster and that it, but not the faster, was sensitive to both GPI-specific phospholipase D and nitrous acid deamination, consistent with conversion of GlcNAc- to GlcN-plasmanylinositol. Lysates of normal and of affected blood leukocytes from two paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) patients supported assembly of the two intermediates within 1 min. Thus, the initial enzymes mediating human GPI-anchor assembly are GlcNAc-plasmanylinositol transferase and GlcNAc-plasmanylinositol deacetylase, their substrates contain plasmanylinositols, and the products of their activities are normal in affected PNH cells.

  9. Golgi sorting regulates organization and activity of GPI-proteins at apical membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tivodar, Simona; Formiggini, Fabio; Ossato, Giulia; Gratton, Enrico; Tramier, Marc; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Here, we combined classical biochemistry with novel biophysical approaches to study with high spatial and temporal resolution the organization of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) at the plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells. We show that in polarized MDCK cells, following sorting in the Golgi, each GPI-AP reaches the apical surface in homo-clusters. Golgi-derived homo-clusters are required for their subsequent plasma membrane organization into cholesterol-dependent hetero-clusters. By contrast, in non-polarized MDCK cells GPI-APs are delivered to the surface as monomers in an unpolarized manner and are not able to form hetero-clusters. We further demonstrate that this GPI-AP organization is regulated by the content of cholesterol in the Golgi apparatus and is required to maintain the functional state of the protein at the apical membrane. Thus, different from fibroblasts, in polarized epithelial cells a selective cholesterol-dependent sorting mechanism in the Golgi regulates both the organization and the function of GPI-APs at the apical surface. PMID:24681536

  10. Rapid activity-dependent delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface of neurons in intact Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Cantallops, Isabel; Cline, Hollis T

    2008-05-01

    CPG15 (aka neuritin) is an activity-induced GPI-anchored axonal protein that promotes dendritic and axonal growth, and accelerates synaptic maturation in vivo. Here we show that CPG15 is distributed inside axons and on the axon surface. CPG15 is trafficked to and from the axonal surface by membrane depolarization. To assess CPG15 trafficking in vivo, we expressed an ecliptic pHluorin (EP)-CPG15 fusion protein in optic tectal explants and in retinal ganglion cells of intact Xenopus tadpoles. Depolarization by KCl increased EP-CPG15 fluorescence on axons. Intraocular kainic acid (KA) injection rapidly increased cell-surface EP-CPG15 in retinotectal axons, but coinjection of TTX and KA did not. Consistent with this, we find that intracellular CPG15 is localized to vesicles and endosomes in presynaptic terminals and colocalizes with synaptic vesicle proteins. The results indicate that the delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface can be regulated on a rapid time scale by activity-dependent mechanisms in vivo.

  11. The IgLON Family Member Negr1 Promotes Neuronal Arborization Acting as Soluble Factor via FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Pischedda, Francesca; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    IgLON proteins are GPI anchored adhesion molecules that control neurite outgrowth. In particular, Negr1 down-regulation negatively influences neuronal arborization in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that the metalloprotease ADAM10 releases Negr1 from neuronal membrane. Ectodomain shedding influences several neuronal mechanisms, including survival, synaptogenesis, and the formation of neurite trees. By combining morphological analysis and virus-mediated selective protein silencing in primary murine cortical neurons, we found that pharmacologically inhibition of ADAM10 results in an impairment of neurite tree maturation that can be rescued upon treatment with soluble Negr1. Furthermore, we report that released Negr1 influences neurite outgrowth in a P-ERK1/2 and FGFR2 dependent manner. Together our findings suggest a role for Negr1 in regulating neurite outgrowth through the modulation of FGFR2 signaling pathway. Given the physiological and pathological role of ADAM10, Negr1, and FGFR2, the regulation of Negr1 shedding may play a crucial role in sustaining brain function and development. PMID:26793057

  12. Intraspecies Variation in Trypanosoma cruzi GPI-Mucins: Biological Activities and Differential Expression of α-Galactosyl Residues

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rodrigo P.; Torrecilhas, Ana C.; Assis, Rafael R.; Rocha, Marcele N.; Moura e Castro, Felipe A.; Freitas, Gustavo F.; Murta, Silvane M.; Santos, Sara L.; Marques, Alexandre F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Romanha, Alvaro J.

    2012-01-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored mucins of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes play an important immunomodulatory role during the course of Chagas disease. Here, some biological activities of tGPI-mucins from four T. cruzi isolates, including benznidazole-susceptible (BZS-Y), benznidazole-resistant (BZR-Y), CL, and Colombiana, were evaluated. GPI-mucins were able to differentially trigger the production of interleukin-12 and nitric oxide in BALB/c macrophages and modulate LLC-MK2 cell invasion. The significance of these variations was assessed after analysis of the terminal α-galactosyl residues. Enzymatic treatment with α-galactosidase indicated a differential expression of O-linked α-galactosyl residues among the strains, with higher expression of this sugar in BZS-Y and BZR-Y T. cruzi populations followed by Colombiana and CL. Unweighted pair group method analysis of the carbohydrate anchor profile and biological parameters allowed the clustering of two groups. One group includes Y and CL strains (T. cruzi II and VI), and the other group is represented by Colombiana strain (T. cruzi I). PMID:22764297

  13. Dissociation of recombinant prion autocatalysis from infectivity.

    PubMed

    Noble, Geoffrey P; Supattapone, Surachai

    2015-01-01

    Within the mammalian prion field, the existence of recombinant prion protein (PrP) conformers with self-replicating (ie. autocatalytic) activity in vitro but little to no infectious activity in vivo challenges a key prediction of the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication--that autocatalytic PrP conformers should be infectious. To understand this dissociation of autocatalysis from infectivity, we recently performed a structural and functional comparison between a highly infectious and non-infectious pair of autocatalytic recombinant PrP conformers derived from the same initial prion strain. (1) We identified restricted, C-terminal structural differences between these 2 conformers and provided evidence that these relatively subtle differences prevent the non-infectious conformer from templating the conversion of native PrP(C) substrates containing a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. (1) In this article we discuss a model, consistent with these findings, in which recombinant PrP, lacking post-translational modifications and associated folding constraints, is capable of adopting a wide variety of autocatalytic conformations. Only a subset of these recombinant conformers can be adopted by post-translationally modified native PrP(C), and this subset represents the recombinant conformers with high specific infectivity. We examine this model's implications for the generation of highly infectious recombinant prions and the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication.

  14. Discovery of GAMA, a Plasmodium falciparum merozoite micronemal protein, as a novel blood-stage vaccine candidate antigen.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Thangavelu U; Takeo, Satoru; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Thonkukiatkul, Amporn; Miura, Kazutoyo; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Zhou, Hong; Long, Carole A; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Thompson, Jennifer; Wilson, Danny W; Beeson, James G; Healer, Julie; Crabb, Brendan S; Cowman, Alan F; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-11-01

    One of the solutions for reducing the global mortality and morbidity due to malaria is multivalent vaccines comprising antigens of several life cycle stages of the malarial parasite. Hence, there is a need for supplementing the current set of malaria vaccine candidate antigens. Here, we aimed to characterize glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored micronemal antigen (GAMA) encoded by the PF08_0008 gene in Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies were raised against recombinant GAMA synthesized by using a wheat germ cell-free system. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated for the first time that GAMA is a microneme protein of the merozoite. Erythrocyte binding assays revealed that GAMA possesses an erythrocyte binding epitope in the C-terminal region and it binds a nonsialylated protein receptor on human erythrocytes. Growth inhibition assays revealed that anti-GAMA antibodies can inhibit P. falciparum invasion in a dose-dependent manner and GAMA plays a role in the sialic acid (SA)-independent invasion pathway. Anti-GAMA antibodies in combination with anti-erythrocyte binding antigen 175 exhibited a significantly higher level of invasion inhibition, supporting the rationale that targeting of both SA-dependent and SA-independent ligands/pathways is better than targeting either of them alone. Human sera collected from areas of malaria endemicity in Mali and Thailand recognized GAMA. Since GAMA in P. falciparum is refractory to gene knockout attempts, it is essential to parasite invasion. Overall, our study indicates that GAMA is a novel blood-stage vaccine candidate antigen.

  15. The Evolutionary History of Daphniid α-Carbonic Anhydrase within Animalia

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Billy W.; Morton, Philip K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive acid-base regulation in organisms is important, especially for organisms in aquatic habitats that experience rapidly fluctuating pH conditions. Previous studies have shown that carbonic anhydrases (CAs), a family of zinc metalloenzymes, are responsible for acid-base regulation in many organisms. Through the use of phylogenetic tools, this present study attempts to elucidate the evolutionary history of the α-CA superfamily, with particular interest in the emerging model aquatic organism Daphnia pulex. We provide one of the most extensive phylogenies of the evolution of α-CAs, with the inclusion of 261 amino acid sequences across taxa ranging from Cnidarians to Homo sapiens. While the phylogeny supports most of our previous understanding on the relationship of how α-CAs have evolved, we find that, contrary to expectations, amino acid conservation with bacterial α-CAs supports the supposition that extracellular α-CAs are the ancestral state of animal α-CAs. Furthermore, we show that two cytosolic and one GPI-anchored α-CA in Daphnia genus have homologs in sister taxa that are possible candidate genes to study for acid-base regulation. In addition, we provide further support for previous findings of a high rate of gene duplication within Daphnia genus, as compared with other organisms. PMID:25893130

  16. Isomaltulose production via yeast surface display of sucrose isomerase from Enterobacter sp. FMB-1 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gil-Yong; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Hansin, Jantra; Ha, Suk-Jin; Cha, Jaeho; Kim, Yong-Sung; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2011-10-01

    The gene encoding sucrose isomerase from Enterobacter sp. FMB-1 species (ESI) was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY100 using a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attachment signal sequence. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the localization of ESI on the yeast cell surface. The displayed ESI (dESI) was stable at a broad range of temperatures (35-55 °C) and pHs (pH 5-7) with optimal temperature and pH at 45 °C and pH 7.0, respectively. In addition, the thermostability of the dESI was significantly enhanced compared with the recombinant ESI expressed in Escherichia coli. Biotransformation of sucrose to isomaltulose was observed in various ranges of substrate concentrations (50-250 mM) with a 6.4-7.4% conversion yield. It suggested that the bioconversion of sucrose to isomaltulose can be successfully performed by the dESI on the surface of host S. cerevisiae.

  17. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    PubMed Central

    West, Ewan; Osborne, Craig; Nolan, William; Bate, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage. PMID:26043272

  18. Microvesicles released constitutively from prostate cancer cells differ biochemically and functionally to stimulated microvesicles released through sublytic C5b-9

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Dan; Moore, Colin; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Lange, Sigrun; Inal, Jameel

    2015-05-08

    We have classified microvesicles into two subtypes: larger MVs released upon stimulation of prostate cancer cells, sMVs, and smaller cMVs, released constitutively. cMVs are released as part of cell metabolism and sMVs, released at 10-fold higher levels, produced upon activation, including sublytic C5b-9. From electron microscopy, nanosight tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering and flow cytometry, cMVs (194–210 nm in diameter) are smaller than sMVs (333–385 nm). Furthermore, using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf) that equate to mass deposited on a sensor, an sMV and a cMV are estimated at 0.267 and 0.241 pg, respectively. sMVs carry more calcium and protein, express higher levels of lipid rafts, GPI-anchored CD55 and phosphatidylserine including deposited C5b-9 compared to cMVs. This may allude to biological differences such as increased bound C4BP on sMVs inhibiting complement more effectively. - Highlights: • Prostate cells release microvesicles constitutively (cMVs) or upon stimulus (sMVs). • sMVs are larger than cMVs and carry more protein, lipid rafts and surface PstSer. • sMVs inhibit complement more effectively than cMVs.

  19. Pathogenesis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiko

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired GPI deficiency caused by somatic mutation of the PIGA gene in one or several hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, PNH caused by somatic mutation of one allele of the PIGT gene in combination with a germline mutation of the other allele was reported, showing that PIGA is not the only gene responsible for PNH, though other causes are rare. These mutant cells become GPI deficient, expand clonally and differentiate into all of the hematopoietic lineages. When GPI deficient erythrocytes increase in proportion, massive hemolysis occurs due to activated complement attack during infection. As the complement regulatory proteins such as CD59 and DAF are GPI anchored proteins, they are defective on GPI deficient erythrocytes and these abnormal erythrocytes are thereby left unprotected from complement attack. Hemolytic anemia, venous thrombosis, and bone marrow failure are thus the resulting triad of symptoms. Clonal expansion does not occur with PIGA deficiency alone. We hypothesize that PIGA deficient cells acquire a proliferative phenotype via additional gene mutations within the associated environment of bone marrow failure. This hypothesis will be explained by introducing recent reports.

  20. Effect of refractive index on the fluorescence lifetime of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Tregidgo, Carolyn; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The average fluorescence lifetime of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in solution is a function of the refractive index of its environment. We report that this is also the case for GFP-tagged proteins in cells. Using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC)-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a confocal scanning microscope, images of GFP-tagged proteins in cells suspended in different refractive index media are obtained. It is found that the average fluorescence lifetime of GFP decreases on addition of glycerol or sucrose to the media in which the fixed cells are suspended. The inverse GFP lifetime is proportional to the refractive index squared. This is the case for GFP-tagged major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins with the GFP located inside the cytoplasm, and also for GPI-anchored GFP that is located outside the cell membrane. The implications of these findings are discussed with regard to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques where the change in refractive index is crucial in producing an evanescent wave to excite fluorophores near a glass interface. Our findings show that the GFP fluorescence lifetime is shortened in TIRF microscopy in comparison to confocal microscopy.

  1. Folate Receptor-Targeted Diagnostics and Therapeutics for Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, an innate immune response mediated by macrophages, forms the first line of defence to protect our body from the invasion of various pathogens. Although inflammation is a defensive response, chronic inflammation has been regarded as the major cause of many types of human diseases such as inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, cancers, neurological diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Folate receptor (FR) is a cell surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein, and its three isoforms, FR-α, FR-β, and FR-γ, are found in humans. Interestingly, FRs are highly expressed on a variety of cells, including cancer cells and activated macrophages, whereas their expression on normal cells is undetectable, indicating that FR-targeting could be a good selective strategy for the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of cancers and activated macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. Previous studies successfully showed FR-targeted imaging of many types of cancers in animal models as well as human patients. Recently, a number of emerging studies have found that activated macrophages, which are critical players for a variety of inflammatory diseases, highly express FRs, and selective targeting of these FR-positive activated macrophages is a good approach to diagnose and treat inflammatory diseases. In this review, we describe the characteristics and structure of FRs, and further discuss FR-targeted diagnostics and therapeutics of human diseases, in particular, activated macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:28035209

  2. Loss of LORELEI function in the pistil delays initiation but does not affect embryo development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Double fertilization, uniquely observed in plants, requires successful sperm cell delivery by the pollen tube to the female gametophyte, followed by migration, recognition and fusion of the two sperm cells with two female gametic cells. The female gametophyte not only regulates these steps but also controls the subsequent initiation of seed development. Previously, we reported that loss of LORELEI, which encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, in the female reproductive tissues causes a delay in initiation of seed development. From these studies, however, it was unclear if embryos derived from fertilization of lre-5 gametophytes continued to lag behind wild-type during seed development. Additionally, it was not determined if the delay in initiation of seed development had any lingering effects during seed germination. Finally, it was not known if loss of LORELEI function affects seedling development given that LORELEI is expressed in eight-day-old seedlings. Here, we showed that despite a delay in initiation, lre-5/lre-5 embryos recover, becoming equivalent to the developing wild-type embryos beginning at 72 hours after pollination. Additionally, lre-5/lre-5 seed germination, and seedling and root development are indistinguishable from wild-type indicating that loss of LORELEI is tolerated, at least under standard growth conditions, in vegetative tissues. PMID:21051955

  3. Structural characterization of NETNES glycopeptide from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Carla G; Verli, Hugo

    2013-05-24

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan, responsible for Chagas disease, that parasites triatomines and some vertebrates, mainly Homo sapiens. In 2010, nearly 10 million people in whole world, most from Latin America, had Chagas disease, which is an illness of high morbidity, low mortality, and serious problems of quality of life. The available treatment has high toxicity and low efficacy at chronic phase. Some of the protozoan antigenic or virulence factors include complex carbohydrate structures that, due to their uniqueness, may constitute potential selective targets for the development of new treatments. One example of such structures is NETNES, a low abundance T. cruzi glycopeptide, comprising 13 amino acid residues, one or two N-glycosylation chains, a GPI anchor and two P-glycosylations. In this context, the current work aims to obtain an atomic model for NETNES, including its glycan chains and membrane attachment, in order to contribute in the characterization of its structure and dynamics. Based on POPC and GPI models built in agreement with experimental data, our results indicate that, in the first third of the simulation, NETNES peptide is very flexible in solution, bending itself between asparagine residues and lying down on some carbohydrates and membrane, exposing amino acid residues and some other glycans, mainly terminal mannoses, to the extracellular medium, remaining in this position until the end of simulations.

  4. Tetherin is an exosomal tether

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, James R; Manna, Paul T; Nishimura, Shinichi; Banting, George; Robinson, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that are released when endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane. They have been implicated in various functions in both health and disease, including intercellular communication, antigen presentation, prion transmission, and tumour cell metastasis. Here we show that inactivating the vacuolar ATPase in HeLa cells causes a dramatic increase in the production of exosomes, which display endocytosed tracers, cholesterol, and CD63. The exosomes remain clustered on the cell surface, similar to retroviruses, which are attached to the plasma membrane by tetherin. To determine whether tetherin also attaches exosomes, we knocked it out and found a 4-fold reduction in plasma membrane-associated exosomes, with a concomitant increase in exosomes discharged into the medium. This phenotype could be rescued by wild-type tetherin but not tetherin lacking its GPI anchor. We propose that tetherin may play a key role in exosome fate, determining whether they participate in long-range or short-range interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17180.001 PMID:27657169

  5. Identification and characterization of a Fc receptor activity on the Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite.

    PubMed

    Vercammen, M; el Bouhdidi, A; Ben Messaoud, A; de Meuter, F; Bazin, H; Dubremetz, J F; Carlier, Y

    1998-01-01

    The Immunoglobulin (Ig) binding capacity of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites was investigated using fluorescence flow-cytometry analysis. Polyclonal mouse, human and rat immunoglobulins without specific anti-Toxoplasma activity bound to parasites in a concentration-dependent manner, saturating them at circulating serum concentrations. The immunoglobulin class and subclass specificity of binding was investigated using irrelevant monoclonal antibodies. IgM, IgA and IgG reacted with the parasite membrane. The attachment of mouse IgM to the parasite surface was hampered by mouse IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. The binding of mouse IgG was proportionally reduced with increasing concentrations of mouse monoclonal IgM. The binding of murine immunoglobulin was diminished when in presence of human IgG. Purified Fc- but not Fab portions of immunoglobulins, fixed to parasites. Using labelled calibrated beads, the Ig binding capacity of parasites was estimated to be 6900 +/- 500 sites per tachyzoite. The Kd of the T. gondii Fc Receptor (FcR) activity was determined at 1.4 +/- 0.1 microM (mean +/- SEM). Such FcR activity was reduced by phospholipase C, trypsin and pronase treatment of the parasites. These data show a low affinity FcR activity on T. gondii tachyzoites which recognizes Ig of different species and isotypes and is likely supported by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface protein of the parasite.

  6. Extraneural manifestations of prion infection in GPI-anchorless transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew M.; Paulsson, Johan F.; Cruite, Justin; Andaya, Abegail A.; Trifilo, Matthew J.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2011-03-01

    Earlier studies indicated that transgenic (tg) mice engineered to express prion protein (PrP) lacking the glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI{sup -/-}) membrane anchor formed abnormal proteinase-resistant prion (PrPsc) amyloid deposits in their brains and hearts when infected with the RML strain of murine scrapie. In contrast, RML scrapie infection of normal mice with a GPI-anchored PrP did not deposit amyloid with PrPsc in the brain or the heart. Here we report that scrapie-infected GPI{sup -/-} PrP tg mice also deposit PrP and transmissible infectious material in the gut, kidneys, and islets of Langerhans. Similar to previously reported amyloid deposits in the brain and heart, amyloid deposits were found in the gut; however, no amyloid deposited in the islets. By high-resolution electron microscopy, we show PrP is located primarily in {alpha} cells and also {beta} cells. Islets contain abundant insulin and there is no abnormality in glucose metabolism in infected GPI{sup -/-} PrP tg mice.

  7. Identification and characterization of Aedes aegypti aminopeptidase N as a putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11A toxin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Pan, Songqin; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, which is used worldwide to control Aedes aegypti larvae, produces Cry11Aa and other toxins during sporulation. In this study, pull-down assays were performed using biotinylated Cry11Aa toxin and solubilized brush border membrane vesicles prepared from midguts of Aedes larvae. Three of the eluted proteins were identified as aminopeptidease N (APN), one of which was a 140 kDa protein, named AaeAPN1 (AAEL 012778 in VectorBase). This protein localizes to the apical side of posterior midgut epithelial cells of larva. The full-length AaeAPN1 was cloned and expressed in E. coli and in Sf21 cells. AaeAPN1 protein expressed in Sf21 cells was enzymatically active, had a GPI-anchor but did not bind Cry11Aa. A truncated AaeAPN1, however, binds Cry11Aa with high affinity, and also Cry11Ba but with lower affinity. BBMV but not Sf21 expressed AaeAPN1 can be detected by wheat germ agglutinin suggesting the native but Sf21 cell expressed APN1 contains N-acetylglucosamine moieties. PMID:19698787

  8. Urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) as a new therapeutic target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montuori, Nunzia; Pesapane, Ada; Rossi, Francesca W; Giudice, Valentina; De Paulis, Amato; Selleri, Carmine; Ragno, Pia

    2016-01-01

    The urokinase (uPA)-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored receptor that focuses urokinase (uPA) proteolytic activity on the cell surface. uPAR also regulates cell adhesion, migration and proliferation, protects from apoptosis and contributes to epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), independently of uPA enzymatic activity. Indeed, uPAR interacts with beta1, beta2 and beta3 integrins, thus regulating their activities. uPAR cross-talks with receptor tyrosine kinases through integrins and regulates cancer cell dormancy, proliferation and angiogenesis. Moreover, uPAR mediates uPA-dependent cell migration and chemotaxis induced by fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLF), through its association with fMLF-receptors (fMLF-Rs). Further, uPAR is an adhesion receptor because it binds vitronectin (VN), a component of provisional extracellular matrix. High uPAR expression predicts for more aggressive disease in several cancer types for its ability to increase invasion and metastasis. In fact, uPAR has been hypothesized to be the link between tumor cell dormancy and proliferation that usually precedes the onset of metastasis. Thus, inhibiting uPAR could be a feasible approach to affect tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we review the more recent advances in the development of uPAR-targeted anti-cancer therapeutic agents suitable for further optimization or ready for the evaluation in early clinical trials. PMID:27896223

  9. Expression of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand, growth hormone, blocks receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Guesdon, François; Kaabi, Yahia; Riley, Aiden H.; Wilkinson, Ian R.; Gray, Colin; James, David C.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between GH (growth hormone) and GHR (GH receptor). We previously demonstrated that a truncated GHR that possesses a transmembrane domain but no cytoplasmic domain blocks receptor signalling. Based on this observation we investigated the impact of tethering the receptor's extracellular domain to the cell surface using a native lipid GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor. We also investigated the effect of tethering GH, the ligand itself, to the cell surface and demonstrated that tethering either the ecGHR (extracellular domain of GHR) or the ligand itself to the cell membrane via a GPI anchor greatly attenuates signalling. To elucidate the mechanism for this antagonist activity, we used confocal microscopy to examine the fluorescently modified ligand and receptor. GH–GPI was expressed on the cell surface and formed inactive receptor complexes that failed to internalize and blocked receptor activation. In conclusion, contrary to expectation, tethering an agonist to the cell surface can generate an inactive hormone receptor complex that fails to internalize. PMID:23013472

  10. Expression of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand, growth hormone, blocks receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Guesdon, François; Kaabi, Yahia; Riley, Aiden H; Wilkinson, Ian R; Gray, Colin; James, David C; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated the interaction between GH (growth hormone) and GHR (GH receptor). We previously demonstrated that a truncated GHR that possesses a transmembrane domain but no cytoplasmic domain blocks receptor signalling. Based on this observation we investigated the impact of tethering the receptor's extracellular domain to the cell surface using a native lipid GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor. We also investigated the effect of tethering GH, the ligand itself, to the cell surface and demonstrated that tethering either the ecGHR (extracellular domain of GHR) or the ligand itself to the cell membrane via a GPI anchor greatly attenuates signalling. To elucidate the mechanism for this antagonist activity, we used confocal microscopy to examine the fluorescently modified ligand and receptor. GH-GPI was expressed on the cell surface and formed inactive receptor complexes that failed to internalize and blocked receptor activation. In conclusion, contrary to expectation, tethering an agonist to the cell surface can generate an inactive hormone receptor complex that fails to internalize.

  11. Molecular insights into Adgra2/Gpr124 and Reck intracellular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bostaille, Naguissa; Gauquier, Anne; Twyffels, Laure

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adgra2, formerly known as Gpr124, is a key regulator of cerebrovascular development in vertebrates. Together with the GPI-anchored glycoprotein Reck, this adhesion GPCR (aGPCR) stimulates Wnt7-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling to promote brain vascular invasion in an endothelial cell-autonomous manner. Adgra2 and Reck have been proposed to assemble a receptor complex at the plasma membrane, but the molecular modalities of their functional synergy remain to be investigated. In particular, as typically found in aGPCRs, the ectodomain of Adgra2 is rich in protein-protein interaction motifs whose contributions to receptor function are unknown. In opposition to the severe ADGRA2 genetic lesions found in previously generated zebrafish and mouse models, the zebrafish ouchless allele encodes an aberrantly-spliced and inactive receptor lacking a single leucine-rich repeat (LRR) unit within its N-terminus. By characterizing this allele we uncover that, in contrast to all other extracellular domains, the precise composition of the LRR domain determines proper receptor trafficking to the plasma membrane. Using CRISPR/Cas9 engineered cells, we further show that Adgra2 trafficking occurs in a Reck-independent manner and that, similarly, Reck reaches the plasma membrane irrespective of Adgra2 expression or localization, suggesting that the partners meet at the plasma membrane after independent intracellular trafficking events. PMID:27979830

  12. Decreased UDP-GlcNAc levels abrogate proliferation control in EMeg32-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Boehmelt, Guido; Wakeham, Andrew; Elia, Andrew; Sasaki, Takehiko; Plyte, Sue; Potter, Julia; Yang, Yingju; Tsang, Eric; Ruland, Jürgen; Iscove, Norman N.; Dennis, James W.; Mak, Tak W.

    2000-01-01

    The hexosamine pathway provides UDP-N-acetylhexosamine donor substrates used in cytosolic and Golgi-mediated glycosylation of proteins and for formation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, which tether proteins to the outer plasma membrane. We have recently identified the murine glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) acetyltransferase, EMeg32, as a developmentally regulated enzyme on the route to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc). Here we describe embryos and cells that have the EMeg32 gene inactivated by homologous recombination. Homozygous mutant embryos die at around embryonic day (E) 7.5 with a general proliferative delay of development. In vitro differentiated EMeg32–/– ES cells show reduced proliferation. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for EMeg32 exhibit defects in proliferation and adhesiveness, which could be complemented by stable re-expression of EMeg32 or by nutritional restoration of intracellular UDP-GlcNAc levels. Reduced UDP-GlcNAc levels predominantly translated into decreased O-GlcNAc modifications of cytosolic and nuclear proteins. Interestingly, growth-impaired EMeg32–/– MEFs withstand a number of apoptotic stimuli and express activated PKB/AKT. Thus, EMeg32-dependent UDP-GlcNAc levels influence cell cycle progression and susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. PMID:11013212

  13. Oxidized Phospholipids Inhibit the Formation of Cholesterol-Dependent Plasma Membrane Nanoplatforms

    PubMed Central

    Brameshuber, Mario; Sevcsik, Eva; Rossboth, Benedikt K.; Manner, Christina; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Peksel, Begüm; Péter, Mária; Török, Zsolt; Hermetter, Albin; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a single-molecule microscopy method termed TOCCSL (thinning out clusters while conserving stoichiometry of labeling), which allows for direct imaging of stable nanoscopic platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the plasma membrane. As a consensus raft marker, we chose monomeric GFP linked via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor to the cell membrane (mGFP-GPI). With this probe, we previously observed cholesterol-dependent homo-association to nanoplatforms diffusing in the plasma membrane of live CHO cells. Here, we report the release of this homo-association upon addition of 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) or 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, two oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) that are typically present in oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein. We found a dose-response relationship for mGFP-GPI nanoplatform disintegration upon addition of POVPC, correlating with the signal of the apoptosis marker Annexin V-Cy3. Similar concentrations of lysolipid showed no effect, indicating that the observed phenomena were not linked to properties of the lipid bilayer itself. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by NB-19 before addition of POVPC completely abolished nanoplatform disintegration by oxPLs. In conclusion, we were able to determine how oxidized lipid species disrupt mGFP-GPI nanoplatforms in the plasma membrane. Our results favor an indirect mechanism involving acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than a direct interaction of oxPLs with nanoplatform constituents. PMID:26745423

  14. Bioinformatics analysis of transcriptome dynamics during growth in angus cattle longissimus muscle.

    PubMed

    Moisá, Sonia J; Shike, Daniel W; Graugnard, Daniel E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Faulkner, Dan B; Berger, Larry L; Loor, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome dynamics in the longissimus muscle (LM) of young Angus cattle were evaluated at 0, 60, 120, and 220 days from early-weaning. Bioinformatic analysis was performed using the dynamic impact approach (DIA) by means of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) databases. Between 0 to 120 days (growing phase) most of the highly-impacted pathways (eg, ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, drug metabolism, cytochrome P450 and Retinol metabolism) were inhibited. The phase between 120 to 220 days (finishing phase) was characterized by the most striking differences with 3,784 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Analysis of those DEGs revealed that the most impacted KEGG canonical pathway was glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis, which was inhibited. Furthermore, inhibition of calpastatin and activation of tyrosine aminotransferase ubiquitination at 220 days promotes proteasomal degradation, while the concurrent activation of ribosomal proteins promotes protein synthesis. Therefore, the balance of these processes likely results in a steady-state of protein turnover during the finishing phase. Results underscore the importance of transcriptome dynamics in LM during growth.

  15. The Green Gut: Chlorophyll Degradation in the Gut of Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Badgaa, Amarsanaa; Büchler, Rita; Wielsch, Natalie; Walde, Marie; Heintzmann, Rainer; Pauchet, Yannik; Svatos, Ales; Ploss, Kerstin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2015-11-01

    Chlorophylls, the most prominent natural pigments, are part of the daily diet of herbivorous insects. The spectrum of ingested and digested chlorophyll metabolites compares well to the pattern of early chlorophyll-degradation products in senescent plants. Intact chlorophyll is rapidly degraded by proteins in the front- and midgut. Unlike plants, insects convert both chlorophyll a and b into the corresponding catabolites. MALDI-TOF/MS imaging allowed monitoring the distribution of the chlorophyll catabolites along the gut of Spodoptera littoralis larvae. The chlorophyll degradation in the fore- and mid-gut is strongly pH dependent, and requires alkaline conditions. Using LC-MS/MS analysis we identified a lipocalin-type protein in the intestinal fluid of S. littoralis homolog to the chlorophyllide a binding protein from Bombyx mori. Widefield and high-resolution autofluorescence microscopy revealed that the brush border membranes are covered with the chlorophyllide binding protein tightly bound via its GPI-anchor to the gut membrane. A function in defense against gut microbes is discussed.

  16. Disulfide Bond Formation and N-Glycosylation Modulate Protein-Protein Interactions in GPI-Transamidase (GPIT)

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lina; Bozkurt, Gunes; Li, Qiubai; Lo, Stanley; Menon, Anant K.; Wu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) transamidase (GPIT), the enzyme that attaches GPI anchors to proteins as they enter the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, is a membrane-bound hetero-pentameric complex consisting of Gpi8, Gpi16, Gaa1, Gpi17 and Gab1. Here, we expressed and purified the luminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) Gpi8 using different expression systems, and examined its interaction with insect cell expressed luminal domain of S. cerevisiae Gpi16. We found that the N-terminal caspase-like domain of Gpi8 forms a disulfide-linked dimer, which is strengthened by N-glycosylation. The non-core domain of Gpi8 following the caspase-like domain inhibits this dimerization. In contrast to the previously reported disulfide linkage between Gpi8 and Gpi16 in human and trypanosome GPIT, our data show that the luminal domains of S. cerevisiae Gpi8 and S. cerevisiae Gpi16 do not interact directly, nor do they form a disulfide bond in the intact S. cerevisiae GPIT. Our data suggest that subunit interactions within the GPIT complex from different species may vary, a feature that should be taken into account in future structural and functional studies. PMID:28374821

  17. Chemical synthesis and functionalization of clickable glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Benjamin M; Guo, Zhongwu

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchorage is a common posttranslational modification of eukaryotic proteins. Chemical synthesis of structurally defined GPIs and GPI derivatives is a necessary step toward understanding the properties and functions of these molecules in biological systems. In this work, the synthesis of several functionalized GPI anchors was accomplished using the para-methoxybenzyl (PMB) group for permanent hydroxyl protection, which allowed the incorporation of functionalities that are incompatible with permanent protecting groups traditionally used in carbohydrate synthesis. A flexible convergent-divergent assembly strategy enabled efficient access to a diverse set of target structures, including "clickable" Alkynyl-GPIs 1 and 2 and Azido-GPI 3. For global deprotection, a one-pot reaction was employed to afford the target GPIs in excellent yields (85-97%). Fully deprotected clickable GPIs 2 and 3 were readily conjugated to imaging and affinity probes via Cu(I)-catalyzed and Cu-free strain-promoted [3+2] cycloaddition, respectively, resulting in GPI-Fluor 4 and GPI-Biotin 5.

  18. Crucial role for prion protein membrane anchoring in the neuroinvasion and neural spread of prion infection.

    PubMed

    Klingeborn, Mikael; Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly D; Rosenke, Rebecca; Striebel, James F; Chesebro, Bruce

    2011-02-01

    In nature prion diseases are usually transmitted by extracerebral prion infection, but clinical disease results only after invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). Prion protein (PrP), a host-encoded glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane glycoprotein, is necessary for prion infection and disease. Here, we investigated the role of the anchoring of PrP on prion neuroinvasion by studying various inoculation routes in mice expressing either anchored or anchorless PrP. In control mice with anchored PrP, intracerebral or sciatic nerve inoculation resulted in rapid CNS neuroinvasion and clinical disease (154 to 156 days), and after tongue, ocular, intravenous, or intraperitoneal inoculation, CNS neuroinvasion was only slightly slower (193 to 231 days). In contrast, in anchorless PrP mice, these routes resulted in slow and infrequent CNS neuroinvasion. Only intracerebral inoculation caused brain PrPres, a protease-resistant isoform of PrP, and disease in both types of mice. Thus, anchored PrP was an essential component for the rapid neural spread and CNS neuroinvasion of prion infection.

  19. Cholesterol Balance in Prion Diseases and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hannaoui, Samia; Shim, Su Yeon; Cheng, Yo Ching; Corda, Erica; Gilch, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative disorders of humans and animals. They are characterized by the accumulation of PrPSc, an aberrantly folded isoform of the cellular prion protein PrPC, in the brains of affected individuals. PrPC is a cell surface glycoprotein attached to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) anchor. Specifically, it is associated with lipid rafts, membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphinoglipids. It has been established that inhibition of endogenous cholesterol synthesis disturbs lipid raft association of PrPC and prevents PrPSc accumulation in neuronal cells. Additionally, prion conversion is reduced upon interference with cellular cholesterol uptake, endosomal export, or complexation at the plasma membrane. Altogether, these results demonstrate on the one hand the importance of cholesterol for prion propagation. On the other hand, growing evidence suggests that prion infection modulates neuronal cholesterol metabolism. Similar results were reported in Alzheimer’s disease (AD): whereas amyloid β peptide formation is influenced by cellular cholesterol, levels of cholesterol in the brains of affected individuals increase during the clinical course of the disease. In this review, we summarize commonalities of alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and discuss consequences for neuronal function and therapy of prion diseases and AD. PMID:25419621

  20. Spontaneous generation of anchorless prions in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Jan; Watts, Joel C; Legname, Giuseppe; Oehler, Abby; Lemus, Azucena; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B; Sussman, Joshua; Wille, Holger; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B; Giles, Kurt

    2011-12-27

    Some prion protein mutations create anchorless molecules that cause Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) disease. To model GSS, we generated transgenic mice expressing cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) lacking the glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor, denoted PrP(ΔGPI). Mice overexpressing PrP(ΔGPI) developed a late-onset, spontaneous neurologic dysfunction characterized by widespread amyloid deposition in the brain and the presence of a short protease-resistant PrP fragment similar to those found in GSS patients. In Tg(PrP,ΔGPI) mice, disease onset could be accelerated either by inoculation with brain homogenate prepared from spontaneously ill animals or by coexpression of membrane-anchored, full-length PrP(C). In contrast, coexpression of N-terminally truncated PrP(Δ23-88) did not affect disease progression. Remarkably, disease from ill Tg(PrP,ΔGPI) mice transmitted to mice expressing wild-type PrP(C), indicating the spontaneous generation of prions.

  1. Capture-stabilize approach for membrane protein SPR assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ruiyin; Reczek, David; Brondyk, William

    2014-12-08

    Measuring the binding kinetics of antibodies to intact membrane proteins by surface plasmon resonance has been challenging largely because of the inherent difficulties in capturing membrane proteins on chip surfaces while retaining their native conformation. Here we describe a method in which His-tagged CXCR5, a GPCR, was purified and captured on a Biacore chip surface via the affinity tag. The captured receptor protein was then stabilized on the chip surface by limited cross-linking. The resulting chip surface retained ligand binding activity and was used for monoclonal antibody kinetics assays by a standard Biacore kinetics assay method with a simple low pH regeneration step. We demonstrate the advantages of this whole receptor assay when compared to available peptide-based binding assays. We further extended the application of the capture-stabilize approach to virus-like particles and demonstrated its utility analyzing antibodies against CD52, a GPI-anchored protein, in its native membrane environment. The results are the first demonstration of chemically stabilized chip surfaces for membrane protein SPR assays.

  2. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-PLC in Trypanosoma brucei forms a linear array on the exterior of the flagellar membrane before and after activation.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Orla; Webb, Helena; O'Byrne, Robert; Brabazon, Elaine; Treumann, Achim; Sunter, Jack D; Carrington, Mark; Voorheis, H Paul

    2009-06-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) that cleaves the GPI-anchor of the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG). Its location in trypanosomes has been controversial. Here, using confocal microscopy and surface labelling techniques, we show that the GPI-PLC is located exclusively in a linear array on the outside of the flagellar membrane, close to the flagellar attachment zone, but does not co-localize with the flagellar attachment zone protein, FAZ1. Consequently, the GPI-PLC and the VSG occupy the same plasma membrane leaflet, which resolves the topological problem associated with the cleavage reaction if the VSG and the GPI-PLC were on opposite sides of the membrane. The exterior location requires the enzyme to be tightly regulated to prevent VSG release under basal conditions. During stimulated VSG release in intact cells, the GPI-PLC did not change location, suggesting that the release mechanism involves lateral diffusion of the VSG in the plane of the membrane to the fixed position of the GPI-PLC.

  3. Ras Diffusion Is Sensitive to Plasma Membrane Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, J. Shawn; Drake, Kimberly R.; Remmert, Catha L.; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2005-01-01

    The cell surface contains a variety of barriers and obstacles that slow the lateral diffusion of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins below the theoretical limit imposed by membrane viscosity. How the diffusion of proteins residing exclusively on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane is regulated has been largely unexplored. We show here that the diffusion of the small GTPase Ras is sensitive to the viscosity of the plasma membrane. Using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we examined the diffusion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged HRas, NRas, and KRas in COS-7 cells loaded with or depleted of cholesterol, a well-known modulator of membrane bilayer viscosity. In cells loaded with excess cholesterol, the diffusional mobilities of GFP-HRas, GFP-NRas, and GFP-KRas were significantly reduced, paralleling the behavior of the viscosity-sensitive lipid probes DiIC16 and DiIC18. However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on protein and lipid diffusion in cell membranes were highly dependent on the depletion method used. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin slowed Ras diffusion by a viscosity-independent mechanism, whereas overnight cholesterol depletion slightly increased both protein and lipid diffusion. The ability of Ras to sense membrane viscosity may represent a general feature of proteins residing on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. PMID:15923235

  4. Ras diffusion is sensitive to plasma membrane viscosity.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J Shawn; Drake, Kimberly R; Remmert, Catha L; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2005-08-01

    The cell surface contains a variety of barriers and obstacles that slow the lateral diffusion of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins below the theoretical limit imposed by membrane viscosity. How the diffusion of proteins residing exclusively on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane is regulated has been largely unexplored. We show here that the diffusion of the small GTPase Ras is sensitive to the viscosity of the plasma membrane. Using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we examined the diffusion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged HRas, NRas, and KRas in COS-7 cells loaded with or depleted of cholesterol, a well-known modulator of membrane bilayer viscosity. In cells loaded with excess cholesterol, the diffusional mobilities of GFP-HRas, GFP-NRas, and GFP-KRas were significantly reduced, paralleling the behavior of the viscosity-sensitive lipid probes DiIC(16) and DiIC(18). However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on protein and lipid diffusion in cell membranes were highly dependent on the depletion method used. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin slowed Ras diffusion by a viscosity-independent mechanism, whereas overnight cholesterol depletion slightly increased both protein and lipid diffusion. The ability of Ras to sense membrane viscosity may represent a general feature of proteins residing on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane.

  5. Insight into the exoproteome of the tissue-derived trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, Rayner; Ricart, Carlos; Machado, Mara; Bastos, Izabela; Santana, Jaime; Sousa, Marcelo; Roepstorff, Peter; Charneau, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, one of the major neglected infectious diseases. It has the potential to infect any nucleated mammalian cell. The secreted/excreted protein repertoire released by T. cruzi trypomastigotes is crucial in host-pathogen interactions. In this study, mammalian tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (Y strain) were used to characterize the exoproteome of the infective bloodstream life form. Proteins released into the serum-free culture medium after 3h of incubation were harvested and digested with trypsin. NanoLC-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 540 proteins, the largest set of released proteins identified to date in Trypanosome spp. Bioinformatic analysis predicted most identified proteins as secreted, predominantly by non-classical pathways, and involved in host-cell infection. Some proteins possess predicted GPI-anchor signals, these being mostly trans-sialidases, mucin associated surface proteins and surface glycoproteins. Moreover, we enriched phosphopeptides and glycopeptides from tryptic digests. The majority of identified glycoproteins are trans-sialidases and surface glycoproteins involved in host-parasite interaction. Conversely, most identified phosphoproteins have no Gene Ontology classification. The existence of various proteins related to similar functions in the exoproteome likely reflects this parasite’s enhanced mechanisms for adhesion, invasion and internalization of different host-cell types, and escape from immune defences.

  6. Tritium labelling of a cholesterol amphiphile designed for cell membrane anchoring of proteins.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Balázs; Orbán, Erika; Kele, Zoltán; Tömböly, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane association of proteins can be achieved by the addition of lipid moieties to the polypeptide chain, and such lipid-modified proteins have important biological functions. A class of cell surface proteins contains a complex glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) glycolipid at the C-terminus, and they are accumulated in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, that is, lipid rafts. Semisynthetic lipoproteins prepared from recombinant proteins and designed lipids are valuable probes and model systems of the membrane-associated proteins. Because GPI-anchored proteins can be reinserted into the cell membrane with the retention of the biological function, they are appropriate candidates for preparing models via reduction of the structural complexity. A synthetic headgroup was added to the 3β-hydroxyl group of cholesterol, an essential lipid component of rafts, and the resulting cholesterol derivative was used as a simplified GPI mimetic. In order to quantitate the membrane integrated GPI mimetic after the exogenous addition to live cells, a tritium labelled cholesterol anchor was prepared. The radioactive label was introduced into the headgroup, and the radiolabelled GPI mimetic anchor was obtained with a specific activity of 1.37 TBq/mmol. The headgroup labelled cholesterol derivative was applied to demonstrate the sensitive detection of the cell membrane association of the anchor under in vivo conditions.

  7. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  8. ZCF32, a fungus specific Zn(II)2 Cys6 transcription factor, is a repressor of the biofilm development in the human pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kakade, Pallavi; Sadhale, Parag; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-01-01

    As a human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans can cause a wide variety of disease conditions ranging from superficial to systemic infections. Many of these infections are caused by an inherent ability of the pathogen to form biofilms on medical devices resulting in high mortality. Biofilms formed by C. albicans are a complex consortium of yeast and hyphal cells embedded in an extracellular matrix and are regulated by a network of transcription factors. Here, we report the role of a novel Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor, ZCF32, in the regulation of biofilm formation. Global transcriptome analysis reveals that biofilm development is the most altered pathway in the zcf32 null mutant. To delineate the functional correlation between ZCF32 and biofilm development, we determined the set of genes directly regulated by Zcf32. Our data suggests that Zcf32 regulates biofilm formation by repressing the expression of adhesins, chitinases and a significant number of other GPI-anchored proteins. We establish that there is the lesser recruitment of Zcf32 on the promoters of biofilm genes in biofilm condition compared to the planktonic mode of growth. Taking together, we propose that the transcription factor ZCF32 negatively regulates biofilm development in C. albicans. PMID:27498700

  9. Citrobacter amalonaticus phytase on the cell surface of Pichia pastoris exhibits high pH stability as a promising potential feed supplement.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Lin, Ying; Huang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Liang, Shuli

    2014-01-01

    Phytase expressed and anchored on the cell surface of Pichia pastoris avoids the expensive and time-consuming steps of protein purification and separation. Furthermore, yeast cells with anchored phytase can be used as a whole-cell biocatalyst. In this study, the phytase gene of Citrobacter amalonaticus was fused with the Pichia pastoris glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein homologue GCW61. Phytase exposed on the cell surface exhibits a high activity of 6413.5 U/g, with an optimal temperature of 60°C. In contrast to secreted phytase, which has an optimal pH of 5.0, phytase presented on the cell surface is characterized by an optimal pH of 3.0. Moreover, our data demonstrate that phytase anchored on the cell surface exhibits higher pH stability than its secreted counterpart. Interestingly, our in vitro digestion experiments demonstrate that phytase attached to the cell surface is a more efficient enzyme than secreted phytase.

  10. Citrobacter amalonaticus Phytase on the Cell Surface of Pichia pastoris Exhibits High pH Stability as a Promising Potential Feed Supplement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Lin, Ying; Huang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Liang, Shuli

    2014-01-01

    Phytase expressed and anchored on the cell surface of Pichia pastoris avoids the expensive and time-consuming steps of protein purification and separation. Furthermore, yeast cells with anchored phytase can be used as a whole-cell biocatalyst. In this study, the phytase gene of Citrobacter amalonaticus was fused with the Pichia pastoris glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein homologue GCW61. Phytase exposed on the cell surface exhibits a high activity of 6413.5 U/g, with an optimal temperature of 60°C. In contrast to secreted phytase, which has an optimal pH of 5.0, phytase presented on the cell surface is characterized by an optimal pH of 3.0. Moreover, our data demonstrate that phytase anchored on the cell surface exhibits higher pH stability than its secreted counterpart. Interestingly, our in vitro digestion experiments demonstrate that phytase attached to the cell surface is a more efficient enzyme than secreted phytase. PMID:25490768

  11. The Lipid-Modifying Enzyme SMPDL3B Negatively Regulates Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Leonhard X.; Baumann, Christoph L.; Köberlin, Marielle S.; Snijder, Berend; Gawish, Riem; Shui, Guanghou; Sharif, Omar; Aspalter, Irene M.; Müller, André C.; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Breitwieser, Florian P.; Pichlmair, Andreas; Bruckner, Manuela; Rebsamen, Manuele; Blüml, Stephan; Karonitsch, Thomas; Fauster, Astrid; Colinge, Jacques; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Knapp, Sylvia; Wenk, Markus R.; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid metabolism and receptor-mediated signaling are highly intertwined processes that cooperate to fulfill cellular functions and safeguard cellular homeostasis. Activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) leads to a complex cellular response, orchestrating a diverse range of inflammatory events that need to be tightly controlled. Here, we identified the GPI-anchored Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase, Acid-Like 3B (SMPDL3B) in a mass spectrometry screening campaign for membrane proteins co-purifying with TLRs. Deficiency of Smpdl3b in macrophages enhanced responsiveness to TLR stimulation and profoundly changed the cellular lipid composition and membrane fluidity. Increased cellular responses could be reverted by re-introducing affected ceramides, functionally linking membrane lipid composition and innate immune signaling. Finally, Smpdl3b-deficient mice displayed an intensified inflammatory response in TLR-dependent peritonitis models, establishing its negative regulatory role in vivo. Taken together, our results identify the membrane-modulating enzyme SMPDL3B as a negative regulator of TLR signaling that functions at the interface of membrane biology and innate immunity. PMID:26095358

  12. The importance of lipid modified proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A

    2015-01-01

    Membranes have long been known to act as more than physical barriers within and between plant cells. Trafficking of membrane proteins, signalling from and across membranes, organisation of membranes and transport through membranes are all essential processes for plant cellular function. These processes rely on a myriad array of proteins regulated in a variety of manners and are frequently required to be directly associated with membranes. For integral membrane proteins, the mode of membrane association is readily apparent, but many peripherally associated membrane proteins are outwardly soluble proteins. In these cases the proteins are frequently modified by the addition of lipids allowing direct interaction with the hydrophobic core of membranes. These modifications include N-myristoylation, S-acylation (palmitoylation), prenylation and GPI anchors but until recently little was truly known about their function in plants. New data suggest that these modifications are able to act as more than just membrane anchors, and dynamic S-acylation in particular is emerging as a means of regulating protein function in a similar manner to phosphorylation. This review discusses how these modifications occur, their impact on protein function, how they are regulated, recent advances in the field and technical approaches for studying these modifications.

  13. Mutants defective in secretory/vacuolar pathways in the EUROFAN collection of yeast disruptants.

    PubMed

    Avaro, Sandrine; Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Sibella-Argüelles, Carla; Volland, Christiane; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine

    2002-03-15

    We have screened the EUROFAN (European Functional Analysis Network) deletion strain collection for yeast mutants defective in secretory/vacuolar pathways and/or associated biochemical modifications. We used systematic Western immunoblotting to analyse the electrophoretic pattern of several markers of the secretory/vacuolar pathways, the soluble alpha-factor, the periplasmic glycoprotein invertase, the plasma membrane GPI-anchored protein Gas1p, and two vacuolar proteins, the soluble carboxypeptidase Y and the membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase, which are targeted to the vacuole by different pathways. We also used colony immunoblotting to monitor the secretion of carboxypeptidase Y into the medium, to identify disruptants impaired in vacuolar targeting. We identified 25 mutants among the 631 deletion strains. Nine of these mutants were disrupted in genes identified in recent years on the basis of their involvement in trafficking (VPS53, VAC7, VAM6, APM3, SYS1), or glycosylation (ALG12, ALG9, OST4, ROT2). Three of these genes were identified on the basis of trafficking defects by ourselves and others within the EUROFAN project (TLG2, RCY1, MON2). The deletion of ERV29, which encodes a COPII vesicle protein, impaired carboxypeptidase Y trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. We also identified eight unknown ORFs, the deletion of which reduced Golgi glycosylation or impaired the Golgi to vacuole trafficking of carboxypeptidase Y. YJR044c, which we identified as a new VPS gene, encodes a protein with numerous homologues of unknown function in sequence databases.

  14. Loss of the membrane anchor of the target receptor is a mechanism of bioinsecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Darboux, Isabelle; Pauchet, Yannick; Castella, Claude; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Charles, Jean-François; Pauron, David

    2002-04-30

    The mosquitocidal activity of Bacillus sphaericus is because of a binary toxin (Bin), which binds to Culex pipiens maltase 1 (Cpm1), an alpha-glucosidase present in the midgut of Culex pipiens larvae. In this work, we studied the molecular basis of the resistance to Bin developed by a strain (GEO) of C. pipiens. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization experiments showed that Cpm1 was undetectable in the midgut of GEO larvae, although the gene was correctly transcribed. The sequence of the cpm1(GEO) cDNA differs from the sequence we previously reported for a susceptible strain (cpm1(IP)) by seven mutations: six missense mutations and a mutation leading to the premature termination of translation. When produced in insect cells, Cpm1(IP) was attached to the membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). In contrast, the premature termination of translation of Cpm1(GEO) resulted in the targeting of the protein to the extracellular compartment because of truncation of the GPI-anchoring site. The interaction between Bin and Cpm1(GEO) and the enzyme activity of the receptor were not affected. Thus, Bin is not toxic to GEO larvae because it cannot interact with the midgut cell membrane, even though its receptor site is unaffected. This mechanism contrasts with other known resistance mechanisms in which point mutations decrease the affinity of binding between the receptor and the toxin.

  15. Incorporation of GM-CSF or CD40L Enhances the Immunogenicity of Hantaan Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lin-Feng; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Yu, Lan; Ye, Wei; Liu, Zi-Yu; Ying, Qi-Kang; Wu, Xing-An; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Fang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective Hantaan virus (HTNV) vaccine is highly desirable because HTNV causes an acute and often fatal disease (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, HFRS). Since the immunity of the inactivated vaccine is weak and the safety is poor, HTNV virus-like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive and safe alternative. These particles lack the viral genome but are perceived by the immune system as virus particles. We hypothesized that adding immunostimulatory signals to VLPs would enhance their efficacy. To accomplish this enhancement, we generated chimeric HTNV VLPs containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or CD40 ligand (CD40L) and investigated their biological activity in vitro. The immunization of mice with chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L induced stronger humoral immune responses and cellular immune responses compared to the HTNV VLPs and Chinese commercial inactivated hantavirus vaccine. Chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L also protected mice from an HTNV challenge. Altogether, our results suggest that anchoring immunostimulatory molecules into HTNV VLPs can be a potential approach for the control and prevention of HFRS. PMID:28066721

  16. Mutation of NgBR, a subunit of cis-prenyltransferase, causes a congenial disorder of glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eon Joo; Grabińska, Kariona A.; Guan, Ziqiang; Stránecký, Viktor; Hartmannová, Hana; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Barešová, Veronika; Sovová, Jana; Jozsef, Levente; Ondrušková, Nina; Hansíková, Hana; Honzík, Tomáš; Zeman, Jiří; Hůlková, Helena; Wen, Rong; Kmoch, Stanislav; Sessa, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dolichol is an obligate carrier of glycans for N-linked protein glycosylation, O-mannosylation, and GPI anchor biosynthesis. Cis-prenyltransferase (cis-PTase) is the first enzyme committed to the synthesis of dolichol. However, the proteins responsible for mammalian cis-PTase activity have not been delineated. Here we show that Nogo-B receptor (NgBR) is a subunit required for dolichol synthesis in yeast, mice and man. Moreover, we describe a family with a congenital disorder of glycosylation caused by a loss of function mutation in the conserved C terminus of NgBR-R290H and show that fibroblasts isolated from patients exhibit reduced dolichol profiles and enhanced accumulation of free cholesterol identically to fibroblasts from mice lacking NgBR. Mutation of NgBR-R290H in man and orthologs in yeast proves the importance of this evolutionarily conserved residue for mammalian cis-PTase activity and function. Thus, these data provides a genetic basis for the essential role of NgBR in dolichol synthesis and protein glycosylation. PMID:25066056

  17. Clustering and Lateral Concentration of Raft Lipids by the MAL Protein

    PubMed Central

    Magal, Lee Goldstein; Yaffe, Yakey; Shepshelovich, Jeanne; Aranda, Juan Francisco; del Carmen de Marco, Maria; Gaus, Katharina; Alonso, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    MAL, a compact hydrophobic, four-transmembrane-domain apical protein that copurifies with detergent-resistant membranes is obligatory for the machinery that sorts glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and others to the apical membrane in epithelia. The mechanism of MAL function in lipid-raft–mediated apical sorting is unknown. We report that MAL clusters formed by two independent procedures—spontaneous clustering of MAL tagged with the tandem dimer DiHcRED (DiHcRED-MAL) in the plasma membrane of COS7 cells and antibody-mediated cross-linking of FLAG-tagged MAL—laterally concentrate markers of sphingolipid rafts and exclude a fluorescent analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine. Site-directed mutagenesis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis demonstrate that MAL forms oligomers via ϕxxϕ intramembrane protein–protein binding motifs. Furthermore, results from membrane modulation by using exogenously added cholesterol or ceramides support the hypothesis that MAL-mediated association with raft lipids is driven at least in part by positive hydrophobic mismatch between the lengths of the transmembrane helices of MAL and membrane lipids. These data place MAL as a key component in the organization of membrane domains that could potentially serve as membrane sorting platforms. PMID:19553470

  18. Functional analysis and molecular characterization of two acetylcholinesterases from the German cockroach, Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Choi, J Y; Je, Y H; Koh, Y H; Lee, S H

    2010-12-01

    Two acetylcholinesterases (AChEs; BgAChE1 and BgAChE2) from Blattella germanica were functionally expressed using the baculovirus system. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that BgAChE2 had higher catalytic efficiency but lower substrate specificity than BgAChE1. With the exceptions of paraoxon and propoxur, BgAChE1 was generally less sensitive to inhibitors than BgAChE2. Western blot analysis using anti-BgAChE antibodies revealed that BgAChE1 was far more abundant in all examined tissues compared to BgAChE2, which is only present in the central nervous system. Both BgAChEs existed in dimeric form, covalently connected via a disulphide bridge under native conditions. Most fractions of BgAChE1 had a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, but a small fraction comprised a collagen-like tail. BgAChE2 appeared to have a collagen-GPI-fused tail. Based on the kinetic and molecular properties, tissue distribution and abundance, BgAChE1 was confirmed to play a major role in postsynaptic transmission.

  19. Cloning and expression of acetylcholinesterase from Bungarus fasciatus venom. A new type of cooh-terminal domain; involvement of a positively charged residue in the peripheral site.

    PubMed

    Cousin, X; Bon, S; Duval, N; Massoulié, J; Bon, C

    1996-06-21

    As deduced from cDNA clones, the catalytic domain of Bungarus fasciatus venom acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is highly homologous to those of other AChEs. It is, however, associated with a short hydrophilic carboxyl-terminal region, containing no cysteine, that bears no resemblance to the alternative COOH-terminal peptides of the GPI-anchored molecules (H) or of other homomeric or heteromeric tailed molecules (T). Expression of complete and truncated AChE in COS cells showed that active hydrophilic monomers are produced and secreted in all cases, and that cleavage of a very basic 8-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment occurs upon secretion. The COS cells produced Bungarus AChE about 30 times more efficiently than an equivalent secreted monomeric rat AChE. The recombinant Bungarus AChE, like the natural venom enzyme, showed a distinctive ladder pattern in nondenaturing electrophoresis, probably reflecting a variation in the number of sialic acids. By mutagenesis, we showed that two differences (methionine instead of tyrosine at position 70; lysine instead of aspartate or glutamate at position 285) explain the low sensitivity of Bungarus AChE to peripheral site inhibitors, compared to the Torpedo or mammalian AChEs. These results illustrate the importance of both the aromatic and the charged residues, and the fact that peripheral site ligands (propidium, gallamine, D-tubocurarine, and fasciculin 2) interact with diverse subsets of residues.

  20. The genes encoding the Eph-related receptor tyrosine kinase ligands LERK-1 (EPLG1, Epl1), LERK-3 (EPLG3, Epl3), and LERK-4 (EPLG4, Epl4) are clustered on human chromosome 1 and mouse chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cerretti, D.P.; Lyman, S.D.; Kozlosky, C.J.

    1996-04-15

    Hek and elk are members of the eph-related family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Recently, we isolated five cDNAs encoding membrane-bound ligands to hek and elk. Because of the promiscuous nature of their binding, we have termed these proteins ligands of the eph-related kinases or LERKs. The LERKs can be divided into two subgroups by virtue of their sequence identity, binding properties, and mode of cell membrane attachment. For example, LERK-2 (EPLG2, Epl2) and LERK-5 (EPLG5, Epl5) are type 1 transmembrane proteins, while LERK-1 (EPLG4, Epl4) are anchored to the membrane by glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Using Southern hybridization analysis of human x rodent somatic cell hybrid DNAs, we have assigned the genes that encode the GPI-anchored LERKs (EPLG1, EPLG3, and EPLG4) to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosome preparations using genomic clones from each locus refined this localization to chromosome 1, bands q21-q22. In addition, Southern blot analysis of DNA from interspecific backcross mice indicated that the mouse homologues Epl1, Epl3, and Epl4 map to a homologous region on mouse chromosome 3. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Rare Noncoding Mutations Extend the Mutational Spectrum in the PGAP3 Subtype of Hyperphosphatasia with Mental Retardation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Alexej; Awaya, Tomonari; Helbig, Ingo; Afawi, Zaid; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Abu‐Rachma, Jubran; Thompson, Miles D.; Cole, David E.; Skinner, Steve; Annese, Fran; Canham, Natalie; Schweiger, Michal R.; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Kinoshita, Taroh; Munnich, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HPMRS or Mabry syndrome is a heterogeneous glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor deficiency that is caused by an impairment of synthesis or maturation of the GPI‐anchor. The expressivity of the clinical features in HPMRS varies from severe syndromic forms with multiple organ malformations to mild nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In about half of the patients with the clinical diagnosis of HPMRS, pathogenic mutations can be identified in the coding region in one of the six genes, one among them is PGAP3. In this work, we describe a screening approach with sequence specific baits for transcripts of genes of the GPI pathway that allows the detection of functionally relevant mutations also including introns and the 5′ and 3′ UTR. By this means, we also identified pathogenic noncoding mutations, which increases the diagnostic yield for HPMRS on the basis of intellectual disability and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. In eight affected individuals from different ethnicities, we found seven novel pathogenic mutations in PGAP3. Besides five missense mutations, we identified an intronic mutation, c.558‐10G>A, that causes an aberrant splice product and a mutation in the 3′UTR, c.*559C>T, that is associated with substantially lower mRNA levels. We show that our novel screening approach is a useful rapid detection tool for alterations in genes coding for key components of the GPI pathway. PMID:27120253

  2. Insight into the Exoproteome of the Tissue-Derived Trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Ricart, Carlos A. O.; Machado, Mara O.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; de Santana, Jaime M.; de Sousa, Marcelo V.; Roepstorff, Peter; Charneau, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, one of the major neglected infectious diseases. It has the potential to infect any nucleated mammalian cell. The secreted/excreted protein repertoire released by T. cruzi trypomastigotes is crucial in host-pathogen interactions. In this study, mammalian tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (Y strain) were used to characterize the exoproteome of the infective bloodstream life form. Proteins released into the serum-free culture medium after 3 h of incubation were harvested and digested with trypsin. NanoLC-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 540 proteins, the largest set of released proteins identified to date in Trypanosoma spp. Bioinformatic analysis predicted most identified proteins as secreted, predominantly by non-classical pathways, and involved in host-cell infection. Some proteins possess predicted GPI-anchor signals, these being mostly trans-sialidases, mucin associated surface proteins and surface glycoproteins. Moreover, we enriched phosphopeptides and glycopeptides from tryptic digests. The majority of identified glycoproteins are trans-sialidases and surface glycoproteins involved in host-parasite interaction. Conversely, most identified phosphoproteins have no Gene Ontology classification. The existence of various proteins related to similar functions in the exoproteome likely reflects this parasite's enhanced mechanisms for adhesion, invasion, and internalization of different host-cell types, and escape from immune defenses. PMID:27872839

  3. Identification and Expression of Acetylcholinesterase in Octopus vulgaris Arm Development and Regeneration: a Conserved Role for ACHE?

    PubMed

    Fossati, Sara Maria; Candiani, Simona; Nödl, Marie-Therese; Maragliano, Luca; Pennuto, Maria; Domingues, Pedro; Benfenati, Fabio; Pestarino, Mario; Zullo, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) is a glycoprotein with a key role in terminating synaptic transmission in cholinergic neurons of both vertebrates and invertebrates. ACHE is also involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis during embryogenesis and regeneration acting through its non-cholinergic sites. The mollusk Octopus vulgaris provides a powerful model for investigating the mechanisms underlying tissue morphogenesis due to its high regenerative power. Here, we performed a comparative investigation of arm morphogenesis during adult arm regeneration and embryonic arm development which may provide insights on the conserved ACHE pathways. In this study, we cloned and characterized O. vulgaris ACHE, finding a single highly conserved ACHE hydrophobic variant, characterized by prototypical catalytic sites and a putative consensus region for a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor attachment at the COOH-terminus. We then show that its expression level is correlated to the stage of morphogenesis in both adult and embryonic arm. In particular, ACHE is localized in typical neuronal sites when adult-like arm morphology is established and in differentiating cell locations during the early stages of arm morphogenesis. This possibility is also supported by the presence in the ACHE sequence and model structure of both cholinergic and non-cholinergic sites. This study provides insights into ACHE conserved roles during processes of arm morphogenesis. In addition, our modeling study offers a solid basis for predicting the interaction of the ACHE domains with pharmacological blockers for in vivo investigations. We therefore suggest ACHE as a target for the regulation of tissue morphogenesis.

  4. Identification of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor with multiple domains implicated in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Nativ, M; Lustig, M; Grumet, M; Schilling, J; Martinez, R; Plowman, G D; Schlessinger, J

    1997-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) expressed on the surface of glial cells binds to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored recognition molecule contactin on neuronal cells leading to neurite outgrowth. We describe the cloning of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor (p190/Caspr) containing a mosaic of domains implicated in protein-protein interactions. The extracellular domain of Caspr contains a neurophilin/coagulation factor homology domain, a region related to fibrinogen beta/gamma, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, neurexin motifs as well as unique PGY repeats found in a molluscan adhesive protein. The cytoplasmic domain of Caspr contains a proline-rich sequence capable of binding to a subclass of SH3 domains of signaling molecules. Caspr and contactin exist as a complex in rat brain and are bound to each other by means of lateral (cis) interactions in the plasma membrane. We propose that Caspr may function as a signaling component of contactin, enabling recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways in neurons. The binding of RPTPbeta to the contactin-Caspr complex could provide a mechanism for cell-cell communication between glial cells and neurons during development. PMID:9118959

  5. Phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class X containing complex promotes cancer cell proliferation through suppression of EHD2 and ZIC1, putative tumor suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Nakakido, Makoto; Tamura, Kenji; Chung, Suyoun; Ueda, Koji; Fujii, Risa; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    We identified phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class X (PIGX), which plays a critical role in the biosynthetic pathway of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor motif, to be upregulated highly and frequently in breast cancer cells. Knockdown of PIGX as well as reticulocalbin 1 (RCN1) and reticulocalbin 2 (RCN2), which we found to interact with PIGX and was indicated to regulate calcium-dependent activities, significantly suppressed the growth of breast cancer cells. We also identified PIGX to be a core protein in an RCN1/PIGX/RCN2 complex. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of two putative tumor suppressor genes, Zic family member 1 (ZIC1) and EH-domain containing 2 (EHD2), were upregulated commonly in cells in which PIGX, RCN1, or RCN2 was knocked down, suggesting that this RCN1/PIGX/RCN2 complex could negatively regulate the expression of these two genes and thereby contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. Our results imply that PIGX may be a good candidate molecule for development of novel anticancer drugs for breast cancer. PMID:27572108

  6. Pantetheinase activity of membrane-bound Vanin-1: lack of free cysteamine in tissues of Vanin-1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pitari, G; Malergue, F; Martin, F; Philippe, J M; Massucci, M T; Chabret, C; Maras, B; Duprè, S; Naquet, P; Galland, F

    2000-10-20

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.-) is an ubiquitous enzyme which in vitro has been shown to recycle pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) and to produce cysteamine, a potent anti-oxidant. We show that the Vanin-1 gene encodes pantetheinase widely expressed in mouse tissues: (1) a pantetheinase activity is specifically expressed by Vanin-1 transfectants and is immunodepleted by specific antibodies; (2) Vanin-1 is a GPI-anchored pantetheinase, and consequently an ectoenzyme; (3) Vanin-1 null mice are deficient in membrane-bound pantetheinase activity in kidney and liver; (4) in these organs, a major metabolic consequence is the absence of detectable free cysteamine; this demonstrates that membrane-bound pantetheinase is the main source of cysteamine in tissues under physiological conditions. Since the Vanin-1 molecule was previously shown to be involved in the control of thymus reconstitution following sublethal irradiation in vivo, this raises the possibility that Vanin/pantetheinase might be involved in the regulation of some immune functions maybe in the context of the response to oxidative stress.

  7. Expeditious chemoenzymatic synthesis of CD52 glycopeptide antigens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xinyu; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2010-11-21

    CD52 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycopeptide antigen found on sperm cells and human lymphocytes. Recent structural studies indicate that sperm-associated CD52 antigen carries both a complex type N-glycan and an O-glycan on the polypeptide backbone. To facilitate functional and immunological studies of distinct CD52 glycoforms, we report in this paper the first chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous CD52 glycoforms carrying both N- and O-glycans. The synthetic strategy consists of two key steps: monosaccharide primers GlcNAc and GalNAc were first installed at the pre-determined N- and O-glycosylation sites by a facile solid-phase peptide synthesis, and then the N- and O-glycans were extended by respective enzymatic glycosylations. It was found that the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation allowed efficient attachment of an intact N-glycan in a single step at the N-glycosylation site, while the recombinant human T-synthase could independently extend the O-linked GalNAc to form the core 1 O-glycan. This chemoenzymatic approach is highly convergent and permits easy construction of various homogeneous CD52 glycoforms from a common polypeptide precursor. In addition, the introduction of a latent thiol group in the form of protected cysteamine at the C-terminus of the CD52 glycoforms will enable site-specific conjugation to a carrier protein to provide immunogens for generating CD52 glycoform-specific antibodies for functional studies.

  8. Mechanism of Action of Secreted Newt Anterior Gradient Protein

    PubMed Central

    Grassme, Kathrin S.; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Delgado, Jean-Paul; Godwin, James W.; Kumar, Anoop; Gates, Phillip B.; Brockes, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient (AG) proteins have a thioredoxin fold and are targeted to the secretory pathway where they may act in the ER, as well as after secretion into the extracellular space. A newt member of the family (nAG) was previously identified as interacting with the GPI-anchored salamander-specific three-finger protein called Prod1. Expression of nAG has been implicated in the nerve dependence of limb regeneration in salamanders, and nAG acted as a growth factor for cultured newt limb blastemal (progenitor) cells, but the mechanism of action was not understood. Here we show that addition of a peptide antibody to Prod1 specifically inhibit the proliferation of blastema cells, suggesting that Prod1 acts as a cell surface receptor for secreted nAG, leading to S phase entry. Mutation of the single cysteine residue in the canonical active site of nAG to alanine or serine leads to protein degradation, but addition of residues at the C terminus stabilises the secreted protein. The mutation of the cysteine residue led to no detectable activity on S phase entry in cultured newt limb blastemal cells. In addition, our phylogenetic analyses have identified a new Caudata AG protein called AG4. A comparison of the AG proteins in a cell culture assay indicates that nAG secretion is significantly higher than AGR2 or AG4, suggesting that this property may vary in different members of the family. PMID:27100463

  9. Flipping lipids: why an’ what’s the reason for?

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Sumana; Menon, Anant K.

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of glycoconjugates such as N-glycoproteins and GPI-anchored proteins in eukaryotes and cell wall peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide in bacteria, requires lipid intermediates to be flipped rapidly across the endoplasmic reticulum or bacterial cytoplasmic membrane (so-called biogenic membranes). Rapid flipping is also required to normalize the number of glycerophospholipids in the two leaflets of the bilayer as the membrane expands in a growing cell. Although lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane, the intrinsic rate at which they flip across membranes is very low. Biogenic membranes possess dedicated lipid transporters or flippases to increase flipping to a physiologically sufficient rate. The flippases are ‘ATP-independent’ and facilitate ‘downhill’ transport. Most predicted biogenic membrane flippases have not been identified at the molecular level, and the few flippases that have been identified by genetic approaches have not been biochemically validated. Here we summarize recent progress on this fundamental topic and speculate on the mechanism(s) by which biogenic membrane flippases facilitate transbilayer lipid movement. PMID:19689162

  10. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) as a promising new imaging target: potential clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been shown to be of special importance during cancer invasion and metastasis. However, currently, tissue samples are needed for measurement of uPAR expression limiting the potential as a clinical routine. Therefore, non-invasive methods are needed. In line with this, uPAR has recently been identified as a very promising imaging target candidate. uPAR consists of three domains attached to the cell membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor and binds it natural ligand uPA with high affinity to localize plasminogen activation at the cell surface. Due to the importance of uPAR in cancer invasion and metastasis, a number of high-affinity ligands have been identified during the last decades. These ligands have recently been used as starting point for the development of a number of ligands for imaging of uPAR using various imaging modalities such as optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission topography (PET). In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the development of uPAR-targeted imaging ligands according to imaging modality. In addition, we will discuss the potential future clinical application for uPAR imaging as a new imaging biomarker. PMID:23701192

  11. KRE genes are required for beta-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of capsule architecture and cell wall protein anchoring in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nicole M; Donlin, Maureen J; Gerik, Kimberly J; Specht, Charles A; Djordjevic, Julianne T; Wilson, Christabel F; Sorrell, Tania C; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2010-04-01

    The polysaccharide beta-1,6-glucan is a major component of the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans, but its function has not been investigated in this fungal pathogen. We have identified and characterized seven genes, belonging to the KRE family, which are putatively involved in beta-1,6-glucan synthesis. The H99 deletion mutants kre5Delta and kre6Deltaskn1Delta contained less cell wall beta-1,6-glucan, grew slowly with an aberrant morphology, were highly sensitive to environmental and chemical stress and were avirulent in a mouse inhalation model of infection. These two mutants displayed alterations in cell wall chitosan and the exopolysaccharide capsule, a primary cryptococcal virulence determinant. The cell wall content of the GPI-anchored phospholipase B1 (Plb1) enzyme, which is required for cryptococcal cell wall integrity and virulence, was reduced in kre5Delta and kre6Deltaskn1Delta. Our results indicate that KRE5, KRE6 and SKN1 are involved in beta-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of cell wall integrity and retention of mannoproteins and known cryptococcal virulence factors in the cell wall of C. neoformans. This study sets the stage for future investigations into the function of this abundant cell wall polymer.

  12. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Proteolytic processing of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall protein Scw4 regulates its activity and influences its covalent binding to glucan.

    PubMed

    Grbavac, Antonija; Čanak, Iva; Stuparević, Igor; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    Yeast cell wall contains a number of proteins that are either non-covalently (Scw-proteins), or covalently (Ccw-proteins) bound to β-1,3-glucan, the latter either through GPI-anchors and β-1,6-glucan, or by alkali labile ester linkages between γ-carboxyl groups of glutamic acid and hydroxyl groups of glucoses (Pir-proteins). It was shown that a part of Scw4, previously identified among the non-covalently bound cell wall proteins, was covalently attached to wall polysaccharides by a so far unknown alkali sensitive linkage. Thus Scw4 could be released from cell walls by treatments with hot SDS, mild alkali, or β-1,3-glucanases, respectively. It was further shown that non-covalently bound Scw4 (SDS released) underwent the Kex2 proteolytic processing. In this paper it was demonstrated that Scw4 was also processed by yapsins at a position 9 amino acids downstream of the Kex2 cleavage site. Scw4 cleaved at the yapsin site had a markedly lower potential for covalent attachment to glucan. The overproduction of the fully processed form of Scw4 lead to high mortality, particularly in the stationary phase of growth, and to markedly increased cell size. On the other hand, the overproduction of Scw4 processed only by Kex2 or not processed at all had no apparent change in mortality indicating that only the smallest, completely mature form of Scw4 had the activity leading to observed phenotype changes.

  14. Influenza virus-like particles engineered by protein transfer with tumor-associated antigens induces protective antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaina M; Vartabedian, Vincent F; Kim, Min-Chul; He, Sara; Kang, Sang-Moo; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2015-06-01

    Delivery of antigen in particulate form using either synthetic or natural particles induces stronger immunity than soluble forms of the antigen. Among naturally occurring particles, virus-like particles (VLPs) have been genetically engineered to express tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and have shown to induce strong TAA-specific immune responses due to their nano-particulate size and ability to bind and activate antigen-presenting cells. In this report, we demonstrate that influenza VLPs can be modified by a protein transfer technology to express TAAs for induction of effective antitumor immune responses. We converted the breast cancer HER-2 antigen to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form and incorporated GPI-HER-2 onto VLPs by a rapid protein transfer process. Expression levels on VLPs depended on the GPI-HER-2 concentration added during protein transfer. Vaccination of mice with protein transferred GPI-HER-2-VLPs induced a strong Th1 and Th2-type anti-HER-2 antibody response and protected mice against a HER-2-expressing tumor challenge. The Soluble form of GPI-HER-2 induced only a weak Th2 response under similar conditions. These results suggest that influenza VLPs can be enriched with TAAs by protein transfer to develop effective VLP-based subunit vaccines against cancer without chemical or genetic modifications and thus preserve the immune stimulating properties of VLPs for easier production of antigen-specific therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  15. The chitin connection.

    PubMed

    Goldman, David L; Vicencio, Alfin G

    2012-01-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is an essential component of the fungal cell wall. Chitosan, a deacetylated form of chitin, is also important in maintaining cell wall integrity and is essential for Cryptococcus neoformans virulence. In their article, Gilbert et al. [N. M. Gilbert, L. G. Baker, C. A. Specht, and J. K. Lodge, mBio 3(1):e00007-12, 2012] demonstrate that the enzyme responsible for chitosan synthesis, chitin deacetylase (CDA), is differentially attached to the cell membrane and wall. Bioactivity is localized to the cell membrane, where it is covalently linked via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Findings from this study significantly enhance our understanding of cryptococcal cell wall biology. Besides the role of chitin in supporting structural stability, chitin and host enzymes with chitinase activity have an important role in host defense and modifying the inflammatory response. Thus, chitin appears to provide a link between the fungus and host that involves both innate and adaptive immune responses. Recently, there has been increased attention to the role of chitinases in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, especially asthma. We review these findings and explore the possible connection between fungal infections, the induction of chitinases, and asthma.

  16. Nanoparticle formulation enhanced protective immunity provoked by PYGPI8p-transamidase related protein (PyTAM) DNA vaccine in Plasmodium yoelii malaria model.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kodama, Yukinobu; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Yui, Katsuyuki; Tien, Nguyen Huy; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-04-07

    We have previously reported the new formulation of polyethylimine (PEI) with gamma polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) nanoparticle (NP) to have provided Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein-1 (PyMSP-1) plasmid DNA vaccine with enhanced protective cellular and humoral immunity in the lethal mouse malaria model. PyGPI8p-transamidase-related protein (PyTAM) was selected as a possible candidate vaccine antigen by using DNA vaccination screening from 29 GPI anchor and signal sequence motif positive genes picked up using web-based bioinformatics tools; though the observed protection was not complete. Here, we observed augmented protective effect of PyTAM DNA vaccine by using PEI and γ-PGA complex as delivery system. NP-coated PyTAM plasmid DNA immunized mice showed a significant survival rate from lethal P. yoelii challenge infection compared with naked PyTAM plasmid or with NP-coated empty plasmid DNA group. Antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2b subclass antibody levels, proportion of CD4 and CD8T cells producing IFN-γ in the splenocytes and IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α levels in the sera and in the supernatants from ex vivo splenocytes culture were all enhanced by the NP-coated PyTAM DNA vaccine. These data indicates that NP augments PyTAM protective immune response, and this enhancement was associated with increased DC activation and concomitant IL-12 production.

  17. C3b deposition on human erythrocytes induces the formation of a membrane skeleton–linked protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanaphanurach, Pallop; Mirchev, Rossen; Ghiran, Ionita; Asara, John M.; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Nicholson-Weller, Anne; Golan, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, also known as CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked (GPI-linked) plasma membrane protein, protects autologous cells from complement-mediated damage by inhibiting complement component 3 (C3) activation. An important physical property of GPI-anchored complement regulatory proteins such as DAF is their ability to translate laterally in the plasma membrane. Here, we used single-particle tracking and tether-pulling experiments to measure DAF lateral diffusion, lateral confinement, and membrane skeletal associations in human erythrocyte membranes. In native membranes, most DAF molecules exhibited Brownian lateral diffusion. Fluid-phase complement activation caused deposition of C3b, one of the products of C3 cleavage, onto erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA). We then determined that DAF, C3b, GPA, and band 3 molecules were laterally immobilized in the membranes of complement-treated cells, and GPA was physically associated with the membrane skeleton. Mass spectrometry analysis further showed that band 3, α-spectrin, β-spectrin, and ankyrin were present in a complex with C3b and GPA in complement-treated cells. C3b deposition was also associated with a substantial increase in erythrocyte membrane stiffness and/or viscosity. We therefore suggest that complement activation stimulates the formation of a membrane skeleton–linked DAF-C3b-GPA–band 3 complex on the erythrocyte surface. This complex may promote the removal of senescent erythrocytes from the circulation. PMID:19258706

  18. Mass spectrometric analysis of the glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains of rat natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Man, Petr; Novák, Petr; Cebecauer, Marek; Horváth, Ondrej; Fiserová, Anna; Havlícek, Vladimír; Bezouska, Karel

    2005-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains (GEM) are membrane entities that concentrate glycosylphosphatiolylinositol(GPI)-anchored, acylated and membrane proteins important for immune receptor signaling. Using rat leukemic cell line RNK-16 we have initiated proteomic studies of microdomains in natural killer (NK) cells. Isolated plasma membranes were treated with Brij 58, or Nonidet-P40, or sodium carbonate. Extracts were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation into very light membrane, medium light membrane and heavy fractions, and a complete protein profile was analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Up to 250 proteins were unambiguously identified in each analyzed fraction. The first study of the proteome of NK cell GEM revealed several new aspects including identification of molecules not expected to be expressed in rat NK cells (e.g., NAP-22) or associated with GEM (e.g., NKR-P1, CD45, CD2). Moreover, it provided clear data consolidating controversial views concerning the occurrence of major histcompatibility complex glycoproteins and RT6.1/CD73/CD38 complex in NK cells. Our results also identified a large number of receptors as candidates for future functional studies.

  19. Tip cell-specific requirement for an atypical Gpr124- and Reck-dependent Wnt/β-catenin pathway during brain angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Stone, Oliver A; Bostaille, Naguissa; Cho, Chris; Zhou, Yulian; Maquet, Emilie; Gauquier, Anne; Cabochette, Pauline; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Mochizuki, Naoki; Nathans, Jeremy; Stainier, Didier YR

    2015-01-01

    Despite the critical role of endothelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling during central nervous system (CNS) vascularization, how endothelial cells sense and respond to specific Wnt ligands and what aspects of the multistep process of intra-cerebral blood vessel morphogenesis are controlled by these angiogenic signals remain poorly understood. We addressed these questions at single-cell resolution in zebrafish embryos. We identify the GPI-anchored MMP inhibitor Reck and the adhesion GPCR Gpr124 as integral components of a Wnt7a/Wnt7b-specific signaling complex required for brain angiogenesis and dorsal root ganglia neurogenesis. We further show that this atypical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway selectively controls endothelial tip cell function and hence, that mosaic restoration of single wild-type tip cells in Wnt/β-catenin-deficient perineural vessels is sufficient to initiate the formation of CNS vessels. Our results identify molecular determinants of ligand specificity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and provide evidence for organ-specific control of vascular invasion through tight modulation of tip cell function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06489.001 PMID:26051822

  20. The skeleton of the staghorn coral Acropora millepora: molecular and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Silva, Paula; Kaandorp, Jaap; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Alcaraz, Gérard; Stern, Christine; Corneillat, Marion; Guichard, Nathalie; Durlet, Christophe; Luquet, Gilles; Marin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The scleractinian coral Acropora millepora is one of the most studied species from the Great Barrier Reef. This species has been used to understand evolutionary, immune and developmental processes in cnidarians. It has also been subject of several ecological studies in order to elucidate reef responses to environmental changes such as temperature rise and ocean acidification (OA). In these contexts, several nucleic acid resources were made available. When combined to a recent proteomic analysis of the coral skeletal organic matrix (SOM), they enabled the identification of several skeletal matrix proteins, making A. millepora into an emerging model for biomineralization studies. Here we describe the skeletal microstructure of A. millepora skeleton, together with a functional and biochemical characterization of its occluded SOM that focuses on the protein and saccharidic moieties. The skeletal matrix proteins show a large range of isoelectric points, compositional patterns and signatures. Besides secreted proteins, there are a significant number of proteins with membrane attachment sites such as transmembrane domains and GPI anchors as well as proteins with integrin binding sites. These features show that the skeletal proteins must have strong adhesion properties in order to function in the calcifying space. Moreover this data suggest a molecular connection between the calcifying epithelium and the skeletal tissue during biocalcification. In terms of sugar moieties, the enrichment of the SOM in arabinose is striking, and the monosaccharide composition exhibits the same signature as that of mucus of acroporid corals. Finally, we observe that the interaction of the acetic acid soluble SOM on the morphology of in vitro grown CaCO3 crystals is very pronounced when compared with the calcifying matrices of some mollusks. In light of these results, we wish to commend Acropora millepora as a model for biocalcification studies in scleractinians, from molecular and structural

  1. Bovine sperm raft membrane associated Glioma Pathogenesis-Related 1-like protein 1 (GliPr1L1) is modified during the epididymal transit and is potentially involved in sperm binding to the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julieta; Frenette, Gilles; D'Amours, Olivier; Belleannée, Clémence; Lacroix-Pepin, Nicolas; Robert, Claude; Sullivan, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Glioma pathogenesis-related 1-like protein1 (GliPr1L1) was identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses of proteins associated to bovine sperm lipid raft membrane domains. This protein belongs to the CAP superfamily including cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 protein. PCR analysis revealed that GliPr1L1 is expressed in testis and, at a much lower level, all along the epididymis. Western blotting showed a similar distribution of GliPr1L1 in testicular and epididymal tissue extracts. In the epididymal lumen, GliPr1L1 was associated with the maturing spermatozoa and epididymosomes all along the excurrent duct but was undetectable in the soluble fraction of epididymal fluid. The protein was detectable as multiple isoforms with a higher MW form in the testis and proximal caput. Treatments with PNGase F revealed that N-glycosylation was responsible of multiple bands detected on Western blots. These results suggest that the N-glycosylation moiety of GliPr1L1 is processed during the transit in the caput. Western blots demonstrated that GliPr1L1 was associated with the sperm plasma membrane preparation. GliPr1L1 is glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchored to caput and cauda spermatozoa as demonstrated by the ability of phosphatidylinositol specific phospholipase C to release GliPr1L1 from intact sperm cells. Lipid raft membrane domains were separated from caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa. GliPr1L1 was immunodetectable in the low buoyant density fractions where lipid rafts are distributed. GliPr1L1 was localized on sperm equatorial segment and neck. In vitro fertilization performed in presence of anti-GliPr1L1 showed that this protein is involved in sperm-zona pellucida interaction.

  2. Establishment a CHO Cell Line Expressing Human CD52 Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kadijeh, Tati; Mahsa, Yazdanpanah-Samani; Amin, Ramezani; Elham, Mahmoudi Maymand; Abbas, Ghaderi

    2016-01-01

    Background: CD52 is a small glycoprotein with a GPI anchor at its C-terminus. CD52 is expressed by Normal and malignant T and B lymphocytes and monocytes. There are detectable amounts of soluble CD52 in plasma of patients with CLL and could be used as a tumor marker. Although the biological function of CD52 is unknown but it seems that CD52 may be involved in migration and activation of T-cells .The aim of this study was to clone and express human CD52 gene in CHO cell line and studying its function in more details Methods: Based on GenBank databases two specific primers were designed for amplification of cd52 gene. Total RNA was extracted from Raji cell line and cDNA synthesized. Amplified fragment was cloned in pBudCE4.1 vector. The new construct was transfected to CHO-K1 cell line using electroporation method. Expression of recombinant CD52 protein was evaluated by Real time PCR and flow cytometry methods. Results: Amplification of CD52 gene using specific primers on Raji cDNA showed a 209 bp band. New construct was confirmed by PCR and restriction pattern and sequence analysis. The new construct was designated as pBudKT1. RT-PCR analysis detected cd52 mRNAs in transfected cells and Flow cytometry Results showed that 78.4 % of cells represented CD52 in their surfaces. Conclusion: In conclusion, we established a human CD52 positive cell line, CHO-CD52, and the protein was expressed on the membrane. Cloning of the CD52 gene could be the first step for the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and detection systems for soluble CD52 in biological fluids PMID:28070536

  3. Developmental role of the cell adhesion molecule Contactin-6 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zuko, Amila; Oguro-Ando, Asami; van Dijk, Roland; Gregorio-Jordan, Sara; van der Zwaag, Bert; Burbach, J. Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene encoding the neural cell adhesion molecule Contactin-6 (Cntn6 a.k.a. NB-3) has been implicated as an autism risk gene, suggesting that its mutation is deleterious to brain development. Due to its GPI-anchor at Cntn6 may exert cell adhesion/receptor functions in complex with other membrane proteins, or serve as a ligand. We aimed to uncover novel phenotypes related to Cntn6 functions during development in the cerebral cortex of adult Cntn6−/− mice. We first determined Cntn6 protein and mRNA expression in the cortex, thalamic nuclei and the hippocampus at P14, which decreased specifically in the cortex at adult stages. Neuroanatomical analysis demonstrated a significant decrease of Cux1+ projection neurons in layers II-IV and an increase of FoxP2+ projection neurons in layer VI in the visual cortex of adult Cntn6−/− mice compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, the number of parvalbumin+ (PV) interneurons was decreased in Cntn6−/− mice, while the amount of NPY+ interneurons remained unchanged. In the hippocampus the delineation and outgrowth of mossy fibers remained largely unchanged, except for the observation of a larger suprapyramidal bundle. The observed abnormalities in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Cntn6−/− mice suggests that Cntn6 serves developmental functions involving cell survival, migration and fasciculation. Furthermore, these data suggest that Cntn6 engages in both trans- and cis-interactions and may be involved in larger protein interaction networks. PMID:26939565

  4. Genetic Variants Modulating CRIPTO Serum Levels Identified by Genome-Wide Association Study in Cilento Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Daniela; Nappo, Stefania; Nutile, Teresa; Sorice, Rossella; Talotta, Francesco; Giorgio, Emilia; Bellenguez, Celine; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Ciullo, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Cripto, the founding member of the EGF-CFC genes, plays an essential role in embryo development and is involved in cancer progression. Cripto is a GPI-anchored protein that can interact with various components of multiple signaling pathways, such as TGF-β, Wnt and MAPK, driving different processes, among them epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell proliferation, and stem cell renewal. Cripto protein can also be cleaved and released outside the cell in a soluble and still active form. Cripto is not significantly expressed in adult somatic tissues and its re-expression has been observed associated to pathological conditions, mainly cancer. Accordingly, CRIPTO has been detected at very low levels in the plasma of healthy volunteers, whereas its levels are significantly higher in patients with breast, colon or glioblastoma tumors. These data suggest that CRIPTO levels in human plasma or serum may have clinical significance. However, very little is known about the variability of serum levels of CRIPTO at a population level and the genetic contribution underlying this variability remains unknown. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study of CRIPTO serum levels in isolated populations (n = 1,054) from Cilento area in South Italy. The most associated SNPs (p-value<5*10-8) were all located on chromosome 3p22.1-3p21.3, in the CRIPTO gene region. Overall six CRIPTO associated loci were replicated in an independent sample (n = 535). Pathway analysis identified a main network including two other genes, besides CRIPTO, in the associated regions, involved in cell movement and proliferation. The replicated loci explain more than 87% of the CRIPTO variance, with 85% explained by the most associated SNP. Moreover, the functional analysis of the main associated locus identified a causal variant in the 5’UTR of CRIPTO gene which is able to strongly modulate CRIPTO expression through an AP-1-mediate transcriptional regulation. PMID:25629528

  5. Candida albicans virulence and drug-resistance requires the O-acyltransferase Gup1p

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background GUP1 gene was primarily identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae being connected with glycerol uptake defects in association with osmotic stress response. Soon after, Gup1p was implicated in a complex and extensive series of phenotypes involving major cellular processes. These include membrane and wall maintenance, lipid composition, bud-site selection, cytoskeleton orientation, vacuole morphology, secretory/endocytic pathway, GPI anchors remodelling, and lipid-ordered domains assembly, which is compatible with their inclusion in the Membrane Bound O-acyl transferases (MBOAT) family. In mammals, it has been described as a negative regulator of the Sonic hedgehog pathway involved in morphogenesis, differentiation, proliferation, among other processes. Results We show that Candida albicans Gup1p strongly interferes with the capacity of cells to develop hyphae, to adhere, to invade, and to form a biofilm, all of which are significant virulence factors. Furthermore, the mutant colonies exhibited an aberrant morphology/differentiation pattern. Identically to S. cerevisiae, Cagup1Δ null mutant was more resistant to antifungals like fluconazole, ketoconazole, and clotrimazole, and displayed an abnormal even sterol distribution at the plasma membrane. Conclusions This work is the first study in the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans, showing a role for the GUP1 gene in virulence as well as in the mechanisms underlying antifungal resistance. Moreover, its impact is even more significant since these results, taken together with all the knowledge about GUP1 gene (from S. cerevisiae and mammals) give consistence to the possibility that Gup1p may be part of a yeast morphogenic pathway parallel to the mammalian Hedgehog. PMID:20843317

  6. Structural Basis for the Antiviral Activity of BST-2/Tetherin and Its Viral Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Juan F.; Iwabu, Yukie; Tokunaga, Kenzo

    2011-01-01

    The interferon-inducible host restriction factor bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin) blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses. In turn, these viruses have evolved specific antagonists to counteract this host antiviral molecule, such as the HIV-1 protein Vpu. BST-2 is a type II transmembrane protein with an unusual topology consisting of an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail (CT) followed by a single transmembrane (TM) domain, a coiled-coil extracellular (EC) domain, and a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor at the C terminus. We and others showed that BST-2 restricts enveloped virus release by bridging the host and virion membranes with its two opposing membrane anchors and that deletion of either one completely abrogates antiviral activity. The EC domain also shows conserved structural properties that are required for antiviral function. It contains several destabilizing amino acids that confer the molecule with conformational flexibility to sustain the protein’s function as a virion tether, and three conserved cysteine residues that mediate homodimerization of BST-2, as well as acting as a molecular ruler that separates the membrane anchors. Conversely, the efficient release of virions is promoted by the HIV-1 Vpu protein and other viral antagonists. Our group and others provided evidence from mutational analyses indicating that Vpu antagonism of BST-2-mediated viral restriction requires a highly specific interaction of their mutual TM domains. This interpretation is further supported and expanded by the findings of the latest structural modeling studies showing that critical amino acids in a conserved helical face of these TM domains are required for Vpu–BST-2 interaction and antagonism. In this review, we summarize the current advances in our understanding of the structural basis for BST-2 antiviral function as well as BST-2-specific viral antagonism. PMID:22180752

  7. The Skeleton of the Staghorn Coral Acropora millepora: Molecular and Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Silva, Paula; Kaandorp, Jaap; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Alcaraz, Gérard; Stern, Christine; Corneillat, Marion; Guichard, Nathalie; Durlet, Christophe; Luquet, Gilles; Marin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The scleractinian coral Acropora millepora is one of the most studied species from the Great Barrier Reef. This species has been used to understand evolutionary, immune and developmental processes in cnidarians. It has also been subject of several ecological studies in order to elucidate reef responses to environmental changes such as temperature rise and ocean acidification (OA). In these contexts, several nucleic acid resources were made available. When combined to a recent proteomic analysis of the coral skeletal organic matrix (SOM), they enabled the identification of several skeletal matrix proteins, making A. millepora into an emerging model for biomineralization studies. Here we describe the skeletal microstructure of A. millepora skeleton, together with a functional and biochemical characterization of its occluded SOM that focuses on the protein and saccharidic moieties. The skeletal matrix proteins show a large range of isoelectric points, compositional patterns and signatures. Besides secreted proteins, there are a significant number of proteins with membrane attachment sites such as transmembrane domains and GPI anchors as well as proteins with integrin binding sites. These features show that the skeletal proteins must have strong adhesion properties in order to function in the calcifying space. Moreover this data suggest a molecular connection between the calcifying epithelium and the skeletal tissue during biocalcification. In terms of sugar moieties, the enrichment of the SOM in arabinose is striking, and the monosaccharide composition exhibits the same signature as that of mucus of acroporid corals. Finally, we observe that the interaction of the acetic acid soluble SOM on the morphology of in vitro grown CaCO3 crystals is very pronounced when compared with the calcifying matrices of some mollusks. In light of these results, we wish to commend Acropora millepora as a model for biocalcification studies in scleractinians, from molecular and structural

  8. The Urokinase/Urokinase Receptor System in Mast Cells: Effects of its Functional Interaction with fMLF Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca Wanda; Prevete, Nella; Rivellese, Felice; Napolitano, Filomena; Montuori, Nunzia; Postiglione, Loredana; Selleri, Carmine; de Paulis, Amato

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell and basophils express the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcɛRI) and are primary effector cells of allergic disorders. The urokinase (uPA)-mediated plasminogen activation system is involved in physiological and pathological events based on cell migration and tissue remodelling, such as inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis and metastasis. uPA is a serine protease that binds uPAR, a high affinity glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchored receptor. uPAR focuses uPA activity at the cell surface and activates intracellular signaling through lateral interactions with integrins, receptor tyrosine kinases and the G-protein-coupled family of fMLF chemotaxis receptors (FPRs). We investigated the expression of the uPA-uPAR system and its functional interaction with FPRs in human mast cells (MCs). Differently from basophils, MCs produced uPA that was able to induce their chemotaxis. Indeed, MCs also expressed uPAR, both in the intact and in a cleaved form (DII-DIII-uPAR) that can expose, at the N-terminus, the SRSRY sequence, able to interact with FPRs and to mediate cell chemotaxis. MCs also expressed mRNAs for FPRs that were functionally active; indeed, uPA and a soluble peptide (uPAR84–95), containing the SRSRY chemotactic sequence of uPAR and able to interact with FPRs, were able to induce MCs chemotaxis. Thus, uPA is a potent chemoattractant for MCs acting through the exposure of the chemotactic epitope of uPAR, that is an endogenous ligand for FPRs. The same mechanism could be involved in VEGF-A secretion by human MCs, also induced by uPA and uPAR84–95 stimulation. PMID:27896225

  9. Carbohydrate Recognition Specificity of Trans-sialidase Lectin Domain from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Waespy, Mario; Gbem, Thaddeus T.; Elenschneider, Leroy; Jeck, André-Philippe; Day, Christopher J.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; Bovin, Nicolai; Tiralongo, Joe; Haselhorst, Thomas; Kelm, Sørge

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen different active Trypanosoma congolense trans-sialidases (TconTS), 11 variants of TconTS1 besides TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4, have been described. Notably, the specific transfer and sialidase activities of these TconTS differ by orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analysis of the catalytic domains (CD) grouped each of the highly active TconTS together with the less active enzymes. In contrast, when aligning lectin-like domains (LD), the highly active TconTS grouped together, leading to the hypothesis that the LD of TconTS modulates its enzymatic activity. So far, little is known about the function and ligand specificity of these LDs. To explore their carbohydrate-binding potential, glycan array analysis was performed on the LD of TconTS1, TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4. In addition, Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR experiments were done on TconTS2-LD for a more detailed analysis of its lectin activity. Several mannose-containing oligosaccharides, such as mannobiose, mannotriose and higher mannosylated glycans, as well as Gal, GalNAc and LacNAc containing oligosaccharides were confirmed as binding partners of TconTS1-LD and TconTS2-LD. Interestingly, terminal mannose residues are not acceptor substrates for TconTS activity. This indicates a different, yet unknown biological function for TconTS-LD, including specific interactions with oligomannose-containing glycans on glycoproteins and GPI anchors found on the surface of the parasite, including the TconTS itself. Experimental evidence for such a scenario is presented. PMID:26474304

  10. The Association of the Vanin-1 N131S Variant with Blood Pressure Is Mediated by Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation and Loss of Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; Wang, Heming; Feng, Tao; Franceschini, Nora; Tang, Hua; Gao, Jianmin; Sung, Yun Ju; Elston, Robert C.; Williams, Scott M.; Cooper, Richard S.; Mu, Ting-Wei; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is the most common cardiovascular risk factor worldwide and a major contributor to heart disease and stroke. We previously discovered a BP-associated missense SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism)–rs2272996–in the gene encoding vanin-1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane pantetheinase. In the present study, we first replicated the association of rs2272996 and BP traits with a total sample size of nearly 30,000 individuals from the Continental Origins and Genetic Epidemiology Network (COGENT) of African Americans (P = 0.01). This association was further validated using patient plasma samples; we observed that the N131S mutation is associated with significantly lower plasma vanin-1 protein levels. We observed that the N131S vanin-1 is subjected to rapid endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) as the underlying mechanism for its reduction. Using HEK293 cells stably expressing vanin-1 variants, we showed that N131S vanin-1 was degraded significantly faster than wild type (WT) vanin-1. Consequently, there were only minimal quantities of variant vanin-1 present on the plasma membrane and greatly reduced pantetheinase activity. Application of MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor, resulted in accumulation of ubiquitinated variant protein. A further experiment demonstrated that atenolol and diltiazem, two current drugs for treating hypertension, reduce the vanin-1 protein level. Our study provides strong biological evidence for the association of the identified SNP with BP and suggests that vanin-1 misfolding and degradation are the underlying molecular mechanism. PMID:25233454

  11. Trypanosoma rangeli: an alkaline ecto-phosphatase activity is involved with survival and growth of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Dos-Santos, André L A; Dick, Claudia F; Silveira, Thaís S; Fonseca-de-Souza, André L; Meyer-Fernandes, José R

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether an alkaline ecto-phosphatase activity is present in the surface of Trypanosoma rangeli. Intact short epimastigote forms were assayed for ecto-phosphatase activity to study kinetics and modulators using β-glycerophosphate (β-GP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) as substrates. Its role in parasite development and differentiation was also studied. Competition assays using different proportions of β-GP and pNPP evidenced the existence of independent and non-interacting alkaline and acid phosphatases. Hydrolysis of β-GP increased progressively with pH, whereas the opposite was evident using pNPP. The alkaline enzyme was inhibited by levamisole in a non-competitive fashion. The Ca(2+) present in the reaction medium was enough for full activity. Pretreatment with PI-PLC decreased the alkaline but not the acid phosphatase evidence that the former is catalyzed by a GPI-anchored enzyme, with potential intracellular signaling ability. β-GP supported the growth and differentiation of T. rangeli to the same extent as high orthophosphate (Pi). Levamisole at the IC50 spared significantly parasite growth when β-GP was the sole source of Pi and stopped it in the absence of β-GP, indicating that the alkaline enzyme can utilize phosphate monoesters present in serum. These results demonstrate the existence of an alkaline ecto-phosphatase in T. rangeli with selective requirements and sensitivity to inhibitors that participates in key metabolic processes in the parasite life cycle.

  12. Membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase from ectopic mineralization and rat bone marrow cell culture.

    PubMed

    Simão, Ana Maria S; Beloti, Márcio M; Cezarino, Rodrigo M; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Pizauro, João M; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2007-04-01

    Cells from rat bone marrow exhibit the proliferation-differentiation sequence of osteoblasts, form mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro and release alkaline phosphatase into the medium. Membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase was obtained by method that is easy to reproduce, simpler and fast when compared with the method used to obtain the enzyme from rat osseous plate. The membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase from cultures of rat bone marrow cells has a MW(r) of about 120 kDa and specific PNPP activity of 1200 U/mg. The ecto-enzyme is anchored to the plasma membrane by the GPI anchor and can be released by PIPLC (selective treatment) or polidocanol (0.2 mg/mL protein and 1% (w/v) detergent). The apparent optimum pH for PNPP hydrolysis by the enzyme was pH 10. This fraction hydrolyzes ATP (240 U/mg), ADP (350 U/mg), glucose 1-phosphate (1100 U/mg), glucose 6-phosphate (340 U/mg), fructose 6-phosphate (460 U/mg), pyrophosphate (330 U/mg) and beta-glycerophosphate (600 U/mg). Cooperative effects were observed for the hydrolysis of PPi and beta-glycerophosphate. PNPPase activity was inhibited by 0.1 mM vanadate (46%), 0.1 mM ZnCl2 (68%), 1 mM levamisole (66%), 1 mM arsenate (44%), 10 mM phosphate (21%) and 1 mM theophylline (72%). We report the biochemical characterization of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase obtained from rat bone marrow cells cultures, using a method that is simple, rapid and easy to reproduce. Its properties are compared with those of rat osseous plate enzyme and revealed that the alkaline phosphatase obtained has some kinetics and structural behaviors with higher levels of enzymatic activity, facilitating the comprehension of the mineralization process and its function.

  13. Afa/Dr-expressing, diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strain C1845 triggers F1845 fimbria-dependent phosphatidylserine externalization on neutrophil-like differentiated PLB-985 cells through an apoptosis-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sémiramoth, Nicolas; Gleizes, Aude; Turbica, Isabelle; Sandré, Catherine; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Gorges, Roseline; Servin, Alain; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2010-07-01

    The enterovirulent Escherichia coli strains potentially involved in inflammatory bowel diseases include diffusely adherent strains expressing Afa/Dr fimbriae (Afa/Dr DAEC). We have previously observed type 1 pilus-mediated interleukin-8 (IL-8) hyperproduction in infected neutrophils. As pathogen induction of host cell death programs and clearance of apoptotic infected cells are crucial for innate immune system homeostasis and host integrity, we examined modulation of neutrophil cell death by Afa/Dr DAEC. Using the human PLB-985 cell line differentiated into fully mature neutrophils, we found that the wild-type enterovirulent E. coli strain C1845 and the recombinant strain DH5alpha/pF1845 (expressing the fimbrial adhesin F1845) similarly induced time-dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, suggesting a major specific role of this virulence factor. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) decay-accelerating factor (DAF)-transfected PLB-985 cells, we then showed that this PS externalization was triggered in part by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored DAF receptor engagement (leading to tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C activation) and that it required cytoskeleton and lipid raft architectural integrity. PS externalization under these conditions was not dependent on caspases, mitochondria, lysosomes, or reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. F1845-mediated PS externalization was sufficient to enable macrophage engulfment of infected differentiated PLB-985 cells. These findings provide new insights into the neutrophil response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection and highlight a new role for F1845 fimbriae. Interestingly, although apoptosis pathways were not engaged, C1845-infected PLB-985 cells displayed enhanced removal by macrophages, a process that may participate in the resolution of Afa/Dr DAEC infection and related inflammation.

  14. Differential recognition of members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family by Afa/Dr adhesins of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC).

    PubMed

    Berger, Cedric N; Billker, Oliver; Meyer, Thomas F; Servin, Alain L; Kansau, Imad

    2004-05-01

    Little is known about the molecular bases underlying the virulence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) harbouring the Afa/Dr family of adhesins. These adhesins recognize as receptors the GPI-anchored proteins CD55 (decay-accelerating factor, DAF) and CD66e (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). CD66e is a member of the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) family, comprising seven members. We analysed the interactions of Afa/Dr DAEC with the CEACAMs using CEACAM-expressing CHO and HeLa cells. The results demonstrate that only E. coli expressing a subfamily of Afa/Dr adhesins, named here Afa/Dr-I, including Dr, F1845 and AfaE-III adhesins, bound onto CHO cells expressing CEACAM1, CEA or CEACAM6. Whereas all the Afa/Dr adhesins elicit recruitment of CD55 around adhering bacteria, only the Afa/Dr-I subfamily elicits the recruitment of CEACAM1, CEA and CEACAM6. In addition, although CEACAM3 is not recognized as a receptor by the subfamily of Afa/Dr adhesins, it is recruited around bacteria in HeLa cells. The recruited CEACAM1, CEA and CEACAM6 around adhering bacteria resist totally or in part a detergent extraction, whereas the recruited CEACAM3 does not. Finally, the results show that recognition of CEA and CEACAM6, but not CEACAM1, is accompanied by tight attachment to bacteria of cell surface microvilli-like extensions, which are elongated. Moreover, recognition of CEA is accompanied by an activation of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and by a phosphorylation of ERM, which in turn elicit the observed cell surface microvilli-like extensions.

  15. Age-dependent impairment of IgG responses to glycosylphosphatidylinositol with equal exposure to Plasmodium falciparum among Javanese migrants to Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hudson Keenihan, Sarah N; Ratiwayanto, Sutanti; Soebianto, Saraswati; Krisin; Marwoto, Harijani; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Gowda, D Channe; Bangs, Michael J; Fryauff, David J; Richie, Thomas L; Kumar, Sanjai; Baird, J Kevin

    2003-07-01

    Immune responses directed at glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors of Plasmodium falciparum may offer protection against symptomatic malaria. To independently explore the effect of age on generation of the anti-GPI IgG response, we measured serum anti-GPI IgGs in a longitudinal cohort of migrant Javanese children (6-12 years old) and adults (> or = 20 years old) with equivalent numbers of exposures to P. falciparum in Papua, Indonesia. While the peak response in adults was achieved after a single infection, comparable responses in children required > or = 3-4 infections. Significantly fewer children (16%) than adults (41%) showed a high (optical density > 0.44) anti-GPI IgG response (odds ratio [OR] = 3.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.3-6.3, P < 0.0001), and adults were more likely to show a persistently high response (OR = 5.5, 95% CI = 1.0-56.8, P = 0.03). However, the minority of children showing a strong response were significantly less likely to experience symptoms with subsequent parasitemia compared with those with a weak response (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.1-13.8, P = 0.02). This effect was not seen among high- and low-responding adults (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.5-2.8, P = 0.60). Host age, independent of cumulative exposure, apparently represents a key determinant of the quantitative and qualitative nature of the IgG response to P. falciparum GPI.

  16. Chemogenetic E-MAP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Identification of Membrane Transporters Operating Lipid Flip Flop

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Hector M.; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Mallela, Shamroop k.; Schneiter, Roger; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    While most yeast enzymes for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and ergosterol are known, genes for several postulated transporters allowing the flopping of biosynthetic intermediates and newly made lipids from the cytosolic to the lumenal side of the membrane are still not identified. An E-MAP measuring the growth of 142'108 double mutants generated by systematically crossing 543 hypomorphic or deletion alleles in genes encoding multispan membrane proteins, both on media with or without an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, was generated. Flc proteins, represented by 4 homologous genes encoding presumed FAD or calcium transporters of the ER, have a severe depression of sphingolipid biosynthesis and elevated detergent sensitivity of the ER. FLC1, FLC2 and FLC3 are redundant in granting a common function, which remains essential even when the severe cell wall defect of flc mutants is compensated by osmotic support. Biochemical characterization of some other genetic interactions shows that Cst26 is the enzyme mainly responsible for the introduction of saturated very long chain fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol and that the GPI lipid remodelase Cwh43, responsible for introducing ceramides into GPI anchors having a C26:0 fatty acid in sn-2 of the glycerol moiety can also use lyso-GPI protein anchors and various base resistant lipids as substrates. Furthermore, we observe that adjacent deletions in several chromosomal regions show strong negative genetic interactions with a single gene on another chromosome suggesting the presence of undeclared suppressor mutations in certain chromosomal regions that need to be identified in order to yield meaningful E-map data. PMID:27462707

  17. Genetic diversity and natural selection of three blood-stage 6-Cys proteins in Plasmodium vivax populations from the China-Myanmar endemic border.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Ma, An; Chen, Shen-Bo; Yang, Ying-Chao; Chen, Jun-Hu; Yin, Ming-Bo

    2014-12-01

    Pv12, Pv38 and Pv41, the three 6-Cys family proteins which are expressed in the blood-stage of vivax malaria, might be involved in merozoite invasion activity and thus be potential vaccine candidate antigens of Plasmodium vivax. However, little information is available concerning the genetic diversity and natural selection of these three proteins. In the present study, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of P. vivax blood-stage 6-Cys family proteins in comparison with the homologue proteins of Plasmodium cynomolgi strain B using bioinformatic methods. We also investigated genetic polymorphisms and natural selection of these three genes in P. vivax populations from the China-Myanmar endemic border. The three P. vivax blood-stage 6-Cys proteins were shown to possess a signal peptide at the N-terminus, containing two s48/45 domains, and Pv12 and Pv38 have a GPI-anchor motif at the C-terminus. Then, 22, 21 and 29 haplotypes of pv12, pv38 and pv41 were identified out of 45, 38 and 40 isolates, respectively. The dN/dS values for Domain II of pv38 and pv41 were 3.33880 and 5.99829, respectively, suggesting positive balancing selection for these regions. Meanwhile, the C-terminus of pv41 showed high nucleotide diversity, and Tajima's D test suggested that this fragment could be under positive balancing selection. Overall, our results have significant implications, providing a genetic basis for blood-stage malaria vaccine development based on these three 6-Cys proteins.

  18. Pharmacological analysis for mechanisms of GPI-80 release from tumour necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Araki, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-10-01

    1 GPI-80, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein initially identified on human neutrophils, plays a role(s) in the regulation of beta2 integrin function. Previous studies have shown that GPI-80 is sublocated in secretory vesicles. It is also found in soluble form in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and in the culture supernatant of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils. To understand the behaviour of GPI-80 under conditions of stimulation, we investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on its expression and release. We also probed the mechanism of its release with various pharmacologic tools. 2 TNF-alpha induced the release of GPI-80 from human neutrophils in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (in the range of 1-100 u ml(-1) and 30-120 min, respectively), but did not affect surface GPI-80 levels. 3 Cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 but not PD98059 inhibited TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release and neutrophil adherence at the same concentration. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced GPI-80 release was inhibited by blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to components of Mac-1 (CD11b and CD18). 4 Antioxidants (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine) inhibited GPI-80 release by TNF-alpha stimulation, but superoxide dismutase did not. Antioxidants but not superoxide dismutase reduced an intracellular oxidation state. 5 These findings indicate that TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release from human neutrophils depends upon adherence via beta2 integrins. They also suggest that cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 inhibit GPI-80 release by suppressing signals for cell adherence, rather than by a direct effect on its secretion. Finally, we suggest that GPI-80 release involves an intracellular change in a redox state.

  19. Structural divergence of GPI-80 in activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Takeda, Yuji; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2007-07-27

    GPI-80 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that is mainly expressed in human neutrophils. Previous studies using 3H9, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against GPI-80, suggested that GPI-80 regulates leukocyte adherence and migration through Mac-1. GPI-80, which is anchored at the plasma membrane in resting neutrophils, moves into the pseudopodia and is released from activated human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophil activation affects GPI-80 dynamics using a new anti-GPI-80 mAb, designated 4D4, which is directed against the form of GPI-80 found on resting human neutrophils. Similar to 3H9, 4D4 influences Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion. Treatment of purified GPI-80 with periodic acid and trypsin indicated that 3H9 and 4D4 recognize peptide and carbohydrate moieties, respectively. Stimulation with fMLP decreased the binding of 4D4 to GPI-80 on the neutrophil surface but increased the overall expression of GPI-80, as visualized by the 3H9 signal. Confocal laser microscopy revealed the 4D4 signal mainly on cell bodies and at a low level on pseudopodia during migration toward increasing concentrations of fMLP, whereas the 3H9 signal was observed in both areas. In addition, soluble GPI-80 released from activated neutrophils did not bind 4D4. These results suggest that there are two populations of GPI-80 that differ in the ability to bind 4D4. The 4D4-recognized form may regulate Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion, and may subsequently be converted to a 4D4-unrecognized form during neutrophil activation.

  20. Unique motifs identify PIG-A proteins from glycosyltransferases of the GT4 family

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis is catalyzed by PIG-A, an enzyme that transfers N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to phosphatidylinositol. This protein is present in all eukaryotic organisms ranging from protozoa to higher mammals, as part of a larger complex of five to six 'accessory' proteins whose individual roles in the glycosyltransferase reaction are as yet unclear. The PIG-A gene has been shown to be an essential gene in various eukaryotes. In humans, mutations in the protein have been associated with paroxysomal noctural hemoglobuinuria. The corresponding PIG-A gene has also been recently identified in the genome of many archaeabacteria although genes of the accessory proteins have not been discovered in them. The present study explores the evolution of PIG-A and the phylogenetic relationship between this protein and other glycosyltransferases. Results In this paper we show that out of the twelve conserved motifs identified by us eleven are exclusively present in PIG-A and, therefore, can be used as markers to identify PIG-A from newly sequenced genomes. Three of these motifs are absent in the primitive eukaryote, G. lamblia. Sequence analyses show that seven of these conserved motifs are present in prokaryote and archaeal counterparts in rudimentary forms and can be used to differentiate PIG-A proteins from glycosyltransferases. Using partial least square regression analysis and data involving presence or absence of motifs in a range of PIG-A and glycosyltransferases we show that (i) PIG-A may have evolved from prokaryotic glycosyltransferases and lipopolysaccharide synthases, members of the GT4 family of glycosyltransferases and (ii) it is possible to uniquely classify PIG-A proteins versus glycosyltransferases. Conclusion Besides identifying unique motifs and showing that PIG-A protein from G. lamblia and some putative PIG-A proteins from archaebacteria are evolutionarily closer to glycosyltransferases, these studies

  1. Lateral distribution of the transmembrane domain of influenza virus hemagglutinin revealed by time-resolved fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Silvia; Engel, Stephanie; Krebs, Nils; Plazzo, Anna Pia; De Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Prieto, Manuel; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas

    2009-06-05

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) has been suggested to be enriched in liquid-ordered lipid domains named rafts, which represent an important step in virus assembly. We employed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) via fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study the interaction of the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domain (TMD) of HA with agly co sylphos pha tidyl ino si tol (GPI)-anchored peptide, an established marker for rafts in the exoplasmic leaflet of living mammalian plasma membranes. Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was fused to GPI, whereas the HA sequence was tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) on its exoplasmic site (TMD-HA-YFP), avoiding any interference of fluorescent proteins with the proposed role of the cytoplasmic domain in lateral organization of HA. Constructs were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) for which cholesterol-sensitive lipid nanodomains and their dimension in the plasma membrane have been described (Sharma, P., Varma, R., Sarasij, R. C., Ira, Gousset, K., Krishnamoorthy, G., Rao, M., and Mayor, S. (2004) Cell 116, 577-589). Upon transfection in CHO-K1 cells, TMD-HA-YFP is partially expressed as a dimer. Only dimers are targeted to the plasma membrane. Clustering of TMD-HA-YFP with GPI-CFP was observed and shown to be reduced upon cholesterol depletion, a treatment known to disrupt rafts. No indication for association of TMD-HA-YFP with GPI-CFP was found when palmitoylation, an important determinant of raft targeting, was suppressed. Clustering of TMD-HA-YFP and GPI-CFP was also observed in purified plasma membrane suspensions by homoFRET. We concluded that the pal mit oy lated TMD-HA alone is sufficient to recruit HA to cholesterol-sensitive nanodomains. The corresponding construct of the spike protein E2 of Semliki Forest virus did not partition preferentially in such domains.

  2. Evidence from simultaneous intracellular- and surface-pH transients that carbonic anhydrase IV enhances CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F

    2014-11-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase IV (CA IV) is GPI-anchored to the outer membrane surface, catalyzing CO2/HCO3 (-) hydration-dehydration. We examined effects of heterologously expressed CA IV on intracellular-pH (pHi) and surface-pH (pHS) transients caused by exposing oocytes to CO2/HCO3 (-)/pH 7.50. CO2 influx causes a sustained pHi fall and a transient pHS rise; CO2 efflux does the opposite. Both during CO2 addition and removal, CA IV increases magnitudes of maximal rate of pHi change (dpHi/dt)max, and maximal pHS change (ΔpHS) and decreases time constants for pHi changes (τpHi ) and pHS relaxations (τpHS ). Decreases in time constants indicate that CA IV enhances CO2 fluxes. Extracellular acetazolamide blocks all CA IV effects, but not those of injected CA II. Injected acetazolamide partially reduces CA IV effects. Thus, extracellular CA is required for, and the equivalent of cytosol-accessible CA augments, the effects of CA IV. Increasing the concentration of the extracellular non-CO2/HCO3 (-) buffer (i.e., HEPES), in the presence of extracellular CA or at high [CO2], accelerates CO2 influx. Simultaneous measurements with two pHS electrodes, one on the oocyte meridian perpendicular to the axis of flow and one downstream from the direction of extracellular-solution flow, reveal that the downstream electrode has a larger (i.e., slower) τpHS , indicating [CO2] asymmetry over the oocyte surface. A reaction-diffusion mathematical model (third paper in series) accounts for the above general features, and supports the conclusion that extracellular CA, which replenishes entering CO2 or consumes exiting CO2 at the extracellular surface, enhances the gradient driving CO2 influx across the cell membrane.

  3. The myeloid 7/4-antigen defines recently generated inflammatory macrophages and is synonymous with Ly-6B

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Marcela; Thomas, Benjamin; Stacey, Martin; Gordon, Siamon; Taylor, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the inflammation-associated 7/4-antigen, which is highly expressed on neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes, some activated macrophages, as well as on bone marrow myeloid-restricted progenitors. The high expression on inflammatory cells is suggestive of a role in inflammation and makes the 7/4-antigen a potential target for the manipulation of inflammatory cells. Consistent with this, the 7/4-antibody mediates specific depletion of 7/4-expressing neutrophils and monocytes. We have identified the 7/4-antigen as a 25- to 30-kDa GPI-anchored glycoprotein synonymous with the Ly-6B.2 alloantigen. We characterized the expression of Ly-6B during the inflammatory reaction induced by zymosan. During the later stages of an experimental, acute, self-resolving inflammatory response, we found that Ly-6B is differentially expressed on macrophages. Ly-6B-expressing macrophages also express more MHCII, CIITA, CCR2, Ly-6C, and CD62L than the Ly-6B-negative macrophages, which in turn, express more of the resident tissue macrophage marker SIGN-R1 and higher CD11b and F4/80. Ly-6B-expressing macrophages incorporate more BrdU than their Ly-6B-negative contemporaries when fed during the resolution phase of the acute inflammatory response. Thus, Ly-6B expression on mature macrophages defines a subset of recently generated inflammatory macrophages that retain monocytic markers and is hence a surrogate marker of macrophage turnover in inflammatory lesions. The definition of the 7/4:Ly-6B antigen will allow further characterization and specific modulation of Ly-6B-expressing cells in vivo. PMID:20400676

  4. Apocrine secretion--fact or artifact?

    PubMed

    Aumüller, G; Wilhelm, B; Seitz, J

    1999-09-01

    In this review, the history of apocrine secretion and the essential categories are briefly mentioned and fused into a more generally applicable terminology. Using the coagulating gland of the male rat as a model, the mechanisms of apocrine secretion, the participation of the cytoskeleton in the formation of the apocrine blebs ("aposomes") and the structure of the secretory proteins, as well as the hormonal regulation of their biosynthesis are described. Apocrine secreted proteins share the following peculiarities: (i) Their biosynthesis and post-translational modification (including an unusual form of glycosylation) take place in the cytoplasm. (ii) Intracellular transport proceeds without participation of the endomembrane system, the Golgi apparatus and secretion granules. (iii) Blood serum derived transsudated albumin entering the secretory cells functions as a carrier of the apocrine-released proteins. Some common molecular features are specific for the apocrine-synthesized proteins studied so far by our group: (a) Their primary sequence is synthesized without a signal peptide. (b) Their N-terminus is blocked by acetylation. (c) The substituting glycanes are neither O- nor N-linked. (d) At least one of the apocrine-synthesized proteins (secretory transglutaminase) contains a glycerol-phosphoinositol (GPI-) anchor. There are a number of still open questions in apocrine secretion, pertaining to (I) the intracellular transport and targeting of the proteins, (II) the coordination of simultaneously occurring apocrine and merocrine secretion in several of the apocrine glands, (III) the biosynthesis of the apical membrane proteins surrounding the aposomes and (IV) the repair mechanisms of the apical cell pole following the release of the aposomes. In conclusion, apocrine release is not an artifact but rather an alternative extrusion mechanism of soluble and membrane-associated proteins, usually linked with sex- or reproductive-related glands, such as the prostate, the

  5. The major surface protease (MSP or GP63) in the intracellular amastigote stage of Leishmania chagasi.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chia-Hung Christine; Yao, Chaoqun; Storlie, Patricia; Donelson, John E; Wilson, Mary E

    2008-02-01

    The Leishmania spp. protozoa have an abundant surface metalloprotease called MSP (major surface protease), which in Leishmania chagasi is encoded by three distinct gene classes (MSPS, MSPL, MSPC). Although MSP has been characterized primarily in extracellular promastigotes, it also facilitates survival of intracellular amastigotes. Promastigotes express MSPS, MSPL, and two forms of MSPC RNAs, whereas amastigotes express only MSPL RNA and one MSPC transcript. We confirmed the presence of MSPC protein in both promastigotes and amastigotes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). More than 10 MSP isoforms were visualized in both amastigotes and promastigotes using two-dimensional immunoblots, but amastigote MSPs migrated at a more acidic pI. Promastigote MSPs were N-glycosylated, whereas most amastigote MSPs were not. Immuno-electron microscopy showed that two-thirds of the promastigote MSP is distributed along the cell surface. In contrast, most amastigote MSP localized at the flagellar pocket, the major site of leishmania endocytosis/exocytosis. Biochemical analyses indicated that most amastigote MSP is soluble in the cytosol, vesicles or organelles, whereas most promastigote MSP is membrane-associated and GPI anchored. Activity gels and immunoblots confirmed the presence of a novel proteolytically active amastigote MSP of higher Mr than the promastigote MSPs. Furthermore, promastigote MSP is shed extracellularly whereas MSP is not shed from axenic amastigotes. We conclude that amastigotes and promastigotes both express multiple MSP isoforms, but these MSPs differ biochemically and localize differently in the two parasite stages. We hypothesize that MSP plays different roles in the extracellular versus intracellular forms of Leishmania spp.

  6. A synthetic peptide from Trypanosoma cruzi mucin-like associated surface protein as candidate for a vaccine against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Serna, Carylinda; Lara, Joshua A; Rodrigues, Silas P; Marques, Alexandre F; Almeida, Igor C; Maldonado, Rosa A

    2014-06-12

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is responsible for producing significant morbidity and mortality throughout Latin America. The disease has recently become a public health concern to nonendemic regions like the U.S. and Europe. Currently there are no fully effective drugs or vaccine available to treat the disease. The mucin-associated surface proteins (MASPs) are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoproteins encoded by a multigene family with hundreds of members. MASPs are among the most abundant antigens found on the surface of the infective trypomastigote stage of T. cruzi, thus representing an attractive target for vaccine development. Here we used immunoinformatics to select a 20-mer peptide with several predicted overlapping B-cell, MHC-I, and MHC-II epitopes, from a MASP family member expressed on mammal-dwelling stages of T. cruzi. The synthetic MASP peptide conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (MASPpep-KLH) was tested in presence or not of an adjuvant (alum, Al) as a vaccine candidate in the C3H/HeNsd murine model of T. cruzi infection. In considerable contrast to the control groups receiving placebo, Al, or KLH alone or the group immunized with MASPpep-KLH/Al, the group immunized with MASPpep-KLH showed 86% survival rate after challenge with a highly lethal dose of trypomastigotes. As evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, MASPpep-KLH-immunized animals had much lower parasite load in the heart, liver, and spleen than control animals. Moreover, protected animals produced trypanolytic, protective antibodies, and a cytokine profile conducive to resistance against parasite infection. Finally, in vivo depletion of either CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells indicated that the latter are critical for protection in mice immunized with MASPpep-KLH. In summary, this new peptide-based vaccine with overlapping B- and T-cell epitopes is able to control T. cruzi infection in mice by priming both humoral and cellular immunity.

  7. Pathogenic Variants in PIGG Cause Intellectual Disability with Seizures and Hypotonia

    PubMed Central

    Makrythanasis, Periklis; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Zaki, Maha S.; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Santoni, Federico A.; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Issa, Mahmoud Y.; Guipponi, Michel; Letourneau, Audrey; Logan, Clare V.; Roberts, Nicola; Parry, David A.; Johnson, Colin A.; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Hamamy, Hanan; Sheridan, Eamonn; Kinoshita, Taroh; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid that anchors >150 various proteins to the cell surface. At least 27 genes are involved in biosynthesis and transport of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). To date, mutations in 13 of these genes are known to cause inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs), and all are inherited as recessive traits. IGDs mainly manifest as intellectual disability, epilepsy, coarse facial features, and multiple organ anomalies. These symptoms are caused by the decreased surface expression of GPI-APs or by structural abnormalities of GPI. Here, we present five affected individuals (from two consanguineous families from Egypt and Pakistan and one non-consanguineous family from Japan) who show intellectual disability, hypotonia, and early-onset seizures. We identified pathogenic variants in PIGG, a gene in the GPI pathway. In the consanguineous families, homozygous variants c.928C>T (p.Gln310∗) and c.2261+1G>C were found, whereas the Japanese individual was compound heterozygous for c.2005C>T (p.Arg669Cys) and a 2.4 Mb deletion involving PIGG. PIGG is the enzyme that modifies the second mannose with ethanolamine phosphate, which is removed soon after GPI is attached to the protein. Physiological significance of this transient modification has been unclear. Using B lymphoblasts from affected individuals of the Egyptian and Japanese families, we revealed that PIGG activity was almost completely abolished; however, the GPI-APs had normal surface levels and normal structure, indicating that the pathogenesis of PIGG deficiency is not yet fully understood. The discovery of pathogenic variants in PIGG expands the spectrum of IGDs and further enhances our understanding of this etiopathogenic class of intellectual disability. PMID:26996948

  8. Biochemical, conformational, and immunogenic analysis of soluble trimeric forms of henipavirus fusion glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee-Peng; Lu, Min; Dutta, Somnath; Yan, Lianying; Barr, Jennifer; Flora, Michael; Feng, Yan-Ru; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Wang, Lin-Fa; Skiniotis, Georgios; Broder, Christopher C

    2012-11-01

    The henipaviruses, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV), are paramyxoviruses discovered in the mid- to late 1990s that possess a broad host tropism and are known to cause severe and often fatal disease in both humans and animals. HeV and NiV infect cells by a pH-independent membrane fusion mechanism facilitated by their attachment (G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. Here, several soluble forms of henipavirus F (sF) were engineered and characterized. Recombinant sF was produced by deleting the transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic tail (CT) domains and appending a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal sequence followed by GPI-phospholipase D digestion, appending a trimeric coiled-coil (GCNt) domain (sF(GCNt)), or deleting the TM, CT, and fusion peptide domain. These sF glycoproteins were produced as F(0) precursors, and all were apparent stable trimers recognized by NiV-specific antisera. Surprisingly, however, only the GCNt-appended constructs (sF(GCNt)) could elicit cross-reactive henipavirus-neutralizing antibody in mice. In addition, sF(GCNt) constructs could be triggered in vitro by protease cleavage and heat to transition from an apparent prefusion to postfusion conformation, transitioning through an intermediate that could be captured by a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat domain of F. The pre- and postfusion structures of sF(GCNt) and non-GCNt-appended sF could be revealed by electron microscopy and were distinguishable by F-specific monoclonal antibodies. These data suggest that only certain sF constructs could serve as potential subunit vaccine immunogens against henipaviruses and also establish important tools for further structural, functional, and diagnostic studies on these important emerging viruses.

  9. Classification, naming and evolutionary history of glycosyltransferases from sequenced green and red algal genomes.

    PubMed

    Ulvskov, Peter; Paiva, Dionisio Soares; Domozych, David; Harholt, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    The Archaeplastida consists of three lineages, Rhodophyta, Virideplantae and Glaucophyta. The extracellular matrix of most members of the Rhodophyta and Viridiplantae consists of carbohydrate-based or a highly glycosylated protein-based cell wall while the Glaucophyte covering is poorly resolved. In order to elucidate possible evolutionary links between the three advanced lineages in Archaeplastida, a genomic analysis was initiated. Fully sequenced genomes from the Rhodophyta and Virideplantae and the well-defined CAZy database on glycosyltransferases were included in the analysis. The number of glycosyltransferases found in the Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta are generally much lower then in land plants (Embryophyta). Three specific features exhibited by land plants increase the number of glycosyltransferases in their genomes: (1) cell wall biosynthesis, the more complex land plant cell walls require a larger number of glycosyltransferases for biosynthesis, (2) a richer set of protein glycosylation, and (3) glycosylation of secondary metabolites, demonstrated by a large proportion of family GT1 being involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In a comparative analysis of polysaccharide biosynthesis amongst the taxa of this study, clear distinctions or similarities were observed in (1) N-linked protein glycosylation, i.e., Chlorophyta has different mannosylation and glucosylation patterns, (2) GPI anchor biosynthesis, which is apparently missing in the Rhodophyta and truncated in the Chlorophyta, (3) cell wall biosynthesis, where the land plants have unique cell wall related polymers not found in green and red algae, and (4) O-linked glycosylation where comprehensive orthology was observed in glycosylation between the Chlorophyta and land plants but not between the target proteins.

  10. Carbohydrate analyses of Manduca sexta aminopeptidase N, co-purifying neutral lipids and their functional interactions with Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, S; Azadi, P; Carlson, R; Adang, M J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac insecticidal toxin binds specifically to 120kDa aminopeptidase N (APN) (EC 3.4.11.2) in the epithelial brush border membrane of Manduca sexta midguts. The isolated 120-kDa APN is a member of a functional Cry1 toxin receptor complex (FEBS Lett. 412 (1997) 270). The 120-kDa form is glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored and converted to a 115-kDa form upon membrane solubilization. The 115-kDa APN also binds Cry1A toxins and Cry1Ac binding is inhibited by N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc). Here we determined the monosaccharide composition of APN. APN is 4.2mol% carbohydrate and contains GalNAc, a residue involved in Cry1Ac interaction. APN remained associated with non-covalently bound lipids through anion-exchange column purification. Most associated lipids were separated from APN by hydrophobic interaction chromatography yielding a lipid aggregate. Chemical analyses of the lipid aggregate separated from APN revealed neutral lipids consisting mostly of diacylglycerol and free fatty acids. The fatty acids were long, unsaturated chains ranging from C:14 to C:22. To test the effect of APN-associated lipids on Cry1Ac function, the lipid aggregate and 115-kDa APN were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. The lipid aggregate increased the amount of Cry1Ac binding, but binding due to the lipid aggregate was not saturable. In contrast the lipid aggregate promoted Cry1Ac-induced release of 86Rb(+) at the lowest Cry1Ac concentration (50nM) tested. The predominant neutral lipid component extracted from the lipid aggregate promoted Cry1Ac-induced 86Rb(+) release from membrane vesicles in the presence of APN.

  11. Signal transducing molecules and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked proteins form a caveolin-rich insoluble complex in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    GPI-linked protein molecules become Triton-insoluble during polarized sorting to the apical cell surface of epithelial cells. These insoluble complexes, enriched in cholesterol, glycolipids, and GPI-linked proteins, have been isolated by flotation on sucrose density gradients and are thought to contain the putative GPI-sorting machinery. As the cellular origin and molecular protein components of this complex remain unknown, we have begun to characterize these low-density insoluble complexes isolated from MDCK cells. We find that these complexes, which represent 0.4-0.8% of the plasma membrane, ultrastructurally resemble caveolae and are over 150-fold enriched in a model GPI-anchored protein and caveolin, a caveolar marker protein. However, they exclude many other plasma membrane associated molecules and organelle-specific marker enzymes, suggesting that they represent microdomains of the plasma membrane. In addition to caveolin, these insoluble complexes contain a subset of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins and cytoplasmically-oriented signaling molecules, including: (a) GTP- binding proteins--both small and heterotrimeric; (b) annex II--an apical calcium-regulated phospholipid binding protein with a demonstrated role in exocytic fusion events; (c) c-Yes--an apically localized member of the Src family of non-receptor type protein- tyrosine kinases; and (d) an unidentified serine-kinase activity. As we demonstrate that caveolin is both a transmembrane molecule and a major phospho-acceptor component of these complexes, we propose that caveolin could function as a transmembrane adaptor molecule that couples luminal GPI-linked proteins with cytoplasmically oriented signaling molecules during GPI-membrane trafficking or GPI-mediated signal transduction events. In addition, our results have implications for understanding v- Src transformation and the actions of cholera and pertussis toxins on hetero-trimeric G proteins. PMID:8349730

  12. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Radon, Yvonne; Sempou, Emily; Jechow, Katharina; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Málaga-Trillo, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP) deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1) the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2) the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and zebrafish.

  13. EGF domain of coagulation factor IX is conducive to exposure of phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Hidai, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Kitano, Hisataka

    2017-04-01

    Lipid rafts are an initiation site for many different signals. Recently, we reported that an EGF domain in activated coagulation factor IX (EGF-F9) increases lipid raft formation and accelerates cell migration. However, the detailed mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of EGF-F9 on the cell membrane. A431 cells (derived from human squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with recombinant EGF-F9. Cells were immunocytochemically stained with probes for lipid rafts or phosphatidylserine (PS). After 3 min of treatment with EGF-F9, cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB) binding domains emerged at the adhesive tips of filopodia. Subsequently, CTxB staining was observed on the filopodial shaft. Finally, large clusters of CTxB domains were observed at the edge of cell bodies. Markers for lipid rafts, such as caveolin-1 and a GPI anchored protein, co-localized with CTxB. Staining with annexin V and XII revealed that PS was exposed at the tips of filopodia, translocated on filopodial shafts, and co-localized with CTxB at the rafts. Immunocytochemistry showed that scramblase-1 protein was present at the filopodial tips. Our data indicates that EGF-F9 accelerates PS exposure around the filopodial adhesion complex and induces clustering of lipid rafts in the cell body. PS exposure is thought to occur on cells undergoing apoptosis. Further study of the function of the EGF-F9 motif in mediating signal transduction is necessary because it is shared by a number of proteins.

  14. MemType-2L: a web server for predicting membrane proteins and their types by incorporating evolution information through Pse-PSSM.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2007-08-24

    Given an uncharacterized protein sequence, how can we identify whether it is a membrane protein or not? If it is, which membrane protein type it belongs to? These questions are important because they are closely relevant to the biological function of the query protein and to its interaction process with other molecules in a biological system. Particularly, with the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the Post-Genomic Age and the relatively much slower progress in using biochemical experiments to determine their functions, it is highly desired to develop an automated method that can be used to help address these questions. In this study, a 2-layer predictor, called MemType-2L, has been developed: the 1st layer prediction engine is to identify a query protein as membrane or non-membrane; if it is a membrane protein, the process will be automatically continued with the 2nd-layer prediction engine to further identify its type among the following eight categories: (1) type I, (2) type II, (3) type III, (4) type IV, (5) multipass, (6) lipid-chain-anchored, (7) GPI-anchored, and (8) peripheral. MemType-2L is featured by incorporating the evolution information through representing the protein samples with the Pse-PSSM (Pseudo Position-Specific Score Matrix) vectors, and by containing an ensemble classifier formed by fusing many powerful individual OET-KNN (Optimized Evidence-Theoretic K-Nearest Neighbor) classifiers. The success rates obtained by MemType-2L on a new-constructed stringent dataset by both the jackknife test and the independent dataset test are quite high, indicating that MemType-2L may become a very useful high throughput tool. As a Web server, MemType-2L is freely accessible to the public at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/MemType.

  15. Structural and functional studies on the extracellular domain of BST2/tetherin in reduced and oxidized conformations

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Heidi L.; Zhai, Qianting; Sandrin, Virginie; Eckert, Debra M.; Garcia-Maya, Mitla; Saul, Louise; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Steiner, Roberto A.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses can be restricted by a host cellular protein called BST2/tetherin that prevents release of budded viruses from the cell surface. Mature BST2 contains a small cytosolic region, a predicted transmembrane helix, and an extracellular domain with a C-terminal GPI anchor. To advance understanding of BST2 function, we have determined a 2.6 Å crystal structure of the extracellular domain of the bacterially expressed recombinant human protein, residues 47–152, under reducing conditions. The structure forms a single long helix that associates as a parallel dimeric coiled coil over its C-terminal two-thirds, while the N-terminal third forms an antiparallel four-helix bundle with another dimer, creating a global tetramer. We also report the 3.45 Å resolution structure of BST2(51-151) prepared by expression as a secreted protein in HEK293T cells. This oxidized construct forms a dimer in the crystal that is superimposable with the reduced protein over the C-terminal two-thirds of the molecule, and its N terminus suggests pronounced flexibility. Hydrodynamic data demonstrated that BST2 formed a stable tetramer under reducing conditions and a dimer when oxidized to form disulfide bonds. A mutation that selectively disrupted the tetramer (L70D) increased protein expression modestly but only reduced antiviral activity by approximately threefold. Our data raise the possibility that BST2 may function as a tetramer at some stage, such as during trafficking, and strongly support a model in which the primary functional state of BST2 is a parallel disulfide-bound coiled coil that displays flexibility toward its N terminus. PMID:20880831

  16. Serum folate receptor alpha as a biomarker for ovarian cancer: Implications for diagnosis, prognosis and predicting its local tumor expression.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Akira; Hasegawa, Kosei; Kato, Tomomi; Abe, Kenji; Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Miyara, Akiko; O'Shannessy, Daniel J; Somers, Elizabeth B; Yasuda, Masanori; Sekino, Tetsuo; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2016-04-15

    Folate receptor alpha (FRA) is a GPI-anchored glycoprotein and encoded by the FOLR1 gene. High expression of FRA is observed in specific malignant tumors of epithelial origin, including ovarian cancer, but exhibits very limited normal tissue expression, making it as an attractive target for the ovarian cancer therapy. FRA is known to shed from the cell surface into the circulation which allows for its measurement in the serum of patients. Recently, methods to detect the soluble form of FRA have been developed and serum FRA (sFRA) is considered a highly promising biomarker for ovarian cancer. We prospectively investigated the levels of sFRA in patients clinically suspected of having malignant ovarian tumors. A total of 231 patients were enrolled in this study and analyzed for sFRA as well as tumor expression of FRA by immunohistochemistry. High sFRA was predominantly observed in epithelial ovarian cancer patients, but not in patients with benign or borderline gynecological disease or metastatic ovarian tumors from advanced colorectal cancers. Levels of sFRA were highly correlated to clinical stage, tumor grade and histological type and demonstrated superior accuracy for the detection of ovarian cancer than did serum CA125. High sFRA was significantly associated with shorter progression-free survival in both early and advanced ovarian cancer patients. Finally, tumor FRA expression status was strongly correlated with sFRA levels. Taken together, these data suggest that sFRA might be a useful noninvasive serum biomarkers for future clinical trials assessing FRA-targeted therapy.

  17. Tomato LeAGP-1 arabinogalactan-protein purified from transgenic tobacco corroborates the Hyp contiguity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhan Dong; Tan, Li; Showalter, Allan Marshall; Lamport, Derek Thomas Anthony; Kieliszewski, Marcia Jane

    2002-08-01

    Functional analysis of the hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) attempts to relate biological roles to the molecular properties that result largely from O-Hyp glycosylation putatively coded by the primary sequence. The Hyp contiguity hypothesis predicts contiguous Hyp residues as attachment sites for arabino-oligosaccharides (arabinosides) and clustered, non-contiguous Hyp residues as arabinogalactan polysaccharide sites. Although earlier tests of naturally occurring hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) and HRGPs designed by synthetic genes were consistent with a sequence-driven code, the predictive value of the hypothesis starting from the DNA sequences of known AGPs remained untested due to difficulties in purifying a single AGP for analysis. However, expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of the major tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) AGP, LeAGP-1, as an enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion glycoprotein (EGFP)-LeAGP-1, increased its hydrophobicity sufficiently for chromatographic purification from other closely related endogenous AGPs. We also designed and purified two variants of LeAGP-1 for future functional analysis: one lacking the putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor signal sequence; the other lacking a 12-residue internal lysine-rich region. Fluorescence microscopy of plasmolysed cells confirmed the location of LeAGP-1 at the plasma membrane outer surface and in Hechtian threads. Hyp glycoside profiles of the fusion glycoproteins gave ratios of Hyp-polysaccharides to Hyp-arabinosides plus non-glycosylated Hyp consistent with those predicted from DNA sequences by the Hyp contiguity hypothesis. These results demonstrate a route to the purification of AGPs and the use of the Hyp contiguity hypothesis for predicting the Hyp O-glycosylation profile of an HRGP from its DNA sequence.

  18. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in

  19. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects.

  20. Stimulation of an alpha1-adrenergic receptor downregulates ecto-5' nucleotidase activity on the apical membrane of RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Reigada, David; Zhang, Xiulan; Crespo, Ana; Nguyen, Johnathan; Liu, Ji; Pendrak, Klara; Stone, Richard A; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire

    2006-09-01

    The purines ATP and adenosine play an important role in the communication between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). While the RPE is known to release ATP into subretinal space, the source of extracellular adenosine is unclear. In other tissues, ecto-nucleotidases mediate the consecutive dephosphorylation of ATP to AMP, and AMP is converted to adenosine by ecto-5' nucleotidase (CD73). This study identifies ecto-5' nucleotidase on RPE cells and investigates modulation of enzyme activity. The RPE was the most active site of 5'AMP dephosphorylation in the posterior rat eye. The ecto-5' nucleotidase inhibitor alphabetamADP prevented the production adenosine by the apical membrane of the bovine RPE. Cultured human ARPE-19 cells expressed mRNA and protein for ecto-5' nucleotidase. The production of phosphate from 5'AMP by ARPE-19 cells was inhibited by alphabetamADP, but the ecto-alkaline phosphatase inhibitor levamisole had no effect. Degradation of 5'AMP was blocked by norepinephrine, epinephrine and phenylephrine, with inhibition by antagonists prazosin and corynanthine implicating the alpha1 adrenergic receptor. The block of enzyme activity by norepinephrine was rapid, occurring within 1 min, and was similar at both 4 and 37 degrees C, consistent with cleavage of the enzyme from its GPI anchor. HPLC measurements indicated norepinephrine reduced levels of adenosine in the bath. In the apical face of the bovine-RPE eyecup, norepinephrine reduced the production of phosphate from 5'AMP, suggesting that both receptor and enzyme face sub-retinal space. In conclusion, RPE cells express ecto-5' nucleotidase, with activity on the apical membrane, and stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors downregulates activity. As epinephrine is released at light onset, and adenosine can inhibit phagocytosis, the corresponding decrease in subretinal adenosine levels may contribute to the enhanced the phagocytosis of rod outer segments that occurs at this time.

  1. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression analysis of genes encoding putative fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.).

    PubMed

    Jun, Li; Xiaoming, Wu

    2012-12-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs), a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), have both predicted AGP-like glycosylated regions and putative fasciclin (FAS) domains, which may function in cell adhesion and communication. Previous studies have identified 21, 27, and 34 FLAs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum), respectively. In this study, we identified 33 FLAs in the annotated genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis line Chiifu-401-42). Sequence analysis indicated that FAS domains each contain two highly conserved regions, named H1 and H2, and that 17 FLAs from B. rapa (BrFLAs) possess both of these regions. Prediction of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites suggested that 15 BrFLAs were GPI-anchored to the plasma membrane. Additionally, 25 BrFLAs may have been duplicated during the processes that shaped the triplicated genome of the mesopolyploid B. rapa. Expression analyses indicated that BrFLA1, BrFLA11, BrFLA13, BrFLA28 and BrFLA32 were specifically expressed in inflorescence. Meanwhile, BrFLA9 (homologous to AtFLA12) is specifically expressed in stem, and BrFLA6/22 (homologous to AtFLA11) is also highly expressed in stem, suggesting BrFLA6/9/22 may have the same functions as AtFLA11/12 in A. thaliana. Taken together, the identification and bioinformatic analysis of FLAs in B. rapa will open the way for studying their biological functions in plant growth and development as well as evolutionary history of this gene family from A. thaliana to B. rapa.

  2. Hansenula polymorpha Pmt4p Plays Critical Roles in O-Mannosylation of Surface Membrane Proteins and Participates in Heteromeric Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunah; Thak, Eun Jung; Lee, Dong-Jik; Agaphonov, Michael O.; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    O-mannosylation, the addition of mannose to serine and threonine residues of secretory proteins, is a highly conserved post-translational modification found in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Here, we report the functional and molecular characterization of the HpPMT4 gene encoding a protein O-mannosyltransferase in the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha, an emerging host for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Compared to the deletion of HpPMT1, deletion of another major PMT gene, HpPMT4, resulted in more increased sensitivity to the antibiotic hygromycin B, caffeine, and osmotic stresses, but did not affect the thermotolerance of H. polymorpha. Notably, the deletion of HpPMT4 generated severe defects in glycosylation of the surface sensor proteins HpWsc1p and HpMid2p, with marginal effects on secreted glycoproteins such as chitinase and HpYps1p lacking a GPI anchor. However, despite the severely impaired mannosylation of surface sensor proteins in the Hppmt4∆ mutant, the phosphorylation of HpMpk1p and HpHog1p still showed a high increase upon treatment with cell wall disturbing agents or high concentrations of salts. The conditional Hppmt1pmt4∆ double mutant strains displayed severely impaired growth, enlarged cell size, and aberrant cell separation, implying that the loss of HpPMT4 function might be lethal to cells in the absence of HpPmt1p. Moreover, the HpPmt4 protein was found to form not only a homomeric complex but also a heteromeric complex with either HpPmt1p or HpPmt2p. Altogether, our results support the function of HpPmt4p as a key player in O-mannosylation of cell surface proteins and its participation in the formation of heterodimers with other PMT members, besides homodimer formation, in H. polymorpha. PMID:26134523

  3. Non-invasive prediction of blastocyst implantation, ongoing pregnancy and live birth, by mass spectrometry lipid fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Borges Jr., Edson; Braga, Daniela P.A.F.; Setti, Amanda Souza; Montanni, Daniela A.; Cabral, Elaine Cristina; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Turco, Edson G. Lo; Iaconelli Jr, Assumpto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify lipid markers of blastocyst implantation and ongoing pregnancy by day three culture medium mass spectrometry (MS) fingerprinting. Methods For this study, 33 culture media samples were harvested on day three, from 22 patients undergoing day five embryo transfers. All embryos achieved the blastocyst stage and were split into groups based on their implantation (Negative Implantation, n= 14 and Positive Implantation, n= 19). The positive implantation cycles resulted in successful ongoing pregnancies. The lipid extraction was performed by the Bligh-Dyer protocol and mass spectra were obtained with a direct infusion into a Q-Tof mass spectrometer. The data obtained was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square Discrimination Analysis (PLS-DA). The statistical analysis was performed using the Metabo-Analyst 2.0. Results The variable importance in the projection (VIP) plot of the PLS-DA provided a list of four ions, in the positive mode, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 73.5%; and eight ions, in the negative mode, with and AUC of 72.0%. For both positive and negative modes, possible biomarkers for the negative implantation were identified by the lipidmaps: phosphoethanolamine, dicarboxylic acids, glycerophosphoglycerol, glycerophosphocholine, glicerophosphoinositol, phosphoethanolamine and unsaturated fat acids. The other ions were not identified. These lipids are involved in the GPI anchor biosynthesis and synthesis of lycerophospholipids and phosphate inositol. Conclusion MS fingerprinting is useful to identify blastocysts that fail to implant, and therefore this technique could be incorporated into the laboratory routine, adjunct to morphology evaluation to identify embryos that should not be transferred. PMID:28050958

  4. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates trans-synaptic signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Samuel H; Dani, Neil; Rushton, Emma; Broadie, Kendal

    2013-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited determinant of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders, is caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene product (FMRP), an mRNA-binding translational repressor. A number of conserved FMRP targets have been identified in the well-characterized Drosophila FXS disease model, but FMRP is highly pleiotropic in function and the full spectrum of FMRP targets has yet to be revealed. In this study, screens for upregulated neural proteins in Drosophila fmr1 (dfmr1) null mutants reveal strong elevation of two synaptic heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs): GPI-anchored glypican Dally-like protein (Dlp) and transmembrane Syndecan (Sdc). Our recent work has shown that Dlp and Sdc act as co-receptors regulating extracellular ligands upstream of intracellular signal transduction in multiple trans-synaptic pathways that drive synaptogenesis. Consistently, dfmr1 null synapses exhibit altered WNT signaling, with changes in both Wingless (Wg) ligand abundance and downstream Frizzled-2 (Fz2) receptor C-terminal nuclear import. Similarly, a parallel anterograde signaling ligand, Jelly belly (Jeb), and downstream ERK phosphorylation (dpERK) are depressed at dfmr1 null synapses. In contrast, the retrograde BMP ligand Glass bottom boat (Gbb) and downstream signaling via phosphorylation of the transcription factor MAD (pMAD) seem not to be affected. To determine whether HSPG upregulation is causative for synaptogenic defects, HSPGs were genetically reduced to control levels in the dfmr1 null background. HSPG correction restored both (1) Wg and Jeb trans-synaptic signaling, and (2) synaptic architecture and transmission strength back to wild-type levels. Taken together, these data suggest that FMRP negatively regulates HSPG co-receptors controlling trans-synaptic signaling during synaptogenesis, and that loss of this regulation causes synaptic structure and function defects characterizing the FXS disease

  5. Matriptase Complexes and Prostasin Complexes with HAI-1 and HAI-2 in Human Milk: Significant Proteolysis in Lactation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Hsin; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Chou, Feng-Pai; Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Tseng, Chun-Che; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Significant proteolysis may occur during milk synthesis and secretion, as evidenced by the presence of protease-protease inhibitor complex containing the activated form of the type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase and the transmembrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. In order to identify other proteolysis events that may occur during lactation, human milk was analyzed for species containing HAI-1 and HAI-2 which is closely related to HAI-1. In addition to the previously demonstrated matriptase-HAI-1 complex, HAI-1 was also detected in complex with prostasin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease. HAI-2 was also detected in complexes, the majority of which appear to be part of higher-order complexes, which do not bind to ionic exchange columns or immunoaffinity columns, suggesting that HAI-2 and its target proteases may be incorporated into special protein structures during lactation. The small proportion HAI-2 species that could be purified contain matriptase or prostasin. Human mammary epithelial cells are the likely cellular sources for these HAI-1 and HAI-2 complexes with matriptase and prostasin given that these protease-inhibitor complexes with the exception of prostasin-HAI-2 complex were detected in milk-derived mammary epithelial cells. The presence of these protease-inhibitor complexes in human milk provides in vivo evidence that the proteolytic activity of matriptase and prostasin are significantly elevated at least during lactation, and possibly contribute to the process of lactation, and that they are under tight control by HAI-1 and HAI-2.

  6. Membrane expression of NK receptors CD160 and CD158k contributes to delineate a unique CD4+ T-lymphocyte subset in normal and mycosis fungoides skin.

    PubMed

    Sako, Nouhoum; Schiavon, Valérie; Bounfour, Touda; Dessirier, Valérie; Ortonne, Nicolas; Olive, Daniel; Ram-Wolff, Caroline; Michel, Laurence; Sicard, Hélène; Marie-Cardine, Anne; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Schmitt, Christian

    2014-10-01

    CD160 is a GPI-anchored Ig-like receptor identified by the BY55 mAb on human circulating CD56dim+ NK cells and TCRγδ lymphocytes. In addition, while most intestinal T lymphocytes express it, only a minor circulating CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte subset is CD160+. Here we describe a population of CD4+ CD160+ human blood T lymphocytes of circulating cutaneous T cells. These rare T lymphocytes represent 2.1 ± 1.9% of the circulating CD3+ CD4+ T cells, coexpress CD8αα, CD244, and perforin but lack CD28 expression, a phenotype corresponding to effector memory cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Functional studies further confirmed their cytotoxic potential. These cells lack αEβ7 integrin and CCR7 expression but do express skin-addressing molecules CLA, and CCR4. In normal human skin, CD4+ CD160+ cells represent 34.6 ± 14.7% of the CD4+ T lymphocytes extracted by collagenase treatment. These T cells coexpress CLA (81 ± 13.6%), CCR4 (62.3 ± 15.9%), and some CD8αα (19.6 ± 13%) or CCR7 (24.4 ± 11.7%) expression. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells express the natural killer receptor KIR3DL2 (CD158k) used as a tumor marker. Not only we confirmed the expression of this marker in the blood and/or skin of mycosis fungoides patients but we also show for the first time CD158k expression (often associated with CD160) on cutaneous CD4+ T cells from healthy individuals (25.3 ± 15%). Therefore, CD4+ CD160+ T cells expressing CD158k might represent specialized cutaneous lymphocytes devoted to immune surveillance, from which could originate cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as mycosis fungoides.

  7. The multifaceted role of the embryonic gene Cripto-1 in cancer, stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Castro, Nadia P.; Rangel, Maria Cristina; Spike, Benjamin T.; Gray, Peter C.; Bertolette, Daniel; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David

    2014-01-01

    Cripto-1 (CR-1)/Teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor1 (TDGF-1) is a cell surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked glycoprotein that can function either in cis (autocrine) or in trans (paracrine). The cell membrane cis form is found in lipid rafts and endosomes while the trans acting form lacking the GPI anchor is soluble. As a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)/Cripto-1-FRL-1-Cryptic (CFC) family, CR-1 functions as an obligatory co-receptor for the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members, Nodal and growth and differentiation factors 1 and 3 (GDF1/3) by activating Alk4/Alk7 signaling pathways that involve Smads 2, 3 and 4. In addition, CR-1 can activate non-Smad-dependent signaling elements such as PI3K, Akt and MAPK. Both of these pathways depend upon the 78 kDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78). Finally, CR-1 can facilitate signaling through the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch/Cbf-1 pathways by functioning as a chaperone protein for LRP5/6 and Notch, respectively. CR-1 is essential for early embryonic development and maintains embryonic stem cell pluripotentiality. CR-1 performs an essential role in the etiology and progression of several types of human tumors where it is expressed in a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this context, CR-1 can significantly enhance tumor cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Collectively, these facts suggest that CR-1 may be an attractive target in the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of several types of human cancer. PMID:25153355

  8. SorLA and CLC:CLF-1-dependent Downregulation of CNTFRα as Demonstrated by Western Blotting, Inhibition of Lysosomal Enzymes, and Immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jakob V; Petersen, Claus M

    2017-01-06

    The heterodimeric cytokine Cardiotrophin-like Cytokine:Cytokine-like Factor-1 (CLC:CLF-1) targets the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored CNTFRα to form a trimeric complex that subsequently recruits glycoprotein 130/Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor-β (gp130/LIFRβ) for signaling. Both CLC and CNTFRα are necessary for signaling but so far CLF-1 has only been known as a putative facilitator of CLC secretion. However, it has recently been shown that CLF-1 contains three binding sites: one for CLC; one for CNTFRα (that may promote assembly of the trimeric complex); and one for the endocytic receptor sorLA. The latter site provides high affinity binding of CLF-1, CLC:CLF-1, as well as the trimeric (CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα) complex to sorLA, and in sorLA-expressing cells the soluble ligands CLF-1 and CLC:CLF-1 are rapidly taken up and internalized. In cells co-expressing CNTFRα and sorLA, CNTFRα first binds CLC:CLF-1 to form a membrane-associated trimeric complex, but it also connects to sorLA via the free sorLA-binding site in CLF-1. As a result, CNTFRα, which has no capacity for endocytosis on its own, is tugged along and internalized by the sorLA-mediated endocytosis of CLC:CLF-1. The present protocol describes the experimental procedures used to demonstrate i) the sorLA-mediated and CLC:CLF-1-dependent downregulation of surface-membrane CNTFRα expression; ii) sorLA-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal targeting of CNTFRα; and iii) the lowered cellular response to CLC:CLF-1-stimulation upon sorLA-mediated downregulation of CNTFRα.

  9. Chilling of dormant buds hyperinduces FLOWERING LOCUS T and recruits GA-inducible 1,3-beta-glucanases to reopen signal conduits and release dormancy in Populus.

    PubMed

    Rinne, Päivi L H; Welling, Annikki; Vahala, Jorma; Ripel, Linda; Ruonala, Raili; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; van der Schoot, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    In trees, production of intercellular signals and accessibility of signal conduits jointly govern dormancy cycling at the shoot apex. We identified 10 putative cell wall 1,3-β-glucanase genes (glucan hydrolase family 17 [GH17]) in Populus that could turn over 1,3-β-glucan (callose) at pores and plasmodesmata (PD) and investigated their regulation in relation to FT and CENL1 expression. The 10 genes encode orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana BG_ppap, a PD-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, the Arabidopsis PD callose binding protein PDCB, and a birch (Betula pendula) putative lipid body (LB) protein. We found that these genes were differentially regulated by photoperiod, by chilling (5°C), and by feeding of gibberellins GA(3) and GA(4). GA(3) feeding upregulated all LB-associated GH17s, whereas GA(4) upregulated most GH17s with a GPI anchor and/or callose binding motif, but only GA(4) induced true bud burst. Chilling upregulated a number of GA biosynthesis and signaling genes as well as FT, but not CENL1, while the reverse was true for both GA(3) and GA(4). Collectively, the results suggest a model for dormancy release in which chilling induces FT and both GPI lipid-anchored and GA(3)-inducible GH17s to reopen signaling conduits in the embryonic shoot. When temperatures rise, the reopened conduits enable movement of FT and CENL1 to their targets, where they drive bud burst, shoot elongation, and morphogenesis.

  10. JPRS Report, China.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Initiates More Water Control Projects [XINHUA] .......................................................... 34 Protein-Enriched Flour Hits M arket [XINH UA...In the winter of 1990, the region stored 5.26 billion kg of hay, Protein-Enriched Flour Hits Market raising hay reserves from less than 50 kg per...October 25 (XINHUA)-A flour Guangxi Cotton Shortages Threaten Spinning enriched with protein has entered markets recently, Industry according to China’s

  11. A Specific Structural Requirement for Ergosterol in Long-chain Fatty Acid Synthesis Mutants Important for Maintaining Raft Domains in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenkolb, Marlis; Zenzmaier, Christoph; Leitner, Erich; Schneiter, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Fungal sphingolipids contain ceramide with a very-long-chain fatty acid (C26). To investigate the physiological significance of the C26-substitution on this lipid, we performed a screen for mutants that are synthetically lethal with ELO3. Elo3p is a component of the ER-associated fatty acid elongase and is required for the final elongation cycle to produce C26 from C22/C24 fatty acids. elo3Δ mutant cells thus contain C22/C24- instead of the natural C26-substituted ceramide. We now report that under these conditions, an otherwise nonessential, but also fungal-specific, structural modification of the major sterol of yeast, ergosterol, becomes essential, because mutations in ELO3 are synthetically lethal with mutations in ERG6. Erg6p catalyzes the methylation of carbon atom 24 in the aliphatic side chain of sterol. The lethality of an elo3Δ erg6Δ double mutant is rescued by supplementation with ergosterol but not with cholesterol, indicating a vital structural requirement for the ergosterol-specific methyl group. To characterize this structural requirement in more detail, we generated a strain that is temperature sensitive for the function of Erg6p in an elo3Δ mutant background. Examination of raft association of the GPI-anchored Gas1p and plasma membrane ATPase, Pma1p, in the conditional elo3Δ erg6ts double mutant, revealed a specific defect of the mutant to maintain raft association of preexisting Pma1p. Interestingly, in an elo3Δ mutant at 37°C, newly synthesized Pma1p failed to enter raft domains early in the biosynthetic pathway, and upon arrival at the plasma membrane was rerouted to the vacuole for degradation. These observations indicate that the C26 fatty acid substitution on lipids is important for establishing raft association of Pma1p and stabilizing the protein at the cell surface. Analysis of raft lipids in the conditional mutant strain revealed a selective enrichment of ergosterol in detergent-resistant membrane domains, indicating that specific

  12. Analysis of glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides expressed by the opportunistic mycopathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Marcos S; Levery, Steven B; Bennion, Beau; Guimaraes, Luciana L; Castle, Sherry A; Lindsey, Rebecca; Momany, Michelle; Park, Chaeho; Straus, Anita H; Takahashi, Helio K

    2007-08-01

    Acidic glycosphingolipid components were extracted from the opportunistic mycopathogen Aspergillus fumigatus and identified as inositol phosphorylceramide and glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs). Using nuclear magnetic resonance sppectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and other techniques, the structures of six major components were elucidated as Ins-P-Cer (Af-0), Manp(alpha1-->3)Manp(alpha1-->2)Ins-P-Cer (Af-2), Manp(alpha1-->2)Manp(alpha1-->3)Manp(alpha1-->2)Ins-P-Cer (Af-3a), Manp(alpha1-->3)[Galf(beta1-->6)]Manp(alpha1-->2)-Ins-P-Cer (Af-3b), Manp(alpha1-->2)-Manp(alpha1-->3)[Galf(beta1-->6)]Manp(alpha1-->2)Ins-P-Cer (Af-4), and Manp(alpha1-->3)Manp(alpha1-->6)GlcpN(alpha1-->2)Ins-P-Cer (Af-3c) (where Ins = myo-inositol and P = phosphodiester). A minor A. fumigatus GIPC was also identified as the N-acetylated version of Af-3c (Af-3c*), which suggests that formation of the GlcNalpha1-->2Ins linkage may proceed by a two-step process, similar to the GlcNalpha1-->6Ins linkage in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors (transfer of GlcNAc, followed by enzymatic de-N-acetylation). The glycosylinositol of Af-3b, which bears a distinctive branching Galf(beta1-->6) residue, is identical to that of a GIPC isolated previously from the dimorphic mycopathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (designated Pb-3), but components Af-3a and Af-4 have novel structures. Overlay immunostaining of A. fumigatus GIPCs separated on thin-layer chromatograms was used to assess their reactivity against sera from a patient with aspergillosis and against a murine monoclonal antibody (MEST-1) shown previously to react with the Galf(beta1-->6) residue in Pb-3. These results are discussed in relation to pathogenicity and potential approaches to the immunodiagnosis of A. fumigatus.

  13. Prion Seeding Activities of Mouse Scrapie Strains with Divergent PrPSc Protease Sensitivities and Amyloid Plaque Content Using RT-QuIC and eQuIC

    PubMed Central

    Vascellari, Sarah; Orrù, Christina D.; Hughson, Andrew G.; King, Declan; Barron, Rona; Wilham, Jason M.; Baron, Gerald S.; Race, Brent; Pani, Alessandra; Caughey, Byron

    2012-01-01

    Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrPSc) can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrPSc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrPC, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrPSen) as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrPSc (PrPRes). Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10−8 and 10−13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrPRes levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrPC. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrPRes, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrPRes strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrPRes levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrPSc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML scrapie strains. Overall

  14. Immunity to Ichthyophthirius infections in fish: a synopsis.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, H W; Findly, R C

    2014-04-01

    provides protection. Vaccination with purified immobilization antigens, which are GPI-anchored membrane proteins, also provides protection under laboratory conditions and immobilization antigens are currently the most promising candidates for subunit vaccines against I. multifiliis.

  15. A new class of orthosteric uPAR·uPA small-molecule antagonists are allosteric inhibitors of the uPAR·vitronectin interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O

    2015-06-19

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 μM and inhibited the tight uPAR·uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 μM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR·uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN·uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR·uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTNSMB·uPAR interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR·VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  16. VSGdb: a database for trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins, a large and diverse family of coiled coil proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Lucio; Menon, Suraj; Ward, Pauline; Wilkes, Jonathan M; Jones, Nicola G; Carrington, Mark; Barry, J David

    2007-01-01

    Background Trypanosomes are coated with a variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that is so densely packed that it physically protects underlying proteins from effectors of the host immune system. Periodically cells expressing a distinct VSG arise in a population and thereby evade immunity. The main structural feature of VSGs are two long α-helices that form a coiled coil, and sets of relatively unstructured loops that are distal to the plasma membrane and contain most or all of the protective epitopes. The primary structure of different VSGs is highly variable, typically displaying only ~20% identity with each other. The genome has nearly 2000 VSG genes, which are located in subtelomeres. Only one VSG gene is expressed at a time, and switching between VSGs primarily involves gene conversion events. The archive of silent VSGs undergoes diversifying evolution rapidly, also involving gene conversion. The VSG family is a paradigm for α helical coiled coil structures, epitope variation and GPI-anchor signals. At the DNA level, the genes are a paradigm for diversifying evolutionary processes and for the role of subtelomeres and recombination mechanisms in generation of diversity in multigene families. To enable ready availability of VSG sequences for addressing these general questions, and trypanosome-specific questions, we have created VSGdb, a database of all known sequences. Description VSGdb contains fully annotated VSG sequences from the genome sequencing project, with which it shares all identifiers and annotation, and other available sequences. The database can be queried in various ways. Sequence retrieval, in FASTA format, can deliver protein or nucleotide sequence filtered by chromosomes or contigs, gene type (functional, pseudogene, etc.), domain and domain sequence family. Retrieved sequences can be stored as a temporary database for BLAST querying, reports from which include hyperlinks to the genome project database (GeneDB) CDS Info and to individual VSGdb

  17. A New Class of Orthosteric uPAR•uPA Small-Molecule Antagonists Are Allosteric Inhibitors of the uPAR•Vitronectin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2015-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR•uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently-labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 µM and inhibited the tight uPAR•uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 µM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR•uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN•uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR•uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells, and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTN•uPARSMB interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR•VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  18. Transcriptomic and molecular genetic analysis of the cell wall salvage response of Aspergillus niger to the absence of galactofuranose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Joohae; Hulsman, Mark; Arentshorst, Mark; Breeman, Matthijs; Alazi, Ebru; Lagendijk, Ellen L; Rocha, Marina C; Malavazi, Iran; Nitsche, Benjamin M; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Meyer, Vera; Ram, Arthur F J

    2016-09-01

    The biosynthesis of cell surface-located galactofuranose (Galf)-containing glycostructures such as galactomannan, N-glycans and O-glycans in filamentous fungi is important to secure the integrity of the cell wall. UgmA encodes an UDP-galactopyranose mutase, which is essential for the formation of Galf. Consequently, the ΔugmA mutant lacks Galf-containing molecules. Our previous work in Aspergillus niger work suggested that loss of function of ugmA results in activation of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway which is characterized by increased expression of the agsA gene, encoding an α-glucan synthase. In this study, the transcriptional response of the ΔugmA mutant was further linked to the CWI pathway by showing the induced and constitutive phosphorylation of the CWI-MAP kinase in the ΔugmA mutant. To identify genes involved in cell wall remodelling in response to the absence of galactofuranose biosynthesis, a genome-wide expression analysis was performed using RNAseq. Over 400 genes were higher expressed in the ΔugmA mutant compared to the wild-type. These include genes that encode enzymes involved in chitin (gfaB, gnsA, chsA) and α-glucan synthesis (agsA), and in β-glucan remodelling (bgxA, gelF and dfgC), and also include several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall protein-encoding genes. In silico analysis of the 1-kb promoter regions of the up-regulated genes in the ΔugmA mutant indicated overrepresentation of genes with RlmA, MsnA, PacC and SteA-binding sites. The importance of these transcription factors for survival of the ΔugmA mutant was analysed by constructing the respective double mutants. The ΔugmA/ΔrlmA and ΔugmA/ΔmsnA double mutants showed strong synthetic growth defects, indicating the importance of these transcription factors to maintain cell wall integrity in the absence of Galf biosynthesis.

  19. Profiling the culprit in Alzheimer's disease (AD): bacterial toxic proteins - Will they be significant for the aetio-pathogenesis of AD and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies?

    PubMed

    Schmitt, H Peter

    2007-01-01

    The aetiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (tSEs) is still elusive. The concept that prion protein (PrP(Sc)) is the aetiological agent (infectious protein) in the tSEs has recently been questioned. In AD, the cause of the aberrant cleavage of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP), resulting in the production of amyloidogenic Abeta fragments, has yet remained obscure. Moreover, the amyloid hypothesis of AD has been seriously challenged. In both AD and the tSEs, pathogens of various nature, including bacteria, have been discussed as possible causal factors. However, aetiological considerations have completely neglected microbial products such as the bacterial toxic proteins (BTPs). The present paper is aimed at drawing a "culprit profile" of these toxic molecules that can exert, at low-dosage, neuro-degeneration through various effects. Clearly, BTPs may affect cell-surface receptors including modulatory amine transmitter receptor expression, block neuro-transmitter release, increase intra-cellular Ca(2+) levels, affect intra-cellular signal transduction, change cyto-skeletal processing, alter synaptic transmission, influence APP proteolysis, interact with cell surface proteins like PrP(C) or their GPI anchors, act as chaperones inducing conformational change in proteins (e.g., PrP(C) to PrP(Sc)), alter lipid membrane integrity by affecting phospholipases or forming pores and channels, induce vacuolar (spongiform) change and elicit inflammatory reactions with cytokine production including cytokines that were demonstrated in the AD brain. Like PrP(Sc), BTPs can be heat-stable and acid-resistant. BTPs can meet the key-proteins of AD and tSEs in the lipid-rich domains of the plasma membrane called rafts. Basically, this might enable them to initiate a large variety of unfavourable molecular events, eventually resulting in pathogenetic cascades as in AD and the tSEs. All in all, their profile lends support to the

  20. Synergistic activation of ENaC by three membrane-bound channel-activating serine proteases (mCAP1, mCAP2, and mCAP3) and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Vallet, Véronique; Jaeger, Nicole Fowler; Hummler, Edith; Rossier, Bernard C

    2002-08-01

    Sodium balance is maintained by the precise regulation of the activity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the kidney. We have recently reported an extracellular activation of ENaC-mediated sodium transport (I(Na)) by a GPI-anchored serine protease (mouse channel-activating protein, mCAP1) that was isolated from a cortical collecting duct cell line derived from mouse kidney. In the present study, we have identified two additional membrane-bound serine proteases (mCAP2 and mCAP3) that are expressed in the same cell line. We show that each of these proteases is able to increase I(Na) 6-10-fold in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. I(Na) and the number (N) of channels expressed at the cell surface (measured by binding of a FLAG monoclonal I(125)-radioiodinated antibody) were measured in the same oocyte. Using this assay, we show that mCAP1 increases I(Na) 10-fold (P < 0.001) but N remained unchanged (P = 0.9), indicating that mCAP1 regulates ENaC activity by increasing its average open probability of the whole cell (wcP(o)). The serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) involved in the aldosterone-dependent signaling cascade enhances I(Na) by 2.5-fold (P < 0.001) and N by 1.6-fold (P < 0.001), indicating a dual effect on N and wcP(o). Compared with Sgk1 alone, coexpression of Sgk1 with mCAP1 leads to a ninefold increase in I(Na) (P < 0.001) and 1.3-fold in N (P < 0.02). Similar results were observed for mCAP2 and mCAP3. The synergism between CAPs and Sgk1 on I(Na) was always more than additive, indicating a true potentiation. The synergistic effect of the two activation pathways allows a large dynamic range for ENaC-mediated sodium regulation crucial for a tight control of sodium homeostasis.

  1. Structural analysis and tissue localization of human C4.4A: a protein homologue of the urokinase receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Line V; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Nielsen, Boye S; Lund, Leif R; Danø, Keld; Jensen, Ole N; Ploug, Michael

    2004-01-01

    C4.4A, a structural homologue of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), was originally identified as a metastasis-associated membrane protein, but little is known about its structural and functional properties. Therefore, we expressed, purified and characterized a soluble truncated form of human C4.4A, and used this protein to produce specific polyclonal anti-C4.4A antibodies. By immunohistochemistry we observed a pronounced surface staining for C4.4A in suprabasal keratinocytes of chronic human wounds and found C4.4A expression markedly upregulated in migrating keratinocytes during re-epithelisation of incisional skin wounds. Phorbol-ester-induced hyperplasia of mouse skin is also accompanied by a significant induction of C4.4A expression in the multilayered, suprabasal keratinocytes. C4.4A contains two Ly-6 (leucocyte antigen 6)/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin modules. Our recombinant human C4.4A is extensively modified by post-translational glycosylation, which include 5-6 N-linked carbohydrates primarily located in or close to its second Ly-6/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin module and approximately 15 O-linked carbohydrates clustered in a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich region at the C-terminus. A highly protease-sensitive region (Tyr200-Arg204) is located between these two clusters of N- and O-linked carbohydrates. The natural, glycolipid-anchored C4.4A from amnion membranes of human term placenta exhibits similar properties. Using recombinant, soluble C4.4A or MCF 7 cells, which express significant amounts of GPI-anchored C4.4A, we find no evidence for an interaction between C4.4A and uPA, a property suggested previously for rat C4.4A. Collectively these data indicate that C4.4A, although being a structural homologue of uPAR, is unlikely to have a functional overlap with uPAR. PMID:15012588

  2. The VSG expression sites of Trypanosoma brucei: multipurpose tools for the adaptation of the parasite to mammalian hosts.

    PubMed

    Pays, E; Lips, S; Nolan, D; Vanhamme, L; Pérez-Morga, D

    2001-04-25

    The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes of Trypanosoma brucei are transcribed in telomeric loci termed VSG expression sites (ESs). Despite permanent initiation of transcription in most if not all of these multiple loci, RNA elongation is abortive except in bloodstream forms where full transcription up to the VSG occurs only in a single ES at a time. The ESs active in bloodstream forms are polycistronic and contain several genes in addition to the VSG, named ES-associated genes (ESAGs). So far 12 ESAGs have been identified, some of which are present only in some ESs. Most of these genes encode surface proteins and this list includes different glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-anchored proteins such as the heterodimeric receptor for the host transferrin (ESAG7/6), integral membrane proteins such as the receptor-like transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (ESAG4) and a surface transporter (ESAG10). An interesting exception is ESAG8, which may encode a cell cycle regulator involved in the differentiation of long slender into short stumpy bloodstream forms. Several ESAGs belong to multigene families including pseudogenes and members transcribed out of the ESs, named genes related to ESAGs (GRESAGs). However, some ESAGs (7, 6 and 8) appear to be restricted to the ESs. Most of these genes can be deleted from the active ES without apparently affecting the phenotype of bloodstream form trypanosomes, probably either due to the expression of ESAGs from 'inactive' ESs (ESAG7/6) or due to the expression of GRESAGs (in particular, GRESAGs4 and GRESAGs1). At least three ESAGs (ESAG7, ESAG6 and SRA) share the evolutionary origin of VSGs. The presence of these latter genes in ESs may confer an increased capacity of the parasite for adaptation to various mammalian hosts, as suggested in the case of ESAG7/6 and proven for SRA, which allows T. brucei to infect humans. Similarly, the existence of a collection of slightly different ESAG4s in the multiple ESs might provide the parasite

  3. A tarantula-venom peptide that antagonises the TRPA1 nociceptor ion channel by binding to the S1-S4 gating domain

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Junhong; Liu, Boyi; Cao, Guan; Lipchik, Andrew M.; Perez, Minervo; Dekan, Zoltan; Mobli, Mehdi; Daly, Norelle L.; Alewood, Paul F.; Parker, Laurie L.; King, Glenn F.; Zhou, Yufeng; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The venoms of predators such as spiders, scorpions, cone snails, sea anemones, and snakes, have been an excellent source of pharmacological diversity for drug discovery and as pharmacological tools for elucidating the structure, function, and physiological properties of ion channels. Here we describe the first known peptide antagonist of the nociceptor ion channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). Results We constructed a recombinant cDNA library encoding ∼100 diverse GPI-anchored peptide toxins (t-toxins) derived from spider venoms and screened this library by co-expression in Xenopus oocytes with TRPA1. This screen resulted in identification of protoxin-I (ProTx-I), a 35-residue peptide from the venom of the Peruvian green-velvet tarantula, Thrixopelma pruriens, as the first known high-affinity peptide TRPA1 antagonist. Interestingly, ProTx-I was previously identified as an antagonist of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels. To identify the surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these distinct ion channel types, we constructed a t-toxin library of ProTx-I alanine-scanning mutants and screened this library against NaV1.2 and TRPA1. This revealed distinct partially overlapping surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these two ion channels, and whose specific chemical features explain its higher affinity for NaV1.2 than for TRPA1. Importantly, this mutagenesis yielded two novel ProTx-I variants that are only active against either TRPA1or NaV1.2, but not both. By testing its activity against chimeric channels, we identified the extracellular loops of the TRPA1 S1-S4 gating domain as the ProTx-I binding site. Conclusions These studies establish screening of t-toxin libraries of native and mutated toxins, which we term “toxineering”, as a generally applicable method for isolation of novel ion channel modifiers and for design of ion channel modifiers with altered target selectivity. They also suggest that ProTx-I will be a valuable

  4. Promoter-Specific Expression and Genomic Structure of IgLON Family Genes in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vanaveski, Taavi; Singh, Katyayani; Narvik, Jane; Eskla, Kattri-Liis; Visnapuu, Tanel; Heinla, Indrek; Jayaram, Mohan; Innos, Jürgen; Lilleväli, Kersti; Philips, Mari-Anne; Vasar, Eero

    2017-01-01

    IgLON family is composed of five genes: Lsamp, Ntm, Opcml, Negr1, and Iglon5; encoding for five highly homologous neural adhesion proteins that regulate neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. In the current study we performed in silico analysis revealing that Ntm and Opcml display similar genomic structure as previously reported for Lsamp, characterized by two alternative promotors 1a and 1b. Negr1 and Iglon5 transcripts have uniform 5′ region, suggesting single promoter. Iglon5, the recently characterized family member, shares high level of conservation and structural qualities characteristic to IgLON family such as N-terminal signal peptide, three Ig domains, and GPI anchor binding site. By using custom 5′-isoform-specific TaqMan gene-expression assay, we demonstrated heterogeneous expression of IgLON transcripts in different areas of mouse brain and several-fold lower expression in selected tissues outside central nervous system. As an example, the expression of IgLON transcripts in urogenital and reproductive system is in line with repeated reports of urogenital tumors accompanied by mutations in IgLON genes. Considering the high levels of intra-family homology shared by IgLONs, we investigated potential compensatory effects at the level of IgLON isoforms in the brains of mice deficient of one or two family members. We found that the lack of IgLONs is not compensated by a systematic quantitative increase of the other family members. On the contrary, the expression of Ntm 1a transcript and NEGR1 protein was significantly reduced in the frontal cortex of Lsamp-deficient mice suggesting that the expression patterns within IgLON family are balanced coherently. The actions of individual IgLONs, however, can be antagonistic as demonstrated by differential expression of Syp in deletion mutants of IgLONs. In conclusion, we show that the genomic twin-promoter structure has impact on both anatomical distribution and intra-family interactions of IgLON family members

  5. Characterization of Drosophila GDNF Receptor-Like and Evidence for Its Evolutionarily Conserved Interaction with Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM)/FasII

    PubMed Central

    Kallijärvi, Jukka; Stratoulias, Vassilis; Virtanen, Kristel; Hietakangas, Ville; Heino, Tapio I.; Saarma, Mart

    2012-01-01

    Background Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands are secreted growth factors distantly related to the TGF-β superfamily. In mammals, they bind to the GDNF family receptor α (Gfrα) and signal through the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the Ret-Gfr-Gdnf signaling system, we have cloned and characterized the first invertebrate Gfr-like cDNA (DmGfrl) from Drosophila melanogaster and generated a DmGfrl mutant allele. Results We found that DmGfrl encodes a large GPI-anchored membrane protein with four GFR-like domains. In line with the fact that insects lack GDNF ligands, DmGfrl mediated neither Drosophila Ret phosphorylation nor mammalian RET phosphorylation. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that DmGfrl is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems throughout Drosophila development, but, surprisingly, DmGfrl and DmRet expression patterns were largely non-overlapping. We generated a DmGfrl null allele by genomic FLP deletion and found that both DmGfrl null females and males are viable but display fertility defects. The female fertility defect manifested as dorsal appendage malformation, small size and reduced viability of eggs laid by mutant females. In male flies DmGfrl interacted genetically with the Drosophila Ncam (neural cell adhesion molecule) homolog FasII to regulate fertility. Conclusion Our results suggest that Ret and Gfrl did not function as an in cis receptor-coreceptor pair before the emergence of GDNF family ligands, and that the Ncam-Gfr interaction predated the in cis Ret-Gfr interaction in evolution. The fertility defects that we describe in DmGfrl null flies suggest that GDNF receptor-like has an evolutionarily ancient role in regulating male fertility and a previously unrecognized role in regulating oogenesis. Significance These results shed light on the evolutionary aspects of the structure, expression and function of Ret-Gfrα and Ncam-Gfrα signaling

  6. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  7. Purification of specific chromatin regions using oligonucleotides: capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART).

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher P; West, Jason A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of genomic binding sites and proteins associated with noncoding RNAs will lead to more complete mechanistic characterization of the regulatory activities of noncoding RNAs. Capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART) is a powerful technique wherein specific RNA molecules are isolated from cross-linked nuclear extracts using complementary, biotinylated capture oligonucleotides, allowing subsequent identification of genomic DNA and proteins cross-linked to the RNA of interest. Here, we describe the procedure for CHART and list strategies to optimize nuclear extract preparation, capture oligonucleotide design, and isolation of nucleic acids and proteins enriched through CHART.

  8. The single biopsy approach is reliable for the measurement of muscle protein synthesis rates in vivo in older men.

    PubMed

    Burd, Nicholas A; Pennings, Bart; Groen, Bart B L; Gijsen, Annemie P; Senden, Joan M G; van Loon, Luc J C

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to assess the reliability of the single biopsy approach for calculating muscle protein synthesis rates compared with the well described sequential muscle biopsy approach following a primed continuous infusion of L-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine and GC-MS analysis in older men. Two separate experimental infusion protocols, with differing stable isotope amino acid incorporation times, were employed consisting of n = 27 (experiment 1) or n = 9 (experiment 2). Specifically, mixed muscle protein FSR were calculated from baseline plasma protein enrichments and muscle protein enrichments obtained at 90 min or 50 min (1BX SHORT), 210 min or 170 min (1BX LONG), and between the muscle protein enrichments obtained at 90 and 210 min or 50 min and 170 min (2BX) of the infusion for experiments 1 and 2, respectively. In experiment 2, we also assessed the error that is introduced to the single muscle biopsy approach when nontracer naive subjects are recruited for participation in a primed continuous infusion of isotope-labeled amino acids. In experiment 1, applying the individual plasma protein enrichment values to the single muscle biopsy approach resulted in no differences in muscle protein FSR between the 1BX SHORT (0.031 ± 0.003%·h(-1)), 1BX LONG (0.032 ± 0.002%·h(-1)), or the 2BX approach (0.034 ± 0.002%·h(-1)). A significant correlation in muscle protein FSR was observed only between the 1BX LONG and 2BX approach (r = 0.8; P < 0.001). Similar results were observed in experiment 2. In addition, using the single biopsy approach in nontracer naïve state results in a muscle protein FSR that is negative for both the 1BX SHORT (-0.67 ± 0.051%·h(-1)) and 1BX LONG (-0.19 ± 0.051%·h(-1)) approaches. This is the first study to demonstrate that the single biopsy approach, coupled with the background enrichment of L-[ring-(2)H(5)]-phenylalanine of mixed plasma proteins, generates data that are similar to using the sequential muscle biopsy approach in the elderly

  9. Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by Metabolites of Phoma glomerata PG41 Isolated From Natural Substrate Colonized by Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Larisa; Statsyuk, Natalia; Mikityuk, Oleg; Nazarova, Tatyana; Dzhavakhiya, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), produced by Aspergillus flavus, is one of the most life threatening food contaminants causing significant economic losses worldwide. Biological AFB1 degradation by microorganisms, or preferably microbial enzymes, is considered as one of the most promising approaches. Objectives: The current work aimed to study the AFB1-degrading metabolites, produced by Phoma glomerata PG41, sharing a natural substrate with aflatoxigenic A. flavus, and the preliminary determination of the nature of these metabolites. Materials and Methods: The AFB1-degrading potential of PG41 metabolites was determined by a quantitative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of residual AFB1 after 72 hours incubation at 27ºC. The effects of pH, heat, and protease treatment on the AFB1-destroying activity of extracellular metabolites were examined. Results: The AFB1-degrading activity of protein-enriched fractions, isolated from culture liquid filtrate and cell-free extract, is associated with high-molecular-weight components, is time- and pH-dependent, thermolabile, and is significantly reduced by proteinase K treatment. The AFB1 degradation efficiency of these fractions reaches 78% and 66%, respectively. Conclusions: Phoma glomerata PG41 strain sharing natural substrate with toxigenic A. flavus secretes metabolites possessing a significant aflatoxin-degrading activity. The activity is associated mainly with a protein-enriched high-molecular-weight fraction of extracellular metabolites and appears to be of enzymatic origin. PMID:25789135

  10. A method for comprehensive glycosite-mapping and direct quantitation of plasma glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Qiuting; Ruhaak, L. Renee; Stroble, Carol; Parker, Evan; Huang, Jincui; Maverakis, Emanual; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive glycan map was constructed for the top eight abundant plasma glycoproteins using both specific and non-specific enzyme digestions followed by nano LC–Chip/QTOF mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Glycopeptides were identified using an in-house software tool, GPFinder. A sensitive and reproducible multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique on a triple quadrupole MS was developed and applied to quantify immunoglobulins G, A, M, and their site-specific glycans simultaneously and directly from human serum without protein enrichments. A total of 64 glycopeptides and 15 peptides were monitored for IgG, IgA, and IgM in a 20-min UPLC gradient. The absolute protein contents were quantified using peptide calibration curves. The glycopeptide ion abundances were normalized to the respective protein abundances to separate protein glycosylation from protein expression. This technique yields higher method reproducibility and less sample loss when compared to quantitation methods that involve protein enrichments. The absolute protein quantitation has a wide linear range (3-4 orders of magnitude) and low limit of quantitation (femtomole level). This rapid and robust quantitation technique, which provides quantitative information for both proteins and glycosylation, will further facilitate disease biomarker discoveries. PMID:26510530

  11. Large oncosomes contain distinct protein cargo and represent a separate functional class of tumor-derived extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Minciacchi, Valentina R; You, Sungyong; Spinelli, Cristiana; Morley, Samantha; Zandian, Mandana; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Cavallini, Lorenzo; Ciardiello, Chiara; Reis Sobreiro, Mariana; Morello, Matteo; Kharmate, Geetanjali; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Tomlinson Guns, Emma; Gleave, Martin; Gho, Yong Song; Mathivanan, Suresh; Yang, Wei; Freeman, Michael R; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2015-05-10

    Large oncosomes (LO) are atypically large (1-10 µm diameter) cancer-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), originating from the shedding of membrane blebs and associated with advanced disease. We report that 25% of the proteins, identified by a quantitative proteomics analysis, are differentially represented in large and nano-sized EVs from prostate cancer cells. Proteins enriched in large EVs included enzymes involved in glucose, glutamine and amino acid metabolism, all metabolic processes relevant to cancer. Glutamine metabolism was altered in cancer cells exposed to large EVs, an effect that was not observed upon treatment with exosomes. Large EVs exhibited discrete buoyant densities in iodixanol (OptiPrep(TM)) gradients. Fluorescent microscopy of large EVs revealed an appearance consistent with LO morphology, indicating that these structures can be categorized as LO. Among the proteins enriched in LO, cytokeratin 18 (CK18) was one of the most abundant (within the top 5th percentile) and was used to develop an assay to detect LO in the circulation and tissues of mice and patients with prostate cancer. These observations indicate that LO represent a discrete EV type that may play a distinct role in tumor progression and that may be a source of cancer-specific markers.

  12. Hexapeptide library as a universal tool for sample preparation in protein glycosylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Carolin; Ruhaak, L Renee; Wuhrer, Manfred; Deelder, André M

    2012-02-16

    Recent analytical advancements allow for large-scale glycomics and glycan-biomarker research with N-glycans released from complex protein mixtures of e.g. plasma with a wide range of protein concentrations. Protein enrichment techniques to obtain samples with a better representation of low-abundance proteins are hardy applied. In this study, hexapeptide ligands previously described for enrichment of low-abundance proteins in proteomics are evaluated for glycan analysis. A repeatable on-bead glycan release strategy was developed, and glycans were analyzed using capillary sieving electrophoresis on a DNA analyzer. Binding of proteins to the hexapeptide library occurred via the protein backbone. At neutral pH no discrimination between protein glycoforms was observed. Interestingly, glycan profiles of plasma with and without hexapeptide library enrichment revealed very similar patterns, despite the vast changes in protein concentrations in the samples. The most significant differences in glycosylation profiles were ascribed to a reduction in immunoglobulin-derived glycans. These results suggest that specific and sensitive biomarkers will be hard to access on the full plasma level using protein enrichment in combination with glycan analysis. Instead, fractionation techniques or profiling strategies on the glycopeptide level after enrichment are proposed for in-depth glycoproteomics research.

  13. High fat diet produces brain insulin resistance, synaptodendritic abnormalities and altered behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Steven E; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R; Carlson, Gregory C; Browne, Caroline A; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F; Kim, Sangwon F

    2014-07-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS(616)), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors.

  14. Comparison of Digestion Protocols for Microgram Quantities of Enriched Protein Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hervey, IV, William Judson; Strader, Michael B; Strader, Michael Brad; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2007-01-01

    Standard biochemical techniques that are used for protein enrichments, such as affinity isolation and density gradient centrifugation, frequently yield high nanogram to low microgram quantities at a significant expenditure of resources and time. The characterization of selected protein enrichments by the "shotgun" mass spectrometry approach is often compromised by the lack of effective and efficient in-solution proteolysis protocols specifically tailored for these small quantities of proteins. This study compares the results of five different digestion protocols that were applied to 2.5 g portions of protein isolates from two disparate sources: Rhodopseudomonas palustris 70S ribosomal proteins, and Bos taurus microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). Proteolytic peptides produced according to each protocol in each type of protein isolate were analyzed by one-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The effectiveness of each digestion protocol was assessed on the basis of three parameters: number of peptide identifications, number of protein identifications, and sequence coverage. The two protocols using a solvent containing 80% acetonitrile (CH3CN) for trypsin digestions performed as well as, and in some instances better than, protocols employing other solvents and chaotropes in both types of protein isolates. A primary advantage of the 80% CH3CN protocol is that it requires fewer sample manipulation steps.

  15. A Method for Comprehensive Glycosite-Mapping and Direct Quantitation of Serum Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hong, Qiuting; Ruhaak, L Renee; Stroble, Carol; Parker, Evan; Huang, Jincui; Maverakis, Emanual; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-12-04

    A comprehensive glycan map was constructed for the top eight abundant glycoproteins in plasma using both specific and nonspecific enzyme digestions followed by nano liquid chromatography (LC)-chip/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Glycopeptides were identified using an in-house software tool, GPFinder. A sensitive and reproducible multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique on a triple quadrupole MS was developed and applied to quantify immunoglobulins G, A, M, and their site-specific glycans simultaneously and directly from human serum/plasma without protein enrichments. A total of 64 glycopeptides and 15 peptides were monitored for IgG, IgA, and IgM in a 20 min ultra high performance (UP)LC gradient. The absolute protein contents were quantified using peptide calibration curves. The glycopeptide ion abundances were normalized to the respective protein abundances to separate protein glycosylation from protein expression. This technique yields higher method reproducibility and less sample loss when compared with the quantitation method that involves protein enrichments. The absolute protein quantitation has a wide linear range (3-4 orders of magnitude) and low limit of quantitation (femtomole level). This rapid and robust quantitation technique, which provides quantitative information for both proteins and glycosylation, will further facilitate disease biomarker discoveries.

  16. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  17. An Optimized Approach to Recover Secreted Proteins from Fibroblast Conditioned-Media for Secretomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Bastien; Deschênes, Lydia T.; Pouliot, Roxane; Dupré, Nicolas; Gros-Louis, Francois

    2016-01-01

    The proteins secreted by a particular type of cell, the secretome, play important roles in the regulation of many physiological processes via paracrine/autocrine mechanisms, and they are of increasing interest to help understanding rare diseases and to identify potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. To facilitate ongoing research involving secreted proteins, we revisited cell culture protocols and whole secreted protein enrichment protocols. A reliable method for culturing and precipitating secreted protein from patient-derived fibroblast conditioned-medium was established. The method is based on the optimization of cell confluency and incubation time conditions. The well-established carrier-based TCA-DOC protein precipitation method was consistently found to give higher protein recovery yield. According to our results, we therefore propose that protein enrichment should be performed by TCA-DOC precipitation method after 48 h at 95% of confluence in a serum-deprived culture medium. Given the importance of secreted proteins as a source to elucidate the pathogenesis of rare diseases, especially neurological disorders, this approach may help to discover novel candidate biomarkers with potential clinical significance. PMID:27064649

  18. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane complex proteins by differential proteomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Afrane, Mary; Clemmer, David E; Zhong, Guangming; Nelson, David E

    2010-06-01

    The extracellular chlamydial infectious particle, or elementary body (EB), is enveloped by an intra- and intermolecular cysteine cross-linked protein shell called the chlamydial outer membrane complex (COMC). A few abundant proteins, including the major outer membrane protein and cysteine-rich proteins (OmcA and OmcB), constitute the overwhelming majority of COMC proteins. The identification of less-abundant COMC proteins has been complicated by limitations of proteomic methodologies and the contamination of COMC fractions with abundant EB proteins. Here, we used parallel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 434/Bu EB, COMC, and Sarkosyl-soluble EB fractions to identify proteins enriched or depleted from COMC. All well-described COMC proteins were specifically enriched in the COMC fraction. In contrast, multiple COMC-associated proteins found in previous studies were strongly enriched in the Sarkosyl-soluble fraction, suggesting that these proteins are not COMC components or are not stably associated with COMC. Importantly, we also identified novel proteins enriched in COMC. The list of COMC proteins identified in this study has provided reliable information for further understanding chlamydial protein secretion systems and modeling COMC and EB structures.

  19. MALDI imaging and in situ identification of integral membrane proteins from rat brain tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Nicklay, Joshua J.; Harris, Glenn A.; Schey, Kevin L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in data generated by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) because of analytical challenges related to their size and solubility. Here we present the first example of MALDI IMS of two highly modified multi-transmembrane domain proteins, myelin proteolipid protein (PLP, 30 kDa) and DM-20 (26 kDa), from various regions of rat brain, namely the cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla. We utilize a novel tissue pre-treatment aimed at transmembrane protein enrichment to show the in situ distribution of fatty acylation of these proteins, particularly of post-translational palmitoylation. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of protease-encapsulated hydrogels for spatially localized on-tissue protein digestion and peptide extraction for subsequent direct coupling to LC-MS/MS for protein identification. PMID:23829295

  20. Spatial differences in an integral membrane proteome detected in laser capture microdissected samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Han, Jun; Schey, Kevin L

    2008-07-01

    The combination of laser capture microdissection and mass spectrometry represents a powerful technology for studying spatially resolved proteomes. Moreover, the compositions of integral membrane proteomes have rarely been studied in a spatially resolved manner. In this study, ocular lens tissue was carefully dissected by laser capture microdissection and conditions for membrane protein enrichment, trypsin digestion, and mass spectrometry analysis were optimized. Proteomic analysis allowed the identification of 170 proteins, 136 of which were identified with more than one peptide match. Spatial differences in protein expression were observed between cortical and nuclear samples. In addition, the spatial distribution of post-translational modifications to lens membrane proteins, such as the lens major intrinsic protein AQP0, were investigated and regional differences were measured for AQP0 C-terminal phosphorylation and truncation.

  1. Klp10A, a stem cell centrosome-enriched kinesin, balances asymmetries in Drosophila male germline stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuie; Inaba, Mayu; Venkei, Zsolt G; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2016-11-25

    Asymmetric stem cell division is often accompanied by stereotypical inheritance of the mother and daughter centrosomes. However, it remains unknown whether and how stem cell centrosomes are uniquely regulated and how this regulation may contribute to stem cell fate. Here we identify Klp10A, a microtubule-depolymerizing kinesin of the kinesin-13 family, as the first protein enriched in the stem cell centrosome in Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs). Depletion of klp10A results in abnormal elongation of the mother centrosomes in GSCs, suggesting the existence of a stem cell-specific centrosome regulation program. Concomitant with mother centrosome elongation, GSCs form asymmetric spindle, wherein the elongated mother centrosome organizes considerably larger half spindle than the other. This leads to asymmetric cell size, yielding a smaller differentiating daughter cell. We propose that klp10A functions to counteract undesirable asymmetries that may result as a by-product of achieving asymmetries essential for successful stem cell divisions.

  2. Cloning of the lambda resistant genes from Brevibacterium albidum and Proteus vulgaris into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chae, K S; Yoo, O J

    1986-11-14

    Genes from Proteus vulgaris ATCC13315 and Brevibacterium albidum ATCC15831 were introduced into Escherichia coli, which rendered the host resistant to coliphage lambda. The clones transformed by any one of the two recombinant plasmids, pRMG101 or pRMG216, were totally resistant against the infection of virulent lambda and N4, but sensitive to ø80, T4 and T7. However, when maltose transport systems of the clones were induced by maltose, the clones were no more resistant to the phage: thus, this phenotype was thought to be due to the inhibition of phage adsorption onto the cell surface. The gene product was shown by SDS-PAGE of membrane protein-enriched extract of the clone. Molecular weight as measured was about 40,000 dalton, which coincide with that inferred from the nucleotide sequences.

  3. RPC53 encodes a subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase C (III) whose inactivation leads to a predominantly G1 arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, C; Micouin, J Y; Chiannilkulchai, N; Treich, I; Buhler, J M; Sentenac, A

    1992-01-01

    RPC53 is shown to be an essential gene encoding the C53 subunit specifically associated with yeast RNA polymerase C (III). Temperature-sensitive rpc53 mutants were generated and showed a rapid inhibition of tRNA synthesis after transfer to the restrictive temperature. Unexpectedly, the rpc53 mutants preferentially arrested their cell division in the G1 phase as large, round, unbudded cells. The RPC53 DNA sequence is predicted to code for a hydrophilic M(r)-46,916 protein enriched in charged amino acid residues. The carboxy-terminal 136 amino acids of C53 are significantly similar (25% identical amino acid residues) to the same region of the human BN51 protein. The BN51 cDNA was originally isolated by its ability to complement a temperature-sensitive hamster cell mutant that undergoes a G1 cell division arrest, as is true for the rpc53 mutants. Images PMID:1406624

  4. Nutritional and functional evaluation of wheat flour cookies supplemented with gram flour.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Ali A; Ahmed, Anwaar; Ahmad, Asif; Hameed, Tabassum; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Hayat, Imran; Khalid, Nauman

    2013-02-01

    Protein-enriched cookies were prepared by supplementing gram flour into wheat flour at levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% and analysed for physicochemical properties. The protein quality of the cookies was assessed by feeding gram flour-supplemented cookies to albino rats for 10 days. The supplementation resulted in a significant increase in protein, fat, crude fibre and ash contents of the cookies. The thickness and spread factor of cookies differ significantly while non-significant effect was observed in the width of the cookies. The protein efficiency ratio, net protein utilization, biological value and true digestibility differed significantly among diets containing cookies with gram flour fed to rats. Cookies with 30% substitution of straight grade flour and gram flour produced acceptable cookies as compared to control. The cookies containing 40-50% gram flour were best regarded as protein bioavailability for rats.

  5. Enrichment of nutrient quality of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) with microbial proteins.

    PubMed

    Antai, S P

    1990-10-01

    The effect of fermentation on the nutrient quality of cassava was investigated. Chemical analysis revealed a general increase in ash, fibre and crude protein content of the fermented cassava mash, while the carbohydrate content showed a substantial decrease. The results of the chemical analysis indicated that fermentation resulted in a slight protein enrichment of the fermentated cassava mash. When active yeast cells were inoculated into the cassava mash before fermentation, the yeast cells grew and generated additional cell mass which was reflected in a higher content of crude protein in the fermented cassava mash. Results obtained also revealed that 3.3% concentration of yeast cell inoculum added to cassava mash before commencement of fermentation was optimum for maximal crude protein formation.

  6. Structural features and in vivo antitussive activity of the water extracted polymer from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudipta; Nosál'ová, Gabriella; Ghosh, Debjani; Flešková, Dana; Capek, Peter; Ray, Bimalendu

    2011-05-01

    Antitussive drugs are amongst the most widely used medications worldwide; however no new class of drugs has been introduced into the market for many years. Herein, we have analyzed the water-extracted polymeric fraction (WE) of Glycyrrhiza glabra. This arabinogalactan protein enriched fraction, ≥ 85% of which gets precipitated with Yariv reagent, consisted mainly of 3- and 3,6-linked galactopyranosyl, and 5- and 3,5-linked arabinofuranosyl residues. Peroral administration of this polymer in a dose of 50mg/kg body weight decreases the number of citric acid induced cough efforts in guinea pigs more effectively than codeine. It does not induce significant change in the values of specific airway resistance or provoked any observable adverse effects.

  7. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  8. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  9. Direct detection of ligand binding to Sepharose-immobilised protein using saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Muenster-Kuehnel, Anja K.; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Itzstein, Mark von . E-mail: m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    We report an easy and direct application of 'Saturation Transfer Double Difference' (STDD) NMR spectroscopy to identify ligands that bind to a Sepharose-immobilised target protein. The model protein, cytidine 5'-monophosphate sialic acid (CMP-Sia) synthetase, was expressed as a Strep-Tag II fusion protein and immobilised on Strep-Tactin Sepharose. STD NMR experiments of the protein-enriched Sepharose matrix in the presence of a binding ligand (cytidine 5'-triphosphate, CTP) and a non-binding ligand ({alpha}/{beta}-glucose) clearly show that CTP binds to the immobilised enzyme, whereas glucose has no affinity. This approach has three major advantages: (a) only low quantities of protein are required, (b) no specialised NMR technology or the application of additional data analysis by non-routine methods is required, and (c) easy multiple use of the immobilised protein is available.

  10. Pathobiology of the stratum corneum.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S M; Williams, M L; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    1993-01-01

    The epidermis is a dynamic system whose metabolic activity is regulated in large part by the integrity of the permeability barrier. This barrier resides in the stratum corneum and comprises a unique 2-compartment system of structural protein-enriched corneocytes embedded in a lipid-enriched intercellular matrix. Lipid extraction or metabolic imbalances, such as essential fatty acid deficiency, produce barrier abnormalities that in turn result in epidermal hyperproliferation, scaling, and inflammation. When the barrier remains intact, lipid imbalances, such as an abnormal cholesterol sulfate:cholesterol ratio in recessive X-linked ichthyosis, can lead to abnormal corneocyte adhesion (visible scale). Both cellular and intercellular proteins also participate in normal desquamation, and protein abnormalities may provoke abnormal scaling (such as filaggrin in ichthyosis vulgaris). Thus, perturbations of the stratum corneum may be the catalyst for a number of skin diseases, rather than the end result of processes that are initiated in subjacent skin layers. PMID:8460510

  11. On-plate selective enrichment and self-desalting of peptides/proteins for direct MALDI MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhoufang; Wang, Yandong; Shi, Shoulei; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Xinhua; Lu, Nan

    2012-03-06

    In this paper, a new technique has been proposed to achieve simultaneous peptides/proteins enrichment and wash-free self-desalting on a novel sample support with a circle hydrophobic-hydrophilic-hydrophobic pattern. Upon deposition, the sample solution is first concentrated in a small area by repulsion of the hydrophobic outer layer, and then, the peptides/proteins and coexisting salt contaminants are selectively captured in different regions of the pattern through strong hydrophobic and hydrophilic attractions, respectively. As a result, the detection sensitivity is improved by 2 orders of magnitude better than the use of the traditional MALDI plate, and high-quality mass spectra are obtained even in the presence of NaCl (1 M), NH(4)HCO(3) (100 mM), or urea (1 M). The practical application of this method is further demonstrated by the successful analysis of myoglobin digests with high sequence coverage, demonstrating the great potential in proteomic research.

  12. Effect of Hordeum vulgare L. (Barley) on blood glucose levels of normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, M.; Ghannadi, A.; Movahedian, A.; Hakim-Elahi, I.

    2014-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is the world's fourth most important cereal crop after wheat, rice and maize. It is readily available with reasonable cost, and has the highest amount of dietary fiber among the cereals which may be beneficial for metabolic syndrome. In the present study, the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of barley seeds and a protein enriched fraction on blood glucose of normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats (STZ, 55 mg/kg, i.p) were investigated. Normal and diabetic male Wistar rats were treated daily with normal saline (1 ml), barley hydroalcoholic extract (BHE) (0.1, 0.25, 0.5 g/kg), protein enriched fraction (PEF) (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 g/kg) and glibenclamide (1 and 3 mg/kg), separately and the treatment was continued for 11 days. Blood samples were taken at 0, 1, 2, 3, 9 h in the first day and the days 5 (120 h) and 11 (264 h) for measuring the blood glucose levels (BGL). Our results indicated that none of the BHE and PEF, were effective to reduce BGL in normal or diabetic rats in acute phase of treatment (1st day). Nevertheless, BHE at doses of 0.25 and 0.5 g/kg, were only effective in detracting BGL of diabetic rats after 11 days of continued daily therapy. Moreover, BHE restored body weight of diabetic rats at the end of treatment. Glibenclamide had also hypoglycemic action in normal and diabetic rats after both acute and extended treatments. These findings suggest that barley seeds hydroalcoholic extract, has a role in diabetic control in long term consumption, and this effect might be at least due to its high fiber content. More detailed studies are warranted to demonstrate its mechanism of action and identify active components. PMID:25657786

  13. Optimal Concentration of 2,2,2-Trichloroacetic Acid for Protein Precipitation Based on Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Albert N; Ezoulin, Miezan JM; Youm, Ibrahima; Youan, Bi-Botti C

    2014-01-01

    For low protein concentrations containing biological samples (in proteomics) and for non proteinaceous compound assays (in bioanalysis), there is a critical need for a simple, fast, and cost-effective protein enrichment or precipitation method. However, 2,2,2-trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is traditionally used for protein precipitation at ineffective concentrations for very low protein containing samples. It is hypothesized that response surface methodology, can be used to systematically identify the optimal TCA concentration for protein precipitation in a wider concentration range. To test this hypothesis, a central composite design is used to assess the effects of two factors (X1 = volume of aqueous solution of protein, and X2 = volume of TCA solution 6.1N) on the optical absorbance of the supernatant (Y1), and the percentage of protein precipitated (Y2). Using either bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein or human urine (with 20 ppm protein content), 4% w/v (a saddle point) is the optimal concentration of the TCA solution for protein precipitation that is visualized by SDS-PAGE analysis. At this optimal concentration, the Y2-values range from 76.26 to 92.67% w/w for 0.016 to 2 mg/mL of BSA solution. It is also useful for protein enrichment and xenobiotic analysis in protein-free supernatant as applied to tenofovir (a model HIV microbicide). In these conditions, the limit of detection and limit of quantitation of tenofovir are respectively 0.0014 mg/mL and 0.0042 mg/mL. This optimal concentration of TCA provides optimal condition for protein purification and analysis of any xenobiotic compound like tenofovir. PMID:25750762

  14. Leaf proteome rebalancing in Nicotiana benthamiana for upstream enrichment of a transiently expressed recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stéphanie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    A key factor influencing the yield of biopharmaceuticals in plants is the ratio of recombinant to host proteins in crude extracts. Postextraction procedures have been devised to enrich recombinant proteins before purification. Here, we assessed the potential of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) as a generic trigger of recombinant protein enrichment in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves before harvesting. Previous studies have reported a significant rebalancing of the leaf proteome via the jasmonate signalling pathway, associated with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO) depletion and the up-regulation of stress-related proteins. As expected, leaf proteome alterations were observed 7 days post-MeJA treatment, associated with lowered RuBisCO pools and the induction of stress-inducible proteins such as protease inhibitors, thionins and chitinases. Leaf infiltration with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens bacterial vector 24 h post-MeJA treatment induced a strong accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins after 6 days, along with a near-complete reversal of MeJA-mediated stress protein up-regulation. RuBisCO pools were partly restored upon infiltration, but most of the depletion effect observed in noninfiltrated plants was maintained over six more days, to give crude protein samples with 50% less RuBisCO than untreated tissue. These changes were associated with net levels reaching 425 μg/g leaf tissue for the blood-typing monoclonal antibody C5-1 expressed in MeJA-treated leaves, compared to less than 200 μg/g in untreated leaves. Our data confirm overall the ability of MeJA to trigger RuBisCO depletion and recombinant protein enrichment in N. benthamiana leaves, estimated here for C5-1 at more than 2-fold relative to host proteins.

  15. Exploring the functional mealtime associations of older adults through consumer segmentation and a means-end chain approach.

    PubMed

    den Uijl, Louise C; Jager, Gerry; de Graaf, Cees; Kremer, Stefanie

    2016-12-01

    Senior consumers are a rapidly growing and highly heterogeneous part of the world's population. This group does not always meet its recommended protein intake, which can negatively impact on their physical functioning and quality of life. To date, little is known about their motivations to consume protein-rich meals. In the current study, we therefore aim to identify consumer segments within the group of vital community-dwelling older adults on the basis of mealtime functionality (for example 'I eat because I'm hungry', or 'I eat because it is cosy'). To this end, we first conducted an online survey to identify these functional mealtime expectations of older consumers (study I, n = 398, 158 males, mean age 65.8 (y) ± 5.9 (SD)). To obtain further insights regarding mealtime functionality and proteins/protein enrichment, laddering interviews were conducted with a subgroup of the segmentation study participants (study II, n = 40, 20 males, mean age 66.9 (y) ± 4.8 (SD)). The results of the online survey showed three consumer clusters: cosy socialisers, physical nutritioners, and thoughtless rewarders. Thoughtless rewarders tend to eat without having explicit thoughts about it, they eat for the reward, and score highest on environmental awareness. Both the segmentation and the in-depth interviews showed that, for the cosy socialisers, the cosiness and social function of a meal are important motivators, whereas for the physical nutritioners the focus is more on the health and nutrient aspects of a meal. For cosy socialisers, protein enrichment can best be achieved through addition of protein-rich ingredients, whereas, for physical nutritioners, addition of protein powder is preferred. These results provide practical guidelines for the development of protein-rich meals and communication strategies tailored to the needs of specific vital community-dwelling older subgroups.

  16. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of extracts from herb of Chelidonium majus L.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Przemysław Łukasz; Kędzia, Bogdan; Ożarowski, Marcin; Kujawski, Radosław; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Białas, Wojciech; Gryszczyńska, Agnieszka; Buchwald, Waldemar; Szulc, Michał; Wasiak, Natalia; Górska-Paukszta, Małgorzata; Baraniak, Justyna; Czerny, Bogusław; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate analgesic activity ("hot plate" test), anti-inflammatory activity (carrageenan-induced paw edema) and locomotor activity in rats under the influence of three fractions of Chelidonium majus herb extract: full water extract (FWE), protein enriched fraction (PEF), and non-protein fraction (NPF). Effects of the fractions on the level of chosen cytokines and their mRNA levels were also assessed using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration as a proinflammatory cue. All fractions and diclofenac did not affect the locomotor activity of rats in comparison with the control group. FWE and PEF three hours after administration showed statistically significant analgesic activities comparable to morphine (p < 0.05). A slight reduction in rat paw edema was observed after three (comparable with diclofenac) and six hours in the NPF group. FWE revealed a statistically significant pro-inflammatory effect after three hours in comparison with the control group. Peripheral IL-1 and IL-4 cytokine concentrations were reduced under FWE and NPF, PEF fractions. The combination of FWE, PEF and NPF together with LPS showed only the effects of LPS. We suggest that protein enriched fraction (PEF) produced centrally mediated (morphine-like) analgesic action, whereas the anti-inflammatory potential was shown only after LPS-induced inflammation. The precise mechanisms involved in the production of anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of studied fractions are not completely understood, but they may be caused rather by the presence of protein more than alkaloids-enriched fraction. This fraction of the extract could be used as an alternative therapy for the prevention of inflammatory-related diseases in the future, but further studies are needed.

  17. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of extracts from herb of Chelidonium majus L.

    PubMed Central

    Kędzia, Bogdan; Ożarowski, Marcin; Kujawski, Radosław; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Białas, Wojciech; Gryszczyńska, Agnieszka; Buchwald, Waldemar; Szulc, Michał; Wasiak, Natalia; Górska-Paukszta, Małgorzata; Baraniak, Justyna; Czerny, Bogusław; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate analgesic activity (“hot plate” test), anti-inflammatory activity (carrageenan-induced paw edema) and locomotor activity in rats under the influence of three fractions of Chelidonium majus herb extract: full water extract (FWE), protein enriched fraction (PEF), and non-protein fraction (NPF). Effects of the fractions on the level of chosen cytokines and their mRNA levels were also assessed using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration as a proinflammatory cue. All fractions and diclofenac did not affect the locomotor activity of rats in comparison with the control group. FWE and PEF three hours after administration showed statistically significant analgesic activities comparable to morphine (p < 0.05). A slight reduction in rat paw edema was observed after three (comparable with diclofenac) and six hours in the NPF group. FWE revealed a statistically significant pro-inflammatory effect after three hours in comparison with the control group. Peripheral IL-1 and IL-4 cytokine concentrations were reduced under FWE and NPF, PEF fractions. The combination of FWE, PEF and NPF together with LPS showed only the effects of LPS. We suggest that protein enriched fraction (PEF) produced centrally mediated (morphine-like) analgesic action, whereas the anti-inflammatory potential was shown only after LPS-induced inflammation. The precise mechanisms involved in the production of anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of studied fractions are not completely understood, but they may be caused rather by the presence of protein more than alkaloids-enriched fraction. This fraction of the extract could be used as an alternative therapy for the prevention of inflammatory-related diseases in the future, but further studies are needed. PMID:26862303

  18. Neurochemical, morphologic, and laminar characterization of cortical projection neurons in the cingulate motor areas of the macaque monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Hof, P. R.; Young, W. G.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The primate cingulate gyrus contains multiple cortical areas that can be distinguished by several neurochemical features, including the distribution of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons. In addition, connectivity and functional properties indicate that there are multiple motor areas in the cortex lining the cingulate sulcus. These motor areas were targeted for analysis of potential interactions among regional specialization, connectivity, and cellular characteristics such as neurochemical profile and morphology. Specifically, intracortical injections of retrogradely transported dyes and intracellular injection were combined with immunocytochemistry to investigate neurons projecting from the cingulate motor areas to the putative forelimb region of the primary motor cortex, area M1. Two separate groups of neurons projecting to area M1 emanated from the cingulate sulcus, one anterior and one posterior, both of which furnished commissural and ipsilateral connections with area M1. The primary difference between the two populations was laminar origin, with the anterior projection originating largely in deep layers, and the posterior projection taking origin equally in superficial and deep layers. With regard to cellular morphology, the anterior projection exhibited more morphologic diversity than the posterior projection. Commissural projections from both anterior and posterior fields originated largely in layer VI. Neurofilament protein distribution was a reliable tool for localizing the two projections and for discriminating between them. Comparable proportions of the two sets of projection neurons contained neurofilament protein, although the density and distribution of the total population of neurofilament protein-enriched neurons was very different in the two subareas of origin. Within a projection, the participating neurons exhibited a high degree of morphologic heterogeneity, and no correlation was observed between somatodendritic morphology and

  19. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28165047

  20. Fetal metabolic programming and epigenetic modifications: a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Burgueño, Adriana L; Pirola, Carlos J

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the notion that epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, both involving chromatin remodeling, contribute to fetal metabolic programming. We use a combination of gene-protein enrichment analysis resources along with functional annotations and protein interaction networks for an integrative approach to understanding the mechanisms underlying fetal metabolic programming. Systems biology approaches suggested that fetal adaptation to an impaired nutritional environment presumes profound changes in gene expression that involve regulation of tissue-specific patterns of methylated cytosine residues, modulation of the histone acetylation-deacetylation switch, cell differentiation, and stem cell pluripotency. The hypothalamus and the liver seem to be differently involved. In addition, new putative explanations have emerged about the question of whether in utero overnutrition modulates fetal metabolic programming in the same fashion as that of a maternal environment of undernutrition, suggesting that the mechanisms behind these two fetal nutritional imbalances are different. In conclusion, intrauterine growth restriction is most likely to be associated with the induction of persistent changes in tissue structure and functionality. Conversely, a maternal obesogenic environment is most probably associated with metabolic reprogramming of glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as future risk of metabolic syndrome (MS), fatty liver, and insulin (INS) resistance.

  1. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    PubMed Central

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  2. Combined intervention of dietary soybean proteins and swim training: effects on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Figard, Hélène; Mougin, Fabienne; Gaume, Vincent; Berthelot, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Soybean proteins, a rich source of isoflavones, taken immediately after an ovariectomy prevent bone loss in rats. Exercise-induced stimuli are essential for bone growth. Few studies exist about the combined effects of swim training and soybean protein supplementation on bone metabolism. So, the purpose of this study was to investigate, in 48 female Sprague-Dawley rats (12 weeks old) the effects of an 8-week swim-training regimen (1 h/day, 5 days/week) and dietary soybean proteins (200 g/kg diet) on bone metabolism. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) ovariectomized fed with a semisynthetic control diet; (2) ovariectomized fed with a soybean protein-enriched semisynthetic diet; (3) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with control diet; (4) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with a soybean protein diet. Following the treatment period, body weight gain was identical in the four groups. Soybean protein supplementation increased bone calcium content, and reduced plasma osteocalcin values, without significant modification of calcium balance and net calcium absorption. Swim training enhanced plasma and bone calcium content and calcium balance and net calcium absorption. It did not modify either plasma osteocalcin values or urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion. Both exercise and soybean protein intake increased plasma on bone calcium without modifying net calcium absorption or bone markers. In conclusion, we demonstrated, in ovariectomized rats, that swimming exercise and dietary supplementation with soy proteins do not have synergistic effects on calcium metabolism and bone markers.

  3. Forensic Proteomics of Poxvirus Production

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Tulman, Edan; Engelmann, Heather E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Geary, Steven J.; Robinson, Aaron C.; Liao, Xiaofen

    2013-08-27

    The field of microbial forensics has recently sought to develop methods to discern biological signatures to indicate production methods for biological agents. Viral agents have received less attention to date. Their obligate propagation in living cells makes purification from cellular material a challenge. This leads to potential carryover of protein-rich signature of their production system. Here we have explored a proteomic analysis of Vaccinia virus as a model poxvirus system in which to compare samples of virus propagated in different cell lines and subjected to different purification schemes. The proteomic data sets indicated viral, host cell and culture medium proteins, and several layers of data analysis were applied to build confidence in the peptide identification and capture information on the taxonomic utility of each. The analysis showed clear shifts in protein profiles with virus purification, with successive gradient purification steps showing different levels of viral protein enrichment. Peptides from cellular proteins, including those present in purified virus preparations, provided signatures which enabled discrimination of cell line substrates, including distinguishing between cells derived from different primate species. The ability to discern multiple aspects of viral production demonstrates the potential value of proteomic analysis as tool for microbial forensics.

  4. Effects of ECM protein micropatterns on the migration and differentiation of adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sunghoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Lee, Eunsoo; Hong, Nari; Sun, Woong; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-08-12

    The migration and differentiation of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) are believed to be strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the stem cell niche. In vitro culture platform, which involves the specific spatial distribution of ECM protein, could offer novel tools for better understanding of aNSC behavior in the spatial pattern of ECM proteins. In this work, we applied soft-lithographic technique to design simple and reproducible laminin (LN)-polylysine cell culture substrates and investigated how aNSCs respond to the various spatial distribution of laminin, one of ECM proteins enriched in the aNSC niche. We found that aNSC preferred to migrate and attach to LN stripes, and aNSC-derived neurons and astrocytes showed significant difference in motility towards LN stripes. By changing the spacing of LN stripes, we were able to control the alignment of neurons and astrocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to investigate the differential cellular responses of aNSCs on ECM protein (LN) and cell adhesive synthetic polymer (PDL) using surface micropatterns. Our findings would provide a deeper understanding in astrocyte-neuron interactions as well as ECM-stem cell interactions.

  5. Punctuated emergences of genetic and phenotypic innovations in eumetazoan, bilaterian, euteleostome, and hominidae ancestors.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Galliot, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic traits derive from the selective recruitment of genetic materials over macroevolutionary times, and protein-coding genes constitute an essential component of these materials. We took advantage of the recent production of genomic scale data from sponges and cnidarians, sister groups from eumetazoans and bilaterians, respectively, to date the emergence of human proteins and to infer the timing of acquisition of novel traits through metazoan evolution. Comparing the proteomes of 23 eukaryotes, we find that 33% human proteins have an ortholog in nonmetazoan species. This premetazoan proteome associates with 43% of all annotated human biological processes. Subsequently, four major waves of innovations can be inferred in the last common ancestors of eumetazoans, bilaterians, euteleostomi (bony vertebrates), and hominidae, largely specific to each epoch, whereas early branching deuterostome and chordate phyla show very few innovations. Interestingly, groups of proteins that act together in their modern human functions often originated concomitantly, although the corresponding human phenotypes frequently emerged later. For example, the three cnidarians Acropora, Nematostella, and Hydra express a highly similar protein inventory, and their protein innovations can be affiliated either to traits shared by all eumetazoans (gut differentiation, neurogenesis); or to bilaterian traits present in only some cnidarians (eyes, striated muscle); or to traits not identified yet in this phylum (mesodermal layer, endocrine glands). The variable correspondence between phenotypes predicted from protein enrichments and observed phenotypes suggests that a parallel mechanism repeatedly produce similar phenotypes, thanks to novel regulatory events that independently tie preexisting conserved genetic modules.

  6. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Ashley D; Morawicki, Rubén O; Hager, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolyzed whey protein isolate (WPI) is used in the food industry for protein enrichment and modification of functional properties. The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility of subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) on WPI and to determine the temperature and reaction time effects on the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and the production of peptides and free amino acids (AAs). Effects of temperature (150 to 320 °C) and time (0 to 20 min) were initially studied with a central composite rotatable design followed by a completely randomized factorial design with temperature (250 and 300 °C) and time (0 to 50 min) as factors. SWH was conducted in an electrically heated, 100-mL batch, high pressure vessel. The DH was determined by a spectrophotometric method after derivatization. The peptide molecular weights (MWs) were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and AAs were quantified by high-performance liquid chromotography. An interaction of temperature and time significantly affected the DH and AA concentration. As the DH increased, the accumulation of lower MW peptides also increased following SWH (and above 10% DH, the majority of peptides were <1000 Da). Hydrolysis at 300 °C for 40 min generated the highest total AA concentration, especially of lysine (8.894 mg/g WPI). Therefore, WPI was successfully hydrolyzed by subcritical water, and with adjustment of treatment parameters there is reasonable control of the end-products.

  7. Expression of SHANK3 in the Temporal Neocortex of Patients with Intractable Temporal Epilepsy and Epilepsy Rat Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanke; Gao, Baobing; Xiong, Yan; Zheng, Fangshuo; Xu, Xin; Yang, Yong; Hu, Yida; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-03

    SH3 and multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeat domain 3 (SHANK3) is a synaptic scaffolding protein enriched in the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. SHANK3 plays an important role in the formation and maturation of excitatory synapses. In the brain, SHANK3 directly or indirectly interacts with various synaptic molecules including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR), and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor. Previous studies have shown that Autism spectrum disorder is a result of mutations of the main SHANK3 isoforms, which may be due to deficit in excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. Recently, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that overexpression of SHANK3 could induce seizures in vivo. However, little is known about the role of SHANK3 in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Therefore, we investigated the expression pattern of SHANK3 in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and in pilocarpine-induced models of epilepsy. Immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis were used to locate and determine the expression of SHANK3 in the temporal neocortex of patients with epilepsy, and in the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex of rats in a pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model. Double-labeled immunofluorescence showed that SHANK3 was mainly expressed in neurons. Western blot analysis confirmed that SHANK3 expression was increased in the neocortex of TLE patients and rats. These results indicate that SHANK3 participates in the pathology of epilepsy.

  8. Plic-1, a new target in repressing epileptic seizure by regulation of GABAAR function in patients and a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Zengyou; Gu, Juan; Zhang, Yanke; Wang, Wei; Shen, Hui; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunction of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors (GABAARs) is a prominent factor affecting intractable epilepsy. Plic-1, an ubiquitin-like protein enriched in the inhibitory synapses connecting GABAARs and the ubiquitin protease system (UPS), plays a key role in the modification of GABAAR functions. However, the relationship between Plic-1 and epileptogenesis is not known. In the present study, we aimed to investigate Plic-1 levels in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as the role of Plic-1 in regulating onset and progression of epilepsy in animal models. We found that Plic-1 expression was significantly decreased in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine- and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced rat epileptic models. Intrahippocampal injection of the PePα peptide, which disrupts Plic-1 binding to GABAARs, significantly shortened the latency of seizure onset, and increased the seizure severity and duration in these two epileptic models. Overexpressed Plic-1 through lentivirus transfection into a PTZ model resulted in a reduction in both seizure severity and generalized tonic-clonic seizure duration. Whole-cell clamp recordings revealed that the PePα peptide decreased miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) whereas overexpressed Plic-1 increased mIPSCs in the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. These effects can be blocked by picrotoxin, a GABAAR inhibitor. Our results indicate that Plic-1 plays an important role in managing epileptic seizures by enhancing seizure inhibition through regulation of GABAARs at synaptic sites.

  9. Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Human Lens Fiber Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Han, Jun; David, Larry L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The human lens fiber cell insoluble membrane fraction contains important membrane proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, and cytosolic proteins that are strongly associated with the membrane. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens fiber cell membrane proteome and phosphoproteome from human lenses. Methods. HPLC-mass spectrometry–based multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), without or with phosphopeptide enrichment, was applied to study the proteome and phosphoproteome of lens fiber cell membranes, respectively. Results. In total, 951 proteins were identified, including 379 integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins. Enriched gene categories and pathways based on the proteomic analysis include carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruvate metabolism), proteasome, cell-cell signaling and communication (GTP binding, gap junction, focal adhesion), glutathione metabolism, and actin regulation. The combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and MudPIT analysis revealed 855 phosphorylation sites on 271 proteins, including 455 phosphorylation sites that have not been previously identified. PKA, PKC, CKII, p38MAPK, and RSK are predicted as the major kinases for phosphorylation on the sites identified in the human lens membrane fraction. Conclusions. The results presented herein significantly expand the characterized proteome and phosphoproteome of the human lens fiber cell and provide a valuable reference for future research in studies of lens development and disease. PMID:23349431

  10. Increased Milk Protein Concentration in a Rehydration Drink Enhances Fluid Retention Caused by Water Reabsorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Saito, Yuri; Ashida, Kinya; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2015-01-01

    A fluid-retention effect is required for beverages that are designed to prevent dehydration. That is, fluid absorbed from the intestines should not be excreted quickly; long-term retention is desirable. Here, we focused on the effect of milk protein on fluid retention, and propose a new effective oral rehydration method that can be used daily for preventing dehydration. We first evaluated the effects of different concentrations of milk protein on fluid retention by measuring the urinary volumes of rats fed fluid containing milk protein at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10%. We next compared the fluid-retention effect of milk protein-enriched drink (MPD) with those of distilled water (DW) and a sports drink (SD) by the same method. Third, to investigate the mechanism of fluid retention, we measured plasma insulin changes in rats after ingesting these three drinks. We found that the addition of milk protein at 5 or 10% reduced urinary volume in a dose-dependent manner. Ingestion of the MPD containing 4.6% milk protein resulted in lower urinary volumes than DW and SD. MPD also showed a higher water reabsorption rate in the kidneys and higher concentrations of plasma insulin than DW and SD. These results suggest that increasing milk protein concentration in a beverage enhances fluid retention, which may allow the possibility to develop rehydration beverages that are more effective than SDs. In addition, insulin-modifying renal water reabsorption may contribute to the fluid-retention effect of MPD.

  11. The Escherichia coli Proteome: Past, Present, and Future Prospects†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics has emerged as an indispensable methodology for large-scale protein analysis in functional genomics. The Escherichia coli proteome has been extensively studied and is well defined in terms of biochemical, biological, and biotechnological data. Even before the entire E. coli proteome was fully elucidated, the largest available data set had been integrated to decipher regulatory circuits and metabolic pathways, providing valuable insights into global cellular physiology and the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. With the recent advent of advanced proteomic technologies, the E. coli proteome has been used for the validation of new technologies and methodologies such as sample prefractionation, protein enrichment, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein detection, mass spectrometry (MS), combinatorial assays with n-dimensional chromatographies and MS, and image analysis software. These important technologies will not only provide a great amount of additional information on the E. coli proteome but also synergistically contribute to other proteomic studies. Here, we review the past development and current status of E. coli proteome research in terms of its biological, biotechnological, and methodological significance and suggest future prospects. PMID:16760308

  12. The Construction and Expression of Lysine-Rich Gene in the Mammary Gland of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEOr was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase–PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows. PMID:22577831

  13. The Antiretroviral Lectin Cyanovirin-N Targets Well-Known and Novel Targets on the Surface of Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Carpentieri, Andrea; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ghosh, Sudip K.; Banerjee, Sulagna; Bushkin, G. Guy; Cui, Jike; Lubrano, Michael; Steffen, Martin; Costello, Catherine E.; O'Keefe, Barry; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2010-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the protist that causes amebic dysentery and liver abscess, has a truncated Asn-linked glycan (N-glycan) precursor composed of seven sugars (Man5GlcNAc2). Here, we show that glycoproteins with unmodified N-glycans are aggregated and capped on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites by the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N and then replenished from large intracellular pools. Cyanovirin-N cocaps the Gal/GalNAc adherence lectin, as well as glycoproteins containing O-phosphodiester-linked glycans recognized by an anti-proteophosphoglycan monoclonal antibody. Cyanovirin-N inhibits phagocytosis by E. histolytica trophozoites of mucin-coated beads, a surrogate assay for amebic virulence. For technical reasons, we used the plant lectin concanavalin A rather than cyanovirin-N to enrich secreted and membrane proteins for mass spectrometric identification. E. histolytica glycoproteins with occupied N-glycan sites include Gal/GalNAc lectins, proteases, and 17 previously hypothetical proteins. The latter glycoproteins, as well as 50 previously hypothetical proteins enriched by concanavalin A, may be vaccine targets as they are abundant and unique. In summary, the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N binds to well-known and novel targets on the surface of E. histolytica that are rapidly replenished from large intracellular pools. PMID:20852023

  14. Intensive enteral feeding in advanced cirrhosis: reversal of malnutrition without precipitation of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Charlton, C P; Buchanan, E; Holden, C E; Preece, M A; Green, A; Booth, I W; Tarlow, M J

    1992-05-01

    Ten children with advanced cirrhosis and malnutrition (less than 90% weight for height) were fed for eight weeks with a nasogastric feed comprising whey protein (enriched with branched chain amino acids), fat as 34% medium chain and 66% long chain triglycerides, and glucose polymer. Six of the children were studied for an eight week control period before feeding. Weight, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle area, and fasting plasma ammonia and amino acid concentrations were measured before and after the control period and after the consequent feed period. Results showed that despite high energy and protein intakes the children remained malnourished over the control period. All anthropometric indices improved significantly during the feed period, and no child developed clinical encephalopathy. The feed period was associated with a small, and not clinically significant, increase in the plasma ammonia concentration, but no consistent trend in the plasma amino acid concentrations. Thus, in children with advanced hepatobiliary disease awaiting liver transplantation, enteral feeding improved nutritional status without adverse clinical or biochemical effects.

  15. c-Myb Binding Sites in Haematopoietic Chromatin Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsen, Mads; Klepper, Kjetil; Gundersen, Sveinung; Cuervo, Ignacio; Drabløs, Finn; Hovig, Eivind; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke; Eskeland, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Strict control of tissue-specific gene expression plays a pivotal role during lineage commitment. The transcription factor c-Myb has an essential role in adult haematopoiesis and functions as an oncogene when rearranged in human cancers. Here we have exploited digital genomic footprinting analysis to obtain a global picture of c-Myb occupancy in the genome of six different haematopoietic cell-types. We have biologically validated several c-Myb footprints using c-Myb knockdown data, reporter assays and DamID analysis. We show that our predicted conserved c-Myb footprints are highly dependent on the haematopoietic cell type, but that there is a group of gene targets common to all cell-types analysed. Furthermore, we find that c-Myb footprints co-localise with active histone mark H3K4me3 and are significantly enriched at exons. We analysed co-localisation of c-Myb footprints with 104 chromatin regulatory factors in K562 cells, and identified nine proteins that are enriched together with c-Myb footprints on genes positively regulated by c-Myb and one protein enriched on negatively regulated genes. Our data suggest that c-Myb is a transcription factor with multifaceted target regulation depending on cell type. PMID:26208222

  16. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-02-06

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy.

  17. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  18. Characterization of the human and rat phospholemman (PLM) cDNAs and localization of the human PLM gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling-Sing K.; Lo, C.F.; Numann, R.; Cuddy, M.

    1997-05-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that the phospholemman (PLM), a 72-residue plasma-membrane protein enriched in skeletal muscle and heart, is a major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin and adrenergic stimulation. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of human and rat PLM cDNA from the heart. Both PLM proteins share significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence and structural similarities with the previously published canine PLM and, to a lesser degree, with Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase {gamma} subunit, Mat-8 protein, and CHIF protein. Despite the functional diversity, all these proteins are quite small and possess a single transmembrane domain. Human PLM appears to be a unique gene localized on chromosome 19q13.1. The PLM mRNA is widely distributed in human tissues, with the highest expression in skeletal muscle and heart, suggesting a functional role in muscle contraction. Like canine PLM, both human and rat PLM induce a hyperpolarization-activated chloride current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The high degree of sequence and functional conservation among the mammalian PLM proteins indicates that this gene is conserved throughout evolution. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Gudu, an Armadillo repeat-containing protein, is required for spermatogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Ip, Y Tony; Xu, Zuoshang

    2013-12-01

    The Drosophila annotated gene CG5155 encodes a protein that contains 10 Armadillo-repeats and has an unknown function. To fill this gap, we performed loss-of-function studies using RNAi. By analysis of four independent Drosophila RNAi lines targeting two non-overlapping regions of the CG5155 transcript, we demonstrate that this gene is required for male fertility. Therefore, we have named this gene Gudu. The transcript of Gudu is highly enriched in adult testes. Knockdown of Gudu by a ubiquitous driver leads to defects in the formation of the individualization complex that is required for spermatid maturation, thereby impairing spermatogenesis. Furthermore, testis-specific knockdown of Gudu by crossing the RNAi lines with the bam-Gal4 driver is sufficient to cause the infertility and defective spermatogenesis. Since Gudu is highly homologous to vertebrate ARMC4, also an Armadillo-repeat-containing protein enriched in testes, our results suggest that Gudu and ARMC4 are a subfamily of Armadillo-repeat containing proteins that may have an evolutionarily conserved function in spermatogenesis.

  20. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  1. Triphenyltin degradation and proteomic response by an engineered Escherichia coli expressing cytochrome P450 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wenying; Yang, Kunliang; Ye, Jinshao; Long, Yan; Ke, Jing; Ou, Huase

    2017-03-01

    Although triphenyltin (TPT) degradation pathway has been determined, information about the enzyme and protein networks involved was severely limited. To this end, a cytochrome P450 hydroxylase (CYP450) gene from Bacillus thuringiensis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), namely E. coli pET32a-CYP450, whose dosage at 1gL(-1) could degrade 54.6% TPT at 1mgL(-1) within 6 d through attacking the carbon-tin bonds of TPT by CYP450. Sequence analysis verified that the CYP450 gene had a 1214bp open reading frame, encoding a protein with 404 amino acids. Proteomic analysis determined that 60 proteins were significantly differentially regulated expression in E. coli pET32a-CYP450 after TPT degradation. The up-regulated proteins enriched in a network related to transport, cell division, biosynthesis of amino acids and secondary metabolites, and microbial metabolism in diverse environments. The current findings demonstrated for the first time that P450 received electrons transferring from NADH could effectively cleave carbon-metal bonds.

  2. Distinct Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Fractions of Drosophila Heterochromatin Protein 1: Their Phosphorylation Levels and Associations with Origin Recognition Complex Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Da Wei; Fanti, Laura; Pak, Daniel T.S.; Botchan, Michael R.; Pimpinelli, Sergio; Kellum, Rebecca

    1998-01-01

    The distinct structural properties of heterochromatin accommodate a diverse group of vital chromosome functions, yet we have only rudimentary molecular details of its structure. A powerful tool in the analyses of its structure in Drosophila has been a group of mutations that reverse the repressive effect of heterochromatin on the expression of a gene placed next to it ectopically. Several genes from this group are known to encode proteins enriched in heterochromatin. The best characterized of these is the heterochromatin-associated protein, HP1. HP1 has no known DNA-binding activity, hence its incorporation into heterochromatin is likely to be dependent upon other proteins. To examine HP1 interacting proteins, we isolated three distinct oligomeric species of HP1 from the cytoplasm of early Drosophila embryos and analyzed their compositions. The two larger oligomers share two properties with the fraction of HP1 that is most tightly associated with the chromatin of interphase nuclei: an underphosphorylated HP1 isoform profile and an association with subunits of the origin recognition complex (ORC). We also found that HP1 localization into heterochromatin is disrupted in mutants for the ORC2 subunit. These findings support a role for the ORC-containing oligomers in localizing HP1 into Drosophila heterochromatin that is strikingly similar to the role of ORC in recruiting the Sir1 protein to silencing nucleation sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:9679132

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles isolated from porcine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Eirin, Alfonso; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Puranik, Amrutesh S.; Woollard, John R.; Tang, Hui; Dasari, Surendra; Lerman, Amir; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) isolated from mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) contribute to recovery of damaged tissue. We have previously shown that porcine MSC-derived EVs transport mRNA and miRNA capable of modulating cellular pathways in recipient cells. To identify candidate factors that contribute to the therapeutic effects of porcine MSC-derived EVs, we characterized their protein cargo using proteomics. Porcine MSCs were cultured from abdominal fat, and EVs characterized for expression of typical MSC and EV markers. LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis was performed and proteins classified. Functional pathway analysis was performed and five candidate proteins were validated by western blot. Proteomics analysis identified 5,469 distinct proteins in MSCs and 4,937 in EVs. The average protein expression was higher in MSCs vs. EVs. Differential expression analysis revealed 128 proteins that are selectively enriched in EVs versus MSCs, whereas 563 proteins were excluded from EVs. Proteins enriched in EVs are linked to a broad range of biological functions, including angiogenesis, blood coagulation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and regulation of inflammation. Excluded are mostly nuclear proteins, like proteins involved in nucleotide binding and RNA splicing. EVs have a selectively-enriched protein cargo with a specific biological signature that MSCs may employ for intercellular communication to facilitate tissue repair. PMID:27786293

  4. In vitro inhibition of ETEC K88 adhesion by pea hulls and of LT enterotoxin binding by faba bean hulls.

    PubMed

    Becker, P M; van der Meulen, J; Jansman, A J M; van Wikselaar, P G

    2012-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing K88 (F4) adhesins are associated with post-weaning diarrhoea in piglets. Different grain fractions from pea (Pisum sativum) and faba bean (Vicia faba) were tested in vitro for their capacity to counteract aetiological factors, which contribute to the development of diarrhoea. In detail, adhesion of E. coli O149:K91:K88ac (ETEC K88ac) to grain legume products, intended to impair the colonization of the host, was studied as well as interference with receptor binding of the pathogen's heat-labile enterotoxin LT, intended to reduce toxin-inflicted gut cell damage. When comparing different pea and faba bean products tested for their binding capacity of ETEC K88ac, especially pea hulls, but also whole pea meal, starch-enriched and protein-enriched pea meal, and digestion-resistant pea hull and meal fractions showed a higher binding of ETEC K88ac than faba bean products. In contrast to the ETEC K88ac adhesion results, bean hulls proved more effective than pea hulls in preventing GM1 receptor binding of LT. Previous small intestinal segment perfusion experiments we performed with ETEC K88ac-challenged piglets indicated that both pea and bean hulls have the potential for successful application in diarrhoea prophylaxis and treatment, which is in agreement with and refined by our detection of their different modes of functioning.

  5. The Disease Protein Tulp1 Is Essential for Periactive Zone Endocytosis in Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapses.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Silke; Magupalli, Venkat Giri; Dembla, Mayur; Katiyar, Rashmi; Schwarz, Karin; Köblitz, Louise; Alpadi, Kannan; Krause, Elmar; Rettig, Jens; Sung, Ching-Hwa; Goldberg, Andrew F X; Schmitz, Frank

    2016-02-24

    Mutations in the Tulp1 gene cause severe, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP14) in humans. In the retina, Tulp1 is mainly expressed in photoreceptors that use ribbon synapses to communicate with the inner retina. In the present study, we demonstrate that Tulp1 is highly enriched in the periactive zone of photoreceptor presynaptic terminals where Tulp1 colocalizes with major endocytic proteins close to the synaptic ribbon. Analyses of Tulp1 knock-out mice demonstrate that Tulp1 is essential to keep endocytic proteins enriched at the periactive zone and to maintain high levels of endocytic activity close to the synaptic ribbon. Moreover, we have discovered a novel interaction between Tulp1 and the synaptic ribbon protein RIBEYE, which is important to maintain synaptic ribbon integrity. The current findings suggest a new model for Tulp1-mediated localization of the endocytic machinery at the periactive zone of ribbon synapses and offer a new rationale and mechanism for vision loss associated with genetic defects in Tulp1.

  6. Highly efficient proteome analysis with combination of protein pre-fractionation by preparative microscale solution isoelectric focusing and identification by μRPLC-MS/MS with serially coupled long microcolumn.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dingyin; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Liang, Yu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of proteome analysis, a strategy with the combination of protein pre-fractionation by preparative microscale solution isoelectric focusing, peptide separation by μRPLC with serially coupled long microcolumn and protein identification by ESI-MS/MS was proposed. By preparative microscale solution isoelectric focusing technique, proteins extracted from whole cell lysates of Escherichia coli were fractionated into five chambers divided by isoelectric membranes, respectively with pH range from 3.0 to 4.6, 4.6 to 5.4, 5.4 to 6.2, 6.2 to 7.0 and 7.0 to 10.0. Compared to the traditional on-gel IFF, the protein recovery could be obviously improved to over 95%. Subsequently, the enriched and fractionated proteins in each chamber were digested, and further separated by a 30-cm long serially coupled RP microcolumn. Through the detection by ESI-MS/MS, about 200 proteins were identified in each fraction, and in total 835 proteins were identified even with one-dimensional μRPLC-MS/MS system. All these results demonstrate that by such a combination strategy, highly efficient proteome analysis could be achieved, not only due to the in-solution protein enrichment and pre-fractionation with improved protein recovery but also owing to the increased separation capacity of serially coupled long μRPLC columns.

  7. On-chip protein isoelectric focusing using a photoimmobilized pH gradient.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lin; Lin, FengMing; Wu, Xin; Liu, Chuanli; Wang, Jianshe; Tang, Qi; Yu, Shiyong; Huang, Kunjie; Deng, Yulin; Geng, Lina

    2014-11-01

    An immobilized pH gradient was directly constructed on the inner wall of a microfluidic chip channel by photoimmobilizing focused carrier ampholytes onto the wall. A mixture of carbonic anhydrase, myoglobin, and trypsin inhibitor was successfully isoelectric-focused and separated with good linearity between the pI values of proteins and the location of the focused bands. Furthermore, coating methods for the resistance of protein nonselective adsorption and simultaneously for pH gradient photocoupling were screened. The PEG-silane coating method was found to be better than the cross-linked polyacrylamide coating and aminosilane modification methods. Finally, based on the open tubular column mode of carrier ampholytes' immobilization and effective antiadsorption coating, the immobilized pH gradient was reused and the chip was recycled for the first time. By virtue of its remarkable features including simplicity, convenience, high efficiency of protein enrichment and separation, and potential for coupling site-selective IEF with other analytical or separation techniques, this novel method promises to be useful in several applications related with zwitterionic biomolecules.

  8. Comparison of nanowire pellicles for plasma membrane enrichment: coating nanowires on cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Rose, Rebecca; Choksawangkarn, Waeowalee; Graham, Lauren M.; Hu, Junkai; Fenselau, Catherine; Lee, Sang Bok

    2013-12-01

    This study is reported on the effect of nanowire density on the ease of pellicle formation and the enrichment of plasma membrane (PM) proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. An optimized synthesis is reported for iron silicate nanowires (ISNW) with a narrow size range of 900 ± 400 nm in length and 200 nm diameter. The nanowires were coated with Al2O3 and used to form pellicles around suspended multiple myeloma cells, which acted as a model for cells recovered from tissue samples. Lighter alumina-coated silica nanowires were also synthesized (Kim et al., doi: 10.2217/NNM.13.96, 2013), which allowed a comparison of the construction of the two pellicles and of the effect of nanowire density on PM enrichment. Evidence is offered that the dense nanowire pellicle does not crush or distort these mammalian cells. Finally, the pellicles were incorporated into a mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to analyze transmembrane proteins in the PM. In contrast to a prior comparison of the effect of density with nanoparticles pellicles (Choksawangkarn et al. J Proteome Res 455 12:1134-1141, 2013), nanowire density was not found to significantly affect the enrichment of the PM. However, nanowires with a favorable aspect for pellicle formation are more easily and reliably produced with iron silicate than with silica. In addition, the method for pellicle formation was optimized through the use of ISNW, which is crucial to the improvement of PM protein enrichment and analysis.

  9. Redundant mechanisms to form silent chromatin at pericentromeric regions rely on BEND3 and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Saksouk, Nehmé; Barth, Teresa K; Ziegler-Birling, Celine; Olova, Nelly; Nowak, Agnieszka; Rey, Elodie; Mateos-Langerak, Julio; Urbach, Serge; Reik, Wolf; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena; Imhof, Axel; Déjardin, Jérome; Simboeck, Elisabeth

    2014-11-20

    Constitutive heterochromatin is typically defined by high levels of DNA methylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9Me3), whereas facultative heterochromatin displays DNA hypomethylation and high H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27Me3). The two chromatin types generally do not coexist at the same loci, suggesting mutual exclusivity. During development or in cancer, pericentromeric regions can adopt either epigenetic state, but the switching mechanism is unknown. We used a quantitative locus purification method to characterize changes in pericentromeric chromatin-associated proteins in mouse embryonic stem cells deficient for either the methyltransferases required for DNA methylation or H3K9Me3. DNA methylation controls heterochromatin architecture and inhibits Polycomb recruitment. BEND3, a protein enriched on pericentromeric chromatin in the absence of DNA methylation or H3K9Me3, allows Polycomb recruitment and H3K27Me3, resulting in a redundant pathway to generate repressive chromatin. This suggests that BEND3 is a key factor in mediating a switch from constitutive to facultative heterochromatin.

  10. Microchip-based immunoassays with application of silicon dioxide nanoparticle film.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Kang, Qin-Shu; Sun, Guo-Ping; Su, Li-Jin; Zheng, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Han-Zhong; He, Zhi-Ke; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Highly sensitive detection of proteins offers the possibility of early and rapid diagnosis of various diseases. Microchip-based immunoassay integrates the benefits from both immunoassays (high specificity of target sample) and microfluidics (fast analysis and low sample consumption). However, direct capture of proteins on bare microchannel surface suffers from low sensitivity due to the low capacity of microsystem. In this study, we demonstrated a microchip-based heterogeneous immunoassay using functionalized SiO(2) nanoparticles which were covalently assembled on the surface of microchannels via a liquid-phase deposition technique. The formation of covalent bonds between SiO(2) nanoparticles and polydimethylsiloxane substrate offered sufficient stability of the microfluidic surface, and furthermore, substantially enhanced the protein capturing capability, mainly due to the increased surface-area-to-volume ratio. IgG antigen and FITC-labeled anti-IgG antibody conjugates were adopted to compare protein-enrichment effect, and the fluorescence signals were increased by ~75-fold after introduction of functionalized SiO(2) nanoparticles film. Finally, a proof-of-concept experiment was performed by highly efficient capture and detection of inactivated H1N1 influenza virus using a microfluidic chip comprising highly ordered SiO(2) nanoparticles coated micropillars array. The detection limit of H1N1 virus antigen was 0.5 ng mL(-1), with a linear range from 20 to 1,000 ng mL(-1) and mean coefficient of variance of 4.71%.

  11. The acute effects of a protein-rich meal on the urinary corticoid:creatinine ratio in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Zeugswetter, F K; Zwack, D; Luckschander-Zeller, N; Schwendenwein, I

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this prospective crossover study was to investigate the effects of a high-protein diet on canine urinary corticoid-to-creatinine ratio (UCCR). The hypothesis was that meal-induced hypercortisolism is, as has been shown in humans, a predictable and consistent finding in healthy dogs. Eight clinic-owned beagles were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The allocation to the groups defined the sequence of a protein-enriched meal (meal A) or no meal on the first and second days, whereas on the third day all dogs again received an identical meal (meal B) to test reproducibility. Urinary corticoids were measured using a solid-phase, competitive CLIA on unextracted urine. Contrary to our expectations, consistent incremental responses of the UCCR were not observed (meal A vs. no meal [anova]: absolute increase, F = 2.546, p = 0.162; relative increase, F = 4.084, p = 0.09; AUC(UCCR) , F = 0.279, p = 0.616). Nevertheless, the robust increases in two dogs above 60% of baseline suggest that the collection of urine prior to feeding likely increases the specificity of the UCCR to discriminate between dogs with and without hypercortisolism.

  12. Alternative translation initiation augments the human mitochondrial proteome

    PubMed Central

    Kazak, Lawrence; Reyes, Aurelio; Duncan, Anna L.; Rorbach, Joanna; Wood, Stuart R.; Brea-Calvo, Gloria; Gammage, Payam A.; Robinson, Alan J.; Minczuk, Michal; Holt, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative translation initiation (ATI) is a mechanism of producing multiple proteins from a single transcript, which in some cases regulates trafficking of proteins to different cellular compartments, including mitochondria. Application of a genome-wide computational screen predicts a cryptic mitochondrial targeting signal for 126 proteins in mouse and man that is revealed when an AUG codon located downstream from the canonical initiator methionine codon is used as a translation start site, which we term downstream ATI (dATI). Experimental evidence in support of dATI is provided by immunoblotting of endogenous truncated proteins enriched in mitochondrial cell fractions or of co-localization with mitochondria using immunocytochemistry. More detailed cellular localization studies establish mitochondrial targeting of a member of the cytosolic poly(A) binding protein family, PABPC5, and of the RNA/DNA helicase PIF1α. The mitochondrial isoform of PABPC5 co-immunoprecipitates with the mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase, and is markedly reduced in abundance when mitochondrial DNA and RNA are depleted, suggesting it plays a role in RNA metabolism in the organelle. Like PABPC5 and PIF1α, most of the candidates identified by the screen are not currently annotated as mitochondrial proteins, and so dATI expands the human mitochondrial proteome. PMID:23275553

  13. [Infant feeding].

    PubMed

    Robert, M

    2012-09-01

    Infants are vulnerable: their growth and their development depend largely on their nutritional status. It is important to propose for them an optimal food. The human milk is unquestionably the best choice for the infant. When breastfeeding is not possible, the choice of the milk is made among hundreds of formulas for infants. They are regulated by a European directive. The healthcare professionals have to recommend as often as possible an infant formula: low protein content, predominance of whey proteins, enrichment with long chain fatty acids, lactose, addition of pre- or probiotics. The formulas for specific indications will be recommended in case of particular situations after verification that the complaints (constipation, regurgitations, stomach pains) cannot be corrected by simple dietary measures (increasing of the intakes of meals with a concomitant reduction of the volume of the meals). The food diversification is recommended between 17 and 26 weeks according to the neuromuscular capacities of the infant. These meals must be presented with a spoon to assure a sufficient nutritional intake. In Belgium, the use is to begin with fruits. One should avoid adding biscuits or sugar. The meal of vegetables will be introduced a little later. It should consist of starchy foods, vegetables with some fat to which the meat will be added. Numerous foods (biscuits, croissants and similar products, chips) should never be part of the ordinary menu, but should be reserved for particular occasions. The education of the children should begin from this age on.

  14. Effect of aerobic and resistance exercise training on late-onset Pompe disease patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Dimopoulos, Filippos; Papadimas, George K; Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Fatouros, Ioannis; Kavouras, Stavros A; Manta, Panagiota

    2011-11-01

    Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the deficiency of acid α-glycosidase resulting in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen. The late-onset disease form is characterized by progressive skeletal and respiratory muscle dysfunction. In addition to the recently introduced enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), treatments such as protein-enriched diet and exercise training have been proposed, although little is known about their effectiveness on the physical condition of such patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of exercise training on muscular strength and body composition in five patients with late-onset Pompe disease receiving ERT. All subjects followed a 20 week lasting program of supervised aerobic and progressive resistance exercise training. Before and after the training period, body composition was determined with dual X-ray absorptiometry and isometric muscular strength was measured with a specialized load transducer. Functional capacity was assessed using the 6-min shuttle walk test. A significant increase in muscular strength (15-50% at various body parts, p<0.05) and 6-minute walking distance (203.8 ± 177 m before vs. 248.2 ± 184 m after, p<0.01) was observed after training, whereas total and lower extremities lean body mass did not change significantly. These results suggest that exercise training has a positive effect on muscular strength and functional capacity in patients on ERT with late-onset Pompe disease.

  15. VHL-dependent regulation of a β-dystroglycan glycoform and glycogene expression in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    AGGELIS, VASSILIS; CRAVEN, RACHEL A.; PENG, JIANHE; HARNDEN, PATRICIA; SCHAFFER, LANA; HERNANDEZ, GILBERTO E.; HEAD, STEVEN R.; MAHER, EAMONN R.; TONGE, ROBERT; SELBY, PETER J.; BANKS, ROSAMONDE E.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers and targets in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains a priority and one cellular compartment that is a rich potential source of such molecules is the plasma membrane. A shotgun proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins enriched by cell surface biotinylation and avidin affinity chromatography was explored using the UMRC2- renal cancer cell line, which lacks von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene function, to determine whether proteins of interest could be detected. Of the 814 proteins identified ∼22% were plasma membrane or membrane-associated, including several with known associations with cancer. This included β-dystroglycan, the transmembrane subunit of the DAG1 gene product. VHL-dependent changes in the form of β-dystroglycan were detected in UMRC2−/+VHL transfectants. Deglycosylation experiments showed that this was due to differential sialylation. Analysis of normal kidney cortex and conventional RCC tissues showed that a similar change also occurred in vivo. Investigation of the expression of genes involved in glycosylation in UMRC2−/+VHL cells using a focussed microarray highlighted a number of enzymes involved in sialylation; upregulation of bifunctional UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) was validated in UMRC2− cells compared with their +VHL counterparts and also found in conventional RCC tissue. These results implicate VHL in the regulation of glycosylation and raise interesting questions regarding the extent and importance of such changes in RCC. PMID:23970118

  16. Thermally-dried immobilized kefir on casein as starter culture in dried whey cheese production.

    PubMed

    Dimitrellou, D; Kourkoutas, Y; Koutinas, A A; Kanellaki, M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of thermally-dried immobilized kefir on casein as a starter culture for protein-enriched dried whey cheese. For comparison reasons, dried whey cheese with thermally-dried free kefir culture and with no starter culture were also produced. The effect of the nature of the culture, the ripening temperature and the ripening process on quality characteristics of the whey cheese was studied. The association of microbial groups during cheese maturation suggested repression of spoilage and protection from pathogens due to the thermally-dried kefir, as counts of coliforms, enterobacteria and staphylococci were significantly reduced in cheeses produced using thermally-dried kefir starter cultures. The effect of the starter culture on production of volatile compounds responsible for cheese flavor was also studied using the SPME GC/MS technique. Thermally-dried immobilized kefir starter culture resulted in an improved profile of aroma-related compounds. The preliminary sensory evaluation ascertained the soft, fine taste and the overall improved quality of cheese produced with the thermally-dried immobilized kefir. The potential of protein-based thermally-dried starter cultures in dairy products is finally highlighted and assessed.

  17. Uncovering Arabidopsis Membrane Protein Interactome Enriched in Transporters Using Mating-Based Split Ubiquitin Assays and Classification Models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin; Lalonde, Sylvie; Obrdlik, Petr; Noorani Vatani, Azam; Parsa, Saman A.; Vilarino, Cristina; Revuelta, Jose Luis; Frommer, Wolf B.; Rhee, Seung Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput data are a double-edged sword; for the benefit of large amount of data, there is an associated cost of noise. To increase reliability and scalability of high-throughput protein interaction data generation, we tested the efficacy of classification to enrich potential protein–protein interactions. We applied this method to identify interactions among Arabidopsis membrane proteins enriched in transporters. We validated our method with multiple retests. Classification improved the quality of the ensuing interaction network and was effective in reducing the search space and increasing true positive rate. The final network of 541 interactions among 239 proteins (of which 179 are transporters) is the first protein interaction network enriched in membrane transporters reported for any organism. This network has similar topological attributes to other published protein interaction networks. It also extends and fills gaps in currently available biological networks in plants and allows building a number of hypotheses about processes and mechanisms involving signal-transduction and transport systems. PMID:22737156

  18. IRSp53 senses negative membrane curvature and phase separates along membrane tubules

    PubMed Central

    Prévost, Coline; Zhao, Hongxia; Manzi, John; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Lappalainen, Pekka; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Bassereau, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    BAR domain proteins contribute to membrane deformation in diverse cellular processes. The inverted-BAR (I-BAR) protein IRSp53, for instance, is found on the inner leaflet of the tubular membrane of filopodia; however its role in the formation of these structures is incompletely understood. Here we develop an original assay in which proteins are encapsulated in giant unilamellar vesicles connected to membrane nanotubes. Our results demonstrate that I-BAR dimers sense negative membrane curvature. Experiment and theory reveal that the I-BAR displays a non-monotonic sorting with curvature, and expands the tube at high imposed tension while constricting it at low tension. Strikingly, at low protein density and tension, protein-rich domains appear along the tube. This peculiar behaviour is due to the shallow intrinsic curvature of I-BAR dimers. It allows constriction of weakly curved membranes coupled to local protein enrichment at biologically relevant conditions. This might explain how IRSp53 contributes in vivo to the initiation of filopodia. PMID:26469246

  19. The brown adipocyte protein CIDEA promotes lipid droplet fusion via a phosphatidic acid-binding amphipathic helix

    PubMed Central

    Barneda, David; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Gaspar, Maria L; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Prasannan, Sunil; Dormann, Dirk; Han, Gil-Soo; Jesch, Stephen A; Carman, George M; Kagan, Valerian; Parker, Malcolm G; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Dixon, Ann M; Henry, Susan A; Christian, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of energy homeostasis depends on the highly regulated storage and release of triacylglycerol primarily in adipose tissue, and excessive storage is a feature of common metabolic disorders. CIDEA is a lipid droplet (LD)-protein enriched in brown adipocytes promoting the enlargement of LDs, which are dynamic, ubiquitous organelles specialized for storing neutral lipids. We demonstrate an essential role in this process for an amphipathic helix in CIDEA, which facilitates embedding in the LD phospholipid monolayer and binds phosphatidic acid (PA). LD pairs are docked by CIDEA trans-complexes through contributions of the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal dimerization region. These complexes, enriched at the LD–LD contact site, interact with the cone-shaped phospholipid PA and likely increase phospholipid barrier permeability, promoting LD fusion by transference of lipids. This physiological process is essential in adipocyte differentiation as well as serving to facilitate the tight coupling of lipolysis and lipogenesis in activated brown fat. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07485.001 PMID:26609809

  20. Enrichment and identification of glycoproteins in human saliva using lectin magnetic bead arrays.

    PubMed

    Caragata, Michael; Shah, Alok K; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hill, Michelle M; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-03-15

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and could provide diagnostic value in cancer detection. Human saliva is an ideal source of glycoproteins due to the relatively high proportion of glycosylated proteins in the salivary proteome. Moreover, saliva collection is noninvasive and technically straightforward, and the sample collection and storage is relatively easy. Although differential glycosylation of proteins can be indicative of disease states, identification of differential glycosylation from clinical samples is not trivial. To facilitate salivary glycoprotein biomarker discovery, we optimized a method for differential glycoprotein enrichment from human saliva based on lectin magnetic bead arrays (saLeMBA). Selected lectins from distinct reactivity groups were used in the saLeMBA platform to enrich salivary glycoproteins from healthy volunteer saliva. The technical reproducibility of saLeMBA was analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the glycosylated proteins enriched by each lectin. Our saLeMBA platform enabled robust glycoprotein enrichment in a glycoprotein- and lectin-specific manner consistent with known protein-specific glycan profiles. We demonstrated that saLeMBA is a reliable method to enrich and detect glycoproteins present in human saliva.

  1. Network-based multiple sclerosis pathway analysis with GWAS data from 15,000 cases and 30,000 controls.

    PubMed

    2013-06-06

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory CNS disease with a substantial genetic component, originally mapped to only the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. In the last 5 years, a total of seven genome-wide association studies and one meta-analysis successfully identified 57 non-HLA susceptibility loci. Here, we merged nominal statistical evidence of association and physical evidence of interaction to conduct a protein-interaction-network-based pathway analysis (PINBPA) on two large genetic MS studies comprising a total of 15,317 cases and 29,529 controls. The distribution of nominally significant loci at the gene level matched the patterns of extended linkage disequilibrium in regions of interest. We found that products of genome-wide significantly associated genes are more likely to interact physically and belong to the same or related pathways. We next searched for subnetworks (modules) of genes (and their encoded proteins) enriched with nominally associated loci within each study and identified those modules in common between the two studies. We demonstrate that these modules are more likely to contain genes with bona fide susceptibility variants and, in addition, identify several high-confidence candidates (including BCL10, CD48, REL, TRAF3, and TEC). PINBPA is a powerful approach to gaining further insights into the biology of associated genes and to prioritizing candidates for subsequent genetic studies of complex traits.

  2. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  3. Administering and Detecting Protein Marks on Arthropods for Dispersal Research.

    PubMed

    Hagler, James R; Machtley, Scott A

    2016-01-28

    Monitoring arthropod movement is often required to better understand associated population dynamics, dispersal patterns, host plant preferences, and other ecological interactions. Arthropods are usually tracked in nature by tagging them with a unique mark and then re-collecting them over time and space to determine their dispersal capabilities. In addition to actual physical tags, such as colored dust or paint, various types of proteins have proven very effective for marking arthropods for ecological research. Proteins can be administered internally and/or externally. The proteins can then be detected on recaptured arthropods with a protein-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here we describe protocols for externally and internally tagging arthropods with protein. Two simple experimental examples are demonstrated: (1) an internal protein mark introduced to an insect by providing a protein-enriched diet and (2) an external protein mark topically applied to an insect using a medical nebulizer. We then relate a step-by-step guide of the sandwich and indirect ELISA methods used to detect protein marks on the insects. In this demonstration, various aspects of the acquisition and detection of protein markers on arthropods for mark-release-recapture, mark-capture, and self-mark-capture types of research are discussed, along with the various ways that the immunomarking procedure has been adapted to suit a wide variety of research objectives.

  4. Characterization of the human and rat phospholemman (PLM) cDNAs and localization of the human PLM gene to chromosome 19q13.1.

    PubMed

    Chen, L S; Lo, C F; Numann, R; Cuddy, M

    1997-05-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that the phospholemman (PLM), a 72-residue plasma-membrane protein enriched in skeletal muscle and heart, is a major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin and adrenergic stimulation. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of human and rat PLM cDNA from the heart. Both PLM proteins share significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence and structural similarities with the previously published canine PLM and, to a lesser degree, with Na+/K(+)-ATPase gamma subunit, Mat-8 protein, and CHIF protein. Despite the functional diversity, all these proteins are quite small and possess a single transmembrane domain. Human PLM appears to be a unique gene localized on chromosome 19q13.1. The PLM mRNA is widely distributed in human tissues, with the highest expression in skeletal muscle and heart, suggesting a functional role in muscle contraction. Like canine PLM, both human and rat PLM induce a hyperpolarization-activated chloride current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The high degree of sequence and functional conservation among the mammalian PLM proteins indicates that this gene is conserved throughout evolution.

  5. Protein Synthesis in Bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss) Cultured Cells during the Induction of Frost Tolerance by Abscisic Acid or Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Albert J.; Gusta, Lawrence V.; Reaney, Martin J. T.; Ishikawa, Masaya

    1987-01-01

    Bromus inermis Leyss cell cultures treated with 75 micromolar abscisic acid (ABA) at both 23 and 3°C developed more freezing resistance than cells cultured at 3°C. Protein synthesis in cells induced to become freezing tolerant by ABA and low temperature was monitored by [14C]leucine incorporation. Protein synthesis continued at 3°C, but net cell growth was stopped. Most of the major proteins detected at 23°C were synthesized at 3°C. However, some proteins were synthesized only at low temperatures, whereas others were inhibited. ABA showed similar effects on protein synthesis at both 23 and 3°C. Comparative electrophoretic analysis of [14C]leucine labeled protein detected the synthesis of 19, 21 and 47 kilodalton proteins in less than 8 hours after exposure to exogenous ABA. Proteins in the 20 kilodalton range were also synthesized at 3°C. In addition, a 31 kilodalton protein band showed increased expression in freezing resistant ABA treated cultures after 36 hours growth at both 3 and 23°C. Quantitative analysis of [14C]leucine labeled polypeptides in two-dimensional gels confirmed the increased expression of the 31 kilodalton protein. Two-dimensional analysis also resolved a 72 kilodalton protein enriched in ABA treated cultures and identified three proteins (24.5, 47, and 48 kilodaltons) induced by low temperature growth. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665607

  6. Worthless donations: male deception and female counter play in a nuptial gift-giving spider

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In nuptial gift-giving species, benefits of acquiring a mate may select for male deception by donation of worthless gifts. We investigated the effect of worthless gifts on mating success in the spider Pisaura mirabilis. Males usually offer an insect prey wrapped in silk; however, worthless gifts containing inedible items are reported. We tested male mating success in the following experimental groups: protein enriched fly gift (PG), regular fly gift (FG), worthless gift (WG), or no gift (NG). Results Males that offered worthless gifts acquired similar mating success as males offering nutritional gifts, while males with no gift experienced reduced mating success. The results suggest that strong selection on the nuptial gift-giving trait facilitates male deception by donation of worthless gifts. Females terminated matings faster when males offered worthless donations; this demonstrate a cost of deception for the males as shorter matings lead to reduced sperm transfer and thus give the deceiving males a disadvantage in sperm competition. Conclusion We propose that the gift wrapping trait allows males to exploit female foraging preference by disguising the gift content thus deceiving females into mating without acquiring direct benefits. Female preference for a genuine prey gift combined with control over mating duration, however, counteracts the male deception. PMID:22082300

  7. MET1 Is a Thylakoid-Associated TPR Protein Involved in Photosystem II Supercomplex Formation and Repair in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; Friso, Giulia; Poliakov, Anton; Ponnala, Lalit

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) requires constant disassembly and reassembly to accommodate replacement of the D1 protein. Here, we characterize Arabidopsis thaliana MET1, a PSII assembly factor with PDZ and TPR domains. The maize (Zea mays) MET1 homolog is enriched in mesophyll chloroplasts compared with bundle sheath chloroplasts, and MET1 mRNA and protein levels increase during leaf development concomitant with the thylakoid machinery. MET1 is conserved in C3 and C4 plants and green algae but is not found in prokaryotes. Arabidopsis MET1 is a peripheral thylakoid protein enriched in stroma lamellae and is also present in grana. Split-ubiquitin assays and coimmunoprecipitations showed interaction of MET1 with stromal loops of PSII core components CP43 and CP47. From native gels, we inferred that MET1 associates with PSII subcomplexes formed during the PSII repair cycle. When grown under fluctuating light intensities, the Arabidopsis MET1 null mutant (met1) showed conditional reduced growth, near complete blockage in PSII supercomplex formation, and concomitant increase of unassembled CP43. Growth of met1 in high light resulted in loss of PSII supercomplexes and accelerated D1 degradation. We propose that MET1 functions as a CP43/CP47 chaperone on the stromal side of the membrane during PSII assembly and repair. This function is consistent with the observed differential MET1 accumulation across dimorphic maize chloroplasts. PMID:25587003

  8. Differential chromatin proteomics of the MMS-induced DNA damage response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein enrichment by sub-cellular fractionation was combined with differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) to address the detection of the low abundance chromatin proteins in the budding yeast proteome. Comparisons of whole-cell extracts and chromatin fractions were used to provide a measure of the degree of chromatin association for individual proteins, which could be compared across sample treatments. The method was applied to analyze the effect of the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) on levels of chromatin-associated proteins. Results Up-regulation of several previously characterized DNA damage checkpoint-regulated proteins, such as Rnr4, Rpa1 and Rpa2, was observed. In addition, several novel DNA damage responsive proteins were identified and assessed for genotoxic sensitivity using either DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) or knockout strains, including Acf2, Arp3, Bmh1, Hsp31, Lsp1, Pst2, Rnr4, Rpa1, Rpa2, Ste4, Ycp4 and Yrb1. A strain in which the expression of the Ran-GTPase binding protein Yrb1 was reduced was found to be hypersensitive to genotoxic stress. Conclusion The described method was effective at unveiling chromatin-associated proteins that are less likely to be detected in the absence of fractionation. Several novel proteins with altered chromatin abundance were identified including Yrb1, pointing to a role for this nuclear import associated protein in DNA damage response. PMID:21967861

  9. Algal Pretreatment Improves Biofuels Yield and Value; Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-15

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. This research has been highlighted in the Green Chemistry journal article mentioned above and a milestone report, and is based on the work the researchers are doing for the AOP projects Algal Biomass Conversion and Algal Biofuels Techno-economic Analysis. That work has demonstrated an advanced process for algal biofuel production that captures the value of both the algal lipids and carbohydrates for conversion to biofuels.  With this process, as much as 150 GGE/ton of biomass can be produced, 2-3X more than can be produced by terrestrial feedstocks.  This can also reduce the cost of biofuel production by as much as 40%. This also represents the first ever design case for the algal lipid upgrading pathway.

  10. Comparative exoprotein profiling of different Staphylococcus epidermidis strains reveals potential link between nonclassical protein export and virulence.

    PubMed

    Siljamäki, Pia; Varmanen, Pekka; Kankainen, Matti; Sukura, Antti; Savijoki, Kirsi; Nyman, Tuula A

    2014-07-03

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) includes commensal and pathogenic strains capable of infecting humans and animals. This study reports global exoproteome profiling of bovine mastitis strain PM221 and two human strains, commensal-type ATCC12228 and sepsis-associated RP62A. We identified 451, 395, and 518 proteins from culture supernatants of PM221, ATCC12228, and RP62A, respectively. Comparison of the identified exoproteomes revealed several strain-specific differences related to secreted antigens and adhesins, higher virulence capability for RP62A, and similarities between the PM221 and RP62A exoproteomes. The majority of the identified proteins (∼80%) were predicted to be cytoplasmic, including proteins known to be associated in membrane vesicles (MVs) in Staphylococcus aureus and immunogenic/adhesive moonlighting proteins. Enrichment of MV fractions from culture supernatants and analysis of their protein composition indicated that this nonclassical protein secretion pathway was being exploited under the conditions used and that there are strain-specific differences in nonclassical protein export. In addition, several predicted cell-surface proteins were identified in the culture media. In summary, the present study is the first in-depth exoproteome analysis of SE highlighting strain-specific factors able to contribute to virulence and adaptation.

  11. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; Sweeney, N.; Van Wychen, S.; Lowell, A.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositional ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.

  12. Discarded oranges and brewer's spent grains as promoting ingredients for microbial growth by submerged and solid state fermentation of agro-industrial waste mixtures.

    PubMed

    Aggelopoulos, Theodoros; Bekatorou, Argyro; Pandey, Ashok; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2013-08-01

    The exploitation of various agro-industrial wastes for microbial cell mass production of Kluyveromyces marxianus, kefir, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reported in the present investigation. Specifically, the promotional effect of whole orange pulp on cell growth in mixtures consisting of cheese whey, molasses, and potato pulp in submerged fermentation processes was examined. A 2- to 3-fold increase of cell mass was observed in the presence of orange pulp. Likewise, the promotional effect of brewer's spent grains on cell growth in solid state fermentation of mixtures of whey, molasses, potato pulp, malt spent rootlets, and orange pulp was examined. The cell mass was increased by 3-fold for K. marxianus and 2-fold for S. cerevisiae in the presence of these substrates, proving their suitability for single-cell protein production without the need for extra nutrients. Cell growth kinetics were also studied by measurements of cell counts at various time intervals at different concentrations of added orange pulp. The protein content of the fermented substrates was increased substantially, indicating potential use of mixed agro-industrial wastes of negligible cost, as protein-enriched livestock feed, achieving at the same time creation of added value and waste minimization.

  13. Effect of combined treatments on viscosity of whey dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camillo, A.; Sabato, S. F.

    2004-09-01

    Whey proteins, enriched protein fractions from milk, are of great interest as ingredients due to nutritional value associated with its functional properties. These proteins could have their structural properties improved when some treatments are applied, such as thermal and gamma irradiation or when some compounds are added. The current work aimed to study the viscometer behavior of whey dispersions submitted to two different combined treatments: (1) thermal plus irradiation and (2) thermal plus vacuum and N 2 plus irradiation. Dispersions of whey protein in water (5% and 8% protein (w/v) base) and containing proteins and glycerol at ratios 1:1 and 2:1 (protein:glycerol) were submitted to both combined treatments. The irradiation doses were 0, 5, 15 and 25 kGy. The viscosity of the two combined treatments and for four levels of absorbed doses is presented and the combined effects are discussed. The thermal treatment combined with gamma irradiation contributed to increase the viscosity as irradiation doses increases for both (5% and 8%) concentrations of proteins ( p<0.05). For protein and glycerol solutions, the irradiation dose seemed to result in a slightly increase. The vacuum applied before the irradiation showed a small contribution.

  14. Date of eclosion modulates longevity: insights across dietary-restriction gradients and female reproduction in the mexfly Anastrepha ludens.

    PubMed

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Molleman, Freerk; Culminskaya, Irina V; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Carey, James R; Yashin, Anatoli I

    2009-11-01

    We use unique experimental data on daily reproduction and survival of individual fruit flies from eight cohorts eclosed at different dates in 2004 and 2005 who were treated with varying proportions of sugar and yeast and subject to different caloric restrictions (CR). We investigate the relationship between eclosion date and longevity across diets and reproduction in Anastrepha ludens. We show that eclosion date can be associated with uncontrolled external or internal factor(s) which can modulate longevity of males and females independently of diet and reproduction to the extent similar to the effect of diet on longevity. The effect of diet manipulation on longevity is sensitive to date of eclosion with the role of CR in life extension ranging from beneficial to harmful. Interaction of date of eclosion with compositional changes of sugar and yeast but not with CR is responsible for life extension. Highly protein-enriched diets reliably maximize reproduction but not life span. Decreased longevity of flies treated with high-protein diets may be associated with harmful consequences of protein ingestion but is unlikely a result of high reproduction rates. We present evidence for the presence of two frailty-sensitive weakly interacting mechanisms of longevity in female flies associated with differences in predisposed fitness.

  15. Mitochondrial lysates induce inflammation and Alzheimer's disease-relevant changes in microglial and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Carl, Steven M; Weber, Sam G; Ramanujan, Suruchi A; Festoff, Barry W; Linseman, Daniel A; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD). While AD genetic studies implicate inflammation-relevant genes and fibrillar amyloid-β protein promotes inflammation, our understanding of AD neuroinflammation nevertheless remains incomplete. In this study we hypothesized damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules arising from mitochondria, intracellular organelles that resemble bacteria, could contribute to AD neuroinflammation. To preliminarily test this possibility, we exposed neuronal and microglial cell lines to enriched mitochondrial lysates. BV2 microglial cells treated with mitochondrial lysates showed decreased TREM2 mRNA, increased TNFα mRNA, increased MMP-8 mRNA, increased IL-8 mRNA, redistribution of NFκB to the nucleus, and increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation. SH-SY5Y neuronal cells treated with mitochondrial lysates showed increased TNFα mRNA, increased NFκB protein, decreased IκBα protein, increased AβPP mRNA, and increased AβPP protein. Enriched mitochondrial lysates from SH-SY5Y cells lacking detectable mitochondrial DNA (ρ0 cells) failed to induce any of these changes, while mtDNA obtained directly from mitochondria (but not PCR-amplified mtDNA) increased BV2 cell TNFα mRNA. These results indicate at least one mitochondrial-derived DAMP molecule, mtDNA, can induce inflammatory changes in microglial and neuronal cell lines. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that a mitochondrial-derived DAMP molecule or molecules could contribute to AD neuroinflammation.

  16. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed "primitive" protein from halophile to mesophile folding.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate "cradle" for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original "prebiotic" set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a "primitive" designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)-having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a "primitive" polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation-identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table.

  17. Effect of dairy powders fortification on yogurt textural and sensorial properties: a review.

    PubMed

    Karam, Marie Celeste; Gaiani, Claire; Hosri, Chadi; Burgain, Jennifer; Scher, Joël

    2013-11-01

    Yogurts are important dairy products that have known a rapid market growth over the past few decades. Industrial yogurt manufacture involves different processing steps. Among them, protein fortification of the milk base is elemental. It greatly enhances yogurt nutritional and functional properties and prevents syneresis, an undesirable yogurt textural defect. Protein enrichment can be achieved by either concentration process (evaporation under vacuum and membrane processing: reverse osmosis and/or ultrafiltration) or by addition of dairy ingredients. Traditionally, skim milk powder (SMP) is used to enrich the milk base before fermentation. However, increased quality and availability of other dairy ingredients such as milk protein isolates (MPI), milk protein concentrates (MPC) whey protein isolates (WPI) and concentrates (WPC), micellar casein (MC) and caseinates have promoted their use as alternatives to SMP. Substituting different dry ingredients for skim milk powder in yogurt making affects the yogurt mix protein composition and subsequent textural and sensorial properties. This review focuses on various type of milk protein used for fortification purposes and their influence on these properties.

  18. Phase separation in solutions with specific and nonspecific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, William M.; Frenkel, Daan; Oxtoby, David W.

    2014-05-28

    Protein solutions, which tend to be thermodynamically stable under physiological conditions, can demix into protein-enriched and protein-depleted phases when stressed. Using a lattice-gas model of proteins with both isotropic and specific, directional interactions, we calculate the critical conditions for phase separation for mode