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Sample records for argopecten purpuratus lamarck

  1. In vitro fertilization with cryopreserved spermatozoa in small pieces of gonad of the scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck, 1819).

    PubMed

    Dupré, Enrique; Covarrubias, Alejandra; Goldstein, Merari; Guerrero, Alicia; Rojas, Herman

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the fertilization rates through the first cleavage, obtained with fresh oocytes inseminated with sperm cryopreserved at different freezing rates (-8.8,-10 and -12 °C/min) and at two thawing rates, using cryoprotectant solution (Me2SO, at 1 M, 2 M, 3 M, 4 M and 5 M with or without egg yolk and sucrose). Sperm contained in small pieces of male gonad were frozen at the three freezing rates, stored in liquid nitrogen and later the samples were thawed at two rates by immersing the samples in water at 50 °C (rapid) or 30 °C. Control fertilization rates ranged from 69.2 ± 2.8%-45.5% ± 1.6%. To determine the best concentration of the cryoprotectant (between 1 M and 5 M), in a first step, a freezing of -15 °C/min and a rapid thawing was used. Fertilization rates ranged between 9.6 ± 2.5% and 34.6± 12.2% and the highest percentages of fertilized oocytes (34.6%) was obtained with 3 M concentration with cryoaditive. The second step, using 3 M Me2SO with cryoadditive, determined that the freezing rate -8.8 °C/min produces the best result 29 ± 2.9% of fertilized oocytes corresponding to 59.2 ± 9.1% compared to controls. Although there were no significant differences among the different freezing rates, the fertilization rate tended to be higher with a lower freezing rate. Comparing the results of the present study, which used a cryoprotective solution composed of Me2SO and a cryoadditive, to those of other studies that used Me2SO without cryoadditives, suggests that the addition of a cryoadditive to the cryoprotectant Me2SO improves the fertilizing capacity of the sperm of Argopecten purpuratus after being cryopreserved.

  2. Pathogenicity of a highly exopolysaccharide-producing Halomonas strain causing epizootics in larval cultures of the Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck, 1819).

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rodrigo; Miranda, Claudio D; Amaro, Ana María

    2009-01-01

    Mass mortalities of larval cultures of Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus have repeatedly occurred in northern Chile, characterized by larval agglutination and accumulation in the bottom of rearing tanks. The exopolysaccharide slime (EPS) producing CAM2 strain was isolated as the primary organism from moribund larvae in a pathogenic outbreak occurring in a commercial hatchery producing larvae of the Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus located in Bahía Inglesa, Chile. The CAM2 strain was characterized biochemically and was identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA as Halomonas sp. (Accession number DQ885389.1). Healthy 7-day-old scallop larvae cultures were experimentally infected for a 48-h period with an overnight culture of the CAM2 strain at a final concentration of ca. 10(5) cells per milliliter, and the mortality and vital condition of larvae were determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to describe the chronology of the disease. Pathogenic action of the CAM2 strain was clearly evidenced by SEM analysis, showing a high ability to adhere and detach larvae velum cells by using its "slimy" EPS, producing agglutination, loss of motility, and a posterior sinking of scallop larvae. After 48 h, a dense bacterial slime on the shell surface was observed, producing high percentages of larval agglutination (63.28 +/- 7.87%) and mortality (45.03 +/- 4.32%) that were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of the unchallenged control cultures, which exhibited only 3.20 +/- 1.40% dead larvae and no larval agglutination. Furthermore, the CAM2 strain exhibited a high ability to adhere to fiberglass pieces of tanks used for scallop larvae rearing (1.64 x 10(5) cells adhered per square millimeters at 24 h postinoculation), making it very difficult to eradicate it from the culture systems. This is the first report of a pathogenic activity on scallop larvae of Halomonas species, and it prompts the necessity of an appraisal on

  3. Sclerochronological records and daily microgrowth of the Peruvian scallop (Argopecten purpuratus, Lamarck, 1819) related to environmental conditions in Paracas Bay, Pisco, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre Velarde, Arturo; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Mendo, Jaime; Jean, Fred

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the rhythm of micro-striae formation in the shell of Argopecten purpuratus and environmental influence on micro-growth increments by monitoring growth over a 98-day period between April and July 2007 under bottom and suspended culture (2 m above the bottom) rearing conditions. The transfer of individuals to the study site induced the formation of a notable growth mark that allowed us to count the number of micro-striae formed between transfer and sampling dates. Micro-striae counts showed a deposition rate of one stria per day independent of rearing condition. This result allowed us to analyse the relationships between growth increments and environmental conditions. We therefore examined the deviations between observed growth rates and growth rates predicted from a Von Bertalanffy growth function. Cross-correlation analysis revealed significant correlations, without time-lag, between these deviations and both particulate organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations in the bottom treatment. Additionally, we observed negative correlations with temperature and current speed at this depth with time-lags of 1 and 10 days respectively. In the suspended treatment, we observed a significant negative correlation with temperature, only with a 12-day lag-time. Our results show that growth response to environmental variability is not always instantaneous. This delay can be explained by the time delay over which metabolic processes need to be performed (e.g. digestion, use/movements of reserves, growth, reproduction). Further modeling studies could help to better understand these processes.

  4. Mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Marín, Alan; Alfaro, Rubén; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus was determined. The length of the mitochondrial coding region is 15,608 bp. A typical bivalve mitochondrial composition was detected with 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 21 transfer RNA genes, with the absence of the atp8 gene. Fifty percent of the protein-coding genes use typical ATG start codon, whereas five genes utilize ATA as their start codon. Only one gene was found to utilize TTG as its start codon. The A. purpuratus mitogenome shows a significant similarity to that of A. irradians irradians, in length as well as in gene composition.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of heterosis in interspecific hybrids of Argopecten purpuratus x A. irradians irradians.

    PubMed

    Hu, L P; Huang, X T; Sun, Y; Mao, J X; Wang, S; Wang, C D; Bao, Z M

    2015-09-09

    Argopecten purpuratus and Argopecten irradians irradians hybridization was successfully performed and the hybrid offspring displayed apparent heterosis in growth traits. To better understand the genetic basis of heterosis, the genomic composition and genetic variation of the hybrids were analyzed with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Seven of eight universal SSR primers displayed polymorphism in the hybrids and their parental groups, and hybrids inherited both parental geno-types at each locus. Using five primer combinations in AFLP analysis, 433 loci were amplified in the hybrids and their parental groups. The frequency of polymorphisms was 88.22%. F1 hybrids inherited 88.11 and 92.88% of AFLP bands from their parents. Some loci did not follow Mendelian Law, including 48 loci in parents that were lost, and 11 new loci that were amplified in the hybrids. The parameters of Nei's gene diversity, Shannon's Information index, genetic distance, and molecular variance between groups were calculated. The genetic differentiation between two hybrid groups (0.253) was smaller than that between hybrids and their parents (0.554 to 0.645), and was especially smaller than that between two parental groups (0.769). The high genetic similarity (0.9347) and low genetic differentiation (0.2531) between two hybrid groups suggests that these hybrid groups were genetically very close. Heterozygosities of hybrid groups were higher than those of parental groups, indicating that the hybrids had increased genetic diversity.

  6. Genome Sequence of Vibrio VPAP30, Isolated from an Episode of Massive Mortality of Reared Larvae of the Scallop Argopecten purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Rodrigo; Miranda, Claudio D.; Romero, Jaime; Asenjo, Freddy; Valderrama, Katherinne; Segovia, Cristopher

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 5.167-Mbp draft genome sequence of Vibrio VPAP30, isolated from an Argopecten purpuratus larval culture. Vibrio VPAP30 is the etiological agent of a vibriosis outbreak causing a complete collapse of a larval culture of the scallop A. purpuratus, which occurred in a commercial hatchery in Chile. PMID:26159530

  7. Genomic Characterization of Interspecific Hybrids between the Scallops Argopecten purpuratus and A. irradians irradians

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liping; Huang, Xiaoting; Mao, Junxia; Wang, Chunde; Bao, Zhenmin

    2013-01-01

    The Peruvian scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) has been introduced to China and has successfully been hybridized with the bay scallop (A. irradians irradians). The F1 hybrids of these two scallops exhibited a large increase in production traits and some other interesting new characteristics. To understand the genetic basis of this heterosis, nuclear gene and partial mtDNA sequences, and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) were employed to analyze the genomic organization of the hybrids. Amplification of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) showed that the parental ITS sequences were present in all the hybrid individuals, illustrating that the hybrid offspring inherited nuclear DNA from both parents. Sequence analyses of the ITS region further confirmed that the hybrids harbored alleles from their parents; some recombinant variants were also detected, which revealed some alterations in the nuclear genetic material of the hybrids. The analysis of mitochondrial 16S rDNA showed that the hybrids possessed sequences that were identical to the 16S rDNA of the female parents, proving a matrilineal inheritance of mitochondrial genes in scallops. In addition, GISH clearly discriminated between the parental chromosomes and indicated a combination of haploid genomes of duplex parents in the hybrids. The genetic analyses in our study illustrated that the F1 hybrids inherited nuclear material from both parents and cytoplasmic genetic material maternally, and some variations occurred in the genome, which might contribute to a further understanding of crossbreeding and heterosis in scallop species. PMID:23620828

  8. Inheritance of the general shell color in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Winkler, F M; Estévez, B F; Jollán, L B; Garrido, J P

    2001-01-01

    Although some external coloration and pigmentation patterns in molluscan shells may be attributable to environmental factors, most variation in these phenotypic characters depends on uncomplicated genetic mechanisms. Genetic research on inheritance of color variations in the north-Chilean scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) has now been expanded to analyze color segregation in juvenile scallops produced under controlled conditions employing self- and cross-fertilization. Calculations from the results were used for comparison with different numerical models based on Mendelian inheritance, and results were also obtained on the inheritance of a dorsoventral white line often observed on the left (upper) valve in this species. The results confirmed the hereditary basis for color variation in the shell of this scallop, suggesting a simple, dominant model of epistasis to explain the distribution of the different color variants observed (purple, brown, orange, yellow, and white). The presence of the white line may be controlled by a recessive allele with simple Mendelian traits on a locus distinct from those that control color variation.

  9. Transcriptomic response of Argopecten purpuratus post-larvae to copper exposure under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Manuel; Tanguy, Arnaud; David, Elise; Moraga, Dario; Riquelme, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Few studies have described the molecular response of mollusk larvae to heavy metal exposure. We investigated the response of Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus post-larvae to copper exposure under experimental conditions. Post-larvae were maintained with and without copper stress in tanks containing netlon collectors with biofilms that were formed by the bacterium Halomonas sp. and the diatom Amphora sp., known to increase larval settlement. We focused on the analysis of the differential expression patterns of genes associated with copper response. A suppression subtractive hybridization method was used to identify copper-specific up- and down-regulated genes in the post-larvae following 4 days and 8 days exposure to 2.5 and 10 microg/l Cu(+2). This method revealed 145 different sequences corresponding to 10 major physiological functions. The expression of 15 potentially regulated genes was analyzed by real-time PCR in post-larvae at different sampling times during the copper stress. The genes chosen were alpha tubulin, elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1A), tributylin binding protein type 1 (TBT), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (NADH2), cavortin, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), ferritin, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), Pam highwire rpm1 (Phr1), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), cellulase, and ribosomal proteins: L18, L44, S3a and S15. This study contributes to the characterization of potential genetic markers that could be used in future environmental monitoring and to explore new mechanisms of stress tolerance in marine mollusk species, especially in early stages of development.

  10. Energy vs. essential fatty acids: what do scallop larvae (Argopecten purpuratus) need most?

    PubMed

    Nevejan, Nancy; Saez, Iris; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2003-04-01

    Larvae of the Chilean-Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus were fed a Dunaliella tertiolecta diet (Dun-diet) supplemented with lipid emulsions, rich in 20:5n-3 (EmEPA), 22:6n-3 (EmDHA) or in saturated fatty acids (EmCOCO). A mixed algal diet of Isochrysis galbana (T-iso) and Chaetoceros neogracile served as a positive control (St-diet). Lipid supplementation to the Dun-diet improved the larval growth and increased the percentage of eyed larvae significantly, compared to the non-supplemented Dun-diet because of the extra energy supplied and not because of its fatty acid composition. No significant differences were observed between supplementation with EmEPA, EmDHA or EmCOCO. A mixture of 20% EmEPA+20% EmDHA (40% EmHUFA) was more efficient in raising the total lipid content in larvae than 40% EmCOCO. Both emulsions increased the triacylglycerol content in larvae compared to the non-supplemented Dun-diet. The best result, however, was obtained with the St-diet, probably because of a more suitable 18:2n-6/18:3n-3 ratio and a higher level of arachidonic acid. A positive relationship between the 18:2n-6/18:3n-3 ratio and the larval performance was found. No significant difference was observed in post-settlement larval size or percentage of metamorphosed larvae between the St-diet and the St-diet supplemented with 20% EmHUFA or 20% EmCOCO. The metamorphosed larvae had a constant DHA/EPA ratio of 3.7, independent from the diet, which suggested a metabolic control of the two fatty acids and a species-dependency of the ratio.

  11. Biomineralization changes with food supply confer juvenile scallops (Argopecten purpuratus) resistance to ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Ramajo, Laura; Marbà, Núria; Prado, Luis; Peron, Sophie; Lardies, Marco A; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Vargas, Cristian A; Lagos, Nelson A; Duarte, Carlos M

    2016-06-01

    Future ocean acidification (OA) will affect physiological traits of marine species, with calcifying species being particularly vulnerable. As OA entails high energy demands, particularly during the rapid juvenile growth phase, food supply may play a key role in the response of marine organisms to OA. We experimentally evaluated the role of food supply in modulating physiological responses and biomineralization processes in juveniles of the Chilean scallop, Argopecten purpuratus, that were exposed to control (pH ~ 8.0) and low pH (pH ~ 7.6) conditions using three food supply treatments (high, intermediate, and low). We found that pH and food levels had additive effects on the physiological response of the juvenile scallops. Metabolic rates, shell growth, net calcification, and ingestion rates increased significantly at low pH conditions, independent of food. These physiological responses increased significantly in organisms exposed to intermediate and high levels of food supply. Hence, food supply seems to play a major role modulating organismal response by providing the energetic means to bolster the physiological response of OA stress. On the contrary, the relative expression of chitin synthase, a functional molecule for biomineralization, increased significantly in scallops exposed to low food supply and low pH, which resulted in a thicker periostracum enriched with chitin polysaccharides. Under reduced food and low pH conditions, the adaptive organismal response was to trade-off growth for the expression of biomineralization molecules and altering of the organic composition of shell periostracum, suggesting that the future performance of these calcifiers will depend on the trajectories of both OA and food supply. Thus, incorporating a suite of traits and multiple stressors in future studies of the adaptive organismal response may provide key insights on OA impacts on marine calcifiers. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Insight into the messenger role of reactive oxygen intermediates in immunostimulated hemocytes from the scallop Argopecten purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Oyanedel, Daniel; Gonzalez, Roxana; Brokordt, Katherina; Schmitt, Paulina; Mercado, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) are metabolites produced by aerobic cells which have been linked to oxidative stress. Evidence reported in vertebrates indicates that ROI can also act as messengers in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, including those involved in innate immunity. In a recent study, an inhibitor of NF-kB transcription factors was identified in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, and its functional characterization suggested that it may regulate the expression of the big defensin antimicrobial peptide ApBD1. In order to give new insights into the messenger role of ROI in the immune response of bivalve mollusks, the effect of ROI production on gene transcription of ApBD1 was assessed in A. purpuratus. The results showed that 48 h-cultured hemocytes were able to display phagocytic activity and ROI production in response to the β-glucan zymosan. The immune stimulation also induced the transcription of ApBD1, which was upregulated in cultured hemocytes. After neutralizing the ROI produced by the stimulated hemocytes with the antioxidant trolox, the transcription of ApBD1 was reduced near to base levels. The results suggest a potential messenger role of intracellular ROI on the regulation of ApBD1 transcription during the immune response of scallops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of Argopecten purpuratus shells structuring the soft bottom community in shallow waters of southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomovasky, Betina J.; Gamero, Patricia A.; Romero, Leonardo; Firstater, Fausto N.; Gamarra Salazar, Alex; Hidalgo, Fernando; Tarazona, Juan; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    2015-12-01

    Accumulation of Argopecten purpuratus shells often occurs after El Niño events in shallow waters of Independencia Bay (14°17‧S-76°10‧W; Pisco, Peru). Here we experimentally investigate the effects of their shell accumulation on macrobenthos assemblages in soft bottom, shallow areas of the bay. A field experiment (from May 2006 to May 2007), including four treatments with different coverage levels of empty shells of A. purpuratus, were randomly arranged in: (1) areas devoid of shells ("Empty" treatment: experimental control), (2) 50% of the plot area covered with shells haphazardly distributed over the bottom ("medium" treatment), (3) 100% of the plot area covered with shells, forming a 10 cm valve layer ("full" treatment) and (4) "natural control". We found a total of 124 taxa throughout the experiment. Polychaetes, crustaceans and mollusks were the most abundant groups in "natural controls", dominated by the gastropod Nassarius gayi and the polychaetes Prionospio peruana, Platynereis bicanaliculata and Mediomastus branchiferus. The abundance of individuals (N) and the species richness (S) were higher in the "medium" treatment, but only in one month under positive sea bottom thermal anomalies. Similarity analysis (Bray-Curtis) showed that "natural control", "empty" and "full" treatments were more similar among them than the "medium" treatment. Multidimensional analysis showed no clear species association among treatments and a higher grouping among the samplings of Jun-06, Aug-06 and Nov-06. Our results also showed that the commercial crab Romaleon polyodon and the polyplacophora Tonicia elegans were positively affected by shell accumulations ("medium" treatment), while the limpet Fissurella crassa was negatively affected. Our study shows that directly by changing habitat structure or indirectly by changing sediment characteristics, the addition of scallop shells to the soft bottom can modify the macrobenthic assemblage; however, the seasonal oceanographic

  14. Molecular characterization and protein localization of the antimicrobial peptide big defensin from the scallop Argopecten purpuratus after Vibrio splendidus challenge.

    PubMed

    González, Roxana; Brokordt, Katherina; Cárcamo, Claudia B; Coba de la Peña, Teodoro; Oyanedel, Daniel; Mercado, Luis; Schmitt, Paulina

    2017-09-01

    Big defensins are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that are proposed as important effectors of the immune response in mollusks, chelicerates and chordates. At present, only two members of the big defensin family have been identified in scallop. In the present work, a cDNA sequence encoding a new big defensin homologue was characterized from the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, namely ApBD1. ApBD1 cDNA sequence comprised 585 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 375 bp and 5'- and 3'-UTRs of 41 and 167 bp, respectively. The deduced protein sequence contains 124 amino acids with a molecular weight of 13.5 kDa, showing characteristic motifs of the big defensin family and presenting 76% identity with the big defensin from the scallop A. irradians. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ApBD1 is included into the cluster of big defensins from mollusks. Tissue-specific transcript expression analysis by RT-qPCR showed that ApBD1 was present in all tissues tested from non-immune challenged scallops but it was most strongly expressed in the mantle. The transcript levels of ApBD1 were significantly up-regulated in gills at 24 and 48 h post-injection with the heat-attenuated bacteria Vibrio splendidus. Additionally, immunofluorescence analysis using a polyclonal anti-ApBD1 antibody showed that this protein was abundantly located in epithelial linings of gills and mantle; and also in digestive gland showing ApBD1-infiltrating hemocytes from immune challenged scallops. This is the first time that a big defensin is detected and located at the protein level in a mollusk. These results suggest an important role of ApBD1 in the mucosal immune response of A. purpuratus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel antifungal peptide designed from the primary structure of a natural antimicrobial peptide purified from Argopecten purpuratus hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Gloria; Guzmán, Fanny; Cárdenas, Constanza; Mercado, Luis; Marshall, Sergio H

    2009-08-01

    We have isolated and purified a natural antimicrobial peptide from Argopecten purpuratus hemocytes. 47 residues were determined from its primary structure representing the N-terminal of the complete sequence. This peptide of 5100.78Da was chemically synthesized and named Ap. The peptide has 25% of hydrophobic amino acids with a net charge of +1, and partial homology with known active antimicrobial peptides. Based on that sequence, a new peptide was designed and modeled to increase hydrophobicity and cationicity. The designed 30-residue peptide was chemically synthesized resulting in a novel 38% hydrophobic molecule named peptide Ap-S, with a net charge of +5 and 3028Da. A secondary structure was shown by circular dichroism, thus exposing a hydrophobic epitope toward the N-terminus and a hydrophilic one toward the C-terminus, improving amphipathicity. Ap-S was much more active than the parental Ap. Ap-S up to 100microM has no cytotoxic effect against fish cell line CHSE-214. We demonstrated that the chemical modification of a natural peptide and the chemical synthesis of derived molecules may be a powerful tool for obtaining substitutes to conventional antibiotics, displaying the many advantages of antimicrobial peptides and overcoming the limitations of natural peptides for large-scale production and application, such as the low specific activity and the minute amounts recovered in vivo. This peptide may have a relevant application in aquaculture by controlling Saprolegna sp., a parasitic pathogen fungus that attacks the culture of fish in different stages of their growth, from egg to adult.

  16. Molecular characterization of two ferritins of the scallop Argopecten purpuratus and gene expressions in association with early development, immune response and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Coba de la Peña, Teodoro; Cárcamo, Claudia B; Díaz, María I; Brokordt, Katherina B; Winkler, Federico M

    2016-08-01

    Ferritin is involved in several iron homoeostasis processes in molluscs. We characterized two ferritin homologues and their expression patterns in association with early development, growth rate and immune response in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, a species of economic importance for Chile and Peru. Two ferritin subunits (Apfer1 and Apfer2) were cloned. Apfer1 cDNA is a 792bp clone containing a 516bp open reading frame (ORF) that corresponds to a novel ferritin subunit in A. purpuratus. Apfer2 cDNA is a 681bp clone containing a 522bp ORF that corresponds to a previously sequenced EST. A putative iron responsive element (IRE) was identified in the 5'-untranslated region of both genes. The deduced protein sequences of both cDNAs possessed the motifs and domains characteristic of functional ferritin subunits. Both genes showed differential expression patterns at tissue-specific and early development stage levels. Apfer1 expression level increased 40-fold along larval developmental stages, decreasing markedly after larval settlement. Apfer1 expression in mantle tissue was 2.8-fold higher in fast-growing than in slow-growing scallops. Apfer1 increased 8-fold in haemocytes 24h post-challenge with the bacterium Vibrio splendidus. Apfer2 expression did not differ between fast- and slow-growing scallops or in response to bacterial challenge. These results suggest that Apfer1 and Apfer2 may be involved in iron storage, larval development and shell formation. Apfer1 expression may additionally be involved in immune response against bacterial infections and also in growth; and thus would be a potential marker for immune capacity and for fast growth in A. purpuratus.

  17. First Report of Vibrio tubiashii Associated with a Massive Larval Mortality Event in a Commercial Hatchery of Scallop Argopecten purpuratus in Chile.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rodrigo; Miranda, Claudio D; Santander, Javier; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The VPAP30 strain was isolated as the highly predominant bacteria from an episode of massive larval mortality occurring in a commercial culture of the Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus. The main aims of this study were, to characterize and identify the pathogenic strain using biochemical and molecular methods to demonstrate its pathogenic activity on scallop larvae, to characterize its pathogenic properties and to describe the chronology of this pathology. The pathogenic strain was identified as Vibrio tubiashii based on its phenotypic properties and the sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA and housekeeping genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA). When triplicate cultures of healthy 10-day-old scallop larvae were challenged with 1 × 10(5) colony forming units (CFU) mL(-1) of the VPAP30 strain, percentages of larval survival of 78.87 ± 3.33%, 34.32 ± 4.94%, and 0% were observed at 12, 24, and 36 h, respectively; whereas uninfected larval cultures showed survival rates of 97.4 ± 1.24% after of 48 h. Clinical symptoms exhibited by the scallop larvae infected with the VPAP30 strain include the accumulation of bacteria around the scallop larvae, velum disruption and necrosis of digestive gland. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of VPAP30 strain at 24 and 48 h was 1.3 × 10(4) and 1.2 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1), respectively. The invasive pathogenic activity of the VPAP30 strain was investigated with staining of the bacterial pathogen with 5-DTAF and analyzing bacterial invasion using epifluorescence, and a complete bacterial dissemination inside the larvae at 24 h post-infection was observed. When scallop larvae were inoculated with cell-free extracellular products (ECPs) of VPAP30, the larval survival rate was 59.5 ± 1.66%, significantly (P < 0.001) lower than the control group (97.4 ± 1.20%) whereas larvae treated with heat-treated ECPs exhibited a survival rate of 61.6 ± 1.84% after 48 h of exposure. This is the first report of the isolation of V

  18. First Report of Vibrio tubiashii Associated with a Massive Larval Mortality Event in a Commercial Hatchery of Scallop Argopecten purpuratus in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Rodrigo; Miranda, Claudio D.; Santander, Javier; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The VPAP30 strain was isolated as the highly predominant bacteria from an episode of massive larval mortality occurring in a commercial culture of the Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus. The main aims of this study were, to characterize and identify the pathogenic strain using biochemical and molecular methods to demonstrate its pathogenic activity on scallop larvae, to characterize its pathogenic properties and to describe the chronology of this pathology. The pathogenic strain was identified as Vibrio tubiashii based on its phenotypic properties and the sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA and housekeeping genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA). When triplicate cultures of healthy 10–day–old scallop larvae were challenged with 1 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) mL-1 of the VPAP30 strain, percentages of larval survival of 78.87 ± 3.33%, 34.32 ± 4.94%, and 0% were observed at 12, 24, and 36 h, respectively; whereas uninfected larval cultures showed survival rates of 97.4 ± 1.24% after of 48 h. Clinical symptoms exhibited by the scallop larvae infected with the VPAP30 strain include the accumulation of bacteria around the scallop larvae, velum disruption and necrosis of digestive gland. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of VPAP30 strain at 24 and 48 h was 1.3 × 104 and 1.2 × 103 CFU mL-1, respectively. The invasive pathogenic activity of the VPAP30 strain was investigated with staining of the bacterial pathogen with 5-DTAF and analyzing bacterial invasion using epifluorescence, and a complete bacterial dissemination inside the larvae at 24 h post-infection was observed. When scallop larvae were inoculated with cell-free extracellular products (ECPs) of VPAP30, the larval survival rate was 59.5 ± 1.66%, significantly (P < 0.001) lower than the control group (97.4 ± 1.20%) whereas larvae treated with heat-treated ECPs exhibited a survival rate of 61.6 ± 1.84% after 48 h of exposure. This is the first report of the isolation of V. tubiashii

  19. Expression of an optimized Argopecten purpuratus antimicrobial peptide in E. coli and evaluation of the purified recombinant protein by in vitro challenges against important plant fungi.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Eduardo; Montes, Christian; Rebufel, Patricia; Paradela, Alberto; Prieto, Humberto; Arenas, Gloria

    2011-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been widely described in several organisms from different kingdoms. We recently designed and evaluated a synthetic version of an AMP isolated and characterized from Argopecten purpuratus hemocytes. This study describes the generation of a chimaeric gene encoding for Ap-S, the use of this construct to transform E. coli strain BL21, and the evaluation of the purified recombinant Ap-S (rApS) as an antifungal agent. The proposed gene coding for rAp-S consists of 93 nucleotides arranged downstream from the IPTG-inducible T7 promoter. The best synthesis conditions were obtained after E. coli cultivation at 26°C for 3h, which allowed for the production of an rAp-S-enriched fraction containing the peptide at 249μM. Mass spectrometry analysis of the purified rAp-S (3085.80Da) showed the addition of a glycine residue on its N-terminal end derived from vector design and peptide purification. The purified rApS fraction was assayed for antifungal activity by direct addition of purified rApS elution to potato dextrose agar media at a final concentration of 81nM. These assays showed important growth inhibitions of both biotrophic (Fusarium oxysporum, Trichoderma harzianum) and necrotrophic (Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria spp.) fungi in that the hyphae structures and spore count were affected in all cases. The strategy of cloning and expressing rAp-S in E. coli, the high yield obtained and its successful use for controlling pathogenic fungi suggest that this molecule could be applied to agricultural crops using various management strategies.

  20. Effects of elevated seawater pCO2 on early development of scallop Argopecten irradias (Lamarck, 1819)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weimin; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Tianwen; Chen, Hongju; Tang, Liao; Mao, Xuewei

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of elevated seawater pCO2 on the early developmental stages of marine benthic calcifying organisms, we exposed the eggs and larvae of Argopecten irradias, an important bivalve species in Chinese aquaculture, in seawater equilibrated with CO2-enriched (1000 ppm) gas mixtures. We demonstrated that elevated seawater pCO2 significantly interfered with fertilization and larval development and resulted in an increased aberration rate. Fertilization in the treatment (pH 7.6) was 74.3% ± 3.8%, which was 9.7% lower than that in the control (pH 8.3) (84.0% ±3.0%). Hatching success decreased by 23.7%, and aberration rate increased by 30.3% under acidic condition. Larvae in acidified seawater still developed a shell during the post-embryonic phase. However, the shell length and height in the treatment were smaller than those in the control. The development of embryos differed significantly at 12 h after fertilization between the two experimental groups. Embryos developed slower in acidified seawater. Nearly half of the embryos in the control developed into D-shaped larvae at 48 h after fertilization, which were considerably more than those in the treatment (11.7%). Results suggest that future ocean acidification (OA) would cause detrimental effects on the early development of A. irradias.

  1. Molecular characterization of an inhibitor of NF-κB in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus: First insights into its role on antimicrobial peptide regulation in a mollusk.

    PubMed

    Oyanedel, D; Gonzalez, R; Flores-Herrera, P; Brokordt, K; Rosa, R D; Mercado, L; Schmitt, P

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitors of nuclear factor kappa B (IκBs) are major control components of the Rel/NF-κB signaling pathway, a key regulator in the modulation of the expression of immune-related genes in vertebrates and invertebrates. The activation of the Rel/NF-κB signaling pathway depends largely in the degradation of IκB proteins and thus, IκBs are a main target for the identification of genes whose expression is controlled by Rel/NF-κB pathway. In order to identify such regulation in bivalve mollusks, the cDNA sequence encoding an IκB protein was characterized in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, ApIκB. The cDNA sequence of ApIκB is comprised of 1480 nucleotides with a 1086 bp open reading frame encoding for 362 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis showed that ApIκB displays the conserved features of IκB proteins. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of a 39.7 kDa protein, which has an N-terminal degradation motif, six ankyrin repeats and a C-terminal phosphorylation site motif. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a high degree of identity between ApIκB and other IκBs from mollusks, but also to arthropod cactus proteins and vertebrate IκBs. Tissue expression analysis indicated that ApIκB is expressed in all examined tissues and it is upregulated in circulating hemocytes from scallops challenged with the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio splendidus. After inhibiting ApIκB gene expression using the RNA interference technology, the gene expression of the antimicrobial peptide big defensin was upregulated in hemocytes from non-challenged scallops. Results suggest that ApIκB may control the expression of antimicrobial effectors such as big defensin via a putative Rel/NF-κB signaling pathway. This first evidence will help to deepen the knowledge of the Rel/NF-κB conserved pathway in scallops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reproductive and larval cycle of the scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Ostreoida: Pectinidae), during El Niño-La Niña events and normal weather conditions in Antofagasta, Chile.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Miguel; Cantillánez, Marcela; Le Pennec, Marcel; Thouzeau, Gérard

    2008-03-01

    Seasonality, amplitude, and magnitude of spawning events were determined for Argopecten purpuratus in the La Rinconada marine reserve, Antofagasta, Chile, between December 1995 and January 2004. During the same period, samples of scallop larvae were obtained in vertical plankton hauls recovered within this reserve in an area routinely exposed to circular, gyre-like currents which helped retain the larvae within the bay. The reproduction of this population in normal or cool (e.g. "La Niña", 1998-2000) years occurred throughout the year, with a more active period between September and April, declining in June and August; this contrasted with the warmer "El Niño" oceanographic period of 1997-98 in which reproductive activity was more intense and prolonged throughout the entire year. The reproductive events in this population were mostly synchronous, although one asynchronous period occurred each year following the more intense March to May spawnings. This reproductive activity generated a continuous presence of larvae in the area in which no strict relation could be found between the intensities of spawning and numbers of larvae in the water. Larval presence was, however, generally correlated with active spawning periods. Important increases in larval numbers recorded at the end of 1999 and the beginning of 2003 were correlated with census data showing a higher percentage presence of broodstock over 90 mm in shell length during these years. An adequate stock of this size class is needed for a successful seed capture program in the reserve (for mass culture).

  3. Piaget and Lamarck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Frederick J.

    1977-01-01

    Examines Piaget's learning theories and his endorsement of the biological viewpoints of Jean Baptiste de Lamarck. Particular points in Piaget's theories and their relationships to Lamarck's biology are discussed. (CP)

  4. Epigenetics, Darwin, and Lamarck

    PubMed Central

    Penny, David

    2015-01-01

    It is not really helpful to consider modern environmental epigenetics as neo-Lamarckian; and there is no evidence that Lamarck considered the idea original to himself. We must all keep learning about inheritance, but attributing modern ideas to early researchers is not helpful, and can be misleading. PMID:26026157

  5. Genomic in situ hybridization identifies parental chromosomes in hybrid scallop (Bivalvia, Pectinoida, Pectinidae) between female Chlamys farreri and male Argopecten irradians irradians

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoting; Bi, Ke; Lu, Wei; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interspecific crossing was artificially carried out between Chlamys farreri (Jones & Preston, 1904) ♀ and Argopecten irradians irradians (Lamarck, 1819) ♂, two of the dominant cultivated scallop species in China. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to examine the chromosome constitution and variation in hybrids at early embryonic stage. The number of chromosomes in 66.38% of the metaphases was 2n = 35 and the karyotype was 2n = 3 m + 5 sm + 16 st + 11 t. After GISH, two parental genomes were clearly distinguished in hybrids, most of which comprised 19 chromosomes derived from their female parent (Chlamys farreri) and 16 chromosomes from their male parent (Argopecten irradians irradians). Some chromosome elimination and fragmentation was also observed in the hybrids. PMID:26140161

  6. JUVENILE BAY SCALLOP (ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS) HABITAT PREFERENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat quality and quantity are known to be important for maintaining populations of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), but data linking habitat attributes to bay scallop populations are lacking. This information is essential to understand the role of habitat alteration in th...

  7. JUVENILE BAY SCALLOP (ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS) HABITAT PREFERENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat quality and quantity are known to be important for maintaining populations of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), but data linking habitat attributes to bay scallop populations are lacking. This information is essential to understand the role of habitat alteration in th...

  8. HABITAT ASSESSMENT MODELS FOR BAY SCALLOP, ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) inhabit shallow subtidal habitats along the Atlantic coast of the United States and require settlement substrates, such as submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), for their early juvenile stages. The short lifespan of bay scallops (1-2 yr) coupled...

  9. A HABITAT SUITABILITY INDEX FOR THE BAY SCALLOP ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Poster presentation at a scientific meeting. A survey of Lagoon Pond, Martha's Vineyard, MA, USA was conducted in September 2005 to determine the combination of habitat factors most highly correlated with the bay scallop Argopecten irradians) abundance. A stratified random samp...

  10. A HABITAT SUITABILITY INDEX FOR THE BAY SCALLOP ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Poster presentation at a scientific meeting. A survey of Lagoon Pond, Martha's Vineyard, MA, USA was conducted in September 2005 to determine the combination of habitat factors most highly correlated with the bay scallop Argopecten irradians) abundance. A stratified random samp...

  11. The Impact of Lamarck's Theory of Evolution Before Darwin's Theory.

    PubMed

    Galera, Andrés

    2017-02-01

    This paper analyzes the impact that Lamarckian evolutionary theory had in the scientific community during the period between the advent of Zoological Philosophy and the publication Origin of Species. During these 50 years Lamarck's model was a well known theory and it was discussed by the scientific community as a hypothesis to explain the changing nature of the fossil record throughout the history of Earth. Lamarck's transmutation theory established the foundation of an evolutionary model introducing a new way to research in nature. Darwin's selectionist theory was proposed in 1859 to explain the origin of species within this epistemological process. In this context, Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology and Auguste Comte's Cours de Philosophie Positive appear as two major works for the dissemination of Lamarck's evolutionary ideology after the death of the French naturalist in 1829.

  12. Age and intrusive relations of the Lamarck granodiorite and associated mafic plutons, Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Joye, J.L.; Bachl, C.A.; Miller, J.S.; Glazner, A.F. . Dept. of Geology); Frost, T.P. ); Coleman, D.S. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The compositionally zoned Late Cretaceous Lamarck granodiorite, west of Bishop, hosts numerous mafic intrusions ranging from hornblende gabbro to mafic granodiorite. Frost and Mahood (1987) suggested from field relations that the Lamarck and the associated mafic plutons were co-intrusive. Contact relations between the Lamarck host and the mafic intrusions are variable (sharp to diffuse) and in places suggest commingling. In order to constrain the intrusive relationships between the Lamarck and its associated mafic plutons, the authors have analyzed feldspars from the Mt. Gilbert pluton and the Lamarck granodiorite to see if feldspar compositions in the Mt. Gilbert overlap those in the Lamarck host and determined U-Pb zircon ages for the Mt. Gilbert and Lake Sabrina plutons to see if they have the same age as the Lamarck granodiorite. Feldspars from the Lamarck granodiorite are normally zoned and range compositionally from An[sub 38--32]; those in the Mt. Gilbert diorite are also normally zoned but range compositionally from An[sub 49--41] and do not overlap the Lamarck host. Four to five zircon fractions from each pluton were handpicked and dated using U-Pb methods. The Mt. Gilbert mafic diorite has a concordant age of 92.5 Ma and the Lake Sabrina diorite has a concordant age of 91.5 Ma. Ages for the two plutons overlap within error, but multiple fractions from each suggest that the Lake Sabrina pluton is slightly younger than the Mt. Gilbert pluton. These data and field relationships indicate: (1) plagioclase phenocrysts in the Mt. Gilbert pluton were not derived from the Lamarck granodiorite despite their textural similarity; but (2) the Lamarck granodiorite and its associated mafic plutons are co-intrusive as supported by the close agreement of the ages with the crystallization age obtained by Stern and others for the Lamarck granodiorite.

  13. Freud's 'Lamarckism' and the politics of racial science.

    PubMed

    Slavet, Eliza

    2008-01-01

    This article re-contextualizes Sigmund Freud's interest in the idea of the inheritance of acquired characteristics in terms of the socio-political connotations of Lamarckism and Darwinism in the 1930s and 1950s. Many scholars have speculated as to why Freud continued to insist on a supposedly outmoded theory of evolution in the 1930s even as he was aware that it was no longer tenable. While Freud's initial interest in the inheritance of phylogenetic memory was not necessarily politically motivated, his refusal to abandon this theory in the 1930s must be understood in terms of wider debates, especially regarding the position of the Jewish people in Germany and Austria. Freud became uneasy about the inheritance of memory not because it was scientifically disproven, but because it had become politically charged and suspiciously regarded by the Nazis as Bolshevik and Jewish. Where Freud seemed to use the idea of inherited memory as a way of universalizing his theory beyond the individual cultural milieu of his mostly Jewish patients, such a notion of universal science itself became politically charged and identified as particularly Jewish. The vexed and speculative interpretations of Freud's Lamarckism are situated as part of a larger post-War cultural reaction against Communism on the one hand (particularly in the 1950s when Lamarckism was associated with the failures of Lysenko), and on the other hand, against any scientific concepts of race in the wake of World War II.

  14. The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M; Davidson, Eric H; Cameron, R Andrew; Gibbs, Richard A; Angerer, Robert C; Angerer, Lynne M; Arnone, Maria Ina; Burgess, David R; Burke, Robert D; Coffman, James A; Dean, Michael; Elphick, Maurice R; Ettensohn, Charles A; Foltz, Kathy R; Hamdoun, Amro; Hynes, Richard O; Klein, William H; Marzluff, William; McClay, David R; Morris, Robert L; Mushegian, Arcady; Rast, Jonathan P; Smith, L Courtney; Thorndyke, Michael C; Vacquier, Victor D; Wessel, Gary M; Wray, Greg; Zhang, Lan; Elsik, Christine G; Ermolaeva, Olga; Hlavina, Wratko; Hofmann, Gretchen; Kitts, Paul; Landrum, Melissa J; Mackey, Aaron J; Maglott, Donna; Panopoulou, Georgia; Poustka, Albert J; Pruitt, Kim; Sapojnikov, Victor; Song, Xingzhi; Souvorov, Alexandre; Solovyev, Victor; Wei, Zheng; Whittaker, Charles A; Worley, Kim; Durbin, K James; Shen, Yufeng; Fedrigo, Olivier; Garfield, David; Haygood, Ralph; Primus, Alexander; Satija, Rahul; Severson, Tonya; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Jackson, Andrew R; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Tong, Mark; Killian, Christopher E; Livingston, Brian T; Wilt, Fred H; Adams, Nikki; Bellé, Robert; Carbonneau, Seth; Cheung, Rocky; Cormier, Patrick; Cosson, Bertrand; Croce, Jenifer; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Genevière, Anne-Marie; Goel, Manisha; Kelkar, Hemant; Morales, Julia; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Robertson, Anthony J; Goldstone, Jared V; Cole, Bryan; Epel, David; Gold, Bert; Hahn, Mark E; Howard-Ashby, Meredith; Scally, Mark; Stegeman, John J; Allgood, Erin L; Cool, Jonah; Judkins, Kyle M; McCafferty, Shawn S; Musante, Ashlan M; Obar, Robert A; Rawson, Amanda P; Rossetti, Blair J; Gibbons, Ian R; Hoffman, Matthew P; Leone, Andrew; Istrail, Sorin; Materna, Stefan C; Samanta, Manoj P; Stolc, Viktor; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Tu, Qiang; Bergeron, Karl-Frederik; Brandhorst, Bruce P; Whittle, James; Berney, Kevin; Bottjer, David J; Calestani, Cristina; Peterson, Kevin; Chow, Elly; Yuan, Qiu Autumn; Elhaik, Eran; Graur, Dan; Reese, Justin T; Bosdet, Ian; Heesun, Shin; Marra, Marco A; Schein, Jacqueline; Anderson, Michele K; Brockton, Virginia; Buckley, Katherine M; Cohen, Avis H; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Hibino, Taku; Loza-Coll, Mariano; Majeske, Audrey J; Messier, Cynthia; Nair, Sham V; Pancer, Zeev; Terwilliger, David P; Agca, Cavit; Arboleda, Enrique; Chen, Nansheng; Churcher, Allison M; Hallböök, F; Humphrey, Glen W; Idris, Mohammed M; Kiyama, Takae; Liang, Shuguang; Mellott, Dan; Mu, Xiuqian; Murray, Greg; Olinski, Robert P; Raible, Florian; Rowe, Matthew; Taylor, John S; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Wang, D; Wilson, Karen H; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Gaasterland, Terry; Galindo, Blanca E; Gunaratne, Herath J; Juliano, Celina; Kinukawa, Masashi; Moy, Gary W; Neill, Anna T; Nomura, Mamoru; Raisch, Michael; Reade, Anna; Roux, Michelle M; Song, Jia L; Su, Yi-Hsien; Townley, Ian K; Voronina, Ekaterina; Wong, Julian L; Amore, Gabriele; Branno, Margherita; Brown, Euan R; Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Duboc, Véronique; Duloquin, Louise; Flytzanis, Constantin; Gache, Christian; Lapraz, François; Lepage, Thierry; Locascio, Annamaria; Martinez, Pedro; Matassi, Giorgio; Matranga, Valeria; Range, Ryan; Rizzo, Francesca; Röttinger, Eric; Beane, Wendy; Bradham, Cynthia; Byrum, Christine; Glenn, Tom; Hussain, Sofia; Manning, Gerard; Miranda, Esther; Thomason, Rebecca; Walton, Katherine; Wikramanayke, Athula; Wu, Shu-Yu; Xu, Ronghui; Brown, C Titus; Chen, Lili; Gray, Rachel F; Lee, Pei Yun; Nam, Jongmin; Oliveri, Paola; Smith, Joel; Muzny, Donna; Bell, Stephanie; Chacko, Joseph; Cree, Andrew; Curry, Stacey; Davis, Clay; Dinh, Huyen; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Fowler, Jerry; Gill, Rachel; Hamilton, Cerrissa; Hernandez, Judith; Hines, Sandra; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Laronda; Jolivet, Angela; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Nazareth, Lynne V; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Parker, David; Pu, Ling-Ling; Thorn, Rachel; Wright, Rita

    2006-11-10

    We report the sequence and analysis of the 814-megabase genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a model for developmental and systems biology. The sequencing strategy combined whole-genome shotgun and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences. This use of BAC clones, aided by a pooling strategy, overcame difficulties associated with high heterozygosity of the genome. The genome encodes about 23,300 genes, including many previously thought to be vertebrate innovations or known only outside the deuterostomes. This echinoderm genome provides an evolutionary outgroup for the chordates and yields insights into the evolution of deuterostomes.

  15. The Genome of the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the sequence and analysis of the 814-megabase genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a model for developmental and systems biology. The sequencing strategy combined whole-genome shotgun and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences. This use of BAC clones, aided by a pooling strategy, overcame difficulties associated with high heterozygosity of the genome. The genome encodes about 23,300 genes, including many previously thought to be vertebrate innovations or known only outside the deuterostomes. This echinoderm genome provides an evolutionary outgroup for the chordates and yields insights into the evolution of deuterostomes. PMID:17095691

  16. French roots of French neo-lamarckisms, 1879-1985.

    PubMed

    Loison, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    This essay attempts to describe the neo-Lamarckian atmosphere that was dominant in French biology for more than a century. Firstly, we demonstrate that there were not one but at least two French neo-Lamarckian traditions. This implies, therefore, that it is possible to propose a clear definition of a (neo)Lamarckian conception, and by using it, to distinguish these two traditions. We will see that these two conceptions were not dominant at the same time. The first French neo-Lamarckism (1879-1931) was structured by a very mechanic view of natural processes. The main representatives of this first period were scientists such as Alfred Giard (1846-1908), Gaston Bonnier (1853-1922) and Félix Le Dantec (1869-1917). The second Lamarckism - much more vitalist in its inspiration - started to develop under the supervision of people such as Albert Vandel (1894-1980) and Pierre-Paul Grassé (1895-1985). Secondly, this essay suggests that the philosophical inclinations of these neo-Lamarckisms reactivated a very ancient and strong dichotomy of French thought. One part of this dichotomy is a material, physicalist tradition, which started with René Descartes but developed extensively during the 18th and 19th centuries. The other is a spiritual and vitalist reaction to the first one, which also had a very long history, though it is most closely associated with the work of Henri Bergson. Through Claude Bernard, the first neo-Lamarckians tried to construct a mechanical and determinist form of evolutionary theory which was, in effect, a Cartesian theory. The second wave of neo-Lamarckians wanted to reconsider the autonomy and reactivity of life forms, in contrast to purely physical systems.

  17. Lamarck, Evolution, and the Inheritance of Acquired Characters

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Scientists are not always remembered for the ideas they cherished most. In the case of the French biologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, his name since the end of the nineteenth century has been tightly linked to the idea of the inheritance of acquired characters. This was indeed an idea that he endorsed, but he did not claim it as his own nor did he give it much thought. He took pride instead in advancing the ideas that (1) nature produced successively all the different forms of life on earth, and (2) environmentally induced behavioral changes lead the way in species change. This article surveys Lamarck’s ideas about organic change, identifies several ironies with respect to how his name is commonly remembered, and suggests that some historical justice might be done by using the adjective “Lamarckian” to denote something more (or other) than a belief in the inheritance of acquired characters. PMID:23908372

  18. The larval stages of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Meighan; Cruz Smith, Luisa; Cameron, R Andrew; Urry, Lisa A

    2008-06-01

    The adult body plan of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is established within the imaginal rudiment during the larval stages. To facilitate the study of these stages, we have defined a larval staging scheme, which consists of seven stages: Stage I, four-arm stage; Stage II, eight-arm stage; Stage III, vestibular invagination stage; Stage IV, rudiment initiation stage; Stage V, pentagonal disc stage; Stage VI, advanced rudiment stage; and Stage VI, tube-foot protrusion stage. Each stage is characterized by significant morphological features observed for the first time at that stage. This scheme is intended as a guide for determining the degree of larval development, and for identifying larval and adult structures. Larval anatomy was visualized using light and confocal microscopy as required on living material, whole mount fixed specimens, and serial sections. Antibody staining to localize specific gene products was also used. Detailed analysis of these data has furthered our understanding of the morphogenesis of the rudiment, and has suggested provocative questions regarding the molecular basis for these events. We intend this work to be of use to investigators studying gene expression and morphogenesis in postembryonic larvae.

  19. Apoptosis in early development of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Vega Thurber, Rebecca; Epel, David

    2007-03-01

    Apoptosis provides metazoans remarkable developmental flexibility by (1) eliminating damaged undifferentiated cells early in development and then (2) sculpting, patterning, and restructuring tissues during successive stages thereafter. We show here that apoptotic programmed cell death is infrequent and not obligatory during early embryogenesis of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. During the first 30 h of urchin development, fewer than 20% of embryos exhibit any cell death. Cell death during the cleavage stages consists of necrotic or pathological cell death, while cell death during the blastula and gastrula stages is random and predominantly caspase-mediated apoptosis. Apoptosis remains infrequent during the late blastula stage followed by a gradual increase in frequency during gastrulation. Even after prolonged exposure during the cleavage period to chemical stress, apoptosis occurs in less than 50% of embryos and always around the pre-hatching stage. Embryonic suppression of apoptosis through caspase inhibition leads to functionally normal larvae that can survive to metamorphosis, but in the presence of inducers of apoptosis, caspase inhibition leads to deformed larvae and reduced survival. Remarkably, however, pharmacological induction of apoptosis, while reducing overall survival, also significantly accelerates development of the survivors such that metamorphosis occurs up to a week before controls.

  20. Sea urchin granuloma secondary to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Strongylocentrotus franciscanus.

    PubMed

    Kabigting, Filamer D; Kempiak, Stephan J; Alexandrescu, Doru T; Yu, Benajmin D

    2009-05-15

    Sea urchin injuries have been associated with a variety of cutaneous lesions, ranging from acute, transient reactions, to more chronic inflammatory conditions that result in the formation of granulomas. Although diverse species of sea urchins have been reported to produce chronic cutaneous granulomas, the two most prevalent organisms found on the US West Coast, purple and red sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Strongylocentrotus franciscanus), have not yet been reported to induce persistent granulomatosis in humans. We describe one case of a 35-year-old marine biologist with chronic cutaneous lesions produced after repeated exposures. The lesions were similar to the ones produced by other urchin species, consisting of small, firm, erythematous nodules on his palms, dorsum of the hands, elbows, and knees. Increased awareness of this condition, including its association with the two prevalent organisms on the West Coast, should lead to a more rapid diagnosis for those affected. This article reviews the types of injuries, clinical cutaneoous lesions, histopathological features, and pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory process induced by sea urchins.

  1. Refertilization in eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Kubota, L F; Carroll, E J

    1988-09-01

    To determine the role of the sea urchin egg plasma membrane in the species-specificity of fertilization, the ability of denuded activated eggs to be heterospecifically refertilized was determined. Our initial studies included evaluating the effectiveness of three commonly used methods of vitelline envelope (VE) removal using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies directed against the VE. Unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs were extracted with 0.01 M dithiothreitol (DTT) for 3 min or digested with 1.0 mg/ml pronase for 1 hr. Eggs were also fertilized, then diluted into a divalent-free medium to produce thin, elevated envelopes (VE*s) that were mechanically removed by sieving the eggs through nylon mesh. We found that both DTT extraction and pronase digestion were not completely effective in VE removal, and mechanical removal methods gave rise to a mixed population of eggs, those that had their VEs removed and those with a collapsed envelope that was not detectable at the light microscope level. Therefore, a new method of VE removal was developed. Eggs with VE*s were prepared followed by treatment with 0.01 M DTT to solubilize the envelopes. Nearly 100% of the denuded activated eggs incorporated one or more homologous and heterologous sperm, suggesting that the egg plasma membrane does not function in determining the species-specificity of fertilization.

  2. Inheritance of acquired traits in plants: reinstatement of Lamarck.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    Since Lamarck proposed the idea of inheritance of acquired traits 200 years ago, much has been said for and against it, but the theory was finally declined after the 1930s. Despite of the negative opinions of the majority of geneticists, botanists and plant breeders have long recognized that altered properties during the growth were occasionally transmitted to the offspring. This was also the case with artificially altered properties such as dwarfism, flowering timing and plant stature, which were induced by a non-mutagenic chemical, 5-azacytidine and its derivatives. As these drugs are powerful inhibitors of DNA methylation in vivo, a close correlation between methylation and phenotypic expression was suggested. Subsequent studies showed that rice plants acquired disease resistance upon demethylation of the corresponding resistant gene, and that both resistant trait and hypomethylated status were inherited by the progeny up to nine generations. Whether or not the methylation pattern changes under natural condition was then questioned, and recent studies have indicated that it indeed naturally changes in response to environmental stresses. Whether or not the altered methylation pattern during the vegetative growth is heritable was also questioned, and studies on toadflax and rice affirmed the question, showing stable maintenance of hypermethylation in the former and hypomethylation in the latter for 250 and 10 years, respectively. The observation strongly suggested that acquired traits can be heritable as far as the acquired methylation pattern is stably transmitted. This concept is consistent with the Lamarck's theory of the inheritance of acquired traits, which therefore should be carefully reevaluated to reestablish his impaired reputation.

  3. Chekhovichia, a new generic replacement name for Rotalites Leleshus 1970 (Anthozoa: Heliolitoidea) non Lamarck 1801 (Protista: Foraminifera).

    PubMed

    Doweld, Alexander B

    2015-10-29

    The genus Rotalites was established by Leleshus (1970: 97) for fossil Upper Silurian heliolitoids (Anthozoa) from Southern Tien Shan. However, the name is preoccupied by Rotalites Lamarck (1801: 401) of Foraminifera (Protista) (cf. Loeblich & Tappan, 1987). In accordance with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, Chekhovichia nom. nov. is proposed here as a replacement name for Rotalites Leleshus non Lamarck.

  4. Structure and mechanical properties of Saxidomus purpuratus biological shells.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Zhang, G P; Zhu, X F; Li, X W; Meyers, M A

    2011-10-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of Saxidomus purpuratus shells were investigated and correlated with the structure. The shells show a crossed lamellar structure in the inner and middle layers and a fibrous/blocky and porous structure composed of nanoscaled particulates (~100 nm diameter) in the outer layer. It was found that the flexure strength and fracture mode are a function of lamellar organization and orientation. The crossed lamellar structure of this shell is composed of domains of parallel lamellae with approximate thickness of 200-600 nm. These domains have approximate lateral dimensions of 10-70 μm with a minimum of two orientations of lamellae in the inner and middle layers. Neighboring domains are oriented at specific angles and thus the structure forms a crossed lamellar pattern. The microhardness across the thickness was lower in the outer layer because of the porosity and the absence of lamellae. The tensile (from flexure tests) and compressive strengths were analyzed by means of Weibull statistics. The mean tensile (flexure) strength at probability of 50%, 80-105 MPa, is on the same order as the compressive strength (~50-150 MPa) and the Weibull moduli vary from 3.0 to 7.6. These values are significantly lower than abalone nacre, in spite of having the same aragonite structure. The lower strength can be attributed to a smaller fraction of the organic interlayer. The fracture path in the specimens is dominated by the orientation of the domains and proceeds preferentially along lamella boundaries. It also correlates with the color changes in the cross section of the shell. The cracks tend to undergo a considerable change in orientation when the color changes abruptly. The distributions of strengths, cracking paths, and fracture surfaces indicate that the mechanical properties of the shell are anisotropic with a hierarchical nature.

  5. Sphedgehog is expressed by pigment cell precursors during early gastrulation in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Egaña, Ana L; Ernst, Susan G

    2004-10-01

    We have sequenced the Sphedgehog (Sphh) gene from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Sphh transcripts are detected first at the mesenchyme blastula stage, and they accumulate throughout early embryogenesis. The Sphh protein is produced by precursor pigment cells during early and midgastrulation. NiCl2 inhibits pigment cell differentiation in sea urchins. Here, we show that, in S. purpuratus, nickel affects a process(es) between 17 and 24 hr of development, corresponding to the time period when Sphh mRNA is first detected. However, nickel treatment does not alter the early expression of Sphh.

  6. Strongylocentrotus purpuratus spindle tubulin. II. Characteristics of its sensitivity to Ca++ and the effects of calmodulin isolated from bovine brain and S. purpuratus eggs

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Tubulin was extracted from spindles isolated from embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and purified through cycles of temperature-dependent assembly and disassembly. At 37 degrees C, the majority of the cycle-purified spindle tubulin polymer is insensitive to free Ca++ at concentrations below 0.4 mM, requiring free Ca++ concentrations greater than 1 mM for complete depolymerization. However, free Ca++ at concentrations above 1 microM inhibits initiation of polymer formation without significantly inhibiting the rate of elongation onto existing polymer. At 15 degrees C and 18 degrees C, temperatures that are physiological for S. purpuratus embryos, spindle tubulin polymer is sensitive to free Ca++ at micromolar concentrations such that 3-20 microM free Ca++ causes complete depolymerization. Calmodulin purified from either bovine brain or S. purpuratus eggs does not affect the Ca++ sensitivity of the spindle tubulin at 37 degrees C, although both increase the Ca++ sensitivity of cycle-purified bovine brain tubulin. These results indicate that cycle-purified spindle tubulin and cycle-purified bovine brain tubulin differ significantly in their responses to calmodulin and in their Ca++ sensitivities at their physiological temperatures. They also suggest that, in vivo, spindle tubulin may be regulated by physiological levels of intracellular Ca++ in the absence of Ca++-sensitizing factors. PMID:7119003

  7. Proteomic analysis of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) spicule matrix

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The sea urchin embryo has been an important model organism in developmental biology for more than a century. This is due to its relatively simple construction, translucent appearance, and the possibility to follow the fate of individual cells as development to the pluteus larva proceeds. Because the larvae contain tiny calcitic skeletal elements, the spicules, they are also important model organisms for biomineralization research. Similar to other biominerals the spicule contains an organic matrix, which is thought to play an important role in its formation. However, only few spicule matrix proteins were identified previously. Results Using mass spectrometry-based methods we have identified 231 proteins in the matrix of the S. purpuratus spicule matrix. Approximately two thirds of the identified proteins are either known or predicted to be extracellular proteins or transmembrane proteins with large ectodomains. The ectodomains may have been solubilized by partial proteolysis and subsequently integrated into the growing spicule. The most abundant protein of the spicule matrix is SM50. SM50-related proteins, SM30-related proteins, MSP130 and related proteins, matrix metalloproteases and carbonic anhydrase are among the most abundant components. Conclusions The spicule matrix is a relatively complex mixture of proteins not only containing matrix-specific proteins with a function in matrix assembly or mineralization, but also: 1) proteins possibly important for the formation of the continuous membrane delineating the mineralization space; 2) proteins for secretory processes delivering proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous precursors; 3) or proteins reflecting signaling events at the cell/matrix interface. Comparison of the proteomes of different skeletal matrices allows prediction of proteins of general importance for mineralization in sea urchins, such as SM50, SM30-E, SM29 or MSP130. The comparisons also help point out putative tissue-specific proteins, such

  8. The actuality of Lamarck: towards the bicentenary of his Philosophic Zoologique.

    PubMed

    Por, Francis Dov

    2006-03-01

    Lamarck, a son of the age of natural philosophy and revolutionary ideas, turned to zoology, the field in which he made his major impact, in his old age. By then, the world had already shifted towards a different intellectual atmosphere and, due to this anachronism, he was snubbed and even ridiculed by the mainstream neo-Darwinists. Yet his basic ideas about the active role of organisms in and the progressive unraveling of evolution stubbornly survived along the academic fringes and, more importantly, among the humanistic writers. Recent developments in genetic inheritance, embryology, immunology and behavioral studies vindicate, at least in part, the 200-year-old vision of Lamarck.

  9. Mutational randomness as conditional independence and the experimental vindication of mutational Lamarckism.

    PubMed

    Razeto-Barry, Pablo; Vecchi, Davide

    2017-05-01

    The Modern Synthesis enshrined natural selection as the driver of adaptive evolution mainly by eliminating competing explanations. One of the eliminated competitors was Lamarckism, particularly 'mutational Lamarckism', a hypothesis according to which mutations may be directed towards producing phenotypes that improve the performance of the organism in a particular environment. Contrary to this hypothesis, the Modern Synthesis' view claims that mutations are 'random', even though the precise meaning of the term was never formally explicated. Current evidence seemingly in favour of the existence of legitimate cases of mutational Lamarckism has revitalized interest to seek a clarification of the meaning of the term 'random' in this context. Herein we analyse previous definitions of random mutations and show that they are deficient in three ways: either they are too wide, or too narrow, or dyadic. We argue that the linguistic expression 'random mutation' refers to a triadic rather than a dyadic relationship, propose a new, formal and precise definition based on the probabilistic concept of conditional independence, and finally provide examples of its application. One important consequence of our analysis is that the genomic specificity of the mutational process is not a necessary condition for the existence of mutational Lamarckism.

  10. Analytical psychology and the ghost of Lamarck: did Jung believe in the inheritance of acquired characteristics?

    PubMed

    Rensma, Ritske

    2013-04-01

    Whether Jung was a Lamarckian or not has always been a hotly debated topic, both within the post-Jungian community and amongst scholars with an interest in Jung in the wider academic community. Yet surprisingly few substantial pieces of work have been dedicated to it and, to my mind, no one has yet managed to do justice to all the subtleties involved. The scholars who have claimed that Jung is a Lamarckian have, for the most part, oversimplified the debate by failing to discuss the passages in which Jung appears to be defending himself against Lamarckism; the scholars who have defended Jung against Lamarckism, however, have as a rule not adequately dealt with the question of whether these passages actually get Jung off the hook. This paper will attempt to correct this imbalance by putting forward four key passages spanning Jung's career that all represent conclusive evidence that Jung was indeed a Lamarckian. After discussing these, it will then deal in detail with the passages in which Jung appears to be defending himself against Lamarckism, making the case that they do not represent a defence against Lamarckism at all and have therefore generally been misinterpreted by many scholars.

  11. Cytological comparison of gametogenesis of scallops, Argopecten irradians and Chlamys farreri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xin-Hong; Liu, Bao-Zhong; Wu, Chang-Gong; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Histological characteristics of gametogenesis of two kinds of scallops, gonochoric Chinese scallop, Chlamys farreri and hermaphroditic bay scallop, Argopecten irradians were investigated in this study. Spermatogenesis in C. farreri has different developmental stages: spermatogonia, primary spermatocyte, second spermatocyte, spermatid and spermatozoon. A large number of same developmental stage spermatic cells converge at a definite area of the testis. Premeiotic, previtellogenic and vitellogenic oocytes can be found during oogenesis in C. farreri, where oocyte distribution is obviously irregular. The A. irradians gonad consists of two different parts in one individual: one part functions as testis, the other as ovary. Between these two parts is a special appearance area, where a large number of spermatic cells are bound with two layers of acellular substance with many oocytes in it.

  12. Presence of two mitochondrial genomes in the mytilid Perumytilus purpuratus: Phylogenetic evidence for doubly uniparental inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Jaime; Pérez, Montse; Toro, Jorge; Astorga, Marcela P.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents evidence, using sequences of ribosomal 16S and COI mtDNA, for the presence of two mitochondrial genomes in Perumytilus purpuratus. This may be considered evidence of doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance. The presence of the two types of mitochondrial genomes differentiates females from males. The F genome was found in the somatic and gonadal tissues of females and in the somatic tissues of males; the M genome was found in the gonads and mantle of males only. For the mitochondrial 16S region, ten haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.004), and 7 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.001), with a distance Dxy of 0.125 and divergence Kxy of 60.33%. For the COI gene 17 haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.009), and 10 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.010), with a genetic distance Dxy of 0.184 and divergence Kxy of 99.97%. Our results report the presence of two well-differentiated, sex-specific types of mitochondrial genome (one present in the male gonad, the other in the female gonad), implying the presence of DUI in P. purpuratus. These results indicate that care must be taken in phylogenetic comparisons using mtDNA sequences of P. purpuratus without considering the sex of the individuals. PMID:26273220

  13. Spatio-temporal variation in the prevalence of trematodes in the bivalve Perumytilus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Gabriela; Torres, Pamela; Valdés, Javiera; Rodríguez, Alejandra

    2013-06-01

    Perumytilus purpuratus is an abundant bivalve located in the intertidal rocky zone of South America that has been considered as a key species of the ecosystem. There are few studies of the host-parasite relationship of this bivalve; thus, this research aims to analyse the spatial and temporal variation in the prevalence of trematodes in P. purpuratus. Bivalves were collected from three localities (El Tabo, Las Cruces and Montemar) of central Chile (33°S, 71°W) during different seasons of 2010. The bivalves were also collected every metre, from the lowest to the highest level of the intertidal rocky zone, to determine the parasite distribution within the localities. Three species of trematodes as sporocyst stages were found: Prosorhynchoides carvajali, Proctoeces sp. and an undetermined fellodistomid species. Of the 37,692 bivalve specimens collected, 2.68% were parasitised. The undetermined fellodistomid species was the most prevalent parasite observed (1.69%). There were little detected differences in the prevalence of some trematode species between seasons. The prevalence of P. carvajali varied between localities, being most prevalent at Montemar. The distribution of trematodes along the rocky zone within the localities was variable, with P. carvajali being more prevalent in the mid-lowest level of the intertidal zone and the undetermined fellodistomid species being more prevalent in the mid-highest level. Both the abundance of definitive hosts and the environmental conditions likely result in different levels of infection by trematodes in P. purpuratus between and within the localities.

  14. Review of Australasian spider flies (Diptera, Acroceridae) with a revision of Panops Lamarck

    PubMed Central

    Winterton, Shaun L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Australasian spider flies (Diptera: Acroceridae) are reviewed, with all eight currently recognized genera diagnosed and figured. The panopine genus Panops Lamarck, 1804 from Australia and Indonesia is revised with four new species described, increasing the total number of species in the genus to nine: Panops aurum sp. n., Panops danielsi sp. n., Panops jade sp. n. and Panops schlingeri sp. n. Five species of Panops are redescribed: Panops austrae Neboiss, 1971, Panops baudini Lamarck, 1804, Panops boharti (Schlinger, 1959), comb. n., Panops conspicuus (Brunetti, 1926) and Panops grossi (Neboiss, 1971), comb. n. The monotypic genera Neopanops Schlinger, 1959 and Panocalda Neboiss, 1971 are synonymized with Panops. Keys to genera of Australasian Acroceridae and species of Panops, Helle Osten Sacken, 1896 and Australasian Pterodontia Gray, 1832 are included. PMID:22448114

  15. Marine Toxin Okadaic Acid Affects the Immune Function of Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians).

    PubMed

    Chi, Cheng; Giri, Sib Sankar; Jun, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Saekil; Kim, Sang Guen; Park, Se Chang

    2016-08-24

    Okadaic acid (OA) is produced by dinoflagellates during harmful algal blooms and is a diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin. This toxin is particularly problematic for bivalves that are cultured for human consumption. This study aimed to reveal the effects of exposure to OA on the immune responses of bay scallop, Argopecten irradians. Various immunological parameters were assessed (total hemocyte counts (THC), reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and nitric oxide (NO) in the hemolymph of scallops at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h post-exposure (hpe) to different concentrations of OA (50, 100, and 500 nM). Moreover, the expression of immune-system-related genes (CLT-6, FREP, HSP90, MT, and Cu/ZnSOD) was also measured. Results showed that ROS, MDA, and NO levels and LDH activity were enhanced after exposure to different concentrations of OA; however, both THC and GSH decreased between 24-48 hpe. The expression of immune-system-related genes was also assessed at different time points during the exposure period. Overall, our results suggest that exposure to OA had negative effects on immune system function, increased oxygenic stress, and disrupted metabolism of bay scallops.

  16. Purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus gamete manipulation using optical trapping and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Berns, Michael W.

    2013-04-01

    A system has been developed that allows for optical and fluidic manipulation of gametes. The optical manipulation is performed by using a single-point gradient trap with a 40× oil immersion PH3 1.3 NA objective on a Zeiss inverted microscope. The fluidic manipulation is performed by using a custom microfluidic chamber designed to fit into the short working distance between the condenser and objective. The system is validated using purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus gametes and has the potential to be used for mammalian in vitro fertilization and animal husbandry.

  17. A STAGE-BASED POPULATION MODEL FOR BAY SCALLOPS (ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS) AND IMPLICATIONS FOR POPULATION-LEVEL EFFECTS OF HABITAT ATLERATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) inhabit shallow subtidal habitats along the Atlantic coast of the United States and require settlement substrates, such as submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), for their early juvenile stages. The short lifespan of bay scallops (1-2 yr) coupled...

  18. A STAGE-BASED POPULATION MODEL FOR BAY SCALLOPS (ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS) AND IMPLICATIONS FOR POPULATION-LEVEL EFFECTS OF HABITAT ATLERATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) inhabit shallow subtidal habitats along the Atlantic coast of the United States and require settlement substrates, such as submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), for their early juvenile stages. The short lifespan of bay scallops (1-2 yr) coupled...

  19. Morphological and molecular analyses of larval trematodes in the intertidal bivalve Perumytilus purpuratus from central Chile.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; López, Z; Cárdenas, L

    2013-09-01

    The bivalve Perumytilus purpuratus is a common species that is widely distributed throughout rocky intertidal zones in Chile. This bivalve is the first intermediate host for three trematode species: one bucephalid (an undetermined species) and two fellodistomids (Proctoeces lintoni and one undetermined species). A few studies based on morphological comparisons, experimental infection and molecular analyses have been performed to ascertain the taxon (at least at the family level) to which these trematodes belong; yet, there remains no clarification about the specific identity of these trematodes. Therefore, in this study, we compared the V4 region nucleotide sequences of the 18S rRNA of these three sporocyst species, classified as morphotypes, found in P. purpuratus and nine adult trematode species from intertidal fishes that are likely definitive hosts for these parasites. The sequences from two of the sporocyst morphotypes matched with adult trematodes from the intertidal fish: type 1 sporocyst was similar to Prosorhynchoides carvajali (Bucephalidae), with a mean genetic divergence of 0.78%, and type 2 sporocyst was similar to Proctoeces sp. (but not P. lintoni), with 0% genetic divergence. The third species (type 3 sporocyst) was classified to the family Fellodistomidae; however, the sequence from this species differed greatly from the three other fellodistomid species documented in the marine fish of Chile and from other fellodistomids in public databases. Moreover, this morphotype has a particular cercarial morphology that greatly differs from other fellodistomid species described thus far. Therefore, this intriguing trematode remains a mystery.

  20. Gene structure in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus based on transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qiang; Cameron, R Andrew; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Davidson, Eric H

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive transcriptome analysis has been performed on protein-coding RNAs of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, including 10 different embryonic stages, six feeding larval and metamorphosed juvenile stages, and six adult tissues. In this study, we pooled the transcriptomes from all of these sources and focused on the insights they provide for gene structure in the genome of this recently sequenced model system. The genome had initially been annotated by use of computational gene model prediction algorithms. A large fraction of these predicted genes were recovered in the transcriptome when the reads were mapped to the genome and appropriately filtered and analyzed. However, in a manually curated subset, we discovered that more than half the computational gene model predictions were imperfect, containing errors such as missing exons, prediction of nonexistent exons, erroneous intron/exon boundaries, fusion of adjacent genes, and prediction of multiple genes from single genes. The transcriptome data have been used to provide a systematic upgrade of the gene model predictions throughout the genome, very greatly improving the research usability of the genomic sequence. We have constructed new public databases that incorporate information from the transcriptome analyses. The transcript-based gene model data were used to define average structural parameters for S. purpuratus protein-coding genes. In addition, we constructed a custom sea urchin gene ontology, and assigned about 7000 different annotated transcripts to 24 functional classes. Strong correlations became evident between given functional ontology classes and structural properties, including gene size, exon number, and exon and intron size.

  1. The involvement of HSP22 from bay scallop Argopecten irradians in response to heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng; Zhao, Jianmin; Qiu, Limei; Dong, Chaohua; Li, Fengmei; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Guanpin

    2010-04-01

    Heat shock protein 22 (HSP22) is an important member of small heat shock protein (sHSP) subfamily which plays a key role in the process of protecting cells, facilitating the folding of nascent peptides, and responding to stress. In the present study, the cDNA of HSP22 was cloned from Argopecten irradians (designated as AiHSP22) by rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) based on the expressed sequence tags (ESTs). The full-length cDNA of AiHSP22 was of 1,112 bp, with an open reading frame of 588 bp encoding a polypeptide of 195 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of AiHSP22 showed high similarity to previously identified HSP22s. The expression patterns of AiHSP22 mRNA in different tissues and in haemocytes of scallops exposed to Cd(2+), Pb(2+) or Cu(2+) were investigated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. The mRNA of AiHSP22 was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues, including haemocyte, muscle, kidney, gonad, gill and heart. The expression level in heart and muscle was higher than that in other tissues. The mRNA level of AiHSP22 in haemocytes was up-regulated after a 10 days exposure of scallops to Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+). However, the expression of AiHSP22 did not increase linearly along with the rise of heavy metal concentration. Different concentrations of the same metal resulted in different effects on AiHSP22 expression. The sensitive response of AiHSP22 to Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) stress indicated that it could be developed as an indicator of exposure to heavy metals for the pollution monitoring programs in aquatic environment.

  2. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.S.; Frost, T.P.; Glazner, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  3. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in california.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D S; Glazner, A F; Frost, T P

    1992-12-18

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  4. Histamine is a modulator of metamorphic competence in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A metamorphic life-history is present in the majority of animal phyla. This developmental mode is particularly prominent among marine invertebrates with a bentho-planktonic life cycle, where a pelagic larval form transforms into a benthic adult. Metamorphic competence (the stage at which a larva is capable to undergo the metamorphic transformation and settlement) is an important adaptation both ecologically and physiologically. The competence period maintains the larval state until suitable settlement sites are encountered, at which point the larvae settle in response to settlement cues. The mechanistic basis for metamorphosis (the morphogenetic transition from a larva to a juvenile including settlement), i.e. the molecular and cellular processes underlying metamorphosis in marine invertebrate species, is poorly understood. Histamine (HA), a neurotransmitter used for various physiological and developmental functions among animals, has a critical role in sea urchin fertilization and in the induction of metamorphosis. Here we test the premise that HA functions as a developmental modulator of metamorphic competence in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Results Our results provide strong evidence that HA leads to the acquisition of metamorphic competence in S. purpuratus larvae. Pharmacological analysis of several HA receptor antagonists and an inhibitor of HA synthesis indicates a function of HA in metamorphic competence as well as programmed cell death (PCD) during arm retraction. Furthermore we identified an extensive network of histaminergic neurons in pre-metamorphic and metamorphically competent larvae. Analysis of this network throughout larval development indicates that the maturation of specific neuronal clusters correlates with the acquisition of metamorphic competence. Moreover, histamine receptor antagonist treatment leads to the induction of caspase mediated apoptosis in competent larvae. Conclusions We conclude that HA is a modulator

  5. Development of marine sediment toxicity identification evaluation methods using Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Mytilus edulis, and Eohaustorius estuarius

    SciTech Connect

    Wortham, G.; Cotsifas, J.S.; Taberski, K.; Hansen, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    Widespread sediment toxicity, including ``clean`` reference sites, dictates that the causes of toxicity in sediments be determined. Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIE) are useful tools in characterizing compounds responsible for toxicity, but were unavailable for sediment samples. TIE methods were developed for sediment porewater and included the following components: determination of an appropriate porewater extraction process; control TIE tests using marine water and porewater evaluating species sensitivities to the fractionation procedures; validation experiments investigating the removal efficiencies of organics using C18 solid phase extraction, and metals chelation using EDTA and STS; spiking experiments to determine the effectiveness of the TIE procedure in identifying multiple toxicants. The authors determined that fractionation procedures could be applied to both marine water and porewater using S. purpuratus, M. edulis and E. estuarius as biological detectors.

  6. Contractile properties of the striated adductor muscle in the bay scallop Argopecten irradians at several temperatures.

    PubMed

    Olson, J M; Marsh, R L

    1993-03-01

    The isometric and isotonic contractile properties of the cross-striated adductor muscle of the bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) were measured in vitro at 10, 15 and 20 degrees C. The length at which twitch force was maximal as a function of the closed length in situ (L0/Lcl) averaged 1.38 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M.) at 10 degrees C. This length is very close to the typical length at maximum gape during natural swimming at this temperature. Passive force was very low over the range of lengths measured here; at L0, passive force averaged approximately 0.08 N cm-2, or only 0.5% of the corresponding peak twitch force. The mean peak isometric twitch force (Ptw,max) at 10 degrees C was 21.43 +/- 0.68 N cm-2 (S.E.M.), and the ratio of peak twitch force to tetanic force (Ptw,max/P0) averaged 0.89 +/- 0.01. Temperature did not affect either twitch force (Ptw), once fatigue was taken into account, or Ptw,max/P0. In contrast, the time-related properties of twitch contractions (latent period, tL; time to peak tension, tPtw; and time from peak tension to half-relaxation, t50%R) were positively modified by temperature at all temperatures measured (Q10 > 1.8). All three properties were more temperature-sensitive over the range 10-15 degrees C than over the range 15-20 degrees C. The force-velocity relationships of the striated adductor muscle were fitted to the hyperbolic-linear (HYP-LIN) equation. The force-velocity curves of the striated adductor muscle of the scallop were strongly influenced by temperature. Maximal velocity at zero force (Vmax), and therefore maximal power output, increased significantly with temperature. The Q10 over the temperature range 10-15 degrees C (1.42) was significantly lower than that over the range 15-20 degrees C (2.41). The shape of the force-velocity relationship, assessed through comparisons of the power ratio (Wmax/VmaxP0), was not influenced by temperature.

  7. Ocean acidification research in the 'post-genomic' era: Roadmaps from the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler G; Padilla-Gamiño, Jacqueline L; Kelly, Morgan W; Pespeni, Melissa H; Chan, Francis; Menge, Bruce A; Gaylord, Brian; Hill, Tessa M; Russell, Ann D; Palumbi, Stephen R; Sanford, Eric; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2015-07-01

    Advances in nucleic acid sequencing technology are removing obstacles that historically prevented use of genomics within ocean change biology. As one of the first marine calcifiers to have its genome sequenced, purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) have been the subject of early research exploring genomic responses to ocean acidification, work that points to future experiments and illustrates the value of expanding genomic resources to other marine organisms in this new 'post-genomic' era. This review presents case studies of S. purpuratus demonstrating the ability of genomic experiments to address major knowledge gaps within ocean acidification. Ocean acidification research has focused largely on species vulnerability, and studies exploring mechanistic bases of tolerance toward low pH seawater are comparatively few. Transcriptomic responses to high pCO₂ seawater in a population of urchins already encountering low pH conditions have cast light on traits required for success in future oceans. Secondly, there is relatively little information on whether marine organisms possess the capacity to adapt to oceans progressively decreasing in pH. Genomics offers powerful methods to investigate evolutionary responses to ocean acidification and recent work in S. purpuratus has identified genes under selection in acidified seawater. Finally, relatively few ocean acidification experiments investigate how shifts in seawater pH combine with other environmental factors to influence organism performance. In S. purpuratus, transcriptomics has provided insight into physiological responses of urchins exposed simultaneously to warmer and more acidic seawater. Collectively, these data support that similar breakthroughs will occur as genomic resources are developed for other marine species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Homeopathy outperforms antibiotics treatment in juvenile scallop Argopecten ventricosus: effects on growth, survival, and immune response.

    PubMed

    Mazón-Suástegui, José Manuel; García-Bernal, Milagro; Saucedo, Pedro Enrique; Campa-Córdova, Ángel; Abasolo-Pacheco, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Mortality from vibriosis in mollusk production is attributed to pathogenic bacteria, particularly Vibrio alginolyticus. Use of increasingly potent antibiotics has led to bacterial resistance and increased pathogenicity. Alternatives in sanitation, safety, and environmental sustainability are currently under analysis. To-date, homeopathy has been investigated in aquaculture of freshwater fish, but not in marine mollusks. The effect of the homeopathic complexes in the growth, survival, and immune response of the Catarina scallop Argopecten ventricosus were assessed. A bioassay to assess the potential of homeopathy in improving cultivation of juvenile A. ventricosus was conducted for 21 days, with a final challenge of 120 h with V. alginolyticus. The experimental design included two homeopathic formulas The homeopathic complex Passival, consisting of Passiflora incarnata 30 CH, Valeriana officinalis 30 CH, Ignatia amara 30 CH and Zincum valerianicum 30 CH plus Phosphoricum acid 30 CH (treatment TH1) or Silicea terra 30 CH (TH2), two antibiotics (ampicillin = AMP, oxytetracycline = OXY), and two reference treatments (without homeopathic or antibiotic treatment = CTRL, ethanol 30° GL = ETH). Additionally, a negative control CTRL- (untreated/uninfected) is included in the challenge test. Juvenile scallops (4.14 ± 0.06 mm, 13.33 mg wet weight) were cultivated in 4 L tanks provided with aerated, filtered (1 μm), and UV-sterilized seawater that was changed every third day. They were fed a blend of the microalgae Isochrysis galbana and Chaetoceros calcitrans (150,000 cells mL(-1) twice a day). All treatments were directly added to the tank water and then 500 mL challenge units were inoculated with 1 × 10(7) CFU/mL (LD50) of V. alginolyticus. Juveniles grew significantly larger and faster in height and weight with TH2 compared to the ETH and CTRL (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Higher concentrations of proteins occurred in scallops exposed to TH2 (160.57 ± 7

  9. The Vindication of Lamarck? Epigenetics at the Intersection of Law and Mental Health.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Matt; Vaughn, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Research on epigenetic mechanisms is gaining traction, yet is poorly understood by criminologists and behavioral scientists. The current objective is to review relevant studies of interest to behavioral scientists who study crime, and to translate admittedly challenging scientific information into text that is digestible to the average criminologist. Using systematic search procedures the authors identified and reviewed 41 studies of epigenetic mechanisms in psychiatric and behavioral phenotypes among humans. Findings revealed significant epigenetic effects in an assortment of genes that are implicated in the etiology of depression, suicidality, callous-unemotional traits, and chronic and intergenerational aggressive behavior. Several polymorphisms that mediate the HPA axis, neurotransmission, immune response, brain development, serotonin synthesis, and other processes were found. Although prescriptive knowledge based on epigenetic findings to date is premature, epigenetics is a new and exciting scientific frontier not too different in spirit from Lamarck's observations centuries ago. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Lamarck needs Darwin: the search for purpose in the study of evolution and of history].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Lamarck's theory of the inheritance of acquired characteristics and immediate responses to environmental challenges has offered a promise of protagonism of human beings and their fellow travellers, the other organisms, in the evolutionary process. Darwin's theory about evolution by natural selection does not offer this consolation and does not presuppose anything else other than gradual changes in the composition of natural populations. The study of ecology, ethology, neurobiology, animal culture, psychology and human history reveals that the lamarckian interpretations of change and character transmission processes always assume what they intend to explain, that is previous processes of darwinian evolution that guarantee the adaptive nature of the observed responses. The permanent search of direction and intentionality in evolutionary processes by many scientists suggests the limited acceptance of materialistic explanations as those offered by Darwin's theory.

  11. Leaf press juice from Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lamarck) Oken induces myometrial relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wächter, R; Brenneisen, R; Hamburger, M; Mennet, M; Schnelle, M; Worel, A M; Simões-Wüst, A P; von Mandach, U

    2011-12-15

    The use of preparations from Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lamarck) Oken (Kalanchoe pinnata (Lamarck) Persoon) in tocolysis is supported by clinical evidence. We studied here the effect of B. pinnatum leaf press juice and its chemical fractions on the response of human myometrial strips. No data are available if the influence on myometrial strips of the juice differs from that of its components in the chemical fractions, in order to increase the pharmacological effect. In vitro study to test the effect of repeated addition of B. pinnatum leaf press juice (BPJ) and its chemical components in several dilutions (undiluted, 1-10%) on myometrium strips hang up in a myograph chamber. Chemical analysis is including HPLC, MPLC with Sephadex LH-20 and TLC. All test solutions are inhibiting contractility by reducing the amplitude and the area under the curve (AUC) of the contractions. Undiluted BPJ and its undiluted chemical fraction 4 are reducing most effective these two parameters: the amplitude was at 78% of the baseline (95% CI (77-89); p<0.05) at the second addition of the BPJ and at 70% (95% CI (50-90); p<0.05) of the first addition of fraction 4; the AUC was at 82% (95% CI (69-95); p<0.05) of the baseline at the first addition of the press juice and at 51% (95% CI (27-74); p<0.05) at the first addition of fraction 4. The BPJ decreased amplitude and AUC significantly faster and increased frequency significantly faster than the control. Fractions could be tentatively assigned to bufadienolids, flavonoids and cinnamic acids. Fraction 4, accounted for flavonoids, increased the frequency of the contractions most effectively: 557% of the baseline (95% CI (316-797); p<0.05) at the first addition. Leaf juice of B. pinnatum and its flavonoid fraction are most effective in relaxing myometrial strips by inducing frequency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of the proteins comprising the integral matrix of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryonic spicules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, C. E.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we enumerate and characterize the proteins that comprise the integral spicule matrix of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins reveals that there are 12 strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins and approximately three dozen less strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins. The majority of the proteins have acidic isoelectric points; however, there are several spicule matrix proteins that have more alkaline isoelectric points. Western blotting analysis indicates that SM50 is the spicule matrix protein with the most alkaline isoelectric point. In addition, two distinct SM30 proteins are identified in embryonic spicules, and they have apparent molecular masses of approximately 43 and 46 kDa. Comparisons between embryonic spicule matrix proteins and adult spine integral matrix proteins suggest that the embryonic 43-kDa SM30 protein is an embryonic isoform of SM30. An adult 49-kDa spine matrix protein is also identified as a possible adult isoform of SM30. Analysis of the SM30 amino acid sequences indicates that a portion of SM30 proteins is very similar to the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin proteins.

  13. The chemical defensome: environmental sensing and response genes in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, J V; Hamdoun, A; Cole, B J; Howard-Ashby, M; Nebert, D W; Scally, M; Dean, M; Epel, D; Hahn, M E; Stegeman, J J

    2006-12-01

    Metazoan genomes contain large numbers of genes that participate in responses to environmental stressors. We surveyed the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome for homologs of gene families thought to protect against chemical stressors; these genes collectively comprise the 'chemical defensome.' Chemical defense genes include cytochromes P450 and other oxidases, various conjugating enzymes, ATP-dependent efflux transporters, oxidative detoxification proteins, and transcription factors that regulate these genes. Together such genes account for more than 400 genes in the sea urchin genome. The transcription factors include homologs of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor, nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2, heat shock factor, and nuclear hormone receptors, which regulate stress-response genes in vertebrates. Some defense gene families, including the ABCC, the UGT, and the CYP families, have undergone expansion in the urchin relative to other deuterostome genomes, whereas the stress sensor gene families do not show such expansion. More than half of the defense genes are expressed during embryonic or larval life stages, indicating their importance during development. This genome-wide survey of chemical defense genes in the sea urchin reveals evolutionary conservation of this network combined with lineage-specific diversification that together suggest the importance of these chemical stress sensing and response mechanisms in early deuterostomes. These results should facilitate future studies on the evolution of chemical defense gene networks and the role of these networks in protecting embryos from chemical stress during development.

  14. Expression of two actin genes during larval development in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R A; Britten, R J; Davidson, E H

    1989-01-01

    We report the first measurements of cell number, total RNA, and transcript accumulations for two actin genes during larval development of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. At 5 weeks of feeding, when development of laboratory-raised larvae is completed, the cell number has increased about 100-fold with respect to the pluteus-stage embryo to about 150,000 +/- 50,000, and the total RNA has increased 46-fold to about 130 ng per larva. The transcripts of the Cylla cytoskeletal actin gene, which is expressed in adult tissues, continue to accumulate throughout larval development. A contrasting pattern of transcript accumulation is observed for Cyllla, a different cytoskeletal actin gene that in the embryo is expressed only in aboral ectoderm. These transcripts increase in number early in larval development, when the larval epidermis is differentiating, and then decline in quantity. It is known that at metamorphosis the larval epidermis is largely histolyzed and that the Cyllla gene is not expressed in the juvenile or adult.

  15. Identification and developmental expression of the ets gene family in the sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus).

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Francesca; Fernandez-Serra, Montserrat; Squarzoni, Paola; Archimandritis, Aristea; Arnone, Maria I

    2006-12-01

    A systematic search in the available scaffolds of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome has revealed that this sea urchin has 11 members of the ets gene family. A phylogenetic analysis of these genes showed that almost all vertebrate ets subfamilies, with the exception of one, so far found only in mammals, are each represented by one orthologous sea urchin gene. The temporal and spatial expression of the identified ETS factors was also analyzed during embryogenesis. Five ets genes (Sp-Ets1/2, Sp-Tel, Sp-Pea, Sp-Ets4, Sp-Erf) are also maternally expressed. Three genes (Sp-Elk, Sp-Elf, Sp-Erf) are ubiquitously expressed during embryogenesis, while two others (Sp-Gabp, Sp-Pu.1) are not transcribed until late larval stages. Remarkably, five of the nine sea urchin ets genes expressed during embryogenesis are exclusively (Sp-Ets1/2, Sp-Erg, Sp-Ese) or additionally (Sp-Tel, Sp-Pea) expressed in mesenchyme cells and/or their progenitors. Functional analysis of Sp-Ets1/2 has previously demonstrated an essential role of this gene in the specification of the skeletogenic mesenchyme lineage. The dynamic, and in some cases overlapping and/or unique, developmental expression pattern of the latter five genes suggests a complex, non-redundant function for ETS factors in sea urchin mesenchyme formation and differentiation.

  16. Age-related changes in gene expression in tissues of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Loram, Jeannette; Bodnar, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The life history of sea urchins is fundamentally different from that of traditional models of aging and therefore they provide the opportunity to gain new insight into this complex process. Sea urchins grow indeterminately, reproduce throughout their life span and some species exhibit negligible senescence. Using a microarray and qRT-PCR, age-related changes in gene expression were examined in three tissues (muscle, esophagus and nerve) of the sea urchin species Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. The results indicate age-related changes in gene expression involving many key cellular functions such as the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, DNA metabolism, signaling pathways and apoptosis. Although there are tissue-specific differences in the gene expression profiles, there are some characteristics that are shared between tissues providing insight into potential mechanisms that promote lack of senescence in these animals. As an example, there is an increase in expression of genes encoding components of the Notch signaling pathway with age in all three tissues and a decrease in expression of the Wnt1 gene in both muscle and nerve. The interplay between the Notch and Wnt pathways may be one mechanism that ensures continued regeneration of tissues with advancing age contributing to the general lack of age-related decline in these animals.

  17. Cloning and characterization of alphaP integrin in embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Susan, J M; Just, M L; Lennarz, W J

    2000-06-16

    Differentially expressed integrins have been shown to be involved in the intricate cell movements that occur during early development. Because the migration and movement of cells have been well characterized in sea urchin embryos, we searched for alpha-integrin subunits in this organism. An alpha integrin subunit, alphaP, was cloned from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus mesenchyme blastula stage mRNA by RT-PCR and RACE and found to exhibit 74-77% sequence similarity to mammalian alpha(5), alpha(8), alpha(IIb), and alpha(v) integrin. The 8-kb transcript was most abundant at the prism stage, although low levels could be detected at all stages by Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR. A polyclonal antibody to this novel integrin was generated against a 100-amino-acid alphaP fragment fused to glutathione S-transferase and shown to recognize a 180-kDa alpha-integrin in the egg and in all stages of embryogenesis studied.

  18. Effects of seawater acidification on cell cycle control mechanisms in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos.

    PubMed

    Place, Sean P; Smith, Bryan W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown fertilization and development of marine species can be significantly inhibited when the pH of sea water is artificially lowered. Little mechanistic understanding of these effects exists to date, but previous work has linked developmental inhibition to reduced cleavage rates in embryos. To explore this further, we tested whether common cell cycle checkpoints were involved using three cellular biomarkers of cell cycle progression: (1) the onset of DNA synthesis, (2) production of a mitotic regulator, cyclin B, and (3) formation of the mitotic spindle. We grew embryos of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, in seawater artifically buffered to a pH of ∼7.0, 7.5, and 8.0 by CO(2) infusion. Our results suggest the reduced rates of mitotic cleavage are likely unrelated to common cell cycle checkpoints. We found no significant differences in the three biomarkers assessed between pH treatments, indicating the embryos progress through the G(1)/S, G(2)/M and metaphase/anaphase transitions at relatively similar rates. These data suggest low pH environments may not impact developmental programs directly, but may act through secondary mechanisms such as cellular energetics.

  19. Neurosensory and neuromuscular organization in tube feet of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Agca, Cavit; Elhajj, Milad C; Klein, William H; Venuti, Judith M

    2011-12-01

    Several behavioral and electrophysiological studies indicate that all classes of echinoderms, including Echinoidia, the class to which sea urchins belong, are photosensitive and exhibit complex behavioral responses to light or changes in light intensity. However, no discrete photosensitive structure has been identified in sea urchins. The purpose of this study was to provide new insights into eye evolution by determining whether distinct photosensory structures are present in adult sea urchins. Recently, we showed that the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome contains orthologs of many mammalian retinal genes and that these genes are expressed in tube feet, suggesting the presence of photoreceptor neurons. To determine whether this is so, we identified several features of tube feet that relate to a possible invertebrate phototransduction system. We show that rhabdomeric opsin is expressed severalfold higher within the disk region of the tube feet and is the most abundant opsin. Immunostaining identified βIII-tubulin-expressing cells at the periphery of disk in the vicinity of the synaptotagmin-expressing nerve fibers. We also showed that Pax6 expression in the disk was restricted to the periphery, where small clusters of putative sensory neurons reside. Our results reveal neuromuscular organization of the tube foot neuromuscular system. They further support earlier studies suggesting the presence of a photosensory system in tube feet.

  20. Spatial and temporal variation in results of purple urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) toxicity tests with zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, B.M.; Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    Purple urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) were maintained in year-round spawning condition in the laboratory for use in fertilization and larval development experiments designed to assess temporal variability in response to zinc. Results of these tests were compared to those from tests using gametes obtained from a field-collected population. Fertilization and larval development tests were also conducted comparing field-collected purple urchins from three geographically distinct groups on the West Coast of the United States. Fertilization tests conducted to assess temporal variability produced variable median effects concentrations (EC50s) ranging from 4.1 to >100 {micro}g/L zinc. Larval development tests did not demonstrate significant differences in response to zinc between geographically distinct purple urchin populations. Fertilization test variability was examined in terms of sperm concentration and sperm collection method during two seasons. Reduced variability was found with dry sperm collection in tests conducted in March 1995 but increased again in tests conducted in June 1995, regardless of sperm collection method. Increased variability in response to zinc may be caused by seasonal temperature effects.

  1. Evidence that hatching enzyme of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is a chymotrypsin-like protease.

    PubMed

    Post, L L; Schuel, R; Schuel, H

    1988-11-01

    The sea urchin blastula secretes a hatching enzyme (HE) that dissolves the fertilization envelope. HE was collected from the supernatant seawater of cultures of hatched Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae, and concentrated 20 times by ultrafiltration. The proteolytic activity of HE using casein as substrate was inhibited by the chymotrypsin inhibitors, chymostatin and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone. The activity was not inhibited by inhibitors (antipain, elastatinal, pepstatin, phosphoramidon, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone) of other types of proteases. HE did not hydrolyze the synthetic trypsin substrate, alpha-N-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester, but did hydrolyze the synthetic substrate of chymotrypsin, N-benzoyl-L-tyrosine ethyl ester (BTEE). The BTEEase activity of HE was completely inhibited by the chymotrypsin inhibitors chymostatin and 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbamate (NCDC). Chymostatin inhibited the natural hatching of sea urchin blastulae. Application of HE to freshly fertilized sea urchin eggs, 2 h after insemination, caused premature dispersal of the hardened fertilization envelope. Chymostatin and NCDC inhibited HE-induced lysis of the fertilization envelope, while inhibitors of other types of proteases were ineffective. These data suggest that sea urchin HE is a chymotrypsin-like protease we call "chymotrypsin."

  2. Cell surface of sea urchin micromeres and primary mesenchyme. [Arbacia punctulata; Strongylocentrotus drobachiensis; Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    SciTech Connect

    DeSimone, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) of the sea urchin embryo were studied during the early morphogenetic events involved in the differentiation of the micromere cell lineage. Sixteen-cell and early cleavage stage blastomeres were isolated and the protein composition of their cell surfaces examined by /sup 125/I-labelling followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Micromere-specific cell surface proteins are reported for Arbacia punctulata, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Cell surface glycoproteins were characterized on the basis of lectin binding specificity with a novel lectin affinity transfer technique. Using this procedure, cell-type specific surface proteins, which are also lectin-binding specific, can be detected. In addition, fluorescein conjugated lectins were microinjected into the blastocoels of living S. drobachiensis and Lytechinus pictus embryos and the patterns of lectin bindings observed by fluorescence microscopy. The evidence presented in this thesis suggests that the differentiation of the primary mesenchyme cells is correlated with changes in the molecular composition of the cell-surface and the ECM.

  3. Characterization of the proteins comprising the integral matrix of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryonic spicules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, C. E.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we enumerate and characterize the proteins that comprise the integral spicule matrix of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins reveals that there are 12 strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins and approximately three dozen less strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins. The majority of the proteins have acidic isoelectric points; however, there are several spicule matrix proteins that have more alkaline isoelectric points. Western blotting analysis indicates that SM50 is the spicule matrix protein with the most alkaline isoelectric point. In addition, two distinct SM30 proteins are identified in embryonic spicules, and they have apparent molecular masses of approximately 43 and 46 kDa. Comparisons between embryonic spicule matrix proteins and adult spine integral matrix proteins suggest that the embryonic 43-kDa SM30 protein is an embryonic isoform of SM30. An adult 49-kDa spine matrix protein is also identified as a possible adult isoform of SM30. Analysis of the SM30 amino acid sequences indicates that a portion of SM30 proteins is very similar to the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin proteins.

  4. [Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck (1744-1829). A dispute on the mechanism of evolution. On the bicentenary of the publication of Philosophie Zoologique (1809)].

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    The author of the paper has made an attempt to prove that a teleological interpretation of Lamarck's theory is false. It is unwarranted to attribute to Lamarck the idea that a living organism has an internal tendency to complicate its organization and to improve its mode of functioning; such a concept is not confirmed by existing textual evidence, and it is also in direct conflict with Lamarck's undisputed mechanicism. The proof presented in the paper begins with an outline of the history of this false interpretation, including the opinions of Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin. As the tendency is ascribed also to nature itself, the next phase of the proof has involved reconstructing the fully ateleological notion of nature to which Lamarck subscribed. Supposed evidence for the tendency is said to be provided by the existence of a series in which the organization of a living body grows from the simplest to the most complex. That is why the author of the current paper has analysed the concept of série animale used by Lamarck in some detail, in order to demonstrate that it is typological in character, and has nothing to do with the tendency that is allegedly inherent in the nature of an organism. Also presented in the paper, in connection with the construction of the series, is the problem of spontaneous generation, which was made complicated by Lamarck. Finally, the very notion of tendency is analysed and confronted with Lamarck's text; the latter in fact does not contain any explanations that would be teleological in the strict sense of the word. The analysis has enabled the author of the current paper to conduct an exegesis of the fragment of Lamarck's text which might give grounds to it being construed in terms of an explanation resorting to the notion of tendency, and possible interpretations of that fragment have been presented. The paper ends with a description of the mechanism which, according to Lamarck, is responsible for the rise in complexity of an

  5. Early developmental gene regulation in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos in response to elevated CO₂ seawater conditions.

    PubMed

    Hammond, LaTisha M; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2012-07-15

    Ocean acidification, or the increased uptake of CO(2) by the ocean due to elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, may variably impact marine early life history stages, as they may be especially susceptible to changes in ocean chemistry. Investigating the regulatory mechanisms of early development in an environmental context, or ecological development, will contribute to increased understanding of potential organismal responses to such rapid, large-scale environmental changes. We examined transcript-level responses to elevated seawater CO(2) during gastrulation and the initiation of spiculogenesis, two crucial developmental processes in the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Embryos were reared at the current, accepted oceanic CO(2) concentration of 380 microatmospheres (μatm), and at the elevated levels of 1000 and 1350 μatm, simulating predictions for oceans and upwelling regions, respectively. The seven genes of interest comprised a subset of pathways in the primary mesenchyme cell gene regulatory network (PMC GRN) shown to be necessary for the regulation and execution of gastrulation and spiculogenesis. Of the seven genes, qPCR analysis indicated that elevated CO(2) concentrations only had a significant but subtle effect on two genes, one important for early embryo patterning, Wnt8, and the other an integral component in spiculogenesis and biomineralization, SM30b. Protein levels of another spicule matrix component, SM50, demonstrated significant variable responses to elevated CO(2). These data link the regulation of crucial early developmental processes with the environment that these embryos would be developing within, situating the study of organismal responses to ocean acidification in a developmental context.

  6. Geographical variation of shell thickness in the mussel Perumytilus purpuratus along the southeast Pacific coast.

    PubMed

    Briones, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M; Fernández, Miriam; Guiñez, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    At broad geographical scales, the variation in bivalve shell thickness can be modulated by environmental factors that vary with latitude, such as sea surface temperature (SST), seawater pH, or calcium carbonate availability. Mussels usually form multilayered beds, and shell thickness is also expected to be affected by density and layering due to intraspecific competition. In this work, we explored the geographical variation of shell thickness in the intertidal mussel Perumytilus purpuratus between 18° and 42°S along the southeastern Pacific coast. We tested the hypothesis that there was a positive relationship between shell thickness and SST, and then we explored other variables that could have an effect on thickness, such as density, number of layers, and others environmental variables (pH and calcite concentration). The expected positive linear relationship between shell thickness and sea surface temperature was not found, but when the other population variables were included in the analysis, an unexpected inverse SST-thickness relationships appeared as significant, probably because this species could be adapted to colder and more acid seawater as are those of the tips of South America. Thickness was also negatively affected by density, which was expected for a gregarious species showing high intraspecific competition. Finally, our results highlight the importance of including density and crowding effects when macroscale patterns are explored, particularly in gregarious species, since these patterns could also be modulated by density-dependent processes, which might then override latitudinal trends of shell thickness when they are not included in the analyses. © 2014 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  7. Critical tissue copper residues for marine bivalve (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and echinoderm (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryonic development: conceptual, regulatory and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Gunther; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Chadwick, D Bart; Ryan, Adam; Santore, Robert C; Paquin, Paul R

    2008-09-01

    Critical tissue copper (Cu) residues associated with adverse effects on embryo-larval development were determined for the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) following laboratory exposure to Cu-spiked seawater collected from San Diego Bay, California, USA. Whole body no-observed-effect-residues (NOER) were similar, with means of 21 and 23 microg g(-1) dw, for M. galloprovincialis and S. purpuratus, respectively. Mean whole body median effect residues (ER50) were 49 and 142 microg g(-1) dw for M. galloprovincialis and S. purpuratus, respectively. The difference in ER50s between species was reduced to a factor of <2 when expressed as soft tissue residues. Coefficients of variation among whole body-ER50s were 3-fold lower than median waterborne effect concentrations (EC50) for both species exposed to samples varying in water quality characteristics. This suggests that tissue concentrations were a better predictor of toxicity than water concentrations. The CBRs described herein do not differentiate between the internal Cu concentrations that are metabolically available and those that are accumulated and then detoxified. They do appear, however, to be well enough related to the level of accumulation at the site of action of toxicity that they serve as useful surrogates for the copper concentration that affects embryonic development of the species tested. Results presented have potentially important implications for a variety of monitoring and assessment strategies. These include regulatory approaches for deriving saltwater ambient water quality criteria for Cu, contributions towards the development of a saltwater biotic ligand model, the conceptual approach of using CBRs, and ecological risk assessment.

  8. The effect of predator exposure and reproduction on oxidative stress parameters in the Catarina scallop Argopecten ventricosus.

    PubMed

    Guerra, C; Zenteno-Savín, T; Maeda-Martínez, A N; Abele, D; Philipp, E E R

    2013-05-01

    Predation is known to impact growth and reproduction, and the physiological state of the prey, including its susceptibility to oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated how prolonged exposure to predators modulates tissue specific antioxidant defense and oxidative damage in the short-lived epibenthic scallop Argopecten ventricosus (2years maximum lifespan). Scallops that were experimentally exposed to predators had not only lower antioxidant capacities (superoxide dismutase and catalase), but also lower oxidative damage (protein carbonyls and TBARS=thiobarbituric acid reactive substances including lipid peroxides) in gills and mantle compared to individuals not exposed to predators. In contrast, oxidative damage in the swimming muscle was higher in predator-exposed scallops. When predator-exposed scallops were on the verge of spawning, levels of oxidative damage increased in gills and mantle in spite of a parallel increase in antioxidant defense in both tissues. Levels of oxidative damage increased also in the swimming muscle whereas muscle antioxidant capacities decreased. Interestingly, post-spawned scallops restored antioxidant capacities and oxidative damage to immature levels, suggesting they can recover from spawning-related oxidative stress. Our results show that predator exposure and gametogenesis modulate oxidative damage in a tissue specific manner and that high antioxidant capacities do not necessarily coincide with low oxidative damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alterations of valve closing behavior in juvenile Catarina scallops (Argopecten ventricosus Sowerby, 1842) exposed to toxic metals.

    PubMed

    Sobrino-Figueroa, A; Cáceres-Martínez, C

    2009-11-01

    We conducted an evaluation of alterations produced in the valve closing speed of juvenile Argopecten ventricosus (Catarina scallop) exposed to the metals cadmium, chromium and lead, because of the connection of this response to the state of health of the mollusk. Bioassays were conducted with 50 juveniles (length 3 +/- 0.5 cm) exposed to 0.02, 0.1, 0.2 mg Cd l(-1); 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 mg Cr l(-1); 0.04, 0.2, 0.4 mg Pb l(-1) and 0.8 and 1.6 mg Cd + Cr + Pb l(-1) for 480 h. The average valve closing speed at the end of the experiment was under 1 s in the control group, from 2 to 3.6 s in the bioassays with cadmium, from 1.4 to 3.4 s with chromium, from 3 to 12 s with lead, and from 12 to 15 s with the metal mixtures. It was found that there are significant differences between the values recorded in assays with metals and the control (P < 0.05). The retardation of valve closing in the organisms exposed to toxic substances is probably caused by damage to the sensory cilia located on the edge of the mantle.

  10. Ecotoxicological effects of a semi-submerged municipal dump (Castle harbour, Bermuda) on the Calico scallop Argopecten gibbus.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Brian; Gagné, Francois; Weber, Jean-Philippe; Blaise, Christian

    2005-01-01

    A biomarker study was undertaken using the Calico scallop Argopecten gibbus to assess the ecotoxicological effects of a semi-submerged municipal dump on the adjacent patch reef lagoon ecosystem (Castle harbour, Bermuda). Caged scallops were deployed in situ for 2 months at various distances from the dump (50 m, 900 m and 2.7 km) and at a reference site (14 km). A suite of biomarkers comprising metallothionein (MT), lipid peroxidation (LPO), vitellin-like proteins (Vn), glutathione S-transferase (GST), DNA strand breaks and condition factor (CF) were investigated in various tissues of the scallop (gill, digestive gland and gonad). Levels of heavy metals were also measured in the whole scallop soft tissue. While there was some variation in response between tissues, in general the results indicated that the dump was negatively impacting scallops deployed in the adjacent marine environment: elevated levels of MT, DNA strand breaks, Vn and GST and reduced condition factor were found for scallops deployed nearest to the dump and at the site 1.5 km from this point source of contamination (Tuckers town) in Castle harbour, with respect to the reference site, North Rock (although this exhibited some degree of metal contamination). The gills from scallops deployed at the dump site were the most responsive tissue, with the highest expression of MT, LPO and DNA damage. This study indicates the potential of the Calico scallop as a convenient bioindicator species in the marine tropical benthos.

  11. Elimination of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl by the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, following single exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tjeerdema, R.S.; Jacobs, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Understanding the fate of a single PCB isomer in a resident species may aid in assessing the risk to the marine community. Therefore, the elimination of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) by the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, following a single exposure, was investigated. The purple sea urchin was chosen because of its economic importance and ability to proliferate in certain polluted conditions. Single exposure may best mimic the effects of intermittent oceanic incineration or disposal, and 2,4,5,2',4',5'-HCBP was chosen due to its presence in common PCB mixtures and high chlorine content, thus strong lipophilicity.

  12. Redescription of Dicyemennea eledones (Wagener, 1857) (Phylum Dicyemida) from Eledone cirrhosa (Lamarck, 1798) (Mollusca: Cephalopoda: Octopoda).

    PubMed

    Souidenne, Dhikra; Florent, Isabelle; Dellinger, Marc; Romdhane, Mohamed Salah; Grellier, Philippe; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2016-11-01

    Dicyemids are common parasites found in the kidneys of many cephalopods. Species identification previously relied on old species descriptions containing considerable confusions, casting doubt on taxonomy and identification. Detailed morphological description and genotyping of all developmental stages are required for an exact taxonomy. To this end, we undertook the redescription of the dicyemid Dicyemennea eledones (Wagener, 1857), infecting the cephalopod Eledone cirrhosa (Lamarck). Samples were collected off Concarneau in the Bay of Biscay, France, and off La Goulette in the Gulf of Tunis, Tunisia. Dicyemennea eledones is a large species, with adults reaching c.7,000 μm in length. The vermiform stages are characterised by having 23 peripheral cells, a conical calotte and an axial cell that extends to the base of the propolar cells. An anterior abortive axial cell is present in vermiform embryos. Infusoriform embryos consist of 37 cells; a single nucleus is present in each urn cell and the refringent bodies, which were not always seen, are possibly liquid. For the first time, an 18S rDNA sequence is generated for D. eledones, illustrating genetic differences with the other dicyemid 18S rDNA sequences available in databases. This sequence can now be used for D. eledones barcoding, making the identification of the species easier and more reliable.

  13. Influence of blue light on the leaf morphoanatomy of in vitro Kalanchoe pinnata (Lamarck) Persoon (Crassulaceae).

    PubMed

    Leal-Costa, Marcos Vinicius; Nascimento, Luana Beatriz dos Santos; Moreira, Nattacha dos Santos; Reinert, Fernanda; Costa, Sônia Soares; Lage, Celso Luiz Salgueiro; Tavares, Eliana Schwartz

    2010-10-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata (Lamarck) Persoon (Crassulaceae) (air plant, miracle leaf) is popularly used to treat gastrointestinal disorders and wounds. Recently, the species was tested to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis with successful results. This medicinal activity was associated with the phenolic fraction of the plant. Blue light induces biosynthesis of phenolic compounds and many changes in anatomical characteristics. We studied the effects of supplementary blue light on the leaf morphology of in vitro K. pinnata. Plants cultured under white light (W plants) only and white light plus blue light (WB plants) show petioles with plain-convex section, amphistomatic leaf blades with simple epidermis, homogeneous mesophyll with densely packed cells, and a single collateral vascular bundle in the midrib. W plants have longer branches, a larger number of nodes per branch, and smaller leaves, whereas WB plant leaves have a thicker upper epidermis and mesophyll. Leaf fresh weight and leaf dry weight were similar in both treatments. Phenolic idioblasts were observed in the plants supplemented with blue light, suggesting that blue light plays an important role in the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds in K. pinnata.

  14. Spicule size variation in Xestospongia testudinaria Lamarck, 1815 at Probolinggo-Situbondo coastal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagio, Iwenda Bella; Setiawan, Edwin; Hariyanto, Sucipto; Irawan, Bambang

    2017-06-01

    Xestospongia testudinaria Lamarck, 1815 is a marine sponge that become a main constituent in reef ecosystems at northern waters Probolinggo-Situbondo. This barrel sponge species possesses an oxea type of spicule that varies in dimensions (length and width) in concordance to condition and location of habitat. The experiment aimed to understand how spicules condition of this sponge reacted to environment variables. Sponges' specimen were taken by SCUBA equipment in 6-7 m, 10-11 m, and 14-15 m depths in addition to four different localities and three different part of sponges' body (upper, middle and basal parts). Environmental variables data were also retrieved (salinity, water clarity, temperature, dissolve silica, and depth) in each locations. Results confirmed that oxea spicule size either in length or width dimensions in four locations (Batu Lawang coral cluster [BL], Karang Mayit coral cluster [KM], Paiton coral cluster [PT], and Takat Palapa [TP]) relatively increased toward depth. Likewise, the size of spicules in the TP relatively longer than three other locations. In contrast, spicules oxea in PT relatively wider than three other locations. Salinity gave negative impact to spicules length, while depth gave positive impact. Depth, water clarity, dissolve silica, and temperature gave negative effect to spicules width while salinity gave positive impact.

  15. The next evolutionary synthesis: from Lamarck and Darwin to genomic variation and systems biology.

    PubMed

    Bard, Jonathan Bl

    2011-11-03

    The evolutionary synthesis, the standard 20th century view of how evolutionary change occurs, is based on selection, heritable phenotypic variation and a very simple view of genes. It is therefore unable to incorporate two key aspects of modern molecular knowledge: first is the richness of genomic variation, so much more complicated than simple mutation, and second is the opaque relationship between the genotype and its resulting phenotype. Two new and important books shed some light on how we should view evolutionary change now. "Evolution: a view from the 21st century" by J.A. Shapiro (2011, FT Press Science, New Jersey, USA. pp. 246) examines the richness of genomic variation and its implications. "Transformations of Lamarckism: from Subtle Fluids to Molecular Biology" edited by S.B. Gissis & E. Jablonka (2011, MIT Press, Cambridge, USA. pp. 457) includes some 40 papers that anyone with an interest in the history of evolutionary thought and the relationship between the environment and the genome will want to read. This review discusses both books within the context of contemporary evolutionary thinking and points out that neither really comes to terms with today's key systems-biology question: how does mutation-induced variation in a molecular network generate variation in the resulting phenotype?

  16. Manipulation of Developing Juvenile Structures in Purple Sea Urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) by Morpholino Injection into Late Stage Larvae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchins have been used as experimental organisms for developmental biology for over a century. Yet, as is the case for many other marine invertebrates, understanding the development of the juveniles and adults has lagged far behind that of their embryos and larvae. The reasons for this are, in large part, due to the difficulty of experimentally manipulating juvenile development. Here we develop and validate a technique for injecting compounds into juvenile rudiments of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We first document the distribution of rhodaminated dextran injected into different compartments of the juvenile rudiment of sea urchin larvae. Then, to test the potential of this technique to manipulate development, we injected Vivo-Morpholinos (vMOs) designed to knock down p58b and p16, two proteins involved in the elongation of S. purpuratus larval skeleton. Rudiments injected with these vMOs showed a delay in the growth of some juvenile skeletal elements relative to controls. These data provide the first evidence that vMOs, which are designed to cross cell membranes, can be used to transiently manipulate gene function in later developmental stages in sea urchins. We therefore propose that injection of vMOs into juvenile rudiments, as shown here, is a viable approach to testing hypotheses about gene function during development, including metamorphosis. PMID:25436992

  17. Substratum cavities affect growth-plasticity, allometry, movement and feeding rates in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, J C; Russell, M P

    2010-02-01

    We assessed the influence of rock cavities, or pits, on the growth dynamics and behavior of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. In a paired-designed, laboratory experiment, sea urchins were assigned to sandstone blocks that were either 'Flat' or had a 'Pit' drilled into the center. At the start, both groups were approximately the same shape and size. In just 2 months, the shapes of the tests were significantly different between the two treatments, with the Pit urchins having an increased height:diameter profile. This result demonstrates the plastic nature of the sea urchin test and that, despite its apparent rigidity, it is capable of deforming during growth. In addition, the presence of pits modified behavior and food consumption as well as allometric growth of the test and Aristotle's lantern. Sea urchins on Pit sandstone blocks tended to stay in the cavities and not move about the flat areas, whereas individuals on Flat blocks changed position. Sea urchins in the Pit treatment consumed less food and had relatively larger demipyramids (the 'jaw' ossicle in Aristotle's lantern). These morphological and allometric changes occurred over a short time-period (8-20 weeks). We conclude that microhabitat is an important factor in controlling the behavior and growth dynamics of the bioeroding sea urchin S. purpuratus.

  18. Manipulation of developing juvenile structures in purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) by morpholino injection into late stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Andreas; Hodin, Jason; Bishop, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchins have been used as experimental organisms for developmental biology for over a century. Yet, as is the case for many other marine invertebrates, understanding the development of the juveniles and adults has lagged far behind that of their embryos and larvae. The reasons for this are, in large part, due to the difficulty of experimentally manipulating juvenile development. Here we develop and validate a technique for injecting compounds into juvenile rudiments of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We first document the distribution of rhodaminated dextran injected into different compartments of the juvenile rudiment of sea urchin larvae. Then, to test the potential of this technique to manipulate development, we injected Vivo-Morpholinos (vMOs) designed to knock down p58b and p16, two proteins involved in the elongation of S. purpuratus larval skeleton. Rudiments injected with these vMOs showed a delay in the growth of some juvenile skeletal elements relative to controls. These data provide the first evidence that vMOs, which are designed to cross cell membranes, can be used to transiently manipulate gene function in later developmental stages in sea urchins. We therefore propose that injection of vMOs into juvenile rudiments, as shown here, is a viable approach to testing hypotheses about gene function during development, including metamorphosis.

  19. "Spiral asters" and cytoplasmic rotation in sea urchin eggs: induction in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs by elevated temperature

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    "Spiral asters" composed of swirls of subcortical microtubules were recently described in fertilized eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. In our study, these structures did not occur at culture temperatures below 16 degrees C. When the culture temperature was elevated, however, "spiral asters" routinely appeared during a susceptible period before mitotic prophase when the sperm aster-diaster normally exists. A massive and protracted rotation of the cytoplasm (excluding an immobile cortex and perinuclear region) began within 1 min of exposure to elevated temperature. Fibrils of the "spiral aster" could be seen within this rotating mass even by bright- field microscopy. The identity of microtubules in these structures was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. A mechanistic association between "spiral aster" formation and cytoplasmic rotation was indicated by the simultaneous inhibitory effects of microtubule and dynein poisons. Inhibitors of microfilaments, however, had no effect. We infer that elevated temperature induces unique changes in the microtubules of the pre-prophase sperm aster-diaster, resulting in cytoplasmic rotation and the spiral configuration of microtubules. Comparative cytological evidence supports the idea that "spiral asters" do not normally occur in fertilized sea urchin eggs. Biogeographic evidence for S. purpuratus indicates that fertilization and development naturally occur below 15 degrees C, hence "spiral asters" in eggs of this species should be regarded as abnormalities induced in the laboratory by unnaturally elevated temperatures. PMID:3156865

  20. Quantitative functional interrelations within the cis-regulatory system of the S. purpuratus Endo16 gene.

    PubMed

    Yuh, C H; Moore, J G; Davidson, E H

    1996-12-01

    Embryonic expression of the Endo16 gene of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is controlled by interactions with at least 13 different DNA-binding factors. These interactions occur within a cis-regulatory domain that extends about 2300 bp upstream from the transcription start site. A recent functional characterization of this domain reveals six different subregions, or cis-regulatory modules, each of which displays a specific regulatory subfunction when linked with the basal promoter and in some cases various other modules (C.-H. Yuh and E. Davidson (1996) Development 122, 1069-1082). In the present work, we analyzed quantitative time-course measurements of the CAT enzyme output of embryos bearing expression constructs controlled by various Endo16 regulatory modules, either singly or in combination. Three of these modules function positively in that, in isolation, each is capable of promoting expression in vegetal plate and adjacent cell lineages, though with different temporal profiles of activity. Models for the mode of interaction of the three positive modules with one another were tested by assuming mathematical relations that would generate, from the measured single module time courses, the experimentally observed profiles of activity obtained when the relevant modules are physically linked in the same construct. The generated and observed time functions were compared, and the differences were minimized by least squares adjustment of a scale parameter. When the modules were tested in context of the endogenous promoter region, one of the positive modules (A) was found to increase the output of the others (B and G), by a constant factor. In contrast, a solution in which the time-course data of modules A and B are multiplied by one another was required for the interrelations of the positive modules when a minimal SV40 promoter was used. One interpretation is that, in this construct, each module independently stimulates the basal transcription complex. We used a

  1. Influence of copper on the feeding rate, growth and reproduction of the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck.

    PubMed

    Peña, Silvia C; Pocsidio, Glorina N

    2007-12-01

    The influence of copper on feeding rate, growth, and reproduction of Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck was evaluated. Ten days of exposure to copper of relatively high concentration (67.5 microg/L) reduced the snails' feeding rate and retarded their growth. Exposure to 20 microg/L after 36 days increased feeding rate to 28%. After 20 days of exposure at 30 microg/L, snail's growth was significant but thereafter declined. Growth of all snails including control was negligible by day 50 when snails were in the reproductive state. Copper did not affect reproduction.

  2. Early Exposure of Bay Scallops (Argopecten irradians) to High CO2 Causes a Decrease in Larval Shell Growth

    PubMed Central

    White, Meredith M.; McCorkle, Daniel C.; Mullineaux, Lauren S.; Cohen, Anne L.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification, characterized by elevated pCO2 and the associated decreases in seawater pH and calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω), has a variable impact on the growth and survival of marine invertebrates. Larval stages are thought to be particularly vulnerable to environmental stressors, and negative impacts of ocean acidification have been seen on fertilization as well as on embryonic, larval, and juvenile development and growth of bivalve molluscs. We investigated the effects of high CO2 exposure (resulting in pH = 7.39, Ωar = 0.74) on the larvae of the bay scallop Argopecten irradians from 12 h to 7 d old, including a switch from high CO2 to ambient CO2 conditions (pH = 7.93, Ωar = 2.26) after 3 d, to assess the possibility of persistent effects of early exposure. The survival of larvae in the high CO2 treatment was consistently lower than the survival of larvae in ambient conditions, and was already significantly lower at 1 d. Likewise, the shell length of larvae in the high CO2 treatment was significantly smaller than larvae in the ambient conditions throughout the experiment and by 7 d, was reduced by 11.5%. This study also demonstrates that the size effects of short-term exposure to high CO2 are still detectable after 7 d of larval development; the shells of larvae exposed to high CO2 for the first 3 d of development and subsequently exposed to ambient CO2 were not significantly different in size at 3 and 7 d than the shells of larvae exposed to high CO2 throughout the experiment. PMID:23596514

  3. Identification and characterization of homeobox transcription factor genes in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and their expression in embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Howard-Ashby, Meredith; Materna, Stefan C; Brown, C Titus; Chen, Lili; Cameron, R Andrew; Davidson, Eric H

    2006-12-01

    A set of 96 homeobox transcription factors was identified in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome using permissive blast searches with a large collection of authentic homeodomain sequences from mouse, human and fly. A phylogenetic tree was constructed to compare the sea urchin homeobox gene family to those of vertebrates, with the result that with the only a few exceptions, orthologs of all vertebrate homeodomain genes were uncovered by our search. QPCR time course measurements revealed that 65% of these genes are expressed within the first 48 h of development (late gastrula). For genes displaying sufficiently high levels of transcript during the first 24 h of development (late blastula), whole mount in situ hybridization was carried out up to 48 h to determine spatial patterns of expression. The results demonstrate that homeodomain transcription factors participate in multiple and diverse developmental functions, in that they are used at a range of time points and in every territory of the developing embryo.

  4. Phosphoproteomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus shell and tooth matrix: identification of a major acidic sea urchin tooth phosphoprotein, phosphodontin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sea urchin is a major model organism for developmental biology and biomineralization research. However, identification of proteins involved in larval skeleton formation and mineralization processes in the embryo and adult, and the molecular characterization of such proteins, has just gained momentum with the sequencing of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome and the introduction of high-throughput proteomics into the field. Results The present report contains the determination of test (shell) and tooth organic matrix phosphoproteomes. Altogether 34 phosphoproteins were identified in the biomineral organic matrices. Most phosphoproteins were specific for one compartment, only two were identified in both matrices. The sea urchin phosphoproteomes contained several obvious orthologs of mammalian proteins, such as a Src family tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C-delta 1, Dickkopf-1 and other signal transduction components, or nucleobindin. In most cases phosphorylation sites were conserved between sea urchin and mammalian proteins. However, the majority of phosphoproteins had no mammalian counterpart. The most interesting of the sea urchin-specific phosphoproteins, from the perspective of biomineralization research, was an abundant highly phosphorylated and very acidic tooth matrix protein composed of 35 very similar short sequence repeats, a predicted N-terminal secretion signal sequence, and an Asp-rich C-terminal motif, contained in [Glean3:18919]. Conclusions The 64 phosphorylation sites determined represent the most comprehensive list of experimentally identified sea urchin protein phosphorylation sites at present and are an important addition to the recently analyzed Strongylocentrotus purpuratus shell and tooth proteomes. The identified phosphoproteins included a major, highly phosphorylated protein, [Glean3:18919], for which we suggest the name phosphodontin. Although not sequence-related to such highly phosphorylated acidic mammalian dental

  5. What Is the Core Oscillator in the Speract-Activated Pathway of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Sperm Flagellum?

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Luis U.; Galindo, Blanca E.; Sánchez, Daniel; Santillán, Moisés

    2012-01-01

    Sperm chemotaxis has an important role in fertilization. Most of our knowledge regarding this phenomenon comes from studies in organisms whose fertilization occurs externally, like sea urchins. Sea urchin spermatozoa respond to sperm-activating peptides, which diffuse from the egg jelly coat and interact with their receptor in the flagellum, triggering several physiological responses: changes in membrane potential, intracellular pH, cyclic nucleotide levels, and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). In particular, flagellar [Ca2+] has been shown to oscillate. These [Ca2+] oscillations are correlated with changes in the flagellar shape and so with the regulation of the sperm swimming paths. In this study, we demonstrate, from a mathematical modeling perspective, that the reported speract-activated signaling pathway in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (speract being a sperm-activating peptide specific to this species) has the necessary elements to replicate the reported [Ca2+] oscillations. We further investigate which elements of this signaling pathway constitute the core oscillator. PMID:22713563

  6. What is the core oscillator in the speract-activated pathway of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sperm flagellum?

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Luis U; Galindo, Blanca E; Sánchez, Daniel; Santillán, Moisés

    2012-06-06

    Sperm chemotaxis has an important role in fertilization. Most of our knowledge regarding this phenomenon comes from studies in organisms whose fertilization occurs externally, like sea urchins. Sea urchin spermatozoa respond to sperm-activating peptides, which diffuse from the egg jelly coat and interact with their receptor in the flagellum, triggering several physiological responses: changes in membrane potential, intracellular pH, cyclic nucleotide levels, and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). In particular, flagellar [Ca2+] has been shown to oscillate. These [Ca2+] oscillations are correlated with changes in the flagellar shape and so with the regulation of the sperm swimming paths. In this study, we demonstrate, from a mathematical modeling perspective, that the reported speract-activated signaling pathway in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (speract being a sperm-activating peptide specific to this species) has the necessary elements to replicate the reported [Ca2+] oscillations. We further investigate which elements of this signaling pathway constitute the core oscillator. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutrient uptake by marine invertebrates: cloning and functional analysis of amino acid transporter genes in developing sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eli; Manahan, Donal T

    2009-08-01

    Transport of amino acids from low concentrations in seawater by marine invertebrates has been extensively studied, but few of the genes involved in this physiological process have been identified. We have characterized three amino acid transporter genes cloned from embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. These genes show phylogenetic proximity to classical amino acid transport systems, including Gly and B0+, and the inebriated gene (INE). Heterologous expression of these genes in frog oocytes induced a 40-fold increase in alanine transport above endogenous levels, demonstrating that these genes mediate alanine transport. Antibodies specific to one of these genes (Sp-AT1) inhibited alanine transport, confirming the physiological activity of this gene in larvae. Whole-mount antibody staining of larvae revealed expression of Sp-AT1 in the ectodermal tissues associated with amino acid transport, as independently demonstrated by autoradiographic localization of radioactive alanine. Maximum rates of alanine transport increased 6-fold during early development, from embryonic to larval stages. Analysis of gene expression during this developmental period revealed that Sp-AT1 transcript abundance remained nearly constant, while that of another transporter gene (Sp-AT2) increased 11-fold. The functional characterization of these genes establishes a molecular biological basis for amino acid transport by developmental stages of marine invertebrates.

  8. Population genetics of cis-regulatory sequences that operate during embryonic development in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Garfield, David; Haygood, Ralph; Nielsen, William J; Wray, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that noncoding sequences comprise a substantial fraction of functional sites within all genomes, the evolutionary mechanisms that operate on genetic variation within regulatory elements remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine the population genetics of the core, upstream cis-regulatory regions of eight genes (AN, CyIIa, CyIIIa, Endo16, FoxB, HE, SM30 a, and SM50) that function during the early development of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Quantitative and qualitative measures of segregating variation are not conspicuously different between cis-regulatory and closely linked "proxy neutral" noncoding regions containing no known functional sites. Length and compound mutations are common in noncoding sequences; conventional descriptive statistics ignore such mutations, under-representing true genetic variation by approximately 28% for these loci in this population. Patterns of variation in the cis-regulatory regions of six of the genes examined (CyIIa, CyIIIa, Endo16, FoxB, AN, and HE) are consistent with directional selection. Genetic variation within annotated transcription factor binding sites is comparable to, and frequently greater than, that of surrounding sequences. Comparisons of two paralog pairs (CyIIa/CyIIIa and AN/HE) suggest that distinct evolutionary processes have operated on their cis-regulatory regions following gene duplication. Together, these analyses provide a detailed view of the evolutionary mechanisms operating on noncoding sequences within a natural population, and underscore how little is known about how these processes operate on cis-regulatory sequences.

  9. Temperature and CO(2) additively regulate physiology, morphology and genomic responses of larval sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Gamiño, Jacqueline L; Kelly, Morgan W; Evans, Tyler G; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2013-05-22

    Ocean warming and ocean acidification, both consequences of anthropogenic production of CO2, will combine to influence the physiological performance of many species in the marine environment. In this study, we used an integrative approach to forecast the impact of future ocean conditions on larval purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) from the northeast Pacific Ocean. In laboratory experiments that simulated ocean warming and ocean acidification, we examined larval development, skeletal growth, metabolism and patterns of gene expression using an orthogonal comparison of two temperature (13°C and 18°C) and pCO2 (400 and 1100 μatm) conditions. Simultaneous exposure to increased temperature and pCO2 significantly reduced larval metabolism and triggered a widespread downregulation of histone encoding genes. pCO2 but not temperature impaired skeletal growth and reduced the expression of a major spicule matrix protein, suggesting that skeletal growth will not be further inhibited by ocean warming. Importantly, shifts in skeletal growth were not associated with developmental delay. Collectively, our results indicate that global change variables will have additive effects that exceed thresholds for optimized physiological performance in this keystone marine species.

  10. The C2H2 zinc finger genes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and their expression in embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Materna, Stefan C; Howard-Ashby, Meredith; Gray, Rachel F; Davidson, Eric H

    2006-12-01

    The C2H2 zinc finger is one of the most abundant protein domains and is thought to have been extensively replicated in diverse animal clades. Some well-studied proteins that contain this domain are transcriptional regulators. As part of an attempt to delineate all transcription factors encoded in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, we identified the C2H2 zinc finger genes indicated in the sequence, and examined their involvement in embryonic development. We found 377 zinc finger genes in the sea urchin genome, about half the number found in mice or humans. Their expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Up to the end of gastrulation less than a third of these genes is expressed, and about 75% of the expressed genes are maternal; both parameters distinguish these from all other classes of regulatory genes as measured in other studies. Spatial expression pattern was determined by whole mount in situ hybridization for 43 genes transcribed at a sufficient level, and localized expression was observed in diverse embryonic tissues. These genes may execute important regulatory functions in development. However, the functional meaning of the majority of this large gene family remains undefined.

  11. Temperature and CO2 additively regulate physiology, morphology and genomic responses of larval sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Gamiño, Jacqueline L.; Kelly, Morgan W.; Evans, Tyler G.; Hofmann, Gretchen E.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean warming and ocean acidification, both consequences of anthropogenic production of CO2, will combine to influence the physiological performance of many species in the marine environment. In this study, we used an integrative approach to forecast the impact of future ocean conditions on larval purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) from the northeast Pacific Ocean. In laboratory experiments that simulated ocean warming and ocean acidification, we examined larval development, skeletal growth, metabolism and patterns of gene expression using an orthogonal comparison of two temperature (13°C and 18°C) and pCO2 (400 and 1100 μatm) conditions. Simultaneous exposure to increased temperature and pCO2 significantly reduced larval metabolism and triggered a widespread downregulation of histone encoding genes. pCO2 but not temperature impaired skeletal growth and reduced the expression of a major spicule matrix protein, suggesting that skeletal growth will not be further inhibited by ocean warming. Importantly, shifts in skeletal growth were not associated with developmental delay. Collectively, our results indicate that global change variables will have additive effects that exceed thresholds for optimized physiological performance in this keystone marine species. PMID:23536595

  12. Comparative analysis of fibrillar and basement membrane collagen expression in embryos of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H R; Reiter, R S; D'Alessio, M; Di Liberto, M; Ramirez, F; Exposito, J Y; Gambino, R; Solursh, M

    1997-06-01

    The time of appearance and location of three distinct collagen gene transcripts termed 1 alpha, 2 alpha, and 3 alpha, were monitored in the developing S. purpuratus embryo by in situ hybridization. The 1 alpha and 2 alpha transcripts of fibrillar collagens were detected simultaneously in the primary (PMC) and secondary (SMC) mesenchyme cells of the late gastrula stage and subsequently expressed in the spicules and gut associated cells of the pluteus stage. The 3 alpha transcripts of the basement membrane collagen appeared earlier than 1 alpha and 2 alpha, and were first detected in the presumptive PMC at the vegetal plate of the late blastula stage. The PMC exhibited high expression of 3 alpha at the mesenchyme blastula stage, but during gastrulation the level of expression was reduced differentially among the PMC. In the late gastrula and pluteus stages, both PMC and SMC expressed 3 alpha mRNA, and thus at these stages all three collagen genes displayed an identical expression pattern by coincidence. This study thus provides the first survey of onset and localization of multiple collagen transcripts in a single sea urchin species.

  13. Developmental expression of a cell surface protein involved in sea urchin skeleton formation. [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; Lytechinus pictus

    SciTech Connect

    Farach, M.C.; Valdizan, M.; Park, H.R.; Decker, G.L.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously used a monoclonal antibody (1223) to identify a 130 Kd cell surface protein involved in skeleton formation is sea urchin embryos. In the current study the authors have examined the expression of the 1223 antigen over the course of development of embryos of two species, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. The 130 Kd protein is detected in S. purp eggs on immunoblots. Labeling with (/sup 3/H) leucine and immunoaffinity chromatography show that it also is synthesized shortly after fertilization. Immunofluroescence reveals that at this early stage the 1223 antigen is uniformly distributed on all of the cells. Synthesis decreases to a minimum by the time of hatching (18 h), as does the total amount of antigen present in the embryo. A second period of synthesis commences at the mesenchyme blastula stage, when the spicule-forming primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) have appeared. During this later stage, synthesis and cell surface expression are restricted to the PMCs. In contrast to S. purp., in L. pictus the 130 Kd protein does not appear until the PMCs are formed. Hybrid embryos demonstrate a pattern of expression of the maternal species. These results suggest that early expression of 1223 antigen in S. purp. is due to utilization of maternal transcripts present in the egg. In both species later expression in PMCs appears to be the result of cell-type specific synthesis, perhaps encoded by embryonic transcripts.

  14. Effects of increased pCO2 and geographic origin on purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) calcite elemental composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sanford, E.; Gaylord, B.; Russell, A. D.; Lenz, E. A.; Hosfelt, J. D.; Young, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (such as Mg and Sr) into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore the effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2) on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low to high magnesium calcites. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions along the US west coast (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California). Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg/Ca or Sr/Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 ppm; pH = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD). However, when reared under elevated CO2 (900 ppm; pH = 7.72 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1), skeletal Sr/Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California) did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr incorporation under elevated CO2 (Sr/Ca = 2

  15. The effects of copper and nickel on the embryonic life stages of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus).

    PubMed

    Tellis, Margaret S; Lauer, Mariana M; Nadella, Sunita; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this research was to generate data on the mechanisms of toxicity of copper [Cu (4-12 µg/L)] and nickel [Ni (33-40 µg/L)] during continuous sublethal exposure in seawater (32 ppt, 15 °C) in a sensitive test organism (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) at its most sensitive life stage (developing embryo). Whole-body ions [calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), potassium (K), and magnesium (Mg)], metal burdens, Ca uptake, and Ca ATPase activity were measured every 12 h during the first 72-84 h of development. Ionoregulatory disruption was clearly an important mechanism of toxicity for both metals and occurred with minimal metal bioaccumulation. Most noteworthy was a significant disruption of Ca homeostasis, which was evident from an inhibition of unidirectional Ca uptake rates, whole-body Ca accumulation, and Ca ATPase activity intermittently during 72-84 h of development. At various times, Cu- and Ni-exposed embryos also displayed lower levels of K and increased levels of Na suggesting inhibition of Na/K ATPase activity. Greater levels of Mg during initial stages of development in Cu-exposed embryos were also observed and were considered a possible compensatory mechanism for disruptions to Ca homeostasis because both of these ions are important constituents of the developing spicule. Notably, most of these effects occurred during the initial stages of development but were reversed by 72-84 h. We therefore propose that it is of value to study the toxic impacts of contaminants periodically during development before the traditional end point of 48-72 h.

  16. Effects of five southern California macroalgal diets on consumption, growth, and gonad weight, in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Matthew C; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Reed, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Consumer growth and reproductive capacity are direct functions of diet. Strongylocentrotid sea urchins, the dominant herbivores in California kelp forests, strongly prefer giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), but are highly catholic in their ability to consume other species. The biomass of Macrocystis fluctuates greatly in space and time, and the extent to which urchins can use alternate species of algae or a mixed diet of multiple algal species to maintain fitness when giant kelp is unavailable is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of single and mixed species diets on consumption, growth and gonad weight in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Urchins were fed single species diets consisting of one of four common species of macroalgae (the kelps Macrocystis pyrifera and Pterygophora californica, and the red algae Chondracanthus corymbiferus and Rhodymenia californica (hereafter referred to by genus)) or a mixed diet containing all four species ad libitum over a 13-week period in a controlled laboratory setting. Urchins fed Chondracanthus, Macrocystis and a mixed diet showed the highest growth (in terms of test diameter, wet weight and jaw length) and gonad weight, while urchins fed Pterygophora and Rhodymenia showed the lowest. Urchins consumed their preferred food, Macrocystis, at the highest rate when offered a mixture, but consumed Chondracanthus or Macrocystis at similar rates when the two algae were offered alone. The differences in urchin feeding behavior and growth observed between these diet types suggest the relative availability of the algae tested here could affect urchin populations and their interactions with the algal assemblage. The fact that the performance of urchins fed Chondracanthus was similar or higher than those fed the preferred Macrocystis suggests that the availability of the former could could sustain growth and reproduction of purple sea urchins during times of low Macrocystis abundance as is common following

  17. Assortative mating drives linkage disequilibrium between sperm and egg recognition protein loci in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Stapper, Andres Plata; Beerli, Peter; Levitan, Don R

    2015-04-01

    Sperm and eggs have interacting proteins on their surfaces that influence their compatibility during fertilization. These proteins are often polymorphic within species, producing variation in gamete affinities. We first demonstrate the fitness consequences of various sperm bindin protein (Bindin) variants in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and assortative mating between males and females based on their sperm Bindin genotype. This empirical finding of assortative mating based on sperm Bindin genotype could arise by linkage disequilibrium (LD) between interacting sperm and egg recognition loci. We then examine sequence variation in eight exons of the sea urchin egg receptor for sperm Bindin (EBR1). We find little evidence of LD among the eight exons of EBR1, yet strong evidence for LD between sperm Bindin and EBR1 overall, and varying degrees of LD between sperm Bindin among the eight exons. We reject the alternate hypotheses of LD driven by shared evolutionary histories, population structure, or close physical linkage between these interacting loci on the genome. The most parsimonious explanation for this pattern of LD is that it represents selection driven by assortative mating based on interactions among these sperm and egg loci. These findings indicate the importance of ongoing sexual selection in the maintenance of protein polymorphisms and LD, and more generally highlight how LD can be used as an indication of current mate choice, as opposed to historic selection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effects of five southern California macroalgal diets on consumption, growth, and gonad weight, in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Jarrett E.K.; Reed, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Consumer growth and reproductive capacity are direct functions of diet. Strongylocentrotid sea urchins, the dominant herbivores in California kelp forests, strongly prefer giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), but are highly catholic in their ability to consume other species. The biomass of Macrocystis fluctuates greatly in space and time, and the extent to which urchins can use alternate species of algae or a mixed diet of multiple algal species to maintain fitness when giant kelp is unavailable is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of single and mixed species diets on consumption, growth and gonad weight in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Urchins were fed single species diets consisting of one of four common species of macroalgae (the kelps Macrocystis pyrifera and Pterygophora californica, and the red algae Chondracanthus corymbiferus and Rhodymenia californica (hereafter referred to by genus)) or a mixed diet containing all four species ad libitum over a 13-week period in a controlled laboratory setting. Urchins fed Chondracanthus, Macrocystis and a mixed diet showed the highest growth (in terms of test diameter, wet weight and jaw length) and gonad weight, while urchins fed Pterygophora and Rhodymenia showed the lowest. Urchins consumed their preferred food, Macrocystis, at the highest rate when offered a mixture, but consumed Chondracanthus or Macrocystis at similar rates when the two algae were offered alone. The differences in urchin feeding behavior and growth observed between these diet types suggest the relative availability of the algae tested here could affect urchin populations and their interactions with the algal assemblage. The fact that the performance of urchins fed Chondracanthus was similar or higher than those fed the preferred Macrocystis suggests that the availability of the former could could sustain growth and reproduction of purple sea urchins during times of low Macrocystis abundance as is common following

  19. A pancreatic exocrine-like cell regulatory circuit operating in the upper stomach of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus larva.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Margherita; Wang, Yue Julia; Leach, Steven D; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2016-05-26

    Digestive cells are present in all metazoans and provide the energy necessary for the whole organism. Pancreatic exocrine cells are a unique vertebrate cell type involved in extracellular digestion of a wide range of nutrients. Although the organization and regulation of this cell type is intensively studied in vertebrates, its evolutionary history is still unknown. In order to understand which are the elements that define the pancreatic exocrine phenotype, we have analyzed the expression of genes that contribute to specification and function of this cell-type in an early branching deuterostome, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We defined the spatial and temporal expression of sea urchin orthologs of pancreatic exocrine genes and described a unique population of cells clustered in the upper stomach of the sea urchin embryo where exocrine markers are co-expressed. We used a combination of perturbation analysis, drug and feeding experiments and found that in these cells of the sea urchin embryo gene expression and gene regulatory interactions resemble that of bona fide pancreatic exocrine cells. We show that the sea urchin Ptf1a, a key transcriptional activator of digestive enzymes in pancreatic exocrine cells, can substitute for its vertebrate ortholog in activating downstream genes. Collectively, our study is the first to show with molecular tools that defining features of a vertebrate cell-type, the pancreatic exocrine cell, are shared by a non-vertebrate deuterostome. Our results indicate that the functional cell-type unit of the vertebrate pancreas may evolutionarily predate the emergence of the pancreas as a discrete organ. From an evolutionary perspective, these results encourage to further explore the homologs of other vertebrate cell-types in traditional or newly emerging deuterostome systems.

  20. Effects of an oil production effluent on gametogenesis and gamete performance in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Stimpson)

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, P.R. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1994-07-01

    Adult organisms subjected to chronic discharges from a point source of pollution may exhibit several sublethal responses. One such response is the impairment of gamete production. This may be expressed in the amount and/or quality of gametes produced by adults. In this study the effects of chronic exposure to produced water (an oil production effluent) on the gametogenesis and gamete performance of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Stimpson) were examined using an in situ caging experiment. Adult purple sea urchins were kept in benthic cages arrayed down-field from a discharging diffuser at 13 sites, with distances ranging from 5 to 1,000 m. Cage exposures were maintained in the field for eight weeks, and each cage held 25 animals. Gametogenesis was examined for each sex by comparing a size-independent measure of relative gonads ass as determined by analysis of covariance. Results showed that there was a significant negative relationship between these estimates of relative gonad mass and distance from the outfall for both sexes, indicating that sea urchins living closer to the outfall produced significantly larger gonads. Gamete performance was measured through a fertilization kinetics bioassay that held the concentration of eggs constant and varied the amount of sperm added. The proportion of eggs fertilized under each sperm concentration was determined and the response fit to a model of fertilizability showed a positive relationship with distance away from the outfall. These findings indicate that although adult sea urchins exposed to a produced water outfall exhibit larger gonads, they suffer a marked decrease in a gamete performance.

  1. Two new species of poecilostomatoid copepods symbiotic on the venomous echinoid Toxopneustes pileolus (Lamarck) (Echinodermata) from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Venmathi Maran, Balu Alagar; Kim, Il-Hoi; Bratova, Olga A; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N

    2017-02-01

    Two new coexisting species of crustacean copepods (Poecilostomatoida) belonging to the echinoid-specific genera Mecomerinx Humes, 1977 (Pseudanthessiidae) and Clavisodalis Humes, 1970 (Taeniacanthidae) found associated with the venomous flower urchin Toxopneustes pileolus (Lamarck) (Echinodermata: Echinoidea: Toxopneustidae) in the South China Sea (Vietnam) are described. The diagnostic features of Mecomerinx ohtsukai n. sp. are: (i) three setae and one aesthetasc on the first segment of antennules; (ii) relatively long caudal ramus; (iii) elongated terminal segment of the antenna; and (iv) two claws on the terminal segment of antenna slightly unequal in length. The taeniacanthid copepod Clavisodalis toxopneusti n. sp. is distinguished from all seven known congeners by having two-segmented endopod of the legs 2-4 and four setae on the distal endopodal segment of the leg 1. This is the first report on copepods associated with echinoids of the genus Toxopneustes Agassiz and the first finding of Mecomerinx as well as taeniacanthid copepods in the South China Sea associated with echinoids.

  2. Increased antioxidant activity and changes in phenolic profile of Kalanchoe pinnata (Lamarck) Persoon (Crassulaceae) specimens grown under supplemental blue light.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Luana B S; Leal-Costa, Marcos V; Coutinho, Marcela A S; Moreira, Nattacha dos S; Lage, Celso L S; Barbi, Nancy dos S; Costa, Sônia S; Tavares, Eliana S

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidant compounds protect plants against oxidative stress caused by environmental conditions. Different light qualities, such as UV-A radiation and blue light, have shown positive effects on the production of phenols in plants. Kalanchoe pinnata (Lamarck) Persoon (Crassulaceae) is used for treating wounds and inflammations. Some of these beneficial effects are attributed to the antioxidant activity of plant components. We investigated the effects of blue light and UV-A radiation supplementation on the total phenol content, antioxidant activity and chromatographic profile of aqueous extracts from leaves of K. pinnata. Monoclonal plants were grown under white light, white plus blue light and white plus UV-A radiation. Supplemental blue light improved the antioxidant activity and changed the phenolic profile of the extracts. Analysis by HPLC of supplemental blue-light plant extracts revealed a higher proportion of the major flavonoid quercetin 3-O-α-L-arabinopyranosyl (1→2) α-L-rhamnopyranoside, as well as the presence of a wide variety of other phenolic substances. These findings may explain the higher antioxidant activity observed for this extract. Blue light is proposed as a supplemental light source in the cultivation of K. pinnata, to improve its antioxidant activity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  3. Accumulation, Biotransformation, Histopathology and Paralysis in the Pacific Calico Scallop Argopecten ventricosus by the Paralyzing Toxins of the Dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo-Lozano, Amada Y.; Estrada, Norma; Ascencio, Felipe; Contreras, Gerardo; Alonso-Rodriguez, Rosalba

    2012-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum produces paralyzing shellfish poisons that are consumed and accumulated by bivalves. We performed short-term feeding experiments to examine ingestion, accumulation, biotransformation, histopathology, and paralysis in the juvenile Pacific calico scallop Argopecten ventricosus that consume this dinoflagellate. Depletion of algal cells was measured in closed systems. Histopathological preparations were microscopically analyzed. Paralysis was observed and the time of recovery recorded. Accumulation and possible biotransformation of toxins were measured by HPLC analysis. Feeding activity in treated scallops showed that scallops produced pseudofeces, ingestion rates decreased at 8 h; approximately 60% of the scallops were paralyzed and melanin production and hemocyte aggregation were observed in several tissues at 15 h. HPLC analysis showed that the only toxins present in the dinoflagellates and scallops were the N-sulfo-carbamoyl toxins (C1, C2); after hydrolysis, the carbamate toxins (epimers GTX2/3) were present. C1 and C2 toxins were most common in the mantle, followed by the digestive gland and stomach-complex, adductor muscle, kidney and rectum group, and finally, gills. Toxin profiles in scallop tissue were similar to the dinoflagellate; biotransformations were not present in the scallops in this short-term feeding experiment. PMID:22822356

  4. Evaluation of the effects of the metals Cd, Cr, Pb and their mixture on the filtration and oxygen consumption rates in catarina scallop, Argopecten ventricosus juveniles.

    PubMed

    Sobrino-Figueroa, Alma S; Cáceres-Martinez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the effect of sublethal concentrations ( LC25, LC10 and LC5) of cadmium, chromium, lead, and their mixture on the filtration rate and oxygen consumption rate of Catarina scallop, Argopecten ventricosus (Sowerby, 1842), juveniles, in order to evaluate the use of these biomarkers as a reliable tool in environmental monitoring studies, because these metals have been found at high levels in water and sediments in the Mexican Pacific systems. An inverse dose-response relationship was observed when metal concentration and exposure time increased, the filtration rate and oxygen consumption rate reduced. The physiological responses evaluated in this study were sufficiently sensitive to detect alterations in the organisms at 0.014 mg l(-1) Cd, 0.311 mg l(-1) Cr, 0.125 mg l(-1) Pb and 0.05 mg l(-1) Cd + Cr + Pb at 24 and 72 hrs. Cd showed the most drastic effect. The Catarina scallop juveniles were more sensitive to Cd, Cr and Pb as compared to other bivalves. The biomarkers evaluated are a reliable tool to carry out environmental monitoring studies.

  5. The expression of embryonic primary mesenchyme genes of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, in the adult skeletogenic tissues of this and other species of echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Drager, B J; Harkey, M A; Iwata, M; Whiteley, A H

    1989-05-01

    Adult tissues of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, were analyzed for the products of a set of genes whose expression, in the embryo, is restricted to the skeletogenic primary mesenchyme (PM). Three embryonic PM-specific mRNAs were found to be abundant in adult skeletal tissues (test and lantern), but not in a variety of soft tissues. Homologous mRNAs were also found in skeletal tissues of the congeneric sea urchin, S. droebachiensis, as well as a more distantly related echinoid, Dendraster excentricus, and an asteroid, Evasterias troschellii. The distributions of two of these RNAs were analyzed in regenerating spines of adult S. purpuratus using in situ hybridization. These gene products were localized primarily in the calcoblasts that accumulated at the regeneration site. In nonregenerating spines SpLM 18 RNAs, the most abundant of these gene products, were localized in a small population of noncalcoblast cells scattered through the spine shaft, and were absent from calcoblasts. These observations suggest that a program of gene expression associated with the process of calcification is conserved both developmentally through the period of metamorphosis and evolutionarily among the echinoderms.

  6. Seasonal variation of biochemical components in clam ( Saxidomus purpuratus Sowerby 1852) in relation to its reproductive cycle and the environmental condition of Sanggou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jinhong; Li, Qi; Zhang, Xinjun; Zhang, Zhixin; Tian, Jinling; Xu, Yushan; Liu, Wenguang

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal variation of biochemical components in clam ( Saxidomus purpuratus Sowerby 1852) was investigated from March 2012 to February 2013 in relation to environmental condition of Sanggou Bay and the reproductive cycle of clam. According to the histological analysis, the reproductive cycle of S. purpuratus includes two distinctive phases: a total spent and inactive stage from November to January, and a gametogenesis stage, including ripeness and spawning, during the rest of the year. Gametes were generated at a low temperature (2.1°C) in February. Spawning took place once a year from June to October. The massive spawning occurred in August when the highest water temperature and chlorophyll a level could be observed. The key biochemical components (glycogen, protein and lipid) in five tissues (gonad, foot, mantle, siphon and adductor muscle) were analyzed. The glycogen content was high before gametogenesis, and decreased significantly during the gonad development in the gonad, mantle and foot of both females and males, suggesting that glycogen was an important energy source for gonad development. The protein and lipid contents increased in the ovary during the gonad development, demonstrating that they are the major organic components of oocytes. The lipid and protein contents decreased in the testis, implying that they can provide energy and material for spermatogenesis. The results also showed that protein stored in the mantle and foot could support the reproduction after the glycogen was depleted.

  7. SpSM30 gene family expression patterns in embryonic and adult biomineralized tissues of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Killian, Christopher E; Croker, Lindsay; Wilt, Fred H

    2010-01-01

    The SpSM30 gene family of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is comprised of six members, designated SpSM30A through SpSM30F (Livingston et al., 2006). The SpSM30 proteins are found uniquely in embryonic and adult mineralized tissues of the sea urchin. Previous studies have revealed that SpSM30 proteins are occluded within the embryonic endoskeleton and adult mineralized tissues (Killian and Wilt, 1996; Mann et al., 2008a,b; Urry et al., 2000). Furthermore, some of the SpSM30 proteins are among the most abundant of the approximately four-dozen integral matrix proteins of the larval spicule (Killian and Wilt, 1996). The amino acid sequence, protein domain architecture, and contiguity within the genome strongly support the supposition that the six genes constitute a gene family. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is used in the present study to describe the time course of expression of the family members during embryonic development, and their expression in adult tissues. SpSM30A, B, C and E are expressed, albeit at different levels, during overt spicule deposition in the embryo with some differences in the precise timing of expression. SpSM30D is not expressed in the embryo, and SpSM30F is expressed transiently and at low levels just prior to overt spicule formation. Whole mount in situ hybridization studies show that SpSM30A, B, C, and E are expressed exclusively in primary mesenchyme (PMC) cells and their descendants. In addition, tissue fractionation studies indicate that SpSM30F expression is highly enriched in PMCs. Each adult tissue examined expresses a different cohort of the SpSM30 family members at varying levels: SpSM30A mRNA is not expressed in adult tissues. Its expression is limited to the embryo. Conversely, SpSM30D mRNA is not expressed in the embryo, but is expressed in adult spines and teeth. SpSM30B and SpSM30C are expressed at modest levels in all mineralized adult tissues; SpSM30E is expressed highly in tooth and

  8. Unveiling the Rosetta Stone of syllids: redescription and neotype designation of Syllis monilaris Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, type species of type genus of family Syllidae Grube, 1850 (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Campos, Patricia; Gil, João; San Martín, Guillermo

    2015-11-11

    Syllis monilaris Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, the type species of the genus Syllis Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, is redescribed based on two specimens deposited in the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (Germany). One specimen is designated as neotype, since the original type material is considered to be lost, and there is a necessity to stabilize the nomenclature of the group. The species is large sized, with long dorsal cirri on anterior segments, becoming short and fusiform from midbody, it has thick compound chaetae with short, unidentate blades, not fused to shafts. The lack of chaetae with fused shafts and blades contradicts the division of the genus Syllis into subgenera as proposed by Langerhans (1879), who considered the subgenus Syllis as having thick fused chaetae on midbody, in addition to compound chaetae, and the subgenus Typosyllis with only compound chaetae. A discussion about the systematics of the genus is included, and according to this new data, Typosyllis is a junior synonymy of Syllis.

  9. The Polymorphism in the Promoter of HSP70 Gene Is Associated with Heat Tolerance of Two Congener Endemic Bay Scallops (Argopecten irradians irradians and A. i. concentricus)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chuanyan; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Jingjing; Jiang, Qiufen; Qiu, Limei; Zhang, Huan; Song, Linsheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is one kind of molecular chaperones, which plays a key role in protein metabolism under normal and stress conditions. Methodology In the present study, the mRNA expressions of HSP70 under normal physiological condition and after acute heat stress were investigated in gills of two bay scallop populations (Argopecten irradians irradians and A. i. concentricus). The heat resistant scallops A. i. concentricus showed significantly lower basal level and higher induction of HSP70 compared with that of the heat sensitive scallops A. i. irradians. The promoter sequence of HSP70 gene from bay scallop (AiHSP70) was cloned and the polymorphisms within this region were investigated to analyze their association with heat tolerance. Totally 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, and four of them (−967, −480, −408 and −83) were associated with heat tolerance after HWE analysis and association analysis. Based on the result of linkage disequilibrium analysis, the in vitro transcriptional activities of AiHSP70 promoters with different genotype were further determined, and the results showed that promoter from A. i. concentricus exhibited higher transcriptional activity than that from A. i. irradians (P<0.05). Conclusions The results provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the thermal adaptation of different congener endemic bay scallops, which suggested that the increased heat tolerance of A. i. concentricus (compared with A. i. irradians) was associated with the higher expression of AiHSP70. Meanwhile, the −967 GG, −480 AA, −408 TT and −83 AG genotypes could be potential markers for scallop selection breeding with higher heat tolerance. PMID:25028964

  10. Structural differences and differential expression among rhabdomeric opsins reveal functional change after gene duplication in the bay scallop, Argopecten irradians (Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Porath-Krause, Anita J; Pairett, Autum N; Faggionato, Davide; Birla, Bhagyashree S; Sankar, Kannan; Serb, Jeanne M

    2016-11-17

    Opsins are the only class of proteins used for light perception in image-forming eyes. Gene duplication and subsequent functional divergence of opsins have played an important role in expanding photoreceptive capabilities of organisms by altering what wavelengths of light are absorbed by photoreceptors (spectral tuning). However, new opsin copies may also acquire novel function or subdivide ancestral functions through changes to temporal, spatial or the level of gene expression. Here, we test how opsin gene copies diversify in function and evolutionary fate by characterizing four rhabdomeric (Gq-protein coupled) opsins in the scallop, Argopecten irradians, identified from tissue-specific transcriptomes. Under a phylogenetic analysis, we recovered a pattern consistent with two rounds of duplication that generated the genetic diversity of scallop Gq-opsins. We found strong support for differential expression of paralogous Gq-opsins across ocular and extra-ocular photosensitive tissues, suggesting that scallop Gq-opsins are used in different biological contexts due to molecular alternations outside and within the protein-coding regions. Finally, we used available protein models to predict which amino acid residues interact with the light-absorbing chromophore. Variation in these residues suggests that the four Gq-opsin paralogs absorb different wavelengths of light. Our results uncover novel genetic and functional diversity in the light-sensing structures of the scallop, demonstrating the complicated nature of Gq-opsin diversification after gene duplication. Our results highlight a change in the nearly ubiquitous shadow response in molluscs to a narrowed functional specificity for visual processes in the eyed scallop. Our findings provide a starting point to study how gene duplication may coincide with eye evolution, and more specifically, different ways neofunctionalization of Gq-opsins may occur.

  11. Changes in oxidative stress parameters in relation to age, growth and reproduction in the short-lived catarina scallop Argopecten ventricosus reared in its natural environment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, C; Zenteno-Savín, T; Maeda-Martínez, A N; Philipp, E E R; Abele, D

    2012-08-01

    Increase in oxidative damage and decrease in cellular maintenance is often associated with aging, but, in marine ectotherms, both processes are also strongly influenced by somatic growth, maturation and reproduction. In this study, we used a single cohort of the short-lived catarina scallop Argopecten ventricosus, to investigate the effects of somatic growth, reproduction and aging on oxidative damage parameters (protein carbonyls, TBARS and lipofuscin) and cellular maintenance mechanisms (antioxidant activity and apoptosis) in scallops, caged in their natural environment. The concentrations of protein carbonyls and TBARS increased steeply during the early period of fast growth and during reproduction in one-year-old scallops. However, oxidative damage was transient, and apoptotic cell death played a pivotal role in eliminating damage in gill, mantle and muscle tissues of young scallops. Animals were able to reproduce again in the second year, but the reduced intensity of apoptosis impaired subsequent removal of damaged cells. In late survivors low antioxidant capacity and apoptotic activity together with a fast accumulation of the age pigment lipofuscin was observed. Rates of oxygen consumption and oxidative stress markers were strongly dependent on somatic growth and reproductive state but not on temperature. Compared to longer-lived bivalves, A. ventricosus seems more susceptible to oxidative stress with higher tissue-specific protein carbonyl levels and fast accumulation of lipofuscin in animals surviving the second spawning. Superoxide dismutase activity and apoptotic cell death intensity were however higher in this short-lived scallop than in longer-lived bivalves. The life strategy of this short-lived and intensely predated scallop supports rapid somatic growth and fitness as well as early maturation at young age at the cost of fast cellular degradation in second year scallops. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A new fibrinogen-related protein from Argopecten irradians (AiFREP-2) with broad recognition spectrum and bacteria agglutination activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuanyan; Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Huang, Mengmeng; Sun, Zhibin; Sun, Ying; Song, Linsheng

    2014-05-01

    Fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) are a kind of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) containing fibrinogen-like (FBG) domains, and they play curial roles in the innate immune response. In the present study, a new FREP protein was identified from bay scallop Argopecten irradians (designated as AiFREP-2). The full-length cDNA of AiFREP-2 was of 1299 bp with an open reading frame of 762 bp encoding a polypeptide of 253 amino acids, including a signal sequence and an FBG domain. The FBG domain in AiFREP-2 was highly similar to those of ficolins, tenascins and other FREPs. The mRNA expression of AiFREP-2 could be detected in all the examined tissues with the highest level in gill. The mRNA expression of AiFREP-2 in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated post the stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and β-glucan (GLU) (P < 0.01). The recombinant AiFREP-2 (rAiFREP-2) could bind not only different PAMP ligands including LPS, PGN and GLU, but also various microbes including Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio anguillarum), Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) and fungus (Pichia pastoris and Yarrowia lipolytica). Additionally, rAiFREP-2 exhibited obvious agglutination activity towards Gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and Gram positive bacteria S. aureus. The results indicated that AiFREP-2 was involved in the immune response against Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and fungus as a PRR in bay scallop, and the information was helpful to understand the innate immune defense mechanisms of mollusks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular cloning, expression of a big defensin gene from bay scallop Argopecten irradians and the antimicrobial activity of its recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianmin; Song, Linsheng; Li, Chenghua; Ni, Duojiao; Wu, Longtao; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Hao; Xu, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are important components of the host innate immune responses by exerting broad-spectrum microbicidal activity against pathogenic microbes. The first mollusk big defensin (designated AiBD) cDNA was cloned from bay scallop Argopecten irradians by expressed sequence tag (EST) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques. The scallop AiBD consisted of 531 nucleotides with a canonical polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA and a poly(A) tail, encoding a polypeptide of 122 amino acids. The high similarity of AiBD deduced amino acid sequence with big defensin from Tachypleus tridentatus and Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtaunese indicated that AiBD should be a member of big defensin family. The expression of AiBD in various tissues was measured by using Northern blotting analysis. mRNA transcripts of AiBD could be detected in haemocytes of unchallenged scallops. The temporal expression of AiBD in haemolymph after Vibrio anguilarum challenge was recorded by quantitative real time PCR. The relative expression level of AiBD in haemolymph was up-regulated evenly in the first 8 h, followed by a drastic increase, and increased 131.1-fold at 32 h post-injection. These results indicated that AiBD could be induced by bacterial challenge, and it should participate in the immune responses of A. irradians. Biological activity assay revealed that recombinant AiBD could inhibit the growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and also showed strong fungicidal activity towards the expression host. Recombinant expression of AiBD made it possible to further characterize its functions involved in immune responses, and also provided a potential therapeutic agent for disease control in aquaculture.

  14. A C-type lectin (AiCTL-3) from bay scallop Argopecten irradians with mannose/galactose binding ability to bind various bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengmeng; Song, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jianmin; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Xiaolin; Song, Linsheng

    2013-11-15

    C-type lectins are a family of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins playing crucial roles in innate immunity of vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, the cDNA of a C-type lectin with one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of 127 amino acids was cloned from bay scallop Argopecten irradians (designated AiCTL-3) by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) techniques based on expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. The mRNA transcripts of AiCTL-3 could be detected in all the tested tissues including hepatopancreas, gonad, adductor muscle, heart, hemocytes, mantle and gill, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. After the challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, the mRNA expression level of AiCTL-3 was obviously up-regulated and reached the maximum level at 9h (11.87fold, P<0.01, and 20.02-fold, P<0.05, respectively). The recombinant AiCTL-3 (designated as rAiCTL-3) could bind LPS, PGN, and glucan in vitro, but could not bind mannan. And it also bound Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus as well as Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. anguillarum. With a Ca(2+) binding site 2 EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, rAiCTL-3 could bind both mannose and galactose which was quite different from those in vertebrate. Meanwhile, it could significantly enhance the phagocytosis of scallop hemocytes in vitro. The results clearly suggested that AiCTL-3 could serve not only as a PRR participated in the immune response against various PAMPs and bacteria in non-self recognition via mannose/galactose binding specificity but an opsonin playing an important part in clearance of invaders.

  15. Genetic organization and embryonic expression of the ParaHox genes in the sea urchin S. purpuratus: insights into the relationship between clustering and colinearity.

    PubMed

    Arnone, Maria I; Rizzo, Francesca; Annunciata, Rosella; Cameron, R Andrew; Peterson, Kevin J; Martínez, Pedro

    2006-12-01

    The ANTP family of homeodomain transcription factors consists of three major groups, the NKL, the extended Hox, and the Hox/ParaHox family. Hox genes and ParaHox genes are often linked in the genome forming two clusters of genes, the Hox cluster and the ParaHox cluster, and are expressed along the major body axis in a nested fashion, following the relative positions of the genes within these clusters, a property called colinearity. While the presences of a Hox cluster and a ParaHox cluster appear to be primitive for bilaterians, few taxa have actually been examined for spatial and temporal colinearity, and, aside from chordates, even fewer still manifest it. Here we show that the ParaHox genes of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus show both spatial and temporal colinearity, but with peculiarities. Specifically, two of the three ParaHox genes-discovered through the S. purpuratus genome project-Sp-lox and Sp-Cdx, are expressed in the developing gut with nested domains in a spatially colinear manner. However, transcripts of Sp-Gsx, although anterior of Sp-lox, are detected in the ectoderm and not in the gut. Strikingly, the expression of the three ParaHox genes would follow temporal colinearity if they were clustered in the same order as in chordates, but each ParaHox gene is actually found on a different genomic scaffold (>300 kb each), which suggests that they are not linked into a single coherent cluster. Therefore, ParaHox genes are dispersed in the genome and are used during embryogenesis in a temporally and spatially coherent manner, whereas the Hox genes, now fully sequenced and annotated, are still linked and are employed as a complex only during the emergence of the adult body plan in the larva.

  16. A detailed staging scheme for late larval development in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus focused on readily-visible juvenile structures within the rudiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, has long been the focus of developmental and ecological studies, and its recently-sequenced genome has spawned a diversity of functional genomics approaches. S. purpuratus has an indirect developmental mode with a pluteus larva that transforms after 1–3 months in the plankton into a juvenile urchin. Compared to insects and frogs, mechanisms underlying the correspondingly dramatic metamorphosis in sea urchins remain poorly understood. In order to take advantage of modern techniques to further our understanding of juvenile morphogenesis, organ formation, metamorphosis and the evolution of the pentameral sea urchin body plan, it is critical to assess developmental progression and rate during the late larval phase. This requires a staging scheme that describes developmental landmarks that can quickly and consistently be used to identify the stage of individual living larvae, and can be tracked during the final two weeks of larval development, as the juvenile is forming. Results Notable structures that are easily observable in developing urchin larvae are the developing spines, test and tube feet within the juvenile rudiment that constitute much of the oral portion of the adult body plan. Here we present a detailed staging scheme of rudiment development in the purple urchin using soft structures of the rudiment and the primordia of these juvenile skeletal elements. We provide evidence that this scheme is robust and applicable across a range of temperature and feeding regimes. Conclusions Our proposed staging scheme provides both a useful method to study late larval development in the purple urchin, and a framework for developing similar staging schemes across echinoderms. Such efforts will have a high impact on evolutionary developmental studies and larval ecology, and facilitate research on this important deuterostome group. PMID:24886415

  17. Taxonomic revision and cladistic analysis of Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Aviculariinae) with description of three new aviculariine genera

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Caroline Sayuri; Bertani, Rogério

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The genus Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 is revised and all species are rediagnosed. The type species, described as Aranea avicularia Linnaeus, 1758, is the oldest mygalomorph species described and its taxonomic history is extensive and confusing. Cladistic analyses using both equal and implied weights were carried out with a matrix of 46 taxa from seven theraphosid subfamilies, and 71 morphological and ecological characters. The optimal cladogram found with Piwe and concavity = 6 suggests Avicularia and Aviculariinae are monophyletic. Subfamily Aviculariinae includes Avicularia Lamarck, 1818, Typhochlaena C. L. Koch, 1850, Tapinauchenius Ausserer, 1871, Stromatopelma Karsch, 1881, Ephebopus Simon, 1892, Psalmopoeus Pocock, 1895, Heteroscodra Pocock, 1899, Iridopelma Pocock, 1901, Pachistopelma Pocock, 1901, Ybyrapora gen. n., Caribena gen. n., and Antillena gen. n. The clade is supported by well-developed scopulae on tarsi and metatarsi, greatly extended laterally. Avicularia synapomorphies are juveniles bearing black tarsi contrasting with other lighter articles; spermathecae with an accentuated outwards curvature medially, and male palpal bulb with embolus medial portion and tegulum’s margin form an acute angle in retrolateral view. Avicularia is composed of twelve species, including three new species: Avicularia avicularia (Linnaeus, 1818), Avicularia glauca Simon, 1891, Avicularia variegata (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896) stat. n., Avicularia minatrix Pocock, 1903, Avicularia taunayi (Mello-Leitão, 1920), Avicularia juruensis Mello-Leitão, 1923, Avicularia rufa Schiapelli & Gerschman, 1945, Avicularia purpurea Kirk, 1990, Avicularia hirschii Bullmer et al. 2006, Avicularia merianae sp. n., Avicularia lynnae sp. n., and Avicularia caei sp. n.. Avicularia species are distributed throughout Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. Three new genera are erected

  18. Taxonomic revision and cladistic analysis of Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Aviculariinae) with description of three new aviculariine genera.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Caroline Sayuri; Bertani, Rogério

    2017-01-01

    The genus Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 is revised and all species are rediagnosed. The type species, described as Aranea avicularia Linnaeus, 1758, is the oldest mygalomorph species described and its taxonomic history is extensive and confusing. Cladistic analyses using both equal and implied weights were carried out with a matrix of 46 taxa from seven theraphosid subfamilies, and 71 morphological and ecological characters. The optimal cladogram found with Piwe and concavity = 6 suggests Avicularia and Aviculariinae are monophyletic. Subfamily Aviculariinae includes Avicularia Lamarck, 1818, Typhochlaena C. L. Koch, 1850, Tapinauchenius Ausserer, 1871, Stromatopelma Karsch, 1881, Ephebopus Simon, 1892, Psalmopoeus Pocock, 1895, Heteroscodra Pocock, 1899, Iridopelma Pocock, 1901, Pachistopelma Pocock, 1901, Ybyraporagen. n., Caribenagen. n., and Antillenagen. n. The clade is supported by well-developed scopulae on tarsi and metatarsi, greatly extended laterally. Avicularia synapomorphies are juveniles bearing black tarsi contrasting with other lighter articles; spermathecae with an accentuated outwards curvature medially, and male palpal bulb with embolus medial portion and tegulum's margin form an acute angle in retrolateral view. Avicularia is composed of twelve species, including three new species: Avicularia avicularia (Linnaeus, 1818), Avicularia glauca Simon, 1891, Avicularia variegata (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896) stat. n., Avicularia minatrix Pocock, 1903, Avicularia taunayi (Mello-Leitão, 1920), Avicularia juruensis Mello-Leitão, 1923, Avicularia rufa Schiapelli & Gerschman, 1945, Avicularia purpurea Kirk, 1990, Avicularia hirschii Bullmer et al. 2006, Avicularia merianaesp. n., Avicularia lynnaesp. n., and Avicularia caeisp. n.. Avicularia species are distributed throughout Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. Three new genera are erected to accommodate

  19. Examining the Effects of Chromatic Aberration, Object Distance, and Eye Shape on Image-Formation in the Mirror-Based Eyes of the Bay Scallop Argopecten irradians.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Daniel I; Gagnon, Yakir Luc; Chhetri, Raghav K; Oldenburg, Amy L; Johnsen, Sönke

    2016-11-01

    The eyes of scallops form images using a concave spherical mirror and contain two separate retinas, one layered on top of the other. Behavioral and electrophysiological studies indicate that the images formed by these eyes have angular resolutions of about 2°. Based on previous ray-tracing models, it has been thought that the more distal of the two retinas lies near the focal point of the mirror and that the proximal retina, positioned closer to the mirror at the back of the eye, receives light that is out-of-focus. Here, we propose three mechanisms through which both retinas may receive focused light: (1) chromatic aberration produced by the lens may cause the focal points for longer and shorter wavelengths to fall near the distal and proximal retinas, respectively; (2) focused light from near and far objects may fall on the distal and proximal retinas, respectively; and (3) the eyes of scallops may be dynamic structures that change shape to determine which retina receives focused light. To test our hypotheses, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a method of near-infrared optical depth-ranging, to acquire virtual cross-sections of live, intact eyes from the bay scallop Argopecten irradians Next, we used a custom-built ray-tracing model to estimate the qualities of the images that fall on an eye's distal and proximal retinas as functions of the wavelengths of light entering the eye (400-700 nm), object distances (0.01-1 m), and the overall shape of the eye. When we assume 550 nm wavelength light and object distances greater than 0.01 m, our model predicts that the angular resolutions of the distal and proximal retinas are 2° and 7°, respectively. Our model also predicts that neither chromatic aberration nor differences in object distance lead to focused light falling on the distal and proximal retinas simultaneously. However, if scallops can manipulate the shapes of their eyes, perhaps through muscle contractions, we speculate that they may be able

  20. A Consensus Microsatellite-Based Linkage Map for the Hermaphroditic Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians) and Its Application in Size-Related QTL Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjun; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Guofan

    2012-01-01

    Bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) is one of the most economically important aquaculture species in China. In this study, we constructed a consensus microsatellite-based genetic linkage map with a mapping panel containing two hybrid backcross-like families involving two subspecies of bay scallop, A. i. irradians and A. i. concentricus. One hundred sixty-one microsatellite and one phenotypic (shell color) markers were mapped to 16 linkage groups (LGs), which corresponds to the haploid chromosome number of bay scallop. The sex-specific map was 779.2 cM and 781.6 cM long in female and male, respectively, whereas the sex-averaged map spanned 849.3 cM. The average resolution of integrated map was 5.9 cM/locus and the estimated coverage was 81.3%. The proportion of distorted markers occurred more in the hybrid parents, suggesting that the segregation distortion was possibly resulted from heterospecific interaction between genomes of two subspecies of bay scallop. The overall female-to-male recombination rate was 1.13∶1 across all linked markers in common to both parents, and considerable differences in recombination also existed among different parents in both families. Four size-related traits, including shell length (SL), shell height (SH), shell width (SW) and total weight (TW) were measured for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Three significant and six suggestive QTL were detected on five LGs. Among the three significant QTL, two (qSW-10 and qTW-10, controlling SW and TW, respectively) were mapped on the same region near marker AiAD121 on LG10 and explained 20.5% and 27.7% of the phenotypic variance, while the third (qSH-7, controlling SH) was located on LG7 and accounted for 15.8% of the phenotypic variance. Six suggestive QTL were detected on four different LGs. The linkage map and size-related QTL obtained in this study may facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS) in bay scallop. PMID:23077533

  1. Measurements of mechanical properties of the blastula wall reveal which hypothesized mechanisms of primary invagination are physically plausible in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Davidson, L A; Oster, G F; Keller, R E; Koehl, M A

    1999-05-15

    Computer simulations showed that the elastic modulus of the cell layer relative to the elastic modulus of the extracellular layers predicted the effectiveness of different force-generating mechanisms for sea urchin primary invagination [L. A. Davidson, M. A. R. Koehl, R. Keller, and G. F. Oster (1995) Development 121, 2005-2018]. Here, we measured the composite elastic modulus of the cellular and extracellular matrix layers in the blastula wall of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos at the mesenchyme blastula stage. Combined, these two layers exhibit a viscoelastic response with an initial stiffness ranging from 600 to 2300 Pa. To identify the cellular structures responsible for this stiffness we disrupted these structures and correlated the resulting lesions to changes in the elastic modulus. We treated embryos with cytochalasin D to disrupt the actin-based cytoskeleton, nocodazole to disrupt the microtubule-based cytoskeleton, and a gentle glycine extraction to disrupt the apical extracellular matrix (ECM). Embryos treated less than 60 min in cytochalasin D showed no change in their time-dependent elastic modulus even though F-actin was severely disrupted. Similarly, nocodazole had no effect on the elastic modulus even as the microtubules were severely disrupted. However, glycine extraction resulted in a 40 to 50% decrease in the elastic modulus along with a dramatic reduction in the hyalin protein at the apical ECM, thus implicating the apical ECM as a major mechanical component of the blastula wall. This finding bears on the mechanical plausibility of several models for primary invagination.

  2. The elemental composition of purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) calcite and potential effects of pCO2 during early life stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sanford, E.; Gaylord, B.; Russell, A. D.; Lenz, E. A.; Hosfelt, J. D.; Young, M. K.

    2013-06-01

    Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (e.g. magnesium) into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2) on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low- to high-Mg calcites. Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions spanning a range of carbonate chemistry conditions (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California). Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg / Ca or Sr / Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 μatm; pHT = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD). However, when reared under elevated pCO2 (900 μatm; pHT = 7.73 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1), skeletal Sr / Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California) did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr

  3. Molecular phylogeny of the genus Taenia (Cestoda: Taeniidae): proposals for the resurrection of Hydatigera Lamarck, 1816 and the creation of a new genus Versteria.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Minoru; Lavikainen, Antti; Iwaki, Takashi; Haukisalmi, Voitto; Konyaev, Sergey; Oku, Yuzaburo; Okamoto, Munehiro; Ito, Akira

    2013-05-01

    The cestode family Taeniidae generally consists of two valid genera, Taenia and Echinococcus. The genus Echinococcus is monophyletic due to a remarkable similarity in morphology, features of development and genetic makeup. By contrast, Taenia is a highly diverse group formerly made up of different genera. Recent molecular phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest the paraphyly of Taenia. To clarify the genetic relationships among the representative members of Taenia, molecular phylogenies were constructed using nuclear and mitochondrial genes. The nuclear phylogenetic trees of 18S ribosomal DNA and concatenated exon regions of protein-coding genes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and DNA polymerase delta) demonstrated that both Taenia mustelae and a clade formed by Taenia parva, Taenia krepkogorski and Taenia taeniaeformis are only distantly related to the other members of Taenia. Similar topologies were recovered in mitochondrial genomic analyses using 12 complete protein-coding genes. A sister relationship between T. mustelae and Echinococcus spp. was supported, especially in protein-coding gene trees inferred from both nuclear and mitochondrial data sets. Based on these results, we propose the resurrection of Hydatigera Lamarck, 1816 for T. parva, T. krepkogorski and T. taeniaeformis and the creation of a new genus, Versteria, for T. mustelae. Due to obvious morphological and ecological similarities, Taenia brachyacantha is also included in Versteria gen. nov., although molecular evidence is not available. Taenia taeniaeformis has been historically regarded as a single species but the present data clearly demonstrate that it consists of two cryptic species.

  4. Cloning of a novel phospholipase C-delta isoform from pacific purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) gametes and its expression during early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Coward, Kevin; Owen, Helen; Poustka, Albert J; Hibbitt, Olivia; Tunwell, Richard; Kubota, Hiroki; Swann, Karl; Parrington, John

    2004-01-23

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger, controlling a diverse range of cellular processes, including fertilization and development of the embryo. One of the key mechanisms involved in triggering intracellular calcium release is the generation of the second messenger inositol-1,4,5-phosphate (IP(3)) by the phospholipase C (PLC) class of enzymes. Although five distinct forms of PLC have been identified in mammals (beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, and zeta), only one, PLCgamma, has thus far been detected in echinoderms. In the present study, we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding a novel PLC isoform of the delta (delta) subclass, PLC-deltasu, from the egg of the Pacific purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We also demonstrate the presence of this PLC within the sperm and in the early embryo. The PLC-deltasu cDNA (2.44kb) encodes a 742 amino acid polypeptide with an open reading frame of 84.6kDa and a pI of 6.04. All of the characteristic domains found in mammalian PLCdelta isoforms (PH domain, EF hands, an X-Y catalytic region, and a C2 domain) are present in PLC-deltasu. A homology search revealed that PLC-deltasu shares most sequence identity with bovine PLCdelta2 (39%). We present evidence that PLC-deltasu is expressed in unfertilized eggs, fertilized eggs, and in the early embryo. In addition to Northern and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses, in situ hybridization experiments further demonstrated that the embryonic regions within which the PLC-deltasu transcript can be detected during early embryonic development are associated with the highest levels of proliferative activity, suggesting a possible involvement with metabolism or cell cycle regulation.

  5. Characterization of insulin-like peptides (ILPs) in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: insights on the evolution of the insulin family.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Margherita; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2014-09-01

    The evolutionary history of the insulin-like peptides (ILPs), members of the insulin family, is still a matter of debate. Although ILPs structure and expression have been described in different metazoans, little is known about these molecules in non-chordate deuterostomes, such as the echinoderms. In order to fill this gap in the current literature, we have characterized two members of the insulin family found in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome (SpIgf1 and SpIgf2 that, after our analysis, we suggest to rename SpILP1 and SpILP2, respectively) together with their putative receptor (SpInsr). We found that SpILP1 gene structure is more similar to the cephalochordate amphioxus ILP, while the SpILP2 gene shows a completely different organization. In addition, we have revealed that SpILP1 and SpILP2 transcripts are expressed in different compartments during embryo/larva development and that the SpILP1 protein mature form differs in the egg and the larva, suggesting different biological roles. Finally, we have analyzed SpILP1 transcript and protein expression in response to different feeding regimes through real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry methodologies, and found that its expression and localization are feeding-dependent. We discuss our findings in a comparative evolutionary perspective including data available in other animal models and provide new insights into the evolution of the insulin family molecules. In the model we put forward, the last common ancestor of all deuterostomes presented an ILP composed of the B-C-A-D-E domains, and successive lineage specific independent gene duplication events resulted in the presence of several ILPs in vertebrates and in echinoderms.

  6. Precise cis-regulatory control of spatial and temporal expression of the alx-1 gene in the skeletogenic lineage of s. purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Damle, Sagar; Davidson, Eric H

    2011-09-15

    Deployment of the gene-regulatory network (GRN) responsible for skeletogenesis in the embryo of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is restricted to the large micromere lineage by a double negative regulatory gate. The gate consists of a GRN subcircuit composed of the pmar1 and hesC genes, which encode repressors and are wired in tandem, plus a set of target regulatory genes under hesC control. The skeletogenic cell state is specified initially by micromere-specific expression of these regulatory genes, viz. alx1, ets1, tbrain and tel, plus the gene encoding the Notch ligand Delta. Here we use a recently developed high throughput methodology for experimental cis-regulatory analysis to elucidate the genomic regulatory system controlling alx1 expression in time and embryonic space. The results entirely confirm the double negative gate control system at the cis-regulatory level, including definition of the functional HesC target sites, and add the crucial new information that the drivers of alx1 expression are initially Ets1, and then Alx1 itself plus Ets1. Cis-regulatory analysis demonstrates that these inputs quantitatively account for the magnitude of alx1 expression. Furthermore, the Alx1 gene product not only performs an auto-regulatory role, promoting a fast rise in alx1 expression, but also, when at high levels, it behaves as an auto-repressor. A synthetic experiment indicates that this behavior is probably due to dimerization. In summary, the results we report provide the sequence level basis for control of alx1 spatial expression by the double negative gate GRN architecture, and explain the rising, then falling temporal expression profile of the alx1 gene in terms of its auto-regulatory genetic wiring.

  7. Effects of produced water on reproduction and early life stages of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus): Field and laboratory tests

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the effects of produced water (an oil-production effluent) on reproduction in the purple sea urchin (Strongy-locentrotus purpuratus) using both field and laboratory experiments. The author investigated the effects of chronic exposure to produced water on the gametogenesis and gamete performance using an in-situ caging experiment. He found a significant negative relationship between gonad mass and cage distance for both sexes, indicating that urchins living closer to the outfall produced significantly larger gonads. He also found significant differences in the fertilizability of eggs between cages and this showed a positive relationship with distance from the outfall. These findings indicate that while urchins exposed to a produced water outfall produce large gonads, they suffer a marked decrease in gamete performance. In a subsequent study the author explored whether and how brief exposure to a range of concentrations of produced water affected gametes and early larval stages of the purple sea urchin. Specifically, he exposed separately and together, eggs, sperm, and zygotes to ascertain the relative sensitivities of these life stages to produced water at durations and concentrations realistic to each state. He also explored the nature of the biological responses, and the potential for delayed expression. I found that both apparent fertilization and embryonic developmental success showed decreased performance with increasing produced water concentrations. Produced water exposure effectively slowed embryological developmental rates, but did not affect embryo survivorship. The spatial and temporal variability in toxicity of receiving waters was addressed using a fertilization bioassay. Receiving waters were collected along a transect down-field from the discharge on three dates while the outfall was actively discharging, and on one date while the plant was not discharging.

  8. Development under elevated pCO2 conditions does not affect lipid utilization and protein content in early life-history stages of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Matson, Paul G; Yu, Pauline C; Sewell, Mary A; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2012-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is expected to have a major impact on marine species, particularly during early life-history stages. These effects appear to be species-specific and may include reduced survival, altered morphology, and depressed metabolism. However, less information is available regarding the bioenergetics of development under elevated CO(2) conditions. We examined the biochemical and morphological responses of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus during early development under ecologically relevant levels of pCO(2) (365, 1030, and 1450 μatm) that may occur during intense upwelling events. The principal findings of this study were (1) lipid utilization rates and protein content in S. purpuratus did not vary with pCO(2); (2) larval growth was reduced at elevated pCO(2) despite similar rates of energy utilization; and (3) relationships between egg phospholipid content and larval length were found under control but not high pCO(2) conditions. These results suggest that this species may either prioritize endogenous energy toward development and physiological function at the expense of growth, or that reduced larval length may be strictly due to higher costs of growth under OA conditions. This study highlights the need to further expand our knowledge of the physiological mechanisms involved in OA response in order to better understand how present populations may respond to global environmental change.

  9. Elastic-mathematical theory of cells and mitochondria in swelling process. II. Effect of temperature upon modulus of elasticity of membranous material of egg cells of sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and of oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Mela, M J

    1968-01-01

    The elastic behavior of the cell wall as a function of the temperature has been studied with particular attention being given to the swelling of egg cells of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Crassostrea virginica in different sea water concentrations at different temperatures. It was found that the modulus of elasticity is a nonlinear function of temperature. At about 12-13 degrees C the modulus of elasticity (E) is constant, independent of the stress (sigma) and strain (epsilon(nu)) which exist at the cell wall; the membranous material follows Hooke's law, and E approximately 3 x 10(7) dyn/cm(2) for S. purpuratus and C. virginica. When the temperature is higher or lower than 12-13 degrees C, the modulus of elasticity increases, and the membranous material does not follow Hooke's law, but is almost directly proportional to the stresses existing at the cell wall. On increasing the stress, the function E(sigma) = E(sigma) approaches saturation. The corresponding stress-strain diagrams, sigma = sigma(epsilon(nu)), and the graphs, E(sigma) = E(sigma) and E(sigma) = E(t) are given. The cyto-elastic phenomena at the membrane are discussed.

  10. The genus Syllis Savigny in Lamarck, 1818 (Annelida: Syllidae: Syllinae) from Australia (second part): four new species and re-description of twelve previously described species.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guillermo San; Álvarez-Campos, Patricia; Hutchings, Pat

    2017-02-27

    Syllis Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, the type genus of Syllidae, is the largest and most diverse within the family. This genus presents many taxonomic and phylogenetic problems due mainly to the lack of molecular data and morphological synapomorphies for many of the species, but also to poor or inadequate descriptions. In order to improve the knowledge of the genus, we have undertaken a morphological revision of Australian species, based on type material and material from the Australian Museum. Sixteen species are herein described, of which four are new and twelve are redescriptions of alreadyknown species, with six new combinations: Syllis boggemanni, n. sp.; S. joaoi, n. sp.; S. karlae, n. sp.; S. marceloi, n. sp.; S. albanyensis (Hartmann-Schröder, 1984) n. comb.; S. erikae (Hartmann-Schröder, 1981) n. comb.; S. krohnii Ehlers 1864; S. lunaris (Imajima, 1966) n. comb.; S. lutea (Hartmann-Schröder, 1960); S. macrodentata (Hartmann-Schröder, 1982) n. comb.; S. monilaris Savigny in Lamarck, 1818; S. nigropunctata Haswell, 1886; S. pectinans Haswell, 1920; S. rosea (Langerhans, 1879); S. warrnamboolensis (Hartmann-Schröder, 1987) n. comb.; and S. yallingupensis (Hartmann-Schröder, 1982), n. comb.

  11. Certain Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sperm mitochondrial proteins co-purify with low density detergent-insoluble membranes and are PKA or PKC-substrates possibly involved in sperm motility regulation.

    PubMed

    Loza-Huerta, Arlet; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Darszon, Alberto; Beltrán, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    Sea urchin sperm motility is regulated by Speract, a sperm-activating peptide (SAP) secreted from the outer egg coat. Upon binding to its receptor in the sperm flagellum, Speract induces a series of ionic and metabolic changes in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus spermatozoa that regulate their motility. Among these events, protein phosphorylation is one of the most relevant and evidence indicates that some proteins of the Speract signaling cascade localize in low density detergent-insoluble membranes (LD-DIM). LD-DIM-derived proteins from immotile, motile or Speract-stimulated S. purpuratus sperm were resolved in 2-D gels and the PKA and PKC substrates detected with specific antibodies were identified by LC-MS/MS. Differential PKA and PKC substrate phosphorylation levels among the LD-DIM isolated from sperm in different motility conditions were found and identified by mass spectrometry as: ATP synthase, creatine kinase, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 2, succinyl-CoA ligase and the voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2), which are mitochondrial proteins, as well as, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II regulatory (PKA RII) subunit, Tubulin β chain and Actin Cy I changed their phosphorylation state. Some mitochondrial proteins regulated by PKA or PKC may influence sea urchin sperm motility. The fact that a high percentage (66%) of the PKA or PKC substrates identified in LD-DIM are mitochondrial proteins suggests that the phosphorylation of these proteins modulates sea urchin sperm motility via Speract stimulation by providing sufficient energy to sperm physiology. Those mitochondrial proteins are indeed PKA- or PKC-substrates in the sea urchin spermatozoa. © 2013.

  12. Lamarck Will Not Lie Down.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Roger

    1981-01-01

    Describes recent research by Edward Steele appearing to support the Lamarckian theory of inheritance. Steele suggests that a mutant somatic cell favored by the environment will undergo clonal expansion. Altered genetic materials from these cells is then picked up by C-type viruses and inserted into the germ line genome. (CS)

  13. Lamarck Will Not Lie Down.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Roger

    1981-01-01

    Describes recent research by Edward Steele appearing to support the Lamarckian theory of inheritance. Steele suggests that a mutant somatic cell favored by the environment will undergo clonal expansion. Altered genetic materials from these cells is then picked up by C-type viruses and inserted into the germ line genome. (CS)

  14. Development and validation of a selective and effective pressurized liquid extraction followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of fructosazine analogues in the ammonia treated extract of Eugenia jambolana Lamarck seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minjie; Arau Jo, Michel Mozeika; Dal, Stéphanie; Sigrist, Séverine; Bergaentzlé, Martine; Ramanitrahasimbola, David; Andrianjara, Charles; Marchioni, Eric

    2016-11-18

    This study describes a selective and effective pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) coupled with HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS method for the identification and quantification of three fructosazine analogues (FZAs), fructosazine, 2,6- and 2,5-deoxyfructosazine in Madeglucyl(®) (MG) which is an ammonia treated extract of Eugenia jambolana Lamarck seeds, and is the world's first anti-diabetic phytodrug. FZAs were extracted from MG by PLE using methanol as extraction solvent. The PLE extract was then analyzed directly by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS without cleanup step. Chromatographic separation of these highly related structures was achieved on a porous graphic carbon (PGC) column. The identification of the target FZAs was confirmed by the similar retention time, similar UV and MS spectra to the corresponding pure standards. The quantification was performed by using an electrospray positive ionization mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The PLE procedure was optimized and overall method was validated in terms of sensitivity, linearity, selectivity and matrix effect, precision, accuracy and recovery, and stability of the target FZAs in the aqueous solution and in the PLE extracts solution of MG. The developed method was proved to be selective, sensitive, precise, accurate for the quantification of FZAs in MG.

  15. Lamarck Is Sitting in the Front Row

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Linda

    2004-01-01

    One of the unifying themes of modern biology is evolution. In introductory biology courses, evolution is studied in some detail and used as a focal point for many courses. For many teachers of those courses, the greatest frustration is their inability to help students become Darwinian. Students do not reject evolutionary ideas, but they quickly…

  16. Lamarck Is Sitting in the Front Row

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Linda

    2004-01-01

    One of the unifying themes of modern biology is evolution. In introductory biology courses, evolution is studied in some detail and used as a focal point for many courses. For many teachers of those courses, the greatest frustration is their inability to help students become Darwinian. Students do not reject evolutionary ideas, but they quickly…

  17. Phytochemical studies on Ruta chalepensis (Lam.) Lamarck.

    PubMed

    Günaydin, Keriman; Savci, Sezer

    2005-04-01

    Ruta chalepensis is a rich source of important secondary metabolites such as furanocoumarins and alkaloids. Besides, it is a medicinal plant and still used in traditional medicine. For that reason, its chemical composition, medicinal properties, and uses were reviewed in this article.

  18. Quantitative developmental transcriptomes of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Cameron, R. Andrew; Davidson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Development depends on the precise control of gene expression in time and space. A critical step towards understanding the global gene regulatory networks underlying development is to obtain comprehensive information on gene expression. In this study, we measured expression profiles for the entire expressed gene set during sea urchin embryonic development. We confirmed the reliability of these profiles by comparison with NanoString measurements for a subset of genes and with literature values. The data show that ~16,500 genes have been activated by the end of embryogenesis, and for half of them the transcript abundance changes more than 10-fold during development. From this genome scale expression survey, we show that complex patterns of expression by many genes underlie embryonic development, particularly during the early stages before gastrulation. An intuitive web application for data query and visualization is presented to facilitate use of this large dataset. PMID:24291147

  19. Mass Extinctions of Pangea (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignall, Paul B.

    2017-04-01

    The 80 million years of Earth history from middle of the Permian to the early Jurassic were some of the worst life ever experienced. The interval includes two mass extinctions that bracket the Triassic period and several lesser crises. It was to be nearly another 120 million years before another major crisis was to strike (this time it was the famous one that removed the dinosaurs). So what was so bad about the 80 million years and why was it so good afterwards? My talk will try to provide at least some of the answers. There are plenty of clues. Notably, the interval coincides with the presence of the Pangea supercontinent and all the extinctions coincided with the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIPs). Indeed, every LIP of this interval coincides with an extinction crisis, a perfect correlation that completely breaks down afterwards. However, getting from correlation to causation is far from straight forward. There are many unknowns - how much gas was released by the volcanism, how quickly and what type of gases were they? These are all questions under investigation. Most of the extinctions of Pangean time coincide with rapid global warming and extensive marine anoxia suggesting that greenhouse gas emissions linked to volcanism were an important extinction driver. For the most severe crises (Permo-Triassic and end-Triassic) losses occurred throughout the food chain all the way down to the primary producers of the oceans and across all habitats including terrestrial ecosystems. At the other end of the spectrum of disaster, the lesser extinctions (Toarcian, Smithian/Spathian) only affected marine invertebrates. The full panoply of catastrophe was played out during the Permo-Triassic mass extinction and has received the most attention. The record in South China shows that there were two phases of extinction. These straddle the boundary and show selective losses initially for shallow-water organisms that were susceptible to high temperatures and then for deeper-water dwellers that succumbed to expanding deep-water anoxia. The contemporary plant losses show a similar duration for extinction losses ( 60 kyr) but the ultimate cause of these extinctions is less clear. It is unlikely to have been directly attributable to greenhouse gases because warm and wet conditions on land are a good thing. A greenhouse is a good place for plants after all. Ozone destruction by halogen emissions followed by intense UV-B radiation is a more promising extinction agent. A key factor in the extinction vulnerability of Pangean life may lie in the subdued nature of carbon cycling in a supercontinent configuration. Feedback mechanisms such as enhanced silicate weathering in warmer, more humid conditions would be less effective because of the vast arid interiors. The burial of carbon in shelf seas would also be minimal because the area of shallow waters around the periphery of the supercontinent was at a Phanerozoic minimum. Once initiated, warmer temperatures would have led to increased rate of organic remineralisation. This may have been responsible the absence of terrestrial organic carbon burial during the most severe crises, further decreasing the ability to drawdown atmospheric carbon. This combination of causes would have produced a planet that was only weakly responsive to sudden influxes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. It was a bad time to endure LIP eruptions.

  20. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy, Osmium, Carbon and Oxygen stratigraphy, the Cryogenian period, history of the plants, hominid prehistory, and last but not least the Anthropocene. The Cambrian Period is radically improved with 10 standard stages and detailed trilobite biochronology. Ordovician now has a stable international stages and graptolites scale. The integration of a refined 100 and 400 ka sedimentary cycles scale and a truly high-resolution U/Pb ages scale for the Mississippian is a major step towards the global Carboniferous GTS. The Devonian GTS leaves to be desired with lack of firm definitions for its upper boundary, and the long Emsian stage; it also lacks age dates. Its stages scaling is disputed. The Rhaetian and Norian stages in the Triassic and the Berriasian stage in the Cretaceous urgently require lower boundary definitions, and also boundary age dates. The single ~400 ka eccentricity component is very stable and can extend orbital tuning from the Cenozoic well into the Mesozoic portion of the GTS. Jurassic and Cretaceous now have long orbitally tuned segments. A completely astronomical-tuned Geological Time Scale (AGTS) for the Cenozoic is within reach showing unprecedented accuracy, precision and resolution. Burdigalian in the Miocene, and Lutetian, Bartonian and Priabonian stages in the Eocene still require formal definition. The K/T boundary will become about 0.5 ± 0.1 Ma older. After 25 years of research and authorship in the GTS it behoves me to especially thank my colleagues James Ogg, Frits Agterberg, John McArthur and Roger Cooper for longstanding collaboration. As a final note I urge construction of more regional time scales(like developed ‘down under') calibrated to the standard global GTS, to scale regional rock units.

  1. Toxicity of un-ionized ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to juvenile bay scallops, Argopecten irradians irradians.

    PubMed

    Widman, James C; Meseck, Shannon L; Sennefelder, George; Veilleux, David J

    2008-04-01

    Juvenile bay scallops (7.2-26.4 mm) were exposed for 72 h to different concentrations of un-ionized ammonia, nitrite, or nitrate. Using the Trimmed Spearman Karber method, 50% lethal concentrations (LC(50)) and 95% confidence limits were calculated individually for each. Un-ionized ammonia concentrations above 1.0 mg N-NH(3)/L resulted in 100% scallop mortality within 72 h. The 72-h LC(50) for un-ionized ammonia was calculated at 0.43 mg N/L. At nitrite concentrations of 800 mg N/L or higher 100% mortality was observed. The 72-h LC(50) for nitrite was calculated at 345 mg N/L. Nitrate was the least toxic, with 100% mortality observed at a concentration of 5000 mg N/L. The calculated nitrate 72-h LC(50) was 4453 mg N/L. Our results indicate that un-ionized ammonia is the most lethal nitrogenous waste component to bay scallops.

  2. ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF HABITAT ALTERATION ON THE BAY SCALLOP, ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory is evaluating approaches for protecting and restoring the ecological integrity of aquatic habitats, such as marine wetlands and coastal zones, from the impacts of multiple aquatic stressors. We are developing ha...

  3. Effects of environmental oxygen deficiency on embryos and larvae of bay scallop, Argopecten irradians irradians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-de, Wang; Fu-Sui, Zhang

    1995-12-01

    The experimental results showed that: 1) The embryonic development of bay scallop is inhibited at a dissolved oxygen range of 1.38-3.64×10-3 at 23°C, and completely blocked below the lower limit. 2) The tolerance of larvae to anoxia increased with larval sizes and was related to their oxygen debt. 3) The scallop larvae exhibited specific behavioral responses to oxygen deficiency, which finally led to velum disintegration and larval death. The possible relationship between environmental oxygen deficiency and the disease of disintegration of the larval velum is also discussed. In this study, considerable oxygen debt was found in bay scallop larvae, which was greater in small animals. Based on the works of previous authors, a new concept is proposed for the estimation of oxygen debt, namely, the compensatory rate of oxygen debt (CROD). This can be used in intra—or interspecific comparison of oxygen debt. The results can be helpful in the management of water quality and for the prevention of larval diseases encountered in scallop culture.

  4. Expression of Spgatae, the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ortholog of vertebrate GATA4/5/6 factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei Yun; Davidson, Eric H

    2004-12-01

    Spgatae is the sea urchin ortholog of the vertebrate gata4/5/6 genes, as confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. The accumulation of Spgatae transcripts during embryonic development and the spatial pattern of expression are reported here. Expression was first detected in the 15 h blastula. The number of Spgatae RNA molecules increases steadily during blastula stages, with expression peaking during gastrulation. After gastrulation is complete, the level of expression decreases until the end of embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that Spgatae transcripts were first detected in a ring of prospective mesoderm cells in the vegetal plate. Spgatae expression then expands to include the entire vegetal plate at the mesenchyme blastula stage. During gastrulation Spgatae is expressed at the blastopore, and at prism stage strongly in the hindgut and midgut but not foregut, and also in mesoderm cells at the tip of the archenteron. Towards the end of embryogenesis, expression in the hindgut decreases. The terminal pattern of expression is in midgut plus coelomic pouches.

  5. Thermal compensation of metabolism in the temperate coral, Plesiastrea versipora (Lamarck, 1816).

    PubMed

    Howe, S A.; Marshall, A T.

    2001-05-15

    Plesiastrea versipora is a hermatypic coral with a distribution that extends to the southern limit for hermatypic corals. The normal annual temperature range for this coral in Port Phillip Bay (Victoria) (approximately 10-21 degrees C) is well below the physiological optimum for the majority of hermatypic corals (25-29 degrees C). The rate of photosynthesis and respiration in Plesiastrea generally increased with temperature before levelling out at the higher temperatures, with Q(10) data suggesting that both photosynthesis and respiration in Plesiastrea acclimate to changing temperatures. Respiration showed a similar trend to photosynthesis, with respect to temperature, but with a slightly lower rate of increase. Photosynthetic rate in Plesiastrea is comparable with that of reef corals despite lower temperatures and irradiance. When expressed as a function of chlorophyll a content photosynthesis approached perfect temperature compensation with prolonged exposure to various temperatures. Temperature-dependent changes with chlorophyll content may be responsible for temperature related changes in photosynthetic rate. This may be a mechanism for stabilising the symbiotic relationship over a wide temperature range. Autotrophic ability, estimated from photosynthesis/respiration (P/R) ratios, was greatest at higher temperatures and was only slightly less than that of reef corals. At low temperatures Plesiastrea may be dependent on heterotrophic feeding.

  6. In between mental evolution and unconscious memory: Lamarckism, Darwinism, and professionalism in late Victorian Britain.

    PubMed

    Turbil, Cristiano

    2017-09-12

    In 1884 Samuel Butler published a collection of essays entitled Remarks on George Romanes' Mental Evolution, where he attempted to show how Romanes' idea of mental evolution presented similarities with his theory of unconscious memory. By looking at Romanes' work through Butler's writing, this article will reevaluate some aspects of their works regarding the complex debate about memory, heredity, and instinct. This paper will explore the main differences and similarities between Romanes' science and Butler's writing on science both in terms of their ideas and contents. It will then look into their different professional relationships with Darwin and how this determined the professional and public reception of their theories. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Early detection of potentially invasive invertebrate species in Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819 dominated communities in harbours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preda, Cristina; Memedemin, Daniyar; Skolka, Marius; Cogălniceanu, Dan

    2012-12-01

    Constanţa harbour is a major port on the western coast of the semi-enclosed Black Sea. Its brackish waters and low species richness make it vulnerable to invasions. The intensive maritime traffic through Constanţa harbour facilitates the arrival of alien species. We investigated the species composition of the mussel beds on vertical artificial concrete substrate inside the harbour. We selected this habitat for study because it is frequently affected by fluctuating levels of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, and by accidental pollution episodes. The shallow communities inhabiting it are thus unstable and often restructured, prone to accept alien species. Monthly samples were collected from three locations from the upper layer of hard artificial substrata (maximum depth 2 m) during two consecutive years. Ten alien macro-invertebrate species were inventoried, representing 13.5% of the total number of species. Two of these alien species were sampled starting the end of summer 2010, following a period of high temperatures that triggered hypoxia, causing mass mortalities of benthic organisms. Based on the species accumulation curve, we estimated that we have detected all benthic alien species on artificial substrate from Constanţa harbour, but additional effort is required to detect all the native species. Our results suggest that monitoring of benthic communities at small depths in harbours is a simple and useful tool in early detection of potentially invasive alien species. The selected habitat is easily accessible, the method is low-cost, and the samples represent reliable indicators of alien species establishment.

  8. Proximate, amino acid and lipid compositions in Sinonovacula constricta (Lamarck) reared at different salinities.

    PubMed

    Ran, Zhaoshou; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Runtao; Xu, Jilin; Liao, Kai; Yu, Xuejun; Zhong, Yingying; Ye, Mengwei; Yu, Shanshan; Ran, Yun; Huang, Wei; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-10-01

    Sinonovacula constricta is an economically and nutritionally important bivalve native to the estuaries and mudflats of China, Japan and Korea. In the present study, S. constricta, cultured either under experimental conditions or collected directly from natural coastal areas with different seawater salinities, was investigated for changes in proximates, amino acids and lipids. When culture salinity was increased, levels of moisture, carbohydrate, crude protein and crude lipid were significantly decreased, whereas the level of ash was significantly increased. The level of Ala was increased by 1.5- to 2-fold, whereas the contents of most lipids were significantly decreased, and the proportion of phosphatidylethanolamine was significantly increased. Notably, a high proportion of ceramide aminoethylphosphonates was detected in S. constricta reared at all salinities. The energy content appears to be higher in S. constricta reared at higher salinity. In experimental S. constricta, when the salinity was enhanced, the changes of compositions were very close to those reared at constant high salinity. Sinonovacula constricta reared at higher salinities possesses a superior quality. A short period of exposure to a higher salinity for farmed S. constricta reared at a lower salinity before harvest would be useful with respect to improving its nutritive value. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. "Days of future passed" - climate change and carbon cycle history (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    With the beginning of the fossil fuel age in the 19th century mankind has become an important geological agent on a global scale. For the first time in human history action of man has an impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Increasing CO2 concentrations will result in a perturbation of global carbon cycling coupled with climate change. Investigations of past changes in carbon cycling and in climate will improve our predictions of future climate. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations will drive climate into a mode of operation, which may resemble climate conditions in the deep geological past. Pliocene climate will give insight into 400ppm world with higher global sea level than today. Doubling of pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 levels will shift the climate system into a state resembling greenhouse climate in the Early Cenozoic or even in the Cretaceous. Carbon isotope geochemistry serves as tool for tracing the pathway of the carbon cycle through geological time. Globally registered negative C-isotope anomalies in the C-isotope record are interpreted as signatures of rapid addition (103 to a few 104 years) of CO2 to the ocean-atmosphere system. Positive C-isotope excursions following negative spikes record the slow post-perturbation recovery of the biosphere at time scales of 105 to 106 years. Duration of C-cycle perturbations in earth history cannot be directly compared with rapid perturbation characterizing the Anthropocene. However, the investigation of greenhouse pulses in the geological past provides insight into different climate states, it allows to identify tipping points in past climate systems and it offers the opportunity to learn about response reactions of the biosphere to rapid changes in global carbon cycling. Sudden injection of massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is recorded in C-isotope record of the Early Cretaceous. The Aptian carbon cycle perturbation triggered changes in temperature and in global hydrological cycling. Changes in physical and chemical oceanography are reflected in widespread black shale deposition ("Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a"), in carbonate platform drowning and in biocalcification crises. "Days of future passed" (Moody Blues, 1967) reminds us that the past provides essential information needed for decisions to be made in the interest of mankind's future.

  10. Banding, age and growth in the calcareous hydrozoan Millepora complanata Lamarck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Prominent bands or lines were present on colonies of Millepora complanata on coral reefs at Barbados, West Indies. These bands appeared as regular, dark and light horizontal zones or stripes on vertically growing plates and blades making up the colonies. Bands are formed by wave-like undulations or currugations of the skeletal surface. The number of bands correlates with colony height and mean band width equals the mean annual vertical growth of measured colonies. Variation in annual growth and differences in growth rates of colonies between different reefs were determined from band width measurements. Bands provide a rapid and non-destructive means for measuring growth and ageing colonies of M. complanata.

  11. Histopathological effects of contaminated sediments on golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata, Lamarck 1822).

    PubMed

    Kruatrachue, M; Sumritdee, C; Pokethitiyook, P; Singhakaew, S

    2011-06-01

    Pomacea canaliculata were exposed experimentally to contaminated sediments from a tributary of the Mae Klong River, Thailand, for 3 months. The highest concentration of Cr, Zn and Fe accumulated in the digestive gland while the gill exhibited the highest concentration of Cu. In addition, histopathological changes (increased mucus vacuoles, loss of cilia, dilation of cells in the epithelial cells of digestive tract organs, and an increase in the number of dark granules in the digestive cells) were observed. The gill exhibited loss of cilia, wider hemolymph space, and degeneration of columnar epithelial cells.

  12. Lamarck rises from his grave: parental environment-induced epigenetic inheritance in model organisms and humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Huijie; Sun, Zhongsheng

    2017-02-20

    Organisms can change their physiological/behavioural traits to adapt and survive in changed environments. However, whether these acquired traits can be inherited across generations through non-genetic alterations has been a topic of debate for over a century. Emerging evidence indicates that both ancestral and parental experiences, including nutrition, environmental toxins, nurturing behaviour, and social stress, can have powerful effects on the physiological, metabolic and cellular functions in an organism. In certain circumstances, these effects can be transmitted across several generations through epigenetic (i.e. non-DNA sequence-based rather than mutational) modifications. In this review, we summarize recent evidence on epigenetic inheritance from parental environment-induced developmental and physiological alterations in nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, rodents, and humans. The epigenetic modifications demonstrated to be both susceptible to modulation by environmental cues and heritable, including DNA methylation, histone modification, and small non-coding RNAs, are also summarized. We particularly focus on evidence that parental environment-induced epigenetic alterations are transmitted through both the maternal and paternal germlines and exert sex-specific effects. The thought-provoking data presented here raise fundamental questions about the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena. In particular, the means that define the specificity of the response to parental experience in the gamete epigenome and that direct the establishment of the specific epigenetic change in the developing embryos, as well as in specific tissues in the descendants, remain obscure and require elucidation. More precise epigenetic assessment at both the genome-wide level and single-cell resolution as well as strategies for breeding at relatively sensitive periods of development and manipulation aimed at specific epigenetic modification are imperative for identifying parental environment-induced epigenetic marks across generations. Considering their diverse epigenetic architectures, the conservation and prevalence of the mechanisms underlying epigenetic inheritance in non-mammals require further investigation in mammals. Interpretation of the consequences arising from epigenetic inheritance on organisms and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will provide insight into how gene-environment interactions shape developmental processes and physiological functions, which in turn may have wide-ranging implications for human health, and understanding biological adaptation and evolution.

  13. Scale-invariance of sediment patterns - the fingerprint of fundamental drivers (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the realms of magmatism and metamorphism, most depositional processes can be observed directly at the earth's surface. Observation of sediment patterns advanced significantly with the advent of remote sensing and 3D reflection seismics. Remote sensing is particularly relevant for the present topic because it documents mainly Holocene sediments - the best objects to link depositional processes to products. Classic examples of scale-invariant geometry are channel-fan systems, i.e. river-delta and canyon-fan complexes. The underlying control in both instances is the energy-dispersion of a channeled stream of water that discharges in a body of still water. The resulting fan-shaped sediment accumulations are scale-invariant over 7 orders of magnitude in linear size. The Mesozoic-Cenozoic record shows comparable trends and patterns. Further examples of depositional scale-invariance include foresets of non-cohesive sediments and braided-channel deposits. Reefs and carbonate platforms offer an example of scale-invariance related to biotic growth. Shallow-water carbonate platforms rimmed by reefs or reef-rimmed atolls with deep lagoons are characteristic morphologies of tropical carbonate deposits. The structure has been compared to a bucket where stiff reef rims hold a pile of loose sediment. Remote sensing data from the Maldive, Chagos and Laccadive archipelagos of the Indian Ocean show that bucket structures are the dominant depositional pattern from meter-size reefs to archipelagos of hundreds of kilometers in diameter, i.e. over more than 4 orders of magnitude in linear size. Over 2.5 orders of magnitude, the bucket structures qualify as statistical fractals. Ecologic and hydrodynamic studies on modern reefs suggest that the bucket structure is a form of biotic self-organization: The edge position in a reef is favored over the center position because bottom shear is higher and the diffusive boundary layer between reef and water thinner. Thus, the reef edge has easier access to nutrients. Moreover, the edge is less likely to be buried by sediment. The bucket structure is an ecologic response to these conditions. Buckets have been documented from all periods of the Phanerozoic and analogous structures from the late Proterozoic show that the microbial carbonate factory also built buckets. We conclude that a voyage through scales in the sediment realm reveals islands of scale-invariance wherever a single principle dominates the sedimentation process.

  14. Arsenic exposure affects embryo development of sea urchin, Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816).

    PubMed

    Gaion, Andrea; Scuderi, Alice; Pellegrini, David; Sartori, Davide

    2013-11-01

    Toxicity tests were performed with embryos of Paracentrotus lividus to investigate the toxicological effect of two arsenic species: arsenate (As(V)), expected to be more toxic, and dimethyl-arsinate (DMA) expected to be less toxic. Exposures to toxicants were performed at different developmental stages in order to identify the most sensitive phase of embryological development. Statistical analysis revealed a high significance of each factor (Molecule, Concentration and Time of exposure) and their interaction for the dependent variable "Percentage of normal-shaped plutei". In particular, the 8 cell stage was the most sensitive to arsenic; at a concentration of 50 μg L(-1) DMA proved to be more toxic than As(V), resulting in nearly 50 % of normal-shaped plutei against the 74 % recorded for As(V). Starting the administration of arsenic at the morula stage, arsenate proved to be significantly more toxic when compared to DMA.

  15. Effects of seawater acidification on early development of the intertidal sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck 1816).

    PubMed

    Moulin, Laure; Catarino, Ana Isabel; Claessens, Thomas; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The effect of pH ranging from 8.0 to 6.8 (total scale - pH(T)) on fertilization, cleavage and larval development until pluteus stage was assessed in an intertidal temperate sea urchin. Gametes were obtained from adults collected in two contrasting tide pools, one showing a significant nocturnal pH decrease (lowest pH(T)=7.4) and another where pH was more stable (lowest pH(T)=7.8). The highest pH(T) at which significant effects on fertilization and cleavage were recorded was 7.6. On the contrary, larval development was only affected below pH(T) 7.4, a value equal or lower than that reported for several subtidal species. This suggests that sea urchins inhabiting stressful intertidal environments produce offspring that may better resist future ocean acidification. Moreover, at pH(T) 7.4, the fertilization rate of gametes whose progenitors came from the tide pool with higher pH decrease was significantly higher, indicating a possible acclimatization or adaptation of gametes to pH stress.

  16. The long way of planktonic Foraminifera from biostratigraphy to paleoceanography (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premoli Silva, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    The mid of the last century was a time of flourishing studies concerning the importance of planktonic foraminifera in precisely dating and correlating sedimentary successions after the publication of the first biostratigraphic schemes provided by the Suisse Group (i.e. Kugler, Bolli, Broennimann) from the Caribbean region and former Southern USSR (Subbotina). Soon after Bolli's Trinidad scheme was widespread, planktonic foraminiferal distribution from Upper Cretaceous to Miocene was investigated intensively for dating the Neogene stratotypes, whose identifications were mainly based on poorly age-diagnostic, facies-controlled macrofossils, and for calibrating Paleogene larger foraminiferal distributions. Since these early works planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy was continously ameliorated, extended in time from Early Cretaceous to Recent by several authors and from different settings and domains, reaching progressively the current higher resolution, now calibrated to calcareous nannofossil distributions. To be mentioned, the detailed biostratigraphic studies on the Gubbio section (central Italy) provided (1) the first carefull documentation of the mass extinction of Cretaceous planktonic foraminifera, the presence of tiny Cretaceous survivors, and the rapid recovery of Danian assemblages, and (2) the first calibration of the Upper Cretaceous to Eocene reversal polarity scale in which the K/Pg boundary was demonstrated to fall within the magnetic reversal C29r. A major step forward was the recovery, since 1968, of several thousand of cores from over 1000 holes drilled in all oceans by the DSDP, ODP and IODP projects. The recovery of deep-sea sediments from all latitudes opened a new research field, the paleoceanography. Based on the large knowledge acquired on modern organisms in the '60s, for the Paleogene and Cretaceous reconstructions we started from the assumption that these extinct organisms lived in the water column like their modern counterpart and were controlled by similar environmental factors (temperature, nutrient supply, current system, etc.), then the fluctuations in abundance and composition of planktonic foraminiferal assemblages could be interpreted in term of paleobiogeography and paleoceanography. The first studies, rigorously quantitative, have been conducted in the '70s on the Paleogene of the Atlantic Ocean, the interval with the best latitudinal coverage at that time. From the areal distribution and variations in assemblage composition through time we (with A. Boersma) were able to identify first the biogeographic indices, then their paleoclimatic significances, from which we could reconstruct the paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic evolution. The associated isotope analyses (with N. Shackleton) on single species allowed to confirm the species latitudinal connotations as well as their position within the water column (mixed layer vs deep dwelling habitats) and preferences for nutrient supply. In the '90s we (with W.V. Sliter) extended the paleoceanographic reconstructions to the Cretaceous exploring the planktonic foraminiferal evolutionary patterns and latitudinal changes in assemblage composition through time. Like in the Paleogene, it was possibile to identify that the more ornamented keeled forms were very sensitive to temperature, liked warm waters and were more abundant in the tropics, the simpler morphologies were less sensitive, more tolerant and cosmopolitan, while, for instance, whiteinellids proliferated in upwelling regions. In the last decade, taking advantage of the wealth of paleoecological and biogeographical data previously collected, we started a new phase of deep taxonomical and stratigraphical revision of planktonic foraminifera. Increased biostratigraphic resolution from tropics to high latitudes is facilitated by the integration with other fossil group biostratigraphies and magneto-, isotope-stratigraphies.

  17. Metabolomic investigation of Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck 1819) caged in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Fasulo, Salvatore; Iacono, Francesco; Cappello, Tiziana; Corsaro, Carmelo; Maisano, Maria; D'Agata, Alessia; Giannetto, Alessia; De Domenico, Elena; Parrino, Vincenzo; Lo Paro, Giuseppe; Mauceri, Angela

    2012-10-01

    Environmental metabolomics was applied to assess the metabolic responses in transplanted mussels to environmental pollution. Specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis, sedentary filter-feeders, were caged in anthropogenic-impacted and reference sites along the Augusta coastline (Sicily, Italy). Chemical analysis revealed increased levels of PAHs in the digestive gland of mussels from the industrial area compared with control, and marked morphological changes were also observed. Digestive gland metabolic profiles, obtained by 1H NMR spectroscopy and analyzed by multivariate statistics, showed changes in metabolites involved in energy metabolism. Specifically, changes in lactate and acetoacetate could indicate increased anaerobic fermentation and alteration in lipid metabolism, respectively, suggesting that the mussels transplanted to the contaminated field site were suffering from adverse environmental condition. The NMR-based environmental metabolomics applied in this study results thus in it being a useful and effective tool for assessing environmental influences on the health status of aquatic organisms.

  18. The first troglomorphic species of the genus Phrynus Lamarck, 1801 (Amblypygi: Phrynidae) from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Ali Abadallan; Joya, Daniel Chirivi; Francke, Oscar F

    2015-02-23

    A new troglomorphic species, Phrynus perrii sp. nov., is described from two adult females from Cueva del Naranjo, Municipio Cintalapa, Chiapas, Mexico. This is the first continental record of a troglomorphic Phrynus species, and the second troglomorphic species of the genus. With the description of this species, in Mexico there are ten extant species, plus one fossil of the genus Phrynus, and it is the seventh species of troglobitic whip spiders from Mexico, making it the country with the highest richness of amblypygids species worldwide.

  19. Limestones: the love of my life - sun, sea and cycles (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    In studies of sedimentary rocks we are striving to understand the short and long-term controls on deposition that lead to the variety of facies we see in the geological record. With the development and application of sequence stratigraphy has come the realisation that in most cases the stratigraphic record is not random, but there are patterns and trends in the nature (composition, facies, diagenesis) and thickness of sedimentary units. In addition, sedimentary cycles are widely, if not ubiquitously, developed through stratigraphic successions, and do themselves vary in thickness and facies through a formation and through time. In many cases, orbital forcing is clearly a major control, in addition to longer term tectonic and tectono-eustatic processes. Understanding the major controls on the stratigraphic record and the processes involved in deposition enables us to develop a degree of prediction for the occurrence of particular facies and rock-types. This is especially significant in terms of hydrocarbon potential in frontier basins, notably in the search for source and reservoir rocks. In the case of carbonate and carbonate-evaporite successions, recent work is showing that even at the higher-frequency scale of individual beds and bed-sets, there are regular patterns and changes in thickness. These show that controls on deposition are not random but well organised. Studies of Carboniferous shelf/mid-ramp bioclastic limestones and Jurassic shallow-marine oolites from England reveal systematic variations in bed thickness, as well as oxygen isotopes, Sr and org C values. Permian lower slope carbonates from NE England show thinning-thickening-upward patterns in turbidite bed thickness on several orders of scale. Turbidity current frequency of 1 per ~200 years can be deduced from thicknesses of interbedded laminated facies, which provide the timescale. Beds in ancient shelf and slope carbonates of many geological periods are on a millennial-scale and their features and patterns clearly indicate that millennial-scale changes in climate, most likely driven by fluctuations in solar output, analogous to the D-O cycles of the Quaternary, were responsible, and that these were then modulated by orbital forcing. Solar forcing rules in carbonates, even at the highest frequency.

  20. Cellular distribution of okadaic acid in the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck, 1819).

    PubMed

    Rossignoli, Araceli E; Blanco, Juan

    2008-12-15

    The distribution of okadaic acid between the digestive and the secretory cells of the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied for the main purpose of determining if they might be responsible for the two-compartment depuration kinetics found in previous studies. The two cell types did not accumulate okadaic acid to the same degree. However, the concentrations found in each cellular type were not consistent with those expected from the output of the two-compartment depuration model, suggesting that a mechanism other that the differential accumulation in cellular types is involved. Binding to some yet undetermined cellular components is suggested.

  1. Mitochondrial genome of the Caribbean king crab Damithrax spinosissimus (Lamarck, 1818) (Decapoda: Majidae).

    PubMed

    Márquez, Edna J; Hurtado-Alarcón, Julio C; Isaza, Juan P; Alzate, Juan F; Campos, Néstor H

    2016-05-01

    The Caribbean king crab Damithrax spinosissimus (former Mithrax spinosissimus) is a large brachyuran in the tropical and subtropical western Atlantic. This is the first report of the complete mitochondrial genome of D. spinosissimus, which was pyrosequenced by FLX 454 technology. The mtDNA encodes for 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs. In addition, the coding sequences and gene synteny were similar to other previously reported mitogenomes of brachyuran.

  2. Growth and Development of Larval Bay Scallops (Argopecten irradians) in Response to Early Exposure to High CO2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    molluscs .    We   investigated  the  effects  of  high  CO2...bivalve   mollusc  species  that  produce  calcareous  skeletons  or  shells.    For   example,  mussel  and  oyster...Weiss,  I.  M.,  N.  Tuross,  L.  Addadi,  and  S.  Weiner.  2002.   Mollusc  larval  shell  formation:  

  3. Bioconversion of (13)C-labeled microalgal phytosterols to cholesterol by the Northern Bay scallop, Argopecten irradians irradians.

    PubMed

    Giner, José-Luis; Zhao, Hui; Dixon, Mark S; Wikfors, Gary H

    2016-02-01

    Bivalve mollusks lack de novo cholesterol biosynthesis capabilities and therefore rely upon dietary sources of sterols for rapid growth. Microalgae that constitute the main source of nutrition for suspension-feeding bivalves contain a diverse array of phytosterols, in most cases lacking cholesterol. Rapid growth of bivalves on microalgal diets with no cholesterol implies that some phytosterols can satisfy the dietary requirement for cholesterol through metabolic conversion to cholesterol, but such metabolic pathways have not been rigorously demonstrated. In the present study, stable isotope-labeled phytosterols were used to supplement a unialgal diet of Rhodomonas sp. and their biological transformation to cholesterol within scallop tissues was determined using (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Scallops efficiently dealkylated ∆(5) C29 (24-ethyl) sterols to cholesterol, and the only C28 sterol that was dealkylated efficiently possessed the 24(28)-double bond. Non-metabolized dietary phytosterols accumulated in the soft tissues. Observed formation of ∆(5,7) sterols (provitamin D) from ∆(5) sterols may represent initiation of steroid hormone (possibly ecdysone) biosynthesis. These findings provide a key component necessary for formulation of nutritionally complete microalgal diets for hatchery production of seed for molluscan aquaculture.

  4. Changes in trophic flow structure of Independence Bay (Peru) over an ENSO cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marc H.; Wolff, Matthias; Mendo, Jaime; Yamashiro, Carmen

    2008-10-01

    During the strong warm El Niño (EN) that occurred in 1997/98, Independence Bay (14°S, Peru) showed a ca. 10 °C increase in surface temperatures, higher oxygen concentrations, and clearer water due to decreased phytoplankton concentrations. Under these quasi-tropical conditions, many benthic species suffered (e.g. macroalgae, portunid crabs, and polychaetes) while others benefited (e.g. scallop, sea stars, and sea urchins). The most obvious change was the strong recruitment success and subsequent proliferation of the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, whose biomass increased fiftyfold. To understand these changes, steady-state models of the bay ecosystem trophic structure were constructed and compared for a normal upwelling year (1996) and during an EN (1998), and longer-term dynamics (1996-2003) were explored based on time series of catch and biomass using Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) software. Model inputs were based on surveys and landings data collected by the Instituto del Mar del Perú (IMARPE). Results indicate that while ecosystem size (total throughput) is reduced by 18% during EN, mainly as a result of decreased total primary production, benthic biomass remains largely unchanged despite considerable shifts in the dominant benthic taxa (e.g. scallops replace polychaetes as secondary consumers). Under normal upwelling conditions, predation by snails and crabs utilize the production of their prey almost completely, resulting in more efficient energy flow to higher trophic levels than occurs during EN. However during EN, the proliferation of the scallop A. purpuratus combined with decreased phytoplankton increased the proportion of directly utilized primary production, while exports and flows to detritus are reduced. The simulations suggest that the main cause for the scallop outburst and for the reduction in crab and macroalgae biomass was a direct temperature effect, whereas other changes are partially explained by trophic interactions. The simulations suggest

  5. Characterization of a homolog of human bone morphogenetic protein 1 in the embryo of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S P; Partin, J S; Lennarz, W J

    1994-03-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a protein homologous to human bone morphogenetic protein 1 (huBMP1) was isolated from a sea urchin embryo cDNA library. This sea urchin gene, named suBMP, encodes a protein of M(r) of 72 x 10(3). The deduced amino acid sequence of suBMP shares 72% sequence similarity (55% identity) with that of huBMP1. Like huBMP1 it also contains an N-terminal metalloendoprotease domain that shares sequence similarity with the astacin protease from crayfish, a C-terminal domain that is similar to the repeat domain found in C1r or C1s serine proteases, and an EGF-like segment. Although suBMP mRNA was detectable at a low level in the unfertilized egg, maximal expression of mRNA was observed at hatched blastula stage, with only a modest decrease in level at later stages of development. In situ hybridization studies revealed that suBMP mRNA is found in both ectodermal and primary mesenchyme cells in hatched blastula-stage embryos. Maximal expression of suBMP was observed at mesenchyme blastula, just before the onset of primitive skeleton (spicule) formation. SuBMP was found by immunoelectronmicroscopy in all cell types in late gastrula stage embryos. The antibody gold particles appeared in small clusters in the cytoplasm, on the surface of the cells and within the blastocoel. This distribution of suBMP, coupled with the finding that it was associated with membranes but was released by sodium carbonate treatment, suggests that the protein is secreted, and subsequently associates with a cell surface component. Two models for the possible function of suBMP in spiculogenesis in the sea urchin embryo are discussed.

  6. Identification of kinesin-C, a calmodulin-binding carboxy-terminal kinesin in animal (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G C; Hart, C L; Wedaman, K P; Scholey, J M

    1999-11-19

    Several novel members of the kinesin superfamily, until now identified only in plants, are unique in their ability to bind calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). Here, we identify the first such kinesin in an animal system. Sequence analysis of this new motor, called kinesin-C, predicts that it is a large carboxy-terminal kinesin, 1624 amino acid residues in length, with a predicted molecular mass of 181 kDa. Kinesin-C is predicted to contain a kinesin motor domain at its carboxy terminus, linked to a segment of alpha-helical coiled-coil 950 amino acid residues long, ending with an amino-terminal proline-rich tail domain. A putative calmodulin-binding domain resides at the extreme carboxy terminus of the motor polypeptide, and recombinant kinesin-C binds to a calmodulin-affinity column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. The presence of this novel calmodulin-binding motor in sea urchin embryos suggests that it plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent events during early sea urchin development.

  7. Ionic status, calcium uptake, and Ca2+-ATPase activity during early development in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus).

    PubMed

    Tellis, Margaret S; Lauer, Mariana M; Nadella, Sunita; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M

    2013-10-01

    Ionic status during early development was investigated in the purple sea urchin. Whole body cation concentrations (Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+)), unidirectional Ca(2+) uptake rates measured with (45)Ca(2+), Ca(2+)-ATPase activity, and growth were examined at 12h intervals over the first 96h of development. Whole body Ca(2+) concentration was low initially but increased steadily by >15-fold through to the pluteus stage. Whole body Mg(2+), K(+) and Na(+) levels exhibited diverse patterns, but all increased at 72-96h. Ca(2+) uptake rates were low during initial cell cleavages at 12h but increased greatly at blastulation (24h) and then again at gastrulation (48h), declining thereafter in the pluteus stage, but increasing slightly at 96h. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was initially low but increased at blastulation through gastrulation (24-48h) but declined thereafter in the pluteus stage. Embryonic weights did not change over most of development, but were significantly higher at 96h. Overall, the gastrulation stage displayed the most pronounced changes, as Ca(2+) uptake and accumulation and Ca(2+)-ATPase levels were the highest at this stage, likely involved in mineralization of the spicule. Biomarkers of Ca(2+) metabolism may be good endpoints for potential future toxicity studies.

  8. Sublethal mechanisms of Pb and Zn toxicity to the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) during early development.

    PubMed

    Tellis, Margaret S; Lauer, Mariana M; Nadella, Sunita; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand sublethal mechanisms of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) toxicity, developing sea urchins were exposed continuously from 3h post-fertilization (eggs) to 96 h (pluteus larvae) to 55 (±2.4) μgPb/L or 117 (±11)μgZn/L, representing ~ 70% of the EC50 for normal 72 h development. Growth, unidirectional Ca uptake rates, whole body ion concentrations (Na, K, Ca, Mg), Ca(2+) ATPase activity, and metal bioaccumulation were monitored every 12h over this period. Pb exhibited marked bioaccumulation whereas Zn was well-regulated, and both metals had little effect on growth, measured as larval dry weight, or on Na, K, or Mg concentrations. Unidirectional Ca uptake rates (measured by (45)Ca incorporation) were severely inhibited by both metals, resulting in lower levels of whole body Ca accumulation. The greatest disruption occurred at gastrulation. Ca(2+) ATPase activity was also significantly inhibited by Zn but not by Pb. Interestingly, embryos exposed to Pb showed some capacity for recovery, as Ca(2+)ATPase activities increased, Ca uptake rates returned to normal intermittently, and whole body Ca levels were restored to control values by 72-96 h of development. This did not occur with Zn exposure. Both Pb and Zn rendered their toxic effects through disruption of Ca homeostasis, though likely through different proximate mechanisms. We recommend studying the toxicity of these contaminants periodically throughout development as an effective way to detect sublethal effects, which may not be displayed at the traditional toxicity test endpoint of 72 h.

  9. Induction of DNA-protein cross-links in developing embryos of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    SciTech Connect

    Garman, G.D.; Cherr, G.N.; Anderson, S.L.

    1994-12-31

    Exposure to environmental agents during embryonic development may result in DNA-protein cross-linking (DPC), as has been demonstrated for mammalian cell lines. In the latter, formation of DPC`s upon exposure to a wide variety of agents, including some metals, has been observed. To determine whether DPCs could be detected in the sea urchin embryo during development, the authors adapted a mammalian cell assay utilizing potassium-SDS precipitation and a DNA fluorochrome to quantify relative amounts of free and protein-bound DNA. Sea urchin embryos exposed to a known DPC agent, nickel, through gastrulation exhibited a dose-dependent increase in DPCs, as well as an increase in developmental abnormalities. Morphological studies demonstrated that stage-specific exposure to Ni prior to gastrulation resulted in similar levels of abnormal pluteus larval development as compared to embryos exposed through gastrulation. Sea urchin embryos exhibit temporal differences in DNA transcription and gene expression during development, and these could be affected by modifications in DNA-protein interactions. Therefore, the authors are investigating the hypothesis that the similarities in morphological responses observed may relate to susceptibility of a critical stage of development.

  10. Breaking out of the comfort zone: El Niño-Southern Oscillation as a driver of trophic flows in a benthic consumer of the Humboldt Current ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Riascos, José M; Solís, Marco A; Pacheco, Aldo S; Ballesteros, Manuel

    2017-06-28

    The trophic flow of a species is considered a characteristic trait reflecting its trophic position and function in the ecosystem and its interaction with the environment. However, climate patterns are changing and we ignore how patterns of trophic flow are being affected. In the Humboldt Current ecosystem, arguably one of the most productive marine systems, El Niño-Southern Oscillation is the main source of interannual and longer-term variability. To assess the effect of this variability on trophic flow we built a 16-year series of mass-specific somatic production rate (P/B) of the Peruvian scallop (Argopecten purpuratus), a species belonging to a former tropical fauna that thrived in this cold ecosystem. A strong increase of the P/B ratio of this species was observed during nutrient-poor, warmer water conditions typical of El Niño, owing to the massive recruitment of fast-growing juvenile scallops. Trophic ecology theory predicts that when primary production is nutrient limited, the trophic flow of organisms occupying low trophic levels should be constrained (bottom-up control). For former tropical fauna thriving in cold, productive upwelling coastal zones, a short time of low food conditions but warm waters during El Niño could be sufficient to waken their ancestral biological features and display massive proliferations. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 August 2011-30 September 2011.

    PubMed

    A'Hara, S W; Amouroux, P; Argo, Emily E; Avand-Faghih, A; Barat, Ashoktaru; Barbieri, Luiz; Bert, Theresa M; Blatrix, R; Blin, Aurélie; Bouktila, D; Broome, A; Burban, C; Capdevielle-Dulac, C; Casse, N; Chandra, Suresh; Cho, Kyung Jin; Cottrell, J E; Crawford, Charles R; Davis, Michelle C; Delatte, H; Desneux, Nicolas; Djieto-Lordon, C; Dubois, M P; El-Mergawy, R A A M; Gallardo-Escárate, C; Garcia, M; Gardiner, Mary M; Guillemaud, Thomas; Haye, P A; Hellemans, B; Hinrichsen, P; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Kerdelhué, C; Kharrat, I; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Yong Yul; Kwan, Ye-Seul; Labbe, Ellen M; LaHood, Eric; Lee, Kyung Mi; Lee, Wan-Ok; Lee, Yat-Hung; Legoff, Isabelle; Li, H; Lin, Chung-Ping; Liu, S S; Liu, Y G; Long, D; Maes, G E; Magnoux, E; Mahanta, Prabin Chandra; Makni, H; Makni, M; Malausa, Thibaut; Matura, Rakesh; McKey, D; McMillen-Jackson, Anne L; Méndez, M A; Mezghani-Khemakhem, M; Michel, Andy P; Paul, Moran; Muriel-Cunha, Janice; Nibouche, S; Normand, F; Palkovacs, Eric P; Pande, Veena; Parmentier, K; Peccoud, J; Piatscheck, F; Puchulutegui, Cecilia; Ramos, R; Ravest, G; Richner, Heinz; Robbens, J; Rochat, D; Rousselet, J; Saladin, Verena; Sauve, M; Schlei, Ora; Schultz, Thomas F; Scobie, A R; Segovia, N I; Seyoum, Seifu; Silvain, J-F; Tabone, Elisabeth; Van Houdt, J K J; Vandamme, S G; Volckaert, F A M; Wenburg, John; Willis, Theodore V; Won, Yong-Jin; Ye, N H; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y X

    2012-01-01

    This article documents the addition of 299 microsatellite marker loci and nine pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) EPIC primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources (MER) Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Alosa pseudoharengus, Alosa aestivalis, Aphis spiraecola, Argopecten purpuratus, Coreoleuciscus splendidus, Garra gotyla, Hippodamia convergens, Linnaea borealis, Menippe mercenaria, Menippe adina, Parus major, Pinus densiflora, Portunus trituberculatus, Procontarinia mangiferae, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, Schizothorax richardsonii, Scophthalmus rhombus, Tetraponera aethiops, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, Tuta absoluta and Ugni molinae. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Barilius bendelisis, Chiromantes haematocheir, Eriocheir sinensis, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus cladocalix, Eucalyptus globulus, Garra litaninsis vishwanath, Garra para lissorhynchus, Guindilla trinervis, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, Luma chequen. Guayaba, Myrceugenia colchagüensis, Myrceugenia correifolia, Myrceugenia exsucca, Parasesarma plicatum, Parus major, Portunus pelagicus, Psidium guayaba, Schizothorax richardsonii, Scophthalmus maximus, Tetraponera latifrons, Thaumetopoea bonjeani, Thaumetopoea ispartensis, Thaumetopoea libanotica, Thaumetopoea pinivora, Thaumetopoea pityocampa ena clade, Thaumetopoea solitaria, Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni and Tor putitora. This article also documents the addition of nine EPIC primer pairs for Euphaea decorata, Euphaea formosa, Euphaea ornata and Euphaea yayeyamana.

  12. Reproductive cycle of Mytella guyanensis (Lamarck, 1819) in a Marine Reserve (RESEX Bay of Iguape), Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Camilo, V M A; Souza, J da C; Conceição, E de J; Luz, J R; Boehs, G; Campiolo, S

    2017-08-17

    Mytella guyanensis, consumed and commercialized in coastal regions of Brazil, is one of several bivalve species of socioeconomic interest for coastal communities. Besides serving as a source of income and subsistence for these communities, it also contributes to their food security as it is a source of proteins and micronutrients. Thus, the reproductive cycle of this species was studied aiming to contribute to food security and its preservation. Samples were collected monthly, between March 2014 and March 2015, in a natural stock (12°38'50"S; 38°51'43"W) in a Marine Reserve (RESEX Bay of Iguape) (community Engenho da Ponte), Bahia, Brazil. Mytella guyanensis is collected by women on site, where the artisanal fishing of this resource is performed without following any specific handling procedure. Also, empirical evidence indicates overexploitation. The specimens collected were measured along the anterior-posterior axis (length), and after macroscopic analysis they were fixed in Davidson solution, processed by routine histology techniques and stained with Harris haematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The macroscopic analysis showed sexual dimorphism, with the male and female gonads presenting a milky-white and orange colour, respectively. A 1:1 sex ratio (M: F) was observed and reproduction of the species was continuous all year round. March, April, July and August were the months with highest values of gamete elimination. We suggest that a M. guyanensis management plan should restrict capture during these months, in order to sustainably regulate exploitation of this food resource in this reserve.

  13. T-PAH contamination in Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Lamarck, 1819) at various stations of the Turkish Straits System.

    PubMed

    Balcıoğlu, Esra Billur; Aksu, Abdullah; Balkıs, Nuray; Öztürk, Bayram

    2014-11-15

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from the Turkish Straits Systems were analyzed for sixteen parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contents by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This marine organism was selected because of its multitude, wide distribution, being bio indicator for the pollution and consumption by humans. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 589 μg g(-1) in Istanbul Strait, 0.94-36.4 μg g(-1) in Marmara Sea and 0.4-47.9 μg g(-1) in Çanakkale Strait during the samplings. According to the results Istanbul and Çanakkale Straits are more polluted than the Marmara Sea.

  14. Lamarck, Darwin, Wallace, and Ameghino: Does This Revolutionary Biology Heritage Qualify As a Biological Engineering View? [Retrospectroscope].

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Saltor, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The universe is the most fundamental wonder: we, as humans, face it every day, contemplate it in endless amazement, question it in our search for answers. And long ago, at a particular moment in a tiny piece of that great wonder, a second wonder, perhaps deeper in reach, emerged: life. Then, slowly, life evolved to contain within it a third wonder, possibly greater in some respects than the universe itself: the human mind.

  15. Sensitivity towards elevated pCO2 in great scallop (Pecten maximus Lamarck) embryos and fed larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Sissel; Grefsrud, Ellen S.; Harboe, Torstein

    2017-02-01

    The increasing amount of dissolved anthropogenic CO2 has caused a drop in pH values in the open ocean known as ocean acidification. This change in seawater carbonate chemistry has been shown to have a negative effect on a number of marine organisms. Early life stages are the most vulnerable, and especially the organisms that produce calcified structures in the phylum Mollusca. Few studies have looked at effects on scallops, and this is the first study presented including fed larvae of the great scallop (Pecten maximus) followed until day 14 post-fertilization. Fertilized eggs from unexposed parents were exposed to three levels of pCO2 using four replicate units: 465 (ambient), 768 and 1294 µatm, corresponding to pHNIST of 7.94, 7.75 (-0.19 units) and 7.54 (-0.40 units), respectively. All of the observed parameters were negatively affected by elevated pCO2: survival, larval development, shell growth and normal shell development. The latter was observed to be affected only 2 days after fertilization. Negative effects on the fed larvae at day 7 were similar to what was shown earlier for unfed P. maximus larvae. Growth rate in the group at 768 µatm seemed to decline after day 7, indicating that the ability to overcome the environmental change at moderately elevated pCO2 was lost over time. The present study shows that food availability does not decrease the sensitivity to elevated pCO2 in P. maximus larvae. Unless genetic adaptation and acclimatization counteract the negative effects of long term elevated pCO2, recruitment in populations of P. maximus will most likely be negatively affected by the projected drop of 0.06-0.32 units in pH within year 2100.

  16. Effect of increased pCO2 on early shell development in great scallop (Pecten maximus Lamarck) larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, S.; Grefsrud, E. S.; Harboe, T.

    2013-02-01

    As a result of high anthropogenic emission of CO2, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in the oceans has increased causing a drop in pH, known as ocean acidification (OA). Numerous studies have shown negative effects on marine invertebrates, and that the early life stages are the most sensitive to OA. We studied the effects on embryo and larvae of great scallop (Pecten maximus L.), using mean pCO2-levels of 477 (ambient), 821, 1184, and 1627 ppm. OA affected both survival and shell growth negatively after seven days. Growth was reduced with 5-10% when pCO2 increased from ambient 477 ppm to 1627 ppm, and survival based on egg number was reduced from 40.4% in the ambient group to 10.7% in the highest pCO2-group. Larvae/embryos stained with calcein one day after fertilization, showed fluorescence in the newly formed shell area indicating calcification of the shell already at the trochophore stage. Shell hinge deformities were observed at elevated pCO2-levels in trochophore larvae after two days. After seven days, deformities in both shell hinge and shell edge were observed in veliger larvae at elevated pCO2-levels. Although the growth showed a moderate reduction, survival rate and increased amount of deformed larvae indicates that P. Maximus larvae are affected by elevated pCO2 levels within the range of what is projected for the next century.

  17. Epigenetics as a source of variation in comparative animal physiology - or - Lamarck is lookin' pretty good these days.

    PubMed

    Burggren, Warren W

    2014-03-01

    Considerable variation is inherent both within and between comparative physiological data sets. Known sources for such variation include diet, gender, time of day and season of experiment, among many other factors, but a meta-analysis of physiological studies shows that surprisingly few studies report controlling for these factors. In fact, less than 3% of comparative physiological papers mention epigenetics. However, our understanding of epigenetic influences on physiological processes is growing rapidly, and it is highly likely that epigenetic phenomena are an additional 'hidden' source of variation, particularly in wild-caught specimens. Recent studies have shown epigenetic inheritance of commonly studied traits such as metabolic rate (water fleas Daphnia magna; emu, Dromaius novaellandiae), hypoxic tolerance, cardiac performance (zebrafish, Danio rerio), as well as numerous morphological effects. The ecological and evolutionary significance of such epigenetic inheritance is discussed in a comparative physiological context. Finally, against this context of epigenetic inheritance of phenotype, this essay also provides a number of caveats and warnings regarding the interpretation of transgenerational phenotype modification as a true epigenetic phenomenon. Parental effects, sperm storage, multiple paternity and direct gamete exposure can all be confounding factors. Epigenetic inheritance may best be studied in animal models that can be maintained in the laboratory over multiple generations, to yield parental stock that themselves are free of epigenetic effects from the historical experiences of their parents.

  18. Oxidative stress in the mollusk Echinolittorina peruviana (Gasteropoda: Littorinidae, Lamarck, 1822) and trace metals in coastal sectors with mining activity.

    PubMed

    Jara, C; Gaete, H; Lobos, G; Hidalgo, M E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of coastal waters of sites with mining activity in Echinolittorina peruviana, through oxidative stress biomarkers and heavy metals determination both in water and in tissue. Organisms were collected in the intertidal zone in areas with and without mining activity. Metal concentrations in the water and tissues, and also, the following biomarkers of oxidative stress: antioxidant enzyme activity, superoxide dismutase and catalase, non-enzymatic oxidative capacity (TRAP), oxidative damage to proteins (carbonyls) and TBARS, were measured The concentrations of accumulated metals had the following order Fe > Cu > Cd > Zn > Cr > Mo > As; the highest concentrations of metals in water and tissues were found in Caleta Palito and Chañaral. Results suggest that the coastal waters with mining activity and greatest concentrations of copper and iron induced the greater antioxidant response and oxidative damage to lipids in E. peruviana.

  19. Disease prevalence and snail predation associated with swell-generated damage on the threatened coral, Acropora palmata (Lamarck)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bright, Allan J.; Rogers, Caroline S.; Brandt, Marilyn E.; Muller, Erinn; Smith, Tyler B.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances such as tropical storms cause coral mortality and reduce coral cover as a direct result of physical damage. Storms can be one of the most important disturbances in coral reef ecosystems, and it is crucial to understand their long-term impacts on coral populations. The primary objective of this study was to determine trends in disease prevalence and snail predation on damaged and undamaged colonies of the threatened coral species, Acropora palmata, following an episode of heavy ocean swells in the US Virgin Islands (USVI). At three sites on St. Thomas and St. John, colonies of A. palmata were surveyed monthly over 1 year following a series of large swells in March 2008 that fragmented 30–93% of colonies on monitored reefs. Post-disturbance surveys conducted from April 2008 through March 2009 showed that swell-generated damage to A. palmata caused negative indirect effects that compounded the initial direct effects of physical disturbance. During the 12 months after the swell event, white pox disease prevalence was 41% higher for colonies that sustained damage from the swells than for undamaged colonies (df = 207, p = 0.01) with greatest differences in disease prevalence occurring during warm water months. In addition, the corallivorous snail, Coralliophila abbreviata, was 46% more abundant on damaged corals than undamaged corals during the 12 months after the swell event (df = 207, p = 0.006).

  20. Reevaluating species number, distribution and endemism of the coral genus Pocillopora Lamarck, 1816 using species delimitation methods and microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Gélin, P; Postaire, B; Fauvelot, C; Magalon, H

    2017-04-01

    Species delimitation methods based on genetic information, notably using single locus data, have been proposed as means of increasing the rate of biodiversity description, but can also be used to clarify complex taxonomies. In this study, we explore the species diversity within the cnidarian genus Pocillopora, widely distributed in the tropical belt of the Indo-Pacific Ocean. From 943 Pocillopora colonies sampled in the Western Indian Ocean, the Tropical Southwestern Pacific and Southeast Polynesia, representing a huge variety of morphotypes, we delineated Primary Species Hypotheses (PSH) applying the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery method, the Poisson Tree Processes algorithm and the Generalized mixed Yule-coalescent model on two mitochondrial markers (Open Reading Frame and Dloop) and reconstructing a haploweb using one nuclear marker (Internal Transcribed Spacer 2). Then, we confronted identified PSHs to the results of clustering analyses using 13 microsatellites to determine Secondary Species Hypotheses (SSH). Based on the congruence of all methods used and adding sequences from the literature, we defined at least 18 Secondary Species Hypotheses among 14 morphotypes, confirming the high phenotypic plasticity in Pocillopora species and the presence of cryptic lineages. We also identified three new genetic lineages never found to date, which could represent three new putative species. Moreover, the biogeographical ranges of several SSHs were re-assessed in the light of genetic data, which may have direct implications in conservation policies. Indeed, the cryptic diversity within this genus should be taken into account seriously, as neglecting its importance is source of confusion in our understanding of ecosystem functioning. Next generation sequencing, combined with other parameters (i.e. microstructure, zooxanthellae identification, ecology even at a micro-scale, resistance and resilience ability to bleaching) will be the next step towards an integrative framework of Pocillopora taxonomy, which will have profound implications for ecological studies, such as studying biodiversity, response to global warming and symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Larval settlement and spat recovery rates of the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana (Lamarck, 1819) using different systems to induce metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Silveira, R C; Silva, F C; Gomes, C H M; Ferreira, J F; Melo, C M R

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed at the assessment, in the laboratory, of the larval settlement and spat recovery rates of oysters of the species Crassostrea brasiliana using plastic collectors, epinephrine (C9H13NO3 C4H6O6) and shell powder in settlement tanks. Polypropylene was used attached to bamboo frames. The material was chosen due to its pliability--that favours the spat detachment. Two experiments were carried out; the first between February and April 2008, and the second between November and December 2008 at the Marine Mussel Laboratory of Santa Catarina Federal University (Laboratório de Moluscos Marinhos da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina). In the first experiment, the scratched plastic collectors were tested consorting them with shell powder; on the second, the plastic collectors were tested consorted with shell powder, only shell powder and epinephrine as the metamorphosis stimulator. The quantification was carried out of the larvae settled in the plastic collectors, and of the recovery and integrity of the spats after their detachment. The first experiment has shown a recovery rate of 48.83% of the spats in comparison with the D larvae used. From this percentage, 4.9% settled in the plastic collectors and 43.93% in shell powder. The second experiment revealed 55.78% regarding the settled spats in comparison with the total of larvae used (using epinephrine), 78.62% in the treatment with the collector plus shell powder and 58.33% in the treatment only with shell powder. Thus, the use of the collector plus shell powder resulted in a greater spat recovery when compared to the other treatments.

  2. Bleaching increases likelihood of disease on Acropora palmata (Lamarck) in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, E.M.; Rogers, Caroline S.; Spitzack, Anthony S.; van Woesik, R.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalously high water temperatures may enhance the likelihood of coral disease outbreaks by increasing the abundance or virulence of pathogens, or by increasing host susceptibility. This study tested the compromised-host hypothesis, and documented the relationship between disease and temperature, through monthly monitoring of Acropora palmata colonies from May 2004 to December 2006, in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Disease prevalence and the rate of change in prevalence showed a positive linear relationship with water temperature and rate of change in water temperature, respectively, but only in 2005 during prolonged periods of elevated temperature. Both bleached and unbleached colonies showed a positive relationship between disease prevalence and temperature in 2005, but the average area of disease-associated mortality increased only for bleached corals, indicating host susceptibility, rather than temperature per se, influenced disease severity on A. palmata.

  3. Bleaching increases likelihood of disease on Acropora palmata (Lamarck) in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, E.M.; Rogers, C.S.; Spitzack, Anthony S.; van Woesik, R.

    2008-01-01

    Anomalously high water temperatures may enhance the likelihood of coral disease outbreaks by increasing the abundance or virulence of pathogens, or by increasing host susceptibility. This study tested the compromised-host hypothesis, and documented the relationship between disease and temperature, through monthly monitoring of Acropora palmata colonies from May 2004 to December 2006, in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Disease prevalence and the rate of change in prevalence showed a positive linear relationship with water temperature and rate of change in water temperature, respectively, but only in 2005 during prolonged periods of elevated temperature. Both bleached and unbleached colonies showed a positive relationship between disease prevalence and temperature in 2005, but the average area of disease-associated mortality increased only for bleached corals, indicating host susceptibility, rather than temperature per se, influenced disease severity on A. palmata. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Trawling disturbance on the isotopic signature of a structure-building species, the sea urchin Gracilechinus acutus (Lamarck, 1816)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Irusta, José M.; Preciado, Izaskun; López-López, Lucia; Punzón, Antonio; Cartes, Joan E.; Serrano, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Bottom trawling is one of the main sources of anthropogenic disturbance in benthic habitats with important direct and indirect effects on the ecosystem functional diversity. In this study, the effect of this impact on a structure-building species, the sea urchin Gracilechinus acutus, was studied in the Central Cantabrian Sea (southern Bay of Biscay) comparing its isotopic signature and additional population descriptors across different trawling pressures. Trawling disturbance had a significant effect on the studied descriptors. In trawling areas, this urchin showed significantly lower values of biomass and mean size and significantly higher values of fullness index. Moreover, the trawling disturbance effect was also significant in the isotopic signature of G. acutus. Urchins inhabiting untrawled areas showed significant lower values of δ15N than urchins dwelling areas under trawling pressure. The urchins' isotopic enrichment increased along the species ontogeny regardless of the trawling effort level. Stable isotope analyses are a suitable tool to detect trawling disturbance on the trophic pathways but do not suffice to explain these changes, especially if there is a lack of baseline information.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of Pholadoidea Lamarck, 1809 supports a single origin for xylotrophy (wood feeding) and xylotrophic bacterial endosymbiosis in Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Distel, Daniel L; Amin, Mehwish; Burgoyne, Adam; Linton, Eric; Mamangkey, Gustaf; Morrill, Wendy; Nove, John; Wood, Nicole; Yang, Joyce

    2011-11-01

    The ability to consume wood as food (xylotrophy) is unusual among animals. In terrestrial environments, termites and other xylotrophic insects are the principle wood consumers while in marine environments wood-boring bivalves fulfill this role. However, the evolutionary origin of wood feeding in bivalves has remained largely unexplored. Here we provide data indicating that xylotrophy has arisen just once in Bivalvia in a single wood-feeding bivalve lineage that subsequently diversified into distinct shallow- and deep-water branches, both of which have been broadly successful in colonizing the world's oceans. These data also suggest that the appearance of this remarkable life habit was approximately coincident with the acquisition of bacterial endosymbionts. Here we generate a robust phylogeny for xylotrophic bivalves and related species based on sequences of small and large subunit nuclear rRNA genes. We then trace the distribution among the modern taxa of morphological characters and character states associated with xylotrophy and xylotrepesis (wood-boring) and use a parsimony-based method to infer their ancestral states. Based on these ancestral state reconstructions we propose a set of plausible hypotheses describing the evolution of symbiotic xylotrophy in Bivalvia. Within this context, we reinterpret one of the most remarkable progressions in bivalve evolution, the transformation of the "typical" myoid body plan to create a unique lineage of worm-like, tube-forming, wood-feeding clams. The well-supported phylogeny presented here is inconsistent with most taxonomic treatments for xylotrophic bivalves, indicating that the bivalve family Pholadidae and the subfamilies Teredininae and Bankiinae of the family Teredinidae are non-monophyletic, and that the principle traits used for their taxonomic diagnosis are phylogenetically misleading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quick characterization of uronic acid-containing polysaccharides in 5 shellfishes by oligosaccharide analysis upon acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Lu, Jiaojiao; Ai, Chunqing; Zhang, Bao; Guo, Li; Song, Shuang; Zhu, Beiwei

    2016-11-29

    Uronic acid-containing polysaccharides (UACPs) including well-known glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and some non-GAGs exist widely in animal kingdom. Although numerous methods have been established to analyze GAGs, few methods are available for non-GAG UACPs. In the present study, a protocol to identify all kinds of UACPs with repeating disaccharide units of hexosamine and uronic acid was demonstrated, and UACP components in five shellfishes, namely Turritella fortilirata Sowerby (GTF), Batillaria zonalis (GBZ), Nassarius variciferus (GNV), Monodonta labio Linnaeus (GML), and Argopecten irradians Lamarck (BAI) were primarily revealed. After a simple isolation procedure, crude polysaccharides were depolymerized by controlled acid hydrolysis, and then the resulting oligosaccharides were detected by HPLC coupled with mass spectrometer after 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) labeling. According to chromatograms using the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, chondroitin sulfate (CS) was found in GNV and GML, a non-GAG named abalone gonad sulfated polysaccharide (AGSP) with a backbone of →4)-β-GlcA-(1 → 2)-α-Man-(1→ repeating units in GBZ, and both of AGSP and CS in BAI and GTF. Further characterization of tetrasaccharides and sulfated/acetylated disaccharides by HPLC combined with an ion trap mass spectrometer confirmed the structural identification of CS and AGSP, and indicated CS in GTF and BAI was Type C. These results suggest the 5 mollusks as potential resources for CS and AGSP. And the analysis protocol presented in this study was powerful and effective for quick characterization of UACPs including GAGs as well as non-GAGs in complicated matrix.

  7. Trophic and environmental drivers of the Sechura Bay Ecosystem (Peru) over an ENSO cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marc H.; Wolff, Matthias; Vadas, Flora; Yamashiro, Carmen

    2008-03-01

    Interannual environmental variability in Peru is dominated by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The most dramatic changes are associated with the warm El Niño (EN) phase (opposite the cold La Niña phase), which disrupts the normal coastal upwelling and affects the dynamics of many coastal marine and terrestrial resources. This study presents a trophic model for Sechura Bay, located at the northern extension of the Peruvian upwelling system, where ENSO-induced environmental variability is most extreme. Using an initial steady-state model for the year 1996, we explore the dynamics of the ecosystem through the year 2003 (including the strong EN of 1997/98 and the weaker EN of 2002/03). Based on support from literature, we force biomass of several non-trophically-mediated ‘drivers’ (e.g. Scallops, Benthic detritivores, Octopus, and Littoral fish) to observe whether the fit between historical and simulated changes (by the trophic model) is improved. The results indicate that the Sechura Bay Ecosystem is a relatively inefficient system from a community energetics point of view, likely due to the periodic perturbations of ENSO. A combination of high system productivity and low trophic level target species of invertebrates (i.e. scallops) and fish (i.e. anchoveta) results in high catches and an efficient fishery. The importance of environmental drivers is suggested, given the relatively small improvements in the fit of the simulation with the addition of trophic drivers on remaining functional groups’ dynamics. An additional multivariate regression model is presented for the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, which demonstrates a significant correlation between both spawning stock size and riverine discharge-mediated mortality on catch levels. These results are discussed in the context of the appropriateness of trophodynamic modeling in relatively open systems, and how management strategies may be focused given the highly environmentally influenced marine

  8. The occurrence of domoic acid linked to a toxic diatom bloom in a new potential vector: the tunicate Pyura chilensis (piure).

    PubMed

    López-Rivera, Américo; Pinto, Maricela; Insinilla, Andrea; Suárez Isla, Benjamín; Uribe, Eduardo; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Lehane, Mary; Furey, Ambrose; James, Kevin J

    2009-11-01

    The tunicate Pyura chilensis (Molina, 1782); Phylum Chordata; Subphylum Urochordata; Class Ascidiacea, common local name "piure" or sea squirt; a filter-feeder (plankton and suspended particles) sessile species; may play an important role in monitoring domoic acid (DA) the principal toxic component of Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP). Significant DA concentrations have been determined in tunicate samples, collected during a recent ASP outbreak in Bahía Inglesa, an important scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) farming area. Several infaunal species were tested for the presence of DA, in addition to the usual scallop monitoring programme. DA was found at sub-toxic levels in filtering bivalves such as mussels (Mytilus chilensis), large mussels (Aulacomya ater) and clams (Protothaca thaca) (6.4, 5.4 and 4.7 microg DA/g tissue respectively). Of particular interest was the observation of significant accumulations of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. diatoms in the internal siphon and atrium spaces of the tunicate. Toxin distribution within major tunicate organs was heterogeneous with 8.7-15.5 microg DA/g in edible tissues, 14.9-17.9 microg DA/g in the fecal material and 13.6-32.7 microg DA/g in the gut content. DA was determined by HPLC-UV and confirmed by diode-array detection and LC-MS/MS analysis. This is the first report of the presence of DA in a tunicate that is regularly consumed by coastal populations. These results confirm the need to include these organisms in sanitation programs for marine toxins.

  9. The effects of chronic inorganic and organic phosphate exposure on bactericidal activity of the coelomic fluid of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck) (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Böttger, S Anne; McClintock, James B

    2009-07-01

    The sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus can survive chronic exposure to sodium phosphate (inorganic phosphate) concentrations as high as 3.2 mg L-1, and triethyl phosphate (organic phosphate) concentrations of 1000 mg L-1. However, chronic exposure to low (0.8 mg L-1 inorganic and 10 mg L-1 organic phosphate), medium (1.6 mg L-1 inorganic and 100 mg L-1 organic phosphate) or high (3.2 mg L-1 inorganic and 1000 mg L-1 organic phosphate) sublethal concentrations of these phosphates inhibit bactericidal clearance of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Bacteria were exposed to coelomic fluid collected from individuals maintained in either artificial seawater, or three concentrations of either inorganic phosphate or organic phosphate. Sterile marine broth, natural seawater and cell free coelomic fluid (cfCF) were employed as controls. Bacterial survival indices were measured at 0, 24 and 48 h periods once a week for four weeks. Bacteria were readily eliminated from the whole coelomic fluid (wCF) of individuals maintained in artificial seawater. Individuals maintained in inorganic phosphates were able to clear bacteria following a two week exposure period, while individuals maintained at even low concentrations of organic phosphates failed to clear all bacteria from their coelomic fluid. Exposure to phosphates represses antimicrobial defenses and may ultimately compromise survival of L. variegatus in the nearshore environment.

  10. EFFECT OF DIET QUALITY ON NUTRIENT ALLOCATION TO THE TEST AND ARISTOTLE'S LANTERN IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS (LAMARCK, 1816).

    PubMed

    Heflin, Laura Elizabeth; Gibbs, Victoria K; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, Addison L; Lawrence, John M

    2012-08-01

    Small adult (19.50 ± 2.01g wet weight) Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (12 to 36% dry weight as fed) and carbohydrate (21 to 39 % dry weight) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily ration of 1.5% of the average body weight of all individuals for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion scores were used to compare six different dietary composition hypotheses for eight growth measurements. For each physical growth response, different mathematical models representing a priori hypotheses were compared using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) score. The AIC is one of many information-theoretic approaches that allows for direct comparison of non-nested models with varying number of parameters. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of test diameter increase. Dietary protein level was the best model of test with spines wet weight gain and test with spines dry matter production. When the Aristotle's lantern was corrected for size of the test, there was an inverse relationship with dietary protein level. Log transformed lantern to test with spines index was also best associated with the dietary protein model. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for growth parameters. However, the protein × carbohydrate interaction model was the best model of organic content (% dry weight) of the test without spines. These data suggest that there is a differential allocation of resources when dietary protein is limiting and the test with spines, but not the Aristotle's lantern, is affected by availability of dietary nutrients.

  11. The Mediterranean Plio-Pleistocene: A reference frame for astronomically paced low and high latitude climate changes (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourens, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The astronomical theory of climate has revolutionized our understanding of past climate change and the development of highly accurate geologic time scales for the entire Cenozoic. Most of this understanding has started with the construction of high-resolution stable oxygen isotope (18O) records from planktonic and benthic foraminifera of open ocean deep marine sediments explored by the international drilling operations of DSDP, ODP and IODP. These efforts culminated into global ocean isotopic stacked records, which give a clear picture of the evolution of the climate state through time. Fundamental for these reconstructions are the assumptions made between the astronomical forcing and the tuned time series and the accuracy of the astronomical solution. In the past decades, an astronomically calibrated time scale for the Pliocene and Pleistocene of the Mediterranean has been developed, which has become the reference for the standard Geologic Time Scale. Characteristic of the studied marine sediments are the cyclic lithological alternations, reflecting the interference between obliquity and precession-paced low latitude climate variability. These interference patterns allowed to evaluate the accuracy of astronomical solutions and to constrain the dynamical ellipticity of the Earth and tidal dissipation by the Sun and the Moon, which in turn provided the backbone for the widely applied LR04 open ocean benthic isotope stack of the past 5 Myr. So far, the assumed time lags between orbital forcing and the global climate response as reflected in LR04 have not been tested, while these assumptions hark back to SPECMAP, using simple ice sheet models and a limited number of radiometric dates. In addition, LR04 adopted a shorter response time for the smaller ice caps during the Pliocene. Here I present the first benthic 18O record of the Mediterranean reference scale, which strikingly mirrors the LR04. I will use this record to discuss the assumed phase relations and its potential to constrain global sea level changes and their cause over the past 5.3 million years.

  12. Mixed Effects of Elevated pCO2 on Fertilisation, Larval and Juvenile Development and Adult Responses in the Mobile Subtidal Scallop Mimachlamys asperrima (Lamarck, 1819)

    PubMed Central

    Scanes, Elliot; Parker, Laura M.; O’Connor, Wayne A.; Ross, Pauline M.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have severe consequences for calcifying marine organisms especially molluscs. Recent studies, however, have found that molluscs in marine environments with naturally elevated or fluctuating CO2 or with an active, high metabolic rate lifestyle may have a capacity to acclimate and be resilient to exposures of elevated environmental pCO2. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of near future concentrations of elevated pCO2 on the larval and adult stages of the mobile doughboy scallop, Mimachlamys asperrima from a subtidal and stable physio-chemical environment. It was found that fertilisation and the shell length of early larval stages of M. asperrima decreased as pCO2 increased, however, there were less pronounced effects of elevated pCO2 on the shell length of later larval stages, with high pCO2 enhancing growth in some instances. Byssal attachment and condition index of adult M. asperrima decreased with elevated pCO2, while in contrast there was no effect on standard metabolic rate or pHe. The responses of larval and adult M. asperrima to elevated pCO2 measured in this study were more moderate than responses previously reported for intertidal oysters and mussels. Even this more moderate set of responses are still likely to reduce the abundance of M. asperrima and potentially other scallop species in the world’s oceans at predicted future pCO2 levels. PMID:24733125

  13. Mixed effects of elevated pCO2 on fertilisation, larval and juvenile development and adult responses in the mobile subtidal scallop Mimachlamys asperrima (Lamarck, 1819).

    PubMed

    Scanes, Elliot; Parker, Laura M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Ross, Pauline M

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have severe consequences for calcifying marine organisms especially molluscs. Recent studies, however, have found that molluscs in marine environments with naturally elevated or fluctuating CO2 or with an active, high metabolic rate lifestyle may have a capacity to acclimate and be resilient to exposures of elevated environmental pCO2. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of near future concentrations of elevated pCO2 on the larval and adult stages of the mobile doughboy scallop, Mimachlamys asperrima from a subtidal and stable physio-chemical environment. It was found that fertilisation and the shell length of early larval stages of M. asperrima decreased as pCO2 increased, however, there were less pronounced effects of elevated pCO2 on the shell length of later larval stages, with high pCO2 enhancing growth in some instances. Byssal attachment and condition index of adult M. asperrima decreased with elevated pCO2, while in contrast there was no effect on standard metabolic rate or pHe. The responses of larval and adult M. asperrima to elevated pCO2 measured in this study were more moderate than responses previously reported for intertidal oysters and mussels. Even this more moderate set of responses are still likely to reduce the abundance of M. asperrima and potentially other scallop species in the world's oceans at predicted future pCO2 levels.

  14. Shell fluctuating asymmetry in the sea-dwelling benthic bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck, 1819) as morphological markers to detect environmental chemical contamination.

    PubMed

    Scalici, Massimiliano; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Spani, Federica; Malafoglia, Valentina; Colamartino, Monica; Persichini, Tiziana; Cappello, Simone; Mancini, Giuseppe; Guerriero, Giulia; Colasanti, Marco

    2017-02-10

    Investigations on asymmetries showed that deviations from perfect bilateral symmetry are interpreted as environmental changes inducing developmental instability. Since morphological abnormalities increase with pollution, deformations may be considered indicators of the organism exposition to pollution. Therefore, the onset of asymmetry in otherwise normally symmetrical traits has been used as a measure of some stresses as well. In this context, we studied how marine pollution affects the valve morphological alterations in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. We used 180 specimens (30 per site) from the aquaculture area of Goro (River Po delta, northern Adriatic Sea), translocated, and released within 50 × 50 × 50 cm cages in five sites: two disturbed and one undisturbed near Naples (eastern Tyrrhenian Sea), and one disturbed and one undisturbed near Siracusa (western Ionian Sea). Disturbed sites were stressed by heavy industrialization and heavy tankers traffic of crude and refined oil, and were defined basing on sediment contamination. In particular, by the cone-beam computed tomography we obtained 3D virtual valve surfaces to be analyzed by the geometric morphometric techniques. Specifically, we focused the levels of the shell shape fluctuating asymmetry in relation to the degrees of marine pollution in different sites of the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Mahalanobis distances (interpreted as proxy of the individual shape asymmetry deviation from the mean asymmetry) significantly regressed with the sediment contamination gradient. Indeed, although the left-right differences were normally distributed in each studied site, the individual asymmetry scores (IAS) significantly varied amongst the investigated sites. IAS showed higher values in disturbed areas than those of undisturbed ones in both Tyrrhenian and Ionian Sea. Our results are consistent with past studies on molluscans and other taxa, demonstrating some detrimental effects of chemicals on organisms, although the investigated morphological marker did not discriminate the real disturbance source. Our findings indicate that the mussels act as a prognostic tool for sea pollution levels driving detrimental effects on benthic community.

  15. Hermaphroditism among dioecious Tagelus plebeius (Lightfoot, 1786) (Mollusca, Psammobiidae) and Iphigenia brasiliana (Lamarck, 1818) (Mollusca, Donacidae) on the Cachoeira River estuary, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ceuta, L O; Boehs, G; Santos, J J B

    2010-02-01

    The samples of Tagelus plebeius and Iphigenia brasiliana were manually collected on the Cachoeira River estuary region (Ilhéus, BA, Brazil) between August 2005 and August 2006, with a periodicity of 15 days, with 20 animals collected/sampled, performing 500 samples from each species. The animals were measured, eviscerated and kept in solution of Davidson and after 24-30 hours, they were transferred to ethanol 70%. The material was processed for routine histology, with paraffin embedding, obtaining 7 microm thick slices, stained with Harris hematoxilin and Eosin (HE). By light microscopy analysis, 2 cases of hermaphroditism (0.4%) in T. plebeius samples and one case (0.2%) in I. brasiliana were registered with predominance of female over male follicles.

  16. Broodstock diet effect on sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816) endotrophic larvae development: potential for their year-round use in environmental toxicology assessment.

    PubMed

    Repolho, Tiago Filipe Baptista da Rosa; Costa, Maria Helena; Luís, Orlando de Jesus; Gago, João André Evaristo de Matos

    2011-05-01

    The effect of captive broodstock diet on fertilization and endotrophic larvae development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus was assessed. Maize grain and five inert pelleted diets were tested, during a three-month experimental period. Maize flour, wheat flour, soybean flour, maize/wheat flour (MWF) and maize/soybean flour mixes were used as vegetal sources for inert feed. Gonad index, percent egg fertilization and larvae malformation occurrence were compared with the results obtained from wild sea urchins (W). Whole egg total amino acid composition was concomitantly analyzed as a tool to explain eventual endotrophic larvae malformations caused by lack of specific nutrients. For all treatment groups (wild and captive), percent egg fertilization values above 96% were always observed, fulfilling the requisites (70-90%) necessary to conduct environmental monitoring bioassays, according to USEPA (2002). Similar values for normal percent larval development were only obtained from P. lividus broodstock subjected to an inert feeding diet based on a maize/wheat flour mix (85.0±1.45%), in comparison to wild P. lividus (82.5±1.75%). Likewise, no statistical differences on resultant whole egg total amino acid composition were observed between P. lividus fed MWF and wild treatments. Moreover, statistical differences between MWF and all the other captive feeding treatments were found for six out of the seventeen amino acids analyzed. This study demonstrates the possibility to obtain high values for P. lividus endotrophic larvae percent normal development based on broodstock held in captivity as long as an appropriate inert diet is provided.

  17. Total and methyl-mercury content in bivalves, Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck and Ostrea edulis Linnaeus: relationship of biochemical composition and body size

    SciTech Connect

    Najdek, M.; Sapunar, J.

    1987-07-01

    Mussels and oysters are of interest to pollution ecologists because they are widely distributed, suspension feeding invertebrates and are likely to accumulate pollutants from their environment (Goldberg 1975). Many authors have estimated the relation between the concentration of metals in the flesh and various biotic and abiotic parameters. Body mass (estimated in dry weight) is evidently an important factor governing the uptake of metals by these organisms. The highest concentrations of certain metals were often found in the smallest individuals. The relation between metal content and body size can best be described using Boyden's model which is useful for quantifying any physiological activities in relation to the dry weight of the specimens. In the present paper the authors describe the investigation into the relationship between total and methyl-mercury content and body mass in mussels and oysters.

  18. Immature stages of giants: morphology and growth characteristics of Goliathus Lamarck, 1801 larvae indicate a predatory way of life (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae)

    PubMed Central

    Vendl, Tomáš; Šípek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The third larval instar of Goliathus goliatus (Drury, 1770), Goliathus orientalis Moser, 1909 and Goliathus albosignatus Boheman, 1857 are described and illustrated for the first time and compared with the immature stages of other Cetoniinae. Larval development of Goliathus goliatus is investigated under laboratory conditions, with particular emphasis on food requirements. These results support the obligatory requirement of proteins in the larval diet. The association between larval morphological traits (e. g., the shape of the mandibles and pretarsus, presence of well-developed stemmata) and larval biology is discussed. Based on observations and the data from captive breeds it is concluded that a possible shift from pure saprophagy to an obligatory predaceous way of larval life occurred within the larvae of this genus, which may explain why these beetles achieve such an enormous size. PMID:27829788

  19. Antioxidant defense responses in Mytella guyanensis (Lamarck, 1819) exposed to an experimental diesel oil spill in Paranaguá Bay (Paraná, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Marques, Joseane A; de Assis, Helena C Silva; Guiloski, Izonete C; Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Carreira, Renato S; Lana, Paulo C

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of diesel oil on the bivalve Mytella guyanensis using biomarkers of oxidative stress (glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and reduced glutathione) after an experimental in situ spill in a mangrove area in southern Brazil. A linear model was developed for the Multiple Before-After Control-Impact (MBACI) experimental design to assess the significance of biological responses. Control and impacted sites were sampled seven and two days before as well as two and seven days after the spill. With the exception of a late response of reduced glutathione (GSH) levels on day seven, none of the biomarkers were significantly altered by the impact. This result was attributed to the high environmental variability of the experimental sites combined with a low sensitivity of Mytella guyanensis to diesel oil at short time-scales. The high resistance of M. guyanensis suggests that its antioxidant response is triggered only after a medium- to long-term exposure to contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Habitat traits and patterns of abundance of the purple sea urchin, Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816), at multiple scales along the north Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Rula; Domínguez Godino, Jorge; Freitas, Cristiano; Machado, Inês; Bertocci, Iacopo

    2015-03-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of abundance and distribution of sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus) from intertidal rockpools of the north Portuguese coast were examined in relation to physical (surface, altitude, depth, topographic complexity and exposure) and biological (substrate cover by dominant organisms) habitat traits. The methodology was based on a multi-factorial design where the total number and the abundance of urchins in each of six size classes were sampled over a range of spatial scales, from 10s of cm to kms, and a temporal scale of five months. The results highlighted three main features of the studied system: (1) the largest proportion of variability of sea urchins occurred at the smallest scale examined; (2) urchins from different size classes showed different patterns of abundance in relation to habitat traits; (3) variables normally invoked as potential drivers of distribution of urchins at a range of scales, such as hydrodynamics and shore height, were relatively less important than other abiotic (i.e. pool area, pool mean depth calculated over five replicate measures and sand cover) and biological (i.e. space occupancy by the reef-forming polychaete Sabellaria alveolata and mussels vs. availability of bare rock) variables to provide a considerable contribution to the variability of sea urchins. Intertidal populations of sea urchins are abundant on many rocky shores, where they are socially and economically important as food resource and ecologically key as habitat modelers. This study provides new clues on relatively unstudied populations, with relevant implications for possible management decisions, including the implementation of protection schemes able to preserve the main recruitment, settlement and development areas of P. lividus.

  1. The effect of feeding or starvation on resource allocation to body components during the reproductive cycle of the sea urchin Sphaerechinus granularis (Lamarck).

    PubMed

    Guillou; Lumingas; Michel

    2000-03-15

    To determine the effects of feeding or starvation on resource allocation to body components during the reproductive cycle of Sphaerechinus granularis, sea urchins were placed in laboratory tanks and either fed ad libitum or starved during two different periods of their biological cycle, i.e. the mature stage and the recovery stage. The urchin growth was monitored over the whole experimental period, the gonad, gut, lantern indices and organic matter levels of different organs were determined at the end of the experiment. During the mature stage sea urchins in good nutritional conditions did not increase in size, but allotted energy to gonad production and stored reserves in body wall. Limiting food stopped the gonadal growth without complete regression. During the recovery period food allowed somatic growth, i.e. test growth and the storage of reserves in gonad somatic cells. This somatic production did not occur under food-limited conditions and the resources allotted for survival and maintenance were taken from different body components.

  2. Seasonal antioxidant responses in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck 1816) used as a bioindicator of the environmental contamination in the South-East Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Amri, Sandra; Samar, Mohamed-Faouzi; Sellem, Fériel; Ouali, Kheireddine

    2017-09-15

    In this study, sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus were sampled seasonally at three stations during 2012 in the coastal areas of the Gulf of Annaba (southeast Mediterranean). For all sea urchins, the gonad index was calculated to determine sea urchin reproductive status. Moreover, a set of biochemical parameters, including biomarkers and oxidative stress parameters, was measured in gonads. The pesticides and physiochemical parameters were measured and dosed in sea water. The results obtained highlighted that the levels of pesticide were generally low and below those commonly applied by environmental quality standards (EQS), indicating that no alarm state is currently present in the Gulf of Annaba. In addition to pollution, seasonal change is an important factor influencing biomarker activity, and the significant increases in biomarker levels in spring are a major observed trend. This activity may also be related to reproductive status. Seasonal variability was confirmed by the significant results of the Kruskal-Wallis test and by the high degree of divergence between seasons in PCA, with a total of 83.83% of variance explained. These results indicate that environmental factors that vary seasonally may affect the antioxidant status of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. EFFECT OF DIET QUALITY ON NUTRIENT ALLOCATION TO THE TEST AND ARISTOTLE’S LANTERN IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS (LAMARCK, 1816)

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, Laura Elizabeth; Gibbs, Victoria K; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, Addison L; Lawrence, John M

    2014-01-01

    Small adult (19.50 ± 2.01g wet weight) Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (12 to 36% dry weight as fed) and carbohydrate (21 to 39 % dry weight) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily ration of 1.5% of the average body weight of all individuals for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion scores were used to compare six different dietary composition hypotheses for eight growth measurements. For each physical growth response, different mathematical models representing a priori hypotheses were compared using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) score. The AIC is one of many information-theoretic approaches that allows for direct comparison of non-nested models with varying number of parameters. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of test diameter increase. Dietary protein level was the best model of test with spines wet weight gain and test with spines dry matter production. When the Aristotle’s lantern was corrected for size of the test, there was an inverse relationship with dietary protein level. Log transformed lantern to test with spines index was also best associated with the dietary protein model. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for growth parameters. However, the protein × carbohydrate interaction model was the best model of organic content (% dry weight) of the test without spines. These data suggest that there is a differential allocation of resources when dietary protein is limiting and the test with spines, but not the Aristotle’s lantern, is affected by availability of dietary nutrients. PMID:25431520

  4. Quantification of a rock platform bioerosion by the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816): the Basque Coast case (Bay of Biscay).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regard, Vincent; de Casamjor, Marie-Noëlle; Maillet, Grégoire M.; Prémaillon, Mélody; Caill-Milly, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    The French Basque Coast is an actively eroding rocky coast. In the study area it is made of flysch with a circa 40 degrees-dip; it is exposed to an average significant wave height of 1.8 m and peak period of 9.6 s. It is mesotidal (spring tide of ˜4m). The current rocky shore platform is carved into the flysch layering. We focus on sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus contribution to rock shore erosion. Indeed, this sea urchin has a burrowing behaviour. An ecological study has been conducted for stock assessment, from shore to 10 m-deep. It indicates that sea urchins are burying their own shelter and are not reusing former ones. Below the depth of 10 m, sea urchins densities are very low and burial behavior is considered insignificant. Estimates of sea urchin density, and biomass are provided, making possible to evaluate the average erosion rate along this coast due to burying. It is of the order of 0.17 mm/y between 0 and 3 m below sea level, ˜0.05 mm/y between 3 and 5 m-deep, ˜0.02 mm/y between 5 and 8 m below sea level, and finally drops to negligible under 8 meters below sea-level. Close to the 0 level, it is thus between 30 and 5% of the expected value (evaluated to be 0.5-3 mm/y after 5-10 cm/y cliff retreat rate and a 1-2 degrees platform dip). The overall sea urchin contribution to shore platform erosion is not negligible.

  5. Bay Scallop Habitat Suitability Models: Predictions over Space and Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of Lagoon Pond, Martha’s Vineyard, MA, USA was conducted in September 2005 to determine the combination of habitat factors most highly correlated with bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) abundance.

  6. Restoration Lessons Learned from Bay Scallop Habitat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat quality and quantity are important factors to consider when restoring bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) populations; however, data linking habitat attributes to bay scallop populations are lacking. This information is essential to guide restoration efforts to reverse sc...

  7. A new species of Phrynus Lamarck, 1801 (Arachnida: Amblypygi),  from Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela, with a redescription of Phrynus pulchripes (Pocock, 1894).

    PubMed

    Joya, Daniel Chirivi

    2017-04-18

    We present the description of Phrynus calypso sp. nov. from Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela This species is very similar to Phrynus pulchripes (Pocock), however after examining Colombian specimens of P. pulchripes (ca. type locality), many differences were found. Characters commonly used in diagnosis of Phrynus species are variable and make identification difficult. Differences in a few structures, like pedipalpal spines, could not be enough to provide a useful diagnosis.  It is necessary to account for variation of similar species in conjunction, and select non overlapping groups of characters. Observations in the variation in both species are presented, pointing out sources of confusion, and suggesting alternative characters to support diagnoses. At the moment, details about variation in many species in Phrynus, like that of P. pulchripes, are poorly known, and for this reason a redescription is provided.

  8. Sediment Quality Characterization Naval Station San Diego

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    Neanthes sp. Sediment % Survival ៀ% > 80% S . purpuratus 1 Pore Water % Normal Larval ៀ% > 80% Development Haliotis sp. 1 Subsurface % Normal Shell ៀ...C. gigas survival, R. abronius survival, S . purpuratus development , and P450 induction. Of 16 sur- vival tests with G. japonica, 10 showed effects...showed effects in S . purpuratus development , and one showed no effects. Effects were observed using R. abronius at four sites and no effects were

  9. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  10. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  11. Using a System Level Approach to Bay Scallop Enhancement and Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last twenty years total harvests of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) have dwindled in the southern New England Region. Management of scallop populations has been underway on Martha’s Vineyard Island to provide the public with a fishery, and have included a com...

  12. Using a System Level Approach to Bay Scallop Enhancement and Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last twenty years total harvests of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) have dwindled in the southern New England Region. Management of scallop populations has been underway on Martha’s Vineyard Island to provide the public with a fishery, and have included a com...

  13. Periodic Matrix Model to Evaluate Management Strategies for Bay Scallop (Argopectin iraddians) Populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last twenty years total harvests of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) have dwindled in the southern New England Region, and one of the reasons often cited for this decline is drastic changes to their habitat, specifically eelgrass. To counteract these declines, bay ...

  14. Molecular and experimental evidence refuse the life cycle of Proctoeces lintoni (Fellodistomidae) in Chile.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Marcelo E; Valdivia, Isabel M; Cárdenas, Leyla; George-Nascimento, Mario; Gonzalez, Karen; Guiñez, Ricardo E; Cuello, Diego

    2010-02-01

    The mussel Perumitylus purpuratus has been described as the first intermediate host for the digenea Proctoeces lintoni (Fellodistomidae) in the Chilean coast. The study of more than 3000 specimens of P. purpuratus, taken off northern Chile revealed the absence of sporocysts. Experimental infection of mussels with eggs obtained from the known host for P. lintoni was unsuccessful. We analyze the V4 region of the SSU rRNA of living sporocysts and cercariae obtained from P. purpuratus from central Chile in order to confirm the proposed life cycle for this digenea. Our results demonstrated that sporocysts and cercariae obtained from P. purpuratus do not belong to P. lintoni but to an undescribed digenea from the Chilean coast.

  15. An Annotated Bibliography on the Biological Effects of Constructing Channels, Jetties, and other Coastal Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Stimpson) and S . franciscanus (A. Ag.) were manipulated in 21 experimental cells constructed on the rocks of the entrance channel...breakwater. Cells were set up with S . purpuratus only, with S . francis- canus only, and with half of the biomass of each species. The rate of change of...NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER MR 83-2 1jq6 i 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON THE

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Spicule Matrix Protein.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    responsible for the observed PCP activity in S . purpuratus , then its function will be essential for collagen deposition and therefore sea urchin development ....PCP) activity in S . purpuratus extracts containing suBMP- 1. This PCP activity is heat labile, and demonstrates both time and concentration dependent...in the developing sea urchin embryo, as well as for calcium carbonate deposition into growing spicules in primary mesenchyme cell culture. Disruption

  17. Skeletogenesis in sea urchin interordinal hybrid embryos.

    PubMed

    Brandhorst, B P; Davenport, R

    2001-07-01

    Reciprocal interordinal crosses were made between the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. Previous research indicated that the expression of many L. pictus genes is reduced in the hybrid embryos. The S. purpuratus gene encoding the spicule matrix protein SM50 and the L. pictus gene encoding its orthologue LSM34 were both expressed at normal levels per gene copy in hybrid embryos, and in about 32 skeletogenic primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) in hybrid and natural gastrulae. In many embryos of all crosses, 16 PMCs initially ingressed, while 32-64 PMCs were present in gastrulae. The skeletal spicules of most hybrid plutei were predominantly like those of S. purpuratus, consistent with the predominance of expression of S. purpuratus genes in hybrid embryos. The spicules of some hybrid plutei showed features characteristic of L. pictus, such as recurrent rods, branched body rod tips, or convergent ventral transverse rods; a few hybrid spicules were predominantly like those of L. pictus. Based on our observations and the literature, we propose the following. Cues from the ectodermal epithelium position the PMCs as they elaborate the initial triradiate spicules. Their orientation and outgrowth appears to be responsible for the convergence of the tips of body rods in most S. purpuratus and hybrid embryos, unlike in most L. pictus embryos. Variations among hybrid and natural embryos in skeletal branching pattern reflect differences in interpretation by PMCs of patterning cues produced by the ectodermal epithelium that probably have similar spatial distributions in the two species.

  18. Madaket Harbor, Nantucket, Massachusetts. Water Resources Improvement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    variations in annual reproduction. As an example, for the Niantic River in Connecticut, the annual bay scallop harvest has varied from 3,000 to...annual yield of 300 pounds, or about 30 pallons, per acre for the Niantic River, a figure, when extrapolated, that iH similar to the projection here. On...1960. Studies of the Niantic River, Connecticut, with special reference to the bay scallop, Argopecten ir- radians. Limnology and Oceanography

  19. Theories of Evolution, Science (Experimental): 5315.42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Joseph P.

    This is an in-depth course of study of the historical attempts to explain the evolutionary process and of recent developments pertinent to the study of biomedical evolution. Topics included in the module are: (1) ancient concepts of the evolutionary process; (2) various aspects of Lamarckism, Darwinism and neo-Darwinism, including substantiating…

  20. Problem-Solving Exercises and Evolution Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angseesing, J. P. A.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that the work of Kammerer provides suitable material, in the form of case studies on which to base discussions of Lamarckism versus Darwinism. A set of structured problems is described as an example of possible problem-solving exercises, and further experiments to extend Kammerer's work are outlined. (Author/MA)

  1. Problem-Solving Exercises and Evolution Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angseesing, J. P. A.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that the work of Kammerer provides suitable material, in the form of case studies on which to base discussions of Lamarckism versus Darwinism. A set of structured problems is described as an example of possible problem-solving exercises, and further experiments to extend Kammerer's work are outlined. (Author/MA)

  2. Weathering rate of male rubber septa impregnator sex pheromone of Sweetpotato Weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera: Brentidae), in East Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamarck, production in Hawaii has been increasing, reaching 190 harvested ha, with a total production of 3.78 million kg in 2009. Sweet potato production in Hawaii is hindered by three major quarantine pests, for which only one, the sweetpotato we...

  3. Trapping sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera: Brentidae), with high doses of sex pheromone: Catch enhancement and weathering rate in Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamarck, one of the top ten staple crops produced worldwide, has increased in production in Hawaii in recent years. The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers)(Coleoptera: Brentidae), is a major economic and quarantine pest of sweetpotato in Hawa...

  4. Life history parameters of the biocontrol agent Gratiana spadicea (Chrysomelidae), reared on the natural host plant Solanum sisymbriifolium and the non-target crop Solanum melongena (Solanaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gratiana spadicea (Klug), a leaf-feeding tortoise beetle native to South America, was released in South Africa for the biological control of Solanum sisymbriifolium Lamarck (wild tomato), despite its ability to develop on cultivated eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) during laboratory host-specificity ...

  5. Green light synergistically enhances male sweetpotato weevil sex pheromone response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamarck, commercially grown in over 100 countries, is the 7th most important staple crop in the world. Sweetpotato weevil is a major pest of sweetpotato in most areas of cultivation, the feeding of which induces production in the sweetpotato root of extremely bitter...

  6. The biological control of Pomacea canaliculata population by rice-duck mutualism in paddy fields

    Treesearch

    Kiang Liang; Jia-en Zhang; Li Fang; Benliang Zaho; Mingzhu Luo; Prem Parajuli; Ying Ouyang

    2013-01-01

    Duck has been used as a non-chemical control method against Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck, but little is known about its principles that underlie the control of snail populations. An indoor experiment was initially used to observe the predation potential of ducks, followed by replicated field trials. In the indoor studies, ducks effectively preyed on...

  7. Students' Preconceptions about Evolution: How Accurate Is the Characterization as "Lamarckian" when Considering the History of Evolutionary Thought?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampourakis, Kostas; Zogza, Vasso

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the main points of Lamarck's and Darwin's theoretical conceptual schemes about evolution are compared to those derived from 15 years old students' explanations of evolutionary episodes. We suggest that secondary students' preconceptions should not be characterized as "Lamarckian", because they are essentially different from the…

  8. Students' Preconceptions about Evolution: How Accurate Is the Characterization as "Lamarckian" when Considering the History of Evolutionary Thought?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampourakis, Kostas; Zogza, Vasso

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the main points of Lamarck's and Darwin's theoretical conceptual schemes about evolution are compared to those derived from 15 years old students' explanations of evolutionary episodes. We suggest that secondary students' preconceptions should not be characterized as "Lamarckian", because they are essentially different from the…

  9. Warmer temperatures reduce the influence of an important keystone predator.

    PubMed

    Bonaviri, Chiara; Graham, Michael; Gianguzza, Paola; Shears, Nick T

    2017-01-11

    Predator-prey interactions may be strongly influenced by temperature variations in marine ecosystems. Consequently, climate change may alter the importance of predators with repercussions for ecosystem functioning and structure. In North-eastern Pacific kelp forests, the starfish Pycnopodia helianthoides is known to be an important predator of the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Here we investigated the influence of water temperature on this predator-prey interaction by: (i) assessing the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of both species across a temperature gradient in the northern Channel Islands, California, and (ii) investigating how the feeding rate of P. helianthoides on S. purpuratus is affected by temperature in laboratory tests. On average, at sites where mean annual temperatures were <14 °C, P. helianthoides were common, S. purpuratus was rare and kelp was persistent, whereas where mean annual temperatures exceeded 14 °C, P. helianthoides and kelp were rare and S. purpuratus abundant. Temperature was found to be the primary environmental factor influencing P. helianthoides abundance, and in turn P. helianthoides was the primary determinant of S. purpuratus abundance. In the laboratory, temperatures >16 °C (equivalent to summer temperatures at sites where P. helianthoides were rare) reduced predation rates regardless of predator and prey sizes, although larger sea urchins were consumed only by large starfishes. These results clearly demonstrate that the effect of P. helianthoides on S. purpuratus is strongly mediated by temperature, and that the local abundance and predation rate of P. helianthoides on sea urchins will likely decrease with future warming. A reduction in top-down control on sea urchins, combined with other expected impacts of climate change on kelp, poses significant risks for the persistence of kelp forests in the future.

  10. The geology of the Inconsolable Range, east-central Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, G.M; Reed, W.E. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Detailed mapping of the Inconsolable Range in the east-central Sierra Nevada reveals a structurally and lithologically complex region of multi-phase intrusions. Some plutons are compositionally-zoned [e.g., Inconsolable (100 Ma) and Lamarck (90 Ma)]; others may be the result of magma mixing. Intrusive borders vary from brittle to ductile and sharp to gradational, and are bounded by contact aureoles of varying metamorphic grade. A shear zone (Long Lake shear zone -- LLSZ) bounds the western margin of the Inconsolable Range for 8 km; this is truncated in the south by the Cretaceous Lamarck intrusive suite, and is tectonically overlain in the north by the Bishop Creek Pendant (Ordovician ). The LLSZ is a complex zone of interleaved septa of biotite schists, orthogneisses, aplitic screens, and calc-silicate gneisses approximately 500 to 800 m wide. Preliminary interpretation suggests that the LLSZ is the sheared remnant of a Triassic-Jurassic igneous terrane complete with metasedimentary pendants. Juxtaposition of greenschist facies meta-sedimentary rocks of the Chocolate Peak klippe over highly deformed amphibolite grade meta-igneous rocks of the LLSZ postdates movement along the LLSZ. Metamorphic grades suggest that deeper structural levels are exposed within the LLSZ near its southern terminus. Twenty plutonic lithologies have been mapped and informally named (e.g., Spotted biotite quartz diorite), including 3 compositionally-zoned plutons. Zonation within the Lamarck, Inconsolable, and Spotted intrusions are the result of multiple emplacement events into partially crystallized host plutons. Along the eastern border of the Lamarck intrusive suite field evidence indicates four separate intrusive events. The Inconsolable body is a compositionally-zoned biotite, clinopyroxene, quartz diorite with irregular granodiorite margins. The base of the Spotted intrusion appears to have been magmatically eroded by a pulse of the younger Lamarck intrusion.

  11. Determining the Fate and Ecological Effects of Copper and Zinc Loading in Estuarine Environments: A Multi-Disciplinary Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    SD32 9-19~1 S . purpuratus • SD33 2-27~2 S . purpuratus ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,USEPA chronic WQC • SD32 9-19~1 M. galloprovinc iallis • SD33 2-27~2 M...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) SPAWAR Systems Center San Diego,53560 Hull Street,San Diego,CA,92152 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  12. Paleogenomics of echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Bottjer, David J; Davidson, Eric H; Peterson, Kevin J; Cameron, R Andrew

    2006-11-10

    Paleogenomics propels the meaning of genomic studies back through hundreds of millions of years of deep time. Now that the genome of the echinoid Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is sequenced, the operation of its genes can be interpreted in light of the well-understood echinoderm fossil record. Characters that first appear in Early Cambrian forms are still characteristic of echinoderms today. Key genes for one of these characters, the biomineralized tissue stereom, can be identified in the S. purpuratus genome and are likely to be the same genes that were involved with stereom formation in the earliest echinoderms some 520 million years ago.

  13. Adult Demography and Larval Processes in Coastal Benthic Populations: Intertidal Barnacles in Southern California and Baja California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    locentrotus franciscanus and S . purpuratus ) in California, 1400-1414, USA. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 111, 41-52. Pineda, J., 2000. Linking...Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution September 2005 Certified by S -Jestis Pineda Thesis Supervisor...0 1 .2 . S Y N O P S IS

  14. Evolutionary and experimental change in egg volume, heterochrony of larval body and juvenile rudiment, and evolutionary reversibility in pluteus form.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Douglas F; Phillips, Nicole E; Strathmann, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    Heterochronic developmental plasticity of the juvenile rudiment and larval body of sea urchin larvae occurs in response to supply of food. Evolutionary increase in egg size can also be associated with earlier development of the juvenile rudiment. We examined effects of egg volume of feeding larvae on this heterochrony and other changes in larval form. (1) Evolutionary and experimental enlargements of egg volume did not accelerate formation of the rudiment relative to the larval body. Development of the larval body and juvenile rudiment was compared for the echinoids Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (with an egg of 78-82 microm) and Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis (with an egg of 150-160 microm diameter). Development of both larval body and rudiment were accelerated in S. droebachiensis relative to S. purpuratus but with greater acceleration of the larval body, so that the rudiment of S. droebachiensis was initiated at a later larval stage even though at an earlier age. Also, experimentally doubling the egg volume of S. purpuratus did not accelerate development of the juvenile rudiment relative to the larval body. (2) Both species exhibited similar plasticity in timing of rudiment development in response to food supplies. (3) Doubling egg volume of S. purpuratus produced a larval form more similar to that of S. droebachiensis. This result mirrors previous experiments in which larvae from half embryos of S. droebachiensis were more similar to larvae of S. purpuratus. Many of the effects of egg volume on larval form are similar against either species' genetic background and are thus evolutionarily reversible effects on larval form.

  15. Autonomous and non-autonomous differentiation of ectoderm in different sea urchin species.

    PubMed

    Wikramanayake, A H; Brandhorst, B P; Klein, W H

    1995-05-01

    During early embryogenesis, the highly regulative sea urchin embryo relies extensively on cell-cell interactions for cellular specification. Here, the role of cellular interactions in the temporal and spatial expression of markers for oral and aboral ectoderm in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus was investigated. When pairs of mesomeres or animal caps, which are fated to give rise to ectoderm, were isolated and cultured they developed into ciliated embryoids that were morphologically polarized. In animal explants from S. purpuratus, the aboral ectoderm-specific Spec1 gene was activated at the same time as in control embryos and at relatively high levels. The Spec1 protein was restricted to the squamous epithelial cells in the embryoids suggesting that an oral-aboral axis formed and aboral ectoderm differentiation occurred correctly. However, the Ecto V protein, a marker for oral ectoderm differentiation, was detected throughout the embryoid and no stomodeum or ciliary band formed. These results indicated that animal explants from S. purpuratus were autonomous in their ability to form an oral-aboral axis and to differentiate aboral ectoderm, but other aspects of ectoderm differentiation require interaction with vegetal blastomeres. In contrast to S. purpuratus, aboral ectoderm-specific genes were not expressed in animal explants from L. pictus even though the resulting embryoids were morphologically very similar to those of S. purpuratus. Recombination of the explants with vegetal blastomeres or exposure to the vegetalizing agent LiCl restored activity of aboral ectoderm-specific genes, suggesting the requirement of a vegetal induction for differentiation of aboral ectoderm cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Exposure of a late cretaceous layered mafic-felsic magma system in the central Sierra Nevada batholith, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.S.; Glazner, A.F.; Miller, J.S.; Bradford, K.J.; Frost, T.P.; Joye, J.L.; Bachl, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    New U-Pb zircon ages for the Lamarck Granodiorite, associated synplutonic gabbro and diorite plutons, and two large mafic intrusive complexes that underlie them in the Sierra Nevada batholith are 92??1 Ma. These ages establish the Late Cretaceous as a period of extensive mafic-felsic magmatism in the central part of the batholith, and confirm the significance of mafic magmatism in the evolution of the voluminous silicic plutions in the Sierran arc. The lack of significant zircon inheritance in any of the units analyzed supports isotopic evidence that the Lamarck and other Late Cretaceous Sierran plutons were derived predominantly from young crust. Recognition of an extensive mafic-felsic magma system in the Sierra Nevada batholith emphasizes the importance of basaltic liquids in the evolution of continental crust in arc settings. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Weismann, Wittgenstein and the homunculus fallacy.

    PubMed

    Smit, Harry

    2010-09-01

    A problem that has troubled both neo-Darwinists and neo-Lamarckians is whether instincts involve knowledge. This paper discusses the contributions to this problem of the evolutionary biologist August Weismann and the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. Weismann discussed an empirical homunculus fallacy: Lamarck's theory mistakenly presupposes a homunculus in the germ cells. Wittgenstein discussed a conceptual homunculus fallacy which applies to Lamarck's theory: it is mistaken to suppose that knowledge is stored in the brain or DNA. The upshot of these two fallacies is that instincts arise through a neo-Darwinian process but are not cognitions in the sense that they involve (the recollection of stored) knowledge. Although neo-Lamarckians have rightly argued that learning processes may contribute to the development of instincts, their ideas about the role of knowledge in the evolution and development of instincts are mistaken.

  18. Essential Shift: Scientific Revolution in the 20th Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-17

    Lamarck, and the Scottish geologist Charles Lyell .5’ Based on the extensive observational research that he conducted on his 1831-1836 voyage on HMS...within the Newtonian paradigm in the nineteenth century, the science of thermodynamics and Charles Darwin’s theory of biological evolution, a scientific...briefly examine histories of thermodynamics and evolution, their relationship with the Newtonian paradigm and with each other. 39 Charles Darwin developed

  19. The Effects of Increased Commercial Navigation Traffic on Freshwater Mussels in the Upper Mississippi River: 1990 Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    0.2360 Fusconaia flava (Rafinesque 1820) 32 0.0242 20 0.2247 Actinonaias ligamentina (Lamarck 1819) 32 0.0242 23 0.2584 Anodonta grandis (Say 1829...undulatus (Say 1817) 12 0.0091 11 0.1236 Lampsilis higginsi (Lea 1857) 5 0.0038 4 0.0449 Quadrula nodulata (Rafinesque 1817) 4 0.0030 3 0.0337 Anodonta

  20. Effects of Increased Commercial Navigation Traffic on Freshwater Mussels in the Upper Mississippi River; 1992 Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    2.44 26.67 Ligumia recta (Lamarck, 1819) 1.33 11.67 Potamilus alatus (Say, 1817) 0.81 14.17 Quadrula metanevra (Rafinesque, 1820) 1.04 12.50 Anodonta ...Truncilla donaciformis (I. Lea, 1828) 0.12 0.83 Anodonta imbecillis Say, 1829 0.12 1.67 Elliptia dilatata (Rafinesque, 1820) 0.06 1.67 Potamilus

  1. Comparative susceptibility of veliger larvae of four bivalve mollusks to a Vibrio alginolyticus strain.

    PubMed

    Luna-González, A; Maeda-Martínez, A N; Sainz, J C; Ascencio-Valle, F

    2002-06-03

    The susceptibility of 7 d old veliger larvae of the scallops Argopecten ventricosus and Nodipecten subnodosus, the penshell Atrina maura, and the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to a pathogenic strain of Vibrio alginolyticus was investigated by challenging the larvae with different bacterial concentrations in a semi-static assay. The results indicate that the larvae of the 2 scallop species are more susceptible to the V. alginolyticus strain than those of the oyster and the penshell. Signs of the disease were similar to bacillary necrosis described in previous work. Interspecies differences in susceptibility to pathogens are discussed.

  2. High opsin diversity in a non-visual infaunal brittle star.

    PubMed

    Delroisse, Jérôme; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Dupont, Sam; Arnone, Maria-Ina; Mallefet, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick

    2014-11-28

    In metazoans, opsins are photosensitive proteins involved in both vision and non-visual photoreception. Echinoderms have no well-defined eyes but several opsin genes were found in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome. Molecular data are lacking for other echinoderm classes although many species are known to be light sensitive. In this study focused on the European brittle star Amphiura filiformis, we first highlighted a blue-green light sensitivity using a behavioural approach. We then identified 13 new putative opsin genes against eight bona fide opsin genes in the genome of S. purpuratus. Six opsins were included in the rhabdomeric opsin group (r-opsins). In addition, one putative ciliary opsin (c-opsin), showing high similarity with the c-opsin of S. purpuratus (Sp-opsin 1), one Go opsin similar to Sp-opsins 3.1 and 3.2, two basal-branch opsins similar to Sp-opsins 2 and 5, and two neuropsins similar to Sp-opsin 8, were identified. Finally, two sequences from one putative RGR opsin similar to Sp-opsin 7 were also detected. Adult arm transcriptome analysis pinpointed opsin mRNAs corresponding to one r-opsin, one neuropsin and the homologue of Sp-opsin 2. Opsin phylogeny was determined by maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses. Using antibodies designed against c- and r-opsins from S. purpuratus, we detected putative photoreceptor cells mainly in spines and tube feet of A. filiformis, respectively. The r-opsin expression pattern is similar to the one reported in S. purpuratus with cells labelled at the tip and at the base of the tube feet. In addition, r-opsin positive cells were also identified in the radial nerve of the arm. C-opsins positive cells, expressed in pedicellariae, spines, tube feet and epidermis in S. purpuratus were observed at the level of the spine stroma in the brittle star. Light perception in A. filiformis seems to be mediated by opsins (c- and r-) in, at least, spines, tube feet and in the radial nerve cord. Other

  3. The transcriptome of the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Manoj P; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Istrail, Sorin; Cameron, R Andrew; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H; Stolc, Viktor

    2006-11-10

    The sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is a model organism for study of the genomic control circuitry underlying embryonic development. We examined the complete repertoire of genes expressed in the S. purpuratus embryo, up to late gastrula stage, by means of high-resolution custom tiling arrays covering the whole genome. We detected complete spliced structures even for genes known to be expressed at low levels in only a few cells. At least 11,000 to 12,000 genes are used in embryogenesis. These include most of the genes encoding transcription factors and signaling proteins, as well as some classes of general cytoskeletal and metabolic proteins, but only a minor fraction of genes encoding immune functions and sensory receptors. Thousands of small asymmetric transcripts of unknown function were also detected in intergenic regions throughout the genome. The tiling array data were used to correct and authenticate several thousand gene models during the genome annotation process.

  4. Application of toxicity identification procedures to the echinoderm fertilization assay to identify toxicity in a municipal effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, H.C.; Miller, J.L.; Miller, M.J.; Dhaliwal, B.S.

    1995-12-01

    Toxicity was detected in a municipal effluent with the echinoderm fertilization assay. Dendraster excentricus appeared more sensitive to the effluent than did Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A Phase 1 toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) was conducted using procedures adapted to the echinoderm fertilization bioassay. The Phase 1 TIE implicated cationic metals as the cause of toxicity, and follow-up investigations suggested that copper was the primary cation responsible. As part of the TIE, bioassays were conducted on ammonia and several cations. No-observable-effect concentrations for D. excentricus were > 13.4 {micro}g/L (Ag), > 9.4 {micro}g/L (Cd), 3.8 to 13.1 {micro}g/L (Cu), > 0.7 {micro}g/L (Hg), and 10 mg/L (N, as total ammonia). The data also suggested that interspecific differences in sensitivity to copper and ammonia exist between Dendraster excentricus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

  5. A Literature Survey on the Wetland Vegetation of Alaska.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Pitmegea River but about 5 miles inland shrubs are well developed with Salix alaxensis 2 to 6 ft tall and S . glauca and S . richardsonii 1 to 4 ft high... develop directly on bare alluvial gravels, the two most important species being Salix pulchra and S . alaxensis. Near the coast the latter is the most common...depth greater than 1 m. The most abundant species * are Crepis nana, Erigeron purpuratus , Epilobium latifolium, Artemisia ’* S tilesii, A. alaskana, A

  6. Bioluminescence Flow Visualization in the Ocean: An Initial Strategy Based on Laboratory Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    development of the 408-416. purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus . Biological Rohr, J., Latz, M.I., Fallon, S ., Nauen, J.C., Hendricks, E...experiments 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHORS 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jim Rohr, Stewart Fallon’ Mark Hyman2 S . TASK NUMBER Michael I...Latz 3 51. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION ’SSC San Diego 2Coastal Systems Station

  7. Annotated Bibliography of Bioassays Related to Sediment Toxicity Testing in Washington State

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    REVIEWS GENERAL Anderson, B. S ., J. W. Hunt, M. Martin, S . L. Turpen and F. H. Palmer. 1988. Marine bioassay project, third report. Protocol development ...Office of Research and Development , U. S . Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR. 60 pp. This is an acute bioassay manual designed by an EPA...test species are: 1. Purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus 2. Green sea urchin, S . droebachiensis 3. Sand dollai, Dendraster excentricus

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Variation in North Atlantic Long-Finned Pilot Whales, Globicephala melas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and S . droebachiensis. Evolution 44: 403-415. Rosel, P.E. (1992). Genetic population structure and systematic relationships of...reproduce and distribute copies of this thesis document in whole or in part Signale of Amho,i^ S ^*^ Joint Program in Oceanography, Massachusetts Institute...variation used in the studies described in this chapter include: 1) Genetic distance (d, p, S , or D) is a measure of the number of nucleotide

  9. Marine Ecological Risk Assessment at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    on Fertilization, Survival, and Development of the Sea Urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ," in Biological Monitoring of Marine Pollutants (F... developed for each proposed study. Funding by NAVOCEANSYSCEN and EPA-ERL is subject to the U. S . Government appropriation process. No responsibility is...ecological risk assessment is developed . Exposure to and the effects of contamination are measured at both subtidal and intertidal s . %tions. A T-shaped

  10. Lectins with potential for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yau, Tammy; Dan, Xiuli; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-02-26

    This article reviews lectins of animal and plant origin that induce apoptosis and autophagy of cancer cells and hence possess the potential of being developed into anticancer drugs. Apoptosis-inducing lectins encompass galectins, C-type lectins, annexins, Haliotis discus discus lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, mistletoe lectin, and concanavalin A, fucose-binding Dicentrarchus labrax lectin, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, and mistletoe lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, autophagy inducing lectins include annexins and Polygonatum odoratum lectin.

  11. Sediment Ecosystem Assessment Protocol (SEAP): An Accurate and Integrated Weight-of-Evidence Based System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    DATE JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sediment Ecosystem Assessment Protocol (SEAP): An Accurate and...characteristics for various test types . Q-P.l.= Qwiklite (Pyrocystis lunula); Q-C.h.=QwikLite (Ceratocorys horrida); S.p.=Strongylocentrotus purpuratus...Median effective concentration EJ Emergent juvenile ERDC Engineer Research and Development Center ERL Effects range low ERM Effects range median

  12. First intermediate host of the digenean trematode Proctoeces lintoni (Fellodistomidae) in Chile.

    PubMed

    Aldana, Marcela; González, Karen; Loot, Geraldine; Pulgar, José; Marquet, Pablo A

    2009-12-01

    The digenetic trematode, Proctoeces lintoni, is a parasite of the rocky intertidal ecosystems of the Chilean Pacific coastline. Although this species is relatively well known, the first intermediate host has not yet been described. In the present study, we used experimental protocols and field studies to identify the host that harbors the sporocysts and cercariae stages of the parasite. The first intermediate host was shown to be the dominant mussel of the mid-littoral zone, Perumytilus purpuratus.

  13. Evolutionary analysis of the cis-regulatory region of the spicule matrix gene SM50 in strongylocentrotid sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jenna; Binkley, Elaine; Haygood, Ralph; Romano, Laura A

    2008-03-15

    An evolutionary analysis of transcriptional regulation is essential to understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity. The sea urchin is an ideal system in which to explore the functional consequence of variation in cis-regulatory sequences. We are particularly interested in the evolution of genes involved in the patterning and synthesis of its larval skeleton. This study focuses on the cis-regulatory region of SM50, which has already been characterized to a considerable extent in the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We have isolated the cis-regulatory region from 15 individuals of S. purpuratus as well as seven closely related species in the family Strongylocentrotidae. We have performed a variety of statistical tests and present evidence that the cis-regulatory elements upstream of the SM50 gene have been subject to positive selection along the lineage leading to S. purpuratus. In addition, we have performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and demonstrate that nucleotide substitutions within Element C affect the ability of nuclear proteins to bind to this cis-regulatory element among members of the family Strongylocentrotidae. We speculate that such changes in SM50 and other genes could accumulate to produce altered patterns of gene expression with functional consequences during skeleton formation.

  14. Network model predicts that CatSper is the main Ca(2+) channel in the regulation of sea urchin sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Priego-Espinosa, Daniel Alejandro; Darszon, Alberto; Beltrán, Carmen; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo

    2017-06-26

    Spermatozoa sea urchin swimming behaviour is regulated by small peptides from the egg outer envelope. Speract, such a peptide, after binding to its receptor in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sperm flagella, triggers a signaling pathway that culminates with a train of intracellular calcium oscillations, correlated with changes in sperm swimming pattern. This pathway has been widely studied but not fully characterized. Recent work on Arbacia punctulata sea urchin spermatozoa has documented the presence of the Ca(2+) CatSper channel in their flagella and its involvement in chemotaxis. However, if other calcium channels participate in chemotaxis remains unclear. Here, based on an experimentally-backed logical network model, we conclude that CatSper is fundamental in the S. purpuratus speract-activated sea urchin sperm signaling cascade, although other Ca(2+) channels could still be relevant. We also present for the first time experimental corroboration of its active presence in S. purpuratus sperm flagella. We argue, prompted by in silico knock-out calculations, that CatSper is the main generator of calcium oscillations in the signaling pathway and that other calcium channels, if present, have a complementary role. The approach adopted here allows us to unveil processes, which are hard to detect exclusively by experimental procedures.

  15. Comparative evaluation of the DNA damage response in two Peruvian marine bivalves exposed to changes in temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotil, Giovanna; Tarazona, Juan; Alvis, Rafael; Francia, Juan C.; Shiga, Betty

    2008-03-01

    The comparison of temperature responses of two mytilids from the high ( Brachidontes purpuratus) and low ( Semimytilus algosus) intertidal zone of the Peruvian coast was carried out focusing on the production of micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities in gill tissue. Two temperatures (23 and 11°C) were evaluated, in presence of three mitomycin C concentrations as a stressor (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 × 10-6), simulating hypothetical El Niño and La Niña conditions. Responses to extreme temperatures between both species were significantly different ( P = 0.008). Frequency of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in S. algosus did not differ statistically among the temperature treatments, whereas in B. purpuratus there was an observed significant decrease in nuclear abnormalities ( P = 0.012) and micronuclei frequencies ( P = 0.002) between both temperature treatments. The low frequency of micronuclei observed at high temperature and mitomycin C suggests a better efficiency to stress resistance, as occurs during El Niño events, of the species from the higher intertidal zone of B. purpuratus compared to S. algosus from the lower intertidal zone.

  16. Dependence of sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration on xyloside- and sulfate-sensitive cell surface-associated components.

    PubMed

    Lane, M C; Solursh, M

    1988-05-01

    The migration of sea urchin primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) is inhibited in embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in seawater containing exogenous xylosides. In the present study, primary mesenchyme cells and extra-cellular matrix have been isolated from normal and treated Lytechinus pictus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos and recombined in an in vitro migration assay to determine whether the cells or the matrix are migration defective. Normal cells were found to migrate on either normal or treated matrix, whereas sulfate-deprived and xyloside-treated PMC failed to migrate in vitro on normal and treated substrata. Migratory ability can be restored to defective cells by returning the PMC to normal seawater, or by exposing the defective cells to materials removed from the surface of normal cells with 1 M urea. The similarity of the results obtained with sulfate-deprived and xyloside-treated PMC suggested that a common molecule may be affected by the two treatments. As a first test of this possibility, xyloside-treated S. purpuratus PMC were given the urea extract prepared from sulfate-deprived S. purpuratus PMC, and this extract did not restore migratory ability. These findings indicate that PMC normally synthesize a surface-associated molecule that is involved in cell migration, and the sensitivity to exogenous xylosides and sulfate deprivation suggests that a sulfated proteoglycan may be involved in primary mesenchyme cell migration.

  17. The Hurd Peak gneiss of the Long Lake shear zone, eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, K.S.; Reed, W.E. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Hurd Peak gneiss is located within the Long Lake valley of the east-central Sierra Nevada, California. This unit is the principle orthogneiss in Hathaway's (1993) Long Lake shear zone. The rock shows porphyroclasts of plagioclase and quartz, abundant mafic enclaves, and cross-cutting field associations which suggest that the gneiss had a plutonic protolith. The gneiss varies from biotite-poor nearest the contact with the Lamarck to biotite-rich nearest Long Lake. The contact zone between the gneiss and the Lamarck pluton ranges from sharp to gradational and from migmatitic to mixed, i.e., the mixed zone being greater than 50% intermingled dikes of 10 cm or greater thickness. In places this contact is marked by a quartz-free biotite hornfels approximately 5 m thick. Based on their relative deformation, at least 3 suites of aplite dikes cross-cut the gneiss, and 5 other lithologies, including basaltic, mixed, composite, andesitic, and quartz dioritic compositions, also cross-cut the gneiss. The Rb-Sr whole rock isochron age of the Hurd Peak gneiss has been determined to be 90.2 Ma. The authors interpret this isochron to be the result of mobilization of the Rb-Sr isotopic system during intrusion of the Lamarck Granodiorite (90 Ma); this may represent a regional cooling age. The initial [sup 87]/Sr[sup 86]Sr ratio of the gneiss is 0.7098, i.e., much more evolved than the surrounding plutons which have [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios near 0.706. Sr model ages indicate that the protolith of the gneiss is considerably older than 90 Ma, one such calculation suggests an age of approximately 250 Ma. Single crystals of zircon have been isolated from the gneiss for U-Pb dating, and analytical work on the zircons is presently on-going.

  18. [The Microsculpture of Glochidia of Some Anodontine Bivalves (Unionidae)].

    PubMed

    Sayenko, E M

    2016-01-01

    Glochidia of three freshwater anodontine bivalves: Kunashiria Starobogatov in Zatrawkin, 1983, Sinanodonta Modell, 1944, from the Far East, and Anodonta Lamarck, 1799, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Data on the microsculpture of the outer surface of glochidial valves are given. Among the three genera discussed, the glochidia of Anodonta are the largest, with a loose-looped outer microsculpture and numerous granules. The glochidia of Kunashiria and Sinanodonta differ by the valve height--length proportions and some details of the outer microsculpture: glochidia of Kunashiria have a tight-looped outer sculpture while the glochidia of Sinanodonta have a loose-net outer sculpture.

  19. Origin of life and definition of life, from Buffon to Oparin.

    PubMed

    Tirard, Stéphane

    2010-04-01

    Many theories on origin of life at the end of the XIXth century and the beginning of the XXth, generally use conceptions of life instead of explicit definitions of life. This paper presents ideas on the origin of life as studied by Buffon (1707-1788), Lamarck (1744-1829), Darwin (1809-1882), Huxley (1825-1895), Oparin (1894-1980) and Haldane (1892-1964). We show that their conceptions on the evolution of matter and life reveal their conceptions of life rather than their definitions of life.

  20. Rediscovery and redescription of Leodice laurillardi (Quatrefages, 1866) comb. nov. (Annelida: Eunicidae)-a rare European polychaete or just an overlooked species?

    PubMed

    Arias, Andrés; Fernández-Álvarez, Fernando Á; Martins, Roberto; Anadón, Nuria

    2015-06-04

    The eunicid polychaete, Eunice laurillardi Quatrefages, 1866, originally described from the central Mediterranean, has been discovered on the northern Iberian Peninsula, constituting the first report of the species since its original description. The new specimens are compared with the type collection and the species is redescribed. Furthermore, the species is assigned to the genus Leodice Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, based on information provided by re-examination of type material and the newly collected specimens. A summary of the complex taxonomic history of the species and a discussion of its current status are also provided.

  1. Bacterially induced stolon settlement in the scyphopolyp of Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmahl, G.

    1985-03-01

    Unsettled stoloniferous scyphopolyps of Aurelia aurita Lamarck were offered different substrates for settlement under defined conditions. On addition of different biogenic and abiotic substrates, a pure strain of bacteria, a species of Micrococcaceae, was observed to trigger the settlement of the stolon. The settlement reaction only takes place following direct contact with the bacteria; sterile filtrated culture medium of the same bacterial strain was not able to induce settlement. The bacteria were found to be effective on stolon settlement during the logarithmic growth phase, but not during the stationary phase.

  2. Origin of Life and Definition of Life, from Buffon to Oparin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirard, Stéphane

    2010-04-01

    Many theories on origin of life at the end of the XIXth century and the beginning of the XXth, generally use conceptions of life instead of explicit definitions of life. This paper presents ideas on the origin of life as studied by Buffon (1707-1788), Lamarck (1744-1829), Darwin (1809-1882), Huxley (1825-1895), Oparin (1894-1980) and Haldane (1892-1964). We show that their conceptions on the evolution of matter and life reveal their conceptions of life rather than their definitions of life.

  3. A soul of truth in things erroneous: Popper's "amateurish" evolutionary philosophy in light of contemporary biology.

    PubMed

    Vecchi, Davide; Baravalle, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    This paper will critically assess Popper's evolutionary philosophy. There exists a rich literature on the topic with which we have many reservations. We believe that Popper's evolutionary philosophy should be assessed in light of the intriguing theoretical insights offered, during the last 10 years or so, by the philosophy of biology, evolutionary biology and molecular biology. We will argue that, when analysed in this manner, Popper's ideas concerning the nature of selection, Lamarckism and the theoretical limits of neo-Darwinism can be appreciated in their full biological and philosophical value.

  4. An Investigation of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) in the Tennessee River below Kentucky Lock and Dam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    found in less than 10 percent of the samples. Thin-shelled species, Anodonta grandis, Anodonta im- becillis, Lampsilis teres, and Leptodeafragilis...Thin-shelled and moderately thick-shelled species (L. fragilis, Potamilus alatus, and Anodonta spp.) were uncommon and comprised less than 1 percent of...00025 9 0.0314 17 Ligumia recta (Lamarck. 18 19) 9 010 1 I 9 0.0314 18 Lampsifts tes (Rat inesque. 1,12’ 7 00015 6 0.0209 19 Anodonta imbectIlis (Say

  5. Effects of Increased Commercial Navigation Traffic on Freshwater Mussels in the Upper Mississippi River: 1989 Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    stronger than at the nearshor site in spring 1988. Leptodea fragilis 45. The fragile papershell was obtained in sufficient numbers (61 individuals) for...L. fragilis ranging in SL from 40 to /4; mm probably represents individuals that settled in spring 1988 and are thus slightly more than I year old...Say 1817) 103 0.023) 77 G.2692 Ligumia recta (Lamarck 1819) 88 0 D19; 54 0.1888 Leptodea fragilis (Rafinesque 1820) 74 C 0165 47 0.1643 Arcidens

  6. Survey for Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) in the Lower Green and Barren Rivers, Kentucky, 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    0.40 0.17 0.19 16 Chapter 3 Bivalve Community high percentage of A. p. plicata). No thin-shelled species (for example Anodonta spp. or Leptodea fragilis ...Rafinesque 1820) Wartyback x x Leptodea fragilis (Ratinesque 1820) Fragile papershell x x Actinonasas ligamentina (Lamarck 1819) Mucket X X A~rcidens...ligamentina - 8.33 16.67 8.82 L. fragilis 20.00 8.33 - 8.82 T. truncata - 8.33 8.33 5.88 F. ebena 10.00 - 8.33 5.88 A. confragosus 20.00 -- 5.8V r

  7. Recent biogenic phosphorite: Concretions in mollusk kidneys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, L.J.; Blake, N.J.; Woo, C.C.; Yevich, P.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorite concretions have been detected in the kidneys of two widespread species ofmollusks, Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians, which have relatively high population densities. These concretions are thefirst documentation of the direct biogenic formation of phosphorite grains. The concretions are principally amorphous calcium phosphate, which upon being heated yields an x-ray diffraction pattern which is essentially that of chlorapatite. These concretions appear to be a normal formation of the excretory process of mollusks under reproductive, environmental, or pollutant-induced stress. Biogenic production of phosphorite concretions over long periods of time and diagenetic change from amorphous to crystalline structure, coupled with secondary enrichment, may account for the formation of some marine phosphorite desposits which are not easily explained by the chemical precipitation- replacement hypothesis. Copyright ?? 1978 AAAS.

  8. Transgenerational exposure of North Atlantic bivalves to ocean acidification renders offspring more vulnerable to low pH and additional stressors.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Andrew W; Gobler, Christopher J

    2017-09-12

    While early life-stage marine bivalves are vulnerable to ocean acidification, effects over successive generations are poorly characterized. The objective of this work was to assess the transgenerational effects of ocean acidification on two species of North Atlantic bivalve shellfish, Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians. Adults of both species were subjected to high and low pCO2 conditions during gametogenesis. Resultant larvae were exposed to low and ambient pH conditions in addition to multiple, additional stressors including thermal stress, food-limitation, and exposure to a harmful alga. There were no indications of transgenerational acclimation to ocean acidification during experiments. Offspring of elevated pCO2-treatment adults were significantly more vulnerable to acidification as well as the additional stressors. Our results suggest that clams and scallops are unlikely to acclimate to ocean acidification over short time scales and that as coastal oceans continue to acidify, negative effects on these populations may become compounded and more severe.

  9. Phenoloxidase activity in larval and juvenile homogenates and adult plasma and haemocytes of bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Luna-González, Antonio; Maeda-Martínez, Alfonso N; Vargas-Albores, Francisco; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Robles-Mungaray, Miguel

    2003-10-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) activity was studied in larval and juvenile homogenates and in the plasma and haemocytes of adult Crassostrea gigas, Argopecten ventricosus, Nodipecten subnodosus, and Atrina maura. Samples were tested for the presence of PO activity by incubation with the substrate L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine using trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, laminarin, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to elicit activation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) system. PO activity was not detected in larval homogenate. In juvenile homogenate, PO activity was found only in C. gigas and N. subnodosus. PO activity was present in adult samples and was enhanced by elicitors in the plasma of all species tested, but in haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS) of only N. subnodosus. Activation of proPO by laminarin was suppressed by a protease inhibitor cocktail (P-2714) in plasma and HLS of all species tested.

  10. Distribution of As, Cd, and Pb in seafood in Southern China and their oral bioavailability in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Peng; Tong, Yong-Peng; Tang, Wei-Yang; Wu, Zheng-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Bing

    2017-02-01

    The distribution of the toxic elements As, Cd, and Pb in nine different types of seafood from Shenzhen, China, was investigated by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results revealed that the concentrations of arsenic (As) in fish (Lutjanus erythropterus, Paralichthys olivaceus) and in bivalve (Meretrix meretrix) and cadmium (Cd) in scallop (Argopecten irradians) exceed the limits established by food safety regulations in China and EU (European Union). Furthermore, the bioavailability of As, Cd, and lead (Pb) in mice after 20-day oral ingestion of Crassostrea rivularis was investigated, and the total rate of absorption of toxic elements in samples from the liver and kidney tissues and blood was determined. The results of this in vivo trial indicated that the oral bioavailability of As, Cd, and Pb was approximately 0.33, 0.45, and 0.74%, respectively.

  11. Supercooling capacity of Urophora affinis and U. quadrifasciata (Diptera: Tephritidae) on spotted knapweed: comparisons among plants, sites, time of season, and gall densities.

    PubMed

    Nowierski, R M.; Fitzgerald, B C.; Zeng, Z

    2001-04-01

    Larval supercooling points of Urophora affinis Frauenfeld and U. quadrifasciata (Meigen) were compared among plants, six research sites in western Montana, four fall/winter time periods, and among gall densities. These two tephritid fly species are introduced biological control agents of spotted knapweed, Centaurea maculosa Lamarck, and diffuse knapweed, Centaurea diffusa Lamarck. Few differences in larval supercooling points for U. affinis and U. quadrifasciata were found among plants, and where differences were found, they were not consistent across fall/winter time periods. Significant differences in larval supercooling points were found among sites and across fall/winter time periods. No relationship was found between larval supercooling points and site elevation. Larval supercooling points of both U. affinis and U. quadrifasciata showed no relationship with the density of Urophora galls within spotted knapweed capitula. Mean larval supercooling points of U. affinis were consistently lower than those of U. quadrifasciata across sites and fall/winter time periods. In conclusion, temporal differences in temperature over the fall/winter time periods and microclimatic differences among sites appear to be the most important abiotic factors influencing the supercooling points in U. affinis and U. quadrifasciata.

  12. The Contributions - and Collapse - of Lamarckian Heredity in Pasteurian Molecular Biology: 1. Lysogeny, 1900-1960.

    PubMed

    Loison, Laurent; Gayon, Jean; Burian, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    This article shows how Lamarckism was essential in the birth of the French school of molecular biology. We argue that the concept of inheritance of acquired characters positively shaped debates surrounding bacteriophagy and lysogeny in the Pasteurian tradition during the interwar period. During this period the typical Lamarckian account of heredity treated it as the continuation of protoplasmic physiology in daughter cells. Félix d'Hérelle applied this conception to argue that there was only one species of bacteriophage and Jules Bordet applied it to develop an account of bacteriophagy as a transmissible form of autolysis and to analyze the new phenomenon of lysogeny. In a long-standing controversy with Bordet, Eugène Wollman deployed a more morphological understanding of the inheritance of acquired characters, yielding a particulate, but still Lamarckian, account of lysogeny. We then turn to André Lwoff who, with several colleagues, completed Wollman's research program from 1949 to 1953. We examine how he gradually set aside the Lamarckian background, finally removing inheritance of acquired characters from the resulting account of bacteriophagy and lysogeny. In the conclusion, we emphasize the complex dual role of Lamarckism as it moved from an assumed explanatory framework to a challenge that the nascent molecular biology had to overcome.

  13. Micro- and nano-structural characterization of six marine sponges of the class Demospongiae.

    PubMed

    Şen, Elif Hilal; Ide, Semra; Bayari, Sevgi Haman; Hill, Malcolm

    2016-12-01

    The sponges produce their skeletal elements and silicateins are the key enzymes in this process. The mechanism underlying the formation of their silica skeleton and its structural properties are of exceptional interest for applications in technology. Micro- and nano-scale structural analysis of the six marine sponges belonging to Demospongiae [Callyspongia (Cladochalia) plicifera (Lamarck, 1814), Cervicornia cuspidifera (Lamarck, 1815), Cinachyrela sp., Niphates erecta (Duchassaing and Michelotti, 1864), Xestospongia muta (Schmidt, 1870) and Amphimedon compressa (Duchassaing and Michelotti, 1864)] were carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) techniques. The nano-structural characterizations give some informative evidence about the manner in which silica/silicatein in spicule skeletons is produced by the sponges. The sponge species were successfully discriminated using cluster analysis (HCA) based on FTIR spectra. This study demonstrates and detection of structural differences among sponges and their spicules using combined techniques.

  14. An introduction to epigenetics as the link between genotype and environment: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; Holt, W V; Fazeli, A

    2014-09-01

    Lamarck was one of the first scientists who attempted to explain evolution, and he is especially well known for formulating the concept that acquired characteristics can be transmitted to future generations and may therefore steer evolution. Although Lamarckism fell out of favour soon after the publication of Darwin's work on natural selection and evolution, the concept of transmission of acquired characteristics has recently gained renewed attention and has led to some rethinking of the standard evolutionary model. Epigenetics, or the study of heritable (mitotically and/or meiotically) changes in gene activity that are not brought about by changes in the DNA sequence, can explain some types of ill health in offspring, which have been exposed to stressors during early development, when DNA is most susceptible to such epigenetic influences. In this review, we explain briefly the history of epigenetics and we propose some examples of epigenetic and transgenerational effects demonstrated in humans and animals. Growing evidence is available that the health and phenotype of a given individual is already shaped shortly before and after the time of conception. Some evidence suggests that epigenetic markings, which have been established around conception, can also be transmitted to future generations. This knowledge can possibly be used to revolutionize animal breeding and to increase human and animal health worldwide.

  15. The prominent absence of Alfred Russel Wallace at the Darwin anniversaries in Germany in 1909, 1959 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the contribution of Alfred Russell Wallace (1823-1913) to the development of the "Darwinian" principle of natural selection has often been neglected. Here we focus on how the three anniversaries to celebrate the origin of the Darwin-Wallace theory in Germany in 1909, in 1959 in the divided country, as well as in 2009, have represented Charles Robert Darwin's and Alfred Russell Wallace's contributions. We have analyzed books and proceedings volumes related to these anniversaries, and the main result is that Wallace was almost always ignored, or only mentioned in passing. In 1909, Ernst Haeckel gave a talk in Jena, later published under the title The worldview of Darwin and Lamarck (Das Weltbild von Darwin und Lamarck), but not as the Darwin-Wallace concept. Haeckel mentions Wallace only once. In two important proceedings volumes from the 1959 anniversaries, Wallace was ignored. The only fair treatment of Wallace is given in another book, a collection of documents edited by Gerhard Heberer, for which the author selected nine key documents and reprinted excerpts (1959). Three of them were articles by Wallace, including the Sarawak- and Ternate-papers of 1855 and 1858, respectively. An analysis of the dominant themes during the celebrations of 2009 shows that none of the six topics had much to do with Wallace and his work. Thus, the tendency to exclude Alfred Russell Wallace is an international phenomenon, and largely attributable to the "Darwin industry".

  16. Scaling of feeding biomechanics in the horn shark Heterodontus francisci: ontogenetic constraints on durophagy.

    PubMed

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    Organismal performance changes over ontogeny as the musculoskeletal systems underlying animal behavior grow in relative size and shape. As performance is a determinant of feeding ecology, ontogenetic changes in the former can influence the latter. The horn shark Heterodontus francisci consumes hard-shelled benthic invertebrates, which may be problematic for younger animals with lower performance capacities. Scaling of feeding biomechanics was investigated in H. francisci (n=16, 19-59cm standard length (SL)) to determine the biomechanical basis of allometric changes in feeding performance and whether this performance capacity constrains hard-prey consumption over ontogeny. Positive allometry of anterior (8-163N) and posterior (15-382N) theoretical bite force was attributed to positive allometry of cross-sectional area in two jaw adducting muscles and mechanical advantage at the posterior bite point (0.79-1.26). Mechanical advantage for anterior biting scaled isometrically (0.52). Fracture forces for purple sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus consumed by H. francisci ranged from 24 to 430N. Comparison of these fracture forces to the bite force of H. francisci suggests that H. francisci is unable to consume hard prey early in its life history, but can consume the majority of S. purpuratus by the time it reaches maximum size. Despite this constraint, positive allometry of biting performance appears to facilitate an earlier entry into the durophagous niche than would an isometric ontogenetic trajectory. The posterior gape of H. francisci is significantly smaller than the urchins capable of being crushed by its posterior bite force. Thus, the high posterior bite forces of H. francisci cannot be fully utilized while consuming prey of similar toughness and size to S. purpuratus, and its potential trophic niche is primarily determined by anterior biting capacity.

  17. Rocky intertidal zonation pattern in Antofagasta, chile: invasive species and shellfish gathering.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Juan Carlos; Manríquez, Patricio H; Delgado, Alejandro; Ortiz, Verónica; Jara, María Elisa; Varas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions affecting rocky intertidal zonation patterns, yield information on species interactions. In the Bay of Antofagasta, northern Chile, the non-indigenous tunicate Pyura praeputialis, originally from Australia, has invaded (in the past century or so) and monopolized a major portion of the mid-intertidal rocky shore, displacing upshore the native mussel Perumytilus purpuratus. In Antofagasta the tunicate is subjected to intensive exploitation. Monitoring protocols show that in the past 10 years Antofagasta's tunicate population has experienced a drastic decline, affecting the intertidal zonation pattern. A 12.5 km of coastline, on the southern eastern shore of the Bay of Antofagasta, was studied. Eight sites were systematically (1993-1994) or sporadically (2003-2014) monitored for the seaward-shoreward expansion or reduction of the tunicate Pyura praeputialis, and native mussel and barnacle bands. A notable reduction in the mid-intertidal band of P. praeputialis and a seaward expansion of the mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, and barnacle bands was observed. We suggest that the major cause for the decline in the tunicate is due to its intensive exploitation by rocky shore Pyura-gathers. The rate of extraction of tunicates by professional Pyura-gathers ranged between 256-740 tunicates hour-(1). Between 2009-2014 the density of professional Pyura-gather ranged between 0.5-4.5 km(-1) per low tide. Hence, 10 professional Pyura-gathers working 1 h for 10 low tides per month, during 6 months, will remove between 307-888 m(2) of tunicates. A drastic decline in tunicate recruitment was observed and several P. praeputialis ecosystems services have been lost. In Antofagasta, the continuous and intensive intertidal gathering of the invasive tunicate Pyura praeputialis, has caused a drastic reduction of its population modifying the zonation pattern. Thereby, native mussel Perumytilus purpuratus has regained its ecological center in the intertidal zone. We

  18. The test skeletal matrix of the black sea urchin Arbacia lixula.

    PubMed

    Kanold, Julia M; Immel, Francoise; Broussard, Cédric; Guichard, Nathalie; Plasseraud, Laurent; Corneillat, Marion; Alcaraz, Gérard; Brümmer, Franz; Marin, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    In the field of biomineralization, the past decade has been marked by the increasing use of high throughput techniques, i.e. proteomics, for identifying in one shot the protein content of complex macromolecular mixtures extracted from mineralized tissues. Although crowned with success, this approach has been restricted so far to a limited set of key-organisms, such as the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, the pearl oyster or the abalone, leaving in the shadow non-model organisms. As a consequence, it is still unknown to what extent the calcifying repertoire varies, from group to group, at high (phylum, class), median (order, family) or low (genus, species) taxonomic rank. The present paper shows the first biochemical and proteomic characterization of the test matrix of the Mediterranean black sea urchin Arbacia lixula (Arbacioida). Our work suggests that the skeletal repertoire of A. lixula exhibits some similarities but also several differences with that of the few sea urchin species (S. purpuratus, Paracentrotus lividus), for which molecular data are already available. The differences may be attributable to the taxonomic position of the species considered: A. lixula belongs to an order - Arbacioida - that diverged more than one hundred million years ago from the Camarodonta, which includes the two species S. purpuratus and P. lividus. For the echinoid class, we suggest that large-scale proteomic screening should be performed in order to understand which molecular functions related to calcification are conserved and which ones have been co-opted for biomineralization in particular lineages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic importance of Na+/K+-ATPase activity during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Leong; Manahan

    1997-01-01

    Early stages of animal development have high mass-specific rates of metabolism. The biochemical processes that establish metabolic rate and how these processes change during development are not understood. In this study, changes in Na+/K+-ATPase activity (the sodium pump) and rate of oxygen consumption were measured during embryonic and early larval development for two species of sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. Total (in vitro) Na+/K+-ATPase activity increased during development and could potentially account for up to 77 % of larval oxygen consumption in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (pluteus stage) and 80 % in Lytechinus pictus (prism stage). The critical issue was addressed of what percentage of total enzyme activity is physiologically active in living embryos and larvae and thus what percentage of metabolism is established by the activity of the sodium pump during development. Early developmental stages of sea urchins are ideal for understanding the in vivo metabolic importance of Na+/K+-ATPase because of their small size and high permeability to radioactive tracers (86Rb+) added to sea water. A comparison of total and in vivo Na+/K+-ATPase activities revealed that approximately half of the total activity was utilized in vivo. The remainder represented a functionally active reserve that was subject to regulation, as verified by stimulation of in vivo Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the presence of the ionophore monensin. In the presence of monensin, in vivo Na+/K+-ATPase activities in embryos of S. purpuratus increased to 94 % of the maximum enzyme activity measured in vitro. Stimulation of in vivo Na+/K+-ATPase activity was also observed in the presence of dissolved alanine, presumably due to the requirement to remove the additional intracellular Na+ that was cotransported with alanine from sea water. The metabolic cost of maintaining the ionic balance was found to be high, with this process alone accounting for 40 % of the metabolic

  20. Toxicity of lead and zinc to developing mussel and sea urchin embryos: critical tissue residues and effects of dissolved organic matter and salinity.

    PubMed

    Nadella, Sunita R; Tellis, Margaret; Diamond, Rachael; Smith, Scott; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M

    2013-08-01

    Lead (Pb) EC50 values in the very sensitive early development phases (48-72h post-fertilization) of the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis and Mytilus trossolus and sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus in 100% sea water were: M. trossolus - 45 (95% C.I.=22-72) μgL(-1); M. galloprovincialis - 63 (36-94) μgL(-1); S. purpuratus - 74 (50-101) μgL(-1). Salinity thresholds for normal development varied: M. trossolus>21ppt; M. galloprovincialis>28ppt; S. purpuratus≥30ppt. Addition of two spectroscopically distinct dissolved organic matters (DOM) from fresh water (Nordic Reservoir) and sea water (Inshore) moderately decreased the toxicity of Pb to both mussels, but not in a concentration-dependent fashion, with only an approximate doubling of EC50 over the range of 1.4-11.2mgCL(-1). Independent Pb binding capacity determinations for DOC explained the lack of a relationship between DOM concentration and toxicity. Salinity had no effect on Pb toxicity down to 21ppt in M. trossolus, and low salinity (21ppt) did not enhance the protective effect of DOC. Both DOMs increased the toxicity of Pb in developing sea urchin embryos, in contrast to mussels. Relative to Pb, the organisms were 6-9 fold less sensitive to Zn on a molar basis in 100% seawater with the following Zn EC50s: M. trossolus - 135 (103-170) μgL(-1); M. galloprovincialis - 172 (126-227) μgL(-1), S. purpuratus - 151 (129-177) μgL(-1). Nordic Reservoir and Inshore DOM (2-12mgCL(-1)) had no significant effect on Zn toxicity to mussels, in accord with voltammetry data showing an absence of any strong ligand binding for Zn by DOMs. As with Pb, DOMs increased Zn toxicity to urchin larvae. Critical Tissue Residues (CTR) based on whole body concentrations of Pb and Zn were determined for M. galloprovincialis at 48h and S. purpuratus at 72h. The median lethal CTR values (LA50s), useful parameters for development of saltwater Biotic Ligand Models (BLMs), were approximately 4-fold higher on a molar basis for Zn than

  1. A rapidly diverging EGF protein regulates species-specific signal transduction in early sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Kamei, N; Swanson, W J; Glabe, C G

    2000-09-15

    The macromolecules mediating species-specific events during fertilization and early development and their molecular evolution are only beginning to be understood. We screened sea urchin ovary mRNA for species-specific gene products using representational differential analysis to identify unique transcripts in Strongylocentrotus franciscanus that are absent or divergent from a closely related species, S. purpuratus. One of the transcripts identified by this screening process is SfEGF-II, which contains four EGF repeats. SfEGF-II is orthologous to the previously reported genes S. purpuratus SpEGF-II and Anthocidaris crassispina AcEGF-II, encoding exogastrulation-inducing peptides (EGIP). EGF peptides derived from EGIP induce exogastrulation, a classical developmental defect, when added to embryos prior to gastrulation. The first three EGF repeats (EGF1-3) share 50 to 60% identity among the three species, but the fourth repeat (EGF4) is more divergent, displaying only 30% identity. Analysis of the sequence divergence indicates that the EGF-II genes display a relatively high nonsynonymous-to-synonymous ratio, a significant excess of radical compared to conservative amino acid substitutions, and a lack of polymorphism within SfEGF-II, indicating that these genes have been subjected to positive Darwinian selection. Recombinant EGF3 from S. franciscanus induces exogastrulation in both S. franciscanus and S. purpuratus. In contrast, recombinant EGF4 from both S. franciscanus and S. purpuratus induces exogastrula in a species-specific manner. In hybrid embryos, both species of EGF4 induce exogastrulation, suggesting that the receptor for this EGF molecule is expressed from both parental genomes during development. Both EGF3 and EGF4 induce the phosphorylation of membrane proteins of the blastula stage embryos, but EGF4 stimulates phosphorylation of proteins only in membranes prepared from homologous embryos, suggesting that it utilizes a unique pathway involving a species

  2. Synonymical and nomenclatural notes on Trachyderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae).

    PubMed

    Monné, Marcela L; Monné, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Megaderus is reinstated and attributed to Germar, 1824 and not to Rafinesque, 1815 or Dejean, 1821; Neomegaderus Monn6, 2006 is an unnecessary replacement name; Purpuricenus brasiliensis Schaufuss, 1871 is a synonym of Eriphus purpuratus Chevrolat, 1862; Panchylissus Waterhouse, 1880 is a synonym of Galissus Dupont, 1840 and G rubiventris Martins & Galileo, 2010 a synonym of G. cyaneipennis (Waterhouse, 1880), comb. nov.; Panchylissus nigriventris Lane, 1965 is transferred to Galissus; a key to the species of Galissus is provided; the female of Poecilopeplusfontanieri (Lucas, 1857) is described; Ischnotes Newman, 1840 currently in Trachyderini, Ancylocerini is transferred to incertae sedis of Cerambycinae.

  3. Tools for sea urchin genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The Sea Urchin Genome Project Web site, SpBase ( http://SpBase.org ), in association with a suite of publicly available sequence comparison tools provides a platform from which to analyze genes and genomic sequences of sea urchin. This information system is specifically designed to support laboratory bench studies in cell and molecular biology. In particular these tools and datasets have supported the description of the gene regulatory networks of the purple sea urchin S. purpuratus. This chapter details methods to undertake in the first steps to find genes and noncoding regulatory sequences for further analysis.

  4. Is evolution Darwinian or/and Lamarckian?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The year 2009 is the 200th anniversary of the publication of Jean-Bapteste Lamarck's Philosophie Zoologique and the 150th anniversary of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species. Lamarck believed that evolution is driven primarily by non-randomly acquired, beneficial phenotypic changes, in particular, those directly affected by the use of organs, which Lamarck believed to be inheritable. In contrast, Darwin assigned a greater importance to random, undirected change that provided material for natural selection. The concept The classic Lamarckian scheme appears untenable owing to the non-existence of mechanisms for direct reverse engineering of adaptive phenotypic characters acquired by an individual during its life span into the genome. However, various evolutionary phenomena that came to fore in the last few years, seem to fit a more broadly interpreted (quasi)Lamarckian paradigm. The prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas system of defense against mobile elements seems to function via a bona fide Lamarckian mechanism, namely, by integrating small segments of viral or plasmid DNA into specific loci in the host prokaryote genome and then utilizing the respective transcripts to destroy the cognate mobile element DNA (or RNA). A similar principle seems to be employed in the piRNA branch of RNA interference which is involved in defense against transposable elements in the animal germ line. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), a dominant evolutionary process, at least, in prokaryotes, appears to be a form of (quasi)Lamarckian inheritance. The rate of HGT and the nature of acquired genes depend on the environment of the recipient organism and, in some cases, the transferred genes confer a selective advantage for growth in that environment, meeting the Lamarckian criteria. Various forms of stress-induced mutagenesis are tightly regulated and comprise a universal adaptive response to environmental stress in cellular life forms. Stress-induced mutagenesis can be construed as a quasi

  5. Immunofluorescence localization of dissociation supernatant and extracellular matrix components in Lytechinus pictus sectioned embryos. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garciaflack, Ana Leticia

    1988-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to localize specific extracellular components in embryos of the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus. Hyalin and S2 (a group of components found in the disaggregation supernatant from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae) were uniformly present at all stages (unfertilized up to 32 hr) except hyalin could not be detected at the 12 hour early blastula stage. Laminin was found in 16 cell, 32 cell, 6 hour, 18 hour, 24 hour, and 32 hour stages, with especially bright fluorescence at 18 hours. Collagen I was present at all stages (freshly fertilized up to 32 hour) except little was detected at 12 hours. Fibronectin was uniformly present in blastocoelar fibers stained with anto-collagen I and anti-fibronectin. These results were compared with those for S. purpuratus to produce an overview of the localization of specific extracellular matrix components during development of two species of sea urchins. The results set the stage for future studies that will examine the function of these components at the various developmental stages.

  6. Multiple gene genealogies reveal asymmetrical hybridization and introgression among strongylocentrotid sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Addison, Jason A; Pogson, Grant H

    2009-03-01

    The evolution of incompatibilities between eggs and sperm is thought to play important roles in establishing and maintaining reproductive isolation among species of broadcast-spawning marine invertebrates. However, the effectiveness of gametic isolation in initiating the speciation process and/or in limiting the introgression of genes among species at later stages of divergence remains largely unknown. In the present study, we collected DNA sequence data from five loci in four species of Strongylocentrotus sea urchins (S. droebachiensis, S. pallidus, S. purpuratus, and S. franciscanus) to test whether the susceptibility of S. droebachiensis eggs to fertilization by heterospecific sperm results in gene flow between species. Despite the potential for introgression, a small but statistically significant signal of introgression was observed only between the youngest pair of sister taxa (S. pallidus and S. droebachiensis) that was strongly asymmetrical (from the former into the latter). No significant gene flow was observed for either S. purpuratus or S. franciscanus despite the ability of their sperm to readily fertilize the eggs of S. droebachiensis. Our results demonstrate that asymmetrical gamete compatibilities in strongylocentrotids can give rise to asymmetrical patterns of introgression but suggest that gamete traits alone cannot be responsible for maintaining species integrities. The genetic boundaries between strongylocentrotid urchin species in the northeast Pacific appear to be related to postzygotic isolating mechanisms that scale with divergence times and not intrinsic gametic incompatibilities per se.

  7. Iodine accumulation in sea urchin larvae is dependent on peroxide.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ashley E M; Heyland, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Iodine has many important biological functions and its concentrations vary with the environment. Recent research has provided novel insights into iodine uptake mechanisms in marine bacteria and kelp through hydrogen peroxide-dependent diffusion (PDD). This mechanism is distinct from sodium-dependent mechanisms known from vertebrates. In vertebrates, iodine accumulates in the thyroid gland by the action of the apical iodide transporter (AIT) and the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS). Neither of these proteins has, thus far, been identified outside of the chordates, and PDD (as an iodine uptake mechanism) has never been studied in animals. Using (125)I as a marker for total iodine influx, we tested iodine uptake via sodium-dependent transport versus PDD in embryos and larvae of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We found that iodine uptake in S. purpuratus is largely independent of NIS/AIT. Instead, we found that uptake is dependent on the presence and production of hydrogen peroxide, indicating that sea urchin larvae use PDD as a mechanism for iodine acquisition. Our data, for the first time, provide conclusive evidence for this mechanism in an animal. Furthermore, our data provide preliminary evidence that sodium-dependent iodine uptake via active transporter proteins is a synapomorphy of vertebrates.

  8. Genomics and expression profiles of the Hedgehog and Notch signaling pathways in sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Katherine D; Croce, Jenifer C; Glenn, Thomas D; Wu, Shu-Yu; McClay, David R

    2006-12-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) and Notch signal transduction pathways control a variety of developmental processes including cell fate choice, differentiation, proliferation, patterning and boundary formation. Because many components of these pathways are conserved, it was predicted and confirmed that pathway components are largely intact in the sea urchin genome. Spatial and temporal location of these pathways in the embryo, and their function in development offer added insight into their mechanistic contributions. Accordingly, all major components of both pathways were identified and annotated in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome and the embryonic expression of key components was explored. Relationships of the pathway components, and modifiers predicted from the annotation of S. purpuratus, were compared against cnidarians, arthropods, urochordates, and vertebrates. These analyses support the prediction that the pathways are highly conserved through metazoan evolution. Further, the location of these two pathways appears to be conserved among deuterostomes, and in the case of Notch at least, display similar capacities in endomesoderm gene regulatory networks. RNA expression profiles by quantitative PCR and RNA in situ hybridization reveal that Hedgehog is produced by the endoderm beginning just prior to invagination, and signals to the secondary mesenchyme-derived tissues at least until the pluteus larva stage. RNA in situ hybridization of Notch pathway members confirms that Notch functions sequentially in the vegetal-most secondary mesenchyme cells and later in the endoderm. Functional analyses in future studies will embed these pathways into the growing knowledge of gene regulatory networks that govern early specification and morphogenesis.

  9. Developmental expression of COE across the Metazoa supports a conserved role in neuronal cell-type specification and mesodermal development.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Daniel J; Meyer, Néva P; Seaver, Elaine; Pang, Kevin; McDougall, Carmel; Moy, Vanessa N; Gordon, Kacy; Degnan, Bernard M; Martindale, Mark Q; Burke, Robert D; Peterson, Kevin J

    2010-12-01

    The transcription factor COE (collier/olfactory-1/early B cell factor) is an unusual basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor as it lacks a basic domain and is maintained as a single copy gene in the genomes of all currently analysed non-vertebrate Metazoan genomes. Given the unique features of the COE gene, its proposed ancestral role in the specification of chemosensory neurons and the wealth of functional data from vertebrates and Drosophila, the evolutionary history of the COE gene can be readily investigated. We have examined the ways in which COE expression has diversified among the Metazoa by analysing its expression from representatives of four disparate invertebrate phyla: Ctenophora (Mnemiopsis leidyi); Mollusca (Haliotis asinina); Annelida (Capitella teleta and Chaetopterus) and Echinodermata (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). In addition, we have studied COE function with knockdown experiments in S. purpuratus, which indicate that COE is likely to be involved in repressing serotonergic cell fate in the apical ganglion of dipleurula larvae. These analyses suggest that COE has played an important role in the evolution of ectodermally derived tissues (likely primarily nervous tissues) and mesodermally derived tissues. Our results provide a broad evolutionary foundation from which further studies aimed at the functional characterisation and evolution of COE can be investigated.

  10. Select microRNAs are essential for early development in the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia L; Stoeckius, Marlon; Maaskola, Jonas; Friedländer, Marc; Stepicheva, Nadezda; Juliano, Celina; Lebedeva, Svetlana; Thompson, William; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Wessel, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene regulation and have emerged as essential regulators of many developmental events. The transcriptional network during early embryogenesis of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is well described and can serve as an excellent model to test functional contributions of miRNAs in embryogenesis. We examined the loss of function phenotypes of major components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway. Inhibition of de novo synthesis of Drosha and Dicer in the embryo led to consistent developmental defects, a failure to gastrulate, and embryonic lethality, including changes in the steady state levels of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in germ layer specification. We annotated and profiled small RNA expression from the ovary and several early embryonic stages by deep sequencing followed by computational analysis. miRNAs as well as a large population of putative piRNAs (piwi-interacting RNAs) had dynamic accumulation profiles through early development. Defects in morphogenesis caused by loss of Drosha could be rescued with four miRNAs. Taken together our results indicate that post-transcriptional gene regulation directed by miRNAs is functionally important for early embryogenesis and is an integral part of the early embryonic gene regulatory network in S. purpuratus.

  11. Germ line determinants are not localized early in sea urchin development, but do accumulate in the small micromere lineage.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Celina E; Voronina, Ekaterina; Stack, Christie; Aldrich, Maryanna; Cameron, Andrew R; Wessel, Gary M

    2006-12-01

    Two distinct modes of germ line determination are used throughout the animal kingdom: conditional-an inductive mechanism, and autonomous-an inheritance of maternal factors in early development. This study identifies homologs of germ line determinants in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus to examine its mechanism of germ line determination. A list of conserved germ-line associated genes from diverse organisms was assembled to search the S. purpuratus genome for homologs, and the expression patterns of these genes were examined during embryogenesis by whole mount in situ RNA hybridization and QPCR. Of the 14 genes tested, all transcripts accumulate uniformly during oogenesis and Sp-pumilio, Sp-tudor, Sp-MSY, and Sp-CPEB1 transcripts are also uniformly distributed during embryonic development. Sp-nanos2, Sp-seawi, and Sp-ovo transcripts, however, are enriched in the vegetal plate of the mesenchyme blastula stage and Sp-vasa, Sp-nanos2, Sp-seawi, and Sp-SoxE transcripts are localized in small micromere descendents at the tip of the archenteron during gastrulation and are then enriched in the left coelomic pouch of larvae. The results of this screen suggest that sea urchins conditionally specify their germ line, and support the hypothesis that this mechanism is the basal mode of germ line determination amongst deuterostomes. Furthermore, accumulation of germ line determinants selectively in small micromere descendents supports the hypothesis that these cells contribute to the germ line.

  12. The life cycle of Prosorhynchoides carvajali (Trematoda: Bucephalidae) involving species of bivalve and fish hosts in the intertidal zone of central Chile.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Valdivia, I; López, Z

    2015-09-01

    We describe the life cycle of the bucephalid Prosorhynchoides carvajali from the intertidal rocky zone of central Chile. To elucidate the life cycle of this digenean, two mytilid bivalves, Semimytilus algosus and Perumytilus purpuratus, and ten intertidal fish species belonging to the families Blenniidae, Tripterygiidae, Labrisomidae, Kyphosidae and Gobiesocidae were analysed for natural infections. In addition, experimental infections of fish were undertaken and molecular analyses were performed of several developmental stages of the digeneans in various host species. Experimental infections of fish were made from infected mytilids to determine which fish species were suitable for the metacercarial stage of Prosorhynchoides. We also determined the abundance and prevalence of metacercariae in natural infections in fish and found that they were lower than in the experimental infections. A molecular analysis showed that sporocysts from S. algosus were identical to metacercariae from five fish species and P. carvajali adults. Sporocysts isolated from P. purpuratus were similar to metacercaria found in one fish species only (G. laevifrons) but were different from P. carvajali, with 1.9-2.0% genetic divergence. Therefore, the complete life cycle of P. carvajali consists of the mytilid species S. algosus as the first intermediate host, at least five intertidal fish species as second intermediate hosts (Scartichthys viridis, Auchenionchus microcirrhis, Hypsoblennius sordidus, Helcogrammoides chilensis and Gobiesox marmoratus), two carnivorous fish as definitive hosts (Auchenionchus microcirrhis and A. variolosus) and one occasional definitive host (Syciases sanguineus). This is the second description of a life cycle of a marine digenean from Chile.

  13. Sea urchin akt activity is Runx-dependent and required for post-cleavage stage cell division.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Anthony J; Coluccio, Alison; Jensen, Sarah; Rydlizky, Katarina; Coffman, James A

    2013-05-15

    In animal development following the initial cleavage stage of embryogenesis, the cell cycle becomes dependent on intercellular signaling and controlled by the genomically encoded ontogenetic program. Runx transcription factors are critical regulators of metazoan developmental signaling, and we have shown that the sea urchin Runx gene runt-1, which is globally expressed during early embryogenesis, functions in support of blastula stage cell proliferation and expression of the mitogenic genes pkc1, cyclinD, and several wnts. To obtain a more comprehensive list of early runt-1 regulatory targets, we screened a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus microarray to identify genes mis-expressed in mid-blastula stage runt-1 morphants. This analysis showed that loss of Runx function perturbs the expression of multiple genes involved in cell division, including the pro-growth and survival kinase Akt (PKB), which is significantly underexpressed in runt-1 morphants. Further genomic analysis revealed that Akt is encoded by two genes in the S. purpuratus genome, akt-1 and akt-2, both of which contain numerous canonical Runx target sequences. The transcripts of both genes accumulate several fold during blastula stage, contingent on runt-1 expression. Inhibiting Akt expression or activity causes blastula stage cell cycle arrest, whereas overexpression of akt-1 mRNA rescues cell proliferation in runt-1 morphants. These results indicate that post-cleavage stage cell division requires Runx-dependent expression of akt.

  14. Select microRNAs are essential for early development in the sea urchin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jia L.; Stoeckius, Marlon; Maaskola, Jonas; Friedländer, Marc; Stepicheva, Nadezda; Juliano, Celina; Lebedeva, Svetlana; Thompson, William; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Wessel, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene regulation and have emerged as essential regulators of many developmental events. The transcriptional network during early embryogenesis of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is well described and would serve as an excellent model to test functional contributions of miRNAs in embryogenesis. We examined the loss of function phenotypes of the major components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway. Inhibition of de novo synthesis of Drosha and Dicer in the embryo led to consistent developmental defects, a failure to gastrulate, and embryonic lethality, including changes in the steady state levels of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in germ layer specification. We annotated and profiled small RNA expression from the ovary and several early embryonic stages by deep sequencing followed by computational analysis. All miRNAs have dynamic accumulation profiles through early development as do a large population of putative piRNAs (piwi-interacting RNAs). Defects in morphogenesis caused by loss of Drosha can be rescued with four miRNAs which permits a strong miRNA functional assay. Taken together our results indicate that post-transcriptional gene regulation directed by miRNAs is functionally important for early embryogenesis and is an integral part of the early embryonic gene regulatory network in S. purpuratus. PMID:22155525

  15. Annual reversible plasticity of feeding structures: cyclical changes of jaw allometry in a sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Thomas A; Hernández, José Carlos; Clemente, Sabrina

    2014-03-22

    A wide variety of organisms show morphologically plastic responses to environmental stressors but in general these changes are not reversible. Though less common, reversible morphological structures are shown by a range of species in response to changes in predators, competitors or food. Theoretical analysis indicates that reversible plasticity increases fitness if organisms are long-lived relative to the frequency of changes in the stressor and morphological changes are rapid. Many sea urchin species show differences in the sizes of jaws (demi-pyramids) of the feeding apparatus, Aristotle's lantern, relative to overall body size, and these differences have been correlated with available food. The question addressed here is whether reversible changes of relative jaw size occur in the field as available food changes with season. Monthly samples of the North American Pacific coast sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus were collected from Gregory Point on the Oregon (USA) coast and showed an annual cycle of relative jaw size together with a linear trend from 2007 to 2009. Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is a long-lived species and under field conditions individuals experience multiple episodes of changes in food resources both seasonally and from year to year. Their rapid and reversible jaw plasticity fits well with theoretical expectations.

  16. A comparison of the copper sensitivity of six invertebrate species in ambient salt water of varying dissolved organic matter concentrations.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W Ray; Cotsifas, Jeffrey S; Ogle, R Scott; Depalma, Sarah G S; Smith, D Scott

    2010-02-01

    The copper sensitivity of four saltwater invertebrates (the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, the oyster Crassostrea virginica, the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus, and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) was determined experimentally using chronic-estimator embryo-larval test procedures. The effect of sample dissolved organic matter (DOM) content on Cu bioavailability was determined for these species using commonly prescribed test procedures. Comparisons were made among these test results and test results reported previously for two other invertebrate species: the mussel Mytilus edulis and the copepod Eurytemora affinis. All six species exhibited a direct and significant relationship between the sample dissolved organic carbon (DOC; a surrogate measure of DOM) and either the dissolved Cu median lethal concentration (LC50) values or median effect concentration (EC50) values. This relationship is significant even when the DOM has different quality as evidenced by molecular fluorescence spectroscopy. Once normalized for the effects of DOM, the Cu sensitivity of these species from least to most sensitive were E. affinis < D. excitricus < C. virginica approximately S. purpuratus approximately M. edulis approximately M. galloprovincialis. This ranking of species sensitivity differs from the saltwater species sensitivity distribution proposed in 2003 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. These results support the need to account for factors that modify Cu bioavailability in future saltwater Cu criteria development efforts. More specifically, Cu saltwater species sensitivity distribution data will need to be normalized by factors affecting Cu bioavailability to assure that accurate and protective criteria are subsequently developed for saltwater species and their uses.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  19. Annual reversible plasticity of feeding structures: cyclical changes of jaw allometry in a sea urchin

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Thomas A.; Hernández, José Carlos; Clemente, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of organisms show morphologically plastic responses to environmental stressors but in general these changes are not reversible. Though less common, reversible morphological structures are shown by a range of species in response to changes in predators, competitors or food. Theoretical analysis indicates that reversible plasticity increases fitness if organisms are long-lived relative to the frequency of changes in the stressor and morphological changes are rapid. Many sea urchin species show differences in the sizes of jaws (demi-pyramids) of the feeding apparatus, Aristotle's lantern, relative to overall body size, and these differences have been correlated with available food. The question addressed here is whether reversible changes of relative jaw size occur in the field as available food changes with season. Monthly samples of the North American Pacific coast sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus were collected from Gregory Point on the Oregon (USA) coast and showed an annual cycle of relative jaw size together with a linear trend from 2007 to 2009. Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is a long-lived species and under field conditions individuals experience multiple episodes of changes in food resources both seasonally and from year to year. Their rapid and reversible jaw plasticity fits well with theoretical expectations. PMID:24500161

  20. Immunofluorescence localization of dissociation supernatant and extracellular matrix components in Lytechinus pictus sectioned embryos. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garciaflack, Ana Leticia

    1988-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to localize specific extracellular components in embryos of the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus. Hyalin and S2 (a group of components found in the disaggregation supernatant from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae) were uniformly present at all stages (unfertilized up to 32 hr) except hyalin could not be detected at the 12 hour early blastula stage. Laminin was found in 16 cell, 32 cell, 6 hour, 18 hour, 24 hour, and 32 hour stages, with especially bright fluorescence at 18 hours. Collagen I was present at all stages (freshly fertilized up to 32 hour) except little was detected at 12 hours. Fibronectin was uniformly present in blastocoelar fibers stained with anto-collagen I and anti-fibronectin. These results were compared with those for S. purpuratus to produce an overview of the localization of specific extracellular matrix components during development of two species of sea urchins. The results set the stage for future studies that will examine the function of these components at the various developmental stages.

  1. Kelp forest monitoring 1993 annual report. Channel Islands National Park. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, D.; Walder, R.; Gorodezky, L.; Lerma, D.; Richards, D.

    1993-06-01

    The 1993 results of the Channel Islands National Park Kelp Forest Monitoring Project are described in this report. Population dynamics of 68 taxa or categories of algea, fish, and invertebrates were measured at 16 permanent sites around the five islands within the park. Survey techniques utilized SCUBA and surface-supplied-air, and included quadrats, band transects, random contacts, fish transects, video transects, size frequency measurements, artificial recruitment modules, and species list surveys. Temperature data was collected using Sea Data batheothermographs, and HOBOTEMP temperature loggers. Temperature loggers were installed at each of the sixteen sites. Size frequency measurements were taken from artifical recruitment modules at nine sites. In 1993, 13 sites had giant kelp, Macrocysts pyrifera, forests, one site was dominated by the aggregating red sea cucumber, pachythyone rubra, one site was dominated by red sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus franciscanus, and another by purple sea urchins, S. purpuratus. The 13 sites with kelp forests consisted of 10 mature and three young kelp forests. Wasting disease was observed in sea stars and wasting syndrome was apparent in sea urchins. Sea urchins wasting syndrome appears to have caused mass mortality of purple sea urchins, S. purpuratus, at two Santa Barbara Island sites.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA in the sea urchin Arbacia lixula: evolutionary inferences from nucleotide sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, C; Lanave, C; Musci, M D; Saccone, C

    1991-07-01

    From the stirodont Arbacia lixula we determined the sequence of 5,127 nucleotides of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encompassing 18 tRNAs, two complete coding genes, parts of three other coding genes, and part of the 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). The sequence confirms that the organization of mtDNA is conserved within echinoids. Furthermore, it underlines the following peculiar features of sea urchin mtDNA: the clustering of tRNAs, the short noncoding regulatory sequence, and the separation by the ND1 and ND2 genes of the two rRNA genes. Comparison with the orthologous sequences from the camarodont species Paracentrotus lividus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus revealed that (1) echinoids have an extra piece on the amino terminus of the ND5 gene that is probably the remnant of an old leucine tRNA gene; (2) third-position codon nucleotide usage has diverged between A. lixula and the camarodont species to a significant extent, implying different directional mutational pressures; and (3) the stirodont-camarodont divergence occurred twice as long ago as did the P. lividus-S. purpuratus divergence.

  3. Developmental expression of COE across the Metazoa supports a conserved role in neuronal cell-type specification and mesodermal development

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Néva P.; Seaver, Elaine; Pang, Kevin; McDougall, Carmel; Moy, Vanessa N.; Gordon, Kacy; Degnan, Bernard M.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Burke, Robert D.; Peterson, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor COE (collier/olfactory-1/early B cell factor) is an unusual basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor as it lacks a basic domain and is maintained as a single copy gene in the genomes of all currently analysed non-vertebrate Metazoan genomes. Given the unique features of the COE gene, its proposed ancestral role in the specification of chemosensory neurons and the wealth of functional data from vertebrates and Drosophila, the evolutionary history of the COE gene can be readily investigated. We have examined the ways in which COE expression has diversified among the Metazoa by analysing its expression from representatives of four disparate invertebrate phyla: Ctenophora (Mnemiopsis leidyi); Mollusca (Haliotis asinina); Annelida (Capitella teleta and Chaetopterus) and Echinodermata (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). In addition, we have studied COE function with knockdown experiments in S. purpuratus, which indicate that COE is likely to be involved in repressing serotonergic cell fate in the apical ganglion of dipleurula larvae. These analyses suggest that COE has played an important role in the evolution of ectodermally derived tissues (likely primarily nervous tissues) and mesodermally derived tissues. Our results provide a broad evolutionary foundation from which further studies aimed at the functional characterisation and evolution of COE can be investigated. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00427-010-0343-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21069538

  4. Elastic-Mathematical Theory of Cells and Mitochondria in Swelling Process

    PubMed Central

    Mela, M. J.

    1968-01-01

    The elastic behavior of the cell wall as a function of the temperature has been studied with particular attention being given to the swelling of egg cells of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Crassostrea virginica in different sea water concentrations at different temperatures. It was found that the modulus of elasticity is a nonlinear function of temperature. At about 12-13°C the modulus of elasticity (E) is constant, independent of the stress (σ) and strain (εν) which exist at the cell wall; the membranous material follows Hooke's law, and E ≈ 3 × 107 dyn/cm2 for S. purpuratus and C. virginica. When the temperature is higher or lower than 12-13°C, the modulus of elasticity increases, and the membranous material does not follow Hooke's law, but is almost directly proportional to the stresses existing at the cell wall. On increasing the stress, the function Eσ = E(σ) approaches saturation. The corresponding stress-strain diagrams, σ = σ(εν), and the graphs, Eσ = E(σ) and Eσ = E(t) are given. The cyto-elastic phenomena at the membrane are discussed. PMID:5689191

  5. The role of lysyl oxidase and collagen crosslinking during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Butler, E; Hardin, J; Benson, S

    1987-11-01

    Lysyl oxidase, the only enzyme involved in collagen crosslinking, is shown to be present in embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. The enzyme specific activity increases over six-fold during development, showing the greatest rise during gastrulation and prism larva formation. The enzyme is inhibited by the specific inhibitor, beta-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN). Continuous BAPN treatment of S. purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus embryos from late cleavage stages onward increases the amount of noncrosslinked collagen present in prism larvae. When BAPN is added at the 128- or 256-cell stage it causes developmental arrest at the mesenchyme blastula stage. Embryos can be maintained in the arrested state for at least 96 h and will resume normal development and morphogenesis following BAPN removal. If BAPN is added after the mesenchyme blastula stage, it has little adverse effect on development; consequently nonspecific toxic effects of the drug are unlikely. The results suggest that lysyl oxidase and collagen crosslinking play a vital role in primary mesenchyme migration, gastrulation, and morphogenesis during sea urchin development and indicate that BAPN may be very useful in studying the extracellular matrix-cell interactions at the cellular and molecular level.

  6. Regional and temporal changes in epizoobiontic bryozoan-communities of Flustra foliacea (Linnaeus, 1758) and implications for North Sea ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitschofsky, F.; Forster, S.; Scholz, J.

    2011-02-01

    Until recently, bryozoans have not been used as indicators for changes in bottom communities or climate control in the North Sea Basin, despite a 200-year history of bryozoan collecting. The epizoobiontic bryozoan fauna of Flustra foliacea (Linnaeus, 1758) was analysed on 51 sample stations kept in four German museums. The samples cover the entire North Sea and different time periods (1776-2008, mainly the period of 1904/1905 compared to 1980-87). Cluster analysis shows a differentiation into a northern and a southern North Sea assemblage. The northern assemblage is characterized by Amphiblestrum flemingii (Busk, 1854), Callopora dumerilii (Audouin, 1826) and Tricellaria ternata (Ellis & Solander, 1786), while the southern North Sea is characterized by Electra pilosa (Linnaeus, 1767), Crisia eburnea (Linnaeus, 1758) and Plagioecia patina (Lamarck, 1816). Spatial separation approximately follows the 50 m depth contour. The temporal distribution patterns of bryozoans are discussed in terms of NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) and temperature variations.

  7. Enzyme Inhibition by Molluscicidal Components of Myristica fragrans Houtt. in the Nervous Tissue of Snail Lymnaea acuminata

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Preetee; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, V. K.; Singh, D. K.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of molluscicidal components of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) on certain enzymes in the nervous tissue of freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata Lamarck (Lymnaeidae). In vivo and in vitro treatments of trimyristin and myristicin (active molluscicidal components of Myristica fragrans Houtt.) significantly inhibited the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), acid and alkaline phosphatase (ACP/ALP) activities in the nervous tissue of Lymnaea acuminata. The inhibition kinetics of these enzymes indicates that both the trimyristin and myristicin caused competitive noncompetitive inhibition of AChE. Trimyristin caused uncompetitive and competitive/noncompetitive inhibitions of ACP and ALP, respectively whereas the myristicin caused competitive and uncompetitive inhibition of ACP and ALP, respectively. Thus results from the present study suggest that inhibition of AChE, ACP, and ALP by trimyristin and myristicin in the snail Lymnaea acuminata may be the cause of the molluscicidal activity of Myristica fragrans. PMID:21048864

  8. HENRY H. CHEEK AND TRANSFORMISM: NEW LIGHT ON CHARLES DARWIN'S EDINBURGH BACKGROUND.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Bill

    2015-06-20

    Evidence for the transformist ideas espoused by Henry H. Cheek (1807-33), a contemporary of Charles Darwin's at the University of Edinburgh, sheds new light on the intellectual environment of Edinburgh in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Cheek was the author of several papers dealing with the transmutation of species influenced by the theories of Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772-1844), Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744-1829) and the Comte de Buffon (1707-88). Some of these were read to student societies, others appeared in the Edinburgh Journal of Natural and Geographical Science, which Cheek edited between 1829 and 1831. His writings give us a valuable window onto some of the transformist theories that were circulating among Darwin's fellow medical students in the late 1820s, to which Darwin would have been exposed during his time in Edinburgh, and for which little other concrete evidence survives.

  9. Elisesione, a new name for Wesenbergia Hartman, 1955, and the description of a new species (Annelida, Hesionidae).

    PubMed

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2016-01-01

    Wesenbergia Hartman, 1955 (Annelida, Hesionidae) is both preoccupied and a junior homonym of Wesenbergia Kryger, 1943 (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae), and must be renamed. Elisesionenom. n. is proposed as a replacement name, derived from the combination of the first name of the discoverer, Elise Wesenberg-Lund, and Hesione Savigny in Lamarck, 1818. Elisesione mezianeisp. n., is described from the Wallis and Futuna islands (southwest Pacific). A key to separate Elisesione mezianeisp. n. from its congener Elisesione problematica (Wesenberg-Lund, 1950) is included; further, the record of Elisesione problematica for Japan should be regarded as a distinct species because it has palps shorter than antennae (subequal in the type species), and shorter neurochaetal blades (7-9 times longer than wide vs 8-12 times longer than wide in the type species).

  10. Elisesione, a new name for Wesenbergia Hartman, 1955, and the description of a new species (Annelida, Hesionidae)

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wesenbergia Hartman, 1955 (Annelida, Hesionidae) is both preoccupied and a junior homonym of Wesenbergia Kryger, 1943 (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae), and must be renamed. Elisesione nom. n. is proposed as a replacement name, derived from the combination of the first name of the discoverer, Elise Wesenberg-Lund, and Hesione Savigny in Lamarck, 1818. Elisesione mezianei sp. n., is described from the Wallis and Futuna islands (southwest Pacific). A key to separate Elisesione mezianei sp. n. from its congener Elisesione problematica (Wesenberg-Lund, 1950) is included; further, the record of Elisesione problematica for Japan should be regarded as a distinct species because it has palps shorter than antennae (subequal in the type species), and shorter neurochaetal blades (7–9 times longer than wide vs 8–12 times longer than wide in the type species). PMID:27920600

  11. Aggregation of Thaumatomyia glabra (Diptera: Chloropidae) Males on Iris spp. Flowers Releasing Methyl Anthranilate.

    PubMed

    Ohler, Bonnie J; Guédot, Christelle; Zack, Richard S; Landolt, Peter J

    2016-12-01

    Aggregations of Thaumatomyia glabra (Diptera: Chloropidae) were observed on flowers of Iris pallida Lamarck (Asparagales: Iridaceae), whereas no T. glabra (Meigen) were observed on nearby Iris germanica L. flowers. Sampling of T. glabra on I. pallida flowers revealed the presence of males only. In a previous study, T. glabra males were attracted to methyl anthranilate. We found methyl anthranilate in extracts of I. pallida flowers on which T. glabra aggregated, but not in extracts of I. germanica flowers. Applying methyl anthranilate to I. germanica flowers elicited attraction of T. glabra to the flowers. This study suggests that I. pallida flowers may attract T. glabra males to aggregate because they release the known attractant, methyl anthranilate, whereas I. germanica flowers may not be attractive because they do not release methyl anthranilate. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Variations on the larval incubation of Anodontites trapesialis (Unionoida, Mycetopodidae): Synergetic effect of the environmental factors and host availability.

    PubMed

    Callil, C T; Krinski, D; Silva, F A

    2012-08-01

    The unionid Anodontites trapesilais (Lamarck, 1819) like most freshwater mussels is a parasite of fish. So it is trivial to assume that the availability of hosts is an important factor for the maintenance of unionoid populations. What seems obvious is not always so easy to demonstrate. This study proposes to investigate the effects of abiotic and biotic variables related to the incubation of larvae in A. trapesialis. For this, we estimate different biological indexes and try to capture the dimensionality of the fish, along with the temporal variation of environmental variables. From the application of a CCA, it was demonstrated that there was a synchronicity among the factors and variables proposed here, and we infer that the flood pulse acts as a synergistic factor in this process.

  13. Morphology of glochidia of Lampsilis higginsi (Bivalvia: Unionidae) compared with three related species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Holland Bartels, L. E.; Mitchell, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    Glochidia of the endangered unionid mussel Lampsilis higginsi (Lea) are morphologically similar to those of several other species in the upper Mississippi River. Life history details, such as the timing of reproduction and identity of host fish, can be readily studied if the glochidia of L. higginsi can be distinguished from those of related species. Authors used light and scanning electron microscopy and statistical analyses of three shell measurements, shell length, shell height, and hinge length, to compare the glochidia of L. higginsi with those of L. radiata siliquoidea (Barnes), L. ventricosa (Barnes), and Ligumia recta (Lamarck). Glochidia of L. higginsi were differentiated by scanning electron microscopy on the basis of a combined examination of the position of the hinge ligament and the width of dorsal ridges, but were indistinguishable by light microscope examination or by statistical analyses of measurements.

  14. The mitochondrial genome of Pomacea maculata (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Liu, Suwen; Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Liu, Jinpeng; Liu, Guangfu; Yu, Xiaoping

    2016-07-01

    The golden apple snail, Pomacea maculata Perry, 1810 (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae) is one of the most serious invasive alien species from the native range of South America. The mitochondrial genome of P. maculata (15 516 bp) consists of 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, two rRNAs, and 22 tRNAs) and a non-coding region with a 16 bp repeat unit. Most mitochondrial genes of P. maculata are distributed on the H-strand, except eight tRNA genes, which are encoded on the L-strand. A phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a close relationship between P. maculata and another invasive golden apple snail species, Pomacea canaliculata (Lamarck, 1822).

  15. Foreign bodies; or, how did Darwin invent the symptom?

    PubMed

    Rowlinson, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Beginning with a discussion of the sources in Darwin's writing for Freud's theory of the hysterical symptom, this essay proceeds to a symptomatic reading of Darwin himself. With reference to "The Origin of Species," "The Descent of Man," and "The Expression of the Emotions," this essay shows that Darwin's theories of involuntary expressive behavior and of aesthetic preference in sexual selection are linked by their role in his understanding of racial difference and also by their reliance on the idea that learned habits can be inherited as instincts, a view often identified with Lamarck. They are thus at once theories of the foreign body and theories that appear as foreigners within the body of Darwin's work.

  16. [From the mechanical complexity in biology].

    PubMed

    Uribe, Libia Herrero

    2008-03-01

    From the mechanical complexity in biology. Through history, each century has brought new discoveries and beliefs that have resulted in different perspectives to study life organisms. In this essay, 1 define three periods: in the first, organisms were studied in the context of their environment, in the second, on the basis of physical and chemical laws, and on the third, systemically. My analysis starts with primitive humans, continues to Aristoteles and Newton, Lamarck and Darwin, the DNA doble helix discovery, and the beginnings of reduccionism in science. I propose that life is paradigmatical, that it obeys physical and chemical laws but cannot be explained by them I review the systemic theory, autopoiesis, discipative structures and non- linear dynamics. 1 propose that the deterministic, lineal and quantitative paradigm of nature are not the only way to study nature and invite the reader to explore the complexity paradigm.

  17. Making Heredity Matter: Samuel Butler's Idea of Unconscious Memory.

    PubMed

    Turbil, Cristiano

    2017-02-28

    Butler's idea of evolution was developed over the publication of four books, several articles and essays between 1863 and 1890. These publications, although never achieving the success expected by Butler, proposed a psychological elaboration of evolution (robustly enforced by Lamarck's philosophy), called 'unconscious memory'. This was strongly in contrast with the materialistic approach suggested by Darwin's natural selection. Starting with a historical introduction, this paper aspires to ascertain the logic, meaning and significance of Butler's idea of 'unconscious memory' in the post-Darwinian physiological and psychological Pan-European discussion. Particular attention is devoted to demonstrating that Butler was not only a populariser of science but also an active protagonist in the late Victorian psychological debate.

  18. Enzyme Inhibition by Molluscicidal Components of Myristica fragrans Houtt. in the Nervous Tissue of Snail Lymnaea acuminata.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Preetee; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, V K; Singh, D K

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of molluscicidal components of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) on certain enzymes in the nervous tissue of freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata Lamarck (Lymnaeidae). In vivo and in vitro treatments of trimyristin and myristicin (active molluscicidal components of Myristica fragrans Houtt.) significantly inhibited the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), acid and alkaline phosphatase (ACP/ALP) activities in the nervous tissue of Lymnaea acuminata. The inhibition kinetics of these enzymes indicates that both the trimyristin and myristicin caused competitive noncompetitive inhibition of AChE. Trimyristin caused uncompetitive and competitive/noncompetitive inhibitions of ACP and ALP, respectively whereas the myristicin caused competitive and uncompetitive inhibition of ACP and ALP, respectively. Thus results from the present study suggest that inhibition of AChE, ACP, and ALP by trimyristin and myristicin in the snail Lymnaea acuminata may be the cause of the molluscicidal activity of Myristica fragrans.

  19. Of mice and men: evolution and the socialist utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw.

    PubMed

    Hale, Piers J

    2010-01-01

    During the British socialist revival of the 1880s competing theories of evolution were central to disagreements about strategy for social change. In News from Nowhere (1891), William Morris had portrayed socialism as the result of Lamarckian processes, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of the movement, became disillusioned as a result of the Malthusianism he learnt from Huxley and his subsequent rejection of Lamarckism in light of Weismann's experiments on mice. This brought him into conflict with his fellow Fabian, George Bernard Shaw, who rejected neo-Darwinism in favour of a Lamarckian conception of change he called "creative evolution."

  20. Induction of stolon settlement in the scyphopolyps of Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa, Semaeostomeae) by glycolipids of marine bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmahl, G.

    1985-06-01

    The settlement of pedal stolons of scyphopolyps of Aurelia aurita Lamarck could be induced by addition of a species of bacteria from the family Micrococcaceae. After treatment of the bacteria with several organic solvents a crude lipid extract free of bacteria could be obtained which was shown to be effective in inducing stolon settlement. Crude lipids extracted from the late logarithmic growth phase had an optimal effect on stolon attachment, in contrast to previously published experiments showing that all logarithmic phases of bacteria had the same level of effectiveness. After separation of the crude lipid extracts by thin layer chromatography and subsequent bioassay of the reeluated substances, acylgalactosidyldiglyceride and monogalactosidyldiglyceride were identified as the effective substances. Monogalactosidyldiglyceride was only found in bacteria from the medium logarithmic growth phase, whereas the former was found at all stages. The effectiveness of acylgalactosidyldiglyceride was independent of the growth phase of the extracted bacteria.

  1. The Foraminiferal Genus Orbitolina in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglass, Raymond Charles

    1960-01-01

    The foraminiferal genus Orbitolina has been useful as an index fossil in the Cretaceous rocks of the circumglobal equatorial belt for nearly a century. In Europe and the Near and Middle East enough work has been done on the species to allow their use for approximate correlations within the Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The study of American specimens of Orbitolina, had been almost neglected although they were used in a rather cursory fashion for markers of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity strata. Three species had been described and assigned to Orbitolina in the United States, but the validity of each of the species had been questioned. A study of the genus Orbitolina, its type species, its morphology and the stratigraphic and geographic distribution in North America are presented in this report. Stratigraphic sections were measured throughout the area of Lower Cretaceous outcrop in Texas, New Mexico. and Arizona, and samples of Orbitolina were taken from these measured sections. Several thousand thin sections were prepared from which 8 species of Orbitolina, 7 of them new, were recognized. Orbitolina texana (Roemer) was found to be confined to the lower part of the Glen Rose limestone and its equivalents. Orbitolina, minuta n. sp. is essentially confined to the upper part of the Glen Rose limestone and its equivalents. Four of the species are known only from the Arizona and New Mexico region. The species of Orbitolina are useful stratigraphically, but all their characters-internal as well as external-must be considered. The use of thin sections for the study of Orbitolina is essential. One of the first things that had to be determined was the correct concept of the genus Orbitolina. The type species had not been determined by earlier authors, although four species had been suggested at various times. With careful study of the early literature, it became apparent that the type species is Orbitulites lenticulata Lamarck, 1816=Madreporites lenticularis Blumenbach, 1805

  2. [Haeckel: a German Darwinian?].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    German biologist Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919) is often considered the most renowned Darwinian in his country since, as early as 1862, he declared that he accepted the conclusions Darwin had reached three years before in On the Origin of Species, and afterwards, he continuously proclaimed himself a supporter of the English naturalist and championed the evolutionary theory. Nevertheless, if we examine carefully his books, in particular his General Morphology (1866), we can see that he carries on a tradition very far from Darwin's thoughts. In spite of his acceptance of the idea of natural selection, that he establishes as an argument for materialism, he adopts, indeed, a conception of evolution that is, in some respects, rather close to Lamarck's views. He is, thus, a good example of the ambiguities of the reception of Darwinism in Germany in the second part of the 19th century.

  3. [Current thought on hereditary transmission and human genetics].

    PubMed

    Snelders, Stephen; Pieters, Toine

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of a review of the historiography on thought about hereditary transmission and human genetics in the 20th century in Britain, the United States, Germany, Russia, Sweden, and the Netherlands, a new research perspective is formulated. Concepts of heredity and their use in society have been various and diverse. Definitions of heredity and of the influence of 'nature' and 'nurture' in shaping genetic material have significantly changed. In the new research perspective the focus is directed to the role of a broad range of concepts of heredity in framing debates and practices around health, disease, and behaviour, including but not exclusively the concepts of Mendelian genetics, neo-Lamarckism', and concepts prevalent in eugenic movements. A research programme is outlined that is directed at specific problem fields in health care (e.g. alcoholism), and uses various sources to examine the historical dynamics in medical and public spheres.

  4. Cancer as a metabolic disease: implications for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto E; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-03-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that cancer is primarily a metabolic disease involving disturbances in energy production through respiration and fermentation. The genomic instability observed in tumor cells and all other recognized hallmarks of cancer are considered downstream epiphenomena of the initial disturbance of cellular energy metabolism. The disturbances in tumor cell energy metabolism can be linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of the mitochondria. When viewed as a mitochondrial metabolic disease, the evolutionary theory of Lamarck can better explain cancer progression than can the evolutionary theory of Darwin. Cancer growth and progression can be managed following a whole body transition from fermentable metabolites, primarily glucose and glutamine, to respiratory metabolites, primarily ketone bodies. As each individual is a unique metabolic entity, personalization of metabolic therapy as a broad-based cancer treatment strategy will require fine-tuning to match the therapy to an individual's unique physiology.

  5. The creative evolution of scientific paradigms: Vernon Lee and the debate over the hereditary transmission of acquired characters.

    PubMed

    Towheed, Shafquat

    2006-01-01

    By the end of the nineteenth century, evolution through natural selection had been widely accepted, but the means by which innate or acquired characteristics were transmitted from parent to offspring remained hotly contested. As the literary career of Vernon Lee makes evident, discussion of the validity of newly espoused theories was not limited to science. This essay explores Lee's lifelong engagement with emerging and often unproven ideas in heredity and evolutionary science by arguing, first, that rather than a unidirectional flow of ideas from experimental science to literature and the social sciences, there was instead a productive and creative trafficking between these fields; and, second, that despite Lee's early rejection of Lamarckism, she continued to utilize superseded paradigms to inform her writing in a number of fields outside evolutionary biology.

  6. Cancer as a metabolic disease: implications for novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that cancer is primarily a metabolic disease involving disturbances in energy production through respiration and fermentation. The genomic instability observed in tumor cells and all other recognized hallmarks of cancer are considered downstream epiphenomena of the initial disturbance of cellular energy metabolism. The disturbances in tumor cell energy metabolism can be linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of the mitochondria. When viewed as a mitochondrial metabolic disease, the evolutionary theory of Lamarck can better explain cancer progression than can the evolutionary theory of Darwin. Cancer growth and progression can be managed following a whole body transition from fermentable metabolites, primarily glucose and glutamine, to respiratory metabolites, primarily ketone bodies. As each individual is a unique metabolic entity, personalization of metabolic therapy as a broad-based cancer treatment strategy will require fine-tuning to match the therapy to an individual’s unique physiology. PMID:24343361

  7. Henry H. Cheek and transformism: new light on Charles Darwin's Edinburgh background

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for the transformist ideas espoused by Henry H. Cheek (1807–33), a contemporary of Charles Darwin's at the University of Edinburgh, sheds new light on the intellectual environment of Edinburgh in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Cheek was the author of several papers dealing with the transmutation of species influenced by the theories of Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772–1844), Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744–1829) and the Comte de Buffon (1707–88). Some of these were read to student societies, others appeared in the Edinburgh Journal of Natural and Geographical Science, which Cheek edited between 1829 and 1831. His writings give us a valuable window onto some of the transformist theories that were circulating among Darwin's fellow medical students in the late 1820s, to which Darwin would have been exposed during his time in Edinburgh, and for which little other concrete evidence survives. PMID:26665300

  8. Sabellaria jeramae, a new species (Annelida: Polychaeta: Sabellariidae) from the shallow waters of Malaysia, with a note on the ecological traits of reefs.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Eijiroh; Matsuo, Kanako; Capa, Maria; Tomioka, Shinri; Kajihara, Hiroshi; Kupriyanova, Elena K; Polgar, Gianluca

    2015-12-07

    A new species of the genus Sabellaria Lamarck, 1818 (Annelida: Polychaeta: Sabellariidae) is described from the intertidal zone of Jeram, Selangor, Malaysia. Sabellaria jeramae n. sp. is a gregarious species that constructs large reefs several hundreds of meters long and 50-200 m wide. The new species is distinguished from other congeners by the character combination of the presence of a single kind of middle paleae with conspicuous morphology, and outer paleae with long frayed teeth. Morphological features of the species are described and compared to those of all congeneric species. We also compare the reef structure and geographical distribution of the new species to those of the members of the family Sabellariidae around the world, demonstrating the ecological traits of the reefs.

  9. Authorship of some polychaete (Annelida) names derived from the works of Renier and Savigny.

    PubMed

    Muir, Alexander I; Petersen, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Full citations of animal specific or generic names ultimately derived from unpublished manuscripts should commemorate the work of the person who described the new species as well as the person who eventually validly published the name. We suggest that biologists should use the following authorships when citing these names: Terebella infundibulum Renier in Meneghini, 1847 (now used in the genus Myxicola); Nereis coccinea Renier in Meneghini, 1847 (now used in the genus Lumbrineris); Thalassema scutatum Renier in Ranzani, 1817 (now known as Sternaspis scutata); Polynoe Savigny in Lamarck, 1818. The case of Myxicola infundibulum is further complicated by a possible homonymy, and to avoid confusion we suggest that the name is used for the Myxicola species found in the Adriatic.

  10. The roots of phylogeny: how did Haeckel build his trees?

    PubMed

    Dayrat, Benoît

    2003-08-01

    Haeckel created much of our current vocabulary in evolutionary biology, such as the term phylogeny, which is currently used to designate trees. Assuming that Haeckel gave the same meaning to this term, one often reproduces Haeckel's trees as the first illustrations of phylogenetic trees. A detailed analysis of Haeckel's own evolutionary vocabulary and theory revealed that Haeckel's trees were genealogical trees and that Haeckel's phylogeny was a morphological concept. However, phylogeny was actually the core of Haeckel's tree reconstruction, and understanding the exact meaning Haeckel gave to phylogeny is crucial to understanding the information Haeckel wanted to convey in his famous trees. Haeckel's phylogeny was a linear series of main morphological stages along the line of descent of a given species. The phylogeny of a single species would provide a trunk around which lateral branches were added as mere ornament; the phylogeny selected for drawing a tree of a given group was considered the most complete line of progress from lower to higher forms of this group, such as the phylogeny of Man for the genealogical tree of Vertebrates. Haeckel's phylogeny was mainly inspired by the idea of the scala naturae, or scale of being. Therefore, Haeckel's genealogical trees, which were only branched on the surface, mainly represented the old idea of scale of being. Even though Haeckel decided to draw genealogical trees after reading On the Origin of Species and was called the German Darwin, he did not draw Darwinian branching diagrams. Although Haeckel always saw Lamarck, Goethe, and Darwin as the three fathers of the theory of evolution, he was mainly influenced by Lamarck and Goethe in his approach to tree reconstruction.

  11. Inheritance of acquired traits in plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since Lamarck proposed the idea of inheritance of acquired traits 200 years ago, much has been said for and against it, but the theory was finally declined after the 1930s. Despite of the negative opinions of the majority of geneticists, botanists and plant breeders have long recognized that altered properties during the growth were occasionally transmitted to the offspring. This was also the case with artificially altered properties such as dwarfism, flowering timing and plant stature, which were induced by a non-mutagenic chemical, 5-azacytidine and its derivatives. As these drugs are powerful inhibitors of DNA methylation in vivo, a close correlation between methylation and phenotypic expression was suggested. Subsequent studies showed that rice plants acquired disease resistance upon demethylation of the corresponding resistant gene, and that both resistant trait and hypomethylated status were inherited by the progeny up to nine generations. Whether or not the methylation pattern changes under natural condition was then questioned, and recent studies have indicated that it indeed naturally changes in response to environmental stresses. Whether or not the altered methylation pattern during the vegetative growth is heritable was also questioned, and studies on toadflax and rice affirmed the question, showing stable maintenance of hypermethylation in the former and hypomethylation in the latter for 250 and 10 years, respectively. The observation strongly suggested that acquired traits can be heritable as far as the acquired methylation pattern is stably transmitted. This concept is consistent with the Lamarck's theory of the inheritance of acquired traits, which therefore should be carefully reevaluated to reestablish his impaired reputation. PMID:20118668

  12. The origins of diversity: Darwin's conditions and epigenetic variations.

    PubMed

    Marsh, David E

    2007-01-01

    This short history of evolutionary thought during the last few centuries describes how some of our foremost thinkers have debated--and still do--the precise mechanisms at the roots of evolutionary change. Commentators frequently contradicted themselves, as well as each other. The popularity of Christian fundamentalism waned following the World Wars. Eventually the rug was pulled from beneath it--till a more recent reaction. Amidst all this babble coming from numerous towers of Babel over centuries, we failed to see Charles Darwin as the great environmentalist: who said environmental conditions, whilst working hand in glove with natural selection, constituted the more important 'law'. A bird's eye view of 18th and 19th century evolutionary thought is considered against the climate of those times (politics, industrial revolution, trade, religious expansionism, etc). Darwinism superseded Lamarckism helped by the neo-Darwinism of Weismann, higher mathematics, population genetics--the 'Modern Synthesis' of 1935--culminating in the discovery of the double helix by Watson, Crick et al, assuring us of the correctness of 'primacy of DNA theory'. Stimulation and challenge is currently fuelled by exciting nascent knowledge of epigenetic variations and Cairnsian 'adaptive mutations'. The work of Marcus Pembrey and Barry Keverne tracking human and animal variation back generationally describing how 'genomic imprinting' causes reversible heritable change from slight variations in the chromosomes of parents, grandparents, great-grandparents and parents to be. The purpose of this thesis is to put forward a new theme proposed neither by Lamarck or Darwin. We stand on the threshold of the first paradigm change for 150 years.

  13. The infauna of three widely distributed sponge species (Hexactinellida and Demospongiae) from the deep Ekström Shelf in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersken, Daniel; Göcke, Christian; Brandt, Angelika; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Schwabe, Enrico; Anna Seefeldt, Meike; Veit-Köhler, Gritta; Janussen, Dorte

    2014-10-01

    Due to their high abundance and large body size sponges have a central position in Antarctic zoobenthos, where they form the most extensive sponge grounds of the world. Though research on Antarctic benthos communities is quite established, research on sponge-associated infauna communities is scarce. We analyzed associated infauna of fifteen individuals of the sponge species Mycale (Oxymycale) acerata Kirkpatrick, 1907 (Demospongiae: Mycalina), Rossella antarctica Carter, 1872 and R. racovitzae Topsent, 1901 (both Hexactinellida: Lyssacinosida). Samples were collected from the deep Ekström Shelf at 602 m in the South-Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the ANT XXIV-2 (SYSTCO I) expedition of RV Polarstern. The number of species, α- and β-diversity and the significantly different species composition of infauna communities related to sponge species were calculated, the latter via cluster analysis. The sponge-associated infauna consisted of five phyla: Foraminifera, Nematoda, Polychaeta, Mollusca and Arthropoda. In total 11,463 infaunal specimens were extracted and we found at least 76 associated species. Highest values of α-diversity were calculated for a sample of R. antarctica with a Shannon-Index of 1.84 and Simpson-Index of 0.72 respectively. Our results of the cluster-analysis show significant differences between infauna communities and a unique species composition for single sponge species. Polychaetes of the genus Syllis Lamarck, 1818 were numerous in M. acerata and genera like Pionosyllis Malmgren, 1867 and Cirratulus Lamarck, 1801 were numerous in R. antarctica. Individuals of the amphipod species Seba cf. dubia Schellenberg, 1926 were often found in R. antarctica and R. racovitzae while Colomastix fissilingua Schellenberg, 1926 was frequent in samples of M. acerata. Molluscs were present in M. acerata and R. antarctica but absent in R. racovitzae.

  14. William Keith Brooks and the naturalist's defense of Darwinism in the late-nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Nash, Richard

    2015-06-01

    William Keith Brooks was an American zoologist at Johns Hopkins University from 1876 until his death in 1908. Over the course of his career, Brooks staunchly defended Darwinism, arguing for the centrality of natural selection in evolutionary theory at a time when alternative theories, such as neo-Lamarckism, grew prominent in American biology. In his book The Law of Heredity (1883), Brooks addressed problems raised by Darwin's theory of pangenesis. In modifying and developing Darwin's pangenesis, Brooks proposed a new theory of heredity that sought to avoid the pitfalls of Darwin's hypothesis. In so doing he strengthened Darwin's theory of natural selection by undermining arguments for the inheritance of acquired characteristics. In later attacks on neo-Lamarckism, Brooks consistently defended Darwin's theory of natural selection on logical grounds, continued to challenge the idea of the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and argued that natural selection best explained a wide range of adaptations. Finally, he critiqued Galton's statistical view of heredity and argued that Galton had resurrected an outmoded typological concept of species, one which Darwin and other naturalists had shown to be incorrect. Brooks's ideas resemble the "biological species concept" of the twentieth century, as developed by evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr and others. The late-nineteenth century was not a period of total "eclipse" of Darwinism, as biologists and historians have hitherto seen it. Although the "Modern Synthesis" refers to the reconciliation of post-Mendelian genetics with evolution by natural selection, we might adjust our understanding of how the synthesis developed by seeing it as the culmination of a longer discussion that extends back to the late-nineteenth century.

  15. Edward Hitchcock's pre-Darwinian (1840) "tree of life".

    PubMed

    Archibald, J David

    2009-01-01

    The "tree of life" iconography, representing the history of life, dates from at least the latter half of the 18th century, but evolution as the mechanism providing this bifurcating history of life did not appear until the early 19th century. There was also a shift from the straight line, scala naturae view of change in nature to a more bifurcating or tree-like view. Throughout the 19th century authors presented tree-like diagrams, some regarding the Deity as the mechanism of change while others argued for evolution. Straight-line or anagenetic evolution and bifurcating or cladogenetic evolution are known in biology today, but are often misrepresented in popular culture, especially with anagenesis being confounded with scala naturae. Although well known in the mid 19th century, the geologist Edward Hitchcock has been forgotten as an early, if not the first author to publish a paleontologically based "tree of life" beginning in 1840 in the first edition of his popular general geology text Elementary Geology. At least 31 editions were published and those between 1840 and 1859 had this "paleontological chart" showing two trees, one for fossil and living plants and another for animals set within a context of geological time. Although the chart did not vary in later editions, the text explaining the chart did change to reflect newer ideas in paleontology and geology. Whereas Lamarck, Chambers, Bronn, Darwin, and Haeckel saw some form of transmutation as the mechanism that created their "trees of life," Hitchcock, like his contemporaries Agassiz and Miller, who also produced "trees of life," saw a deity as the agent of change. Through each edition of his book Hitchcock denounced the newer transmutationist hypotheses of Lamarck, then Chambers, and finally Darwin in an 1860 edition that no longer presented his tree-like "paleontological chart."

  16. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of several Heliconia species in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Isaza, L; Marulanda, M L; López, A M

    2012-12-19

    Researchers have classified the Heliconia genus as a group of highly variable and diverse plants. Species and cultivars are visually differentiated primarily on the basis of the color and size of inflorescence bracts. At taxonomic level, flower type (parabolic, sigmoid, or erect) and size are taken into account. The vast morphological diversity of heliconias at intra-specific, intra-population, and varietal levels in central-west Colombia prompted the present study. We characterized the genetic variability of 67 genotypes of cultivated heliconias belonging to Heliconia caribaea Lamarck, H. bihai (L.) L., H. orthotricha L. Andersson, H. stricta Huber, H. wagneriana Petersen, and H. psittacorum L. f., as well as that of several interspecific hybrids such as H. psittacorum L. f. x H. spathocircinata Aristeguieta and H. caribaea Lamarck x H. bihai (L.) L. We also created an approximation to their phylogenetic analysis. Molecular analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers revealed a total of 170 bands. Two large, well-defined groups resulted: the first grouped cultivars of the very closely related H. caribaea and H. bihai species with those of H. orthotricha and H. psittacorum, and the second grouped H. stricta and H. wagneriana cultivars. The lowest percentage of polymorphism was found in H. psittacorum (17.65%) and the highest was in H. stricta (55.88%). Using AFLP, phylogenetic analysis of the species studied revealed the monophyletic origin of the Heliconiaceae family, and identified the Heliconia subgenus as monophyletic while providing evidence of the polyphyletic origin of several representatives of the Stenochlamys subgenus.

  17. Rocky Intertidal Zonation Pattern in Antofagasta, Chile: Invasive Species and Shellfish Gathering

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Juan Carlos; Manríquez, Patricio H.; Delgado, Alejandro; Ortiz, Verónica; Jara, María Elisa; Varas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological invasions affecting rocky intertidal zonation patterns, yield information on species interactions. In the Bay of Antofagasta, northern Chile, the non-indigenous tunicate Pyura praeputialis, originally from Australia, has invaded (in the past century or so) and monopolized a major portion of the mid-intertidal rocky shore, displacing upshore the native mussel Perumytilus purpuratus. In Antofagasta the tunicate is subjected to intensive exploitation. Monitoring protocols show that in the past 10 years Antofagasta's tunicate population has experienced a drastic decline, affecting the intertidal zonation pattern. Methodology/Principal Findings A 12.5 km of coastline, on the southern eastern shore of the Bay of Antofagasta, was studied. Eight sites were systematically (1993–1994) or sporadically (2003–2014) monitored for the seaward-shoreward expansion or reduction of the tunicate Pyura praeputialis, and native mussel and barnacle bands. A notable reduction in the mid-intertidal band of P. praeputialis and a seaward expansion of the mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, and barnacle bands was observed. We suggest that the major cause for the decline in the tunicate is due to its intensive exploitation by rocky shore Pyura-gathers. The rate of extraction of tunicates by professional Pyura-gathers ranged between 256–740 tunicates hour−1. Between 2009–2014 the density of professional Pyura-gather ranged between 0.5–4.5 km−1 per low tide. Hence, 10 professional Pyura-gathers working 1 h for 10 low tides per month, during 6 months, will remove between 307–888 m2 of tunicates. A drastic decline in tunicate recruitment was observed and several P. praeputialis ecosystems services have been lost. Conclusion and Significance In Antofagasta, the continuous and intensive intertidal gathering of the invasive tunicate Pyura praeputialis, has caused a drastic reduction of its population modifying the zonation pattern. Thereby, native mussel Perumytilus

  18. Estradiol and endocrine disrupting compounds adversely affect development of sea urchin embryos at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Troy A; Snyder, Mark J; Cherr, Gary N

    2005-01-26

    Environmental endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are a wide variety of chemicals that typically exert effects, either directly or indirectly, through receptor-mediated processes, thus mimicking endogenous hormones and/or inhibiting normal hormone activities and metabolism. Little is known about the effects of EDCs on echinoderm physiology, reproduction and development. We exposed developing sea urchin embryos (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus anamesus) to two known EDCs (4-octylphenol (OCT), bisphenol A (BisA)) and to natural and synthetic reproductive hormones (17beta-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), progesterone (P4) and 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2)). In addition, we studied two non-estrogenic EDCs, tributyltin (TBT) and o,p-DDD. Successful development to the pluteus larval stage (96 h post-fertilization) was used to define EDC concentration-response relationships. The order of compound potency based on EC50 values for a reduction in normal development was as follows: TBT(L. anamesus)>OCT>TBT(S. purpuratus)>E2>EE2>DDD>BisA>P4>E1>E3. The effect of TBT was pronounced even at concentrations substantially lower than those commonly reported in heavily contaminated areas, but the response was significantly different in the two model species. Sea urchin embryos were generally more sensitive to estrogenic EDCs and TBT than most other invertebrate larvae. Stage-specific exposure experiments were conducted to determine the most sensitive developmental periods using blastula, gastrula and post-gastrula (pluteus) stages. The stage most sensitive to E2, OCT and TBT was the blastula stage with less overall sensitivity in the gastrula stage, regardless of concentration. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) were added to the experiments individually and in combination with estrogenic EDCs to interfere with potential receptor-mediated actions. Tamoxifen, a partial ER agonist, alone inhibited development at concentrations as low as 0.02 ng

  19. Effects of elevated temperature and carbon dioxide on the growth and survival of larvae and juveniles of three species of northwest Atlantic bivalves.

    PubMed

    Talmage, Stephanie C; Gobler, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    Rising CO(2) concentrations and water temperatures this century are likely to have transformative effects on many coastal marine organisms. Here, we compared the responses of two life history stages (larval, juvenile) of three species of calcifying bivalves (Mercenaria mercenaria, Crassostrea virginica, and Argopecten irradians) to temperatures (24 and 28°C) and CO(2) concentrations (∼250, 390, and 750 ppm) representative of past, present, and future summer conditions in temperate estuaries. Results demonstrated that increases in temperature and CO(2) each significantly depressed survival, development, growth, and lipid synthesis of M. mercenaria and A. irradians larvae and that the effects were additive. Juvenile M. mercenaria and A. irradians were negatively impacted by higher temperatures while C. virginica juveniles were not. C. virginica and A. irradians juveniles were negatively affected by higher CO(2) concentrations, while M. mercenaria was not. Larvae were substantially more vulnerable to elevated CO(2) than juvenile stages. These findings suggest that current and future increases in temperature and CO(2) are likely to have negative consequences for coastal bivalve populations.

  20. Primary structure of myosin from the striated adductor muscle of the Atlantic scallop, Pecten maximus, and expression of the regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Janes, D P; Patel, H; Chantler, P D

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the complete cDNA and deduced amino acid sequences of the heavy chain, regulatory light chain and essential light chain which constitute the molecular structure of myosin from the striated adductor muscle of the scallop, Pecten maximus. The deduced amino acid sequences of P. maximus regulatory light chain, essential light chain and heavy chain comprise 156, 156 and 1940 amino acids, respectively. These myosin peptide sequences, obtained from the most common of the eastern Atlantic scallops, are compared with those from three other molluscan myosins: the striated adductor muscles of Argopecten irradians and Placopecten magellanicus, and myosin from the siphon retractor muscle of the squid, Loligo pealei. The Pecten heavy chain sequence resembles those of the other two scallop sequences to a much greater extent as compared with the squid sequence, amino acid identities being 97.5% (A. irradians), 95.6% (P. magellanicus) and 73.6% (L. pealei), respectively. Myosin heavy chain residues that are known to be important for regulation are conserved in Pecten maximus. Using these Pecten sequences, we have overexpressed the regulatory light chain, and a combination of essential light chain and myosin heavy chain fragment, separately, in E. coli BL21 (DE3) prior to recombination, thereby producing Pecten regulatory domains without recourse to proteolytic digestion. The expressed regulatory domain was shown to undergo a calcium-dependent increase (approximately 7%) in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence with a mid-point at a pCa of 6.6.

  1. Contamination of shellfish from Shanghai seafood markets with paralytic shellfish poisoning and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins determined by mouse bioassay and HPLC.

    PubMed

    Wu, J-Y; Zheng, L; Wang, J-H

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports the results of investigations of shellfish toxin contamination of products obtained from Shanghai seafood markets. From May to October 2003, 66 samples were collected from several major seafood markets. Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins in shellfish samples were monitored primarily by a mouse bioassay, then analysed by HPLC for the chemical contents of the toxins. According to the mouse bioassay, eight samples were detected to be contaminated by PSP toxins and seven samples were contaminated by DSP toxins. Subsequent HPLC analysis indicated that the concentrations of the PSP toxins ranged from 0.2 to 1.9 microg/100 g tissues and the main components were gonyautoxins 2/3 (GTX2/3). As for DSP, okadaic acid was detected in three samples, and its concentration ranged from 3.2 to 17.5 microg/100 g tissues. Beside okadaic acid, its analogues, dinophysistoxins (DTX1), were found in one sample. According to the results, gastropod (Neverita didyma) and scallop (Argopecten irradians) were more likely contaminated with PSP and DSP toxins, and most of the contaminated samples were collected from Tongchuan and Fuxi markets. In addition, the contaminated samples were always found in May, June and July. Therefore, consumers should be cautious about eating the potential toxic shellfish during this specific period.

  2. Selected alternatives to conventional chlorination. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garey, J.F.

    1980-10-01

    This study was jointly funded by EPRI and five electric utility companies in New England (New England Power, Northeast Utilities, United Illuminating, Vermont Yankee Nuclear, and Public Service of New Hampshire). Previous investigations had identified three major areas for further study: continuous low-level chlorination, dechlorination, and condenser biofouling control. Continuous low-level chlorination, studied at two locations, one on open coastal water and the other in an industrialized estuarine area, showed that 0.1 ppM total residual oxidant (TRO) prevented attachment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) to concrete surfaces. Chronic bioassays showed that 0.075 ppM TRO reduced biofouling by indigenous organisms; 0.1 ppM TRO slightly increased mortalities of the Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia) but had no effect on the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Dechlorination investigations showed that threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia), larval bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), and the copepod Acartia tonsa exposed to water chlorinated to 0.5 ppM TRO for 10, 100, and 1000 seconds, followed by dechlorination with sodium thiosulfate, all suffered significant toxic effects. Condenser tube biofouling studies showed that there was a strong correlation between condenser performance and condenser tube biofouling; biofilm induction varied inversely with ambient water temperature, but orientation of the tubes had no effect on biofilm formation; and all chemicals tested (mono-, di-, and trisodium phosphate; Polident; and TRO at 0.1 ppM) reduced but did not remove biofilms.

  3. Predicting Effects of Coastal Acidification on Marine Bivalve ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) is increasing in the oceans and causing changes in seawater pH commonly described as ocean or coastal acidification. It is now well-established that, when reproduced in laboratory experiments, these increases in pCO2 can reduce survival and growth of early life stage bivalves. However, the effects that these impairments would have on whole populations of bivalves are unknown. In this study, these laboratory responses were incorporated into field-parameterized population models to assess population-level sensitivities to acidification for two northeast bivalve species with different life histories: Mercenaria mercenaria (hard clam) and Argopecten irradians (bay scallop). The resulting models permitted translation of laboratory pCO2 response functions into population-level responses to examine population sensitivity to future pCO2 changes. Preliminary results from our models indicate that if the current M. mercenaria negative population growth rate was attributed to the effects of pCO2 on early life stages, the population would decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at 420 microatmospheres (µatm) pCO2. If the current population growth rate was attributed to other additive factors (e.g., harvest, harmful algal blooms), M. mercenaria populations were predicted to decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at the preliminary estimate of 1010 µatm pCO2. The estimated population growth rate was positive for A. irradians,

  4. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Bay Scallop

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, C.W.; Neves, R.J.; Pardue, G.B.

    1983-10-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. The bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) is a commercially and ecologically important scallop of estuarine and inshore environments, from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to Laguna Madre, Texas. They occur at depths from 0.3 to 18 m but are most common in waters less than 2 m deep. They spawn at 1 year of age from April through December, later in southern populations. Water temperature and food supply are important factors for proper gonad developent and spawning. Larvae are planktonic, and juveniles settle and attach by byssal threads to suitable substrates; seagrass beds are preferred for settlement. Bay scallops are filter feeders, consuming primarily benthic diatoms. Temperature, salinity, water currents, and availability of suitable attachment/settlement substrates are the most important environmental requirements of bay scallops. They require a minimum water temperature of 20/sup 0/C for spawning, and a minimum of 14 ppt salinity, grow best in currents less than 1 cm/s, and prefer eelgrass to other seagrasses for settlement and attachment during early life stages. 52 references, 2 figures.

  5. Effects of past, present, and future ocean carbon dioxide concentrations on the growth and survival of larval shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Gobler, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The combustion of fossil fuels has enriched levels of CO2 in the world’s oceans and decreased ocean pH. Although the continuation of these processes may alter the growth, survival, and diversity of marine organisms that synthesize CaCO3 shells, the effects of ocean acidification since the dawn of the industrial revolution are not clear. Here we present experiments that examined the effects of the ocean’s past, present, and future (21st and 22nd centuries) CO2 concentrations on the growth, survival, and condition of larvae of two species of commercially and ecologically valuable bivalve shellfish (Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians). Larvae grown under near preindustrial CO2 concentrations (250 ppm) displayed significantly faster growth and metamorphosis as well as higher survival and lipid accumulation rates compared with individuals reared under modern day CO2 levels. Bivalves grown under near preindustrial CO2 levels displayed thicker, more robust shells than individuals grown at present CO2 concentrations, whereas bivalves exposed to CO2 levels expected later this century had shells that were malformed and eroded. These results suggest that the ocean acidification that has occurred during the past two centuries may be inhibiting the development and survival of larval shellfish and contributing to global declines of some bivalve populations. PMID:20855590

  6. Benthic communities under anthropogenic pressure show resilience across the Quaternary

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Luis P.; González, Jorge; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.

    2017-01-01

    The Southeast Pacific is characterized by rich upwelling systems that have sustained and been impacted by human groups for at least 12 ka. Recent fishing and aquaculture practices have put a strain on productive coastal ecosystems from Tongoy Bay, in north-central Chile. We use a temporal baseline to determine whether potential changes to community structure and composition over time are due to anthropogenic factors, natural climatic variations or both. We compiled a database (n = 33 194) with mollusc species abundances from the Mid-Pleistocene, Late Pleistocene, Holocene, dead shell assemblages and live-sampled communities. Species richness was not significantly different, neither were diversity and evenness indices nor rank abundance distributions. There is, however, an increase in relative abundance for the cultured scallop Argopecten, while the previously dominant clam Mulinia is locally very rare. Results suggest that impacts from both natural and anthropogenic stressors need to be better understood if benthic resources are to be preserved. These findings provide the first Pleistocene temporal baseline for the south Pacific that shows that this highly productive system has had the ability to recover from past alterations, suggesting that if monitoring and management practices continue to be implemented, moderately exploited communities from today have hopes for recovery. PMID:28989781

  7. Composition, abundance, biomass, and production of macrofauna in a New England estuary: comparisons among eelgrass meadows and other nursery habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heck, K.L.; Able, K.W.; Roman, C.T.; Fahay, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative suction sampling was used to characterize and compare the species composition, abundance, biomass, and secondary production of macrofauna inhabiting intertidal mudflat and sandflat, eelgrass meadow, and saltmarshpool habitats in the Nauset Marsh complex, Cape Cod, Massachusetts (USA). Species richness and abundance were often greatest in eelgrass habitat, as was macroinvertebrate biomass and production. Most striking was the five to fifteen times greater rate of annual macrofaunal production in eelgrass habitat than elsewhere, with values ranging from approximately 23139 g AFDW m super(2) yr super(1). The marsh pool containing widgeon grass (Ruppia maritima) supported surprisingly low numbers of macroinvertebrates, probably due to stressfully low dissolved oxygen levels at night during the summer. Two species of macroinvertebrates, blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and to a lesser extent bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), used eelgrass as 'nursery habitat.' Calculations showed that macroinvertebrate production is proportionally much greater than the amount of primary production attributable to eelgrass in the Nauset Marsh system, and that dramatic changes at all trophic levels could be expected if large changes in seagrass abundance should occur. This work further underscores the extraordinarily large impact that seagrass can have on both the structure and function of estuarine ecosystems.

  8. Effects of Elevated Temperature and Carbon Dioxide on the Growth and Survival of Larvae and Juveniles of Three Species of Northwest Atlantic Bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Talmage, Stephanie C.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Rising CO2 concentrations and water temperatures this century are likely to have transformative effects on many coastal marine organisms. Here, we compared the responses of two life history stages (larval, juvenile) of three species of calcifying bivalves (Mercenaria mercenaria, Crassostrea virginica, and Argopecten irradians) to temperatures (24 and 28°C) and CO2 concentrations (∼250, 390, and 750 ppm) representative of past, present, and future summer conditions in temperate estuaries. Results demonstrated that increases in temperature and CO2 each significantly depressed survival, development, growth, and lipid synthesis of M. mercenaria and A. irradians larvae and that the effects were additive. Juvenile M. mercenaria and A. irradians were negatively impacted by higher temperatures while C. virginica juveniles were not. C. virginica and A. irradians juveniles were negatively affected by higher CO2 concentrations, while M. mercenaria was not. Larvae were substantially more vulnerable to elevated CO2 than juvenile stages. These findings suggest that current and future increases in temperature and CO2 are likely to have negative consequences for coastal bivalve populations. PMID:22066018

  9. Cloning of a big defensin gene and its response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge in the noble scallop Chlamys nobilis (Bivalve: Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianqing; Luo, Jiafu; Zheng, Huaiping; Lu, Yeqing; Zhang, Hongkuan

    2016-09-01

    The noble scallop Chlamys nobilis has been an important marine cultured bivalve in the Southern Sea of China for decades. However, large-scale mortality events often occurred during the scallop' cultivation. As one of AMPs (antimicrobial peptides), big defensin is an important component of the innate immunity against pathogenic microorganisms in invertebrates. In order to investigate whether the big defensin can play a role in the immune defense against pathogenic microorganisms in noble scallop, a big defensin gene from the hemocytes of Chlamys nobilis (CnBD) was cloned, and the mRNA level was measured after an acute Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge of 36 h. The CnBD cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 381 bp encoding a peptide of 126 amino acids residues. The deduce amino acid sequence of CnBD shows a high similarity with that from Argopecten irradians and displays common features of big defensin, indicating that CnBD is a new member of the big defensin family. Compared with the control group, the relative mRNA level of CnBD was significantly up-regulated at 3, 24 and 36 h. The present result indicated that CnBD played an immune role against bacterial infection in noble scallop. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Testing Predictions of the Oxidative Stress Hypothesis of Aging Using a Novel Invertebrate Model of Longevity: The Giant Clam (Tridacna Derasa)

    PubMed Central

    Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Bivalve species with exceptional longevity are newly introduced model systems in biogerontology to test evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of aging. Here, we tested predictions based on the oxidative stress hypothesis of aging using one of the tropical long-lived sessile giant clam species, the smooth giant clam (Tridacna derasa; predicted maximum life span: >100 years) and the short-lived Atlantic bay scallop (Argopecten irradians irradians; maximum life span: 2 years). The warm water–dwelling giant clams warrant attention because they challenge the commonly held view that the exceptional longevity of bivalves is a consequence of the cold water they reside in. No significant interspecific differences in production of H2O2 and in the gills, heart, or adductor muscle were observed. Protein carbonyl content in gill and muscle tissues were similar in T derasa and A i irradians. In tissues of T derasa, neither basal antioxidant capacities nor superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were consistently greater than in A i irradians. We observed a positive association between longevity and resistance to mortality induced by exposure to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). This finding is consistent with the prediction based on the oxidative stress hypothesis of aging. The findings that in tissues of T derasa, proteasome activities are significantly increased as compared with those in tissues of A i irradians warrant further studies to test the role of enhanced protein recycling activities in longevity of bivalves. PMID:22904097

  11. Contraction increases the T(2) of muscle in fresh water but not in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R A; Prior, B M; Siles, R I; Wiseman, R W

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that the activity-induced increase in (1)H-NMR transverse relaxation time (T(2)) observed in mammalian skeletal muscles is related to an osmotic effect of intracellular metabolite accumulation. This hypothesis was tested by comparing T(2) (measured by (1)H-NMR imaging at 4.7 T) and metabolite changes (measured by (31)P-NMR spectroscopy) after stimulation in the muscles of a freshwater (crayfish, Orconectes virilis) vs two osmoconforming marine invertebrates (lobster, Homarus americanus; scallop, Argopecten concentricus). Intracellular pH significantly decreased after stimulation in the lobster tail muscle, but not in the crayfish tail or scallop phasic adductor muscles. The decrease in phosphoarginine-to-ATP ratio after stimulation was similar in the three muscles. Muscle T(2) increased from 37 to 43 ms (p < 0.02, n = 7) after stimulation in crayfish, but was unchanged in lobster muscle (32 ms, n = 7), and significantly decreased (from 40 to 36 ms, p < 0.02, n = 11) in scallop muscle. The observation that T(2) does not increase after stimulation in muscles of marine invertebrates with high natural osmolarity is consistent with the hypothesis that the T(2) increase in mammalian muscle is related to osmotically driven shifts of fluid between subcellular compartments.

  12. Genomic organization of Hox and ParaHox clusters in the echinoderm, Acanthaster planci.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Kenneth W; McDougall, Carmel; Cummins, Scott F; Hall, Mike; Degnan, Bernard M; Satoh, Nori; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2014-12-01

    The organization of echinoderm Hox clusters is of interest due to the role that Hox genes play in deuterostome development and body plan organization, and the unique gene order of the Hox complex in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, which has been linked to the unique development of the axial region. Here, it has been reported that the Hox and ParaHox clusters of Acanthaster planci, a corallivorous starfish found in the Pacific and Indian oceans, generally resembles the chordate and hemichordate clusters. The A. planci Hox cluster shared with sea urchins the loss of one of the medial Hox genes, even-skipped (Evx) at the anterior of the cluster, as well as organization of the posterior Hox genes.

  13. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Killian, Christopher E.; Olson, Ian C.; Appathurai, Narayana P.; Amasino, Audra L.; Martin, Michael C.; Holt, Liam J.; Wilt, Fred H.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC·H2O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC·H2O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC·H2O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC·H2O in vitro. PMID:22492931

  14. High regulatory gene use in sea urchin embryogenesis: Implications for bilaterian development and evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard-Ashby, Meredith; Materna, Stefan C; Brown, C Titus; Tu, Qiang; Oliveri, Paola; Cameron, R Andrew; Davidson, Eric H

    2006-12-01

    A global scan of transcription factor usage in the sea urchin embryo was carried out in the context of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome sequencing project, and results from six individual studies are here considered. Transcript prevalence data were obtained for over 280 regulatory genes encoding sequence-specific transcription factors of every known family, but excluding genes encoding zinc finger proteins. This is a statistically inclusive proxy for the total "regulome" of the sea urchin genome. Close to 80% of the regulome is expressed at significant levels by the late gastrula stage. Most regulatory genes must be used repeatedly for different functions as development progresses. An evolutionary implication is that animal complexity at the stage when the regulome first evolved was far simpler than even the last common bilaterian ancestor, and is thus of deep antiquity.

  15. The impact of gene expression variation on the robustness and evolvability of a developmental gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Garfield, David A; Runcie, Daniel E; Babbitt, Courtney C; Haygood, Ralph; Nielsen, William J; Wray, Gregory A

    2013-10-01

    Regulatory interactions buffer development against genetic and environmental perturbations, but adaptation requires phenotypes to change. We investigated the relationship between robustness and evolvability within the gene regulatory network underlying development of the larval skeleton in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We find extensive variation in gene expression in this network throughout development in a natural population, some of which has a heritable genetic basis. Switch-like regulatory interactions predominate during early development, buffer expression variation, and may promote the accumulation of cryptic genetic variation affecting early stages. Regulatory interactions during later development are typically more sensitive (linear), allowing variation in expression to affect downstream target genes. Variation in skeletal morphology is associated primarily with expression variation of a few, primarily structural, genes at terminal positions within the network. These results indicate that the position and properties of gene interactions within a network can have important evolutionary consequences independent of their immediate regulatory role.

  16. Diversity of olfactomedin proteins in the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Brian J; Moy, Gary W; Vacquier, Victor D

    2007-06-01

    Olfactomedin (OLF) domain proteins maintain extracellular protein-protein interactions in diverse phyla. Only one OLF family member, amassin-1, has been described from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a basal invertebrate deuterostome. Amassin-1 mediates intercellular adhesion of coelomocytes (immunocytes). Here we describe the protein structural features of four additional OLF proteins, the total for the genome being five. Phylogenetically, four of these proteins (the amassins) form a subgroup among previously identified OLF proteins. The fifth OLF protein is within the colmedin subfamily and contains a type II transmembrane domain, collagen repeats, and an OLF domain. Sea urchin OLF proteins represent an intermediate diversification between protostomes and vertebrates. Transcripts of all five OLF family members are in coelomocytes and adult radial nerve tissue. Transcripts for some OLF proteins increase during late larval stages. Transcript levels for amassin-1 increase 1,000,000-fold, coinciding with formation of the adult urchin rudiment within the larval body.

  17. Turbidity as a method of preparing sperm dilutions in the echinoid sperm/egg bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, T.J.; Haley, R.K.; Battan, K.J. )

    1993-11-01

    The use of turbidimeter for preparing sperm dilutions used in the echinoid sperm/egg bioassay was evaluated. Regression analyses of the relationship between sperm density and turbidity for the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus indicated that although there were slope differences for each species, each coefficient of determination was highly significant. For Dendraster excentricus, triplicate hemacytometer counts over a range of turbidities as well as repeated preparations of a single sperm turbidity indicated similar variability for each. The use of the turbidimeter has time-saving advantages over conventional hemacytometer methods without sacrificing precision. Sperm dilutions can be prepared rapidly, minimizing seawater sperm preactivation before test initiation, and may therefore contribute to increased test precision.

  18. Ecological role of purple sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Pearse, John S

    2006-11-10

    Sea urchins are major components of marine communities. Their grazing limits algal biomass, and they are preyed upon by many predators. Purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) are among the best studied species. They live in environments that alternate between two stable states: luxuriant, species-rich kelp forests and sea urchin-dominated "barrens." The transition from one state to the other can be initiated by several factors, including the abundance of algal food, predators, storm intensities, and incidence of disease. Purple sea urchins compete with other grazers, some of which are important fishery resources (such as abalones and red sea urchins), and they are harvested for scientific research. Revelations from their genome will lead to a better understanding of how they maintain their ecological importance, and may in turn enhance their economic potential.

  19. Colchicine-binding activity distinguishes sea urchin egg and outer doublet tubulins

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The colchicine-binding activity of tubulin has been utilized to distinguish the tubulins from two distinct microtubule systems of the same species, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We have analyzed the colchicine-binding affinities of highly purified tubulins from the unfertilized eggs and from the flagellar outer doublet microtubules by van't Hoff analysis, and have found significant differences in the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes characterizing the binding of colchicine to the two tubulins. The data indicate that significant chemical differences in the tubulins from the two functionally distinct microtubule systems exist, and that the differences are expressed in the native forms of the tubulins. Our findings are discussed in terms of the possibility that the colchicine- binding site may be an important regulatory site on the tubulin molecule. PMID:6539784

  20. Post-translational regulation by gustavus contributes to selective Vasa protein accumulation in multipotent cells during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Eric A.; Yajima, Mamiko; Juliano, Celina E.; Wessel, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    Vasa is a broadly conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase associated with germ line development and is expressed in multipotent cells in many animals. During embryonic development of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Vasa protein is enriched in the small micromeres despite a uniform distribution of vasa transcript. Here we show that the Vasa coding region is sufficient for its selective enrichment and find that gustavus, the B30.2/SPRY and SOCS box domain gene, contributes to this phenomenon. In vitro binding analyses show that Gustavus binds the N-terminal and DEAD-box portions of Vasa protein independently. A knockdown of Gustavus protein reduces both Vasa protein abundance and its propensity for accumulation in the small micromeres, whereas overexpression of the Vasa-interacting domain of Gustavus (GusΔSOCS) results in Vasa protein accumulation throughout the embryo. We propose that Gustavus has a conserved, positive regulatory role in Vasa protein accumulation during embryonic development. PMID:21035437

  1. The Impact of Gene Expression Variation on the Robustness and Evolvability of a Developmental Gene Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, David A.; Runcie, Daniel E.; Babbitt, Courtney C.; Haygood, Ralph; Nielsen, William J.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory interactions buffer development against genetic and environmental perturbations, but adaptation requires phenotypes to change. We investigated the relationship between robustness and evolvability within the gene regulatory network underlying development of the larval skeleton in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We find extensive variation in gene expression in this network throughout development in a natural population, some of which has a heritable genetic basis. Switch-like regulatory interactions predominate during early development, buffer expression variation, and may promote the accumulation of cryptic genetic variation affecting early stages. Regulatory interactions during later development are typically more sensitive (linear), allowing variation in expression to affect downstream target genes. Variation in skeletal morphology is associated primarily with expression variation of a few, primarily structural, genes at terminal positions within the network. These results indicate that the position and properties of gene interactions within a network can have important evolutionary consequences independent of their immediate regulatory role. PMID:24204211

  2. Extracellular matrix modifications at fertilization: regulation of dityrosine crosslinking by transamidation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Julian L.; Wessel, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Fertilization is accompanied by the construction of an extracellular matrix that protects the new zygote. In sea urchins, this structure is built from glycoproteins residing at the egg surface and in secretory vesicles at the egg cortex. Four enzymatic activities are required for the transformation of these proteins into the mechanically and chemically resilient fertilization envelope: proteolysis, transamidation, NADPH-dependent oxidation and peroxidation. Here, we identify the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus enzymes responsible for the formation of ε(γ-glutamyl)lysine crosslinks (transamidation). We find that these two transglutaminases are activated by local acidification and act on specific substrates within the fertilization envelope (including ovoperoxidase, rendezvin and SFE9). Surprisingly, these enzymes also regulate dityrosine crosslinking both by direct conjugation of ovoperoxidase and by modulating hydrogen peroxide production. Together, these results emphasize how transglutaminases can coordinate the activities of other enzymes during extracellular matrix transmogrifications. PMID:19403662

  3. A partial skeletal proteome of the brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaver, Ryan W.

    The formation of mineralized tissue was critical to the evolution and diversification of metazoans and remains functionally significant in most animal lineages. Of special importance is the protein found occluded within the mineral matrix, which facilitates the process of biomineralization and modulates the final mineral structure. These skeletal matrix proteins have well been described in several species, including the sea urchin Stronglyocentrotus purpuratus, an important model organism. Biomineralization research is limited in other echinoderm classes. This research encompasses the first description of mineral matrix proteins in a member of the echinoderm class Ophiuroidea. This work describes the skeletal matrix proteins of the brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii using bioinformatic and proteomic techniques. General characteristics of matrix protein are described and a number of candidate biomineralization related genes have been identified, cloned, and sequenced. The unique evolutionary and biochemical properties of brittle star skeletal matrix proteins are also described.

  4. SEM and x-ray microanalysis of cellular differentiation in Sea Urchin Embryos: a frozen hydrated study

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.B.

    1985-12-01

    Quantitative studies of major chemical element distribution among individual differentiating cells were attempted using scanning electron microscopy. Frozen hydrated embryos of the sea urchin Strongelocentrotus purpuratus were examined at three stages: blastula, mesenchyme blastula, and early gastrula. The blastocoel matrix contained large beads of approximately 1 ..mu..m diameter. The cells of the archenteron lacked well defined cell boundaries. Characteristic levels of beam damage and charging provided structural information. The primary mesenchyme cells within the blastocoel were particularly susceptible to both effects. Damaging effects were noted in material stored in liquid nitrogen longer than three months. Ice crystal growth, shrinkage, elemental shift, density changes and charge accumulation may take place in these stored specimens. 151 refs., 50 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Kelp forest monitoring 1994 annual report. Channel Islands National Park. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, D.; Lerma, D.; Richards, D.

    1994-12-31

    The 1994 results of the Channel Islands Natonal Park Kelp Forest Monitoring Project are described in this report. Population dynamics of 68 taxa or categories of algae, fish, and invertebrates were measured at 16 permanent sites around the five islands within the park. Survey techniques utilized SCUBA and surface-supplied-air, and included quadrants, band transects, random point contacts, fish transects, video transects, size frequency measurements, artificial recruitment modules, and species list surveys. Temperature data was collected using temperature loggers deployed at each of the sixteen sites. Size frequency measurements were taken from artificial recruitment modules at ten sites. In 1994, 13 sites had giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, forests, one site was dominated by the aggregating red sea cucumber, Pachythyone rubra, one site was dominated by red sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus francisanus, and another by purple sea urchins, S. purpuratus. Wasting disease was observed in sea stars and wasting syndrome was apparent in sea urchins.

  6. Evolutionary analysis of sea urchin mitochondrial tRNAs: folding of the molecules as suggested by the non-random occurrence of nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, C D; Martiradonna, A; Saccone, C

    1996-08-01

    Comparative analyses of the mitochondrial tRNA sequences of the sea urchins Arbacia lixula, Paracentrotus lividus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus revealed that conserved nucleotides may be involved in determining the typical L-shaped spatial conformation of tRNAs. These results shed light on the specific tertiary interactions that allow the folding of the atypical mitochondrial tRNAs into a functional form. A consensus mitochondrial tRNA secondary structure was derived. It shows the presence of nucleotides virtually conserved only in these organisms that represent a sort of molecular signature in sea urchins and suggests a possible physiological role. Finally, we speculate that the non-canonical structure of animal tRNAs, as well as the deviations from the universality of the genetic code, may be due to the reduction in size of the metazoan mitochondrial genome, with the concomitant acquisition of new functions by the mitochondrial tRNAs.

  7. The cloning and expression of alpha-tubulin in Monochamus alternatus.

    PubMed

    Song, L; Liu, X-X; Zhang, Y-A; Zhang, Q-W; Zhao, Z-W

    2008-09-01

    The Japanese pine sawyer Monochamus alternatus is one of the major forest pests. It damages pine directly and transfers the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus to pine wood; resulting in serious economic losses around the world every year. Alpha-tubulin is one of most important proteins in most species. We cloned a ubiquitously expressed M. alternatus alpha-tubulin gene and analysed its nucleotides and protein structure; its sequence characters are consistent with what have been reported in other insects. The alignment of proteins showed that there is high homology of alpha-tubulin between M. alternatus and other species. Western blot and immunocytochemistry analyses suggested a common epitope of alpha-tubulin between M. alternatus and Strongylcentrotus purpuratus. We also expressed the protein in Escherichia coli for further functional studies.

  8. DNA polymerase alpha and beta in the California urchin.

    PubMed Central

    Racine, F M; Morris, P W

    1978-01-01

    DNA polymerase alpha and beta were identified in the urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. The DNA polymerase beta sedimented at 3.4 S, constituted 5% of total DNA polymerase activity, and was resistant to N-ethylmaleimide and high ionic strength. The polymerase alpha sedimented at 6--8 S, was inhibited by N-ethylmalemide or 0.1 M (NH4)2SO4, and was dependent upon glycerol for preservation of activity. Both the polymerases alpha and beta were nuclear associated in embryos. The DNA polymerase alpha was markedly heterogeneous on DEAE-Sephadex ion exchange and showed three modal polymerase species. These polymerase alpha species were indistinguishable by template activity assays but the DNA polymerase associated ribonucleotidyl transferase (Biochemistry 75 : 3106-3113, 1976) was found predominantly with only one of the DNA polymerase alpha species. PMID:569291

  9. SpBase: the sea urchin genome database and web site.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R Andrew; Samanta, Manoj; Yuan, Autumn; He, Dong; Davidson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    SpBase is a system of databases focused on the genomic information from sea urchins and related echinoderms. It is exposed to the public through a web site served with open source software (http://spbase.org/). The enterprise was undertaken to provide an easily used collection of information to directly support experimental work on these useful research models in cell and developmental biology. The information served from the databases emerges from the draft genomic sequence of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and includes sequence data and genomic resource descriptions for other members of the echinoderm clade which in total span 540 million years of evolutionary time. This version of the system contains two assemblies of the purple sea urchin genome, associated expressed sequences, gene annotations and accessory resources. Search mechanisms for the sequences and the gene annotations are provided. Because the system is maintained along with the Sea Urchin Genome resource, a database of sequenced clones is also provided.

  10. Sea urchin collagen evolutionarily homologous to vertebrate pro-alpha 2(I) collagen.

    PubMed

    Exposito, J Y; D'Alessio, M; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1992-08-05

    We isolated several overlapping cDNA clones covering the 4242 nucleotides of a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus transcript that codes for a fibrillar procollagen chain. The sea urchin polypeptide includes a 124-amino acid long amino pre-propeptide, a 1064-amino acid alpha-chain inclusive of 338 uninterrupted Gly-X-Y repeats, and a 226-residue carboxyl-propeptide. The distribution of the highly conserved cysteines within the last domain together with the structural configuration of the amino-propeptide and the organization of the corresponding coding region, strongly suggest that the sea urchin gene is evolutionarily related to the vertebrate pro-alpha 2(I) collagen. This work, therefore, represents the first report of the complete primary structure of an invertebrate fibrillar procollagen chain. It also provides a new insight into the evolution of the amino-propeptide, the most divergent among the major protein domains of fibrillar procollagen chains.

  11. Assessment of chronic toxicity of petroleum and produced water components to marine organisms. Final technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cherr, G.N.; Higashi, R.M.; Shenker, J.M.

    1993-05-31

    The objectives of the report were: (1) to determine the effects of produced water exposure in early life stages of marine plants and animals, at the cellular, subcellular, and physiological levels; (2) to determine the effects of produced water exposure on reproduction in marine organisms; and (3) to develop non-invasive approaches for assessing reproductive impairment. The effects of produced water (PW) was assessed on development in three ecologically and economically important species, the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), the giant kelp (macrocystis pyrifera), and tsahe California mussel (Mytilus califonrnianus). To determine the basis for effects of PW on these developing organisms, some fundamental studies were prerequisite. Furthermore, eggs and embryos from adults which were outplanted near the discharge were also studied. Finally, the biochemical response of embryos to PW was also defined.

  12. Applied DC magnetic fields cause alterations in the time of cell divisions and developmental abnormalities in early sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.; Ernst, S.G.

    1997-05-01

    Most work on magnetic field effects focuses on AC fields. The present study demonstrates that exposure to medium-strength (10 mT--0.1 T) static magnetic fields can alter the early embryonic development of two species of sea urchin embryos. Batches of fertilized eggs from two species of urchin were exposed to fields produced by permanent magnets. Samples of the continuous cultures were scored for the timing of the first two cell divisions, time of hatching, and incidence of exogastrulation. It was found that static fields delay the onset of mitosis in both species by an amount dependent on the exposure timing relative to fertilization. The exposure time that caused the maximum effect differed between the two species. Thirty millitesla fields, but not 15 mT fields, caused an eightfold increase in the incidence of exogastrulation in Lytechinus pictus, whereas neither of these fields produced exogastrulation in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the olfactomedin domain from the sea urchin cell-adhesion protein amassin

    SciTech Connect

    Hillier, Brian J.; Sundaresan, Vidyasankar; Stout, C. David; Vacquier, Victor D.

    2006-01-01

    The olfactomedin (OLF) domain from the sea urchin cell-adhesion protein amassin has been crystallized. A native data set extending to 2.7 Å has been collected using an in-house X-ray source. A family of animal proteins is emerging which contain a conserved protein motif known as an olfactomedin (OLF) domain. Novel extracellular protein–protein interactions occur through this domain. The OLF-family member amassin, from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, has previously been identified to mediate a rapid cell-adhesion event resulting in a large aggregation of coelomocytes, the circulating immune cells. In this work, heterologous expression and purification of the OLF domain from amassin was carried out and initial crystallization trials were performed. A native data set has been collected, extending to 2.7 Å under preliminary cryoconditions, using an in-house generator. This work leads the way to the determination of the first structure of an OLF domain.

  14. Spermidine is bound to a unique protein in early sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Canellakis, Z.N.; Bondy, P.K.; Infante, A.A.

    1985-11-01

    Spermidine is rapidly taken up and becomes bound to protein during the very early hours of sea urchin embryogenesis. During the first 6 hr after fertilization of freshly obtained sea urchin eggs (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), which are incubated in the presence of exogenous (/sup 3/H)-spermidine, up to 7% of the total cell-associated spermidine appears uniquely as spermidine bound in macromolecular form. This unique protein containing spermidine migrates as a single radioactive band in gel electrophoresis. It has a Mr of approximately equal to 30,000 and is readily distinguishable from the protein initiation factor eIF-4D, which has a Mr of 18,000, the only other identifiable protein known to date to be posttranslationally modified by polyamines.

  15. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  16. Divergent patterns of neural development in larval echinoids and asteroids.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Murray, Greg; Burke, Robert D

    2004-01-01

    The development and organization of the nervous systems of echinoderm larvae are incompletely described. We describe the development and organization of the larval nervous systems of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Asterina pectinifera using a novel antibody, 1E11, that appears to be neuron specific. In the early pluteus, the antibody reveals all known neural structures: apical ganglion, oral ganglia, lateral ganglia, and an array of neurons and neurites in the ciliary band, the esophagus, and the intestine. The antibody also reveals several novel features, such as neurites that extend to the posterior end of the larva and additional neurons in the apical ganglion. Similarly, in asteroid larvae the antibody binds to all known neural structures and identifies novel features, including large numbers of neurons in the ciliary bands, a network of neurites under the oral epidermis, cell bodies in the esophagus, and a network of neurites in the intestine. The 1E11 antigen is expressed during gastrulation and can be used to trace the ontogenies of the nervous systems. In S. purpuratus, a small number of neuroblasts arise in the oral ectoderm in late gastrulae. The cells are adjacent to the presumptive ciliary bands, where they project neurites with growth cone-like endings that interconnect the neurons. In A. pectinifera, a large number of neuroblasts appear scattered throughout the ectoderm of gastrulae. The cells aggregate in the developing ciliary bands and then project neurites under the oral epidermis. Although there are several shared features of the larval nervous systems of echinoids and asteroids, the patterns of development reveal fundamental differences in neural ontogeny.

  17. Conservation of Endo16 expression in sea urchins despite evolutionary divergence in both cis and trans-acting components of transcriptional regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, Laura A.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in transcriptional regulation undoubtedly play an important role in creating morphological diversity. However, there is little information about the evolutionary dynamics of cis-regulatory sequences. This study examines the functional consequence of evolutionary changes in the Endo16 promoter of sea urchins. The Endo16 gene encodes a large extracellular protein that is expressed in the endoderm and may play a role in cell adhesion. Its promoter has been characterized in exceptional detail in the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We have characterized the structure and function of the Endo16 promoter from a second sea urchin species, Lytechinus variegatus. The Endo16 promoter sequences have evolved in a strongly mosaic manner since these species diverged approximately 35 million years ago: the most proximal region (module A) is conserved, but the remaining modules (B-G) are unalignable. Despite extensive divergence in promoter sequences, the pattern of Endo16 transcription is largely conserved during embryonic and larval development. Transient expression assays demonstrate that 2.2 kb of upstream sequence in either species is sufficient to drive GFP reporter expression that correctly mimics this pattern of Endo16 transcription. Reciprocal cross-species transient expression assays imply that changes have also evolved in the set of transcription factors that interact with the Endo16 promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that stabilizing selection on the transcriptional output may have operated to maintain a similar pattern of Endo16 expression in S. purpuratus and L. variegatus, despite dramatic divergence in promoter sequence and mechanisms of transcriptional regulation.

  18. Identification, Modeling and Ligand Affinity of Early Deuterostome CYP51s, and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Zebrafish Sterol 14α-Demethylase

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Ann Michelle Stanley; Goldstone, Jared V.; Lamb, David C.; Kubota, Akira; Lemaire, Benjamin; Stegeman, John. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sterol 14α-demethylase (cytochrome P450 51, CYP51, P45014DM) is a microsomal enzyme that in eukaryotes catalyzes formation of sterols essential for cell membrane function and as precursors in biosynthesis of steroid hormones. Functional properties of CYP51s are unknown in non-mammalian deuterostomes. Methods PCR-cloning and sequencing and computational analyses (homology modeling and docking) addressed CYP51 in zebrafish Danio rerio, the reef fish sergeant major Abudefduf saxatilis, and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Following N-terminal amino acid modification, zebrafish CYP51 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and lanosterol 14α-demethylase activity and azole inhibition of CYP51 activity were characterized using GC/MS. Results Molecular phylogeny positioned S. purpuratus CYP51 at the base of the deuterostome clade. In zebrafish, CYP51 is expressed in all organs examined, most strongly in intestine. The recombinant protein bound lanosterol and catalyzed 14α-demethylase activity, at 3.2 nmol/min/nmol CYP51. The binding of azoles to zebrafish CYP51 gave KS (dissociation constant) values of 0.26 μM for ketoconazole and 0.64 μM for propiconazole. Displacement of carbon monoxide also indicated zebrafish CYP51 has greater affinity for ketoconazole. Docking to homology models showed that lanosterol docks in fish and sea urchin CYP51s with an orientation essentially the same as in mammalian CYP51. Docking of ketoconazole indicates it would inhibit fish and sea urchin CYP51s. Conclusions Biochemical and computational analyses are consistent with lanosterol being a substrate for early deuterostome CYP51s. General Significance The results expand the phylogenetic view of animal CYP51, with evolutionary, environmental and therapeutic implications. PMID:24361620

  19. The GTP-binding protein RhoA localizes to the cortical granules of Strongylocentrotus purpuratas sea urchin egg and is secreted during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Mata, P; Martínez-Cadena, G; López-Godínez, J; Obregón, A; García-Soto, J

    2000-02-01

    The sea urchin egg has thousands of secretory vesicles known as cortical granules. Upon fertilization, these vesicles undergo a Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. G-protein-linked mechanisms may take place during the egg activation. In somatic cells from mammals, GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family regulate a number of cellular processes, including organization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report here that a crude membrane fraction from homogenates of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin eggs, incubated with C3 (which ADP-ribosylates specifically Rho proteins) and [32P]NAD, displayed an [32P]ADP-ribosylated protein of 25 kDa that had the following characteristics: i) identical electrophoretic mobility in SDS-PAGE gels as the [32P]ADP-ribosylated Rho from sea urchin sperm; ii) identical mobility in isoelectro focusing gels as human RhoA; iii) positive cross-reactivity by immunoblotting with an antibody against mammalian RhoA. Thus, unfertilized S. purpuratus eggs contain a mammalian RhoA-like protein. Immunocytochemical analyses indicated that RhoA was localized preferentially to the cortical granules; this was confirmed by experiments of [32P]ADP-ribosylation with C3 in isolated cortical granules. Rho was secreted and retained in the fertilization membrane after insemination or activation with A23187. It was observed that the Rho protein present in the sea urchin sperm acrosome was also secreted during the exocytotic acrosome reaction. Thus, Rho could participate in those processes related to the cortical granules, i.e., in the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis or actin reorganization that accompany the egg activation.

  20. Localization of tektin filaments in microtubules of sea urchin sperm flagella by immunoelectron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Extraction of doublet microtubules from the sperm flagella of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus with sarkosyl (0.5%)-urea (2.5 M) yields a highly pure preparation of "tektin" filaments that we have previously shown to resemble intermediate filament proteins. They form filaments 2-3 nm in diameter as seen by negative stain electron microscopy and are composed of approximately equal amounts of three polypeptide bands with apparent molecular weights of 47,000, 51,000, and 55,000, as determined by SDS PAGE. We prepared antibodies to this set of proteins to localize them in the doublet microtubules of S. purpuratus and other species. Tektins and tubulin were antigenically distinct when tested by immunoblotting with affinity-purified antitektin and antitubulin antibodies. Fixed sperm or axonemes from several different species of sea urchin showed immunofluorescent staining with antitektin antibodies. We also used antibodies coupled to gold spheres to localize the proteins by electron microscopy. Whereas a monoclonal antitubulin (Kilmartin, J.V., B. Wright, and C. Milstein, 1982, J. Cell Biol. 93:576-582) decorates intact microtubules along their lengths, antitektins labeled only the ends of intact microtubules and sarkosyl-insoluble ribbons. However, if microtubules and ribbons attached to electron microscope grids were first extracted with sarkosyl-urea, the tektin filaments that remain were decorated by antitektin antibodies throughout their length. These results suggest that tektins form integral filaments of flagellar microtubule walls, whose antigenic sites are normally masked, perhaps by the presence of tubulin around them. PMID:3880749

  1. Sediment toxicity test results for the Urban Waters Study 2010, Bellingham Bay, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biedenbach, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington Department of Ecology annually determines the quality of recently deposited sediments in Puget Sound as a part of Ecology's Urban Waters Initiative. The annual sediment quality studies use the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) approach, thus relying on measures of chemical contamination, toxicity, and benthic in-faunal effects (Chapman, 1990). Since 2002, the studies followed a rotating sampling scheme, each year sampling a different region of the greater Puget Sound Basin. During the annual studies, samples are collected in locations selected with a stratified-random design, patterned after the designs previously used in baseline surveys completed during 1997-1999 (Long and others, 2003; Wilson and Partridge, 2007). Sediment samples were collected by personnel from the Washington Department of Ecology, in June of 2010 and shipped to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratory in Corpus Christi, Texas (not shown), where the tests were performed. Sediment pore water was extracted with a pneumatic apparatus and was stored frozen. Just before testing, water-quality measurements were made and salinity adjusted, if necessary. Tests were performed on a dilution series of each sample consisting of 100-, 50-, and 25-percent pore-water concentrations. The specific objectives of this study were to: * Extract sediment pore water from a total of 30 sediment samples from the Bellingham Bay, Washington area within a day of receipt of the samples. * Measure water-quality parameters (salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, sulfide, and ammonia) of thawed pore-water samples before testing and adjust salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen, if necessary, to obtain optimal ranges for the test species. * Conduct the fertilization toxicity test with pore water using sea urchin (Stronylocentrotus purpuratus) (S. purpuratus) gametes. * Perform quality control assays with reference pore water, dilution blanks and a positive control dilution series with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS

  2. Whole-genome positive selection and habitat-driven evolution in a shallow and a deep-sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas A; Garfield, David A; Manier, Mollie K; Haygood, Ralph; Wray, Gregory A; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    Comparisons of genomic sequence between divergent species can provide insight into the action of natural selection across many distinct classes of proteins. Here, we examine the extent of positive selection as a function of tissue-specific and stage-specific gene expression in two closely-related sea urchins, the shallow-water Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and the deep-sea Allocentrotus fragilis, which have diverged greatly in their adult but not larval habitats. Genes that are expressed specifically in adult somatic tissue have significantly higher dN/dS ratios than the genome-wide average, whereas those in larvae are indistinguishable from the genome-wide average. Testis-specific genes have the highest dN/dS values, whereas ovary-specific have the lowest. Branch-site models involving the outgroup S. franciscanus indicate greater selection (ω(FG)) along the A. fragilis branch than along the S. purpuratus branch. The A. fragilis branch also shows a higher proportion of genes under positive selection, including those involved in skeletal development, endocytosis, and sulfur metabolism. Both lineages are approximately equal in enrichment for positive selection of genes involved in immunity, development, and cell-cell communication. The branch-site models further suggest that adult-specific genes have experienced greater positive selection than those expressed in larvae and that ovary-specific genes are more conserved (i.e., experienced greater negative selection) than those expressed specifically in adult somatic tissues and testis. Our results chart the patterns of protein change that have occurred after habitat divergence in these two species and show that the developmental or functional context in which a gene acts can play an important role in how divergent species adapt to new environments.

  3. Transcriptomic responses to ocean acidification in larval sea urchins from a naturally variable pH environment.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler G; Chan, Francis; Menge, Bruce A; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2013-03-01

    Some marine ecosystems already experience natural declines in pH approximating those predicted with future anthropogenic ocean acidification (OA), the decline in seawater pH caused by the absorption of atmospheric CO2 . The molecular mechanisms that allow organisms to inhabit these low pH environments, particularly those building calcium carbonate skeletons, are unknown. Also uncertain is whether an enhanced capacity to cope with present day pH variation will confer resistance to future OA. To address these issues, we monitored natural pH dynamics within an intertidal habitat in the Northeast Pacific, demonstrating that upwelling exposes resident species to pH regimes not predicted to occur elsewhere until 2100. Next, we cultured the progeny of adult purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) collected from this region in CO2 -acidified seawater representing present day and near future ocean scenarios and monitored gene expression using transcriptomics. We hypothesized that persistent exposure to upwelling during evolutionary history will have selected for increased pH tolerance in this population and that their transcriptomic response to low pH seawater would provide insight into mechanisms underlying pH tolerance in a calcifying species. Resulting expression patterns revealed two important trends. Firstly, S. purpuratus larvae may alter the bioavailability of calcium and adjust skeletogenic pathways to sustain calcification in a low pH ocean. Secondly, larvae use different strategies for coping with different magnitudes of pH stress: initiating a robust transcriptional response to present day pH regimes but a muted response to near future conditions. Thus, an enhanced capacity to cope with present day pH variation may not translate into success in future oceans. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mocko-Strand, Julie A.; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W.; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J.; Klein, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. PMID:26962139

  5. Dynamic evolution of toll-like receptor multigene families in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Katherine M; Rast, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a large and long-lived invertebrate, provides a new perspective on animal immunity. Analysis of this genome uncovered a highly complex immune system in which the gene families that encode homologs of the pattern recognition receptors that form the core of vertebrate innate immunity are encoded in large multigene families. The sea urchin genome contains 253 Toll-like receptor (TLR) sequences, more than 200 Nod-like receptors and 1095 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains, a 10-fold expansion relative to vertebrates. Given their stereotypic protein structure and simple intron-exon architecture, the TLRs are the most tractable of these families for more detailed analysis. A role for these receptors in immune defense is suggested by their similarity to TLRs in other organisms, sequence diversity, and expression in immunologically active tissues, including phagocytes. The complexity of the sea urchin TLR multigene families is largely derived from expansions independent of those in vertebrates and protostomes, although a small family of TLRs with structure similar to that of Drosophila Toll can be traced to an ancient eumetazoan ancestor. Several other echinoderm sequences are now available, including Lytechinus variegatus, as well as partial sequences from two other sea urchin species. Here, we present an analysis of the invertebrate deuterostome TLRs with emphasis on the echinoderms. Representatives of most of the S. purpuratus TLR subfamilies and homologs of the mccTLR sequences are found in L. variegatus, although the L. variegatus TLR gene family is notably smaller (68 TLR sequences). The phylogeny of these genes within sea urchins highlights lineage-specific expansions at higher resolution than is evident at the phylum level. These analyses identify quickly evolving TLR subfamilies that are likely to have novel immune recognition functions and other, more stable, subfamilies that may

  6. A mechanistic model to study the thermal ecology of a southeastern pacific dominant intertidal mussel and implications for climate change.

    PubMed

    Finke, G R; Bozinovic, F; Navarrete, S A

    2009-01-01

    Developing mechanistic models to predict an organism's body temperature facilitates the study of physiological stresses caused by extreme climatic conditions the species might have faced in the past or making predictions about changes to come in the near future. Because the models combine empirical observation of different climatic variables with essential morphological attributes of the species, it is possible to examine specific aspects of predicted climatic changes. Here, we develop a model for the competitively dominant intertidal mussel Perumytilus purpuratus that estimates body temperature on the basis of meteorological and tidal data with an average difference (+/-SE) of 0.410 degrees +/- 0.0315 degrees C in comparison with a field-deployed temperature logger. Modeled body temperatures of P. purpuratus in central Chile regularly exceeded 30 degrees C in summer months, and values as high as 38 degrees C were found. These results suggest that the temperatures reached by mussels in the intertidal zone in central Chile are not sufficiently high to induce significant mortality on adults of this species; however, because body temperatures >40 degrees C can be lethal for this species, sublethal effects on physiological performance warrant further investigation. Body temperatures of mussels increased sigmoidally with increasing tidal height. Body temperatures of individuals from approximately 70% of the tidal range leveled off and did not increase any further with increasing tidal height. Finally, body size played an important role in determining body temperature. A hypothetical 5-cm-long mussel (only 1 cm longer than mussels found in nature) did reach potentially lethal body temperatures, suggesting that the biophysical environment may play a role in limiting the size of this small species.

  7. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  8. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. © 2016 The Authors.

  9. Characterization of the Highly Variable Immune Response Gene Family, He185/333, in the Sea Urchin, Heliocidaris erythrogramma

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Mattias O.; Wilkins, Adam G.; Cooke, Georgina M.; Raftos, David A.; Nair, Sham V.

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the highly variable He185/333 genes, transcripts and proteins in coelomocytes of the sea urchin, Heliocidaris erythrogramma. Originally discovered in the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, the products of this gene family participate in the anti-pathogen defenses of the host animals. Full-length He185/333 genes and transcripts are identified. Complete open reading frames of He185/333 homologues are analyzed as to their element structure, single nucleotide polymorphisms, indels and sequence repeats and are subjected to diversification analyses. The sequence elements that compose He185/333 are different to those identified for Sp185/333. Differences between Sp185/333 and He185/333 genes are also evident in the complexity of the sequences of the introns. He185/333 proteins show a diverse range of molecular weights on Western blots. The observed sizes and pIs of the proteins differ from predicted values, suggesting post-translational modifications and oligomerization. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that He185/333 proteins are mainly located on the surface of coelomocyte subpopulations. Our data demonstrate that He185/333 bears the same substantial characteristics as their S. purpuratus homologues. However, we also identify several unique characteristics of He185/333 (such as novel element patterns, sequence repeats, distribution of positively-selected codons and introns), suggesting species-specific adaptations. All sequences in this publication have been submitted to Genbank (accession numbers JQ780171-JQ780321) and are listed in table S1. PMID:25333281

  10. Molecular cloning of hsf1 and hsbp1 cDNAs, and the expression of hsf1, hsbp1 and hsp70 under heat stress in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongxue; Sun, Lina; Liu, Shilin; Zhang, Libin; Yang, Hongsheng

    2016-08-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is known for the elevated synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) under heat stress, which is mediated primarily by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). Heat shock factor binding protein 1 (HSBP1) and feedback control of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) are major regulators of the activity of HSF1. We obtained full-length cDNA of genes hsf1 and hsbp1 in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus, which are the second available for echinoderm (after Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), and the first available for holothurian. The full-length cDNA of hsf1 was 2208bp, containing a 1326bp open reading frame encoding 441 amino acids. The full-length cDNA of hsbp1 was 2850bp, containing a 225bp open reading frame encoding 74 amino acids. The similarities of A. japonicus HSF1 with other species are low, and much higher similarity identities of A. japonicus HSBP1 were shared. Phylogenetic trees showed that A. japonicus HSF1 and HSBP1 were clustered with sequences from S. purpuratus, and fell into distinct clades with sequences from mollusca, arthropoda and vertebrata. Analysis by real-time PCR showed hsf1 and hsbp1 mRNA was expressed constitutively in all tissues examined. The expression of hsf1, hsbp1 and hsp70 in the intestine at 26°C was time-dependent. The results of this study might provide new insights into the regulation of heat shock response in this species.

  11. Conservation of Endo16 expression in sea urchins despite evolutionary divergence in both cis and trans-acting components of transcriptional regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, Laura A.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in transcriptional regulation undoubtedly play an important role in creating morphological diversity. However, there is little information about the evolutionary dynamics of cis-regulatory sequences. This study examines the functional consequence of evolutionary changes in the Endo16 promoter of sea urchins. The Endo16 gene encodes a large extracellular protein that is expressed in the endoderm and may play a role in cell adhesion. Its promoter has been characterized in exceptional detail in the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We have characterized the structure and function of the Endo16 promoter from a second sea urchin species, Lytechinus variegatus. The Endo16 promoter sequences have evolved in a strongly mosaic manner since these species diverged approximately 35 million years ago: the most proximal region (module A) is conserved, but the remaining modules (B-G) are unalignable. Despite extensive divergence in promoter sequences, the pattern of Endo16 transcription is largely conserved during embryonic and larval development. Transient expression assays demonstrate that 2.2 kb of upstream sequence in either species is sufficient to drive GFP reporter expression that correctly mimics this pattern of Endo16 transcription. Reciprocal cross-species transient expression assays imply that changes have also evolved in the set of transcription factors that interact with the Endo16 promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that stabilizing selection on the transcriptional output may have operated to maintain a similar pattern of Endo16 expression in S. purpuratus and L. variegatus, despite dramatic divergence in promoter sequence and mechanisms of transcriptional regulation.

  12. Some biological reflections on the concept of life.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Life is the natural phenomenon that has always aroused the largest interest of philosophers, theologians and scientists, on which a new science--biology--was founded two century ago just for throwing light on its mechanisms. As the pre-Hellenic culture was not able to separate distinctly philosophy from science, life was interpreted as a spurious flurry of the activity of Nature, in which religion, magic and science were interlaced in an intricate way. The Hippocratic medicine constituted the first attempt to focus attention on life by collecting some biological knowledge in order to maintain man's health. All the subsequent physiologists (from the Hellenic to the Latin period) benefited from the precepts of the Corpus Hippocraticum as long as the Christian religion imposed its theological rules that favoured the question relative to soul ever more closely interlaced with the physiology of body. The concept of life became therefore subjected to a number of opposite theories with strong prevalence of metaphysical conjectures until the 19th century but, in spite of this imposition, splendid successes were achieved by physiologists and naturalists such as Harvey, Descartes, Haller, Malpighi, Spallanzani, Wolff, and others, who laid the foundation of a biology that has Lamarck as promoter. The importance of Lamarck's biology came from the release from metaphysics with the introduction of physical and structural concepts which permeated the experimental biology to come. Three main events characterised the biology of the 19th century: i) the interplay of the new chemistry with biology, ii) the cell theory, iii) the concept of metabolism. These events led biology to the 20th century, the era of biochemistry and molecular genetics. The discoveries relative to metabolism characterised the first half of this century, while the second half was witness to the internal mechanisms regulating the life of cells, perhaps the most advanced success of the biology of all time. Today

  13. Anatomical mercury speciation in bay scallops by thio-bearing chelating resin concentration and GC-electron capture detector determination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihua; Yang, Guipeng

    2014-01-01

    The highly toxic methyl-, ethyl- and phenylmercury species that may exist in the three main anatomical parts - the adductor muscle, the mantle and the visceral mass - of bay scallops (Argopecten irradias) were quantitatively released by cupric chloride, zinc acetate, sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid (HCl) under ultrasonic extraction. After centrifugation, the mercury species in the supernatant were concentrated by thio (SH)-bearing chelating resins, eluted with HClO4 and HCl and extracted with toluene. Separation was achieved by capillary GC equipped with programmed temperatures, a constant nitrogen flow and detected by a micro-electron capture detector (μECD). Under optimised conditions, the LODs for methyl-, ethyl- and phenylmercury in bay scallop samples were 1.1, 0.65 and 0.80 ng g(-1), respectively. The maximum RSD for three replicate determinations of methyl-, ethyl- and phenylmercury in bay scallop samples were 13.7%, 14.0% and 11.2%, respectively. In the concentration range of 4-200 ng g(-1) in bay scallop samples, the calibration graphs were linear with correlation coefficients not less than 0.997. Recoveries for spiked samples were in the range of 92.7-103.5% (methylmercury), 87.5-108.3% (ethylmercury) and 91.6-106.0% (phenylmercury), respectively. The method was verified by the determination of methylmercury in a CRM GBW10029 (Total Mercury and Methyl Mercury in Fish Tissue), with results in good agreement with the certified values. Methylmercury - the only existing species in bay scallops - was successfully determined by the method.

  14. Physiological response and resilience of early life-stage Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to past, present and future ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Gobler, Christopher J; Talmage, Stephanie C

    2014-01-01

    The Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791), is the second most valuable bivalve fishery in the USA and is sensitive to high levels of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Here we present experiments that comprehensively examined how the ocean's past, present and projected (21st and 22nd centuries) CO2 concentrations impact the growth and physiology of larval stages of C. virginica. Crassostrea virginica larvae grown in present-day pCO2 concentrations (380 μatm) displayed higher growth and survival than individuals grown at both lower (250 μatm) and higher pCO2 levels (750 and 1500 μatm). Crassostrea virginica larvae manifested calcification rates, sizes, shell thicknesses, metamorphosis, RNA:DNA ratios and lipid contents that paralleled trends in survival, with maximal values for larvae grown at 380 μatm pCO2 and reduced performance in higher and lower pCO2 levels. While some physiological differences among oysters could be attributed to CO2-induced changes in size or calcification rates, the RNA:DNA ratios at ambient pCO2 levels were elevated, independent of these factors. Likewise, the lipid contents of individuals exposed to high pCO2 levels were depressed even when differences in calcification rates were considered. These findings reveal the cascading, interdependent impact that high CO2 can have on oyster physiology. Crassostrea virginica larvae are significantly more resistant to elevated pCO2 than other North Atlantic bivalves, such as Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians, a finding that may be related to the biogeography and/or evolutionary history of these species and may have important implications for future bivalve restoration and aquaculture efforts.

  15. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Two Transcriptomes Reveal Multiple Light-Mediated Functions in the Scallop Eye (Bivalvia: Pectinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pairett, Autum N.; Serb, Jeanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The eye has evolved across 13 separate lineages of molluscs. Yet, there have been very few studies examining the molecular machinary underlying eye function of this group, which is due, in part, to a lack of genomic resources. The scallop (Bivalvia: Pectinidae) represents a compeling molluscan model to study photoreception due to its morphologically novel and separately evolved mirror-type eye. We sequenced the adult eye transcriptome of two scallop species to: 1) identify the phototransduction pathway components; 2) identify any additional light detection functions; and 3) test the hypothesis that molluscs possess genes not found in other animal lineages. Results A total of 3,039 contigs from the bay scallop, Argopecten irradians and 26,395 contigs from the sea scallop, Placopecten magellanicus were produced by 454 sequencing. Targeted BLAST searches and functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) terms and KEGG pathways identified transcripts from three light detection systems: two phototransduction pathways and the circadian clock, a previously unrecognized function of the scallop eye. By comparing the scallop transcriptomes to molluscan and non-molluscan genomes, we discovered that a large proportion of the transcripts (7,776 sequences) may be specific to the scallop lineage. Nearly one-third of these contain transmembrane protein domains, suggesting these unannotated transcripts may be sensory receptors. Conclusions Our data provide the most comprehensive transcriptomic resource currently available from a single molluscan eye type. Candidate genes potentially involved in sensory reception were identified, and are worthy of further investigation. This resource, combined with recent phylogenetic and genomic data, provides a strong foundation for future investigations of the function and evolution of molluscan photosensory systems in this morphologically and taxonomically diverse phylum. PMID:23922823

  16. Shell chemistry used to identify essential habitat for Bay Scallops in Nantucket, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadaway, B.; Hannigan, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    Nantucket Harbor (MA) has one of the world’s last surviving wild populations of the bay scallop (Argopecten irradians). This species is unusual in that it grows rapidly, generally lives for 2 years, and spawns only before it dies or is harvested by shell fisherman. In order to sustain the bay scallop fishery, the spawning class size must be maintained. This study was undertaken to determine if specific habitats within the harbor are essential source habitats and therefore require adaptations to current management practice. Spawning of bay scallops is controlled by favorable environmental conditions: an ideal water temperature of 18°C and available phytoplankton. In Nantucket, studies show that this most commonly occurs in June. In the summer of 2009, water, adult (~60 centimeters in length) and juvenile scallops (less than a centimeter in length; where available), were collected from 32 sites in Nantucket Harbor. Water temperature, salinity, total dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and pH were measured at each site. Major (Mn, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg) and trace elements (La, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cu, As, Hg, Sn, Fe, Cd) in water samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The umbo (Y0) and the leading edge (Y1) of the left valve of juvenile shells were analyzed by laser ablation ICP-MS and elemental concentrations quantified using external calibration (USGS MACS-3). The edge (Y1, Y1+) major and trace chemistries of juveniles and adults within a site were compared to water chemistry to establish guidelines for site identification. The umbo (Y0) was then compared to the leading edge (Y1) to see if the species exhibited site fidelity in the adult spawning class.

  17. Hypoxia and acidification have additive and synergistic negative effects on the growth, survival, and metamorphosis of early life stage bivalves.

    PubMed

    Gobler, Christopher J; DePasquale, Elizabeth L; Griffith, Andrew W; Baumann, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen zones in coastal and open ocean ecosystems have expanded in recent decades, a trend that will accelerate with climatic warming. There is growing recognition that low oxygen regions of the ocean are also acidified, a condition that will intensify with rising levels of atmospheric CO2. Presently, however, the concurrent effects of low oxygen and acidification on marine organisms are largely unknown, as most prior studies of marine hypoxia have not considered pH levels. We experimentally assessed the consequences of hypoxic and acidified water for early life stage bivalves (bay scallops, Argopecten irradians, and hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria), marine organisms of significant economic and ecological value and sensitive to climate change. In larval scallops, experimental and naturally-occurring acidification (pH, total scale  = 7.4-7.6) reduced survivorship (by >50%), low oxygen (30-50 µM) inhibited growth and metamorphosis (by >50%), and the two stressors combined produced additively negative outcomes. In early life stage clams, however, hypoxic waters led to 30% higher mortality, while acidified waters significantly reduced growth (by 60%). Later stage clams were resistant to hypoxia or acidification separately but experienced significantly (40%) reduced growth rates when exposed to both conditions simultaneously. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the consequences of low oxygen and acidification for early life stage bivalves, and likely other marine organisms, are more severe than would be predicted by either individual stressor and thus must be considered together when assessing how ocean animals respond to these conditions both today and under future climate change scenarios.

  18. Effects of pH and bicarbonate on mitochondrial functions of marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Haider, Fouzia; Falfushynska, Halina; Ivanina, Anna V; Sokolova, Inna M

    2016-08-01

    Estuarine organisms including mollusks are exposed to periodic oxygen deficiency (hypoxia) that leads to a decrease in intracellular pH and accumulation of bicarbonate (HCO3(-)). These changes can affect cellular bioenergetics; however, their effects on mitochondria of estuarine mollusks are not well understood. We determined the interactive effects of bicarbonate (0-10mM) and pH (7.2 and 6.5) on mitochondrial oxygen consumption (ṀO2), membrane potential (Δψ) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in two common estuarine bivalves - hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria, and bay scallops Argopecten irradians. In both species, elevated HCO3(-) levels suppressed ADP-stimulated (state 3) ṀO2 but had little effect on the resting (state 4) respiration. These effects were not mediated by the soluble adenylyl cyclase or cyclic AMP. Effects of the low pH (6.5) on mitochondrial traits were species-specific and depended on the substrate oxidized by the mitochondria. Mild acidosis (pH6.5) had minimal effects on ṀO2 and Δψ of the bivalve mitochondria oxidizing pyruvate but led to increased rates of ROS production in clams (ROS production could not be measured in scallops). In succinate-respiring mitochondria of clams, mild acidosis suppressed ṀO2 and increased mitochondrial coupling, while in scallop mitochondria the effects of low pH were opposite. Suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by bicarbonate and/or acidosis may contribute to the metabolic rate depression during shell closure or environmental hypoxia/hypercapnia. These findings have implications for understanding the physiological mechanisms involved in regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics during hypoxia exposure in estuarine bivalves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypoxia and Acidification Have Additive and Synergistic Negative Effects on the Growth, Survival, and Metamorphosis of Early Life Stage Bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Gobler, Christopher J.; DePasquale, Elizabeth L.; Griffith, Andrew W.; Baumann, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen zones in coastal and open ocean ecosystems have expanded in recent decades, a trend that will accelerate with climatic warming. There is growing recognition that low oxygen regions of the ocean are also acidified, a condition that will intensify with rising levels of atmospheric CO2. Presently, however, the concurrent effects of low oxygen and acidification on marine organisms are largely unknown, as most prior studies of marine hypoxia have not considered pH levels. We experimentally assessed the consequences of hypoxic and acidified water for early life stage bivalves (bay scallops, Argopecten irradians, and hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria), marine organisms of significant economic and ecological value and sensitive to climate change. In larval scallops, experimental and naturally-occurring acidification (pH, total scale  = 7.4–7.6) reduced survivorship (by >50%), low oxygen (30–50 µM) inhibited growth and metamorphosis (by >50%), and the two stressors combined produced additively negative outcomes. In early life stage clams, however, hypoxic waters led to 30% higher mortality, while acidified waters significantly reduced growth (by 60%). Later stage clams were resistant to hypoxia or acidification separately but experienced significantly (40%) reduced growth rates when exposed to both conditions simultaneously. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the consequences of low oxygen and acidification for early life stage bivalves, and likely other marine organisms, are more severe than would be predicted by either individual stressor and thus must be considered together when assessing how ocean animals respond to these conditions both today and under future climate change scenarios. PMID:24416169

  20. Physiological response and resilience of early life-stage Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to past, present and future ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Gobler, Christopher J.; Talmage, Stephanie C.

    2014-01-01

    The Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791), is the second most valuable bivalve fishery in the USA and is sensitive to high levels of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Here we present experiments that comprehensively examined how the ocean's past, present and projected (21st and 22nd centuries) CO2 concentrations impact the growth and physiology of larval stages of C. virginica. Crassostrea virginica larvae grown in present-day pCO2 concentrations (380 μatm) displayed higher growth and survival than individuals grown at both lower (250 μatm) and higher pCO2 levels (750 and 1500 μatm). Crassostrea virginica larvae manifested calcification rates, sizes, shell thicknesses, metamorphosis, RNA:DNA ratios and lipid contents that paralleled trends in survival, with maximal values for larvae grown at 380 μatm pCO2 and reduced performance in higher and lower pCO2 levels. While some physiological differences among oysters could be attributed to CO2-induced changes in size or calcification rates, the RNA:DNA ratios at ambient pCO2 levels were elevated, independent of these factors. Likewise, the lipid contents of individuals exposed to high pCO2 levels were depressed even when differences in calcification rates were considered. These findings reveal the cascading, interdependent impact that high CO2 can have on oyster physiology. Crassostrea virginica larvae are significantly more resistant to elevated pCO2 than other North Atlantic bivalves, such as Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians, a finding that may be related to the biogeography and/or evolutionary history of these species and may have important implications for future bivalve restoration and aquaculture efforts. PMID:27293625

  1. Spectral sensitivity of the concave mirror eyes of scallops: potential influences of habitat, self-screening and longitudinal chromatic aberration.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Daniel I; Loew, Ellis R; Johnsen, Sönke

    2011-02-01

    Scallop eyes contain two retinas, one proximal and one distal. Molecular evidence suggests that each retina expresses a different visual pigment. To test whether these retinas have different spectral sensitivities, we used microspectrophotometry to measure the absorption spectra of photoreceptors from the eyes of two different scallop species. Photoreceptors from the proximal and distal retinas of the sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus had absorption peak wavelengths (λ(max)) of 488 ± 1 nm (mean ± s.e.m.; N=20) and 513 ± 3 nm (N=26), respectively. Photoreceptors from the corresponding retinas of the bay scallop Argopecten irradians had λ(max) values of 506 ± 1 nm (N=21) and 535 ± 3 nm (N=14). Assuming that the proximal and distal receptors had equal absorption coefficients (k(D)=0.0067 microm(-1)), we found that self-screening within the scallop eye caused the proximal and distal receptors in P. magellanicus to have peak absorption at 490 and 520 nm, respectively, and the corresponding receptors in A. irradians to have peak absorption at 504 and 549 nm. We conclude that environment may influence the λ(max) of scallop visual pigments: P. magellanicus, generally found in blue oceanic water, has visual pigments that are maximally sensitive to shorter wavelengths than those found in A. irradians, which lives in greener inshore water. Scallop distal retinas may be sensitive to longer wavelengths of light than scallop proximal retinas to correct for either self-screening by the retinas or longitudinal chromatic aberration of the lens.

  2. Trace elements in major marketed marine bivalves from six northern coastal cities of China: concentrations and risk assessment for human health.

    PubMed

    Li, Peimiao; Gao, Xuelu

    2014-11-01

    One hundred and fifty nine samples of nine edible bivalve species (Argopecten irradians, Chlamys farreri, Crassostrea virginica, Lasaea nipponica, Meretrix meretrix, Mytilus edulis, Ruditapes philippinarum, Scapharca subcrenata and Sinonovacula constricta) were randomly collected from eight local seafood markets in six big cities (Dalian, Qingdao, Rizhao, Weifang, Weihai and Yantai) in the northern coastal areas of China for the investigation of trace element contamination. As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn were quantified. The risk of these trace elements to humans through bivalve consumption was then assessed. Results indicated that the concentrations of most of the studied trace element varied significantly with species: the average concentration of Cu in C. virginica was an order of magnitude higher than that in the remaining species; the average concentration of Zn was also highest in C. virginica; the average concentration of As, Cd and Pb was highest in R. philippinarum, C. farreri and A. irradians, respectively. Spatial differences in the concentrations of elements were generally less than those of interspecies, yet some elements such as Cr and Hg in the samples from different cities showed a significant difference in concentrations for some bivalve species. Trace element concentrations in edible tissues followed the order of Zn>Cu>As>Cd>Cr>Pb>Hg generally. Statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA) indicated that different species examined showed different bioaccumulation of trace elements. There were significant correlations between the concentrations of some elements. The calculated hazard quotients indicated in general that there was no obvious health risk from the intake of trace elements through bivalve consumption. But care must be taken considering the increasing amount of seafood consumption.

  3. Generalized training effects induced by athletic preparation. A review.

    PubMed

    Issurin, V B

    2009-12-01

    The present review deals with training effects produced by training pieces of different duration. Athletes' responses to training workloads can be considered hierarchically, where the most intimate level encompasses changes produced at the cellular and molecular levels, while the generalized level summarizes the most integrative training outcomes, which characterize athletes' adaptability, preparedness and readiness for forthcoming workloads. These training outcomes, called generalized training effects (GTE) are considered to be closely linked with duration and mode of training workloads. Summarizing earlier and more recent publications, GTEs are categorized as acute, immediate, cumulative, delayed and residual training effects, which encompass changes induced by 1) a single exercise; 2) a single workout or training day; 3) a series of workouts; or 4) obtained over a given time interval after a program completion ; or (5) changes retained after cessation of training beyond a give time period. Each one these GTEs has a three-fold characterization:1) variables of executed workloads; 2) athletes' responses to workloads and training-induced changes in their state; 3) changes in athletic performance as described by sport specific indicators. Although the concept of GTE is far from complete in terms of an understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying the short-, medium-, and long-term changes caused by athletic training, a number of fundamental theories and statements contribute to its scientific background. They are Cannon's theory of homeostasis; Salye's theory of stress adaptation; Weigert's law of supercompensation; and Lamarck's classic theory of evolution regarding the "use" and "disuse" of any organ or function.

  4. A revision of the Neogene Conidae and Conorbidae (Gastropoda) of the Paratethys Sea.

    PubMed

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Landau, Bernard

    2016-12-22

    The Miocene Conidae and Conorbidae of the central- and south-eastern European Paratethys Sea are revised. In total, 74 species are described of which 10 are new species and 5 are documented for the first time from Paratethyan localities. Species descriptions and delimitations are partly based on morphometric data. In addition, colour patterns are described for the first time for the majority of species. In respect to the ongoing discussion on the supraspecific treatment of extant Conidae, we strongly focus on generic allocations and provide a key for the genera as understood herein. Biogeographically, the larger part of the assemblage indicates affiliation with modern western African faunas as indicated by the occurrence of genera such as Lautoconus, Kalloconus, Monteiroconus and Pseudonoduloconus. The relationship with Indo-West Pacific faunas is comparatively low. The high alpha-diversities observed for localities in the Pannonian, Transylvanian and Vienna basins, with up to 44 species, is a marker of tropical conditions in the Paratethys Sea during middle Miocene times.        Conasprella minutissima nov. sp., Kalloconus hendricksi nov. sp., Kalloconus letkesensis nov. sp., Kalloconus pseudohungaricus nov. sp., Lautoconus kovacsi nov. sp., Lautoconus pestensis nov. sp., Lautoconus quaggaoides nov. sp., Leporiconus paratethyianus nov. sp., Plagioconus breitenbergeri nov. sp. and Plagioconus bellissimus nov. sp. are described as new species; Conilithes eichwaldi nov. nom. is proposed as new name for Conus exiguus Eichwald, 1830 [non Lamarck, 1810].

  5. Homology--history of a concept.

    PubMed

    Panchen, A L

    1999-01-01

    The concept of homology is traceable to Aristotle, but Belon's comparison in 1555 of a human skeleton with that of a bird expressed it overtly. Before the late 18th century, the dominant view of the pattern of organisms was the scala naturae--even Linnaeus with his divergent hierarchical classification did not necessarily see the resulting taxonomic pattern as a natural phenomenon. The divergent hierarchy, rather than the acceptance of phylogeny, was the necessary spur to discussion of homology and the concept of analogy. Lamarck, despite his proposal of evolution, attributed homology to his escalator naturae and analogy to convergent acquired characters. Significantly, it was the concept of serial homology that emerged at the end of the 18th century, although comparison between organisms became popular soon after, and was boosted by the famous Cuvier/Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire debate of the 1830s. The concepts of homology and analogy were well understood by the pre- (or anti-) evolutionary comparative anatomists before the general acceptance of phylogeny, and they were defined by Owen in 1843. The acceptance of evolution led to the idea that homology should be defined by common ancestry, and to the confusion between definition and explanation. The term 'homoplasy', introduced by Lankester in 1870, also arose from a phylogenetic explanation of homology.

  6. The turbellarian urastoma cyprinae from edible mussels mytilus galloprovincialis and mytilus californianus in baja california, NW Mexico

    PubMed

    Caceres-martinez; Vasquez-yeomans; Sluys

    1998-11-01

    The turbellarian Urastoma cyprinae (Graff, 1913) was found in the mantle cavity of Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck and Mytilus californianus Conrad, on the Pacific coast of Baja California NW Mexico. This is the first record of this turbellarian for bivalves from the Pacific coast of North America. In M. galloprovincialis from an exposed rocky shore, prevalence ranged from 10 to 87% and mean number of turbellarians per infested mussel was 1.9; in a culture area prevalence ranged from 57 to 100% and the mean number of turbellarians per infested mussel was 7.4. In the protected and polluted areas U. cyprinae was scarce or absent, prevalence ranging from 0 to 15% and the mean number of turbellarian per infested mussel being 0.07. The prevalence and the mean number of turbellarians per M. californianus in the exposed rocky shore ranged from 20 to 100% and 5.1, respectively. There were more worms in the larger mussels. Demibranches of M. galloprovincialis and M. californianus may be injured by the presence of turbellarians. An infiltration of hemocyte cells around the turbellarians was observed in both species and the blood sinuses in the infected area were engorged. Recorded damage was not related to a negative effect on the condition index of mussels. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  7. Amino acids, fatty acids and sterols profile of some marine organisms from Portuguese waters.

    PubMed

    Pereira, David M; Valentão, Patrícia; Teixeira, Natércia; Andrade, Paula B

    2013-12-01

    Marine organisms have been increasingly regarded as good sources of new drugs for human therapeutics and also as nutrients for human diet. The amino acids, fatty acids and sterols profiles of the widely consumed echinoderms Paracentrotus lividus Lamarck (sea urchin), Holothuria forskali Chiaje (sea cucumber), the gastropod molluscs Aplysia fasciata Poiret and Aplysia punctata Cuvier (sea hares), from Portuguese waters, were established by GC-MS analysis. Overall, 10 amino acids, 14 fatty acids and 4 sterols were determined. In general, all species presented the 10 amino acids identified, with the exceptions of H. forskali, in which no glycine, proline, trans-4-hydroxy-proline or phenylalanine were found, and of A. fasciata which did not contain proline. Unsaturated fatty acids were predominant compounds, with those from the ω-6 series, being in higher amounts than their ω-3 homologues, and cholesterol being the main sterol. The amino acids, fatty acids and sterols qualitative and quantitative composition of A. fasciata, A. punctata and H. forskali is reported here for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genitalic Differentiations in Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Gueneé) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Associated with Solanaceae Crops in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Noboa, Michelle; Viera, William; Díaz, Ana; Vásquez, Wilson; Ron, Lenin

    2017-08-31

    Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Guenée) is an oligophagous species of plants in the Solanaceae family that has a broad geographical distribution in the tropical zones of South America. It is the most important insect pest of naranjilla (Solanum quitoense Lamarck), a crop grown in threatened areas of the tropical old-growth forest in Ecuador. In this study, two host-specific populations of N. elegantalis were collected from infested fruit of naranjilla and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum Cavanilles) in different locations. Sexually virgin adult insects (93 females and 103 males) were dissected to extract their genitalia to measure 12 morphological variables in females and six in males, resulting in six and four informative variables respectively. Using univariate and multivariate analysis of variance, it was found that the Solanaceous host was the main factor differentiating the area measurements of the seventh abdominal segment and ostium bursae in female genitalia, and cornuti length in male genitalia. Principal components generated with these measurements were employed in a logistic regression model for the classification of the Solanaceous host. Female genitalia of individuals from S. betaceum showed significantly larger ostium bursae relative to female genitalia from S. quitoense. For males, individuals collected from S. betaceum showed longer cornuti length than samples collected from S. quitoense. The results suggest genotypic differentiation according to the Solanaceous host or phenotypic plasticity in N. elegantalis. Further molecular and bio-geographical studies are needed to properly differentiate N. elegantalis populations that would help in the control of this pest.

  9. [The scholarly program of Johann Friedrich Meckel the Younger (1781-1833) and it importance for the development of life sciences].

    PubMed

    Göbbel, Luminita; Schultka, Rüdiger

    2002-11-01

    Although Johann Friedrich Meckel the Younger was one of the most famous anatomists, his research work has been severely neglected in the recent historiographical literature on the German morphology. The goal of our study is to approach a general characterization of his research program. Our analysis reveals that Meckel introduced the Cuvierian empiricism in Germany, but he also considered the "Abstraktion" as a main component of the scientific knowledge. According to his epistemology on nascent organisms and transmutable species, both, variability and relatedness of the organic forms are important to the same degree. Meckel explicitly adopted the Jean-Baptiste de Lamarcks (1744-1829) evolutionary theories. Even though in Meckel's discourse about diversity the Cuvierian notion of "functional adaptation" was preserved, the main goal of his research program was to demonstrate empirically the "Allgemeinheit des Bildungstypus". For this purpose, he considered the entire variety of the animal kingdom: normal as well as abnormal organisms, adult specimens and above all embryos. Moreover, he believed that the abnormal development is due to the same laws as the normal development. He applied parallelisms to a new domain, the study of malformation. With Meckel's researches on teratology, a new era in the analyses of the anomalies was opened. They became an integral part of the natural diversity and thus a highly exploited subject of biomedical researches. Meckel's empirical and epistemological writings on the embryology, comparative embryology, teratology, pathology, systematics and comparative anatomy have largely contributed to the foundation of the biological research.

  10. Experimental and geochemical evidence for derivation of the El Capitan Granite, California, by partial melting of hydrous gabbroic lower crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratajeski, K.; Sisson, T.W.; Glazner, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Partial melting of mafic intrusions recently emplaced into the lower crust can produce voluminous silicic magmas with isotopic ratios similar to their mafic sources. Low-temperature (825 and 850??C) partial melts synthesized at 700 MPa in biotite-hornblende gabbros from the central Sierra Nevada batholith (Sisson et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol 148:635-661, 2005) have major-element and modeled trace-element (REE, Rb, Ba, Sr, Th, U) compositions matching those of the Cretaceous El Capitan Granite, a prominent granite and silicic granodiorite pluton in the central part of the Sierra Nevada batholith (Yosemite, CA, USA) locally mingled with coeval, isotopically similar quartz diorite through gabbro intrusions (Ratajeski et al. in Geol Soc Am Bull 113:1486-1502, 2001). These results are evidence that the El Capitan Granite, and perhaps similar intrusions in the Sierra Nevada batholith with lithospheric-mantle-like isotopic values, were extracted from LILE-enriched, hydrous (hornblende-bearing) gabbroic rocks in the Sierran lower crust. Granitic partial melts derived by this process may also be silicic end members for mixing events leading to large-volume intermediate composition Sierran plutons such as the Cretaceous Lamarck Granodiorite. Voluminous gabbroic residues of partial melting may be lost to the mantle by their conversion to garnet-pyroxene assemblages during batholithic magmatic crustal thickening. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  11. Evidence that blood flukes (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) of chondrichthyans infect bivalves as intermediate hosts: indications of an ancient diversification of the Schistosomatoidea.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Thomas H; Chick, Rowan C; O'Connor, Wayne; O'Connor, Stephan; Johnson, Daniel; Sewell, Kim B; Cutmore, Scott C

    2017-08-12

    Blood flukes (Aporocotylidae) of actinopterygians (bony fishes) have been shown to infect freshwater gastropods and marine polychaetes as intermediate hosts. However, no life cycle is known for any aporocotylid of chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fishes) and no adult aporocotylid has been linked to a cercaria infecting a bivalve. Here we report two novel infections that fill these gaps. Cercariae consistent with the family Aporocotylidae were found developing in sporocysts in the gonad of the surf pipi, Donax deltoides Lamarck, 1818 (Bivalvia: Donacidae), from Stockton Beach, central New South Wales, Australia. Adult aporocotylids were found in the heart of the giant shovelnose ray, Glaucostegus typus (Anonymous [Bennett], 1830), from Moreton Bay, southeastern Queensland, Australia. Phylogenetic analyses of the 28S rDNA region generated from the new specimens resulted in phylograms in which the two parasites form a strongly supported clade with Chimaerohemecus trondheimensis van der Land, 1967, the only aporocotylid known from a holocephalan and the only other chondrichthyan-infecting aporocotylid for which sequence data are available. Most marine aporocotylids of actinopterygians also form a strongly supported clade. These findings lead us to hypothesise that the aporocotylids of chondrichthyans are distinct from all other blood flukes in infecting bivalves as intermediate hosts. Putative cophyly between three major blood fluke clades and both definitive and intermediate host groups is consistent with diversification of the Schistosomatoidea over 400million years ago. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. All rights reserved.

  12. Revision of the genus Turris Batsch, 1789 (Gastropoda: Conoidea: Turridae) with the description of six new species

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Richard N.; Fedosov, Alexander E.; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomy of the genus Turris Batsch, 1789, type genus of the family Turridae, widespread in shallow-water habitats of tropic Indo-Pacific, is revised. A total of 31 species of Turris, are here recognized as valid. New species described: Turris chaldaea, Turris clausifossata, Turris guidopoppei, Turris intercancellata, Turris kantori, T. kathiewayae. Homonym renamed: Turris bipartita nom. nov. for Pleurotoma variegata Kiener, 1839 (non Philippi, 1836). New synonymies: Turris ankaramanyensis Bozzetti, 2006 = Turris tanyspira Kilburn, 1975; Turris imperfecti, T. nobilis, T. pulchra and T. tornatum Röding, 1798, and Turris assyria Olivera, Seronay & Fedosov, 2010 = T. babylonia; Turris dollyi Olivera, 2000 = Pleurotoma crispa Lamarck, 1816; Turris totiphyllis Olivera, 2000 = Turris hidalgoi Vera-Peláez, Vega-Luz & Lozano-Francisco, 2000; Turris kilburni Vera-Peláez, Vega-Luz & Lozano-Francisco, 2000 = Turris pagasa Olivera, 2000; Turris (Annulaturris) munizi Vera-Peláez, Vega-Luz & Lozano-Francisco, 2000 = Gemmula lululimi Olivera, 2000. Revised status: Turris intricata Powell, 1964, Pleurotoma variegata Kiener, 1839 (non Philippi, 1836) and Pleurotoma yeddoensis Jousseaume, 1883, are regarded as full species (not subspecies of Turris crispa). Neotype designated: For Pleurotoma garnonsii Reeve, 1843, to distinguish it from Turris garnonsii of recent authors, type locality emended to Zanzibar. New combination: Turris orthopleura Kilburn, 1983, is transferred to genus Makiyamaia, family Clavatulidae. PMID:23847408

  13. Phrenology, heredity and progress in George Combe's Constitution of Man.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Bill

    2015-09-01

    The Constitution of Man by George Combe (1828) was probably the most influential phrenological work of the nineteenth century. It not only offered an exposition of the phrenological theory of the mind, but also presented Combe's vision of universal human progress through the inheritance of acquired mental attributes. In the decades before the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species, the Constitution was probably the single most important vehicle for the dissemination of naturalistic progressivism in the English-speaking world. Although there is a significant literature on the social and cultural context of phrenology, the role of heredity in Combe's thought has been less thoroughly explored, although both John van Wyhe and Victor L. Hilts have linked Combe's views on heredity with the transformist theories of Jean-Baptiste Lamarck. In this paper I examine the origin, nature and significance of his ideas and argue that Combe's hereditarianism was not directly related to Lamarckian transformism but formed part of a wider discourse on heredity in the early nineteenth century.

  14. The instinctual nation-state: non-Darwinian theories, state science and ultra-nationalism in Oka Asajirō's Evolution and Human Life.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    In his anthology of socio-political essays, Evolution and Human Life, Oka Asajirō (1868-1944), early twentieth century Japan's foremost advocate of evolutionism, developed a biological vision of the nation-state as super-organism that reflected the concerns and aims of German-inspired Meiji statism and anticipated aspects of radical ultra-nationalism. Drawing on non-Darwinian doctrines, Oka attempted to realize such a fused or organic state by enhancing social instincts that would bind the minzoku (ethnic nation) and state into a single living entity. Though mobilization during the Russo-Japanese War seemed to evince this super-organism, the increasingly contentious and complex society that emerged in the war's aftermath caused Oka to turn first to Lamarckism and eventually to orthogenesis in the hopes of preserving the instincts needed for a viable nation-state. It is especially in the state interventionist measures that Oka finally came to endorse in order to forestall orthogenetically-driven degeneration that the technocratic proclivities of his statist orientation become most apparent. The article concludes by suggesting that Oka's emphasis on degeneration, autarkic expansion, and, most especially, totalitarian submersion of individuals into the statist collectivity indicates a complex relationship between his evolutionism and fascist ideology, what recent scholarship has dubbed radical Shinto ultra-nationalism.

  15. Molluscicidal saponins from Sapindus mukorossi, inhibitory agents of golden apple snails, Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Liao, Sin-Chung; Chang, Fang-Rong; Kuo, Yao-Haur; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2003-08-13

    Extracts of soapnut, Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn. (Sapindaceae) showed molluscicidal effects against the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck. (Ampullariidae) with LC(50) values of 85, 22, and 17 ppm after treating 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. Bioassay-directed fractionation of S. mukorossi resulted in the isolation of one new hederagenin-based acetylated saponin, hederagenin 3-O-(2,4-O-di-acetyl-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (1), along with six known hederagenin saponins, hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-di-acetyl-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (2), hederagenin 3-O-(3-O-acetyl-beta-d-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (3), hederagenin 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-d-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (4), hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-di-acetyl-beta-d-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (5), hederagenin 3-O-beta-d-xylopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (6), and hederagenin 3-O-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (7). The bioassay data revealed that 1-7 were molluscicidal, causing 70-100% mortality at 10 ppm against the golden apple snail.

  16. Imposex in the golden apple snail Pomacea canaliculata in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Hui; Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Huang, Da-Ji; Liu, Ming-Yie; Lee, Ching-Chang; Liu, Li-Lian

    2006-12-01

    The golden apple snail Pomacea canaliculata (Lamarck, 1822) was introduced into Taiwan intentionally in the early 1980s and has become a recurring pest that seriously threatens aquatic crops. In this study, a field description of imposex with a developed penis sheath and penis in female golden apple snails from crop/domestic wastewater drainage sites and a six-order river is presented for the first time. Based on the five field collections and the aquarium group, the vas deferens sequence (VDS) of P. canaliculata in imposex development was categorized into four stages, i.e., stage 0: without male genital system; stage 1: with rudimentary penis; stage 2: with rudimentary penis and penis sheath; and stage 3: the rudimentary penis developing into penis pouch and penis. The VDS indices varied between 1.07 and 2.82 and were lowest in the aquarium group and Yuanlin2. Regarding the severity of imposex, the aquarium group was less pronounced, as illustrated by the length of penis sheath and penis length, than the field collections (p<0.05). In respect of the penis length, males of the most imposex-affected site were up to 15% shorter than that of the aquarium group. Negative correlations between male penis length and female imposex characters (i.e., penis length and penis sheath length) were also observed.

  17. The search for purpose in a post-Darwinian universe: George Bernard Shaw, 'creative evolution', and Shavian eugenics: 'The dark side of the force'.

    PubMed

    Hale, Piers J

    2006-01-01

    The Irish playwright and socialist George Bernard Shaw has been of marginal concern for historians of biology because his vitalist Lamarckism has been viewed as out of step with contemporary science. However, Julian Huxley and J.B.S. Haldane were certainly of the opinion that Shaw was a man of influence in this regard and took pains to counter his views in their own attempts to engage the public in science. Previously, Shaw's colleague and friend H.G. Wells had also agued with Shaw from his own mechanistic neo-Darwinian perspective. The very public debate between Shaw and Wells, which continued to concern Huxley and Haldane, shows that public concern over the moral implications of Darwinism has a long history. Taking into account the opinions of John Maynard Smith on this matter, I suggest that a consideration of Shaw in this context can give us an understanding of the historical popularity of vitalist teleology as well as of the persistent ambivalence to the non-normative character of Darwinism.

  18. Who invented the dichotomous key? Richard Waller's watercolors of the herbs of Britain.

    PubMed

    Griffing, Lawrence R

    2011-12-01

    On 27 March 1689, Richard Waller, Fellow and Secretary of the Royal Society presented his "Tables of the English Herbs reduced to such an order, as to find the name of them by their external figures and shapes" to his assembled colleagues at a meeting of the Royal Society. These tables were developed for the novice by being color images, composed in pencil and watercolor, of selected plants and their distinguishing characteristics. The botanical watercolors for the tables are now a Turning-the-Pages document online on the website of the Royal Society. However, for the past 320 years, the scientific context for the creation of these outstanding botanical watercolors has remained obscure. These tables were developed by Waller as an image-based dichotomous key, pre-dating by almost 100 years the text-based dichotomous keys in the first edition of Flora Française (1778) by Jean Baptiste Lamarck, who is generally given priority for the development of the dichotomous key. How these large folio images were arranged to illustrate a dichotomous key is unknown, but an arrangement based on Waller's description is illustrated here as leaf-ordering for the separate hierarchical clusters (tables). Although only 24 species of watercolored dicot herbs out of a total of 65 in the set of watercolors (the others being monocots) are used in these tables, they are a "proof of concept", serving as models upon which a method is based, that of using a key composed of dichotomous choices for aiding identification.

  19. Environmental Epigenetics and a Unified Theory of the Molecular Aspects of Evolution: A Neo-Lamarckian Concept that Facilitates Neo-Darwinian Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Environment has a critical role in the natural selection process for Darwinian evolution. The primary molecular component currently considered for neo-Darwinian evolution involves genetic alterations and random mutations that generate the phenotypic variation required for natural selection to act. The vast majority of environmental factors cannot directly alter DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms directly regulate genetic processes and can be dramatically altered by environmental factors. Therefore, environmental epigenetics provides a molecular mechanism to directly alter phenotypic variation generationally. Lamarck proposed in 1802 the concept that environment can directly alter phenotype in a heritable manner. Environmental epigenetics and epigenetic transgenerational inheritance provide molecular mechanisms for this process. Therefore, environment can on a molecular level influence the phenotypic variation directly. The ability of environmental epigenetics to alter phenotypic and genotypic variation directly can significantly impact natural selection. Neo-Lamarckian concept can facilitate neo-Darwinian evolution. A unified theory of evolution is presented to describe the integration of environmental epigenetic and genetic aspects of evolution. PMID:25917417

  20. "Stand up straight": notes toward a history of posture.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Sander L

    2014-03-01

    The essay presents a set of interlinked claims about posture in modern culture. Over the past two centuries it has come to define a wide range of assumptions in the West from what makes human beings human (from Lamarck to Darwin and beyond) to the efficacy of the body in warfare (from Dutch drill manuals in the 17th century to German military medical studies of soldiers in the 19th century). Dance and sport both are forms of posture training in terms of their own claims. Posture separates 'primitive' from 'advanced' peoples and the 'ill' from the 'healthy.' Indeed an entire medical sub-specialty developed in which gymnastics defined and recuperated the body. But all of these claims were also part of a Western attempt to use posture (and the means of altering it) as the litmus test for the healthy modern body of the perfect citizen. Focusing on the centrality of posture in two oddly linked moments of modern thought--modern Zionist thought and Nationalism in early 20th century China--in terms of bodily reform, we show how "posture" brings all of the earlier debates together to reform the body.

  1. Shell selection and utilization in a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita compressus (H. Milne Edwards).

    PubMed

    Abrams, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Shell utilization and shell selection studied in the tropical terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita compressus (H. Milne Edwards). Three major shell related variables are examined; shell size, shell species, and shell condition. Nerita scabricosta (Lamarck) is the most commonly occupied shell, and it is also preferred over other shell species. Coenobita in the field are usually found in smaller than the preferred size of shell, and the difference between utilized and preferred shells is most pronounced in relatively small individuals. Shell size preference differs significantly between similarly sized crabs collected at different sites. There is also a preference for shells which have previously been used by other Coenobita individuals. This preference is due to shell modification by Coenobita, which increases the effective size of the shell. It is argued that the fitness of most sexually mature individuals is probably unaffected by the supply of new shells, since these are too small to be utilized. It is possible that the interaction of adult Coenobita for shells may be better described as mutualism than as competition. This illustrates the fact that a significant difference between utilized and preferred resources need not imply competition for those resources. Results indicate that the nature of intraspecific competition and population regulation in at least this terrestrial hermit crab is significantly different from these processes in marine hermit crabs.

  2. The cushion–star Parvulastra exigua in South Africa: one species or more?

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Robyn P.; Griffiths, Charles L.; von der Heyden, Sophie; Koch, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cushion–star Parvulastra exigua (Lamarck, 1816) is a widely distributed member of the temperate intertidal fauna in the southern hemisphere. In South Africa, it occurs in sympatry with the endemic Parvulastra dyscrita (Clark, 1923), the two species being differentiated predominantly by gonopore placement. Several recent studies have suggested that there may be additional cryptic species within the Parvulastra exigua complex in South Africa, based variously on color morphology, genetic evidence and the differential placement of the gonopores. This paper attempts to resolve whether one or more species are represented within Parvulastra exigua. A total of 346 Parvulastra exigua and 8 Parvulastra dyscrita were collected from sites on the west and south–west coasts of South Africa; morphological, anatomical and genetic analyses were performed to determine whether cryptic species and/or Parvulastra exigua specimens with aboral gonopores were present. Results show that neither cryptic species nor Parvulastra exigua specimens with aboral gonopores occur at these sites. This study thus refutes previous claims of the existence of aboral gonopores in South African Parvulastra exigua, and suggests that a single species is represented. The distinction between Parvulastra exigua and Parvulastra dyscrita is also confirmed, and features separating these two species are clarified and documented. PMID:26478703

  3. Phylogenetic systematics of the Indo-Pacific heart urchin Metalia Gray, 1885

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Plunkett, S.; Mooi, R.

    2014-12-01

    Irregular sea urchins of the clade Spatangoida, informally known as heart urchins, form a major and important component of tropical marine ecosystems. The spatangoid sea urchin genus, Metalia Gray 1885, a member of the spatangoid family Brissidae, is known primarily from the Indo-pacific region, although one species is known from the west coast of North America. Examination of new material is adding significantly to our knowledge of the morphology and taxonomy of Metalia. There are nine known species: Metalia spatagus (Linnaeus, 1758); Metalia sternalis (Lamarck, 1816); Metalia townsendi (Bell, 1904); Metalia nobilis Verrill, 1867-71; Metalia robillardi (de Loriol, 1876); Metalia dicrana H.L. Clark, 1917; Metalia latissima H.L. Clark, 1925; Metalia persica (Mortensen, 1940); Metalia angustus de Ridder, 1984; and Metalia kermadecensis Baker & Rowe, 1990. In addition, we have discovered two Philippines species new to science. Our work is presently removing ambiguities among characters used to typify all known Metalia, allowing for the establishment of more reliable species identification. A morphology-based phylogenetic analysis of Metalia using outgroup comparisons among brissid taxa such as Anametalia, Granobrissoides, Rhynobrissus, Brissopsis, Eupatatus, Meoma, and Brissus suggests that Metalia is monophyletic. An intriguing possibility is that the very distinctive and beautiful form from North America, Plagiobrissus, is very closely related to and possibly evolved from within Metalia. We are also studing various aspects of the biogeography and growth of Metalia.

  4. [The evolution theory in the medical sciences in Chile].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1994-02-01

    The evolutionist ideas of Lamarck, Darwin and Haeckel entered the country through the arrival of their books. "On the origin of Species" arrived in Chile in 1869. The most outstanding immigrant european physicians that discussed these ideas were Rodulfo A Phillippi (1808-1904) and Juan José Brunner (1825-1899). Both discussed Darwin's ideas in their books and conferences as academics of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile. The first Chilean physicians that read and discussed the validity of evolution theory were Adolfo Valderrama (1834-1902) and Pedro Candia Salgado. Both wrote articles about this matter in Revista Médica de Chile in 1872 and 1874. The professor of general biology, Juan Noé Crevani, italian physician and zoologist that arrived in Chile in 1912, was the first to teach directly the concepts of the evolution theory until his death in 1947. Professor Noé founded the great biological school of the twentieth century in Chile and his disciples introduced the concepts of Mendelian theory and neodarwinism in the decade of fifties. The theory of evolution was taught as a chapter of general biology in the Faculty of Medicine between 1913 and 1947, but its practical applications to medicine were introduced with the birth of medical genetics in the decade of fifties and the foundation of Chilean Genetics society in 1964, under the direction of professors Danko Brncic and Gustavo Hoecker, both awarded with the National Sciences Prize.

  5. Ostreid herpesvirus in wild oysters from the Huelva coast (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    López-Sanmartín, M; López-Fernández, J R; Cunha, M E; De la Herrán, R; Navas, J I

    2016-08-09

    This is the first report of ostreid herpesvirus 1 microvariant (OsHV-1 µVar) infecting natural oyster beds located in Huelva (SW Spain). The virus was detected in 3 oyster species present in the intertidal zone: Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793), C. angulata (Lamarck, 1819) and, for the first time, in Ostrea stentina Payraudeau, 1826. Oysters were identified by a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and posterior restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis based on cytochrome oxidase I (COI) mitochondrial DNA. Results confirmed that C. angulata still remains the dominant oyster population in SW Spain despite the introduction of C. gigas for cultivation in the late 1970s, and its subsequent naturalization. C. angulata shows a higher haplotype diversity than C. gigas. OsHV-1 virus was detected by PCR with C2/C6 pair primers. Posterior RFLP analyses with the restriction enzyme MfeI were done in order to reveal the OsHV-1 µVar. Detections were confirmed by DNA sequencing, and infections were evidenced by in situ hybridization in C. gigas, C. angulata and O. stentina samples. The prevalence was similar among the 3 oyster species but varied between sampling locations, being higher in areas with greater harvesting activities. OsHV-1 µVar accounted for 93% of all OsHV-1 detected.

  6. The contribution of cytogenetics and flow cytometry for understanding the karyotype evolution in three Dorstenia (Linnaeus, 1753) species (Moraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Silva, Paulo Marcos; Clarindo, Wellington Ronildo; Carrijo, Tatiana Tavares; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto; Praça-Fontes, Milene Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chromosome morphometry and nuclear DNA content are useful data for cytotaxonomy and for understanding the evolutionary history of different taxa. However, the chromosome number is the only karyotype aspect reported for the species of Dorstenia so far. In this study, the nuclear genome size of Dorstenia arifolia (Lamarck, 1786), Dorstenia bonijesu (Carauta & C. Valente, 1983) and Dorstenia elata (Hooker, 1840) was evaluated and their karyotype morphometry accomplished, with the aim of verifying the potential of those parameters to understand evolutionary issues. Mean nuclear 2C value ranged from 2C = 3.49 picograms (pg) for Dorstenia elata to 2C = 5.47 pg for Dorstenia arifolia, a variation of ± 1.98 pg. Even though showing a marked difference in 2C value, the three species exhibited the same 2n = 32. Corroborating the flow cytometry data, differences in chromosome morphology were found among the karyotypes of the species investigated. Based on this and the only phylogeny proposed for Dorstenia thus far, structural rearrangements are related to the karyotype variations among the three species. Besides, the karyological analysis suggests a polyploid origin of the Dorstenia species studied here. PMID:27186340

  7. Bucardium grateloupianum n. sp. from the Lower Miocene of Aquitaine with    taxonomic comments on some fossil species from Europe (Bivalvia, Cardiidae).

    PubMed

    Perna, Rafael La

    2016-10-26

    The genus Bucardium J. E. Gray, 1853 has been widely used in the past literature, either for living and fossil cardiids, but only a single species was known, its type species B. ringens (Bruguière, 1789), living in the tropical waters of West Africa. Another species, from the Lower Miocene of the Aquitaine Basin, turned out to be undescribed, though known since the 19th century. It is herein described as Bucardium grateloupianum n. sp. The genus seems to have always had a low diversity and a tropical distribution. Its disappearance in Europe coincides with the general cooling trend recorded after the Middle Miocene. Several poorly known cardiids from the Lower-Middle Miocene of France and Austria and from the Upper Oligocene of Hungary show closer morphological affinities with the living Cardium indicum Lamarck, 1819, rather than with the genus Bucardium or with Cardium costatum Linnaeus, 1758, the type species of Cardium Linnaeus, 1758. These affinities suggest the need of a systematic reappraisal of the living and fossil species currently assigned to Cardium.

  8. Enhanced resistance to four species of Clypeorrhynchan pests in Neotyphodium uncinatum infected Italian ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Keiichiro; Shiba, Takuya; Sasaki, Tohru; Matsumura, Masaya

    2012-02-01

    Particular alkaloids produced by Neotyphodium endophytes show toxicity to invertebrates. Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lamarck) cultivars and strains that are symbiotic with Neotyphodium endophytes have been recently established in Japan. N. uncinatum-infected Italian ryegrass lines accumulate N-formylloline, a type of loline alkaloid (1-aminopyrrolizidine) showing neurotoxicity to herbivorous insects. This study investigated the toxicity of N-formylloline and resistance of N. uncinatum-infected Italian ryegrass to vascular-sap feeding Clypeorrhynchan pests. When four vascular-sap feeding insects: Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén) (Homoptera: Delphacidae), Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Homoptera: Delphacidae), Cicadulina bipunctata (Melichar) (Homoptera: Cicadellidae), and Nephotettix cincticeps (Uhler) (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) fed on N. uncinatum-infected Italian ryegrass, significant decreases in survival rate were observed for three phloem-sap feeders but not for a xylem-sap feeder, N. cincticeps. This result suggests an uneven distribution of N-formylloline among plant tissues. A potency assay for N-formylloline using a Parafilm feeding sachet and a quantitative analysis of N-formylloline in plant showed a concentration-dependent lethal effect of N-formylloline on all four tested vascular-sap feeders. Our results strongly suggest that N. uncinatum-infected plants can control some Clypeorrhynchan pests in crop fields.

  9. [Buffon, the director of 'Jardin du Roi' in the 1700s].

    PubMed

    Jeune, Bernard; Petersen, Hans Christian

    2008-01-01

    Buffon and Linné were the two greatest naturalists of the 1700s. As they were both born in 1707, their 300 anniversaries were therefore celebrated in France and Sweden. At the celebration meeting at the University of Bourgogne in Dijon - The Buffon Legacy - September 3-6, 2007, we presented the following paper: "Buffon and the longevity of species". In the present paper the life and work of Buffon is introduced on the basis of recent literature, including Jacques Roger's famous biography. Among non-biologists Buffon has nearly been forgotten, even though in the 1700s he was considered to be at the same level as the most famous French thinkers of the Enlightenment - Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau and Diderot. His largest contributions were the publication of his comprehensive "Histoire naturelle" and his long and significant leadership of "Jardin du Roi", which he built up to become one of the best scientific institutions of Europe. Buffon's scientific contributions wereas overshadowed by those of Linné, as it was his classification system, which became dominant all overn Europe. Buffon's student Lamarck and later Darwin contributed by pushing Buffon in oblivion of history, even though Darwin valued him highly. However, in recent decades Buffon is experiencing a renaissance in connection with the increasing interest in biological anthropology, biogeography, ethology, and ecology, as well as on account of his modern species concept.

  10. Adaptation or Malignant Transformation: The Two Faces of Epigenetically Mediated Response to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation—the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments. PMID:24187667

  11. Adaptation or malignant transformation: the two faces of epigenetically mediated response to stress.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation--the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments.

  12. The biology of Dactylopius tomentosus (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae).

    PubMed

    Mathenge, C W; Holford, P; Hoffmann, J H; Spooner-Hart, R; Beattie, G A C; Zimmermann, H G

    2009-12-01

    Dactylopius tomentosus (Lamarck) (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae) is a cochineal insect whose host range is restricted to Cylindropuntia species (Caryophyllales: Cactaceae). This insect has been utilized successfully for biological control of Cylindropuntia imbricata (Haw.) F.M. Knuth in Australia and South Africa. Despite this, its biology has not been studied previously, probably due to the widely held belief that the biology of all Dactylopius species is similar. This study investigated the life cycle and the morphological and reproductive characteristics of D. tomentosus. Results revealed some unique characteristics of D. tomentosus: (i) eggs undergo a much longer incubation period, an average of 17 days compared to <1 day in its congeners; (ii) eggs are laid singly but are retained as an egg mass secured in a mesh of waxy threads attached to the female; (iii) the developmental times of males and females are longer compared to other Dactylopius spp. due to a longer egg incubation period; (iv) D. tomentosus does not undergo parthenogenesis; (v) D. tomentosus is smaller in size than its congeners; and (vi) male mating capacity and reproductive potential were both high and variable between males. There was a significant, strong, positive relationship (r = 0.93) between female mass and fecundity, whereas the relationship between the number of females mated per male that became gravid and their fecundity was negative (r = -0.68). Besides contributing to our knowledge of this economically important species, the finding of unique characteristics of D. tomentosus biology underlines the need to study each species in this genus.

  13. Psychoontogeny and psychophylogeny: Bernhard Rensch's (1900-1990) selectionist turn through the prism of panpsychistic identism.

    PubMed

    Levit, Georgy S; Simunek, Michal; Hossfeld, Uwe

    2008-11-01

    Toward the end of the 1930s, Bernhard Rensch (1900-1990) turned from Lamarckism and orthogenesis to selectionism and became one of the key figures in the making of the Synthetic Theory of Evolution (STE). He contributed to the Darwinization of biological systematics, the criticism of various anti-Darwinian movements in the German lands, but more importantly founded a macroevolutionary theory based on Darwinian gradualism. In the course of time, Rensch's version of the STE developed into an all-embracing metaphysical conception based on a kind of Spinozism. Here we approach Rensch's "selectionist turn" by outlining its context, and by analyzing his theoretical transformation. We try to reconstruct the immanent logic of Rensch's evolution from a "Lamarckian Synthesis" to a "Darwinian Synthesis". We will pay close attention to his pre-Darwinian works, because this period has not been treated in detail in English before. We demonstrate an astonishing continuity in topics, methodology, and empirical generalizations despite the shift in Rensch's views on evolutionary mechanisms. We argue that the continuity in Rensch's theoretical system can be explained, at last in part, by the guiding role of general methodological principles which underlie the entire system, explicitly or implicitly. Specifically, we argue that Rensch's philosophy became an asylum for the concept of orthogenesis which Rensch banned from evolutionary theory. Unable to explain the directionality of evolution in terms of empirically based science, he "pre-programmed" the occurrence of human-level intelligence by a sophisticated philosophy combined with a supposedly naturalistic evolutionary biology.

  14. Pomacea canaliculata (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in Patagonia: potential role of climatic change in its dispersion and settlement.

    PubMed

    Darrigran, G; Damborenea, C; Tambussi, A

    2011-02-01

    Pomacea canaliculata (Lamarck, 1822) (Mollusca Gastropoda) shows a large native distribution range in South America, reaching as far south as 37º S (Buenos Aires, Argentina). This species was deliberately introduced into Southeast Asia around 1980 and subsequently underwent a rapid intentional or accidental dispersal into many countries in the region. It was also introduced into North and Central America and Hawaii. In this contribution we record the presence of P. canaliculata in Patagonia, assessing the possible influence of climatic change in the new establishment of this species there. Three samplings (between September 2004 and April 2005) were carried out at 38º 58' 20.2" S-68º 11' 27.3" W. In the sampling we found two adult specimens of P. canaliculata and numerous egg clutches. Pomacea canaliculata is naturally distributed in the Plata and Amazon Basins. The southern boundary of this species has been established as the isotherms of 14 ºC and 16 ºC in Buenos Aires province, and precipitations of 900 to 600 mm/year. This study also analysed variations in annual temperature and precipitation in Patagonia. Average temperatures show an increase over the years, although not constantly. Important modifications in precipitation regime in northern Patagonia, triggered by global climatic changes, could be beneficial for the settlement of populations of P. canaliculata in this new area, where precipitation increased enough to reach values similar to those in the southernmost area of distribution of this species.

  15. A genomic glance through the fog of plasticity and diversification in Pocillopora.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Erika C; Forsman, Zac H; Flot, Jean-François; Schmidt-Roach, Sebastian; Pinzón, Jorge H; Knapp, Ingrid S S; Toonen, Robert J

    2017-07-20

    Scleractinian corals of the genus Pocillopora (Lamarck, 1816) are notoriously difficult to identify morphologically with considerable debate on the degree to which phenotypic plasticity, introgressive hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting obscure well-defined taxonomic lineages. Here, we used RAD-seq to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among seven species of Pocillopora represented by 15 coral holobiont metagenomic libraries. We found strong concordance between the coral holobiont datasets, reads that mapped to the Pocillopora damicornis (Linnaeus, 1758) transcriptome, nearly complete mitochondrial genomes, 430 unlinked high-quality SNPs shared across all Pocillopora taxa, and a conspecificity matrix of the holobiont dataset. These datasets also show strong concordance with previously published clustering of the mitochondrial clades based on the mtDNA open reading frame (ORF). We resolve seven clear monophyletic groups, with no evidence for introgressive hybridization among any but the most recently derived sister species. In contrast, ribosomal and histone datasets, which are most commonly used in coral phylogenies to date, were less informative and contradictory to these other datasets. These data indicate that extant Pocillopora species diversified from a common ancestral lineage within the last ~3 million years. Key to this evolutionary success story may be the high phenotypic plasticity exhibited by Pocillopora species.

  16. Neoparamoeba branchiphila infections in moribund sea urchins Diadema aff. antillarum in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Dyková, Iva; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Kostka, Martin; Valladares, Basilio; Pecková, Hana

    2011-07-12

    A total of 109 sea urchins from 3 species collected in 2 localities off the coast of Tenerife Island, Spain, were examined for the presence of free-living amoebae in their coelomic fluid. Amoeba trophozoites were isolated exclusively from moribund individuals of long-spined sea urchins Diadema aff. antillarum (Philippi) (Echinoidea, Echinodermata) that manifested lesions related to sea urchin bald disease on their tests (16 out of 56 examined). No amoebae were detected in Arbacia lixula (L.) and Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck). From the former sea urchin species, 8 strains, established from 10 primary isolates, were identified as Neoparamoeba branchiphila Dyková et al., 2005 using morphological and molecular methods. Results of this study (limited to the screening for free-living amoebae) together with data on agents of sea urchin mortalities reported to date justify the hypothesis that free-living amoebae play an opportunistic role in D. aff. antillarum mortality. The enlargement of the dataset of SSU rDNA sequences brought new insight into the phylogeny of Neoparamoeba species.

  17. Environmental Epigenetics and a Unified Theory of the Molecular Aspects of Evolution: A Neo-Lamarckian Concept that Facilitates Neo-Darwinian Evolution.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K

    2015-04-26

    Environment has a critical role in the natural selection process for Darwinian evolution. The primary molecular component currently considered for neo-Darwinian evolution involves genetic alterations and random mutations that generate the phenotypic variation required for natural selection to act. The vast majority of environmental factors cannot directly alter DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms directly regulate genetic processes and can be dramatically altered by environmental factors. Therefore, environmental epigenetics provides a molecular mechanism to directly alter phenotypic variation generationally. Lamarck proposed in 1802 the concept that environment can directly alter phenotype in a heritable manner. Environmental epigenetics and epigenetic transgenerational inheritance provide molecular mechanisms for this process. Therefore, environment can on a molecular level influence the phenotypic variation directly. The ability of environmental epigenetics to alter phenotypic and genotypic variation directly can significantly impact natural selection. Neo-Lamarckian concept can facilitate neo-Darwinian evolution. A unified theory of evolution is presented to describe the integration of environmental epigenetic and genetic aspects of evolution. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. The search for minimum-energy atomic configurations on a lattice: Lamarckian twist on Darwinian Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avezac, Mayeul; Zunger, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We examine how two different mechanisms proposed historically for biological evolution compare for the determination of crystal structures from random initial lattice-configurations. The Darwinian theory of evolution contends that the genetic makeup inherited at birth is the one passed on to offsprings. Lamarck surmised additionally that offspring can inherit acquired traits. In the case of lattice-configurations, such improvements consist in A<->B transmutations of atomic sites as guided by ``Virtual Atom'' energy-gradients(M. d'Avezac and Alex Zunger, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt. 19, 402201 (2007)). This hybrid evolution is shown to provide an efficient solution to a generalized Ising Hamiltonian, illustrated by finding the ground-states of face-centered cubic Au1-xPdx using a cluster-expansion functional fitted to first-principles total-energies. For example, finding all minimum-energy structures of a 32-atom supercell with 95,% confidence requires evaluating 750, 000 configurations using local improvements only, 150, 000 using a reciprocal-space genetic algorithm only, and 14,000 using the hybrid approach. We consider applying the lamarckian search to further functionals.

  19. Erasmus Darwin, Herbert Spencer, and the origins of the evolutionary worldview in British provincial scientific culture, 1770-1850.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The significance of Herbert Spencer's evolutionary philosophy has been generally recognized for over a century, as the familiarity of his phrase "survival of the fittest" indicates, yet accounts of the origins of his system still tend to follow too closely his own description, written many decades later. This essay argues that Spencer's own interpretation of his intellectual development gives an inadequate impression of the debt he owed to provincial scientific culture and its institutions. Most important, it shows that his evolutionism was originally stimulated by his association with the Derby philosophical community, for it was through this group--of which his father, who also appears to have espoused a deistic evolutionary theory, was a member--that he was first exposed to progressive Englightenment social and educational philosophies and to the evolutionary worldview of Erasmus Darwin, the first president of the Derby Philosophical Society. Darwin's scheme was the first to incorporate biological evolution, associationist psychology, evolutionary geology, and cosmological developmentalism. Spencer's own implicit denials of the link with Darwin are shown to be implausible in the face of Darwin's continuing influence on the Derby savants, the product of insecurity in his later years when he feared for his reputation as Lamarckism became increasingly untenable.

  20. "Synergistic selection": a Darwinian frame for the evolution of complexity.

    PubMed

    Corning, Peter A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-04-21

    Non-Darwinian theories about the emergence and evolution of complexity date back at least to Lamarck, and include those of Herbert Spencer and the "emergent evolution" theorists of the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In recent decades, this approach has mostly been espoused by various practitioners in biophysics and complexity theory. However, there is a Darwinian alternative - in essence, an economic theory of complexity - proposing that synergistic effects of various kinds have played an important causal role in the evolution of complexity, especially in the "major transitions". This theory is called the "synergism hypothesis". We posit that otherwise unattainable functional advantages arising from various cooperative phenomena have been favored over time in a dynamic that the late John Maynard Smith characterized and modeled as "synergistic selection". The term highlights the fact that synergistic "wholes" may become interdependent "units" of selection. We provide some historical perspective on this issue, as well as a brief explication of the underlying theory and the concept of synergistic selection, and we describe two relevant models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [THE PROFESSORS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND THE SOCIETY OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SCIENCES OF WARSAW (1800-1832)].

    PubMed

    Daszkiewicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The National Museum of Natural History played a crucial role in the formation of Polish scientific elites in the 19th century. Many Polish students were attending in Paris natural history, botany, zoology, chemistry and mineralogy courses. The Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning was the largest scientific society and one of the most important scientific institutions in Poland. It had also an impact on the political and cultural life of the country, occupied and deprived of freedom at that time. Amongst its founders and members, could be found listeners to the lectures of Lamarck, Haüy, Vauquelin, Desfontaines, Jussieu. Moreover, seven professors of the National Museum of Natural History were elected foreign members of the Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning: Cuvier, Desfontaines, Haüy, Jussieu, Latreille, Mirbel, Vauquelin. The article analyses this choice and underlines the relationship between these scientists and Warsaw's scientists. The results of this research allow to confirm that the National Museum of Natural History was the most important foreign institution in the 19th century for Polish science, and more specifically natural sciences.

  2. The skeletal proteome of the sea star Patiria miniata and evolution of biomineralization in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rachel L; Livingston, Brian T

    2017-06-05

    Proteomic studies of skeletal proteins have revealed large, complex mixtures of proteins occluded within the mineral. Many skeletal proteomes contain rapidly evolving proteins with repetitive domains, further complicating our understanding. In echinoderms, proteomic analysis of the skeletal proteomes of mineralized tissues of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus prominently featured spicule matrix proteins with repetitive sequences linked to a C-type lectin domain. A comparative study of the brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii skeletal proteome revealed an order of magnitude fewer proteins containing C-type lectin domains. A number of other proteins conserved in the skeletons of the two groups were identified. Here we report the complete skeletal proteome of the sea star Patiria miniata and compare it to that of the other echinoderm groups. We have identified eighty-five proteins in the P. miniata skeletal proteome. Forty-two percent of the proteins were determined to be homologous to proteins found in the S. purpuratus skeletal proteomes. An additional 34 % were from similar functional classes as proteins in the urchin proteomes. Thirteen percent of the P. miniata proteins had homologues in the O. wendtii skeletal proteome with an additional 29% showing similarity to brittle star skeletal proteins. The P. miniata skeletal proteome did not contain any proteins with C-lectin domains or with acidic repetitive regions similar to the sea urchin or brittle star spicule matrix proteins. MSP130 proteins were also not found. We did identify a number of proteins homologous between the three groups. Some of the highly conserved proteins found in echinoderm skeletons have also been identified in vertebrate skeletons. The presence of proteins conserved in the skeleton in three different echinoderm groups indicates these proteins are important in skeleton formation. That a number of these proteins are involved in skeleton formation in vertebrates suggests a common origin for

  3. Testing lagoonal sediments with early life stages of the copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana): An approach to assess sediment toxicity in the Venice Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Delaney, Eugenia; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2017-08-24

    The early-life stages of development of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa from egg to copepodite I is proposed as an endpoint for assessing sediment toxicity by exposing newly released eggs directly onto the sediment-water interface. A preliminary study of 5 sediment samples collected in the lagoon of Venice highlighted that the larval development rate (LDR) and the early-life stages (ELS) mortality endpoints with A. tonsa are more sensitive than the standard amphipod mortality test; moreover LDR resulted in a more reliable endpoint than ELS mortality, due to the interference of the sediment with the recovery of unhatched eggs and dead larvae. The LDR data collected in a definitive study of 48 sediment samples from the Venice Lagoon has been analysed together with the preliminary data to evaluate the statistical performances of the bioassay (among replicate variance and minimum significant difference between samples and control) and to investigate the possible correlation with sediment chemistry and physical properties. The results showed that statistical performances of the LDR test with A. tonsa correspond with the outcomes of other tests applied to the sediment-water interface (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryotoxicity test), sediments (Neanthes arenaceodentata survival and growth test) and porewater (S. purpuratus); the LDR endpoint did, however, show a slightly higher variance as compared with other tests used in the Lagoon of Venice, such as 10-d amphipod lethality test and larval development with sea urchin and bivalves embryos. Sediment toxicity data highlighted the high sensitivity and the clear ability of the larval development to discriminate among sediments characterized by different levels of contamination. The data of the definitive study evidenced that inhibition of the larval development was not affected by grain-size and the organic carbon content of the sediment; in contrast, a strong correlation between inhibition of the larval development

  4. Respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization.

    PubMed Central

    Heinecke, J W; Shapiro, B M

    1989-01-01

    Partially reduced oxygen species are toxic, yet sea urchin eggs synthesize H2O2 in a "respiratory burst" at fertilization, as an extracellular oxidant to crosslink their protective surface envelopes. To study the biochemical mechanism for H2O2 production, we have isolated an NADPH-specific oxidase fraction from homogenates of unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs that produces H2O2 when stimulated with Ca2+ and MgATP2-. Concentrations of free Ca2+ previously implicated in regulation of egg activation modulate the activity of the oxidase. Inhibitors were used to test the relevance of this oxidase to the respiratory burst of fertilization. Procaine, two phenothiazines, and N-ethylmaleimide (but not iodoacetamide) inhibited H2O2 production by the oxidase fraction and oxygen consumption by activated eggs. The ATP requirement suggested that protein kinase activity might regulate the respiratory burst of fertilization; consonant with this hypothesis, H-7 and staurosporine were inhibitory. The respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization is an NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase that appears to be regulated by a protein kinase; although it bears a remarkable resemblance to the neutrophil oxidase, unlike the latter it does not form O2- as its initial product. PMID:2537493

  5. The Insect Chemoreceptor Superfamily Is Ancient in Animals.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Hugh M

    2015-11-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily consists of 2 gene families, the highly diverse gustatory receptors (GRs) found in all arthropods with sequenced genomes and the odorant receptors that evolved from a GR lineage and have been found only in insects to date. Here, I describe relatives of the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, specifically the basal GR family, in diverse other animals, showing that the superfamily dates back at least to early animal evolution. GR-Like (GRL) genes are present in the genomes of the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, an anemone Nematostella vectensis, a coral Acropora digitifera, a polychaete Capitella teleta, a leech Helobdella robusta, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (and many other nematodes), 3 molluscs (a limpet Lottia gigantea, an oyster Crassostrea gigas, and the sea hare Aplysia californica), the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the sea acorn Saccoglossus kowalevskii. While some of these animals contain multiple divergent GRL lineages, GRLs have been lost entirely from other animal lineages such as vertebrates. GRLs are absent from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica, and 2 available chaonoflagellate genomes, so it remains unclear whether this superfamily originated before or during animal evolution.

  6. Phylogenomic resolution of the hemichordate and echinoderm clade.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Johanna T; Kocot, Kevin M; Waits, Damien S; Weese, David A; Swalla, Billie J; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2014-12-01

    Ambulacraria, comprising Hemichordata and Echinodermata, is closely related to Chordata, making it integral to understanding chordate origins and polarizing chordate molecular and morphological characters. Unfortunately, relationships within Hemichordata and Echinodermata have remained unresolved, compromising our ability to extrapolate findings from the most closely related molecular and developmental models outside of Chordata (e.g., the acorn worms Saccoglossus kowalevskii and Ptychodera flava and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). To resolve long-standing phylogenetic issues within Ambulacraria, we sequenced transcriptomes for 14 hemichordates as well as 8 echinoderms and complemented these with existing data for a total of 33 ambulacrarian operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Examination of leaf stability values revealed rhabdopleurid pterobranchs and the enteropneust Stereobalanus canadensis were unstable in placement; therefore, analyses were also run without these taxa. Analyses of 185 genes resulted in reciprocal monophyly of Enteropneusta and Pterobranchia, placed the deep-sea family Torquaratoridae within Ptychoderidae, and confirmed the position of ophiuroid brittle stars as sister to asteroid sea stars (the Asterozoa hypothesis). These results are consistent with earlier perspectives concerning plesiomorphies of Ambulacraria, including pharyngeal gill slits, a single axocoel, and paired hydrocoels and somatocoels. The resolved ambulacrarian phylogeny will help clarify the early evolution of chordate characteristics and has implications for our understanding of major fossil groups, including graptolites and somasteroideans.

  7. Repression of mesodermal fate by foxa, a key endoderm regulator of the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Paola; Walton, Katherine D; Davidson, Eric H; McClay, David R

    2006-11-01

    The foxa gene is an integral component of the endoderm specification subcircuit of the endomesoderm gene regulatory network in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Its transcripts become confined to veg2, then veg1 endodermal territories, and, following gastrulation, throughout the gut. It is also expressed in the stomodeal ectoderm. gatae and otx genes provide input into the pregastrular regulatory system of foxa, and Foxa represses its own transcription, resulting in an oscillatory temporal expression profile. Here, we report three separate essential functions of the foxa gene: it represses mesodermal fate in the veg2 endomesoderm; it is required in postgastrular development for the expression of gut-specific genes; and it is necessary for stomodaeum formation. If its expression is reduced by a morpholino, more endomesoderm cells become pigment and other mesenchymal cell types, less gut is specified, and the larva has no mouth. Experiments in which blastomere transplantation is combined with foxa MASO treatment demonstrate that, in the normal endoderm, a crucial role of Foxa is to repress gcm expression in response to a Notch signal, and hence to repress mesodermal fate. Chimeric recombination experiments in which veg2, veg1 or ectoderm cells contained foxa MASO show which region of foxa expression controls each of the three functions. These experiments show that the foxa gene is a component of three distinct embryonic gene regulatory networks.

  8. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin HoxCluster

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Paul M.; Lucas, Susan; Cameron, R. Andrew; Rowen,Lee; Nesbitt, Ryan; Bloom, Scott; Rast, Jonathan P.; Berney, Kevin; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Martinez, Pedro; Davidson, Eric H.; Peterson, KevinJ.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-05-10

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3' gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5'-Hox1,2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, '11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3)'. The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  9. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin Hox Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, R A; Rowen, L; Nesbitt, R; Bloom, S; Rast, J P; Berney, K; Arenas-Mena, C; Martinez, P; Lucas, S; Richardson, P M; Davidson, E H; Peterson, K J; Hood, L

    2005-10-11

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3 gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5-Hox1, 2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, 11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3). The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  10. A Method for Microinjection of Patiria minata Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle Jarvela, Alys M.; Hinman, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Echinoderms have long been a favorite model system for studies of reproduction and development, and more recently for the study of gene regulation and evolution of developmental processes. The sea star, Patiria miniata, is gaining prevalence as a model system for these types of studies which were previously performed almost exclusively in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus. An advantage of these model systems is the ease of producing modified embryos in which a particular gene is up or downregulated, labeling a group of cells, or introducing a reporter gene. A single microinjection method is capable of creating a wide variety of such modified embryos. Here, we present a method for obtaining gametes from P. miniata, producing zygotes, and introducing perturbing reagents via microinjection. Healthy morphant embryos are subsequently isolated for quantitative and qualitative studies of gene function. The availability of genome and transcriptome data for this organism has increased the types of studies that are performed and the ease of executing them. PMID:25226153

  11. [Evolutional principles of homology in regulatory genes of myogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ozerniuk, I D; Miuge, N S

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of early steps in muscular system development of invertebrates and vertebrates shows that early steps of myogenesis are regulated by genes-orthologs mainly belonging to two families, Pax and bHLH. In the majority of the following organisms, muscles formation (steps of determination and the earliest steps of myogenesis) is regulated by genes orthologs Pax3 which belong to the family Pax: nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans, Pristionchus pacificus), insects (Drosophila melanogaster), echinoderms (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), sea squirts (Ciona intestinalis, Holocynthia roretzi), fishes (Danio rerio), amphibians (Xenopus laevis), birds, and mammals (mouse, rat). The nematode C. elegans is an exception since formation of its muscles in this period is regulated by homeobox gene Pal-1 belonging to the family Caudal. The sea squirt C. intestinalis is also an exception because the earliest steps of development involved in further muscle formation are accompanied by activation of the gene CiSna (snail) (gene family basic Zinc finger). The next steps of myogenesis in all analyzed species are regulated by genes orthologs belonging to the family of transcriptional factors bHLH. They along with genes Pax3 are characterized by a high extent of homology in all studied groups of animals.

  12. A method for microinjection of Patiria miniata zygotes.

    PubMed

    Cheatle Jarvela, Alys M; Hinman, Veronica

    2014-09-01

    Echinoderms have long been a favorite model system for studies of reproduction and development, and more recently for the study of gene regulation and evolution of developmental processes. The sea star, Patiria miniata, is gaining prevalence as a model system for these types of studies which were previously performed almost exclusively in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus. An advantage of these model systems is the ease of producing modified embryos in which a particular gene is up or downregulated, labeling a group of cells, or introducing a reporter gene. A single microinjection method is capable of creating a wide variety of such modified embryos. Here, we present a method for obtaining gametes from P. miniata, producing zygotes, and introducing perturbing reagents via microinjection. Healthy morphant embryos are subsequently isolated for quantitative and qualitative studies of gene function. The availability of genome and transcriptome data for this organism has increased the types of studies that are performed and the ease of executing them.

  13. Na+/K+-ATPase activity during early development and growth of an Antarctic sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Leong, P K; Manahan, D T

    1999-08-01

    In Antarctic environments, the physiological bases for long larval life spans under natural conditions of limited food availability are not understood. The Na+ pump is likely to be involved with hypometabolic regulation in such cold environments. Changes in the activity and metabolic importance of Na+/K+-ATPase were measured in embryos of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri and in larvae reared under different feeding conditions. The rate of increase of total Na+/K+-ATPase activity was 3.9 times faster in fed than in unfed larvae. During development and growth, there was an increase in the percentage of total, potential Na+/K+-ATPase activity that was physiologically utilized. In early (10-day-old) gastrulae, 17 % was utilized in vivo, increasing to 77 % in six-arm pluteus (48-day-old) larvae. The metabolic importance of in vivo Na+/K+-ATPase activity also increased during development, accounting for 12 % of metabolic rate at day 10 and 84 % at day 48. When compared at the same enzyme assay temperature (15 degrees C), the protein-specific total Na+/K+-ATPase activities for late embryonic (prism) and early larval (pluteus) stages of S. neumayeri were 2.6 times lower than those for comparable developmental stages of two temperate sea urchin species (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus).

  14. Expression of the Hox gene complex in the indirect development of a sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Mena, C; Martinez, P; Cameron, R A; Davidson, E H

    1998-10-27

    Hox complex genes control spatial patterning mechanisms in the development of arthropod and vertebrate body plans. Hox genes are all expressed during embryogenesis in these groups, which are all directly developing organisms in that embryogenesis leads at once to formation of major elements of the respective adult body plans. In the maximally indirect development of a large variety of invertebrates, the process of embryogenesis leads only to a free-living, bilaterally organized feeding larva. Maximal indirect development is exemplified in sea urchins. The 5-fold radially symmetric adult body plan of the sea urchin is generated long after embryogenesis is complete, by a separate process occurring within imaginal tissues set aside in the larva. The single Hox gene complex of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus contains 10 genes, and expression of eight of these genes was measured by quantitative methods during both embryonic and larval developmental stages and also in adult tissues. Only two of these genes are used significantly during the entire process of embryogenesis per se, although all are copiously expressed during the stages when the adult body plan is forming in the imaginal rudiment. They are also all expressed in various combinations in adult tissues. Thus, development of a microscopic, free-living organism of bilaterian grade, the larva, does not appear to require expression of the Hox gene cluster as such, whereas development of the adult body plan does. These observations reflect on mechanisms by which bilaterian metazoans might have arisen in Precambrian evolution.

  15. Rho-kinase in sea urchin eggs and embryos.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Armenta, Beatriz; López-Godínez, Juana; Martínez-Cadena, Guadalupe; García-Soto, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    The activation of sea urchin eggs at fertilization provides an ideal system for studying the molecular events involved in cellular activation. Rho GTPases, which are key signaling enzymes in eukaryotes, are involved in sustaining the activation of sea urchin eggs; however, their downstream effectors have not yet been characterized. In somatic cells, RhoA regulates a serine/threonine kinase known as Rho-kinase (ROCK). The activity of ROCK in early sea urchin development has been inferred, but not tested directly. A ROCK gene was identified in the sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome and the sequence of its cDNA determined. The sea urchin ROCK (SpROCK) sequence predicts a protein of 158 kDa with >72% and 45% identities with different protein orthologues of the kinase catalytic domain and the complete protein sequence, respectively. SpROCK mRNA levels are high in unfertilized eggs and decrease to 35% after 15 min postfertilization and remain low up to the 4 cell stage. Antibodies to the human ROCK-I kinase domain revealed SpROCK to be concentrated in the cortex of eggs and early embryos. Co-immunoprecipitation assays indicate that RhoA and SpROCK are physically associated. This association is destroyed by treatment with the C3 exoenzyme and with the ROCK antagonist H-1152. H-1152 also inhibited DNA synthesis in embryos. We conclude that the Rho-dependent signaling pathway, via SpROCK, is essential for early embryonic development.

  16. Turbulent shear spurs settlement in larval sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Gaylord, Brian; Hodin, Jason; Ferner, Matthew C

    2013-04-23

    Marine invertebrates commonly produce larvae that disperse in ocean waters before settling into adult shoreline habitat. Chemical and other seafloor-associated cues often facilitate this latter transition. However, the range of effectiveness of such cues is limited to small spatial scales, creating challenges for larvae in finding suitable sites at which to settle, especially given that they may be carried many kilometers by currents during their planktonic phase. One possible solution is for larvae to use additional, broader-scale environmental signposts to first narrow their search to the general vicinity of a candidate settlement location. Here we demonstrate strong effects of just such a habitat-scale cue, one with the potential to signal larvae that they have arrived in appropriate coastal areas. Larvae of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) exhibit dramatic enhancement in settlement following stimulation by turbulent shear typical of wave-swept shores where adults of this species live. This response manifests in an unprecedented fashion relative to previously identified cues. Turbulent shear does not boost settlement by itself. Instead, it drives a marked developmental acceleration that causes "precompetent" larvae refractory to chemical settlement inducers to immediately become "competent" and thereby reactive to such inducers. These findings reveal an unrecognized ability of larval invertebrates to shift the trajectory of a major life history event in response to fluid-dynamic attributes of a target environment. Such an ability may improve performance and survival in marine organisms by encouraging completion of their life cycle in advantageous locations.

  17. Early development and neurogenesis of Temnopleurus reevesii.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Wada, Wakana; Tsuchiya, Yasutaka; Sato, Toshihiko; Shinagawa, Hideo; Yamada, Yutaro; Yaguchi, Junko

    2015-04-01

    Sea urchins are model non-chordate deuterostomes, and studying the nervous system of their embryos can aid in the understanding of the universal mechanisms of neurogenesis. However, despite the long history of sea urchin embryology research, the molecular mechanisms of their neurogenesis have not been well investigated, in part because neurons appear relatively late during embryogenesis. In this study, we used the species Temnopleurus reevesii as a new sea urchin model and investigated the detail of its development and neurogenesis during early embryogenesis. We found that the embryos of T. reevesii were tolerant of high temperatures and could be cultured successfully at 15-30°C during early embryogenesis. At 30°C, the embryos developed rapidly enough that the neurons appeared at just after 24 h. This is faster than the development of other model urchins, such as Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus or Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. In addition, the body of the embryo was highly transparent, allowing the details of the neural network to be easily captured by ordinary epifluorescent and confocal microscopy without any additional treatments. Because of its rapid development and high transparency during embryogenesis, T. reevesii may be a suitable sea urchin model for studying neurogenesis. Moreover, the males and females are easily distinguishable, and the style of early cleavages is intriguingly unusual, suggesting that this sea urchin might be a good candidate for addressing not only neurology but also cell and developmental biology.

  18. Utilization of the aquatic research facility and fertilization syringe unit to study sea urchin development in space.

    PubMed

    Schatten, H; Chakrabarti, A; Levine, H G; Anderson, K

    1999-10-01

    Methods were developed for the investigation of the effects of microgravity on early development in sea urchins within the Canadian Space Agency's Aquatic Research Facility (ARF). The ARF payload provided light, temperature control, automated fixation capability, and a 1 G on-orbit centrifuge control. Eggs and embryos of either the sea urchin species Lytechinus pictus or Strongylocentrotus purpuratus were loaded into Standard Container Assemblies (SCAs) which comprised the experimental aquaria (33 mL volume) contained within the ARF. A newly developed Fertilization Syringe Unit (FSU) was used to achieve "in-flight" fertilization capability. Fixative solutions were preloaded into fixation blocks maintained adjacent to the SCAs and injected at pre-selected time points, resulting in final (diluted) concentrations of either 0.5% or 2% glutaraldehyde (depending upon embryonic stage). Light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy determined that all desired embryonic and cell division stages (16-cell stage, blastula, gastrula, and pluteus) were preserved using the experimental protocols and fixation capability provided by the ARF/FSU system.

  19. Characterization and expression of two matrix metalloproteinase genes during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Eric P; Pendharkar, Ninad C

    2005-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an essential role in a variety of processes in development that require extracellular matrix remodeling and degradation. In this study, we characterize two MMPs from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. These clones can both be identified as MMPs based on the presence of conserved domains such as the cysteine switch, zinc-binding, and hemopexin domains. In addition, both of these genes contain consensus furin cleavage sites and putative transmembrane domains, classifying them as membrane-type MMPs. We have named these clones SpMMP14 and SpMMP16 based on the vertebrate MMPs with which they share the greatest similarity. SpMMP14 is expressed in all cells from the egg to mesenchyme blastula stage embryo. Expression of this gene is strongest in the animal and vegetal poles early in gastrulation and in the animal pole only later in gastrulation. SpMMP16 is expressed at low levels in eggs. Expression of SpMMP16 becomes more pronounced in the vegetal pole region at the blastula and mesenchyme blastula stages and becomes confined to vegetal pole descendants, such as pigment cells, later in development. In the future, we hope to learn more about the possible functions of these genes in sea urchin development.

  20. Deadenylase depletion protects inherited mRNAs in primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Swartz, S Zachary; Reich, Adrian M; Oulhen, Nathalie; Raz, Tal; Milos, Patrice M; Campanale, Joseph P; Hamdoun, Amro; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    A crucial event in animal development is the specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs), which become the stem cells that create sperm and eggs. How PGCs are created provides a valuable paradigm for understanding stem cells in general. We find that the PGCs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus exhibit broad transcriptional repression, yet enrichment for a set of inherited mRNAs. Enrichment of several germline determinants in the PGCs requires the RNA-binding protein Nanos to target the transcript that encodes CNOT6, a deadenylase, for degradation in the PGCs, thereby creating a stable environment for RNA. Misexpression of CNOT6 in the PGCs results in their failure to retain Seawi transcripts and Vasa protein. Conversely, broad knockdown of CNOT6 expands the domain of Seawi RNA as well as exogenous reporters. Thus, Nanos-dependent spatially restricted CNOT6 differential expression is used to selectively localize germline RNAs to the PGCs. Our findings support a 'time capsule' model of germline determination, whereby the PGCs are insulated from differentiation by retaining the molecular characteristics of the totipotent egg and early embryo.

  1. SM30 protein function during sea urchin larval spicule formation.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Fred; Killian, Christopher E; Croker, Lindsay; Hamilton, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    A central issue in better understanding the process of biomineralization is to elucidate the function of occluded matrix proteins present in mineralized tissues. A potent approach to addressing this issue utilizes specific inhibitors of expression of known genes. Application of antisense oligonucleotides that specifically suppress translation of a given mRNA are capable of causing aberrant biomineralization, thereby revealing, at least in part, a likely function of the protein and gene under investigation. We have applied this approach to study the possible function(s) of the SM30 family of proteins, which are found in spicules, teeth, spines, and tests of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus as well as other euechinoid sea urchins. It is possible using the anti-SM30 morpholino-oligonucleotides (MO's) to reduce the level of these proteins to very low levels, yet the development of skeletal spicules in the embryo shows little or no aberration. This surprising result requires re-thinking about the role of these, and possibly other occluded matrix proteins.

  2. Phylogeny and development of marine model species: strongylocentrotid sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Christiane H; Kessing, Bailey D; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of ten strongy-locentrotid sea urchin species were determined using mitochondrial DNA sequences. This phylogeny provides a backdrop for the evolutionary history of one of the most studied groups of sea urchins. Our phylogeny indicates that a major revision of this group is in order. All else remaining unchanged, it supports the inclusion of three additional species into the genus Strongylocentrotus (Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus, Allocentrotus fragilis, and Pseudocentrotus depressus). All were once thought to be closely related to this genus, but subsequent revisions separated them into other taxonomic groupings. Most strongylocentrotid species are the result of a recent burst of speciation in the North Pacific that resulted in an ecological diversification. There has been a steady reduction in the complexity of larval skeletons during the expansion of this group. Gamete attributes like egg size, on the other hand, are not correlated with phylogenetic position. In addition, our results indicate that the rate of replacement substitutions is highly variable among phylogenetic lineages. The branches leading to S. purpuratus and S. franciscanus were three to six times longer than those leading to closely related species.

  3. Regulation of spblimp1/krox1a, an alternatively transcribed isoform expressed in midgut and hindgut of the sea urchin gastrula.

    PubMed

    Livi, Carolina B; Davidson, Eric H

    2007-01-01

    The sea urchin regulatory gene Spblimp1/krox produces alternatively transcribed and spliced isoforms, 1a and 1b, which have different temporal and spatial patterns of expression. Here we describe a cis-regulatory module that controls the expression of the 1a splice form in the midgut and hindgut at the beginning of gastrulation. Conserved sequence patches revealed by a comparison of the blimp1/krox locus in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus genomes were tested by gene transfer, in association with GFP or CAT reporter genes. An expression construct containing a conserved sequence patch immediately 5' of exon 1a included the transcription initiation site for blimp1/krox1a. This construct displays specific mid and hindgut expression, indicating that these are the locations of endogenous blimp1/krox1a transcription during the gastrula stage. Its sequence contains binding sites for Brn1/2/4, Otx, and Blimp1/Krox itself, as predicted in a prior regulatory network analysis.

  4. CO2 induced seawater acidification impacts sea urchin larval development I: elevated metabolic rates decrease scope for growth and induce developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Stumpp, M; Wren, J; Melzner, F; Thorndyke, M C; Dupont, S T

    2011-11-01

    Anthropogenic CO(2) emissions are acidifying the world's oceans. A growing body of evidence is showing that ocean acidification impacts growth and developmental rates of marine invertebrates. Here we test the impact of elevated seawater pCO(2) (129 Pa, 1271 μatm) on early development, larval metabolic and feeding rates in a marine model organism, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Growth and development was assessed by measuring total body length, body rod length, postoral rod length and posterolateral rod length. Comparing these parameters between treatments suggests that larvae suffer from a developmental delay (by ca. 8%) rather than from the previously postulated reductions in size at comparable developmental stages. Further, we found maximum increases in respiration rates of +100% under elevated pCO(2), while body length corrected feeding rates did not differ between larvae from both treatments. Calculating scope for growth illustrates that larvae raised under high pCO(2) spent an average of 39 to 45% of the available energy for somatic growth, while control larvae could allocate between 78 and 80% of the available energy into growth processes. Our results highlight the importance of defining a standard frame of reference when comparing a given parameter between treatments, as observed differences can be easily due to comparison of different larval ages with their specific set of biological characters.

  5. Spatial expression of Hox cluster genes in the ontogeny of a sea urchin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenas-Mena, C.; Cameron, A. R.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Hox cluster of the sea urchin Strongylocentrous purpuratus contains ten genes in a 500 kb span of the genome. Only two of these genes are expressed during embryogenesis, while all of eight genes tested are expressed during development of the adult body plan in the larval stage. We report the spatial expression during larval development of the five 'posterior' genes of the cluster: SpHox7, SpHox8, SpHox9/10, SpHox11/13a and SpHox11/13b. The five genes exhibit a dynamic, largely mesodermal program of expression. Only SpHox7 displays extensive expression within the pentameral rudiment itself. A spatially sequential and colinear arrangement of expression domains is found in the somatocoels, the paired posterior mesodermal structures that will become the adult perivisceral coeloms. No such sequential expression pattern is observed in endodermal, epidermal or neural tissues of either the larva or the presumptive juvenile sea urchin. The spatial expression patterns of the Hox genes illuminate the evolutionary process by which the pentameral echinoderm body plan emerged from a bilateral ancestor.

  6. Ion channels: Key elements in sea urchin sperm physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darszon, Alberto; de De Latorre, Lucia; Vargas, Irma; Liévano, Arturo; Beltrán, Carmen; Santi, Celia; Labarca, Pedro; Zapata, Otilia

    1995-08-01

    Ion channels are deeply involved in sea urchin sperm activation, motility, chemotaxis and in the acrosome reaction. Unraveling ion channel function and regulation in sperm behavior has required a combination of complementary approaches since spermatozoa are very tiny cells. Planar bilayer and patch clamp techniques have allowed us to detect, for the first time, the activity of single channels in the plasma membrane of these cells. Unlike intact sperm, swollen sperm can be much more easily patch clamped and single channel activity recorded. These techniques, together with studies of membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ and pH in whole sperm, have established the presence of K+, Ca2+, and Cl- channels in this cell. The strategies developed to study sea urchin sperm channels are applicable to mammalian spermatozoa. We recently detected a Ca2+ channel resembling one found in S. purpuratus sperm in planar bilayers containing mouse sperm plasma membranes. The presence of this Ca2+ channel in such diverse species suggests it is important in sperm function.

  7. Analysis of Cytoskeletal and Motility Proteins in the Sea Urchin Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    RL, Morris; MP, Hoffman; RA, Obar; SS, McCafferty; IR, Gibbons; AD, Leone; J, Cool; EL, Allgood; AM, Musante; KM, Judkins; BJ, Rossetti; AP, Rawson; DR, Burgess

    2007-01-01

    The sea urchin embryo is a classical model system for studying the role of the cytoskeleton in such events as fertilization, mitosis, cleavage, cell migration and gastrulation. We have conducted an analysis of gene models derived from the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome assembly and have gathered strong evidence for the existence of multiple gene families encoding cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators in sea urchin. While many cytoskeletal genes have been cloned from sea urchin with sequences already existing in public databases, genome analysis reveals a significantly higher degree of diversity within certain gene families. Furthermore, genes are described corresponding to homologs of cytoskeletal proteins not previously documented in sea urchins. To illustrate the varying degree of sequence diversity that exists within cytoskeletal gene families, we conducted an analysis of genes encoding actins, specific actin-binding proteins, myosins, tubulins, kinesins, dyneins, specific microtubule-associated proteins, and intermediate filaments. We conducted ontological analysis of select genes to better understand the relatedness of urchin cytoskeletal genes to those of other deuterostomes. We analyzed developmental expression (EST) data to confirm the existence of select gene models and to understand their differential expression during various stages of early development. PMID:17027957

  8. Exogenous expression of marine lectins DlFBL and SpRBL induces cancer cell apoptosis possibly through PRMT5-E2F-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liqin; Yang, Xinyan; Duan, Xuemei; Cui, Lianzhen; Li, Gongchu

    2014-03-28

    Lectins are widely existed in marine bioresources, and some purified marine lectins were found toxic to cancer cells. In this report, genes encoding Dicentrarchus labrax fucose-binding lectin (DlFBL) and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus rhamnose-binding lectin (SpRBL) were inserted into an adenovirus vector to form Ad.FLAG-DlFBL and Ad.FLAG-SpRBL, which elicited significant in vitro suppressive effect on a variety of cancer cells. Anti-apoptosis factors Bcl-2 and XIAP were determined to be downregulated by Ad.FLAG-DlFBL and Ad.FLAG-SpRBL. Subcellular localization studies showed that DlFBL but not SpRBL widely distributed in membrane systems. Both DlFBL and SpRBL were shown associated with protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), and PRMT5-E2F-1 pathway was suggested to be responsible for the DlFBL and SpRBL induced apoptosis. Further investigations revealed that PRMT5 acted as a common binding target for various exogenous lectin and non-lectin proteins, suggesting a role of PRMT5 as a barrier for foreign gene invasion. The cellular response to exogenous lectins may provide insights into a novel way for cancer gene therapy.

  9. Egg jelly induces the phosphorylation of histone H3 in spermatozoa of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata.

    PubMed

    Vacquier, V D; Porter, D C; Keller, S H; Aukerman, M

    1989-05-01

    When spermatozoa of Arbacia punctulata are labeled with 32P and treated with soluble egg jelly, radiolabel is incorporated into histone H3. The time course of labeling correlates with the period of chromatin decondensation of sperm pronuclei in eggs. Phosphorylation is on serine and may result from increased turnover of phosphate on H3. The macromolecular fraction of egg jelly (and not the peptide fraction) is the inducer of H3 phosphorylation. The reaction is dependent on external Ca2+ and is induced by monensin and A23187. H3 phosphorylation is not induced by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX and relatively high (250 microM) concentrations of the protein kinase inhibitor H8 are needed to block the reaction, suggesting that it is cAMP independent. A surprising finding is that merely diluting the cells into Na+ free media is the most effective method to induce the radiolabeling of H3. These results are in contrast to findings on the egg jelly induced phosphorylation of histone H1 in S. purpuratus spermatozoa. These species differences must reflect the great evolutionary divergence between these two sea urchin species in the mechanism of regulation of the phosphorylation of nuclear proteins during fertilization.

  10. A calcium-binding, asparagine-linked oligosaccharide is involved in skeleton formation in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have previously identified a 130-kD cell surface protein that is involved in calcium uptake and skeleton formation by gastrula stage embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Carson et al., 1985. Cell. 41:639-648). A monoclonal antibody designated mAb 1223 specifically recognizes the 130-kD protein and inhibits Ca+2 uptake and growth of the CaCO3 spicules produced by embryonic primary mesenchyme cells cultured in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate that the epitope recognized by mAb 1223 is located on an anionic, asparagine- linked oligosaccharide chain on the 130-kD protein. Combined enzymatic and chemical treatments indicate that the 1223 oligosaccharide contains fucose and sialic acid that is likely to be O-acetylated. Moreover, we show that the oligosaccharide chain containing the 1223 epitope specifically binds divalent cations, including Ca+2. We propose that one function of this negatively charged oligosaccharide moiety on the surfaces of primary mesenchyme cells is to facilitate binding and sequestration of Ca+2 ions from the blastocoelic fluid before internalization and subsequent deposition into the growing CaCO3 skeleton. PMID:2475510

  11. Evolutionary rewiring of gene regulatory network linkages at divergence of the echinoid subclasses

    PubMed Central

    Erkenbrack, Eric M.; Davidson, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of animal body plans occurs with changes in the encoded genomic programs that direct development, by alterations in the structure of encoded developmental gene-regulatory networks (GRNs). However, study of this most fundamental of evolutionary processes requires experimentally tractable, phylogenetically divergent organisms that differ morphologically while belonging to the same monophyletic clade, plus knowledge of the relevant GRNs operating in at least one of the species. These conditions are met in the divergent embryogenesis of the two extant, morphologically distinct, echinoid (sea urchin) subclasses, Euechinoidea and Cidaroidea, which diverged from a common late Paleozoic ancestor. Here we focus on striking differences in the mode of embryonic skeletogenesis in a euechinoid, the well-known model Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Sp), vs. the cidaroid Eucidaris tribuloides (Et). At the level of descriptive embryology, skeletogenesis in Sp and Et has long been known to occur by distinct means. The complete GRN controlling this process is known for Sp. We carried out targeted functional analyses on Et skeletogenesis to identify the presence, or demonstrate the absence, of specific regulatory linkages and subcircuits key to the operation of the Sp skeletogenic GRN. Remarkably, most of the canonical design features of the Sp skeletogenic GRN that we examined are either missing or operate differently in Et. This work directly implies a dramatic reorganization of genomic regulatory circuitry concomitant with the divergence of the euechinoids, which began before the end-Permian extinction. PMID:26170318

  12. Tissue type matters: selective herbivory on different life history stages of an isomorphic alga.

    PubMed

    Thornber, Carol; Stachowicz, John J; Gaines, Steven

    2006-09-01

    Selective grazing by herbivores can have large effects on the population dynamics and community structure of primary producers. However, the ecological impacts of within-species herbivore preference for tissues of different phases (e.g., ploidy levels) or reproductive status remain relatively poorly known, especially among algae and other species with free-living haploid (gametophyte) and diploid (sporophyte) phases. We tested for herbivore selectivity among tissue types of the isomorphic (identical haploid and diploid free-living stages) red alga Mazzaella flaccida. Laboratory feeding assays demonstrated that the snail Tegula funebralis exhibited more than a threefold preference for gametophyte reproductive tissue over other tissue types, due to morphological differences. In contrast, the urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus did not distinguish as clearly between gametophytes and sporophytes; but it did prefer sporophyte reproductive to nonreproductive tissue, due to differences in water-soluble chemicals. Field surveys of grazer damage on M. flaccida blades were consistent with these laboratory preferences, with more damage found on gametophytes than sporophytes and reproductive than nonreproductive tissues. Differential fecundity can contribute to a skew in relative frequencies of phases in the field, and our results suggest that differential grazing by snails may contribute to this pattern and thus play a role in algal population biology.

  13. Cis-regulatory analysis of the sea urchin pigment cell gene polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Calestani, Cristina; Rogers, David J

    2010-04-15

    The Strongylocentrotus purpuratus polyketide synthase gene (SpPks) encodes an enzyme required for the biosynthesis of the larval pigment echinochrome. SpPks is expressed exclusively in pigment cells and their precursors starting at blastula stage. The 7th-9th cleavage Delta-Notch signaling, required for pigment cell development, positively regulates SpPks. In previous studies, the transcription factors glial cell missing (SpGcm), SpGatae and kruppel-like (SpKrl/z13) have been shown to positively regulate SpPks. To uncover the structure of the Gene Regulatory Network (GRN) regulating the specification and differentiation processes of pigment cells, we experimentally analyzed the putative SpPks cis-regulatory region. We established that the -1.5kb region is sufficient to recapitulate the correct spatial and temporal expression of SpPks. Predicted DNA-binding sites for SpGcm, SpGataE and SpKrl are located within this region. The mutagenesis of these DNA-binding sites indicated that SpGcm, SpGataE and SpKrl are direct positive regulators of SpPks. These results demonstrate that the sea urchin GRN for pigment cell development is quite shallow, which is typical of type I embryo development.

  14. Selective accumulation of germ-line associated gene products in early development of the sea star and distinct differences from germ-line development in the sea urchin

    PubMed Central

    Fresques, Tara; Zazueta-Novoa, Vanesa; Reich, Adrian; Wessel, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Echinodermata is a diverse Phylum, a sister group to chordates, and contains diverse organisms that may be useful to understand varied mechanisms of germ-line specification. Results We tested 23 genes in development of the sea star Patiria miniata that fall into five categories: 1) Conserved germ-line factors; 2) Genes involved in the inductive mechanism of germ-line specification; 3) Germ-line associated genes; 4) Molecules involved in left-right asymmetry; and 5) Genes involved in regulation and maintenance of the genome during early embryogenesis. Overall, our results support the contention that the posterior enterocoel is a source of the germ line in the sea star P. miniata. Conclusion The germ line in this organism appears to be specified late in embryogenesis, and in a pattern more consistent with inductive interactions amongst cells. This is distinct from the mechanism seen in sea urchins, a close relative of the sea star clad. We propose that P. miniata may serve as a valuable model to study inductive mechanisms of germ-cell specification and when compared to germ-line formation in the sea urchin S. purpuratus may reveal developmental transitions that occur in the evolution of inherited and inductive mechanisms of germ-line specification. PMID:24038550

  15. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone variant H2A.Z during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Hajdu, Mihai; Calle, Jasmine; Puno, Andrea; Haruna, Aminat; Arenas-Mena, César

    2016-12-01

    Histone variant H2A.Z promotes chromatin accessibility at transcriptional regulatory elements and is developmentally regulated in metazoans. We characterize the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of H2A.Z in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. H2A.Z depletion by antisense translation-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides during early development causes developmental collapse, in agreement with its previously demonstrated general role in transcriptional multipotency. During H2A.Z peak expression in 24-h embryos, endogenous H2A.Z 3' UTR sequences stabilize GFP mRNAs relative to those with SV40 3' UTR sequences, although the 3' UTR of H2A.Z does not determine the spatial distribution of H2A.Z transcripts during embryonic and postembryonic development. We elaborated an H2A.Z::GFP BAC reporter that reproduces embryonic H2A.Z expression. Genome-wide chromatin accessibility analysis using ATAC-seq revealed a cis-regulatory module (CRM) that, when deleted, causes a significant decline of the H2A.Z reporter expression. In addition, the mutation of a Sox transcription factor binding site motif and, more strongly, of a Myb motif cause significant decline of reporter gene expression. Our results suggest that an undetermined Myb-family transcription factor controls the transcriptional regulation of H2A.Z. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  16. Identification of purple sea urchin telomerase RNA using a next-generation sequencing based approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Podlevsky, Joshua D; Marz, Manja; Qi, Xiaodong; Hoffmann, Steve; Stadler, Peter F; Chen, Julian J-L

    2013-06-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme essential for telomere maintenance and chromosome stability. While the catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein is well conserved across eukaryotes, telomerase RNA (TR) is extensively divergent in size, sequence, and structure. This diversity prohibits TR identification from many important organisms. Here we report a novel approach for TR discovery that combines in vitro TR enrichment from total RNA, next-generation sequencing, and a computational screening pipeline. With this approach, we have successfully identified TR from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (purple sea urchin) from the phylum Echinodermata. Reconstitution of activity in vitro confirmed that this RNA is an integral component of sea urchin telomerase. Comparative phylogenetic analysis against vertebrate TR sequences revealed that the purple sea urchin TR contains vertebrate-like template-pseudoknot and H/ACA domains. While lacking a vertebrate-like CR4/5 domain, sea urchin TR has a unique central domain critical for telomerase activity. This is the first TR identified from the previously unexplored invertebrate clade and provides the first glimpse of TR evolution in the deuterostome lineage. Moreover, our TR discovery approach is a significant step toward the comprehensive understanding of telomerase RNP evolution.

  17. Coastal Upwelling Drives Intertidal Assemblage Structure and Trophic Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Reddin, Carl J.; Docmac, Felipe; O’Connor, Nessa E.; Bothwell, John H.; Harrod, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Similar environmental driving forces can produce similarity among geographically distant ecosystems. Coastal oceanic upwelling, for example, has been associated with elevated biomass and abundance patterns of certain functional groups, e.g., corticated macroalgae. In the upwelling system of Northern Chile, we examined measures of intertidal macrobenthic composition, structure and trophic ecology across eighteen shores varying in their proximity to two coastal upwelling centres, in a hierarchical sampling design (spatial scales of >1 and >10 km). The influence of coastal upwelling on intertidal communities was confirmed by the stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) of consumers, including a dominant suspension feeder, grazers, and their putative resources of POM, epilithic biofilm, and macroalgae. We highlight the utility of muscle δ15N from the suspension feeding mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, as a proxy for upwelling, supported by satellite data and previous studies. Where possible, we used corrections for broader-scale trends, spatial autocorrelation, ontogenetic dietary shifts and spatial baseline isotopic variation prior to analysis. Our results showed macroalgal assemblage composition, and benthic consumer assemblage structure, varied significantly with the intertidal influence of coastal upwelling, especially contrasting bays and coastal headlands. Coastal topography also separated differences in consumer resource use. This suggested that coastal upwelling, itself driven by coastline topography, influences intertidal communities by advecting nearshore phytoplankton populations offshore and cooling coastal water temperatures. We recommend the isotopic values of benthic organisms, specifically long-lived suspension feeders, as in situ alternatives to offshore measurements of upwelling influence. PMID:26214806

  18. A Novel Fatty Acid-Binding Protein-Like Carotenoid-Binding Protein from the Gonad of the New Zealand Sea Urchin Evechinus chloroticus

    PubMed Central

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Sabherwal, Manya; Garama, Daniel; Carne, Alan

    2014-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized protein with a carotenoid-binding function has been isolated and characterized from the gonad of the New Zealand sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus. The main carotenoid bound to the protein was determined by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography to be 9′-cis-echinenone and hence this 15 kDa protein has been called an echinenone-binding protein (EBP). Purification of the EBP in quantity from the natural source proved to be challenging. However, analysis of EBP by mass spectrometry combined with information from th