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Sample records for arhioluhi tshto zh

  1. Improvement of strain Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 for tannase production by induced mutation.

    PubMed

    Zakipour-Molkabadi, E; Hamidi-Esfahani, Z; Sahari, M A; Azizi, M H

    2013-11-01

    In the search for an efficient producer of tannase, Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 was subjected to mutagenesis using heat treatment and strain EZ-ZH290 was isolated. The maximum tannase in this mutant strain was 4.32 U/mL with an incubation period of 84 h as compared to wild strain EZ-ZH190 where the incubation period was 96 h with a maximum enzyme activity of 4.33 U/mL. Also, the Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH290 tannase had a maximum activity at 40 °C and pH 5.5. Then, the spores of strain EZ-ZH290 were subjected to γ irradiation mutagenesis and strain EZ-ZH390 was isolated. Strain EZ-ZH390 exhibited higher tannase activity (7.66 U/mL) than the parent strain EZ-ZH290. It was also found that Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 tannase had an optimum activity at 35 °C and a broad pH profile with an optimum at pH 5.5. The tannase pH stability of Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 and its maximum production of tannase followed the same trend for five generations confirming the occurrence of stable mutant. This paper is shown that γ irradiation can mutate the Penicillium sp. leading to increase the tannase production.

  2. The ZH ratio Analysis of Global Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Shikato, S.; Rivera, L.; Tanimoto, T.

    2007-12-01

    The ZH ratio, the ratio of vertical to horizontal component of the fundamental Rayleigh wave as a function of frequency, is an alternative approach to phase/group velocity analysis for constructing the S-wave velocity structure. In this study, teleseismic Rayleigh wave data for the frequency range between 0.004Hz to 0.04Hz is used to investigate the interior structure. We have analyzed most of the GEOSCOPE network data and some IRIS GSN stations using a technique developed by Tanimoto and Rivera (2007). Stable estimates of the ZH ratios were obtained for the frequency range for most stations. We have performed the inversion of the measured ZH ratios for the structure in the crust and mantle by using nonlinear iterative scheme. The depth sensitivity kernels for inversion are numerically calculated. Depth sensitivity of the lowest frequency extends to depths beyond 500 km but the sensitivity of the overall data for the frequency band extends down to about 300km. We found that an appropriate selection of an initial model, particularly the depth of Mohorovicic discontinuity, is important for this inversion. The inversion result depends on the initial model and turned out to be non-unique. We have constructed the initial model from the CRUST 2.0. Inversion with equal weighting to each data point tends to reduce variance of certain frequency range only. Therefore, we have developed a scheme to increase weighting to data points that do not fit well after the fifth iteration. This occurs more often for low frequency range, 0.004-0.007Hz. After fitting the lower frequency region, the low velocity zone around a depth of 100km is observed under some stations such as KIP (Kipapa, Hawaii) and ATD (Arta Cave, Djibouti). We have also carried out an analysis on the resolving power of data by examining the eigenvalues-eigenvectors of the least-squares problem. Unfortunately, the normal matrix usually has 1-2 very large eigenvalues, followed by much smaller eigenvalues. The third

  3. Concept analysis of Diné Hózhó: a Diné wellness philosophy.

    PubMed

    Kahn-John, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    American Indian Alaska Native people of the United States face challenges in attaining physical, mental, spiritual, and environmental health. This article presents a concept analysis of Diné Hózhó, a complex and misunderstood wellness concept the Diné (Navajo) strive to attain. Findings from a literature review are presented to explore anthropological definitions and uses of the concept Hózhó. The method of concept analysis of Walker and Avant is utilized, model cases are presented. Recommendations for application in nursing practice are presented.

  4. Genetic subpopulations of Rift Valley fever virus strains ZH548 and MP-12 and recombinant MP-12 strains.

    PubMed

    Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N; Morrill, John C; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-12-01

    Rift Valley fever virus strain MP-12 was generated by serial plaque passages of parental strain ZH548 12 times in MRC-5 cells in the presence of a chemical mutagen, 5-fluorouracil. As a result, MP-12 encoded 4, 9, and 10 mutations in the S, M, and L segments, respectively. Among them, mutations in the M and L segments were responsible for attenuation, while the MP-12 S segment still encoded a virulent phenotype. We performed high-throughput sequencing of MP-12 vaccine, ZH548, and recombinant MP-12 (rMP-12) viruses. We found that rMP-12 contains very low numbers of viral subpopulations, while MP-12 and ZH548 contain 2 to 4 times more viral genetic subpopulations than rMP-12. MP-12 genetic subpopulations did not encode the ZH548 sequence at the 23 MP-12 consensus mutations. On the other hand, 4 and 2 mutations in M and L segments of MP-12 were found in ZH548 subpopulations. Thus, those 6 mutations were no longer MP-12-specific mutations. ZH548 encoded several unique mutations compared to other Egyptian strains, i.e., strains ZH501, ZH1776, and ZS6365. ZH548 subpopulations shared nucleotides at the mutation site common with those in the Egyptian strains, while MP-12 subpopulations did not share those nucleotides. Thus, MP-12 retains unique genetic subpopulations and has no evidence of reversion to the ZH548 sequence in the subpopulations. This study provides the first information regarding the genetic subpopulations of RVFV and shows the genetic stability of the MP-12 vaccine manufactured in MRC-5 cells.

  5. Genetic Subpopulations of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strains ZH548 and MP-12 and Recombinant MP-12 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Morrill, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus strain MP-12 was generated by serial plaque passages of parental strain ZH548 12 times in MRC-5 cells in the presence of a chemical mutagen, 5-fluorouracil. As a result, MP-12 encoded 4, 9, and 10 mutations in the S, M, and L segments, respectively. Among them, mutations in the M and L segments were responsible for attenuation, while the MP-12 S segment still encoded a virulent phenotype. We performed high-throughput sequencing of MP-12 vaccine, ZH548, and recombinant MP-12 (rMP-12) viruses. We found that rMP-12 contains very low numbers of viral subpopulations, while MP-12 and ZH548 contain 2 to 4 times more viral genetic subpopulations than rMP-12. MP-12 genetic subpopulations did not encode the ZH548 sequence at the 23 MP-12 consensus mutations. On the other hand, 4 and 2 mutations in M and L segments of MP-12 were found in ZH548 subpopulations. Thus, those 6 mutations were no longer MP-12-specific mutations. ZH548 encoded several unique mutations compared to other Egyptian strains, i.e., strains ZH501, ZH1776, and ZS6365. ZH548 subpopulations shared nucleotides at the mutation site common with those in the Egyptian strains, while MP-12 subpopulations did not share those nucleotides. Thus, MP-12 retains unique genetic subpopulations and has no evidence of reversion to the ZH548 sequence in the subpopulations. This study provides the first information regarding the genetic subpopulations of RVFV and shows the genetic stability of the MP-12 vaccine manufactured in MRC-5 cells. PMID:23035230

  6. On top quark mass effects to gg → ZH at NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselhuhn, Alexander; Luthe, Thomas; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We compute next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the process gg → ZH. In the effective-theory approach we confirm the results in the literature. We consider top quark mass corrections via an asymptotic expansion and show that there is a good convergence below the top quark threshold which describes approximately a quarter of the total cross section. Our corrections are implemented in the publicly available C++ program ggzh.

  7. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) – An Emerging Adjunct in Routine Oral Care

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Swapnadeep; Mehta, Parul; Indra, B Niranjanaprasad; Rastogi, Saurabh; Jain, Ankita; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Sharma, Saumya; Singh, Sanjeev; Gill, Shruti; Singh, Nisha; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) (‘acus’ (needle) + ‘punctura’ (to puncture)) is the stimulation of specific points along the skin of the body involving various methods such as penetration by thin needles or the application of heat, pressure, or laser light. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) aims to treat a range of medical and dental ailments, though is most commonly used for pain relief. This article reviews about the various possible roles of acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) in clinical dental practice. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) has potential in supplementing conventional treatment procedures by its diverse applicability outreach. Role of acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) in dental practice has been well supported by clinical trials. Its role in alleviating facial pain, pre-operative and post-operative dental pain has led to its widespread application. Its role as sole analgesic for treatment procedure has to be tested. It's It is a thought that acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) may prove an indispensible supplement to conventional treatment modalities and more of clinical trials and studies are required to prove the efficacy. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) is not a miracle cure and is not going to replace the drill. However, the technique can be a supplement to conventional treatments in TMDs, facial pain, pain management Sjoegrens syndrome, and in phobias and anxiety. The application and use of Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) comes with some side effects. Proper training needs to be obtained before commencement of any procedure related to acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ). Various training programs are offered to train clinical practitioners the apt method to use acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ). PMID:25379462

  8. Search for Standard Model $ZH \\to \\ell^+\\ell^-b\\bar{b}$ at DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Peng

    2014-07-01

    We present a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the ZH → ℓ + ℓ ₋ $b\\bar{b}$ channel, using data collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is based on a sample of reprocessed data incorporating several improve ments relative to a previous published result, and a modified multivariate analysis strategy. For a Standard Model Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV, the expected cross section limit over the Standard M odel prediction is improved by about 5% compared to the previous published results in this c hannel from the DØ Collaboration

  9. Living in Health, Harmony, and Beauty: The Diné (Navajo) Hózhó Wellness Philosophy

    PubMed Central

    Koithan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    zhó is the complex wellness philosophy and belief system of the Diné (Navajo) people, comprised of principles that guide one's thoughts, actions, behaviors, and speech. The alignment of integrative nursing principles and the Hózhó Wellness Philosophy illustrates the power that integrative nursing offers as a meta-theoretical perspective that can transform our healthcare system so that it is inclusive and responsive to the needs of our varied populations. Integrative nursing offers the opportunity to re-introduce cultural wellness wisdom, such as Hózhó, as a means to improve whole-person/whole-systems wellbeing and resilience. Integrative nursing, through the acceptance and validation of indigenous health-sustaining wisdom, contributes to the delivery of effective, authentic, culturally tailored, whole-person/whole-system, patient-centered, relationship-based healthcare. Highlighting the Diné Hózhó philosophy re-introduces this philosophy to the Diné, other American Indian/Alaska Native nations, global indigenous cultures, and even nonindigenous people of the world as a means to promote and sustain global health and wellbeing. PMID:25984415

  10. Living in health, harmony, and beauty: the diné (navajo) hózhó wellness philosophy.

    PubMed

    Kahn-John Diné, Michelle; Koithan, Mary

    2015-05-01

    zhó is the complex wellness philosophy and belief system of the Diné (Navajo) people, comprised of principles that guide one's thoughts, actions, behaviors, and speech. The alignment of integrative nursing principles and the Hózhó Wellness Philosophy illustrates the power that integrative nursing offers as a meta-theoretical perspective that can transform our healthcare system so that it is inclusive and responsive to the needs of our varied populations. Integrative nursing offers the opportunity to re-introduce cultural wellness wisdom, such as Hózhó, as a means to improve whole-person/whole-systems wellbeing and resilience. Integrative nursing, through the acceptance and validation of indigenous health-sustaining wisdom, contributes to the delivery of effective, authentic, culturally tailored, whole-person/whole-system, patient-centered, relationship-based healthcare. Highlighting the Diné Hózhó philosophy re-introduces this philosophy to the Diné, other American Indian/Alaska Native nations, global indigenous cultures, and even nonindigenous people of the world as a means to promote and sustain global health and wellbeing.

  11. A Search for the Higgs Boson in the $ZH$ Dilepton Decay Channel at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar, Ravi; /Duke U.

    2009-07-01

    This dissertation describes a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with the Z boson via Higgs-strahlung at the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. At a Higgs boson mass between 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and 135 GeV/c{sup 2}, the primary Higgs decay mode is to a pair of b quarks. The associated Z boson can decay to a pair of electrons or muons, allowing detection of a final event signature of two visible leptons and two b quarks. This final state allows reduction of large QCD backgrounds compared to a hadronic Z boson decay, leading to a more sensitive search. To increase sensitivity, standard model matrix element probabilities for ZH signal and the dominant backgrounds are used as components to a likelihood fit in signal fraction. In 2.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data, we see no evidence of production of a Higgs boson with a mass between 100 GeV c{sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. Using the Feldman-Cousins technique to set a limit, at 95% coverage and a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, the median expected limit was 12.1 x {sigma}{sub SM} and a limit of 8.2 x {sigma}{sub SM} was observed, where {sigma}{sub SM} is the NNLO theoretical cross section of p{bar p} {yields}ZH {yields} l +l -b{bar b} at {radical}s=1.96 TeV . Cross section limits are computed at a range of Higgs boson mass values between 100 GeV/c {sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. A New Dioic Acid from a wbl Gene Mutant of Deepsea-Derived Streptomyces somaliensis SCSIO ZH66

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huiming; Li, Huayue; Qiu, Yanhong; Hou, Lukuan; Ju, Jianhua; Li, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    The wblAso gene functions as a global regulatory gene in a negative manner in deepsea-derived Streptomyces somaliensis SCSIO ZH66. A new dioic acid (1) as well as two known butenolides (2 and 3) were isolated from the ΔwblAso mutant strain of S. somaliensis SCSIO ZH66. The structure of 1 was elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic analyses, including MS and NMR techniques. In the cell growth inhibitory evaluation, compound 3 exhibited moderate activity against the human hepatic carcinoma cell line (Huh7.5) with an IC50 value of 19.4 μg/mL, while compounds 1 and 2 showed null activity up to 100 μg/mL. PMID:27763499

  13. A search for the Higgs boson in the zh channel with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Heinmiller, James Matthew

    2006-01-01

    This analysis describes a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson through the decay mode ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$ in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample used in this analysis corresponds to 452 pb-1 of integrated luminosity accumulated with the D0 detector. Agreement between data and standard model predictions is observed. A 95% confidence level upper exclusion limit for the σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH) x BR(H → b$\\bar{b}$) channel is set between 3.2-8.2 pb for Higgs masses of 105 to 145 GeV.

  14. Search for the standard model Higgs Boson in the pp[over]-->ZH-->nunu[over]bb[over] channel.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; Cruz-Burelo, E De La; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Kooten, R Van; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E Von; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-10-20

    We report a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson based on data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 260 pb(-1). We study events with missing transverse energy and two acoplanar b jets, which provide sensitivity to the ZH production cross section in the nunu[over]bb[over] channel, and to WH production when the lepton from the W-->lnu decay is undetected. The data are consistent with the SM background expectation, and we set 95% C.L. upper limits on sigma(pp[over]-->ZH/WH)xB(H-->bb[over]) from 3.4/8.3 to 2.5/6.3 pb, for Higgs-boson masses between 105 and 135 GeV.

  15. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observedmore » Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.« less

  16. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  17. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes.

    PubMed

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    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a [Formula: see text] quark pair. The searches use the 8 [Formula: see text] pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 [Formula: see text]. Certain channels include data from 7 [Formula: see text] collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 [Formula: see text]. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95 % confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  18. The ZH ratio method for long-period seismic data: inversion for S-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Tomoko; Tanimoto, T.; Rivera, L.

    2009-10-01

    The particle motion of surface waves, in addition to phase and group velocities, can provide useful information for S-wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle. In this study, we applied a new method to retrieve velocity structure using the ZH ratio, the ratio between vertical and horizontal surface amplitudes of Rayleigh waves. Analysing data from the GEOSCOPE network, we measured the ZH ratios for frequencies between 0.004 and 0.05 Hz (period between 20 and 250s) and inverted them for S-wave velocity structure beneath each station. Our analysis showed that the resolving power of the ZH ratio is limited and final solutions display dependence on starting models; in particular, the depth of the Moho in the starting model is important in order to get reliable results. Thus, initial models for the inversion need to be carefully constructed. We chose PREM and CRUST2.0 in this study as a starting model for all but one station (ECH). The eigenvalue analysis of the least-squares problem that arises for each step of the iterative process shows a few dominant eigenvalues which explains the cause of the inversion's initial-model dependence. However, the ZH ratio is unique in having high sensitivity to near-surface structure and thus provides complementary information to phase and group velocities. Application of this method to GEOSCOPE data suggest that low velocity zones may exist beneath some stations near hotspots. Our tests with different starting models show that the models with low-velocity anomalies fit better to the ZH ratio data. Such low velocity zones are seen near Hawaii (station KIP), Crozet Island (CRZF) and Djibuti (ATD) but not near Reunion Island (RER). It is also found near Echery (ECH) which is in a geothermal area. However, this method has a tendency to produce spurious low velocity zones and resolution of the low velocity zones requires further careful study. We also performed simultaneous inversions for volumetric perturbation and

  19. Type 1 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Complications and Sesame (芝麻 Zhī Má)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Thùy, Trần Dương; Wang, Shu-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major concern among medical practitioners, with the annual mortality rate increasing up to 26.9% in a person aged 65 years or older and 11.3% in the adult. There are many serious complications associated with diabetes, particularly cardiovascular complications due to microvascular diseases. A prerequisite to reduce the risk of microvascular and neurologic complications of type 1 diabetes is normoglycemia. Insulin therapy is the most common treatment used nowadays in type 1 diabetes. However, this method still has many disadvantages such as increased episode of severe hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia unawareness, increased weight gain, transient exacerbation of pre-existing retinopathy, etc. Using insulin pump (the insulin pump is a medical device used for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion to manage the insulin level in the treatment of diabetes mellitus), is associated with known disadvantages including increased ketoacidosis, infection at the infusion site, and the treatment being less suitable in young children (less than 7 years of age). Therefore, alternative treatment for diabetes is still in great demand. We took the approach of traditional Chinese medicine to discuss this matter. Sesame (芝麻 Zhī Má), a herb, has been used medicinally for thousands of years in almost all the countries in the world. The beneficial effects of sesame in remediating diabetes, such as hypoglycemic effects, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidemic effects, improving fat metabolism, and reducing cholesterol, have been demonstrated in many studies,. However, reports on the effects of sesame in remediating cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients are limited, which necessitates further studies on the effects of sesame on cardiovascular complications. PMID:24872931

  20. Determination of the onset time in polarization power ratio Z/H for precursor of Sumatra earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Ahadi, S.; Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G.; Saroso, S.

    2014-09-25

    Determination of onset time precursors of strong earthquakes (Mw > 5) and distance (d < 500 km) using geomagnetic data from Geomagnetic station KTB, Sumatra and two station references DAV, Philippine and DAW, Australia. separate techniques are required in its determination. Not the same as that recorded in the kinetic wave seismograms can be determined by direct time domain. Difficulties associated with electromagnetic waves seismogenic activities require analysis of the transformed signal in the frequency domain. Determination of the frequency spectrum will determine the frequency of emissions emitted from the earthquake source. The aim is to analyze the power amplitude of the ULF emissions in the horizontal component (H) and vertical component (Z). Polarization power ratio Z/H is used for determining the sign of earthquake precursors controlled by the standard deviation. The pattern recognition polarization ratio should be obtained which can differentiate emissions from seismogenic effects of geomagnetic activity. ULF emission patterns generated that seismogenic effect has duration > 5 days and the dominance of emission intensity recorded at the Z component and for the dominance of the emission intensity of geomagnetic activity recorded in the component H. The result shows that the onset time is determined when the polarization power ratio Z/H standard deviation over the limit (p ± 2 σ) which has a duration of > 5 days.

  1. Joint Inversion of Receiver Function, Surface Wave Dispersion and ZH Ratio for Crustal Structure Based on Tikhonov Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Zhang, P.

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a joint iterative inversion method using receiver function, surface wave dispersion and ZH ratio data to better resolve 1-D crustal shear and compressional wave speed structure simultaneously. We implement a three-stage inversion strategy, which can take advantages of each dataset due to their complementary sensitivities to crust structures, to obtain structure information step by step using iterative linearized inversion approaches based on Tikhonov regularization of model parameters. We firstly invert surface wave dispersion and ZH ratio data to get 1-D shear velocity model, then incorporate P-wave receiver function data to obtain a much finer shear velocity model considering its high sensitivity to discontinuities. For the first two steps, the compressional velocity and density parameters are obtained from the shear velocity model using some empirical relationship. Finally, three datasets are further used to jointly invert for the compressional velocity structure based on the obtained shear velocity model. Synthetic tests show the superiority of joint inversion against separate inversion using only one or two datasets. They also demonstrate that the three-stage inversion strategy can make better use of different datasets to implement inversion physically and resolve finer crustal structure with more accuracy.

  2. From ZZ to ZH : How Low Can These Cross Sections Go or Everybody, Let's Cross Section Limbo!

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Emanuel Alexandre

    2009-08-01

    We report on two searches performed at the D0 detector at the Fermi National Laboratory. The first is a search for Z di-boson production with a theoretical cross section of 1.4 pb. The search was performed on 2.6 fb-1 of data and contributed to the first observation of ZZ production at a hadron collider. The second is a search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs in 4.2 fb-1 of data. The Higgs boson is produced in association with a Z boson where the Higgs decays hadronically and the Z decays to two leptons. The ZZ search was performed in both the di-electron and di-muon channels. For the ZH search, we will focus on the muonic decays where we expanded the traditional coverage by considering events in which one of the two muons fails the selection requirement, and is instead reconstructed as an isolated track. We consider Higgs masses between 100 and 150 GeV, with theoretical cross sections ranging from 0.17 to 0.042 pb, and set upper limits on the ZH production cross-section at 95% confidence level.

  3. Degradation of Si-Al aluminide coating after service of turbine blades made of ZhS6K superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiela, B.; Kianicová, M.; Sozańska, M.; Swadźba, L.

    2012-05-01

    Aero engine turbine blades made of nickel-based superalloys are characterized by very good mechanical properties, but their hot corrosion resistance is insufficient. Therefore, various protective coatings must be applied. These coatings are typically made of diffusive aluminide coatings based on the β-NiAl intermetallic phase. Although the oxidation resistance and hot corrosion resistance of these coatings are very good, their thermal resistance is relatively poor. As a result, turbine blades with aluminide coatings are prone to degradation in case of overheating. In this paper we study the degradation of the Si-Al aluminide coating on turbine blades made of ZhS6K superalloy during overheating in the DV2 jet engine.

  4. Past, Present, and Future of the Pulse Examination (脈診 mài zhěn)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuh-Ying Lin; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Jan, Ming-Yie; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2012-01-01

    The pulse examination (脈診 mài zhěn) is a unique diagnostic approach of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The description of pulse examination in the history of Traditional Chinese Medicine is full of amazement and mythology. After researching in hemodynamics and investigating in clinical application for three decades, this article describes the development and the merits and demerits of pulse examination. The experiences of the ancients are tried to be illustrated with modern knowledge and language. As the theory of resonant blood circulation is discovered, Traditional Chinese Medicine could be on the shoulder of Newton and then lead the development of modern medicine. Hope the tool of pulse examination constructed according to eigen-vector with specific time domain and position can bring the running water for Traditional Chinese Medicine. Quantitative research could overcome the plight of analog logic qualitative research, and therefore bring new health revolution. PMID:24716130

  5. Polarisations of the Z and W bosons in the processes pp → ZH and pp → W ± H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Junya

    2017-08-01

    The Z boson in the process pp → ZH and the W + and W - in the process pp → W ± H can be in polarised states. The polarisation density matrix of the Z ( W) boson contains the complete information about a state of polarisation of the Z ( W) boson, and HZZ, HZγ and HWW interactions may be studied in detail from a careful analysis of these matrices. In this paper, a systematic approach to analyse these polarisation density matrices is presented. With the aim of making maximum use of the polarisation information, all of the elements of the polarisation density matrices are related with observables, which are measurable at the environment of pp collisions. Consequences of non-standard HZZ, HZγ and HWW interactions for these observables are discussed.

  6. A search for $ZH\\rightarrow \\mu\\mu b \\bar{b}$ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ancu, Lucian-Stefan

    2010-04-20

    The Standard Model describes with a very good accuracy all interactions of the, so far, known elementary particles. However the Higgs mechanism, which gives rise to the observed mass of these particles, has not yet been confirmed. The Higgs particle has not yet been observed, and the observation or exclusion is an important test of the Standard Model. The Standard Model does not predict the mass of the Higgs particle, however it does impose some limits on the range in which this mass can lie. In direct searches a Higgs with a mass smaller than 114.4 GeV and within 162 GeV and 166 GeV has been excluded at 95% CL at the LEP and the Tevatron colliders. The analysis presented in this thesis is aimed to search for the ZH → μμb$\\bar{b}$ events in 3.1 fb-1 of data collected with the DØ detector in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV.

  7. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH → μ+μ-b$\\bar{b}$ Production at DØ and Evidence for the H→ b$\\bar{b}$ Decay at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jiaming

    2014-01-01

    search for ZH → μ+μ-b$\\bar{b}$ is presented, using a Run 2 dataset with an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 collected by the DØ detector. Selected events contain at least two reconstructed jets and a Z candidate reconstructed with two opposite-sign charged muons. Random forests of decision trees are trained to distinguish between signal and background events in two orthogonal b-tag samples. The ZH → μ+μ-b$\\bar{b}$b analysis is then combined with ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$ analysis. For the combined results of ZH → ℓ+ℓ-b$\\bar{b}$b, no Higgs signal is observed, limits are set on the ZH cross-section BR(H→ b$\\bar{b}$) for different Higgs masses, from 90 to 150 GeV. For a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV, the observed cross-section limit is 7.1 times the SM cross-section with an expected sensitivity of 5.1 times the SM cross section. The result of ZH → ℓ+ℓ-b$\\bar{b}$b channel has been combined with searches in other Higgs decay channels at the Tevatron, which led to the first evidence of H → b$\\bar{b}$.

  8. Activation and enhancement of Fredericamycin A production in deepsea-derived Streptomyces somaliensis SCSIO ZH66 by using ribosome engineering and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghe; Huang, Huiming; Xu, Shanshan; Wang, Bo; Ju, Jianhua; Tan, Huarong; Li, Wenli

    2015-05-01

    Marine microorganisms are an important source of new drug leads. However, the discovery and sustainable production of these compounds are often hampered due to the unavailable expression of cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters or limited titer. Ribosome engineering and response surface methodology (RSM) integrated strategy was developed in this study to activate cryptic gene cluster in the deepsea-derived Streptomyces somaliensis SCSIO ZH66, and subsequently isolation, structural analysis, and the yield enhancement of the activated compound, anticancer drug lead Fredericamycin A (FDM A), were performed. In order to discover novel natural products from marine Streptomyces strains by genome mining strategy, the deepsea-derived S. somaliensis SCSIO ZH66 was subject to ribosome engineering to activate the expression of cryptic gene clusters. A resistant strain ZH66-RIF1 was thereby obtained with 300 μg/mL rifampicin, which accumulated a brown pigment with cytotoxicity on MS plate while absent in the wild type strain. After screening of fermentation conditions, the compound with pigment was purified and identified to be FDM A, indicating that the activation of a cryptic FDM A biosynthetic gene cluster was taken place in strain ZH66-RIF1, and then it was identified to be ascribed to the mutation of R444H in the β subunit of RNA polymerase. To further improve the yield efficiently, nine fermentation medium components were examined for their significance on FDM A production by Plackett-Burman design and Box-Behnken design. The optimum medium composition was achieved by RSM strategy, under which the titer of FDM A reached 679.5 ± 15.8 mg/L after 7 days of fermentation, representing a 3-fold increase compared to the original medium. In terms of short fermentation time and low-cost fermentation medium, strain ZH66-RIF1 would be an ideal alternative source for FDM A production. Our results would hasten the efforts for further development of FDM A as a drug candidate

  9. Activation of a plasmid-situated type III PKS gene cluster by deletion of a wbl gene in deepsea-derived Streptomyces somaliensis SCSIO ZH66.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiming; Hou, Lukuan; Li, Huayue; Qiu, Yanhong; Ju, Jianhua; Li, Wenli

    2016-06-27

    Actinomycete genome sequencing has disclosed a large number of cryptic secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters. However, their unavailable or limited expression severely hampered the discovery of bioactive compounds. The whiB-like (wbl) regulatory genes play important roles in morphological differentiation as well as secondary metabolism; and hence the wblA so gene was probed and set as the target to activate cryptic gene clusters in deepsea-derived Streptomyces somaliensis SCSIO ZH66. wblA so from deepsea-derived S. somaliensis SCSIO ZH66 was inactivated, leading to significant changes of secondary metabolites production in the ΔwblA so mutant, from which α-pyrone compound violapyrone B (VLP B) was isolated. Subsequently, the VLP biosynthetic gene cluster was identified and characterized, which consists of a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) gene vioA and a regulatory gene vioB; delightedly, inactivation of vioB led to isolation of another four VLPs analogues, among which one was new and two exhibited improved anti-MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA) activity than VLP B. Moreover, transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression levels of whi genes (whiD, whiG, whiH and whiI) and wbl genes (wblC, wblE, wblH, wblI and wblK) were repressed by different degrees, suggesting an intertwined regulation mechanism of wblA so in morphological differentiation and secondary metabolism of S. somaliensis SCSIO ZH66. wblA orthologues would be effective targets for activation of cryptic gene clusters in marine-derived Streptomyces strains, notwithstanding the regulation mechanisms might be varied in different strains. Moreover, the availability of the vio gene cluster has enriched the diversity of type III PKSs, providing new opportunities to expand the chemical space of polyketides through biosynthetic engineering.

  10. The 3-3-1 Model with RH Neutrinos and Associated ZH Production at High-Energy {textit{e}}+{textit{e}}- Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao-Bei; An, Ai-Qin; Han, Hong-Mei

    2011-05-01

    In the context of SU(3) C ⊗ SU(3) L ⊗ U(1) X (3-3-1) model with right-handed neutrinos, we study the Higgsstrahlung process e + e - → ZH and calculate the cross section of this process at leading order. Our numerical results showed that the production cross sections for this process can be significantly large as M_{Z'}≈ sqrt{s}. With reasonable values of the Z' mass M Z', Z' exchange can generate large corrections to the cross sections of this process, which might be detected in the future high-energy linear e + e - collider experiments.

  11. Search for the Higgs Boson in the $ZH\\to\\mu^+\\mu^- b\\bar{b}$ Channel at CDF Using Novel Multivariate Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pilot, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson using the process $ZH\\to\\mu^+\\mu^- b\\bar{b}$. We use a dataset corresponding to 9.2 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity from proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, collected with the CDF II detector. This analysis benefits from several new multivariate techniques that have not been used in previous analyses at CDF. We use a multivariate function to select muon candidates, increasing signal acceptance while simultaneously keeping fake rates small. We employ an inclusive trigger selection to further increase acceptance. To enhance signal discrimination, we utilize a multi-layer approach consisting of expert discriminants. This multi-layer discriminant method helps isolate the two main classes of background events, $t\\bar{t}$ and $Z$+jets production. It also includes a flavor separator, to distinguish light flavor jets from jets consistent with the decay of a $B$-hadron. Wit h this novel multi-layer approach, we proceed to set limits on the $ZH$ production cross section times branching ratio. For a Higgs boson with mass 115 GeV/$c^2$, we observe (expect) a limit of 8.0 (4.9) times the Standard Model prediction.

  12. Measurement of Rayleigh wave Z/H ratio and joint inversion for a high-resolution S wave velocity model beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, W.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge on the 3D sediment structure beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin is not only important to explore the oil and gas resources in the area, but also essential to decipher the deep crust and mantle structure beneath the margin with teleseismic data. In this study, we conduct a joint inversion of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase velocity at 6-40 s to construct a 3-D S wave velocity model in a rectangular area of 100°-87° west and 28°-37° north. We use ambient noise data from a total of 215 stations of the Transportable Array deployed under the Earthscope project. Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave Z/H (vertical to horizontal) amplitude ratio is mostly sensitive to shallow sediment structure, while the dispersion data are expected to have reasonably good resolution to uppermost mantle depths. The Z/H ratios measured from stations inside the Gulf Coastal Plain are distinctly lower in comparison with those measured from the inland stations. We also measured the phase velocity dispersion from the same ambient noise dataset. Our preliminary 3-D model is featured by strong low-velocity anomalies at shallow depth, which are spatially well correlated with Gulf Cost, East Texas, and the Lower Mississippi basins. We will discuss other features of the 3-D models once the model is finalized.

  13. Search for ZH → l+ l- bb production in 4.2 fb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[s] =1 .96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2010-12-17

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 4.2 fb(-1) of pp collisions, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt[s] =1 .96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z → e+ e- or Z → μ+ μ- candidate and at least two jets, including at least one b-tagged jet. In the absence of an excess over the background expected from other standard model processes, limits on the ZH cross section multiplied by the branching ratios are set. The limit at M(H) = 115  GeV is a factor of 5.9 larger than the standard model prediction.

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the p anti-p ---> ZH ---> nu anti-nu b anti-b channel

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U.

    2006-07-01

    We report a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson based on data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 260 pb{sup -1}. We study events with missing transverse energy and two acoplanar b-jets, which provide sensitivity to the ZH production cross section in the {nu}{bar {nu}}B{bar b} channel and to WH production, when the lepton from the W {yields} {ell}{nu} decay is undetected. The data are consistent with the SM background expectation, and we set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} ZN/WH) x B(H {yields} b{bar b}) from 3.4/8.3 to 2.5/6.3 pb, for Higgs masses between 105 and 135 GeV.

  15. On the Hazard Caused by the Heat of Acupuncture Needles in Warm Needling (溫針Wēn Zhēn)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Chieh; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Chen, Wen-Jiuan; Lo, Lun-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Due to its simplicity and convenience, acupuncture has become popular as a complementary therapy. In this Chinese medicine, doctors have to find the traditional meridian acupuncture points before puncturing the needles into them. Moxibustion (艾灸 Ài Jiǔ) is also an important part of the acupuncture remedy. Treatment by acupuncture can be classified roughly into two types – direct moxibustion and indirect moxibustion. Warm-needling acupuncture (溫針灸 Wēn Zhēn Jiǔ) is classified under the method of indirect moxibustion. In the present study, 10 standard stainless steel acupuncture needles with 10 pieces of cylinder-shaped moxa cone (艾柱 Ài Zhù) as the heat source of warm needles were used. In order to prevent the practitioners from getting burns, it is necessary to study the temperature changes in some designated parts of the needles. Two sizes, 0.6 g and 1.0 g, of moxa cones were used for comparison of the measured temperatures. The needles are typically divided into two parts – the handle part and the needle body. In our experiment, the temperatures of WNA at different parts of the needles were measured. The larger the size of moxa cone is, the longer is the burning time. Based on the observations we suggest that when 0.6 g moxa is used, the physicians should better pick out the needles around 9 min after ignition; however, while using the 1 g moxa, it might be safer to pick out the needles around 13 min after ignition. PMID:24716166

  16. Characterization of cell-free extracts from fenpropathrin-degrading strain Bacillus cereus ZH-3 and its potential for bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Wenwen; Han, Haitao; She, Changchun; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-08-01

    Synthetic pyrethroid fenpropathrin has received increasing attention because of its environmental contamination and toxic effects on non-target organisms including human beings. Here we report the degradation characteristics of cell-free extracts from fenpropathrin-degrading strain Bacillus cereus ZH-3 and its potential for pyrethroid bioremediation in soils. 50mg·L(-1) of fenpropathrin was decreased to 20.6mg·L(-1) by the enzymatic extracts (869.4mg·L(-1)) within 30min. Kinetic constants Km and Vm were determined to be 1006.7nmol·L(-1) and 56.8nmol·min(-1), respectively. Degradation products were identified as 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde, α-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-benzeneacetonitrile and phenol by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition to degradation of fenpropathrin, the cell-free extracts could degrade other pyrethroids including beta-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin and cypermethrin. Additionally, the reaction conditions were optimized. In the sterile and non-sterile soils, 50mg·kg(-1) of fenpropathrin was reduced to 15.3 and 13.9mg·L(-1) in 1d, respectively. Sprayed 100 and 300mg·kg(-1) of fenpropathrin emulsifiable concentrate (EC), up to 84.6% and 92.1% of soil fenpropathrin were removed from soils within 7d, respectively. Taken together, our results depict the biodegradation characteristics of cell-free extracts from B. cereus ZH-3, highlight its promising potential in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated soils and also provide new insights into the utilization of degrading microbes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Finding the Higgs boson of the standard model in the channel ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$ with the D0 detector at the Tevatron; Recherche du boson de Higgs du nideke standard dans le canal ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$ avec le detecteur DØ aupres du Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Calpas, Betty Constante

    2010-06-11

    The organization of this thesis consists of three main ideas: the first presents the theoretical framework and experimental, as well as objects used in the analysis and the second relates to the various work tasks of service that I performed on the calorimeter, and the third is the search for the Higgs boson in the channel ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$. Thus, this thesis has the following structure: Chapter 1 is an introduction to the standard model of particle physics and the Higgs mechanism; Chapter 2 is an overview of the complex and the acceleration of the Tevatron at Fermilab DØ detector; Chapter 3 is an introduction to physical objects used in this thesis; Chapter 4 presents the study made on correcting the energy measured in the calorimeter; Chapter 5 describes the study of certification of electrons in the calorimeter; Chapter 6 describes the study of certification of electrons in the intercryostat region of calorimeter; Chapter 7 Detailed analysis on the search for Higgs production in the channel ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$; and Chapter 8 presents the final results of the calculations of upper limits to the production cross section of the Higgs boson on a range of low masses.

  18. Identity and healing in three Navajo religious traditions: sa'ah naagháí bik'eh hózh [symbol: see text].

    PubMed

    Lewton, E L; Bydone, V

    2000-12-01

    In this article, we elucidate how the Navajo synthetic principle sa'ah naagháí bik'eh hózh [symbol: see text] (SNBH) is understood, demonstrated, and elaborated in three different Navajo healing traditions. We conducted interviews with Navajo healers and their patients affiliated with Traditional Navajo religion, the Native American Church, and Pentecostal Christianity. Their narratives provide access to cultural themes of identity and healing that invoke elements of SNBH. SNBH specifies that the conditions for health and well-being are harmony within and connection to the physical/spiritual world. Specifically, each religious healing tradition encourages affective engagement, proper family relations, an understanding of one's cultural and spiritual histories, and the use of kinship terms to establish affective bonds with one's family and with the spiritual world. People's relationships within this common behavioral environment are integral to their self-orientations, to their identities as Navajos, and to the therapeutic process. The disruption and restoration of these relationships constitute an important affective dimension in Navajo distress and healing.

  19. Search for a CP-odd Higgs boson decaying to Zh in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Schlatter, W. -D.

    2015-03-28

    A search for a heavy, CP-odd Higgs boson, A, decaying into a Z boson and a 125 GeV Higgs boson, h, with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The search uses proton–proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3fb-1. Decays of CP-even h bosons to ττ or bb pairs with the Z boson decaying to electron or muon pairs are considered, as well as h → bb decays with the Z boson decaying to neutrinos. No evidence for the production of an A boson in these channels is foundmore » and the 95% confidence level upper limits derived for σ(gg → A) × BR(A → Zh) × BR(h → f¯f) are 0.098–0.013pb for f = τ and 0.57–0.014 pb for f = b in a range of mA=220–1000 GeV. The results are combined and interpreted in the context of two-Higgs-doublet models.« less

  20. The Antidepressant-like Effect of Ethanol Extract of Daylily Flowers (金針花 Jīn Zhēn Huā) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Hang; Chang, Hui-Chi; Chen, Pei-Ju; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Su, Kuan-Pin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2013-01-01

    According to the prediction of the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) report, depression will be the highest burden disease by the year 2030. Daylily flower (金針花 Jīn Zhēn Huā ; the flower of Hemerocallis fulva) is traditionally used for soothing in Chinese dietary therapy. The major flavonoid of daylily flowers, rutin, is also characterized to be an antidepressant. In this study, we investigated the antidepressant effects of ethanol extract of daylily flowers (DFEtoH) and rutin by forced swimming test (FST) and neurotransmitter metabolism of brain regions (frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and amygdala). Results show that either short- or long-term tests, the extract and rutin significantly reduce the immobility time and increased swimming time of FST, which are compared with the vehicle (P < 0.05). The extract and rutin also increase the serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine concentration of these brain regions (P < 0.05). In long-term tests, the daylily flowers extract markedly increased serotonin concentration and reduced serotonin turnover rate in these brain regions but not frontal cortex. In conclusion, present data illustrated that DFEtoH does have antidepressant-like effects possibly via the regulation of serotonergic system. Moreover, rutin might be playing a very important role in the antidepressant-like effects of DFEtoH. PMID:24716156

  1. Using a Human Challenge Model of Infection to Measure Vaccine Efficacy: A Randomised, Controlled Trial Comparing the Typhoid Vaccines M01ZH09 with Placebo and Ty21a

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Claire; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Waddington, Claire S.; Zhou, Liqing; Peters, Anna; Haworth, Kathryn; Sie, Rebecca; Green, Christopher A.; Jeppesen, Catherine A.; Moore, Maria; Thompson, Ben A. V.; John, Tessa; Kingsley, Robert A.; Yu, Ly-Mee; Voysey, Merryn; Hindle, Zoe; Lockhart, Stephen; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typhoid persists as a major cause of global morbidity. While several licensed vaccines to prevent typhoid are available, they are of only moderate efficacy and unsuitable for use in children less than two years of age. Development of new efficacious vaccines is complicated by the human host-restriction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) and lack of clear correlates of protection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protective efficacy of a single dose of the oral vaccine candidate, M01ZH09, in susceptible volunteers by direct typhoid challenge. Methods and Findings We performed a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in healthy adult participants at a single centre in Oxford (UK). Participants were allocated to receive one dose of double-blinded M01ZH09 or placebo or 3-doses of open-label Ty21a. Twenty-eight days after vaccination, participants were challenged with 104CFU S. Typhi Quailes strain. The efficacy of M01ZH09 compared with placebo (primary outcome) was assessed as the percentage of participants reaching pre-defined endpoints constituting typhoid diagnosis (fever and/or bacteraemia) during the 14 days after challenge. Ninety-nine participants were randomised to receive M01ZH09 (n = 33), placebo (n = 33) or 3-doses of Ty21a (n = 33). After challenge, typhoid was diagnosed in 18/31 (58.1% [95% CI 39.1 to 75.5]) M01ZH09, 20/30 (66.7% [47.2 to 87.2]) placebo, and 13/30 (43.3% [25.5 to 62.6]) Ty21a vaccine recipients. Vaccine efficacy (VE) for one dose of M01ZH09 was 13% [95% CI -29 to 41] and 35% [-5 to 60] for 3-doses of Ty21a. Retrospective multivariable analyses demonstrated that pre-existing anti-Vi antibody significantly reduced susceptibility to infection after challenge; a 1 log increase in anti-Vi IgG resulting in a 71% decrease in the hazard ratio of typhoid diagnosis ([95% CI 30 to 88%], p = 0.006) during the 14 day challenge period. Limitations to the study included the requirement to limit the challenge

  2. Using a Human Challenge Model of Infection to Measure Vaccine Efficacy: A Randomised, Controlled Trial Comparing the Typhoid Vaccines M01ZH09 with Placebo and Ty21a.

    PubMed

    Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Blohmke, Christoph J; Waddington, Claire S; Zhou, Liqing; Peters, Anna; Haworth, Kathryn; Sie, Rebecca; Green, Christopher A; Jeppesen, Catherine A; Moore, Maria; Thompson, Ben A V; John, Tessa; Kingsley, Robert A; Yu, Ly-Mee; Voysey, Merryn; Hindle, Zoe; Lockhart, Stephen; Sztein, Marcelo B; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Typhoid persists as a major cause of global morbidity. While several licensed vaccines to prevent typhoid are available, they are of only moderate efficacy and unsuitable for use in children less than two years of age. Development of new efficacious vaccines is complicated by the human host-restriction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) and lack of clear correlates of protection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protective efficacy of a single dose of the oral vaccine candidate, M01ZH09, in susceptible volunteers by direct typhoid challenge. We performed a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in healthy adult participants at a single centre in Oxford (UK). Participants were allocated to receive one dose of double-blinded M01ZH09 or placebo or 3-doses of open-label Ty21a. Twenty-eight days after vaccination, participants were challenged with 104CFU S. Typhi Quailes strain. The efficacy of M01ZH09 compared with placebo (primary outcome) was assessed as the percentage of participants reaching pre-defined endpoints constituting typhoid diagnosis (fever and/or bacteraemia) during the 14 days after challenge. Ninety-nine participants were randomised to receive M01ZH09 (n = 33), placebo (n = 33) or 3-doses of Ty21a (n = 33). After challenge, typhoid was diagnosed in 18/31 (58.1% [95% CI 39.1 to 75.5]) M01ZH09, 20/30 (66.7% [47.2 to 87.2]) placebo, and 13/30 (43.3% [25.5 to 62.6]) Ty21a vaccine recipients. Vaccine efficacy (VE) for one dose of M01ZH09 was 13% [95% CI -29 to 41] and 35% [-5 to 60] for 3-doses of Ty21a. Retrospective multivariable analyses demonstrated that pre-existing anti-Vi antibody significantly reduced susceptibility to infection after challenge; a 1 log increase in anti-Vi IgG resulting in a 71% decrease in the hazard ratio of typhoid diagnosis ([95% CI 30 to 88%], p = 0.006) during the 14 day challenge period. Limitations to the study included the requirement to limit the challenge period prior to treatment to 2

  3. Search for the standard model higgs Boson in the ZH-->nunubb channel in 5.2 fb{-1} of pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Camacho-Pérez, E; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2010-02-19

    A search is performed for the standard model Higgs boson in 5.2 fb{-1} of pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final state considered is a pair of b jets and large missing transverse energy, as expected from pp-->ZH-->nunubb production. The search is also sensitive to the WH-->lnubb channel when the charged lepton is not identified. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, a limit is set at the 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by branching fraction for [pp-->(Z/W)H](H-->bb) that is a factor of 3.7 larger than the standard model value, consistent with the factor of 4.6 expected.

  4. Jet Energy Scale Studies and the Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Channel ZH → v $\\bar{v}$ b$\\bar{b}$ at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Lydia Mary Isis

    2006-11-01

    The D0 experiment is based at the Tevatron, which is currently the world's highest-energy accelerator. The detector comprises three major subsystems: the tracking system, the calorimeter and the muon detector. Jets, seen in the calorimeter, are the most common product of the proton-proton interactions at 2TeV. This thesis is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on jets and describes the derivation of a jet energy scale using p$\\bar{p}$ → (Z + jets) events as a cross-check of the official D0 jet energy scale (Versions 4.2 and 5.1) which is derived using p$\\bar{p}$ → γ + jets events. Closure tests were also carried out on the jet energy calibration as a further verification. Jets from b-quarks are commonly produced at D0, readily identified and are a useful physics tool. These require a special correction in the case where the b-jet decays via a muon and a neutrino. Thus a semileptonic correction was also derived as an addition to the standard energy correction for jets. The search for the Higgs boson is one of the largest physics programs at D0. The second part of this thesis describes a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ channel in 52fb-1 of data. The analysis is based on a sequence of event selection criteria optimized on Monte Carlo event samples that simulate four light Higgs boson masses between 105 GeV and 135 GeV and the main backgrounds. For the first time, the data for the analysis are selected using new acoplanarity triggers and the b-quark jets are selected using the D0 neural net b-jet tagging tool. A limit is set for σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH) x Br(H → b$\\bar{b}$).

  5. A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the process ZH → ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ in 4.1 fb-1 of CDF II data

    SciTech Connect

    Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki

    2010-05-01

    parameter in the theory. Experimental evidence suggests that the Higgs mass has a value between 114.4 and 186 GeV/c2. Particles with a mass in this range can be produced in collisions of less massive particles accelerated to near the speed of light. Currently, one of only a few machines capable of achieving collision energies large enough to potentially produce a standard model Higgs boson is the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. This dissertation describes the effort to observe the standard model Higgs in Tevatron collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) II experiment in the ZH →ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ production and decay channel. In this process, the Higgs is produced along with a Z boson which decays to a pair of electrons or muons (Z →ℓ+-), while the Higgs decays to a bottom anti-bottom quark pair (H → b$\\bar{b}$). A brief overview of the standard model and Higgs theory is presented in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 explores previous searches for the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron and elsewhere. The search presented in this dissertation expands upon the techniques and methods developed in previous searches. The fourth chapter contains a description of the Tevatron collider and the CDF II detector. The scope of the discussion in Chapter 4 is limited to the experimental components relevant to the current ZH →ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ search. Chapter 5 presents the details of object reconstruction; the methods used to convert detector signals into potential electrons, muons or quarks. Chapter six describes the data sample studied for the presence of a ZH →ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ signal and details the techniques used to model the data. The model accounts for both signal and non-signal processes (backgrounds) which are expected to contribute to the observed event sample. Chapters 7

  6. Breathing clean air is Są’áh Naagháí Bik'eh Hózhóó (SNBH): a culturally centred approach to understanding commercial smoke-free policy among the Diné (Navajo People)

    PubMed Central

    Chief, Carmenlita; Sabo, Samantha; Clark, Hershel; Nez Henderson, Patricia; Yazzie, Alfred; Nahee, Jacqueline; Leischow, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Indigenous worldviews and research approaches are fundamental to make meaning of complex health issues and increase the likelihood of identifying existing cultural protective factors that have contributed to the resilience and survival of Indigenous people worldwide. Objective We describe the process for applying the Diné (Navajo) paradigm of Są’áh Naagháí Bik'eh Hózhóó (SNBH), a belief system that guides harmonious living, and demonstrate how the application of SNBH enhances understanding of Navajo principles for well-being. Specifically, we juxtapose this analysis with a conventional qualitative analysis to illuminate and interpret Diné perspectives on the health and economic impact of commercial secondhand smoke and smoke-free policy. Methods Focus groups were conducted throughout Navajo Nation to assess the appeal and impact of several evidence-based messages regarding the health and economic impact of smoke-free policy. Results Diné perspectives have shifted away from family and cultural teachings considered protective of a smoke-free life, and struggle to balance the ethical and economics of respect for individual and collective rights to live and work in smoke-free environments. Conclusions Indigenous-centred approaches to public health research and policy analysis contribute to understanding the cultural knowledge, practices and beliefs that are protective of the health and well-being of Indigenous people. PMID:27697944

  7. Effect of pressure on magnetic properties of mixed ferro-ferrimagnet (Ni0.38Mn0.62)3[Cr(CN)6]2.zH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentková, M.; Mihalik, M.; Arnold, Z.; Kamarád, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of magnetization measurements performed on the ferro-ferrimagnetic (Ni0.38Mn0.62)3[Cr(CN)6]2.zH2O molecule-based magnet under pressures up to 0.8 GPa. Both antiferromagnetic JAF and ferromagnetic interaction JF are present in this magnet and temperature dependence of magnetization μ(T) exhibits the compensation temperature Tcomp at which the sign of the magnetization is reversed. Our results indicate that JAF dominates. The Curie temperature TC of the magnet increases with applied pressure, dTC/dp = 10.6 KGPa-1, due to strengthened JAF. The increase of the JAF is attributed to the enhanced value of the single electron overlapping integral S and the energy gap Δ of the mixed molecular orbitals t2g (Mn2+) and t2g (CrIII) induced by pressure. Magnetization processes are also affected by pressure: magnetization saturates at higher magnetic field and saturated magnetization is reduced. The compensation temperature Tcomp decreases under pressure.

  8. Understanding temperature and magnetic-field actuated magnetization polarity reversal in the Prussian blue analogue Cu0.73Mn0.77[Fe(CN)6].zH2O, using XMCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Debdutta; Choi, Yongseong; Kumar, Amit; Ramanan, Nitya; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Sharma, Surinder; Haskel, Daniel; Yusuf, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the microscopic origin of temperature and magnetic-field actuated magnetization reversal in Cu0.73Mn0.77[Fe(CN)(6)]center dot zH(2)O, using XMCD. Our results show a fair deviation from the mean-field-theory in the form of different ordering temperatures of Fe and Mn sublattices. A preferential sign reversal of Mn spin under magnetic field and different spin cant angles for the two sublattices have also been observed. An antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe and Mn sublattices along with different ordering temperatures (sublattice decoupling) for these sublattices explain the temperature-dependent magnetization reversal. Whereas, Mn spin reversal alone (under external magnetic field) is responsible for the observed field-dependent magnetization reversal. The dissimilar magnetic behavior of Fe and Mn sublattices in this cubic 3d-orbital system has been understood by invoking disparity and competition among inter-sublattice magnetic control parameters, viz. magnetic Zeeman energy, exchange coupling constant and magnetic anisotropy constant. Our results have significant design implications for future magnetic switches, by optimizing the competition among these magnetic control parameters.

  9. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the ZH->vvbb channel in 5.2 fb-1 of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2009-12-01

    A search is performed for the standard model Higgs boson in 5.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final state considered is a pair of b jets and large missing transverse energy, as expected from p{bar p} {yields} ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} production. The search is also sensitive to the WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} channel when the charged lepton is not identified. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, a limit is set at the 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by branching fraction for (p{bar p} {yields} (Z/W)H) x (H {yields} b{bar b}) that is a factor of 3.7 larger than the standard model value, consistent with the factor of 4.6 expected.

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ channel in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, Abhinav

    2011-01-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is performed in 5.2 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at p √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The final state considered is a pair of b jets with large missing transverse energy, as expected from p$\\bar{p}$→ ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ production. The search is also sensitive to the WH → ℓvb$\\bar{b}$ channel, where the charged lepton is not identified. Boosted decision trees are used to discriminate signal from background. Good agreement is observed between data and expected backgrounds, and, for a Higgs-boson mass of 115 GeV, a limit is set at 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by branching fraction of (p$\\bar{p}$ → (Z/W)H) × (H → b$\\bar{b}$) that is a factor 4.57 expected and 3.73 observed larger than the value expected from the standard model.

  11. Breathing clean air is Są'áh Naagháí Bik'eh Hózhóó (SNBH): a culturally centred approach to understanding commercial smoke-free policy among the Diné (Navajo People).

    PubMed

    Chief, Carmenlita; Sabo, Samantha; Clark, Hershel; Nez Henderson, Patricia; Yazzie, Alfred; Nahee, Jacqueline; Leischow, Scott J

    2016-10-01

    Indigenous worldviews and research approaches are fundamental to make meaning of complex health issues and increase the likelihood of identifying existing cultural protective factors that have contributed to the resilience and survival of Indigenous people worldwide. We describe the process for applying the Diné (Navajo) paradigm of Są'áh Naagháí Bik'eh Hózhóó (SNBH), a belief system that guides harmonious living, and demonstrate how the application of SNBH enhances understanding of Navajo principles for well-being. Specifically, we juxtapose this analysis with a conventional qualitative analysis to illuminate and interpret Diné perspectives on the health and economic impact of commercial secondhand smoke and smoke-free policy. Focus groups were conducted throughout Navajo Nation to assess the appeal and impact of several evidence-based messages regarding the health and economic impact of smoke-free policy. Diné perspectives have shifted away from family and cultural teachings considered protective of a smoke-free life, and struggle to balance the ethical and economics of respect for individual and collective rights to live and work in smoke-free environments. Indigenous-centred approaches to public health research and policy analysis contribute to understanding the cultural knowledge, practices and beliefs that are protective of the health and well-being of Indigenous people. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Searches for a heavy scalar boson $$ \\mathrm{H} $$ decaying to a pair of 125 GeV Higgs bosons $$ \\mathrm{ hh } $$ or for a heavy pseudoscalar boson $$ \\mathrm{A} $$ decaying to $$ \\mathrm{Zh} $$, in the final states with $$\\mathrm{h} \\to \\tau \\tau$$

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-02-09

    A search for a heavy scalar boson H decaying into a pair of lighter standard-model-like 125 GeV Higgs bosons hh and a search for a heavy pseudoscalar boson A decaying into a Z and an h boson are presented. The searches are performed on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, collected by CMS in 2012. A final state consisting of two τ leptons and two b jets is used to search for the H → hh decay. A final state consisting of two τmore » leptons from the h boson decay, and two additional leptons from the Z boson decay, is used to search for the decay A → Zh. The results are interpreted in the context of two-Higgs-doublet models. No excess is found above the standard model expectation and upper limits are set on the heavy boson production cross sections in the mass ranges 260 < mH < 350 GeV and 220 < mA < 350 GeV.« less

  13. Analysis of 572 Cases of Adolescent Pregnancy in Z.H. Maternity Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Aydin; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared records of 572 adolescents who delivered babies in 1 obstetric service with records of 978 older patients. Found no significant differences between groups regarding spontaneous and operative delivery rates or regarding neonatal risk. Findings support view that obstetric outcomes of adolescents are no worse than outcomes for older…

  14. Search for the Higgs Boson in the ZH → vvb$\\bar{b}$ Channel at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Brandon Scott

    2008-01-01

    This analysis focuses on a low mass Higgs boson search with 1.7 fb-1 of data. The focus is on Higgs events in which it is produced in association with a W or Z boson. Such events are expected to leave a distinct signature of large missing transverse energy for either a Z → vv decay or a leptonic W decay in which the lepton goes undetected, as well as jets with taggable secondary vertices from the H → b$\\bar{b}$ decay. Utilizing a new track based technique for removing QCD multi-jet processes as well as a neural network discriminant, an expected limit of 8.3 times the Standard Model prediction at the 95% CL for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2 is calculated, with an observed limit of 8.0*SM.

  15. Search for the Higgs boson in the ZH to ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ channel at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Efron, Jonathan Zvi

    2007-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is in excellent agreement with the observed phenomena of particle physics. Within the Standard Model, the weak and electromagnetic forces are successfully combined. However, this combination is only valid if the masses of the force carriers of the weak force, the Z and W bosons, are massless. In fact, these two particles are the second and third most massive observed elementary particles. Within the minimal Standard Model, the Higgs mechanism is introduced to reconcile this contradiction. Conclusive proof of this theory would come with the discovery of the Higgs boson.

  16. Cooperative antioxidative effects of zein hydrolysates with sage (Salvia officinalis) extract in a liposome system.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haotian; Han, Qi; Kong, Baohua; Liu, Qian

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the cooperative antioxidative effects of sage extract (SE) and zein hydrolysates (ZH). The combination of 3mg/ml ZH and 10μg/ml SE exhibited a significant synergism in inhibition of the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and provided superior protection of liposomes against oxidation. Zeta-potential results revealed that the interactions between liposomes and ZH were electrostatic interactions. Particle size determination further proved that ZH and SE added to oxidized liposomes significantly decreased the mean particle size. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that when ZH was present in the liposome oxidizing system, the droplet sizes were obviously decreased compared to oxidized samples. ZH dispersed more uniformly and the interfacial membrane was more compact in the ZH-SE liposome. Transmission electron microscopy conveyed that the ZH-SE complex around the liposome particles could form a denser network structure, preventing radicals and oxidants from the approach of the liposomes.

  17. Immobilization of Alcaligenes faecalis penicillin G acylase on epoxy-type supports.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Zhou, Y; Yuan, Z; Xu, G

    2009-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis penicillin G acylase has several desired features over other penicillin G acylases and its use in industry requires immobilization. In this work, two novel supports ZH-EP (epoxy-type) and ZH-HA (epoxy-amino type) were used to immobilize Alcaligenes faecalis penicillin G acylase (AfPGA) with Eupergit C as reference. The saturation of immobilized protein on ZH-EP (269 mg/g, 116 h) and ZH-HA (296 mg/g, 15 h) was obtained more rapidly than Eupergit C (197 mg/g, 260 h). And the activity of immobilized AfPGA on ZH-EP (520 U/g) and ZH-HA (2200 U/g) was higher than that on Eupergit C (310 U/g). The properties of three immobilized enzymes were compared and no obvious difference was observed, which indicated that ZH-EP and ZH-HA were promised in industry.

  18. The effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and shade on blood metabolites of finishing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Hales, K E; Foote, A P; Jones, S A; Shackelford, S D; Boyd, B M; Erickson, G E

    2016-07-01

    The effects of feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) and shade were evaluated on blood metabolites in finishing beef steers ( = 480). Cattle were fed 0 or 8.33 mg/kg of diet DM ZH for 21 d with a 3- or 4-d withdrawal before harvest and were housed in open or shaded pens. Blood samples were collected the day before ZH was fed and on the day the cattle were shipped to the commercial abattoir. Lactate concentration was not different between cattle fed ZH in open or shaded pens ( = 0.12). Nonetheless, a tendency for a diet × time interaction was detected for lactate concentration ( = 0.09), in which it was greater in cattle fed the control diet in open pens before being fed ZH. Cortisol concentration was less before and after ZH was fed ( = 0.01). Glucose was greater for cattle fed the control diet than cattle fed ZH for 21 d ( = 0.03). Cattle fed in open vs. shaded pens did not differ in glucose concentration ( = 0.12), whereas glucose concentrations were greater before ZH was fed than after ( = 0.02). In contrast, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) concentration was not different in response to diet ( = 0.24), housing type ( = 0.65), or before vs. after being fed ZH ( = 0.60). Lactate concentrations were not different across diet or shade treatments before ZH was fed, whereas after ZH, lactate concentrations were greater in control cattle than cattle fed ZH. Additionally, cortisol was less after feeding ZH. Glucose was greater before than after feeding ZH.

  19. The effect of zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on energy metabolism and nitrogen and carbon retention of steers fed at maintenance and fasting intake levels.

    PubMed

    Walter, L J; Cole, N A; Jennings, J S; Hutcheson, J P; Meyer, B E; Schmitz, A N; Reed, D D; Lawrence, T E

    2016-10-01

    An indirect calorimetry trial examined energy metabolism, apparent nutrient digestibility, C retention (CR), and N retention (NR) of cattle supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH). Beef steers ( = 20; 463 ± 14 kg) blocked ( = 5) by weight and source were individually fed and adapted to maintenance energy intake for 21 d before allotment to ZH (90 mg/steer∙d) or no β-adrenergic agonist treatment (control [CONT]) for 20 d (455 ± 14 kg at the start of treatment). Respiration chambers = 4 were used to quantify heat production (HP) during maintenance (d 12 to 16 of the ZH period) and fasting heat production (FHP; d 19 to 20 of ZH period; total 4 d of fast). Steers were harvested after a 6-d ZH withdrawal and carcasses were graded 24 h after harvest. Control cattle lost more BW ( < 0.01; 9 kg for CONT and 2 kg for ZH-treated) during maintenance whereas the BW loss of ZH-treated steers was greater ( < 0.01; 9 kg for ZH-treated and vs. 4 kg, for CONT) during FHP; no differences ( ≥ 0.76) were detected for G:F, ADG, and end BW. No differences in DMI, apparent nutrient digestibility, O consumption, or CH production ( ≥ 0.12) were detected; however, ZH-treated cattle had greater CO production during maintenance ( = 0.04; 23.6 L/kgBW for ZH-treated and 22.4 L/kg BW for CONT). Digestible energy and ME did not differ ( ≥ 0.19); however, urinary energy was greater ( = 0.05; 0.091 Mcal for CONT and 0.074 Mcal for ZH-treated) in CONT cattle. Steers treated with ZH tended to have greater HP ( = 0.09; 12.44 Mcal for ZH-treated and 11.69 Mcal for CONT), but the effect was reduced on a BW basis ( = 0.12; 0.126 Mcal/kg BW0.75 for ZH-treated and 0.120 Mcal/kg BW0.75 for CONT vs. 0.120 Mcal/kg BW). No treatment difference in FHP was observed ( ≥ 0.32) although CO production (L/steer) increased with ZH treatment ( = 0.04; 1,423 L/steer for ZH-treated and 1,338 L/steer for CONT). Control cattle excreted more ( = 0.05) N in urine (39.8 g/d for CONT and 32.4 g/d for ZH

  20. Effects of shade and feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride to finishing steers on performance, carcass quality, heat stress, mobility, and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Boyd, B M; Shackelford, S D; Hales, K E; Brown-Brandl, T M; Bremer, M L; Spangler, M L; Wheeler, T L; King, D A; Erickson, G E

    2015-12-01

    Steers ( = 480; 22% with black hides and 78% with red hides) were used to study the effects of shade and feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on performance, carcass quality, heat stress, mobility, and body temperature (BT). A randomized block design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement was used with 4 replicates per treatment. Factors included housing type (open or shaded pens) and the feeding of ZH (0 or 8.33 mg/kg DM) the last 21 d on feed with a 3-d withdrawal. Cattle were blocked by BW into a heavy or light block and randomly assigned to pen within each block. Rumen boluses to record BT were inserted before ZH feeding. Respiration rate and panting scores were recorded daily during the ZH feeding period. Mobility scores were collected at various time points from before ZH feeding through harvest. Interactions between ZH and housing type were not significant ( > 0.26) for animal performance, carcass characteristics, and respiration or panting score. No differences ( > 0.44) were observed for DMI, ADG, or G:F on a live basis due to ZH; however, cattle fed in open pens tended ( = 0.08) to have a greater ADG than cattle in shaded pens. Cattle fed ZH had 14 kg heavier carcasses with larger LM area ( < 0.01) than control cattle. Respiration rates for cattle fed ZH were greater ( = 0.05) with no differences ( = 0.88) due to housing. Time affected ( < 0.01) mobility scores, with observations on the morning of harvest at the abattoir being the worst for all groups of cattle. An interaction ( < 0.01) was observed between ZH and housing type for BT. Cattle fed ZH, in both shaded and open pens, had lower ( < 0.05) average, maximum, and area under the curve BT than control cattle fed in the same housing type. However, the observed reduction in BT due to ZH was greater for cattle fed ZH in open pens than for cattle fed ZH in shaded pens. From these results, we conclude that ZH improved HCW with little impact on heat stress or mobility, suggesting that animal

  1. Development of Ion-Plasma Refractory Metallic Layers of Heat-Insulating Coatings for Cooled Turbine Rotor Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinovskii, S. A.; Muboyadzhyan, S. A.; Gayamov, A. M.; Matveev, P. V.

    2014-03-01

    Alloys ZhS32 and ZhS36 with heat-protection coatings (HPC) consisting of external ceramic layers and internal refractory metallic layers are studied. The coated alloys are tested for heat fastness and high-temperature strength at 1100 - 1150°C. The HPC with a metallic layer of the (Ni - Cr - Al - Hf) + Al system are shown to be more advantageous than similar HPC based on an SPD-2 + VSDP-16 commercial refractory coating. The effect of the HPC on the characteristics of high-temperature strength and fatigue resistance of alloys ZhS32 and ZhS36 is investigated.

  2. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride feeding duration on crossbred beef semimembranosus steak color in aerobic or modified atmosphere packaging.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, J A; Hunt, M C; Houser, T A; Boyle, E A E; Dikeman, M E; Johnson, D E; VanOverbeke, D L; Hilton, G G; Brooks, C; Killefer, J; Allen, D M; Streeter, M N; Nichols, W T; Hutcheson, J P; Yates, D A

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effects of feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) for 0, 20, 30, or 40 d before slaughter (ZH0, ZH20, ZH30, or ZH40, respectively) on semimembranosus (SM) color development and stability. A 7.62-cm-thick portion was removed from 60 beef steer SM subprimals and stored (2 degrees C) for 21 d; then two 2.54-cm-thick steaks were cut, overwrapped with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film, and assigned to 0 or 3 d of display. Remaining portions of the subprimals were stored in a vacuum for 10 d and then enhanced 10% to a meat concentration of 0.3% sodium chloride, 0.35% phosphate, and 0.05% rosemary extract. Steaks were packaged in a high-oxygen (HO-MAP) or carbon monoxide (CO-MAP) modified atmosphere and assigned to 0, 3, or 5 d (HO-MAP) or 0 or 9 d (CO-MAP) of display. The deep (DSM) and superficial (SSM) portions of steaks were evaluated for initial color, display color, discoloration, pH, L*, a*, b*, hue angle, and saturation indices. For steaks in PVC, no differences (P > 0.05) occurred in initial or discoloration color scores because of ZH feeding duration. The enhanced SSM steaks from ZH20 in PVC were brighter red (P < 0.05) than SSM steaks from ZH40 in PVC. The DSM in PVC had less (P < 0.05) pH and paler (P < 0.05) color than the SSM. Display color scores for the DSM of PVC steaks were brighter red (P < 0.05) than the SSM initially (d 0 and 1), but the DSM discolored faster (P < 0.05) than the SSM on d 1 to 3. The SM steaks from steers fed ZH20 or ZH30 were slightly brighter and less discolored during display in PVC than the ZH40 diet. For enhanced steaks in HO-MAP, the DSM of ZH20 and ZH30 diets displayed 4 d and the DSM of ZH20 displayed 5 d was a brighter (P < 0.05) red than the DSM from ZH40. At display d 1 and 5, the SSM of ZH20 steaks in HO-MAP was a brighter (P < 0.05) red than SSM steaks from ZH40. The SSM of ZH40 HO-MAP steaks was darker (P < 0.05) red on d 3 than the SSM from other diets. For enhanced steaks

  3. Retraction RETRACTION of "Efficacy and safety of nucleoside analogues in preventing vertical transmission of the hepatitis B virus from father to infant", by L.-H. Cao, P.-L. Zhao, Z.-M. Liu, S.-C. Sun, D.-B. Xu, J.-D. Zhang and Z.-H. Shao - Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 15539-15546 (2015).

    PubMed

    Cao, L-H; Zhao, P-L; Liu, Z-M; Sun, S-C; Xu, D-B; Zhang, J-D; Shao, Z-H

    2016-10-07

    The retracted article is: Cao L-H, Zhao P-L, Liu Z-M, Sun S-C, et al. (2015). Efficacy and safety of nucleoside analogues in preventing vertical transmission of the hepatitis B virus from father to infant. Genet. Mol. Res. 14: 15539-15546. The article published in Genetics and Molecular Research 14 (4): 15539-15546 (2015) is a very good paper, but it appears that the authors' group submitted this manuscript to multiple journals, which is ethical misconduct. This manuscript (similar language and identical data) was published in the Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine Journal prior to being submitted to GMR. There are parts copied from "Efficacy and safety of nucleoside analogs on blocking father-to-infant vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus", by Li-Hau Cao, Pei-Li Zhao, Zhi-Min Liu, Shao-Chun Sun, et al. Exp. Ther. Med. 9 (6): 2251-2256 (2015) - DOI: 10.3892/etm.2015.2379. The GMR editorial staff was alerted and after a thorough investigation, there is strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure. Also, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract this article in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics.

  4. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and wholesale cut yield of hair-breed ewe lambs consuming feedlot diets under moderate environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Reyes, L; Macías-Cruz, U; Alvarez-Valenzuela, F D; Aguila-Tepato, E; Torrentera-Olivera, N G; Soto-Navarro, S A

    2011-12-01

    Twenty-four Dorper × Pelibuey ewe lambs initially weighing 25.1 ± 0.6 kg were used in a 34-d feeding experiment and after slaughter to evaluate the effect of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and wholesale cut yield. Ewe lambs were individually housed in pens, blocked by initial BW, and assigned randomly within BW blocks to 1 of 2 treatments: 1) control (no ZH) and 2) supplemented with ZH (10 mg/ewe lamb daily) during 32-d and a 2-d withdrawal preslaughter period. Feeding ZH increased (P < 0.01) final BW, ADG, and G:F of ewe lambs, whereas feed intake was unaffected (P = 0.80). Hot and cold carcass weights, dressing percentage, and conformation score were improved (P < 0.001) when ZH was fed. Likewise, LM area was 3.7 ± 0.41 cm(2) larger (P < 0.001) for ZH than control ewe lambs. Feeding ZH did not affect (P ≥ 0.29) cooling loss, carcass length, fat thickness, or KPH. With exception of peritoneum (P < 0.001), head (P = 0.021), and neck (P < 0.001), ZH did not increase (P ≥ 0.12) noncarcass components or wholesale cut yield percentage. A trend to increase (P = 0.060) loin percentage from HCW was observed in lambs supplemented with ZH. In conclusion, feeding ZH to Dorper × Pelibuey ewe lambs improved feedlot performance and also some carcass traits (HCW, cool carcass weight, dressing percentage, and LM area) of economic importance; however, fat deposition was not affected by ZH.

  5. Effects feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, fillet yeild, and body composition of rainbow trout, nile, tilapia, and channel catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) is a potent ß-adrenergic agonist (BAA) that has been used in feedlot cattle to increase average daily gain, feed efficiency, yield of trimmed cuts, and dress out percent. While positive effects of ZH have been observed in cattle, there have been no reports of this prod...

  6. Supplementation of zilpaterol hydrochloride to crossbred Angus heifers does not increase stress responsiveness or homeostatic metabolic parameters after a combined corticoptropin releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anecdotal claims suggest that feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) alters the stress response in cattle; however, there is no scientific data to support or refute these claims. This study was designed to determine if differences exist in the stress response of ZH-supplemented cattle when exposed to...

  7. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, No. 17, July - September 1974

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-29

    34 " I I I I 151, Stamenov, K., Ya. Vasilev. Zh. Yordanova , and L. Pavlov (NS). Pulsed prismatic Q-switch for lasers. IN: Godishn... YORDANOVA , ZH. 22 63 YUKOV. YE. A. 69 46 YUREVICHYUS, SH. V. 48 22 YURIST, B.V. 44 17 YURSHINA, N.I. 52 13 35 Z 42 40 ZAIKA, V.V. 76

  8. Zilpaterol hydrochloride affects cellular muscle metabolism and lipid components of ten different muscles in feedlot heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study determined if zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) altered muscle metabolism and lipid components of ten muscles. Crossbred heifers were either supplemented with ZH (n = 9) or not (Control; n = 10). Muscle tissue was collected (adductor femoris, biceps femoris, gluteus medius, infraspinatus, lat...

  9. Critical Nucleation Field at the Structured Surface of a Superconductor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Marcel Dekker 1969 8. Ginzburg, V.L., Landau, L.D.: Zh. Eksperim. i Tear. Fiz. 20, 1064 (1950) 9. Gor’kov, L.P.: Zh. Eksperim. i Tear. Fiz. 36, 1918...Department of Chemistry Washington, D.C. 20234 Janes Franck Institute - 5640 Ellis Avenue Dr. J. E. Demuth Chicago, Illinois 60637 IBM Corporation

  10. The effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and shade on blood metabolites of finishing beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) and shade were evaluated on blood metabolites and lung score in finishing beef steers. Cattle were fed 0 or 8.33 mg/kg ZH for 21 d with a 3- or 4-d withdrawal before harvest and were housed in open or shaded pens. Blood samples and lung scores w...

  11. Evaluation of the effects of zilpateral hydrochloride supplementation on catecholamin response and other blood metabolites following a combined corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The stress response of cattle supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) has become a topic due to anecdotal claims of supplemented cattle responding poorly to stress. This study was designed to determine if differences exist in the catecholamine and blood metabolite response of ZH-supplemente...

  12. Feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride to calf-fed Holsteins has minimal effects on semimembranosus steak color.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, J A; Hunt, M C; Houser, T A; Boyle, E A E; Dikeman, M E; Johnson, D E; VanOverbeke, D L; Hilton, G G; Brooks, C; Killefer, J; Allen, D M; Streeter, M N; Nichols, W T; Hutcheson, J P; Yates, D A

    2009-11-01

    To determine the effects of feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) for 0, 20, 30, or 40 d (ZH0, ZH20, ZH30, ZH40) on semimembranosus (SM) steak color and color stability in 3 packaging systems, SM subprimals were removed from 60 calf-fed Holstein steers 24 h postmortem. A 7.62-cm-thick portion was removed from each subprimal and stored (2 degrees C) for 21 d; then two 2.54-cm-thick steaks were cut, overwrapped with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film, and assigned to 0 or 3 d of display. Remaining portions of the subprimals were vacuum packaged for 10 d and then enhanced (10% with a solution containing 0.3% sodium chloride, 0.35% phosphate, and 0.05% rosemary extract), cut into steaks, packaged in high-oxygen (HO-MAP) or carbon monoxide (CO-MAP) modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), and assigned to 0, 3, or 5 d (HO-MAP) or 0 or 9 d (CO-MAP) of display. Panelists evaluated the deep and superficial portions of SM steaks for initial color, display color, discoloration, pH, L*, a*, b*, hue angle, and saturation indices. Feeding duration did not affect (P > 0.05) initial color scores of steaks in PVC. Steaks displayed in PVC from ZH20 or ZH30 diets were slightly brighter and less discolored than the ZH40 treatment. For enhanced steaks in HO-MAP, ZH20 steaks were darker on d 5 (P < 0.05) and more discolored (P < 0.05) on d 3 through 5 than all other diet treatments. For enhanced steaks from steers fed ZH40 and in CO-MAP, the deep and superficial SM tended (P > 0.05) to have improved display color compared with other dietary regimens; however, steaks in CO-MAP from all feeding durations had less than 20% metmyoglobin through d 9 of display. Overall, feeding ZH20 might result in steaks with slightly less color stability when packaged in HO-MAP; however, feeding ZH20 or ZH30 to calf-fed Holstein steers will yield steaks that have equal to or more desirable color traits when packaged in PVC or CO-MAP. Regardless of ZH feeding regimen, HO-MAP and CO-MAP extended the color life of the

  13. Closely Coupled Multi-Mode Radiators: A New Concept for Improving the Performance of Electrically Small Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    experimentally verify the effect of asymmetry on improving the omni-directionality. Asymmetric coupled loop antenna on  PEC ground. P1 LL CC P2 Ls Zo Zh Zh ( f...phase shifter in (a).(Here, Zo = 50 Ω, Zh = 115 Ω, Ls = 50 mm, L = 23 nH, and C = 3.3 pF.) Fig. 4. Simulated and measured VSWR of the antenna combined...antenna in Fig. 1 obtained by feeding its two ports using the ideal feed network shown in the inset. P1 LL CC P2 Ls Ls Zo Zh Zh (a) (b) 0.5 1.0 1.5

  14. Effects of dietary urea concentration and zilpaterol hydrochloride on performance and carcass characteristics of finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, K L; Hubbert, M E; Löest, C A

    2016-12-01

    Cattle receiving zilpaterol hydrochloride () may recycle less N and require a greater supply of RDP. This study evaluated effects of ZH on performance and carcass characteristics of steers fed diets with increasing dietary RDP concentrations supplied as urea. Steers (429 animals; BW = 423 ± 4.5 kg) were sorted into 3 blocks according to BW and assigned to 1 of 6 treatments (6 pens per treatment) in a randomized complete block design. Treatments were a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of either no ZH or ZH (75 mg ZH per steer daily) supplemented to finishing diets containing 0, 0.5, or 1.0% urea of dietary DM. Pen weights were recorded before treatment initiation; urea was fed for 27 d, and ZH treatments were fed for 24 d with a 3-d withdrawal period. Pen weights were recorded before transporting steers to a commercial abattoir. Continuous response variables were analyzed using the MIXED procedure and categorical data were analyzed using the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS. No ZH × dietary urea interactions ( ≥ 0.14) occurred for all performance and carcass response variables. Feeding ZH for the last 27 d (included a 3-d withdrawal period) of the finishing period increased ( < 0.01) ADG, decreased ( < 0.01) DMI, and increased ( < 0.01) G:F compared with no ZH. In addition, ZH increased HCW ( < 0.01), dressing percentage ( < 0.01), LM area ( < 0.01), and decreased ( = 0.01) yield grade. Increasing dietary urea linearly decreased ( = 0.01) ADG and DMI. A tendency for a linear decrease ( = 0.10) in HCW, and a tendency for a quadratic increase ( = 0.07) in marbling score were observed as urea increased in the diet. Results indicate that cattle supplemented with ZH do not require additional RDP in the diet, and that performance and carcass characteristics were negatively affected when urea was increased in the diet.

  15. Effect of vitamin D, zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation, and postmortem aging on shear force measurements of three muscles in finishing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Knobel-Graves, S M; Brooks, J C; Johnson, B J; Starkey, J D; Beckett, J L; Hodgen, J M; Hutcheson, J P; Streeter, M N; Thomas, C L; Rathmann, R J; Garmyn, A J; Miller, M F

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D (D3) supplementation may be used to increase tenderness in beef from cattle fed zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH). The study was arranged as a 2 × 2 factorial with fixed effects of ZH (no ZH or ZH fed at 8.3 mg/kg DM for 20 d with a 3-d withdrawal) and D3 (no D3 or 500,000 IU D3·steer·d for 10 d prior to harvest). Cattle ( = 466) were harvested in 2 blocks on the basis of BW with subsequent collection of carcass data. Full loins and inside rounds ( = 144 of each subprimal) were collected for fabrication of 5 steaks from the longissimus lumborum (LL), gluteus medius (GM), and semimembranosus (SM), which were aged for 7, 14, 21, 28, or 35 d. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) was used to evaluate mechanical tenderness of LL, GM, and SM steaks at all aging periods. Slice shear force (SSF) analysis was conducted on only 14- and 21-d LL steaks. No interactions ( > 0.05) between ZH and D3 occurred throughout the entire study. Supplementing ZH resulted in increased HCW ( < 0.01), larger LM area ( < 0.01), and improved calculated yield grades ( < 0.01) with decreases in fat thickness ( = 0.02) and marbling scores ( = 0.05). Supplementation with D3 increased calculated yield grade ( < 0.01) and decreased ( = 0.01) rib eye area. Feeding ZH increased ( ≤ 0.05) WBSF of LL steaks at each postmortem age interval, whereas D3 had no effect ( > 0.05) on WBSF or SSF of LL steaks. Like for WBSF, ZH supplementation increased SSF values at 14 and 21 d postmortem ( < 0.01) compared with those for non-ZH steaks. There was an interaction between ZH and postmortem age ( < 0.01) for WBSF of LL steaks. At 7 d LL steaks from ZH steers sheared over 0.6 kg greater than non-ZH steaks; however, by 21 d this difference was reduced to an average of 0.2 kg. Differences in distribution between LL steaks below 3.0 kg from non-ZH and ZH-fed cattle were also notable ( ≤ 0.05) through 21 d of aging. At 35 d postmortem a high proportion of LL steaks (68.5%) from ZH-fed steers required less

  16. Supplemental vitamin D3 and zilpaterol hydrochloride. II. Effect on calcium concentration, muscle fiber type, and calpain gene expression of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Korn, K T; Lemenager, R P; Claeys, M C; Waddell, J N; Engstrom, M; Schoonmaker, J P

    2013-07-01

    Two hundred and ten Angus × Simmental steers (initial BW 314 ± 11 kg) were separated into heavy and light BW blocks and allotted evenly by BW to 6 treatments (3 heavy and 2 light pens per treatment) to determine the effect of supplemental vitamin D3: 0 IU (no D), 250,000 IU for 165 d (long-term D), or 5 × 10(6) IU for 10 d (short-term D) on plasma and muscle calcium concentrations and gene expression in steers fed either 0 (NZ) or 8.38 mg/kg (ZH) zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) daily for 21 d. Placebo or ZH was added to the diet 24 d, and short-term D was added 13 d before slaughter. Treatments were removed from all diets 3 d before slaughter. Plasma total calcium (Ca(2+)) was determined at study initiation, start of ZH and short-term D feedings, and at vitamin D3 and ZH withdrawal. Both plasma total and ionic Ca(2+) were determined when animals were sent to harvest. Longissimus muscle total and ionic Ca(2+) were determined in meat aged 7 and 4 d postmortem, respectively. When ZH was fed, long-term D decreased plasma total Ca(2+) at slaughter (P < 0.04). Short-term D increased (P < 0.01) plasma total and ionic Ca(2+) at slaughter regardless of ZH inclusion in the diet. Long- and short-term D, with or without ZH, did not affect (P > 0.28) LM total Ca(2+); however, both long- and short-term D increased LM ionic Ca(2+) when ZH was not fed (P < 0.01). Long-term D reduced LM ionic Ca(2+) when ZH was fed (P < 0.02). Neither long- nor short-term D affected PPARα or δ gene expression (P = 0.19) whether or not ZH was fed. Expression of MYH1 and 2A (P < 0.05) but not 2X (P = 0.21) was decreased in steers fed ZH. Long-term D had no effect on MYH2A expression (P = 0.21). Short-term D increased MYH2A expression when ZH was not fed (P < 0.03). Calpain mRNA tended to be lower in steers fed ZH (P = 0.09), but was not affected by long- or short-term D regardless of whether or not ZH was fed (P = 0.39). Expression of calpastatin did not differ with vitamin D supplementation (P

  17. The Relationship between Science and the Military in the Soviet Union

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-07-01

    173. 22. Konyukhov, V. K., I. V. Matrosov , A. M. Prokhorov, D. T. Shalunov, and N. N. Shlrokov, ZhETF P, Vol. 12, 1970, p. 461. 23. Konyukhov, V. K...I. V. Matrosov , A. M. Prokhorov, D. T. Shalunov, and N. N. Shlrokov, ZhETF P, Vol. 10, 1969, p. 10. 24. Kridler, T. P., Soviet Professional...487. :4. Konyukhov, V. K., 1. V. Matrosov , A. M. Prokhorov, D. T. Shalunov, and N. N. Shlrokov, ZhETF / , Vol. 12, 1970, p. 84. ■i Mri51— 49 35

  18. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride withdrawal time on beef carcass cutability, composition, and tenderness.

    PubMed

    Shook, J N; VanOverbeke, D L; Kinman, L A; Krehbiel, C R; Holland, B P; Streeter, M N; Yates, D A; Hilton, G G

    2009-11-01

    The impact of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on carcass yield, composition, and tenderness was evaluated using 384 beef steers in a randomized complete block design. Main effects were the addition of 0 or 8.3 mg/kg of ZH for the final 20 d of feeding and each inclusion level was paired with withdrawal periods of 3, 10, 17, or 24 d. The 2 animals with BW closest to the pen average were selected for carcass fabrication to determine carcass yield, composition, and tenderness. The carcasses from animals fed ZH had greater (P = 0.008) individual side weights. Carcass fat determinations were unchanged (P = 0.70) by ZH. Weights of the strip loin (P = 0.01), peeled tenderloin (P = 0.02), and top sirloin butt (P < 0.001) were all improved with ZH. When expressed as a proportion of carcass weight, ZH increased percentage of carcass in the top sirloin butt (P = 0.006), bottom sirloin tri-tip (P = 0.02), top inside round (P = 0.002), bottom round flat (P = 0.001), and flank steak (P = 0.02). A longer withdrawal time (WT) increased (P < 0.001) carcass weights. Shoulder clod weights were greatest (P < 0.001) with 17-d WT from ZH, whereas chuck roll weights were greatest (P = 0.02) at 17 and 24 d of WT. Peeled tenderloins, top sirloin butts, and eye of rounds responded to WT, with increased (P < 0.001) weights seen at 10 d of WT as compared with all other WT. Shear force values were greater at each of the 3 aging times, 7 d (P < 0.001), 14 d (P < 0.001), and 21 d (P = 0.003), in steaks from ZH-fed steers compared with control steers. Protein percentages were greater in ZH steaks (P = 0.03) and ZH ground beef trim (P < 0.001). Percent moisture was increased (P < 0.001) in strip loin steaks at 3 and 10 d WT. Ground beef trim had an increase (P = 0.04) in percent moisture and a decrease (P = 0.01) in percent fat at 10 d WT. Carcass weights and yields were improved with ZH feeding and may continue to improve even up to 10 d after withdrawal of the supplement. Tenderness was slightly

  19. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and soybean oil supplementation on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of hair-breed ram lambs under heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Ramírez, J L; Macías-Cruz, U; Torrentera-Olivera, N G; González-Ríos, H; Soto-Navarro, S A; Rojo-Rubio, R; Avendaño-Reyes, L

    2014-03-01

    Forty Dorper × Pelibuey ram lambs initially weighing 31.7 ± 2.30 kg were stratified by BW and randomly assigned to treatments under a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to evaluate effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 0 or 10 mg/lamb daily) and soybean oil (SBO; 0 or 6%) on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and wholesale cut yield of ram lambs under heat stress conditions. After a 34-d feeding period, all lambs were harvested. Climatic conditions were of moderate heat stress (average temperature 35.7°C) for lambs during the study. Interactions ZH × SBO were not observed (P ≥ 0.11) for any of the variables evaluated. During the first 17 d of experiment, ZH increased (P ≤ 0.05) BW, ADG, and G:F without affecting feed intake (P = 0.40), but from d 18 to 34 and the entire 34-d feeding period, feedlot performance was not affected (P = 0.18) by ZH. Also, ZH decreased KPH, dressing percent, LM area, LM pH at 24 h postmortem, and leg perimeter (P ≤ 0.04). Renal fat (P = 0.03) decreased with ZH while other noncarcass components were not affected (P ≥ 0.06) by ZH supplementation. Leg yield (P = 0.01) and plain loin (P = 0.04) decreased with ZH and yields of other wholesale cuts were not affected (P ≥ 0.10) by ZH. Feedlot performance (P ≥ 0.20) and wholesale cut yield (P ≥ 0.21) were not affected by SBO. Additionally, dressing percentage decreased (P < 0.01) with SBO while other carcass characteristics (P ≥ 0.12) were not affected by SBO. In conclusion, inclusion of both ZH and SBO in feedlot finishing diets did not improve feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, or wholesale cut yield of hair-breed ram lambs under moderate heat stress. Feedlot performance responded only to ZH and only during the first 17 d of the feeding period. In addition, some carcass characteristics of economic importance, such as dressing, LM area, and leg yield, were improved by ZH.

  20. Effects of supplemental lysine and methionine with zilpaterol hydrochloride on feedlot performance, carcass merit, and skeletal muscle fiber characteristics in finishing feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hosford, A D; Hergenreder, J E; Kim, J K; Baggerman, J O; Ribeiro, F R B; Anderson, M J; Spivey, K S; Rounds, W; Johnson, B J

    2015-09-01

    Feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) with ruminally protected AA was evaluated in a small-pen feeding trial. Crossbred steers ( = 180; initial BW = 366 kg) were blocked by weight and then randomly assigned to treatments (45 pens; 9 pens/treatment). Treatment groups consisted of no ZH and no AA (Cont-), ZH and no AA (Cont+), ZH and a ruminally protected lysine supplement (Lys), ZH and a ruminally protected methionine supplement (Met), and ZH and ruminally protected lysine and methionine (Lys+Met). Zilpaterol hydrochloride (8.3 mg/kg DM) was fed for the last 20 d of the finishing period with a 3-d withdrawal period. Lysine and Met were top dressed daily for the 134-d feeding trial to provide 12 or 4 g·hd·d, respectively, to the small intestine. Carcass characteristics, striploins, and prerigor muscle samples were collected following harvest at a commercial facility. Steaks from each steer were aged for 7, 14, 21, and 28 d, and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) was determined as an indicator of tenderness. Prerigor muscle samples were used for immunohistological analysis. Cattle treated with Met and Lys+Met had increased final BW ( < 0.3) and ADG ( < 0.05) compared to Cont- and Cont+. Supplementation of Lys, Met, and Lys+Met improved G:F ( < 0.05) compared to Cont- during the ZH feeding period (d 111 to 134) as well as the entire feeding period ( < 0.05). Zilpaterol hydrochloride increased carcass ADG ( < 0.05) when compared to non-ZH-fed steers. Methionine and Lys+Met treatments had heavier HCW ( < 0.02) than that of Cont-. Yield grade was decreased ( < 0.04) for Cont+ steers compared to steers treated with Lys, Lys+Met, and Cont-. Tenderness was reduced ( < 0.05) with ZH regardless of AA supplementation. Lysine, Met, Lys+Met, and Cont+ had less tender steaks ( < 0.05) throughout all aging groups compared to Cont-. Steaks from Lys-treated steers were less tender ( < 0.05) than those of Cont+ during the 7- and 14-d aging periods. Nuclei density was the greatest

  1. Effects of feeding dry-rolled corn-based diets with and without wet distillers grains with solubles and zilpaterol hydrochloride on performance, carcass characteristics, and heat stress in finishing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Hales, K E; Shackelford, S D; Wells, J E; King, D A; Hayes, M D; Brown-Brandl, T M; Kuehn, L A; Freetly, H C; Wheeler, T L

    2014-09-01

    Zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) has been approved for use since 2006; however, there is no research on any interactions between ZH and coproducts. Additionally, there is no published information on the potential effects of ZH on heat stress in feedlot cattle. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feeding dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets with and without wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) and ZH on performance, carcass characteristics, and heat stress in feedlot cattle. Four hundred thirty-eight steers were used in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments in 16 pens with 26 to 28 steers in each pen. Factors consisted of inclusion of 0 or 30% (on a DM basis) WDGS and inclusion of ZH at 0 or 84 mg/steer daily for 21 d at the end of the finishing period. Therefore, cattle were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to 1 of the resulting 4 treatment combinations: 1) DRC-based diet with 0% WDGS and 84 mg/steer ZH, 2) DRC-based diet with 0% WDGS and no ZH, 3) DRC-based diet with 30% WDGS and 84 mg/steer of ZH, and 4) DRC-based diet with 30% WDGS and no ZH. Final live BW, carcass-adjusted BW, ADG, and G:F were greater for cattle fed ZH than non-ZH-fed cattle (P < 0.01). Additionally, cattle fed ZH consumed 7.4% less DM than cattle not fed ZH (P < 0.01). Cattle fed ZH for 21 d also had a 2.9% greater HCW (P < 0.01), a 1.1% greater dressing percentage (P < 0.01), 7.3% greater LM area (P < 0.01), and an 8.4% improvement in yield grade (P < 0.01) than cattle not fed ZH. For the main effect of WDGS inclusion, ADG was greater for cattle fed 0 vs. 30% WDGS (P = 0.04) and G:F also tended to be greater for cattle fed 0 vs. 30% WDGS (P = 0.07) for the 21-d ZH feeding period. However, when evaluated over the entire experiment, cattle fed 30 vs. 0% WDGS had a greater ADG and G:F (P < 0.01). Furthermore, cattle fed 30 vs. 0% WDGS had a greater dressing percentage and tended to have a greater amount of 12th rib

  2. A new agent developed by biotransformation of polyphyllin VII inhibits chemoresistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Mao, Ai-Qin; Wei, Juan; Liu, De-Quan; Shi, Gui-Yang; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Biotransformation by the endophytes of certain plants changes various compounds, and this ‘green’ chemistry becomes increasingly important for finding new products with pharmacological activity. In this study, polyphyllin VII (PPL7) was biotransformed by endophytes from the medicinal plant Paris polyphylla Smith, var. yunnanensis. This produced a new compound, ZH-2, with pharmacological activity in vitro and in vivo. ZH-2 was more potent than PPL7 in selectively killing more chemoresistant than chemosensitive breast cancer cells. ZH-2 also re-sensitized chemoresistant breast cancer cells, as evidenced by the improved anti-cancer activity of commonly-used chemotherapeutic agent in vitro, in vivo, and in clinical samples. This anti-chemoresistance effect of ZH-2 was associated with inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. Taken together, our findings are the first one to link biotransformation with a biomedicine. The results provide insights into developing new pharmacologically-active agents via biotransformation by endophytes. PMID:26701723

  3. Analytical Design for Internal Burning Star Grains of Solid Rockets,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-19

    garrer , M., Zhomott, A., B.F. Vebek, Zh. Vandenkerkkhove. Raketnyye Dvitateli. Oborongiz, Moscow, 1962, 306-312. [4) Qian Xue-sen. Introduction to Interstellar Flight. Science Publications (1963), 77-86. 10

  4. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth rates, feed conversion, and carcass traits in calf-fed Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Beckett, J L; Delmore, R J; Duff, G C; Yates, D A; Allen, D M; Lawrence, T E; Elam, N

    2009-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) to enhance growth performance and carcass characteristics in calf-fed Holstein steers. In Exp. 1, Holstein steers (n = 2,311) were fed in a large-pen trial in 2 phases at a commercial feed yard in the desert Southwest. In Exp. 2, a total of 359 steers were fed in a small-pen university study. In Exp. 1 and 2, cattle were implanted with a combination trenbolone acetate-estradiol implant approximately 120 d before slaughter. Cattle were fed ZH for 0, 20, 30, or 40 d before slaughter at a rate of 8.3 mg/kg (DM basis). A 3-d withdrawal was maintained immediately before slaughter. Cattle within an experiment were fed to a common number of days on feed. During the last 120 d before slaughter, ADG was not enhanced by feeding ZH for 20 d (P = 0.33 in Exp. 1, and P = 0.79 in Exp. 2). Gain-to-feed conversion was increased by feeding ZH for all durations in Exp. 1 (P < 0.05). Feeding ZH increased HCW by 9.3 (Exp. 2) to 11.6 (Exp. 1) kg at 20 d compared with the control groups. Across both experiments, dressing percent was increased for all durations of feeding ZH (P < 0.05). Although skeletal maturity score, liver integrity, lean color, fat thickness, and KPH were not affected by feeding ZH for 20 d in either experiment (P >or= 0.6), LM area was increased for all durations of feeding ZH (P < 0.05). The percentage of carcasses identified as USDA Choice was reduced (P < 0.01) for all durations of feeding ZH in Exp. 1. This effect was not observed in Exp. 2. Holstein steers clearly respond to the beta-agonist ZH, and 20 d of feeding ZH with a 3-d withdrawal significantly increased carcass weights, muscling, and carcass leanness.

  5. Comparative effects of ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, carcass traits, and longissimus tenderness of finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Scramlin, S M; Platter, W J; Gomez, R A; Choat, W T; McKeith, F K; Killefer, J

    2010-05-01

    Ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) and zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) are beta-adrenergic agonists that improve growth performance and affect carcass characteristics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative effects of RAC and ZH when fed to beef steers during the last 33 d of the finishing period. Three hundred crossbred beef steers (516 +/- 8 kg) were grouped by BW, BCS, and breed type and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments (10 steers per pen; 10 pens per treatment). Treatments were control (no beta-agonists added), RAC (200 mg of ractopaminexhdx(-1)d(-1), for 33 d), or ZH (75 mg of zilpaterolxanimalx(-1)d(-1), for 30 d, removed 3 d for required withdrawal period). Steers were slaughtered, carcass characteristics were evaluated, and cut-out yields were determined. Both RAC and ZH increased final BW, ADG, feed efficiency (G:F), and HCW compared with controls (P < 0.05). Compared with RAC, ZH decreased ADG, ADFI, and final BW, but increased HCW and dressing percentage (P < 0.05). Carcass yield was not affected by RAC in this experiment, whereas ZH decreased adjusted fat thickness and KPH, increased ribeye area, improved yield grade, and increased cut-out yields, when compared with controls (P < 0.05). Marbling, lean maturity, and skeletal maturity were not different between treatments (P > 0.05). Steaks from RAC steers had greater (P < 0.05) Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) values than steaks from control steers at 3 and 7 d of aging, but did not differ from controls after 14 d of aging. Steaks from ZH steers had greater WBSF values (P < 0.05) than steaks from controls and RAC steaks throughout the 21-d postmortem aging period. Although both beta-adrenergic agonists were effective at improving feedlot performance, RAC showed no negative effect on WBSF after 14 d, whereas WBSF values for ZH steaks were significantly greater than controls after 21 d.

  6. A Patatin-Like Protein Associated with the Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules of Haloferax mediterranei Acts as an Efficient Depolymerase in the Degradation of Native PHA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guiming; Hou, Jing; Cai, Shuangfeng; Zhao, Dahe; Cai, Lei; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The key enzymes and pathways involved in polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis in haloarchaea have been identified in recent years, but the haloarchaeal enzymes for PHA degradation remain unknown. In this study, a patatin-like PHA depolymerase, PhaZh1, was determined to be located on the PHA granules in the haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei. PhaZh1 hydrolyzed the native PHA (nPHA) [including native polyhydroxybutyrate (nPHB) and native poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (nPHBV) in this study] granules in vitro with 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) monomer as the primary product. The site-directed mutagenesis of PhaZh1 indicated that Gly16, Ser47 (in a classical lipase box, G-X-S47-X-G), and Asp195 of this depolymerase were essential for its activity in nPHA granule hydrolysis. Notably, phaZh1 and bdhA (encoding putative 3HB dehydrogenase) form a gene cluster (HFX_6463 to _6464) in H. mediterranei. The 3HB monomer generated from nPHA degradation by PhaZh1 could be further converted into acetoacetate by BdhA, indicating that PhaZh1-BdhA may constitute the first part of a PHA degradation pathway in vivo. Interestingly, although PhaZh1 showed efficient activity and was most likely the key enzyme in nPHA granule hydrolysis in vitro, the knockout of phaZh1 had no significant effect on the intracellular PHA mobilization, implying the existence of an alternative PHA mobilization pathway(s) that functions effectively within the cells of H. mediterranei. Therefore, identification of this patatin-like depolymerase of haloarchaea may provide a new strategy for producing the high-value-added chiral compound (R)-3HB and may also shed light on the PHA mobilization in haloarchaea. PMID:25710370

  7. A patatin-like protein associated with the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules of Haloferax mediterranei acts as an efficient depolymerase in the degradation of native PHA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiming; Hou, Jing; Cai, Shuangfeng; Zhao, Dahe; Cai, Lei; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The key enzymes and pathways involved in polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis in haloarchaea have been identified in recent years, but the haloarchaeal enzymes for PHA degradation remain unknown. In this study, a patatin-like PHA depolymerase, PhaZh1, was determined to be located on the PHA granules in the haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei. PhaZh1 hydrolyzed the native PHA (nPHA) [including native polyhydroxybutyrate (nPHB) and native poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (nPHBV) in this study] granules in vitro with 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) monomer as the primary product. The site-directed mutagenesis of PhaZh1 indicated that Gly16, Ser47 (in a classical lipase box, G-X-S47-X-G), and Asp195 of this depolymerase were essential for its activity in nPHA granule hydrolysis. Notably, phaZh1 and bdhA (encoding putative 3HB dehydrogenase) form a gene cluster (HFX_6463 to _6464) in H. mediterranei. The 3HB monomer generated from nPHA degradation by PhaZh1 could be further converted into acetoacetate by BdhA, indicating that PhaZh1-BdhA may constitute the first part of a PHA degradation pathway in vivo. Interestingly, although PhaZh1 showed efficient activity and was most likely the key enzyme in nPHA granule hydrolysis in vitro, the knockout of phaZh1 had no significant effect on the intracellular PHA mobilization, implying the existence of an alternative PHA mobilization pathway(s) that functions effectively within the cells of H. mediterranei. Therefore, identification of this patatin-like depolymerase of haloarchaea may provide a new strategy for producing the high-value-added chiral compound (R)-3HB and may also shed light on the PHA mobilization in haloarchaea. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Effects of a three-dimensional hill on the wake characteristics of a model wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Howard, Kevin B.; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-02-01

    The spatial evolution of a turbine wake downwind of a three-dimensional sinusoidal hill is studied using large-eddy simulations and wind tunnel measurements. The computed flow fields behind the hill show good agreement with wind tunnel measurements. Three different heights of the hill, i.e., hhill = zh - 0.5D, ≈ zh and =zh + 0.5D (where zh is the turbine hub height and D is the diameter of the turbine rotor), were considered. The effect of the hill turbine spacing was investigated through a comparative analysis with the turbine wake results in the undisturbed turbulent boundary layer. It is observed that the turbine wakes downwind of the hill with hhill ≈ zh and hhill = zh + 0.5D recover faster because of the increased entrainment of ambient flow into the turbine wake, which is due to the enhanced turbulent transport in both spanwise and vertical directions. In comparison with the turbine only case, significant increases in the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) in the turbine wake are observed for the hill-turbine cases with hhill ≈ zh and hhill = zh + 0.5D. A velocity scale UT, defined in terms of the thrust force acting on the turbine, is introduced for the turbine-added velocity deficit and TKE. For the turbine-added velocity deficit, UT is shown to be an appropriate scale at wake locations sufficiently far downwind of the turbine (i.e., greater than or equal to 8D). The vertical profiles of the turbine-added TKE normalized by UT 2 are shown to nearly collapse in the wake both for the turbine only and hill-turbine cases at all locations greater than 4D downwind of the turbine. A simple model for the turbine-added TKE in complex terrain is also proposed based on the new physical insights obtained from our simulations.

  9. Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, Osama; Zhou, Dingzhong; Song, Qi; Soomro, Abdul Aziz; Cai, Minmin; Zheng, Longyu; Yu, Ziniu; Zhang, Jibin

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides from a wide spectrum of insects possess potent microbicidal properties against microbial-related diseases. In this study, seven new gene fragments of three types of antimicrobial peptides were obtained from Hermetia illucens (L), and were named cecropinZ1, sarcotoxin1, sarcotoxin (2a), sarcotoxin (2b), sarcotoxin3, stomoxynZH1, and stomoxynZH1(a). Among these genes, a 189-basepair gene (stomoxynZH1) was cloned into the pET32a expression vector and expressed in the Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. Results show that Trx-stomoxynZH1 exhibits diverse inhibitory activity on various pathogens, including Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, fungus Rhizoctonia solani Khün (rice)-10, and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary-14. The minimum inhibitory concentration of Trx-stomoxynZH1 is higher against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria but similar between the fungal strains. These results indicate that H. illucens (L.) could provide a rich source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides. Importantly, stomoxynZH1 displays a potential benefit in controlling antibiotic-resistant pathogens. PMID:28056070

  10. Zilpaterol hydrochloride improves beef yield, changes palatability traits, and increases calpain-calpastatin gene expression in Nellore heifers.

    PubMed

    Cônsolo, Nara Regina Brandão; Ferrari, Viviane Borba; Mesquita, Ligia Garcia; Goulart, Rodrigo Silva; Silva, Luis Felipe Prada E

    2016-11-01

    This research aimed to evaluate the effects of the beta-agonist zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on carcass traits, subprimal yield, meat quality, palatability traits, and gene expression in Nellore heifers. Zilpaterol increased Longissimus lumborum area and did not change back fat thickness, meat color, and cooking loss. Heifers fed ZH had greater hindquarter weight and carcass percentage. Muscles from hindquarter were heavier for animals fed ZH. Forequarter (% of carcass) decreased and brisket did not change with ZH supplementation. There were no differences between treatments for steak aroma, beef flavor, and off-flavor. However, tenderness and juiciness were reduced by ZH, depending on postmortem aging. Zilpaterol increased Calpain-1, Calpain-2, and calpastatin mRNA expression, with no effect of day of slaughter or ZH×Day interaction. In conclusion, ZH supplementation improved hypertrophy, meat production, and debone yield in Nellore heifers, which led to decreased tenderness and to increased mRNA expression in the calpain-calpastatin system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L.).

    PubMed

    Elhag, Osama; Zhou, Dingzhong; Song, Qi; Soomro, Abdul Aziz; Cai, Minmin; Zheng, Longyu; Yu, Ziniu; Zhang, Jibin

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides from a wide spectrum of insects possess potent microbicidal properties against microbial-related diseases. In this study, seven new gene fragments of three types of antimicrobial peptides were obtained from Hermetia illucens (L), and were named cecropinZ1, sarcotoxin1, sarcotoxin (2a), sarcotoxin (2b), sarcotoxin3, stomoxynZH1, and stomoxynZH1(a). Among these genes, a 189-basepair gene (stomoxynZH1) was cloned into the pET32a expression vector and expressed in the Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. Results show that Trx-stomoxynZH1 exhibits diverse inhibitory activity on various pathogens, including Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, fungus Rhizoctonia solani Khün (rice)-10, and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary-14. The minimum inhibitory concentration of Trx-stomoxynZH1 is higher against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria but similar between the fungal strains. These results indicate that H. illucens (L.) could provide a rich source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides. Importantly, stomoxynZH1 displays a potential benefit in controlling antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  12. Micromonospora violae sp. nov., isolated from a root of Viola philippica Car.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuejing; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xinhui; Wang, Shurui; Liu, Chongxi; Yu, Chao; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2014-08-01

    A novel actinomycete, designated strain NEAU-zh8(T), was isolated from a root of Viola philippica Car collected in China and characterized using a polyphasic approach. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain NEAU-zh8(T) belongs to the genus Micromonospora, being most closely related to Micromonospora chokoriensis 2-9(6)(T) (99.9 %), Micromonospora saelicesensis Lupac 09(T) (99.3 %) and Micromonospora lupini Lupac 14N(T) (99.0 %). gyrB gene analysis also indicated that strain NEAU-zh8(T) should be assigned to the genus Micromonospora. The cell-wall peptidoglycan consisted of meso-diaminopimelic acid and glycine. The major menaquinones were MK-10(H4), MK-10(H2) and MK-10(H6). The phospholipid profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, C16:0 and C17:0 10-methyl. A combination of DNA-DNA hybridization results and some physiological and biochemical properties indicated that strain NEAU-zh8(T) could be readily distinguished from the closest phylogenetic relatives. Therefore, it is proposed that strain NEAU-zh8(T) represents a novel Micromonospora species, for which the name Micromonospora violae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-zh8(T) (=CGMCC 4.7102(T)=DSM 45888(T)).

  13. Effect of zilpaterol hydrochloride duration of feeding on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Elam, N A; Vasconcelos, J T; Hilton, G; VanOverbeke, D L; Lawrence, T E; Montgomery, T H; Nichols, W T; Streeter, M N; Hutcheson, J P; Yates, D A; Galyean, M L

    2009-06-01

    Four trials, each with a randomized complete block design, were conducted with 8,647 beef steers (initial BW = 346 +/- 29.6 kg) in 3 different locations in the United States to evaluate the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot cattle. Treatments consisted of feeding ZH (8.33 mg/kg of dietary DM) for 0, 20, 30, or 40 d, at the end of the feeding period, followed by a 3-d withdrawal period before slaughter. Cattle were weighed on d 0 and 50 before slaughter (in 3 of the 4 studies), and on the day of slaughter. Data from the 4 trials were pooled for statistical analyses. No differences (P > or = 0.78) were detected among treatments for ADG and G:F from the start of the study until the final 50 d on feed. Final BW was greater for the average of the 3 ZH-treated groups (P < 0.01) than for the 0-d group. Average daily gain was greater for ZH-treated vs. control cattle during the final 50 d on feed (P < 0.01) and for the entire feeding period (P < 0.01). No differences in DMI were noted for any periods of the experiment (P > or = 0.42) for ZH-treated cattle vs. controls. No differences were noted for DMI among the ZH-treated groups for the final 50 d on feed (P = 0.81) or for the overall feeding period (P = 0.31). Feeding ZH for any length of time increased G:F (P < 0.01) for the final 50 d and overall compared with 0-d cattle. In addition, a linear increase with more days of ZH feeding was observed for G:F during the period that ZH was fed (P = 0.01), as well as for the overall feeding period (P = 0.01). The ZH-treated cattle had heavier HCW (P < 0.01), greater dressing percent (P < 0.01), reduced marbling scores (P < 0.01), less 12th-rib fat (P < 0.01), larger LM area (P < 0.01), less KPH (P = 0.01), and a lower USDA yield grade (P < 0.01) than the 0-d cattle, regardless of the duration of ZH feeding. Dressing percent increased linearly (P < 0.01) with increased duration of ZH feeding, whereas 12th-rib fat (P = 0

  14. Impact of a leptin single nucleotide polymorphism and zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth and carcass characteristics in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Kononoff, P J; Defoor, P J; Engler, M J; Swingle, R S; James, S T; Deobald, H M; Deobald, J L; Marquess, F L S

    2013-10-01

    A total of 4,178 steers (mean initial BW = 403.9 ± 16.04 kg) were used to test the interactive effects, if any, of leptin R25C genotypes (CC, CT, or TT) and zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) feeding duration on growth performance and carcass traits. Steers were blocked by arrival at the feed yard, genotyped for the leptin SNP, allotted to genotype-specific pens (90 steers/pen), and assigned randomly within genotype and block to 0 or 21 d of dietary ZH. All pens within a block were slaughtered on the same day (132.1 ± 10.9 d on feed). Final BW of steers fed ZH was 6.0 kg heavier (P = 0.008), and ZH-fed steers had greater (P = 0.003) ADG than steers not fed ZH. Feeding ZH decreased DMI in steers with increased frequency of the T allele (9.67, 9.53, and 9.28 kg/d for CC, CT, and TT, respectively), but DMI increased with the frequency of the T allele (9.68, 9.90, and 10.1 kg for CC, CT, and TT, respectively) when ZH was not fed (leptin genotype × ZH, P = 0.011). At the conclusion of the study, ultrasonic fat was greatest for TT steers (11.4 ± 0.28 mm) and least (P = 0.003) for CC steers (11.0 ± 0.25 mm). Regardless of ZH-feeding duration, TT steers produced a greater (P = 0.006) percentage of USDA yield grade (YG) 4 or higher carcasses (5.4 vs. 2.7%) and a lesser (P = 0.006) percentage of YG 1 carcasses (17.7 vs. 26.8%) than CC steers. In addition, ZH-fed steers produced a greater (P < 0.001) percentage of USDA YG 1 carcasses (25.9 vs. 16.2%) and a lesser (P < 0.001) percentage of YG 4 or higher carcasses (1.6 vs. 6.0%) than steers fed the control diet. Marbling scores and the percentage of carcasses grading USDA Choice and Prime were greater in TT than CC steers when fed diets devoid of ZH, but both marbling and quality grades did not differ among leptin genotypes when fed ZH for 21 d (leptin genotype × ZH, P ≤ 0.03). The amount of HCW gain tended to be less (P = 0.095) for steers of the TT genotype (12.7 kg) than either CC (16.3 kg) or CT (17.0 kg) genotypes

  15. Predicting red meat yields in carcasses from beef-type and calf-fed Holstein steers using the United States Department of Agriculture calculated yield grade.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T E; Elam, N A; Miller, M F; Brooks, J C; Hilton, G G; VanOverbeke, D L; McKeith, F K; Killefer, J; Montgomery, T H; Allen, D M; Griffin, D B; Delmore, R J; Nichols, W T; Streeter, M N; Yates, D A; Hutcheson, J P

    2010-06-01

    Analyses were conducted to evaluate the ability of the USDA yield grade equation to detect differences in subprimal yield of beef-type steers and calf-fed Holstein steers that had been fed zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Intervet Inc., Millsboro, DE) as well as those that had not been fed ZH. Beef-type steer (n = 801) and calf-fed Holstein steer (n = 235) carcasses were fabricated into subprimal cuts and trim. Simple correlations between calculated yield grades and total red meat yields ranged from -0.56 to -0.62 for beef-type steers. Reliable correlations from calf-fed Holstein steers were unobtainable; the probability of a type I error met or exceeded 0.39. Linear models were developed for the beef-type steers to predict total red meat yield based on calculated USDA yield grade within each ZH duration. At an average calculated USDA yield grade of 2.9, beef-type steer carcasses that had not been fed ZH had an estimated 69.4% red meat yield, whereas those fed ZH had an estimated 70.7% red meat yield. These results indicate that feeding ZH increased red meat yield by 1.3% at a constant calculated yield grade. However, these data also suggest that the calculated USDA yield grade score is a poor and variable estimator (adjusted R(2) of 0.31 to 0.38) of total red meat yield of beef-type steer carcasses, regardless of ZH feeding. Moreover, no relationship existed (adjusted R(2) of 0.00 to 0.01) for calf-fed Holstein steer carcasses, suggesting the USDA yield grade is not a valid estimate of calf-fed Holstein red meat yield.

  16. Effects of sequential feeding of β-adrenergic agonists on cull cow performance, carcass characteristics, and mRNA relative abundance.

    PubMed

    Weber, M J; Dikeman, M E; Unruh, J A; Jaeger, J R; Murray, L; Houser, T A; Johnson, B J

    2012-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of supplementation with a single β-adrenergic agonist (β-AA) or a sequence of β-AA on cow performance, carcass characteristics, and mRNA relative abundance of cull cows implanted and fed a concentrate diet. Sixty cull cows were implanted with Revalor-200 (200 mg of trenbolone acetate and 20 mg of estradiol) and assigned to 1 of 4 treatments (n = 15/treatment): CON = fed a concentrate diet only; RH = supplemented with ractopamine-HCl for the last 25 d before slaughter; ZH = supplemented with zilpaterol-HCl for 20 d before a 3-d withdrawal before slaughter; RH + ZH = supplemented with RH for 25 d, followed by ZH for 20 d before a 3-d withdrawal before slaughter. Ractopamine-HCl was supplemented at a dose of 200 mg·animal(-1)·d(-1), and ZH was supplemented at 8.33 mg/kg (100% DM basis) of feed. All cows were fed a concentrate diet for 74 d. Each treatment had 5 cows per pen and 3 replicate pens. Body weights were collected on d 1, 24, 51, and 72. Muscle biopsies from the LM were collected on d 24, 51, and at slaughter from a subsample of 3 cows per pen. Carcass traits were evaluated postslaughter. The 2 ZH treatments averaged 15.3 kg more BW gain, 0.20 kg greater ADG, and 7.8 cm(2) larger LM area than CON and RH treatments, and 21 kg more HCW than CON, but these differences were not significant (P > 0.10), likely due to a sample size of n = 15/treatment. The sequence of RH followed by ZH tended to optimize the combination of HCW, LM area, percent intramuscular fat, and lean color and maturity compared with the ZH treatment. Abundance of β(2)-adrenergic receptor (AR) mRNA was not altered in the RH + ZH treatment during RH supplementation from d 24 to 51 of feeding. However, the abundance of β(2)-AR mRNA increased (P < 0.05) the last 23 d of feeding for the RH treatment and tended (P = 0.10) to increase in ZH cows during ZH supplementation. For all cows, abundance of type IIa myosin heavy chain (MHC

  17. Biological responses of beef steers to steroidal implants and zilpaterol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Parr, S L; Brown, T R; Ribeiro, F R B; Chung, K Y; Hutcheson, J P; Blackwell, B R; Smith, P N; Johnson, B J

    2014-08-01

    British × Continental steers (n = 168; 7 pens/treatment; initial BW = 362 kg) were used to evaluate the effect of dose/payout pattern of trenbolone acetate (TBA) and estradiol-17β (E2) and feeding of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on serum urea-N (SUN), NEFA, IGF-I, and E2 concentrations and LM mRNA expression of the estrogen (ER), androgen (ANR), IGF-I (IGF-IR), β1-adrenergic (β1-AR), and β2-adrenergic (β2-AR) receptors and IGF-I. A randomized complete block design was used with a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Main effects were implant (no implant [NI], Revalor-S [REV-S; 120 mg TBA + 24 mg E2], and Revalor-XS [REV-X; 200 mg TBA + 40 mg E2]) and ZH (0 or 8.3 mg/kg of DM for 20 d with a 3-d withdrawal). Steers were fed for 153 or 174 d. Blood was collected (2 steers/pen) at d -1, 2, 6, 13, 27, 55, 83, 111, and 131 relative to implanting; LM biopsies (1 steer/pen) were collected at d -1, 27, 55, and 111. Blood and LM samples were collected at d -1, 11, and 19 relative to ZH feeding. A greater dose of TBA + E2 in combination with ZH increased ADG and HCW in an additive manner, suggesting a different mechanism of action for ZH and steroidal implants. Implanting decreased (P < 0.05) SUN from d 2 through 131. Feeding ZH decreased (P < 0.05) SUN. Serum NEFA concentrations were not affected by implants (P = 0.44). There was a day × ZH interaction (P = 0.06) for NEFA; ZH steers had increased (P < 0.01) NEFA concentrations at d 11 of ZH feeding. Serum E2 was greater (P < 0.05) for implanted steers by d 27. Serum trenbolone-17β was greater (P < 0.05) for implanted steers by d 2 followed by a typical biphasic release rate, with a secondary peak at d 111 for REV-X (P < 0.05) implanted steers. Implanting did not affect mRNA expression of the ANR or ER, but the IGF-IR and the β1-AR and β2-AR were less (P < 0.05) for REV-S than NI at d 55 and β2-AR mRNA was less (P < 0.05) for REV-S than for REV-X. Expression of the IGF-IR and the β1-AR at d 111 was

  18. Feedlot performance and carcass traits of hairbreed ewe lambs in response to zilpaterol hydrochloride and soybean oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Ramírez, J L; Macías-Cruz, U; Torrentera-Olivera, N G; González-Ríos, H; Peña-Ramos, E A; Soto-Navarro, S A; Avendaño-Reyes, L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 0 or 10 mg/lamb daily) and soybean oil (SBO; 0 or 6%) supplementation on feedlot performance, carcass traits, and wholesale cut yield of 32 Dorper × Pelibuey ewe lambs (30.55 ± 2. 57 kg of initial BW). Lambs were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to treatments under a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. After a 34-d feeding period, all ewes were slaughtered. No ZH × SBO interactions were detected (P ≥ 0.11) for the variables evaluated. In the overall feeding period and first 17 d of experiment, feedlot performance was not affected (P ≥ 0.26) by ZH supplementation, but from d 18 to 34, ZH increased (P ≤ 0.03) total gain, ADG, and G:F without affecting DMI (P = 0.58). Also, ZH increased (P ≤ 0.02) HCW, cold carcass weight, dressing percentage, LM area, and leg perimeter. Lung weight as percentage of final BW decreased (P = 0.05) whereas other noncarcass components and wholesale cut yields were not affected (P ≥ 0.06) by ZH supplementation. Inclusion of SBO did not affect (P ≥ 0.08) feedlot performance or wholesale cut yields. The LM pH at 24 h postmortem as well as liver and peritoneum percentages were decreased (P ≤ 0.05) by SBO supplementation, but no other carcass characteristics or noncarcass components were affected (P ≥ 0.08) by SBO. In conclusion, feedlot performance and carcass characteristics were not altered by the interaction of ZH × SBO. However, ZH alone increased the growth of ewes during the last 17 d of the feeding period. Likewise, carcass characteristics of economic importance (i.e., HCW, dressing percentage, LM area, and leg perimeter) increased with ZH supplementation. In general, feedlot performance, carcass traits, and wholesale cut yields were not altered by including 6% of SBO in the finishing diet of ewe lambs.

  19. The effect of days on feed and zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on feeding behavior and live growth performance of Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Walter, L-A J; McEvers, T J; May, N D; Reed, J A; Hutcheson, J P; Lawrence, T E

    2016-05-01

    This experiment was designed to study the effect of days on feed (d 225-533) and zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) supplementation on Holstein steer ( = 110) performance and feeding behavior as part of a serial slaughter trial. Steers were randomly assigned to 1 of 11 harvest groups with 10 steers ( = 5 control and = 5 ZH; ZH at 8.33 mg/kg diet) harvested each 28 d. Steers were weighed every 28 d (d 225, 253, 281, 309, 337, 365, 393, 421, 449, 477, 505, and 533); individual daily meal consumption data for each steer were recorded using GrowSafe technology. In the pretreatment period, dry matter intake expressed a negative quadratic relationship with days on feed (DOF) {DMI = -5.7120 + (0.08370 x DOF)- (0.00011 x DOF); Adj. = 0.2574; RMSE = 0.25 75; 0.01}. A linear increase in BW ( < 0.01) occurred during the pretreatment 308 d period from 466 to 844 kg, {BWend = 137.61 + (1.4740 x DOF); Adj. = 0.8819; RMSE = 37.06; < 0.01}, whereas ADG and G:F decreased linearly. Dry matter intake per meal exhibited a quadratic relationship over days on feed and peaked ( < 0.01) during d 365 to 392 at 1.065 kg coinciding with the highest numerical daily DMI (11.19 kg). Daily consumption visit duration differed ( < 0.01) during the 308 d period, with a low of 52.29 min (d 337-364) and a high of 55.59 min (d 365-392). Consumption rate peaked at 714 g/min (d 337-364) and exhibited a quadratic relationship to DOF. The difference ( < 0.04) in DMI between control and ZH treated cattle across all 11 harvest groups averaged 0.575 kg. Moreover, ZH treatment resulted in decreased ( 0.01) DMI per meal event of 0.093 kg. Gain to feed tended to improve ( = 0.06) with ZH treatment by 0.017 kg gain per kg feed relative to the control cattle. Daily bunk, consumption, and meal visit durations were influenced by ZH during the 20 d treatment period ( = 0.01); the average difference between control and ZH supplemented cattle over the 308 d trial was 9.09, 8.71, and 11.39 min per d, respectively. The data

  20. Assessment of the contribution of differential polarization to improved rainfall measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Carlton W.; Atlas, David

    1984-01-01

    A description is given of the effects of variations in the shape or breadth of the drop size distribution (DSD) on rainfall parameters deduced from a measurement technique which employs the differential reflectivity factor ZDR and the reflectivity factor at horizontal polarization ZH. The mathematical form of the DSD used is a gamma distribution. Justification for such a form is given through consideration of varying DSD shape in nature as implied by the results of empirical analyses of other workers. Theoretical expressions are derived for rainfall rate R, liquid water content W, and median volume diameter D0 in terms of ZDR, ZH, and size distribution dependent factors. The latter calculations assume backscattering cross sections for oblate, nonoscillating raindrops falling in still air with equilibrium shapes. These expressions are used to assess quantitatively the effects of changes in DSD breadth on values of R, W, and D0 deduced from ZDR and ZH. They are also used to show the effects of measurement errors in ZDR and ZH on R, W, and D0. The potential improvement in accuracy which is possible when account is taken of DSD shape variations is shown by simulating a (ZDR, ZH) dual-measurement method using experimental raindrop size spectra. Methods by which DSD shape variations could be detected through the use of a third remote measurable are discussed.

  1. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Mature Pollen in Triploid and Diploid Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Ying-Hua; Sun, Pei; Jia, Hui-Xia; Fan, Wei; Lu, Meng-Zhu; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2016-09-03

    Ploidy affects plant growth vigor and cell size, but the relative effects of pollen fertility and allergenicity between triploid and diploid have not been systematically examined. Here we performed comparative analyses of fertility, proteome, and abundances of putative allergenic proteins of pollen in triploid poplar 'ZhongHuai1' ('ZH1', triploid) and 'ZhongHuai2' ('ZH2', diploid) generated from the same parents. The mature pollen was sterile in triploid poplar 'ZH1'. By applying two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), a total of 72 differentially expressed protein spots (DEPs) were detected in triploid poplar pollen. Among them, 24 upregulated and 43 downregulated proteins were identified in triploid poplar pollen using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation coupled with time of-flight tandem mass spectrometer analysis (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS). The main functions of these DEPs were related with "S-adenosylmethionine metabolism", "actin cytoskeleton organization", or "translational elongation". The infertility of triploid poplar pollen might be related to its abnormal cytoskeletal system. In addition, the abundances of previously identified 28 putative allergenic proteins were compared among three poplar varieties ('ZH1', 'ZH2', and '2KEN8'). Most putative allergenic proteins were downregulated in triploid poplar pollen. This work provides an insight into understanding the protein regulation mechanism of pollen infertility and low allergenicity in triploid poplar, and gives a clue to improving poplar polyploidy breeding and decreasing the pollen allergenicity.

  2. Strictly co-isogenic C57BL/6J-Prnp−/− mice: A rigorous resource for prion science

    PubMed Central

    Nuvolone, Mario; Hermann, Mario; Sorce, Silvia; Russo, Giancarlo; Tiberi, Cinzia; Schwarz, Petra; Minikel, Eric; Sanoudou, Despina; Pelczar, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Although its involvement in prion replication and neurotoxicity during transmissible spongiform encephalopathies is undisputed, the physiological role of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) remains enigmatic. A plethora of functions have been ascribed to PrPC based on phenotypes of Prnp−/− mice. However, all currently available Prnp−/− lines were generated in embryonic stem cells from the 129 strain of the laboratory mouse and mostly crossed to non-129 strains. Therefore, Prnp-linked loci polymorphic between 129 and the backcrossing strain resulted in systematic genetic confounders and led to erroneous conclusions. We used TALEN-mediated genome editing in fertilized mouse oocytes to create the Zurich-3 (ZH3) Prnp-ablated allele on a pure C57BL/6J genetic background. Genomic, transcriptional, and phenotypic characterization of PrnpZH3/ZH3 mice failed to identify phenotypes previously described in non–co-isogenic Prnp−/− mice. However, aged PrnpZH3/ZH3 mice developed a chronic demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, confirming the crucial involvement of PrPC in peripheral myelin maintenance. This new line represents a rigorous genetic resource for studying the role of PrPC in physiology and disease. PMID:26926995

  3. The NSm proteins of Rift Valley fever virus are dispensable for maturation, replication and infection

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Brian H.; Albariño, Cesar G.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2007-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus belongs to the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-strand RNA viruses and causes mosquito-borne disease in sub-Saharan Africa. We report the development of a T7 RNA polymerase driven plasmid-based genetic system for the virulent Egyptian isolate, ZH501. We have used this system to rescue a virus that has a 387 nucleotide deletion on the genomic M segment that eliminates the coding region for two non-structural proteins known as NSm. This virus, ΔNSm rZH501, is indistinguishable from the parental ZH501 strain with respect to expression of structural proteins and growth in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:17070883

  4. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride feeding duration on beef and calf-fed Holstein strip loin steak color.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H R; Brooks, J C; Hunt, M C; Hilton, G G; VanOverbeke, D L; Killefer, J; Lawrence, T E; Delmore, R J; Johnson, B J; Allen, D M; Streeter, M N; Nichols, W T; Hutcheson, J P; Yates, D A; Martin, J N; Miller, M F

    2010-03-01

    Two studies using beef and calf-fed Holstein cattle were conducted to determine the effect of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) supplementation on the color of strip loin steaks packaged in traditional and modified-atmosphere packaging. Select (USDA) strip loins were obtained from the carcasses of beef (n = 118) or calf-fed Holstein (n = 132) cattle fed ZH (6.8 g/ton on a 90% DM basis) for the last 0, 20, 30, or 40 d of feeding. One portion of the strip loin was moisture enhanced, cut into steaks, and packaged in an atmosphere containing 80% oxygen and 20% carbon dioxide. The remaining portion of the strip loin was vacuum-packaged until further processing. At 14 d postmortem, the vacuum-packaged loins were portioned and packaged in traditional retail packaging. Traditionally packaged and modified-atmosphere-packaged steaks were then placed in retail cases at -1 to 3 degrees C for 5 d and evaluated by both trained and consumer panelists. Instrumental color values and purge loss were also recorded. Zilpaterol hydrochloride duration had no effect on the color and purchase intention scores of consumer panelists for beef and calf-fed Holstein strip loin steaks. Zilpaterol hydrochloride feeding duration had no effect on the color or discoloration scores of trained panelists for enhanced, modified-atmosphere-packaged beef strip steaks. Traditionally packaged beef steaks from cattle treated with ZH for 20 d had more desirable (P < 0.05) lean color scores than steaks from cattle not treated with ZH on d 2, 3, and 4 of display and had similar discoloration scores on d 1, 2, and 3 of display. The color scores of trained panelists for enhanced calf-fed Holstein steaks were more desirable (P < 0.05) for steaks from cattle not treated with ZH than for steaks from cattle treated with ZH for 20 d on d 1, 2, 3, and 4 of display. However, the discoloration scores of trained panelists for enhanced and modified-atmosphere-packaged calf-fed Holstein steaks were similar for steaks from

  5. Nutritional quality and ions uptake to PTNDS in soybeans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minjuan; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Porous-tube nutrient delivery system (PTNDS) allows high control of the root environment and prevents plant infections in both microgravity and ground conditions. In this paper, six soybean cultivars ('ZH13', 'ZH57', 'LD10', 'HH35', 'HH43', and 'ZGDD') were evaluated in terms of yield, photosynthetic efficiency, insoluble dietary fiber and ions uptake efficiency. Besides proximal composition, the concentrations of mineral and isoflavones were monitored in the seeds. 'HH35' and 'ZH13' plants showed much higher yield and harvest index, in addition to the lower lignin content of inedible biomass. Data showed that 'HH35' had the higher photosynthetic efficiency of soybean leaves with regard to photosynthetic rate and instantaneous carboxylation efficiency, whereas chlorophyll ratio and carotenoids content were no difference with the other cultivars. Both cations and anions except NH4(+) and H2PO4(-), were accumulated excessively compared to controls, especially with anions in PTNDS.

  6. Assessment of the contribution of differential polarization to improved rainfall measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, C. W.; Atlas, D.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement technique employing the differential reflectivity factor Z(DR) and the horizontal polarization reflectivity factor Z(H) is the basis of the present study of the effects of variations in the shape or breadth of the drop size distribution (DSD) on rainfall parameters. Theoretical expressions are derived for rainfall rate, liquid water content W, and median volume diameter D(O) in terms of Z(DR), Z(H), and size distribution-dependent factors. The latter calculations assume backscattering cross sections for oblate, nonoscillating raindrops falling in still air with equilibrium shapes. These expressions are used to quantitatively assess the effects of changes in DSD breadth on values of R, W, and D(O) deduced from Z(DR) and Z(H).

  7. On the transfer of protective coating elements on a metal surface from halide gaseous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    The processes occurring during the formation of multicomponent diffusion coatings on nickel alloys at the stage of delivery of elements on the article surface when chlorine, bromine, and iodine halides are used as activators are considered. Balance equations and calculated values are given for the partial pressures in the composition of a gas phase of components participating in chemical transport reaction; the possible reactions of delivering elements on the article surfaces and the structures of Ni-Al, Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Al, Co-Cr-Al coatings deposited on the ZhS26, ZhS6U, ZhS32, and VZhL12U alloys are presented.

  8. Assessment of the contribution of differential polarization to improved rainfall measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, C. W.; Atlas, D.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement technique employing the differential reflectivity factor Z(DR) and the horizontal polarization reflectivity factor Z(H) is the basis of the present study of the effects of variations in the shape or breadth of the drop size distribution (DSD) on rainfall parameters. Theoretical expressions are derived for rainfall rate, liquid water content W, and median volume diameter D(O) in terms of Z(DR), Z(H), and size distribution-dependent factors. The latter calculations assume backscattering cross sections for oblate, nonoscillating raindrops falling in still air with equilibrium shapes. These expressions are used to quantitatively assess the effects of changes in DSD breadth on values of R, W, and D(O) deduced from Z(DR) and Z(H).

  9. [SSR molecular markers related to wood density and fibre traits in poplar].

    PubMed

    Huang, Lie-Jian; Su, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Huang, Qin-Jun

    2004-03-01

    In this study, field experiment was carried out following the randomized complete block design with five replications in 1999. F2 population was derived from a cross between the female ZH3 and the male ZH1 (ZH3, ZH1 were selected from F1 individuals derived from the cross of Populus deltoides with P. cathayana, produced by HUANG Dong-Sen in 1973). Sixty-eight F2 populations, four F1 individuals (included ZH3, ZH1) and both parents (Populus deltoides and P. cathayana) were measured for wood densities, fibre lengths, fibre widths and fibre angles. The results indicated that the trait of fibre length has obviously heterosis, there may have positive effects among the genes controlling the trait of fibre length, but may have negative effects among the genes controlling the trait of wood density. Using the method of single factor variance, the SSR markers correlated with wood density, fibre length, fibre width and fibre angle were identified to be 5, 7, 4 and 2, respectively. There were some useful markers among the above traits in P. cathayana, such as PMGC2873-1 for wood density (its contribution was 4.88%), PMGC456-3, PMGC2702-2 for fibre length (their contribution were 22.96% and 9.17%, respectively), PMGC2408-1 for fibre width (its contribution was 7.18%), and PMGC2525-1 for fibre angle (its contribution was 16.59%), these markers might be useful for wood property improvement if using them correctly in breeding program.

  10. Physiological mechanisms for high salt tolerance in wild soybean (Glycine soja) from Yellow River Delta, China: photosynthesis, osmotic regulation, ion flux and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Kun; Shao, Hongbo; Zhao, Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Glycine soja (BB52) is a wild soybean cultivar grown in coastal saline land in Yellow River Delta, China. In order to reveal the physiological mechanisms adapting to salinity, we examined photosynthesis, ion flux, antioxidant system and water status in Glycine soja under NaCl treatments, taking a cultivated soybean, ZH13, as control. Upon NaCl exposure, higher relative water content and water potential were maintained in the leaf of BB52 than ZH13, which might depend on the more accumulation of osmotic substances such as glycinebetaine and proline. Compared with ZH13, activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and contents of ascorbate, glutathione and phenolics were enhanced to a higher level in BB52 leaf under NaCl stress, which could mitigate the salt-induced oxidative damage in BB52. Consistently, lipid peroxidation indicated by malondialdehyde content was lower in BB52 leaf. Photosynthetic rate (Pn) was decreased by NaCl stress in BB52 and ZH13, and the decrease was greater in ZH13. The decreased Pn in BB52 was mainly due to stomatal limitation. The inhibited activation of rubisco enzyme in ZH13 due to the decrease of rubisco activase content became an important limiting factor of Pn, when NaCl concentration increased to 200 mM. Rubisco activase in BB52 was not affected by NaCl stress. Less negative impact in BB52 derived from lower contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the tissues, and non-invasive micro-test technique revealed that BB52 roots had higher ability to extrude Na(+) and Cl(-). Wild soybean is a valuable genetic resource, and our study may provide a reference for molecular biologist to improve the salt tolerance of cultivated soybean in face of farmland salinity.

  11. Measurement of the Higgs boson mass and e+e-ZH cross section using Zμ+μ- and Ze+e- at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J.; Watanuki, S.; Fujii, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeans, D.; Strube, J.; Tian, J.; Yamamoto, H.

    2016-12-05

    This paper presents a full simulation study of the measurement of the production cross section(ZH) of the Higgsstrahlung process e+e- ZH and the Higgs boson mass (MH) at the International Linear Collider (ILC), using events in which a Higgs boson recoils against a Z boson decaying into a pair of muons or electrons. The analysis is carried out for three center-of-mass energiesps =250, 350, and 500 GeV, and two beam polarizations e L e+ R and e Re+L , for which the polarizationsof e and e+ are Pe-; Pe+ =(-80%, +30%) and (+80%, -30%), respectively. Assuming an integrated luminosity of 250 fb1 for each beam polarization at ps = 250 GeV, where the best lepton momentum resolution is obtainable, ZH and MH can be determined with a precision of 2.5%and 37 MeV for e L e+R and 2.9% and 41 MeV for e-Re+L , respectively. Regarding a 20 year ILC physics program, the expected precisions for the HZZ coupling and MH are estimated to be 0.4% and 14MeV, respectively. The event selection is designed to optimize the precisions of ZH and MH while minimizing the bias on the measured ZH due to discrepancy in signal efficiencies among Higgs decay modes. For the first time, model independence has been demonstrated to a sub-percent level for the ZH measurement at each of the three center-of-mass energies. The results presented show the impact of center-of-mass energy and beam polarization on the evaluated precisons and serve as

  12. Translation from Russian to English the Book "Blast Effects Caused by Explosions" Authored by B. Gelfand and M. Silnikov

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    31-47. 2.16. Gold K.F., Tempo K. High-explosive field tests. DNA-6187F, 1983. 2.17. Khristoforov B.D. Parameters of the wave front in air at...Cole R.H. Underwater Explosions, Princ. Univ. Press. 1948,242 p. 2.27. Khristoforov B.D. Underwater explosion in an air cavity // ZhPMTF, 1962, № 6...p. 128-132. (in Russian) 2.28. Khristoforov B.D. On the similarity of shock waves at explosion of spherical charges in water and air // ZhPMTF

  13. Search for a Low Mass Standard Model Higgs Boson at D0 in ppbar Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV$

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel, Murilo

    2010-02-01

    We present combined searches for the low mass Standard Model Higgs boson at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using up to 5 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The major contributing processes are associated production (WH {yields} lvbb, ZH {yields} vvbb, ZH {yields} llbb). The significant improvements across the full mass range resulting from the larger data sets and improved analyses as well as future prospects are discussed.

  14. Joint Services Electronics Program Progress Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-30

    sveral heated debates9, lV almost 20 years ago. The results presented in pro- vide a definitive and rigorous resolution of the fundamental issues raised...Contraints," Proc. Allerton Conference, October 2, 1974. L9 E. S. Levitin and B. T. Polyak , Zh. Vychisl. Mat. Mat. Fiz., 6, 5, pp. 787-823, 1966. LIOE...Design Problems," presented at Optimization Days, 1977 IEEE Control Systems Society and SIAM, Montreal, Quebec May 5-6, 1977. P18B. T. Polyak , Zh. Vychisl

  15. Optimization of multiparameter radar estimates of rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Scarchilli, Gianfranco

    1993-01-01

    The estimates of rainfall rate derived from a multiparameter radar based on reflectivity factor (R sub ZH), differential reflectivity (R sub DR), and specific differential propagation phase (R sub DP) have widely varying accuracies over the dynamic range of the natural occurrence of rainfall. This paper presents a framework to optimally combine the three estimates, R sub zH, R sub DR, and R sub DP, to derive the best estimate of rainfall using coherent multiparameter radars. The optimization procedure is demonstrated for application to multiparameter radar measurements at C band.

  16. Comparative effects of beta-adrenergic agonist supplementation on the yield and quality attributes of selected subprimals from calf-fed Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Martin, J N; Garmyn, A J; Miller, M F; Hodgen, J M; Pfeiffer, K D; Thomas, C L; Rathmann, R J; Yates, D A; Hutcheson, J P; Brooks, J C

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical portioning tests were performed on beef rib, strip loin, tenderloin, and top sirloin subprimals obtained from calf-fed Holstein steers to characterize the influence of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH), ractopamine hydrochloride (RH), or no β-adrenergic agonist (βAA; CON) on subprimal and steak yield. In addition, βAA effects on tenderness, composition, and raw and cooked color of steaks from the aforementioned strip loin subprimals were characterized. At 14 to 15 d (ribs, tenderloins, and top sirloin) or 16 d (strip loin) postmortem, subprimals were portioned into steaks using a mechanical portioning machine. The appropriate variables were measured before and after portioning to determine βAA influence on trimmed and untrimmed subprimal weight, subprimal length (rib only), steak weight and yield, and steak thickness (rib only). Steaks obtained from the strip loin subprimals were subjected to analysis of raw instrument color (L*, a*, b*), proximate composition, and pH. In addition, strip steaks were aged (16 or 23 d) before analysis of cooked internal color, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), and slice shear force (SSF). Briefly, ZH supplementation increased (P < 0.01) the weight of all subprimals when compared to CON. Furthermore, subprimals from CON animals consistently had fewer and lighter steaks (P ≤ 0.04) than subprimals from ZH-fed steers. Additionally, raw steaks from ZH cattle were a less vivid red (lower a* and saturation index values; P < 0.01) when compared to CON and RH steaks, which did not differ (P > 0.05). There was no interaction between βAA treatment and postmortem aging length for WBSF or SSF (P > 0.10). However, CON steaks (3.25 kg) had lower WBSF values (P < 0.05) than ZH or RH steaks (3.68 and 3.67 kg, respectively). Regardless, aging for 23 d vs. 16 d resulted in decreased WBSF and SSF (P < 0.01) for all βAA treatments. Although differences were numerically small, evaluations indicated the internal cooked surfaces of ZH and

  17. Optical Properties and Structure of Si/InAs/Si Layers Grown by MBE on Si Substrate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-23

    Masalov, D. V . Kurochkin, 0. M. Gorbenko, N. I. Komyak, V . M. Ustinov, A. Yu . Egorov, A. R. Kovsh, M. V . Maximov, A. E Tsatsul’nikov, B. V . Volovik...Smolski, D. V . Denisov , Zh. I. Alferov, N. N. Ledentsov, R. Heitz and D. Bimberg, 7-th Int. Symp. ’Nanostructures: Physics and Technology’, St. Petersburg...p 216, 1999. [6] N. D. Zakharov, P. Werner, R. Heitz, D. Bimberg, N. N. Ledentsov, V .M. Ustinov, D. V . Denisov , Zh. I. Alferov and G. E. Cirlin, MRS

  18. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on retail yields of subprimals from beef and calf-fed Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Haneklaus, A N; Hodgen, J M; Delmore, R J; Lawrence, T E; Yates, D A; Allen, D M; Griffin, D B; Savell, J W

    2011-09-01

    Retail cutting tests were conducted on subprimals from cattle fed zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) to determine if the improved carcass composition and red meat yield resulting from ZH feeding would translate into increased retail yields of ready-to-cook products. As part of a 3-phase study, selection of carcasses from Holstein steers was done once (fall 2008), followed by the collection of carcasses from beef-type steers on 2 separate occasions (beef study I: summer 2009; beef study II: spring 2010). Each of the 3 groups of steers was assigned previously to 1 of 2 treatments, treated (fed 8.3 mg/kg of ZH for 20 d) or control (not fed ZH). All steers were slaughtered and carcasses were fabricated in commercial beef-processing establishments. Only those carcasses grading USDA Choice or higher were used. Five subprimals were used for both the calf-fed Holstein study (n = 546 subprimals) and beef study I (n = 576 subprimals): beef chuck, chuck roll; beef chuck, shoulder clod; beef round, sirloin tip (knuckle), peeled; beef round, top round; and beef round, outside round (flat). Seven subprimals were used in beef study II (n = 138 subprimals): beef chuck, chuck roll; beef round, sirloin tip (knuckle), peeled; beef round, top round; beef round, eye of round; beef loin, strip loin, boneless; beef loin, top sirloin butt, boneless; and beef loin, tenderloin. A simulated retail market environment was created, and 3 retail meat merchandisers prepared retail cuts from each subprimal so salable yields and processing times could be obtained. Differences in salable yields were found for the calf-fed Holstein steer chuck rolls (96.54% for ZH vs. 95.71% for control; P = 0.0045) and calf-fed Holstein steer top rounds (91.30% for ZH vs. 90.18% for control; P = 0.0469). However, other than heavier subprimals and an increased number of retail cuts obtained, total salable yields measured on a percentage basis and processing times were mostly unaffected by ZH. Cutability advantages of

  19. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, blood metabolites, and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Van Bibber-Krueger, C L; Miller, K A; Parsons, G L; Thompson, L K; Drouillard, J S

    2015-05-01

    The effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood metabolites and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue were evaluated in crossbred finishing steers (n = 18, BW 639 ± 12.69 kg) that were stratified by BW and randomly assigned, within strata (block), to receive 0 (control) or 8.33 mg/kg diet DM ZH. Cattle were fed once daily ad libitum in individual feeding pens (9 pens/treatment). Zilpaterol hydrochloride was fed for 23 d and withdrawn 3 d before harvest. Blood samples and measures of BW were taken on d 0, 7, 14, and 21. Concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), glucose, and lactate were determined from whole blood. Nonesterified fatty acids, urea nitrogen (PUN), glucose, lactate, and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) concentrations were analyzed from plasma. Postharvest, adipose tissue samples (approximately 20 g) from subcutaneous fat covering the lumbar vertebrae were collected after 48 h of refrigeration and analyzed for LCFA profiles. Feeding ZH decreased DMI by 8% (P = 0.03) but did not affect BW gain or efficiency (P = 0.83 and P = 0.56, respectively). Addition of ZH resulted in greater HCW, dressing percentage, and LM area ( P = 0.02, P = 0.08, and P = 0.07, respectively) but did not influence other carcass traits (P > 0.10). A ZH × d interaction was observed for PUN and whole-blood glucose concentrations (P = 0.06), in which concentrations decreased in cattle receiving ZH. Nonesterified fatty acids, BHB, plasma glucose, whole-blood, and plasma lactate concentrations were unaffected by ZH (P > 0.10). Zilpaterol hydrochloride increased plasma concentrations of elaidic (P = 0.03), vaccenic (P = 0.006), and docosapentaenoic acids ( P= 0.08), but LCFA concentrations of adipose tissue were unaffected ( P> 0.10), suggesting no preferential oxidation of specific fatty acids. In conclusion, ZH supplementation decreased PUN concentration possibly due to decreased muscle catabolism, but components of blood related to lipid oxidation were unaffected.

  20. Laser generation in opal-like single-crystal and heterostructure photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchyanov, A. S.; Plekhanov, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    This study describes the laser generation of a 6Zh rhodamine in artificial opals representing single-crystal and heterostructure films. The spectral and angular properties of emission and the threshold characteristics of generation are investigated. In the case where the 6Zh rhodamine was in a bulk opal, the so-called random laser generation was observed. In contrast to this, the laser generation caused by a distributed feedback inside the structure of the photonic bandgap was observed in photonic-crystal opal films.

  1. Chinese Medicine Patterns in Patients with Post-Stroke Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Liu, Hsu-Jan; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liu, Jui-Chen; Chen, Ping-Kun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    A stroke often results in post-stroke dementia, a rapid decline in memory and intelligence causing dysfunctions in daily life. The Chinese medicine doctor uses 4 examinations of inspection, listening, smelling, and feeling to determine the Chinese medicine pattern (CMP). Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the CMP in patients with post-stroke dementia. A total of 101 stroke patients were examined, consistent with the DSM IV diagnostic criteria of the American Psychiatric Association, as well as the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-Association International pour Ia Recherche et I’Enseignement en Neurosciences vascular dementia diagnostic criteria of post-stroke dementia. Results: 100 patients (99.0%) were KEDP (kidney essence deficiency pattern, shèn jīng kuī xū zhèng, 腎精虧虛證), 83 patients were AHLYP (ascendant hyperactivity of liver yang pattern, gān yáng shàng kàng zhèng, 肝陽上亢證), 83 patients were QBDP (qi-blood deficiency pattern, qì xuè kuī xū zhèng, 氣血虧虛證), 81 patients were SBOCP (static blood obstructing the collaterals pattern, yū xuè zǔ luò zhèng, 瘀血阻絡證), 72 patients were BSTRP (bowels stagnation turbidity retention pattern, fǔ zhì zhuó liú zhèng, 腑滯濁留證), 50 patients were FHIEP (fire heat interior excess pattern, huǒ rè nèi sheng zhèng, 火熱內盛證), and 39 participants (38.6%) were PTOOP (phlegm turbidity obstructing the orifices pattern, tán zhuó zǔ qiào zhèng, 痰濁阻竅證); one to 31 patients have at least 2 CMPs simultaneously. In conclusion, the most CMP is KEDP CMP in the post-stroke dementia patients, and one patient may have one or at least 2 CMPs simultaneously. PMID:24716124

  2. Zinc Methionine Supplementation Impacts Gene and Protein Expression in Calf-fed Holstein Steers with Miniaml Impact on Feedlot Performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calf-fed Holstein steers were supplemented with a zinc (Zn) methionine supplement (ZnMet; ZINPRO®; Zinpro Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN) for 115±5 days prior to harvest along with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax®; Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ) for the last 20 days with a 3 day withdrawal to ...

  3. On the Nonlinear Conductivity Tensor for an Unmagnetized Relativistic Turbulent Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    New York (1977). (10) L. M. Al’tshul’ and V. I. Karpman , The Kinetics of Waves in a Weakly Turbulent Plasma, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., 47 (1964), 1552...LONTZ DEFENSE FOR RESEARCH & ENGINEERING ATTN B. D. GUENTHER DIR ENERGY TECHNOLOGY OFFICE ATTN TECH LIBRARY ATTN J. R. AIREY RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC

  4. Orientation relations in aluminide coatings on single crystals of nickel superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayutin, S. G.

    2008-03-01

    The crystallographic orientation of NiAl refractory coatings on the surface of single crystals of high-temperature nickel alloy ZhS32 is studied. The orientation relation between single-crystal substrates based on an fcc γ-phase and coatings based on a bcc β-phase is studied.

  5. Solar Polarimetry: Proceedings of the National Solar Observatory/ Sacramento Peak Summer Workshop 11th Held in Sunspot, New Mexico on 27-31 August 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    operation ( Rutin and Minarovjech 1990/. Except of that, there are, of course, the plans to continue in measuring the polari- zation in 530.3 nm and...granici po- liarnostej fonovych magnitnych polej, Astron. Zh. 60, 340. Rutin , V., and Minarovjech, M. 1990, Short-term oscillations in green and red

  6. The metabolic, stress axis, and hematology response of zilpaterol hydrochloride supplemented beef heifers when exposed to a dual corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine the metabolic, stress, and hematology cell response of beef heifers supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) when exposed to an endocrine stress challenge. Heifers (n = 20; 556 ± 7 kg BW) were randomized into two treatment groups: 1) Control (CON):...

  7. Van der Waals, Casimir, and Lifshitz forces in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2015-09-01

    E M Lifshitz's theory of fluctuation molecular forces (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., Vol. 29, p. 94, 1955 [Sov. Phys. JETP, Vol. 2, 73, 1956]) and related problems are introduced from a historical perspective. Applications of the theory to soft matter physics are discussed, together with some new predictions (for example, the stability of smectic or cholesteric liquid crystal films).

  8. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on blood gas, electrolyte balance, and pH in feedlot cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood gas, electrolyte balance and pH in feedlot cattle. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech University Beef Center in New Deal, TX. C...

  9. Evaluation of objective and subjective mobility variables in feedlot cattle supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on mobility in feedlot cattle. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech University Beef Center in New Deal, TX. Cattle were weighed and scan...

  10. Jet substructure as a new Higgs search channel at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Jonathan M.; Davison, Adam R.; Rubin, Mathieu; Salam, Gavin P.

    2008-11-23

    These proceedings discuss a possible new search strategy for a light Higgs boson at the LHC, in high-p{sub t} WH and ZH production where the Higgs boson decays to a single collimated bb-bar jet. Material is included that is complementary to what was shown in the original article, arXiv:0802.2470.

  11. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on methane production, total body oxygen consumption, and blood metabolites in finishing beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An indirect calorimetry experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) for 20 d on total body oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient, methane production, and blood metabolites in finishing beef steers. Sixteen Angus steers (initial BW = 555 ± 12.7 kg) w...

  12. Nitrolysis of the CN Single Bond and Related Chemistry of Nitro and Nitroso Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    J. Liebigs ’ Ann. Chem., 1953, 579, 193. 13. Y. Ogata, Y. Sawaki, and Y. Kuriyama, Tetrahedron, 1968, 24, 3425. 14. Y. L. Chow, W. C. Damen, S. F...Rozhdestvenskaya, L. I. Kovalenko, and V. G. Isagulyants, Zh. Orq. Khim., 1973, 9, 905; Chem. Abstr., 1973, 79, 53436j. 7. U. Schollkopf and P. Tonne, Justus

  13. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on internal body temperature and respiration rate of black-hided feedlot steers and heifers during moderate heat stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on the internal body temperature and respiration rate of feedlot cattle during moderate heat stress. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech...

  14. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 66, July-August 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    79 534. Gotra, Z.Yu., A.V. Skoblenko, and A.V. Ivanov (81). Effect of residual gases in vacuum precipitation on mechanical stresses in thin resistive...G.I. Bekov, B.V. Vinogradov, Yu.A. Timofeyev, and N.S. Fateyeva (0). Fiber endoscopy of a high-pressure Bridgman anvil chamber. ZhTF P, no. 15, 1983

  15. Performance of finishing beef steers in response to anabolic implant and zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our objectives were to evaluate the dose/payout pattern of trenbolone acetate (TBA) and estradiol-17b (E2) implants and feeding of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on performance and carcass characteristics of finishing beef steers. A randomized complete block design was used with a 3 × 2 factorial arr...

  16. Performance of finishing beef steers in response to anabolic implant dose and zilpaterol hydrochloride

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    British × Continental steers (n = 168; 7 pens/treatment; initial BW = 362 kg) were used to evaluate the dose of trenbolone acetate (TBA) and estradiol-17ß (E2) and feeding of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on performance and carcass characteristics. A randomized complete block design was used with a ...

  17. Recent progress of research on medicinal mushrooms, foods, and other herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yang, Xiaoming; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Ting; Wu, Shou-Fang; Shi, Qian; Itokawa, Hideji

    2012-01-01

    This article will review selected herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine, including medicinal mushrooms (巴西蘑菇 bā xī mó gū; Agaricus blazei, 雲芝 yún zhī; Coriolus versicolor, 靈芝 líng zhī; Ganoderma lucidum, 香蕈 xiāng xùn; shiitake, Lentinus edodes, 牛樟芝 niú zhāng zhī; Taiwanofungus camphoratus), Cordyceps (冬蟲夏草 dōng chóng xià cǎo), pomegranate (石榴 shí liú; Granati Fructus), green tea (綠茶 lǜ chá; Theae Folium Non Fermentatum), garlic (大蒜 dà suàn; Allii Sativi Bulbus), turmeric (薑黃 jiāng huáng; Curcumae Longae Rhizoma), and Artemisiae Annuae Herba (青蒿 qīng hāo; sweet wormwood). Many of the discussed herbal products have gained popularity in their uses as dietary supplements for health benefits. The review will focus on the active constituents of the herbs and their bioactivities, with emphasis on the most recent progress in research for the period of 2003 to 2011. PMID:24716120

  18. Efficient Numerical Method for Computation of Thermohydrodynamics of Laminar Lubricating Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    longitudinal position along film, m y lateral position along film, m z position normal to film, measured from midsurface 2 dissipation, J/sm 3 , defined by eq...position as transverse coordinate across the film. Thus: [5.09] C = 2z/h where "z" is measured from the midsurface . Taking "x" as a typical lateral

  19. Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Qizhong Li

    2003-06-10

    One of the highest priority physics goals for the upgraded Tevatron experiments, CDF and D0, is the search for the Higgs boson. We present the initial results from both experiments, based on 40-90 pb{sup -1} integrated luminosity, of Higgs searches in several final states, including WH and ZH, H {yields} WW, and doubly-charged Higgs.

  20. High Peak Power Ka-Band Gyrotron Oscillator Experiments with Slotted and Unslotted Cavities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-10

    822, 1986. [4) N.S. Ginzburg, V.I. Krementsov, M.I. Petelin , P.S. Strelkov, and A.G. Shkvarunets, "Cyclotron-resonance maser with a high-current...Krementsov, M.I. Petelin , P.S. Strelkov, and A.K. Shkvarunets, "Experimental investigation of a high-current relativistic cyclotron maser," Zh. Tekh

  1. Serum blood metabolite response and evaluation of select organ weight, histology and cardiac morphology of beef heifers exposed to a dual corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge following supplementation of

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to: 1) determine if supplementation of Zilpaterol Hydrochloride (ZH) altered select organ weights, histology and cardiac anatomical features at harvest and 2) determine if administration of a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) challenge followi...

  2. Long-term growth of pediatric patients following living-donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Jong; Rim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Joo Hoon; Choi, Bo Hwa; Lee, Seon Yun; Chang, Soo Hee; Lee, Young Joo; Lee, Sung Gyu

    2005-10-01

    In order to determine the influence of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) on long-term growth, we studied the progress of 36 children who had survived more than 5 yr after LDLT from 1994 to 1999. The median age at the transplantation was 1.5 yr (range: 6 months-15 yr) and the median follow-up period was 6.5 yr (range: 5-9 yr). A height standard deviation score (zH) was analyzed for each patient according to medical records. Significant catch-up growth occurred within 2 yr after LDLT with a mean zH changing from -1.2 to 0.0 and was maintained for up to 7 yr post-transplantation (zH-0.1). Younger children (<2 yr) were more growth-retarded at the time of LDLT, but showed higher catch-up growth rates and their final zH was greater than that of older children. Children with liver cirrhosis were more growth-retarded at the time of LDLT, but showed significant catch-up growth and their final height was similar to children with fulminant hepatitis. Growth in children who experienced significant hepatic dysfunction after LDLT was not significantly different from those without graft dysfunction. There was no difference between the types of immunosuppressants used. Our finding suggests that LDLT can result in adequate catchup linear growth, and this effect can persist even after 7 yr post-transplantation.

  3. Evaluation of the effects of zilpateral hydrochloride supplementation on catecholamine response and other blood metabolites following a combined corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Supplementation of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax®) to cattle has been implicated as having a negative impact on the well-being of cattle. However, there is no data to support or refute these claims. This study was designed to determine if differences exist in the serum metabolic profile and m...

  4. Computational studies of radiation characteristics for U-238 gamma and neutron protection

    SciTech Connect

    Babicheva, T.S.; Vatulin, V.V.; Zhitnik, A.K.

    1993-12-31

    This paper is devoted to predicting the radiation security and nuclear safety of the ZhT-80 container design used to transport 18 WWER-1000 fuel assemblies and is promising in terms of increasing specific loading based on U-238 and hard neutron protection consisting of boron filled organic materials. Studies were carried out using the Monte Carlo Method.

  5. Landau-Khalatnikov phonon damping in strongly interacting Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkjian, Hadrien; Castin, Yvan; Sinatra, Alice

    2016-11-01

    We derive the phonon damping rate due to the four-phonon Landau-Khalatnikov process in low-temperature strongly interacting Fermi gases using quantum hydrodynamics, correcting and extending the original calculation of Landau and Khalatnikov (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., 19 (1949) 637). Our predictions can be tested in state-of-the-art experiments with cold atomic gases in the collisionless regime.

  6. Role of the ARF Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    literature. We asked Dr. Jeff Arbeit in the department of Surgery here at Washington University for his expertise in mouse prostate tumor development...18070929 6. Lu, Z.H., Wright, J.D., Belt, B., Cardiff, R.D. & Arbeit , J.M. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 facilitates cervical cancer progression in human

  7. Recent progress of research on medicinal mushrooms, foods, and other herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Yang, Xiaoming; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Ting; Wu, Shou-Fang; Shi, Qian; Itokawa, Hideji

    2012-04-01

    This article will review selected herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine, including medicinal mushrooms ( bā xī mó gū; Agaricus blazei, yún zhī; Coriolus versicolor, líng zhī; Ganoderma lucidum, xiāng xùn; shiitake, Lentinus edodes, niú zhāng zhī; Taiwanofungus camphoratus), Cordyceps ( dōng chóng xià cǎo), pomegranate ( shí liú; Granati Fructus), green tea ( lǜ chá; Theae Folium Non Fermentatum), garlic ( dà suàn; Allii Sativi Bulbus), turmeric ( jiāng huáng; Curcumae Longae Rhizoma), and Artemisiae Annuae Herba ( qīng hāo; sweet wormwood). Many of the discussed herbal products have gained popularity in their uses as dietary supplements for health benefits. The review will focus on the active constituents of the herbs and their bioactivities, with emphasis on the most recent progress in research for the period of 2003 to 2011.

  8. SUSY effects in Higgs production at high energy e+ e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junjie; Han, Chengcheng; Ren, Jie; Wu, Lei; Yang, Jin-Min; Zhang, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Considering the constraints from collider experiments and dark matter detection, we investigate the SUSY effects in the Higgs production channels e+ e- → Zh at an e+ e- collider with a center-of-mass energy above 240 GeV and γγ → h → bb¯ at a photon collider with a center-of-mass energy above 125 GeV. In the parameter space allowed by current experiments, we find that the SUSY corrections to e+ e- → Zh can reach a few percent and the production rate of γγ → h → bb¯ can be enhanced by a factor of 1.2 over the SM prediction. We also calculate the exotic Higgs production e+ e-→ Zh1 in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model (NMSSM) (h is the SM-like Higgs, h1 is the CP-even Higgs bosons which can be much lighter than h). We find that at a 250 GeV e+ e- collider the production rates of e+ e-→ Zh1 can reach 60 fb. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC)(10821504, 11222548, 11305049, 11135003), Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, and ARC Center of Excellence for Particle Physics at Tera-scale. C. Han is supported by World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI Initiative), MEXT, Japan

  9. Comparative RNA-Sequence Transcriptome Analysis of Phenolic Acid Metabolism in Salvia miltiorrhiza, a Traditional Chinese Medicine Model Plant

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenqiao; Guo, Linlin; Liu, Tian; Lin, Caicai; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In this study, two S. miltiorrhiza genotypes (BH18 and ZH23) with different phenolic acid concentrations were used for de novo RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). A total of 170,787 transcripts and 56,216 unigenes were obtained. There were 670 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) identified between BH18 and ZH23, 250 of which were upregulated in ZH23, with genes involved in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway being the most upregulated genes. Nine genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway were upregulated in BH18 and thus result in higher lignin content in BH18. However, expression profiles of most genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway were higher in ZH23 than that in BH18. These results indicated that genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway might play an important role in downstream secondary metabolism and demonstrated that lignin biosynthesis was a putative partially competing pathway with phenolic acid biosynthesis. The results of this study expanded our understanding of the regulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:28194403

  10. Supplementation of zilpaterol hydrochloride does not significantly alter the serum metabolic profile and metabolic enzyme profile of finishing heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Supplementation of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax®) to cattle has been implicated as having a negative impact on the well-being of cattle. However, there is no data to support or refute these claims. This study was designed to determine if differences exist in the serum metabolic profile and m...

  11. Effects of shade and feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride to finishing steers on performance, carcass quality, mobility, and body temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crossbred steers (n=480) were utilized to study the effects of shade and feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on performance, carcass quality, mobility, and body temperature (BT). A randomized block design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments was conducted with four replicates per treatme...

  12. Effects of shade and feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride to finishing steers on performance, carcass quality, heat stress, mobility, and body temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Steers (n = 480) were used to study the effects of shade and feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on performance, carcass quality, heat stress, mobility, and body temperature (BT). A randomized block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used with 4 replicates per treatment. F...

  13. The Current State and Problems of the Upbringing Process Today: A Roundtable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a roundtable discussion on the current state and problems of the upbringing process. The participants were professors from different universities in Russia. In his opening remarks, Zh.T. Toshchenko, editor in chief of Sotsiologicheskie issledovaniia and a corresponding member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, emphasized the…

  14. Nitrogen-Activated Phase Separation in InGaAsN/GaAs Heterostructures Grown by MBE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Gorbenko 6, W. Passenberg2 , H. Kuenzel 2 , N. Grote 2, V. M. Ustinov1 , H. Kirmse 3 , W. Neuman 3 , P. Werner 4, N. D. Zakharov 4, D. Bimberg 5 and Zh. I...Phys’. 84, 6409 (1998). [9] S. Sato and S. Satoh, J. Cryst. Growth 192, 381 (1998). [10] B. .Soshnikov, A. M. Gorbenko , A. P . Golubok and N. N

  15. Structural Transformations in heat resistant coatings containing rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, N. I.; Lepakova, O. K.; Kosova, N. I.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of two-layered coatings and ZhS6U alloy microstructure were studied during long-term processes of high temperature annealing and creeping. It was shown that yttrium and zirconium oxides are promising as protective coatings for heat resistant nickel based alloy.

  16. Magneto-Optics of GaAs Quantum Wire Lattices Grown by Selective-Area MOVPE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    flux. We can suggest that this oscillation is the Altshuler-Aronov- Spivak (AAS) effect [6] with a periodicity of B2/2. Unfortunately, a lack of...Lett. 84, 2664 (2004). [6] B.L. Altshuler, A.G. Aronov, and B.Z. Spivak , Pis’ma Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 33, 101 (1981) [JETP Lett. 33, 94 (1981)]. 133

  17. Selective internalization of self-assembled artificial oil bodies by HER2/neu-positive cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Li-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2011-01-01

    A novel delivery carrier was developed using artificial oil bodies (AOBs). Plant seed oil bodies (OBs) consist of a triacylglycerol matrix surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with the storage protein oleosin (Ole). Ole consists of a central hydrophobic domain with two amphiphatic arms that extrude from the surface of OBs. In this study, a bivalent anti-HER2/neu affibody domain (ZH2) was fused with Ole at the C terminus. After overproduction in Escherichia coli, the fusion protein (Ole-ZH2) was recovered to assemble AOBs. The size of self-assembled AOBs was tailored by varying the oil/Ole-ZH2 ratio and pH to reach a nanoscale. Upon co-incubation with tumor cells, the nanoscale AOBs encapsulated with a hydrophobic fluorescence dye were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-overexpressing cells and displayed biocompatibility with the cells. In addition, the ZH2-mediated endosomal entry of AOBs occurred in a time- and AOB dose-dependent manner. The internalization efficiency was as high as 90%. The internalized AOBs disintegrated at the non-permissive pH (e.g. in acidic endosomes) and the cargo dye was released. Results of in vitro study revealed a sustained and prolonged release profile. Taken together, our findings indicate the potential of AOBs as a delivery carrier.

  18. Evaluation of commercial ß-agonists, dietary protein, and shade on fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from feedlot cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a foodborne pathogen commonly associated with cattle feces. Diet, including dietary supplements such as ß–agonists, may impact fecal shedding of this pathogen. A series of 3 experiments was conducted to determine if the ß-agonists ractopamine (RAC) or ziplaterol (ZH) hy...

  19. [Comparison of different test systems for the radioimmunological determination of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Shchegolev, A S; Kushch, A A; Momot, A M; Shumaĭ, E P; Skoblov, Iu S

    1987-01-01

    The sensitivity of test systems for radioimmunological detection of HBsAg prepared on the basis of polyclonal immunoglobulins, affinity polyclonal antibody (PCA) and monoclonal antibody (MCA) was compared. MCA ZhAK 22 and ZhAK 12 interacting with two different HBsAg determinants: general-type "a" and subtype "y", respectively, were used. The solid phase was sensitized with MCA of each clone or a mixture of MCA in concentration ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1. After sensitization of the solid phase and addition of HBsAg, 125I-labeled affinity PCA were added (in all tests). The radioimmunological test-system based on MCA ZhAK 22 and ZhAK 12 adsorbed on the solid phase at a 2:1 ratio was found the most sensitive: 0.5 ng, i.e. 4 times as high as that of the system prepared on the basis of PCA.

  20. Effects of two beta-adrenergic agonists on finishing performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Reyes, L; Torres-Rodríguez, V; Meraz-Murillo, F J; Pérez-Linares, C; Figueroa-Saavedra, F; Robinson, P H

    2006-12-01

    The impact of using 2 beta-adrenergic agonists in feedlot cattle fed finishing diets was evaluated using 54 steers (45 crossbred Charolais and 9 Brangus) initially weighing 424 +/- 26.6 kg in a randomized complete block design with 3 treatments and 6 blocks (i.e., 18 pens with 3 steers per pen). Response variables were feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality. Treatments were 1) control (no supplement added); 2) zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 60 mg.steer(-1).d(-1)); and 3) ractopamine hydrochloride (RH; 300 mg.steer(-1).d(-1)). The beta-agonists were added to the diets during the final 33 d of the experiment. The groups of steers fed ZH or RH improved (P < 0.01) ADG by 26 or 24%, respectively, compared with control steers. Steers supplemented with RH consumed less (P = 0.03) DM (8.37 kg) than control steers (8.51 kg), whereas intake was similar (P = 0.37) for ZH and control steers. Addition of either beta-agonist to the diet considerably improved (P < 0.01) the G:F (ZH, 0.253 and RH, 0.248 vs. control, 0.185). Hot carcass weight and carcass yield were enhanced (P < 0.05) with both beta-agonists. The LM area was increased (P = 0.026) by ZH (75.2 cm(2)), but that of RH (72.2 cm(2)) was similar (P = 0.132) to the control steers (66.8 cm(2)). Meat from the ZH- (P = 0.0007) and RH- (P = 0.0267) supplemented steers had greater shear force values than control steers (ZH = 5.11; RH = 4.83; control = 4.39 kg/cm(2)). Variables related to meat color indicated that both beta-agonists led to a similar redness of the LM area related to the control group. In general, feedlot performance was greatly enhanced by beta-adrenergic agonists, and meat tenderness from treated animals was classified as intermediate. Furthermore, meat color was not altered by beta-agonist supplementation.

  1. Comparative effects of supplementing beef steers with zilpaterol hydrochloride, ractopamine hydrochloride, or no beta agonist on strip loin composition, raw and cooked color properties, shear force, and consumer assessment of steaks aged for fourteen or twenty-one days postmortem.

    PubMed

    Garmyn, A J; Brooks, J C; Hodgen, J M; Nichols, W T; Hutcheson, J P; Rathmann, R J; Miller, M F

    2014-08-01

    Beef steers (n = 1,914) were assigned to 1 of 3 β-adrenergic agonist (βAA) supplementation treatments-zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 8.3 mg/kg of DM for 20 d with 3-d withdrawal), ractopamine hydrochloride (RH; 308 mg·head(-1)·d(-1) for 28 d), or no βAA (CON)-to determine the effects on consumer eating quality. Strip loins (n = 1,101; CON = 400, RH = 355, and ZH = 346) were obtained and fabricated into 2.5-cm-thick steaks for proximate, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), slice shear force (SSF), and consumer analyses; steaks were aged until 14 or 21 d postmortem. Fat and moisture contents were not affected by βAA supplementation (P > 0.05), but strip steaks from steers fed ZH had more protein (P < 0.01) than those from steers fed CON or RH, which were similar. An interaction between βAA and aging was observed (P < 0.01) for WBSF but not SSF. Within steaks aged 14 d, ZH steaks required the most force to shear, RH steaks were intermediate, and CON steaks had the lowest WBSF values; however, RH steaks had a stronger response to aging than CON or ZH steaks, resulting in the lowest WBSF values at 21 d. Slice shear force values were greater (P < 0.01) in steaks from steers fed ZH than in steaks from steers fed CON or RH, which did not differ. Following shear force analyses, steaks within 2 SD of each treatment mean for WBSF were selected randomly for consumer assessment of eating quality. Consumer testing (n = 400; 200/postmortem aging period) was arranged in a 3 × 3 factorial representing 3 quality grades (Select, Low Choice, and Premium Choice) and 3 treatments (ZH, RH, and CON). In steaks aged 14 d, βAA supplementation affected (P < 0.01) tenderness, flavor, and overall liking and tenderness acceptability, resulting in lower consumer scores for ZH than CON and RH; however, juiciness, flavor, and overall acceptability were similar (P > 0.05). In steaks aged 21 d, feeding βAA influenced (P < 0.01) only tenderness and juiciness scores. Despite these differences

  2. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on longissimus muscle shear force and sensory attributes of calf-fed Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Howard, S T; Woerner, D R; Vote, D J; Scanga, J A; Chapman, P L; Bryant, T C; Acheson, R J; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E

    2014-01-01

    The effect of ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) and zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on slice shear force (SSF) and sensory characteristics of beef from calf-fed Holstein steers was evaluated. All steers were implanted with a progesterone (100 mg) plus estradiol benzoate (10 mg) implant followed by a terminal trenbolone acetate (200 mg) plus estradiol (40 mg) implant. Steers were blocked by weight into pens (n = 32) randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: control, RH fed at 300 mg·steer(-1)·d(-1) (RH 300) or RH fed at 400 mg·steer(-1)·d(-1)(RH 400) for the final 31 d of finishing, or ZH fed at 6.8 g/t for 21 d with a 5-d withdrawal before harvest. Fourteen carcasses were randomly selected from each pen, and two LM samples (1 per side) were excised and aged either 14 or 21 d before SSF testing. For trained panel evaluation, two steaks were collected from each of 60 low Choice strip loins (20 each from control, RH 300, and ZH treatments) and aged either 14 or 21 d. Steers fed RH and ZH produced steaks with SSF values that were 9% to 25% higher than controls. No difference in SSF was detected between the two levels of RH (P > 0.05). Compared to controls, the probability of steaks aged 14 d failing to meet SSF requirements to be certified tender (SSF < 20 kg) was increased 0.15, 0.17, and 0.26 in steers fed RH 300, RH 400, and ZH, respectively. Compared to controls, the probability of steaks aged 21 d having SSF values >20 kg was increased 0.03, 0.08, and 0.16 in steers fed RH 300, RH 400, and ZH, respectively. Steaks from Select carcasses of steers fed ZH aged 21 d postmortem had double the probability (0.39 vs. 0.17) of having SSF values >20 kg compared to steaks from steers fed either level of RH (P < 0.05). This difference tended to be identical in steaks from Select carcasses 14 d postmortem (0.50 vs. 0.33; P = 0.11); however, no difference was found in low Choice samples at 14 or 21 d postmortem. Trained panelists rated steaks aged 14 d from steers fed ZH lower for

  3. Ruegeria marina sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ying-Yi; Xu, Xue-Wei; Li, Xue; Liu, Chen; Cui, Heng-Lin; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Wu, Min

    2011-02-01

    A Gram-negative, neutrophilic and rod-shaped bacterium, strain ZH17(T), was isolated from a marine sediment of the East China Sea and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic characterization. The isolate grew in the presence of 0-7.5 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 6.5-9.0; optimum growth was observed with 0.5-3.0 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.5. Chemotaxonomic analysis showed ubiquinone-10 as predominant respiratory quinone and C(18 : 1)ω7c, 11-methyl C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(16 : 0), C(12 : 0) 3-OH and C(16 : 0) 2-OH as major fatty acids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 63.5 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belongs to the genus Ruegeria. Strain ZH17(T) exhibited the closest phylogenetic affinity to the type strain of Ruegeria pomeroyi, with 97.2 % sequence similarity, and less than 97 % sequence similarity with respect to other described species of the genus Ruegeria. The DNA-DNA reassociation value between strain ZH17(T) and R. pomeroyi DSM 15171(T) was 50.7 %. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, strain ZH17(T) represents a novel species of the genus Ruegeria, for which the name Ruegeria marina sp. nov. (type strain ZH17(T) =CGMCC 1.9108(T) =JCM 16262(T)) is proposed.

  4. A meta-analysis of zilpaterol and ractopamine effects on feedlot performance, carcass traits and shear strength of meat in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lean, Ian J; Thompson, John M; Dunshea, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    This study is a meta-analysis of the effects of the beta-agonists zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) and ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) on feedlot performance, carcase characteristics of cattle and Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF) of muscles. It was conducted to evaluate the effect of the use of these agents on beef production and meat quality and to provide data that would be useful in considerations on the effect of these agents on meat quality in Meat Standards Australia evaluations. We conducted a comprehensive literature search and study assessment using PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scirus, and CAB and identification of other studies from reference lists in papers and searches. Searches were based on the key words: zilpaterol, zilmax, ractopamine, optaflexx, cattle and beef. Studies from theses obtained were included. Data were extracted from more than 50 comparisons for both agents and analysed using meta-analysis and meta-regression. Both agents markedly increased weight gain, hot carcase weight and longissimus muscle area and increased the efficiency of gain:feed. These effects were particularly large for ZH, however, fat thickness was decreased by ZH, but not RAC. Zilpaterol also markedly increased WBSF by 1.2 standard deviations and more than 0.8 kg, while RAC increased WBSF by 0.43 standard deviations and 0.2 kg. There is evidence in the ZH studies, in particular, of profound re-partitioning of nutrients from fat to protein depots. This work has provided critically needed information on the effects of ZH and RAC on production, efficiency and meat quality.

  5. Attenuation of pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus strain through the chimeric S-segment encoding sandfly fever phlebovirus NSs or a dominant-negative PKR.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Slack, Olga A L; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E; Juelich, Terry L; Zhang, Lihong; Smith, Jennifer K; Perez, David; Gong, Bin; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-11-16

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease affecting ruminants and humans. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) causes abortions and fetal malformations in ruminants, and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or retinitis in humans. The live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the US. However, this vaccine lacks a marker for the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals (DIVA). NSs gene is dispensable for RVFV replication, and thus, rMP-12 strains lacking NSs gene is applicable to monitor vaccinated animals. However, the immunogenicity of MP-12 lacking NSs was not as high as parental MP-12. Thus, chimeric MP-12 strains encoding NSs from either Toscana virus (TOSV), sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) or Punta Toro virus Adames strain (PTA) were characterized previously. Although chimeric MP-12 strains are highly immunogenic, the attenuation through the S-segment remains unknown. Using pathogenic ZH501 strain, we aimed to demonstrate the attenuation of ZH501 strain through chimeric S-segment encoding either the NSs of TOSV, SFSV, PTA, or Punta Toro virus Balliet strain (PTB). In addition, we characterized rZH501 encoding a human dominant-negative PKR (PKRΔE7), which also enhances the immunogenicity of MP-12. Study done on mice revealed that attenuation of rZH501 occurred through the S-segment encoding either PKRΔE7 or SFSV NSs. However, rZH501 encoding either TOSV, PTA, or PTB NSs in the S-segment uniformly caused lethal encephalitis. Our results indicated that the S-segments encoding PKRΔE7 or SFSV NSs are attenuated and thus applicable toward next generation MP-12 vaccine candidates that encode a DIVA marker.

  6. A Meta-Analysis of Zilpaterol and Ractopamine Effects on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Traits and Shear Strength of Meat in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Ian J.; Thompson, John M.; Dunshea, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    This study is a meta-analysis of the effects of the beta-agonists zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) and ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) on feedlot performance, carcase characteristics of cattle and Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF) of muscles. It was conducted to evaluate the effect of the use of these agents on beef production and meat quality and to provide data that would be useful in considerations on the effect of these agents on meat quality in Meat Standards Australia evaluations. We conducted a comprehensive literature search and study assessment using PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scirus, and CAB and identification of other studies from reference lists in papers and searches. Searches were based on the key words: zilpaterol, zilmax, ractopamine, optaflexx, cattle and beef. Studies from theses obtained were included. Data were extracted from more than 50 comparisons for both agents and analysed using meta-analysis and meta-regression. Both agents markedly increased weight gain, hot carcase weight and longissimus muscle area and increased the efficiency of gain:feed. These effects were particularly large for ZH, however, fat thickness was decreased by ZH, but not RAC. Zilpaterol also markedly increased WBSF by 1.2 standard deviations and more than 0.8 kg, while RAC increased WBSF by 0.43 standard deviations and 0.2 kg. There is evidence in the ZH studies, in particular, of profound re-partitioning of nutrients from fat to protein depots. This work has provided critically needed information on the effects of ZH and RAC on production, efficiency and meat quality. PMID:25548908

  7. Polarimetric scattering characteristics of planar and spatial ice crystals at millimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Thomas Martin

    Polarimetric scattering characteristics of one planar (4 branches) and three spatial (4, 6, and 8 branches) bullet rosette models for sizes from 0.03 to 2 mm were evaluated. The electromagnetic scattering calculations were performed at 35, 94, and 220 GHz frequencies using the T-matrix method for small sizes and the finite- difference time-domain method (FDTD) for large sizes. Three previously analyzed crystal models (column, plate, and stellar crystal) were also included in the evaluations. At 220 GHz, spatial rosettes could be distinguished from spheres using either the linear depolarization ratio (LDR), or the copolarized cross-correlation coefficient (rhv). At 35 and for 94 GHz up to 1 mm, the spatial rosettes did not display measurable polarimetric signatures. Using LDR (or rhv ), columns could be distinguished from oriented spatial and planar crystals at vertical incidence, and from randomly oriented spatial rosettes by scanning the radar elevation angle. An equal volume study comparing columns with capped columns, and plates with double plates, found differences in the magnitudes of the polarization parameters, but not in the trends. Simulations of radar parameters were developed using gamma model size distributions. Relationships were established between the backscattering cross sections and the particle maximum dimension, the effective reflectivity factor (Zh) and difference reflectivity (ZDP), and ice water content (IWC) and Zh. A technique was developed to estimate the fraction of Zh due to aggregates in a mixture with columnar or planar ice crystals using the measured (Zh) and ZDP. Six cases of aircraft penetrations into cold clouds were evaluated from a 1997 University of Wyoming field campaign in Laramie, Wyoming. An onboard 95 GHz polarimetric radar made measurements at side and vertical incidence, while onboard optical array probe measurements were used to infer particle type. Comparisons of the side incidence radar data with the simulated Z h- ZDP

  8. Influence of Mean Rooftop-Level Estimation Method on Sensible Heat Flux Retrieved from a Large-Aperture Scintillometer Over a City Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieliński, Mariusz; Fortuniak, Krzysztof; Pawlak, Włodzimierz; Siedlecki, Mariusz

    2017-08-01

    The sensible heat flux ( H) is determined using large-aperture scintillometer (LAS) measurements over a city centre for eight different computation scenarios. The scenarios are based on different approaches of the mean rooftop-level (zH) estimation for the LAS path. Here, zH is determined separately for wind directions perpendicular (two zones) and parallel (one zone) to the optical beam to reflect the variation in topography and building height on both sides of the LAS path. Two methods of zH estimation are analyzed: (1) average building profiles; (2) weighted-average building height within a 250 m radius from points located every 50 m along the optical beam, or the centre of a certain zone (in the case of a wind direction perpendicular to the path). The sensible heat flux is computed separately using the friction velocity determined with the eddy-covariance method and the iterative procedure. The sensitivity of the sensible heat flux and the extent of the scintillometer source area to different computation scenarios are analyzed. Differences reaching up to 7% between heat fluxes computed with different scenarios were found. The mean rooftop-level estimation method has a smaller influence on the sensible heat flux (-4 to 5%) than the area used for the zH computation (-5 to 7%). For the source-area extent, the discrepancies between respective scenarios reached a similar magnitude. The results demonstrate the value of the approach in which zH is estimated separately for wind directions parallel and perpendicular to the LAS optical beam.

  9. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Mature Pollen in Triploid and Diploid Populus deltoides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Ying-Hua; Sun, Pei; Jia, Hui-Xia; Fan, Wei; Lu, Meng-Zhu; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Ploidy affects plant growth vigor and cell size, but the relative effects of pollen fertility and allergenicity between triploid and diploid have not been systematically examined. Here we performed comparative analyses of fertility, proteome, and abundances of putative allergenic proteins of pollen in triploid poplar ‘ZhongHuai1’ (‘ZH1’, triploid) and ‘ZhongHuai2’ (‘ZH2’, diploid) generated from the same parents. The mature pollen was sterile in triploid poplar ‘ZH1’. By applying two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), a total of 72 differentially expressed protein spots (DEPs) were detected in triploid poplar pollen. Among them, 24 upregulated and 43 downregulated proteins were identified in triploid poplar pollen using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation coupled with time of-flight tandem mass spectrometer analysis (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS). The main functions of these DEPs were related with “S-adenosylmethionine metabolism”, “actin cytoskeleton organization”, or “translational elongation”. The infertility of triploid poplar pollen might be related to its abnormal cytoskeletal system. In addition, the abundances of previously identified 28 putative allergenic proteins were compared among three poplar varieties (‘ZH1’, ‘ZH2’, and ‘2KEN8‘). Most putative allergenic proteins were downregulated in triploid poplar pollen. This work provides an insight into understanding the protein regulation mechanism of pollen infertility and low allergenicity in triploid poplar, and gives a clue to improving poplar polyploidy breeding and decreasing the pollen allergenicity. PMID:27598155

  10. Improving the rainfall rate estimation in the midstream of the Heihe River Basin using raindrop size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Chu, R.; Zhang, T.; Li, J.; Shen, J.; Wu, Z.

    2011-03-01

    During the intensive observation period of the Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER), a total of 1074 raindrop size distribution were measured by the Parsivel disdrometer, the latest state-of-the-art optical laser instrument. Because of the limited observation data in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, the modelling behaviour was not well done. We used raindrop size distributions to improve the rain rate estimator of meteorological radar in order to obtain many accurate rain rate data in this area. We got the relationship between the terminal velocity of the raindrop and the diameter (mm) of a raindrop: v(D) = 4.67D0.53. Then four types of estimators for X-band polarimetric radar are examined. The simulation results show that the classical estimator R (ZH) is most sensitive to variations in DSD and the estimator R (KDP, ZH, ZDR) is the best estimator for estimating the rain rate. An X-band polarimetric radar (714XDP) is used for verifying these estimators. The lowest sensitivity of the rain rate estimator R (KDP, ZH, ZDR) to variations in DSD can be explained by the following facts. The difference in the forward-scattering amplitudes at horizontal and vertical polarizations, which contributes KDP, is proportional to the 3rd power of the drop diameter. On the other hand, the exponent of the backscatter cross-section, which contributes to ZH, is proportional to the 6th power of the drop diameter. Because the rain rate R is proportional to the 3.57th power of the drop diameter, KDP is less sensitive to DSD variations than ZH.

  11. Comparative effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and ractopamine hydrochloride on live performance and carcass characteristics of calf-fed Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Brown, T R; Sexten, A K; Lawrence, T E; Miller, M F; Thomas, C L; Yates, D A; Hutcheson, J P; Hodgen, J M; Brooks, J C

    2014-09-01

    Holstein steers (n = 2,275) were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: 1) a control diet containing no β-agonists, 2) a diet that contained zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 8.3 mg/kg [100% DM basis]) for 20 d with a 3-d withdrawal period before harvest, and 3) a diet that contained ractopamine hydrochloride (RH; 30.1 mg/kg [100% DM basis]) for 28 d before harvest. No differences (P ≥ 0.18) were detected between treatments for initial BW, BW at d 28, or DMI. Final BW, BW gain for the last 28 d, total BW gain, ADG for the last 28 d, and overall ADG were greater (P < 0.05) for steers fed ZH or RH than for steers fed the control diet. Additionally, G:F for the last 28 d and G:F for the entire trial was increased (P < 0.02) for steers fed ZH (0.147, 0.147) or RH (0.153, 0.151) compared to steers fed the control diet (0.134, 0.143), respectively. Steers fed ZH or RH had HCW that were 15.5 and 8.2 kg heavier (P ≤ 0.01) and LM areas that were 7.1 and 2.3 cm(2) larger (P < 0.01) than control cattle. Steers fed ZH also had dressed carcass yields that were 1.3% to 1.5% greater and USDA calculated yield grades that were decreased 0.16 to 0.23 units compared to RH and control steers. No differences (P ≥ 0.39) were found between treatments for marbling score, fat thickness, and percentage KPH. Steers fed ZH had an increased (P ≤ 0.04) percentage of yield grade 1 and 2 carcasses (15.1, 55.0) and a reduced (P ≤ 0.02) percentage of yield grade 3 carcasses (27.1) compared with those fed RH (10.5, 49.1, 36.1) or the control diet (9.0, 47.4, 36.4), respectively. Additionally, ZH-fed steers had a decreased (P ≤ 0.04) percentage of yield grade 4 and 5 carcasses (2.8) compared with steers fed the control diet (6.9). Steers fed ZH had an increased (P ≤ 0.01) percentage of USDA Select grading carcass (31.0%) and a decreased (P ≤ 0.01) percentage of USDA Choice grading carcasses (65.0%) compared with steers fed RH (25.8%, 70.2%) and no β-agonist (24.8%, 72.0%), respectively. Feeding

  12. Effect of the administration program of 2 β-adrenergic agonists on growth performance and carcass and meat characteristics of feedlot ram lambs.

    PubMed

    López-Carlos, M A; Ramírez, R G; Aguilera-Soto, J I; Rodríguez, H; Aréchiga, C F; Méndez-Llorente, F; Chavez, J J; Medina, C A; Silva, J M

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of 3 feeding dose programs of the β-adrenergic agonists (β-AA) ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) or zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) for the final 30 d before slaughter on growth performance and carcass and meat characteristics of feedlot ram lambs. Eighty-four Dorper × Katahdin ram lambs (30.0 ± 1.6 kg) were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to pens (4 lambs per pen and 3 pens per treatment). Pens within a block were assigned randomly to 1 of 7 dietary treatments: 1) control (CTL) = diet without β-AA; 2) RH constant (RHC) = 20.0 mg/kg of RH, d 1 to 30; 3) RH increasing (RHI) = 10.0 mg/kg, d 1 to 10; 20.0 mg/kg, d 11 to 20; and 30.0 mg/kg, d 21 to 30; 4) RH decreasing (RHD) = 30.0 mg/kg, d 1 to 10; 20.0 mg/kg, d 11 to 20; and 10.0 mg/kg, d 21 to 30; 5) ZH constant (ZHC) = 6.0 mg/kg of ZH, d 1 to 30; 6) ZH increasing (ZHI) = 3.0 mg/kg, d 1 to 10; 6.0 mg/kg, d 11 to 20; and 9.0 mg/kg d 21 to 30; and 7) ZH decreasing (ZHD) = 9.0 mg/kg, d 1 to 10; 6.0 mg/kg, d 11 to 20; and 3.0 mg/kg, d 21 to 30. Overall, β-AA supplementation reduced DMI (P < 0.001) compared with CTL lambs, but lambs fed RHI and ZHI programs had greater (P < 0.05) total BW gain, ADG, and G:F. Carcass weight was improved (P < 0.05) by RHI and ZHI programs, but dressing percentage was enhanced (P < 0.05) by only ZHC or ZHI treatments. Fat thickness and yield grade were reduced (P < 0.05) by ZH or RH regardless of feeding program. Most LM characteristics (pH, moisture loss, and chemical composition) were not different among treatments (P > 0.05), with the exception of fat content that was reduced (P < 0.001) in lambs fed β-AA, and diameter of muscle fibers that was increased (P < 0.05) by ZHI treatment. Constant and increasing doses of ZH reduced (P < 0.05) the a* value of LM and semitendinosus muscles, with no effects on L* or b* values. The mass of liver was reduced (P < 0.05) in ZHI-treated lambs compared with CTL lambs, and plasma urea concentration

  13. Effect of feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride to beef and calf-fed Holstein cattle on consumer palatability ratings.

    PubMed

    Mehaffey, J M; Brooks, J C; Rathmann, R J; Alsup, E M; Hutcheson, J P; Nichols, W T; Streeter, M N; Yates, D A; Johnson, B J; Miller, M F

    2009-11-01

    The need to provide consumer data for beef steak tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall palatability ratings from zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) beef to the processor, retailers, restaurants, and consumers is paramount. Consumer palatability responses were studied for 14- and 21-d aged USDA Choice and USDA Select quality grade beef and USDA Choice calf-fed Holstein New York Strip steaks from cattle that had been fed ZH for 0, 20, and 30 d before slaughter. Strip loins were cut into 2.54-cm-thick New York strip steaks and assigned to a 14- or 21-d aging treatment. The first and fourth steaks were assigned for 14- or 21-d WBSF analysis, and the second, third, fifth, and sixth steaks were reserved for consumer sensory panel evaluation. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) analysis was conducted at Texas Tech University (TTU, Lubbock), Kansas State University (Manhattan), Oklahoma State University (Stillwater), and West Texas A&M University (Canyon) with values used to sort steaks for consumer evaluation. Slice shear force analysis was performed at TTU on available paired consumer steaks. Consumers (n = 3,007) in 4 metropolitan areas (Baltimore, MD/Washington, DC; Chicago, IL; Los Angeles, CA; and Lubbock, TX) were asked to rate tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall acceptability. Consumers were selected to represent a wide range of income, education, and ethnicity at each city. Steaks were cooked to a medium degree of doneness (71 degrees C), cut into 1 cm(3) pieces, and served warm to consumers. Consumers tasted samples from each of 3 separate steaks from each ZH treatment (0, 20, and 30 d) and within each USDA quality grade and within the 14- and 21-d aging treatments. Steaks were selected to represent the distribution of tenderness for the first, second, and third SD either side of the mean for each treatment. A second calf-fed Holstein consumer study (n = 240) was conducted with consumers eating USDA Choice 14- and 21-d aged steaks from Holstein cattle fed

  14. Impact of sorting before feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of yearling steers.

    PubMed

    Hilscher, F H; Hussey, E M; Nuttelman, B L; Burken, D B; Griffin, W A; Vander Pol, K J; Hutcheson, J P; Erickson, G E

    2015-05-01

    Two studies evaluated sorting and feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics in randomized block-designed finishing trials. In Exp. 1 (initial BW 342 ± 10 kg, = 1,000), 5 treatments included an unsorted non-ZH fed negative control (-CON), an unsorted ZH fed positive control (+CON), and 3 treatments in which the heaviest 20% within the pen were sorted and marketed 28 d early and the remaining 80% were fed ZH. The 20% were identified at the beginning (EARLY), 100 d from slaughter (MIDDLE), or 50 d from slaughter (LATE). Because of sorting, the remaining steers in sorted treatments were fed 14 d longer than -CON and +CON. Average days on feed for control treatments were 165 and 173 d for the EARLY, MIDDLE, and LATE treatments. In Exp. 2 (initial BW 376 ± 29 kg, = 1,400), 4 treatments included -CON; +CON; an early weight sort fed ZH (1-SORT) with the heaviest 20% identified at d 1 and sorted 50 d from harvest and marketed 14 d before -CON and +CON, with the remaining 80% of the pen fed 7 d longer than -CON and +CON; and a 4-way sort 50 d from harvest fed ZH (4-SORT) with steers sorted into HEAVY, MID-HEAVY, MID-LIGHT, and LIGHT groups marketed -14, 0, +7, and +28 d from -CON and +CON, respectively. Average days on feed for control treatments were 154 and 157 d for the 1-SORT and 159 d for 4-SORT. Steers were fed Zilmax at 8.3 mg/kg DM for 20 d followed by a 3 d withdrawal. In Exp. 1, steers fed +CON had 13 kg greater (P < 0.01) HCW than steers fed -CON. Steers sorted EARLY, MIDDLE, and LATE had 28, 25, and 24 kg heavier ( P< 0.01) HCW than -CON steers, respectively. Carcass weight SD was greater (P = 0.01) for +CON than -CON but was not different (P = 0.17) between -CON and ZH sorted treatments. Percentage of overweight carcasses (454 kg) was greater (P ≤ 0.05) in sorted treatments than in -CON. In Exp. 2, HCW for +CON was 15 kg heavier (P < 0.01) than that for -CON, and HCW for 4-SORT was greater (P < 0.02) than that

  15. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on carcass cutability of calf-fed Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Howard, S T; Woerner, D R; Vote, D J; Scanga, J A; Acheson, R J; Chapman, P L; Bryant, T C; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E

    2014-01-01

    Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) and zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on saleable yield of carcass sides from calf-fed Holstein steers were evaluated using steers implanted with a progesterone (100 mg) plus estradiol benzoate (10 mg) implant followed by a terminal trenbolone acetate (200 mg) plus estradiol (40 mg) implant. Steers were blocked by weight into pens (n = 32) randomly assigned to one of four treatments: control, RH fed at 300 mg•steer(-1)/d(-1) (RH 300) or RH fed at 400 mg•steer(-1)/d(-1) (RH 400) the final 31 d of finishing, and ZH fed at 60 to 90 mg•steer(-1)/d(-1) (7.56 g/ton on a 100% DM basis) for 21 d with a 5 d withdrawal before harvest. Eight to nine carcass sides were randomly selected from each pen; carcass sides with excessive hide pulls, fat pulls or bruises were avoided. Cutout data were collected within a commercial facility using plant personnel to fabricate sides at a rate of one every 3 to 4 min into items typically merchandised by the facility. All lean, fat and bone were weighed and summed back to total chilled side weight with a sensitivity of ± 2% to be included in the data set. Compared to controls, β-agonists increased saleable yield of whole-muscle cuts by 0.61%, 0.86% and 1.95% for RH 300, RH 400 and ZH, respectively (P < 0.05). Percent fat was less in carcasses from the ZH treatment compared to controls (P < 0.05); however, this difference was not observed between RH treatments and controls (P > 0.05). Percent bone was less in the ZH treatment due to increased muscle (P < 0.05). The percent of chilled side weight comprised of trimmings was unchanged between treatments, but on a 100% lean basis, RH 400 and ZH increased trim yields (P < 0.05). Analysis of saleable yield by primal showed a fundamental shift in growth and development. Beta-agonists caused a shift in proportion of saleable yield within individual primals, with a greater portion produced from the hindquarter relative to the forequarter, specifically in

  16. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on longissimus muscle shear force and sensory attributes of beef steers.

    PubMed

    Arp, T S; Howard, S T; Woerner, D R; Scanga, J A; McKenna, D R; Kolath, W H; Chapman, P L; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E

    2013-12-01

    Effect of ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) and zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on LM shear force and sensory attributes was determined using pens (n = 40) British × Continental crossbred steers randomly allocated to one of the following treatments: control; RH fed at 200 (RH 200) or 300 mg • steer(-1) • d(-1) (RH 300), or 400 mg • steer(-1) • d(-1) (RH 400) top-dressed for the final 30 d of feeding; or ZH fed at 7.5 mg/kg, beginning 23 d before slaughter with a 3-d withdrawal. Two replicates (pens) per treatment were represented in four blocks. Eighteen carcasses per pen were randomly selected and one 5-cm LM sample was removed from both carcass sides to be used for shear force and sensory evaluation. Samples were aged for 14 d, frozen at -28.8 °C, and cut into 2.5-cm steaks. All steaks were cooked to an internal temperature of 71.1 °C before being evaluated for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), slice shear force (SSF), or being fed to trained sensory panelists. Increasing dose and potency of β-agonist increased WBSF by 4 to 17% and SSF by 5 to 24% (P < 0.05). Steaks from steers fed ZH had higher WBSF and SSF values compared with all other treatments (P < 0.05), whereas steaks from controls and steers fed RH 200 were not different (P > 0.05). Probability of steaks failing to meet shear force standards to be certified tender (WBSF <4.4 kg, SSF < 20 kg) was increased from an initial probability of <0.06 in steaks from steers in the control treatment to 0.10 to 0.20 in steers fed RH 400 or ZH (P < 0.05). No difference was detected in panel ratings for overall tenderness of steaks from steers fed RH 200 compared with controls (P > 0.05). Steaks from steers fed RH 300 and RH 400 were comparable for all sensory attributes; however, both RH 300 and RH 400 were rated lower for overall tenderness than controls (P < 0.05). Panelists failed to detect differences in overall tenderness of steaks from steers fed RH 400 and ZH (P < 0.05). Panelists detected no

  17. Starch-enhanced degradation of HMW PAHs by Fusarium sp. in an aged polluted soil from a coal mining area.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ou-Ya; Zhang, Xue-Na; Feng, Sheng-Dong; Zhang, Li-Xiu; Shi, Wei; Yang, Zhi-Xin; Chena, Miao-Miao; Fanga, Xue-Dan

    2017-05-01

    The present study used strain ZH-H2 (Fusarium sp.) isolated by our group as the PAH-degrading strain and 5-6-rings PAHs as degradation objects. The soil incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the starch-enhanced degradation effects of HMW PAHs by Fusarium sp. in an Aged Polluted Soil from a Coal Mining Area. The results showed that the removal rates of BaP, InP and BghiP increased with increasing inoculation rate of ZH-H2 in the unsterile aged polluted soil of coal mining area, with the exception of BbF degradation which increased in the H2 treatment and then decreased. Different addition dosage of starch apparently resulted in degradation of 4 PAHs in soil, with removal rates of 14.47% for BaP, 23.83% for DbA, 30.77% for BghiP and 31.00% for InP obtained with treatment D2, respectively higher than in treatment D1. So starch addition apparently enhanced the degradation of the 4 PAHs, especially InP and BghiP, by native microbes in the aged HMW PAH-polluted soil. By adding starch to these aged polluted soils with inoculated strain ZH-H2, HMW-PAHs degradation was further improved and addition of 0.5 g kg(-1) starch to soils with 1.0 g kg(-1) Fusarium ZH-H2 (D2 + H2) performed best to the 4 HMW-PAHs in all of these combination treatments by a factor of up to 3.09, depending on the PAH. We found that the highest polyphenol oxidase activities under D2 + H2 treatments are consistent with the results of removal rates of 4 PAHs. Our findings suggest that the combination of Fusarium sp. ZH-H2 and starch offers a suitable alternative for bioremediation of aged PAH-contaminated soil in coal mining areas, with a recommended inoculation size of 0.5 g Fusarium sp. ZH-H2 and addition of 0.5 g kg(-1) starch per kg soil. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. RNA polymerase I-mediated expression of viral RNA for the rescue of infectious virulent and avirulent Rift Valley fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Billecocq, Agnès; Gauliard, Nicolas; Le May, Nicolas; Elliott, Richard M; Flick, Ramon; Bouloy, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) is a mosquito-transmitted arbovirus that causes human and animal diseases in sub-Saharan Africa and was introduced into the Arabian Peninsula in 2000. Here, we describe a method of reverse genetics to recover infectious RVFV from transfected plasmids based on the use of the cellular RNA polymerase I promoter to synthesize viral transcripts. We compared its efficiency with a system using T7 RNA polymerase and found that both are equally efficient for the rescue of RVFV generating titers of approx. 10(7) to 10(8) pfu/ml. We used the RNA polymerase I-based system to rescue both attenuated MP12 and virulent ZH548 strains as well as chimeric MP12-ZH548 viruses, and in addition RVFV expressing reporter proteins.

  19. Rain-Rate Estimation in the Presence of Hail Using S-Band Specific Differential Phase and Other Radar Parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, K.; Bringi, V. N.; Liu, L.

    1995-02-01

    Multiparameter radar measurements were made during a heavy rainfall event accompanied by hail in Colorado. Rainfall rates R and accumulation for this event were estimated using S-band specific differential phase KDP, reflectivity factor ZH, and X-band specific attenuation AH3. These estimates were compared with measurements from a ground-based rain gauge. Both R KDP and R AH3 relations were in good agreement with the rain gauge data, that is, less than 10% difference in the rainfall accumulations. The R Z relation produced similar results only when ZH was truncated at 55 dBZ. This study demonstrates the potential of KDP for estimating rainfall rates in severe storms that may have rain-hail mixtures.

  20. Search for associated production of z and Higgs bosons in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    BackusMayes, John Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We present a search for associated production of Z and Higgs bosons in 4.2 fb-1 of $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, produced in RunII of the Tevatron and recorded by the D0 detector. The search is performed in events containing at least two muons and at least two jets. The ZH signal is distinguished from the expected backgrounds by means of multivariate classifiers known as random forests. Binned random forest output distributions are used in comparing the data to background-only and signal+background hypotheses. No excess is observed in the data, so we set upper limits on ZH production with a 95% confidence level.

  1. Helical twisting in nemato-cholesteric systems based on cholesterol derivatives and photosensitive azoxy compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Serbina, M. I.; Kasian, N. A.; Lisetski, L. N.

    2013-01-15

    For cholesteric liquid crystal systems containing photosensitive nematic ZhK-440 and a mixture of cholesterol derivatives, changes in helical twisting induced by UV radiation were studied. The UV-induced shift of selective reflection maximum {lambda}{sub max} was shown to depend upon concentration of the nematic component. For low concentrations of ZhK-440, {lambda}{sub max} increases, which correlates with corresponding changes with increasing temperature. For higher concentrations, {lambda}{sub max} decreases, regardless of the temperature behavior of the system. A theoretical description of the available experimental data is proposed on the basis of development of molecular models of helical twisting, including an assumed possibility of ordered orientation of short molecular axes of cis-isomers formed as a result of UV irradiation, which is determined by the sense of the cholesteric helix already present in the system.

  2. Feeding performance, carcass characteristics, and tenderness attributes of steers sorted by the Igenity tenderness panel and fed zilpaterol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    McEvers, T J; Nichols, W T; Hutcheson, J P; Edmonds, M D; Lawrence, T E

    2012-11-01

    Steers (n = 560; initial BW = 420 ± 26 kg) were selected from a pool of 1,040, using the IGENITY Profile DNA test for tenderness, sorted into 1 of 4 tenderness genotype (TG) groups [140 tough (TUF), 140 intermediate (INT), 140 tender (TEND), or 140 mixed (MXD)], and subsequently allocated into 56 pens at random, of which one-half (28 pens, 7 pens from each TG) were supplemented the β-adrenergic agonist zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) and the balance fed a control ration. No TG × ZH interaction (P ≥ 0.15) occurred for any measured trait. Cattle from INT TG had less (P < 0.05) DMI during pretreatment (d 0 to 118) and entire trial (d 0 to 143) periods than other TG. Cattle fed ZH had greater (P < 0.01) ADG and G:F, and decreased (P < 0.01) DMI during the treatment period (d 119 to 143). Cattle from the TEND group had greater (P < 0.01) marbling scores, increased (P < 0.02) calculated USDA yield grades (YG), and more (P < 0.02) calculated empty body fat (EBF) than TUF cattle. Cattle receiving ZH during the treatment period had increased (P < 0.01) HCW, dressed yield, and LM area. Additionally, cattle fed ZH exhibited decreased (P < 0.01) EBF, marbling, KPH, and calculated USDA YG. No difference (P > 0.06) in YG distributions were detected among TG, yet TEND cattle were represented by a greater (P < 0.01) proportion of Prime and premium Choice carcasses. Cattle fed ZH exhibited increased (P < 0.01) frequencies of YG 2 carcasses and fewer (P < 0.01) YG 3, 4, and 5 carcasses concurrent with an increase (P < 0.04) in the percentage of Select carcasses. Longissimus steaks from TUF cattle had greater (P < 0.03) Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (WBSF) values at 7 and 14 d postmortem than steaks from INT or TEND cattle. Furthermore, ZH-fed cattle had increased (P < 0.01) WBSF values for all aging periods compared with control cattle. Frequency of steaks with WBSF values <3.9 kg (certified tender) were less (P < 0.05) for the TUF group. Feeding ZH resulted in fewer longissimus

  3. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying into four taus at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Sloan, T.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Beacham, J.; Cranmer, K.; Yavin, I.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.; ALEPH Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    A search for the production and non-standard decay of a Higgs boson, h, into four taus through intermediate pseudoscalars, a, is conducted on 683 pb-1 of data collected by the ALEPH experiment at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV. No excess of events above background is observed, and exclusion limits are placed on the combined production cross section times branching ratio, {ξ^2} = {σ left( {{text{e}+ /text{e- } to {text{Zh}}} right)}}{{{σ_{text{SM}}}left( {{text{e}+ }{text{e}- } to {text{Zh}}} right)}} × Bleft( {h to {text{aa}}} right) × B{left( {{text{a}} to {tau+ }{tau- }} right)^2} . For m h < 107 GeV/ c 2 and 4 < m a < 10 GeV/ c 2, ξ 2 > 1 is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  4. FET Noise Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    factor....................................... 101 5.4.4 Conclusions ................................... 1084 Section Page 5.5 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Sore inis...0* 30 0 a0 C) : p 0 * N IM VIT INUM SIONMVw 450 >-> mIr. i i,, 0 -° V 0 (¥)PI LIN m3 NIV O 46 L tiw tl~ -- .00 S .0* Ra C)~ go -c C1 47 /fl 4 to 1/f...0 b ZH/ (VU) ZH /< U1 > IN38fl 3SION NIV ~a 56 0 0 Er. 0U 4). 0 U 4-Q tO co 0 0 0 4- CA= .- iLL .04 00 C.) 󈧬- 577 40 CDD In c En 0 rg~J --0 i w E

  5. Higgs Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Krisztian

    2009-11-01

    We present the status and prospects of Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Results from the Tevatron are using up to 5 fb{sup -} of data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors. The major contributing processes include associated production (WH {yields} l{nu}bb, ZH {yields} {nu}{nu}bb, ZH {yields} llbb) and gluon fusion (gg {yields} H {yields} WW{sup (*)}). Improvements across the full mass range resulting from the larger data sets, improved analyses techniques and increased signal acceptance are discussed. Recent results exclude the SM Higgs boson in a mass range of 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV. Searches for the neutral MSSM Higgs boson in the region 90 < m{sub A} < 200 GeV exclude tan {beta} values down to 30 for several benchmark scenarios.

  6. Winter hailstorms signatures by C-band polarimetric radar at Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Devajyoti; Kasimahanthi, Amar Jyothi; Devarajan, Preveen Kumar; George, John P.; Rajagopal, Ekkattil N.

    2016-04-01

    In the northern region of India, hailstorms are common phenomena during winter. Four cases of hailstorms around Delhi (28° 58975‧ N, 77° 22195‧ E) region during winter have been analyzed in the present study. It is mainly based on the observations of polarimetric radar variables (ZH and ZDR), as observed by Delhi C-band Doppler weather radar and supplementary thermodynamic variables (CAPE, CIN, wind shear). The thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere during the hailstorm events have been studied using radiosonde observations. The hailstorms over the study region are classified into two types with and without large CAPE. Although ZH is higher for all events, the ZDR differs for the two categories. The events with small CAPE and strong shear produce storms with larger ZDR (rain mixed with small hail), while those with large CAPE and weak shear produce smaller ZDR (strong hail).

  7. Associated heavy quarks pair production with Higgs as a tool for a search for non-perturbative effects of the electroweak interaction at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, B. A.; Zaitsev, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    Assuming an existence of the anomalous triple electro-weak bosons interaction being defined by coupling constant λ we calculate its contribution to interactions of the Higgs with pairs of heavy particles. Bearing in mind experimental restrictions - 0.011 < λ < 0.011 we present results for possible effects in processes p p →W+W- H , p p →W+ ZH , p p →W- ZH , p p → t bar tH, pp → b bar bH. Effects could be significant with negative sign of λ in associated heavy quarks t , b pairs production with the Higgs. In calculations we rely on results of the non-perturbative approach to a spontaneous generation of effective interactions, which defines the form-factor of the three-boson anomalous interaction.

  8. Search for the Higgs boson produced in association with Z-->l+l in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-12-19

    We present a search for the Higgs boson in the process qq-->ZH-->l;{+}l;{-}bb[over ]. The analysis uses an integrated luminosity of 1 fb;{-1} of pp[over ] collisions produced at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV and accumulated by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II). We employ artificial neural networks both to correct jets mismeasured in the calorimeter and to distinguish the signal kinematic distributions from those of the background. We see no evidence for Higgs boson production, and set 95% C.L. upper limits on sigma{ZH}B(H-->bb[over ]), ranging from 1.5 to 1.2 pb for a Higgs boson mass (m{H}) of 110 to 150 GeV/c(2).

  9. Plant architecture and grain yield are regulated by the novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Lin, Jian Zhong; Peng, Dan; Yang, Yuan Zhu; Guo, Ming; Tang, Dong Ying; Tan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xuan Ming

    2017-01-01

    In many plants, architecture and grain yield are affected by both the environment and genetics. In rice, the tiller is a vital factor impacting plant architecture and regulated by many genes. In this study, we cloned a novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene Os02g0819100 and its alternative splice variant OsDHHC1 from the cDNA of rice (Oryza sativa L.), which regulate plant architecture by altering the tiller in rice. The tillers increased by about 40% when this type of DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene was over-expressed in Zhong Hua 11 (ZH11) rice plants. Moreover, the grain yield of transgenic rice increased approximately by 10% compared with wild-type ZH11. These findings provide an important genetic engineering approach for increasing rice yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fundamental Studies of Electronic Properties of Materials and Devices for High Power, Compact Terahertz Vacuum Electron Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-23

    Workshop on Computational Electronics, (full length conference paper) Beijing, China, May 2009, pp. 265-268. Available online through IEEE Xplore ...of traveling-wave tube regenerative oscillators,” IEEE Trans Elec Dev, vol 57, 1152-1159 (2010). [5] P. Gao, J. H. Booske, Z.-H. Yang, B. Li, J. He...J. Temkin, “Vacuum Electronic High Power Terahertz Sources,” invited review paper, Inaugural Issue, IEEE Transactions on Terahertz Science and

  11. Administration of Interleukin-6 Stimulates Multilineage Hematopoiesis and Accelerates Recovery from Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Htirano T, Kishimoto T, Nakahata T. Asano S: In vitro hernatopoietic growth factors. J1 Natl Cancer Inst 81: t370. 1989 expansion of the murine...a.i phas S. %’ink A. Billiau A. VanSnick 1: Identification of the nutohlbyrcmiatntrekn.Cllmuolt12. human Zh-kd protein, interferon beta ,, as a B... beta . B-cell %timulatory factor type 2 shares identity T. Takaku F. Akivama Y: In vivo effects of recombinant human with rnsanc~tc-derived

  12. Formation of the μ phase in the transition zone of a diffusion chromium aluminide coating on a nickel superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskii, Yu. R.; Khadyev, M. S.; Lesnikov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. P.; Galoyan, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has shown the formation of two morphological types of the μ phase in the zone of a chromium aluminide coating on the ZhS36VI superalloy. Three types of orientation relationships between the crystal lattices of the μ and γ' phases have been revealed. The origin of the revealed morphological and crystallographic characteristics of the μ phase has been established.

  13. Effect of Phosphorus and Silicon on Structure and Properties of Highly Refractory Cast Alloys and Development of Effective Methods for Eliminating Their Unfavorable Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. V.; Rigin, V. E.; Min, P. G.; Folomeikin, Yu. I.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of phosphorus and silicon admixtures on heat-resistance properties of VZhM4-VI, VZhM5-VI, and ZhS32-VI alloys intended for casting single-crystal gas turbine blades is studied. The effect of admixtures on microhardness within single crystals and strengthening phase dispersed particle coalescence is studied. Apermissible limit is established for these admixtures in alloys. The possibility is evaluated of neutralizing the harmful effect of phosphorus by microalloying with lanthanum.

  14. Design of Large Area PLEDs on Flexible Substrates: Highly Efficient Flexible Devices Using a Statistical Copolymer of Oxadiazole-Containing PPV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Conjugated Polymers for Light - emitting Diodes in Advanced Materials, 10, 680-684. Vaidyanathan...4c and 4d). 3 Bernius, M.; Inbasekaran, M.; O’Brien, J . ; and Wu, W.S., 2000: Progress With Light Emitting Polymers in Advanced Materials, 12... H .; 2002: High Efficiency Organic Light - Emitting Diodes in IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 8, 346-361. Peng, Z.H.;

  15. Light Matter Interaction on the Nanoscale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-05

    proposal, we outlined two specific projects: (i) investigation of coherent electronic coupling in semiconductor quantum dot clusters ; (ii...investigation of metallic nanoparticles and clusters as well as hybrid nanostructures consisted of both metallic and semiconductor components. In...Xiaoqin Li, J. H. Lee, Zh. M. Wang, G. J. Salamo, “Strongly Confined Excitons in Self-Assembled InGaAs Quantum Dot Clusters Produced by a Hybrid

  16. USAF Durability Design Handbook: Guidelines for the Analysis and Design of Durable Aircraft Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    W. Norris developed the computer software for storing and analyzing the fractographic data, supported the initial fatigue quality model calibration...Hý -Kq *H w 44 0 > - -4 zH* 4.51~~ H * i •b %. CRAK faU 0.050" SIZE aL " 0.020" ý -- EIFS Dirtributiou * M S. .. , Fa(O) (x) - e . [ ]; O<xUXu -1.0 x

  17. Structural changes and damage of single-crystal turbine blades during life tests of an aviation gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospennikova, O. G.; Orlov, M. R.; Kolodochkina, V. G.; Nazarkin, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    The irreversible structural changes of the single-crystal ZhS32-VI nickel superalloy blades of a high-pressure turbine that occur during life tests of a gas turbine engine are studied. The main operation damages in the hottest section of the blade airfoil are found to be the fracture of the heat-resistant coating in the leading edge and the formation of thermomechanical fatigue cracks. The possibility of reconditioning repair of the blades is considered.

  18. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 62, November-December 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-30

    V.L. Strizhevskiy, Zh. Shukirov, and Yu.N. Yashkir (51). Parametric spectroscopy of luminescence kinetics for color centers in KCl and KBr crystals...YAROVOY L K 29 Z11IDKOV L L 16 YASHIN V YE 7,60 ZHIGALKIN A K 11 YASHKIR YU N 95 ZHITNYUK V A 2 YASHUMOV I V 5 ZHIZHIN G N 96,113 YASTREMSKIY A G 15 Z11O0

  19. Characterization of the Human Proteomic Response to Hydrocodone: A Preliminary Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    hippocampus and striatum after exposure to morphine , lnt J Mol Med 18 (2006) 775-784. [50] Z.H. Wen, G.J. Wu, L.C. Hsu, W.F. Chen, J.Y. Chen, H.A...McMillin, F.M. Urry, Simultaneous determination of codeine, morphine , hydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and 6-acetylmorphine in urine, serum...Simultaneous assay of morphine , morphine -3-glucuronide and morphine -6-glucuronide in human plasma using normal-phase liquid chromatography-tandem

  20. Long-Term Strength of a Composition of Complex Refractory Coating and Single-Crystal Rhenium-Alloyed Nickel Alloy after High-Temperature Holds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. P.; Lesnikov, V. P.; Moroz, E. V.; Khadyev, M. S.; Konakova, I. P.

    2013-11-01

    The long-term strength of a system of single-crystal nickel alloy ZhS36-VI with Cr - Al gas circulation coating (GCC) + Ni - Cr - Al - Ta - Re - Yion-plasma coating (IPC) + Al - Ni - Cr - Yion-plasma coating (IPC) is analyzed under conditions close to the operating ones after a hold for 1 - 1000 h in a temperature range of 1050 - 1300°C.

  1. USSR Report, Physics and Mathematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Semiconductors Upon Absorption of Light (S.M. Avanesyan, V.E. Gusev; KVANTOVAYA ELEKTRONIKA, No 6, Jun 86) 19 Acoustic Emission in Metallic Glasses (A.M...Straight-Band Semiconductor During Inter-Band Absorption of High-Power Light Pulses (I.L. Bronevoy, S.Ye. Kumekov, et al.; PISMA V ZHURNAL...Change of Polarization of Coherent Ultrashort Light Pulse in Resonant Medium (A.Zh. Muradyan, A.S. Petrosyan; IZVESTIYA AKADEMII NAUK ARMYANSKOY SSR

  2. Prevention of Trauma/Hemorrhagic Shock-Induced Mortality, Apoptosis, Inflammation and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    inhibit Stat3 activation. PLoS ONE. 2009;4(3):e4783. 2. Meng ZH, Dyer K, Billiar TR, Tweardy DJ. Distinct effects of systemic infusion of G-CSF vs. IL-6...hemorrhagic shock 1. When 3 trauma with hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) is accompanied with resuscitation, the end effect 4 is essentially a systemic ischemia...we demonstrated: 1) 72% mortality at 48 hr, 2) hypovolemic circulatory collapse, 3) left ventricular contractile dysfunction, 4) apoptosis of

  3. Bibliography of Soviet Developments in Superconductivity, January 1975 - June 1976

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-31

    period of flux quantization In hollow superconducting cylinders, due to quantom effects In the normal state. Phys. st. solidl (b), v. 67, no...and S. K. Uvarova. ’Plasmon and exciton mechanisms of superconductivity in layered structures. Fiz. m nizk. temp., no. 8, 1975, 984-995. — 65...1975, 686-690. 73. Gasparyan, R. A.,, and V. Z. Kresin. Thermal dissipation mechanism in type II superconductors. ZhETF, v. 69, no. 1

  4. Effects of High Power Lasers, Number 7, November 1975 - Jun 1976

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-28

    effects are explained. ZhLryakov, B. M., N . I. Popov, A. A. Samokhin, and A. K . Fannibo. Pulsed regime of developed vaporization of a metal under the...found to be in good agreement. Tananykhin, A. A., N . A. Zatenko, and K . 1. Kononenko. Coefficients of reflection and trans- mission in thin films...Dyatel, V. I. Yepifanov, and K . I. Proskuryakov . Using laser beams for cutting diamond crystals. EOM, no. 5, 1975, 13-15. Experimental methods are

  5. USSR Report, Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-14

    V ASTRONOMICHESKIY ZHURNAL No 12, Dec 83).... 73 INTERPLANETARY SCIENCES ’Venera-15, -l6’ Radar Imagery of Venus (0. N. Rzhiga; ZEMLYA I...Unbalanced Infrared Radiation and Natural Laser Effect in Atmospheres of Venus and Mars (B. F . Gordiyets, V. Ya. Panchenko; KOSMICHESKIYE ISSLEDOVANIYA, No...No k, Oct-Dec 83) 83 Distribution of Craters of Various Age on Martian Surface (Zh. F . Rodionova, K. I. Dekhtyareva; ASTRONOMICHESKIY VESTNIK, No

  6. Contribution of a pure NCG forbidden process to the Z associated Higgs production

    SciTech Connect

    Bradji, O.; Mebarki, N.

    2012-06-27

    The contribution of the pure NCG forbidden subprocess gg{yields}ZHis calculated. It is shown that the cross section becomes important at the LHC energies and depends strongly on the choice of the noncommutativity parameter. Because of the gluons luminosity inside the proton, it becomes comparable to that of the commutative standard model subprocess qq(bar sign)ZH for reasonable values of the NCG parameter.

  7. Production of Neutral Beams from Negative Ion Beam Systems in the USSR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Oparin , V. A., R. N. l’in, and Ye. S. Solov’yev, "Formation of Highly Excited Hydrogen Atoms by Charge Exchange of Protons in Metal Vapors," ZhETF...Vol. 52, No. 2, 1967, p. 369. 106. il’in, R. N., V. A. Oparin , Ye. S. Solov’yev, and N. V. Fedorenko, "Charge Exchange of Protons in Alkali Metal Vapors

  8. Emittance of a Field Emission Electron Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-05

    mode within the wiggler in order for the laser threshold to be reached. The mode is characterized by a waist radius w and a divergence , the product...the field line red or curved compared to a massive particle trajectory blue or straight. The field lines originate on the surface at s ,zs and...emitter surface s ,zs and along the evalu- ation plane h ,zh. The equivalent sphere characterized by a , is also shown. The red curved line

  9. Transactions of the Second All-Union Conference on Charged Particle Accelerators (Moscow, 11-18 November 1970). Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-09

    accelerating systems by the particle motion in zh accelerators to the superhigh en ergies. A. N. Didenko, V. K. Conaai, G. P. i’omenko. (Scieatific rase; arch ...of the self-alignment of the natural frequency of resonators ( ARCh ). Systems APCh of basic and supplementary resonators are carried out on the phase...with dij-.al-anai ^ converters of the type of catenary with relay changeover Ld]. majority of them has tha resolution of 5 decimal Foints and short-term

  10. Study of (W/Z)H production and Higgs boson couplings using H→ W W * decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-27

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a W or Z boson, in the H→ W W * decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies \\( \\sqrt{s}=7 \\) TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb-1 and 20.3 fb-1, respectively. The WH production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two- lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the ZH production mode. The observed significance, for the combined W H and ZH production, ismore » 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined W H and ZH signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, μV H , is found to be μ V H = 3.0-1.1+1.3 (stat.)-0.7 +1.0 (sys.) for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The W H and ZH production modes are also combined with the gluon fusion and vector boson fusion production modes studied in the H → W W * → ℓνℓν decay channel, resulting in an overall observed significance of 6.5 standard deviations and μggF + VBF + VH = 1.16-0.15+0.16 (stat.) -0.15+0.18 (sys.). The results are interpreted in terms of scaling factors of the Higgs boson couplings to vector bosons (κV ) and fermions (κF ); the combined results are: |κ V | = 1.06-0.10+0.10, |κ F| = 0.85-0.20+0.26.« less

  11. Tuning of radar algorithms with disdrometer data during two extremely wet months in the Paris area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Radar algorithms convert quantities measured by radars to rain rate, the quantity hydrometerologists are interested in. They basically rely on power law relations between these quantities. This paper focuses on three relations between the horizontal reflectivity (Zh), the differential reflectivity (Zdr), the differential phase shift (Kdp) and the rain rate (R) : Zh-R, R-Kdp and R-Z-Zdr. Data collected during the extremely wet months of May and June 2016 by three disdrometers operated by Ecole des Ponts ParisTech on its campus is used to assess the performance of these respective algorithms. In a first step the temporal variability of the parameters characterizing the radar relations is investigated and quantified. It appears to be significant between events and even within an event. In a second step a methodology relying on checking the ability of a given algorithm to reproduce the very good scale invariant multifractal behaviour (on scales 30 s - few h) observed on rainfall time series is implemented. It is compared with the use of standard scores computed at a single scale as commonly done. We show that a hybrid model (Zh-R relation for low rain rates and R-Kdp for great ones) performs best. In also appears that the more local possible estimates of the parameters should be used in the radar relations.

  12. Protection of MP-12-vaccinated rhesus macaques against parenteral and aerosol challenge with virulent rift valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Morrill, John C; Peters, C J

    2011-07-15

    To test safety and efficacy of the Rift Valley fever MP-12 (RVF MP-12) vaccine, 9 healthy adult Rhesus macaques, weighing 5-10 kg, were inoculated intramuscularly with 6 × 10(3) plaque forming units (PFUs) of MP-12 vaccine. The monkeys developed neutralizing antibody responses with no adverse effects other than a transient, low-titer viremia in 3 monkeys. Four vaccinated animals challenged intravenously with 3 × 10(6) PFUs of virulent Rift Valley fever virus strain ZH-501 (RVFV ZH-501) at 126 days after vaccination were protected against infection. The remaining 5 vaccinated monkeys along with 2 monkeys that had been vaccinated 6 years prior were completely protected against a small particle aerosol challenge of 5 × 10(5) PFUs of RVFV ZH-501. The mutagen-attenuated RVF MP-12 vaccine was determined to be protective against intravenous and aerosol challenge with virulent RVFV in these macaques, which suggests further development as a vaccine for humans is warranted.

  13. Giant magnetoimpedance in Ag-doped La0.7Sr0.3MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, S. K.; Kaviraj, B.; Dey, T. K.

    2007-01-01

    The resistive and reactive parts of the magnetoimpedance of sintered ferromagnetic samples of La0.7Sr0.3-xAgxMnO3 (x=0.05,0.25) have been measured at room temperature (Z(H )-Z(0)]/[Z(0)-Z(4kOe)] when plotted against scaled field H /H1/2 is found to be frequency independent; H1/2 is the field where δZ is reduced to half its maximum. A phenomenological formula for magnetoimpedance, Z(H ), in a ferromagnetic material, is proposed based on the Padé approximant. The formula for Z(H ) predicts the scaled behavior of δZ.

  14. Functionalized nanoscale oil bodies for targeted delivery of a hydrophobic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin; Lu, Tzu-Li; Wang, Hesin-Fu

    2011-10-01

    Effective formulations of hydrophobic drugs for cancer therapies are challenging. To address this issue, we have sought to nanoscale artificial oil bodies (NOBs) as an alternative. NOBs are lipid-based particles which consist of a central oil space surrounded by a monolayer of oleosin (Ole)-embedded phospholipids (PLs). Ole was first fused with the anti-HER2/neu affibody (Ole-ZH2), and the resulting hybrid protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli. ZH2-displayed NOBs were then assembled by sonicating the mixture containing plant oil, PLs, and isolated Ole-ZH2 in one step. To illustrate their usefulness, functionalized NOBs were employed to encapsulate a hydrophobic anticancer drug, Camptothecin (CPT). As a result, these CPT-loaded NOBs remained stable in serum and the release of CPT at the non-permissive condition exhibited a sustained and prolonged profile. Moreover, plain NOBs were biocompatible whereas CPT-loaded NOBs exerted a strong cytotoxic effect on HER2/neu-positive cells in vitro. Administration of xenograft nude mice with CPT-loaded NOBs also led to the regression of solid tumors in an effective way. Overall, the result indicates the potential of NOBs for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  15. A dual-polarisation radar rainfall estimation method using a multi-parameter fuzzy logic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Will; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel Angel

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of dual-polarisation radar has resulted in a significant enhancement of quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE). It has enabled the measurement of rain drop size and shapes within a volume, the classification of hydrometeors, and the ability to more accurately account for attenuation of the radar beam. Previous methods for QPE have used only the radar reflectivity (Zh) to estimate rainfall, but more recent methods can use a combination of ZH, differential reflectivity (Zdr), specific differential phase (Kdp), and specific attenuation (Ah). The radar variables perform differently depending on rain rate, attenuation, and bright band presence. This has led to the use of fixed threshold values within which the different estimators are used, or the variables are weighted based on performance. This new method to be presented will use fuzzy logic to try to form a more robust algorithm using combinations of the rainfall estimators R(Zh), R(Kdp), and R(Ah). For this a C-band dual-polarised radar based in Hameldon Hill, near Burnley, UK, will be used, alongside a rain gauge network for calibration adn validation.

  16. The operational weather radar of Fossalon di Grado (Gorizia, Italy): accuracy of reflectivity and differential reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechini, R.; Gorgucci, E.; Scarchilli, G.; Dietrich, S.

    The error structure of radar measurements should be accurately known in order to provide reliable estimates for a number of quantitative meteorological applications, from rainfall rate estimation to cloud microphysics. The aim of this paper is to give a detailed characterization of ZH and ZDR measurements obtained by the weather radar of Fossalon di Grado (Gorizia, Italy). Vertical-looking observations are used to determine the system bias on differential reflectivity and to estimate the measurement error on both ZH and ZDR in the rain medium. It is estimated that no bias is affecting ZDR and the accuracy of ZH and ZDR is 0.8 and 0.1dB, respectively. A similar evaluation is done in the rain medium at larger ranges with the antenna pointing at low elevation angles. The long time stability of the absolute reflectivity calibration is also established by radar-rain gage inter-comparison over almost 200 hours of precipitation data collected during nearly two years.

  17. Aerospace Structures Technology Damping Design Guide. Volume 3. Damping Material Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    doi:Dvi ssoi ’(D~dr4) sCnlciový v’NI i I), r (zH) AONBRo36-i 1111 i- LU IU L1 1 1 1; 1 1 2 E23 T [22 -D E2 1 E20 -*. [19 KE E18 -~ [17 -i [E15 0...ta ’-Ix - 0¶% (zH) k:DN~nO3aJi Ofl r- (D LO) It 0 ~ 1%J - LAJ LJ LiJ LiJ L&i LiJ Li I LAJ LiJ Li o uilrln ,rl ,rlm i ilrli ,rl ,rl il on E18 13 El17...4 C40 -x CD Pv N C:) al In F’ L&iJ L.J IAJ LiJLA Li JWW a000 000 000 p%. ’I% - p Lsaw (zH) )AON3flO~di (0 -- It K) C LU- Lu Li wU LwL U U E18

  18. Effects of immunocastration and β-adrenergic agonists on the performance and carcass traits of feedlot finished Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Antonelo, D S; Mazon, M R; Nubiato, K E Z; Gómez, J F M; Brigida, D J; Gomes, R C; Netto, A S; Leme, P R; Silva, S L

    2017-04-26

    β-Adrenergic agonists (β-AA) are non-hormonal growth promoters which promote muscle hypertrophy in supplemented animals. The effects of two β-AA in combination with the immunocastration technique on the performance and carcass traits were evaluated using 96 feedlot Nellore males in a randomized complete block design with two sex conditions (immunocastrated (IC) v. non-castrated (NC)) and three treatments: CON (no β-agonists added), RH (300 mg of ractopamine hydrochloride/day, for 33 days) or ZH (80 mg of zilpaterol·hydrochloride animal/day for 30 days, removed 3 days for required withdrawal period). The trial was carried for 100 days where in the first 70 days animals did not receive β-AA (phase 1) and during the last 30 days they were treated with β-AA (phase 2). The performance and ultrasound measurements of longissimus muscle area (LMA), backfat thickness (BFT) and rump fat thickness (RFT) were evaluated in both phases. No sex condition v. treatment interactions were observed for any trait. The NC animals had higher average daily gain (ADG) and final BW than the IC animals, but they did not differ in dry matter intake (DMI) and feed efficiency (gain to feed). The NC animals showed greater LMA (P=0.0001) and hot carcass weight (P=0.0006), and smaller BFT (P=0.0007), RFT (P=0.0039) and percentage of kidney, pelvic and heart fat (P<0.0001) when compared with IC animals. The animals fed ZH showed greater ADG (P=0.0002), G : F (P<0.0001) and dressing per cent (P=0.0136) than those fed RH and CON diets. No differences in BW and DMI were observed. A interaction between treatment and time on feed was observed for LMA and BFT, in which the animals fed ZH diet showed greater LMA (P<0.01) and lower BFT (P<0.01) at 100 days than the animals fed RH and CON diets, whereas RH and CON diets did not differ. Immunocastration decreases muscle development and increases carcass finishing. In contrast, β-AA increases muscle and decreases fat deposition. The ZH has a higher

  19. Evaluation of X-band polarimetric radar estimation of rainfall and rain drop size distribution parameters in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, A. K.; Gosset, M.; Zahiri, E.-P.; Ochou, A. D.; Kacou, M.; Cazenave, F.; Assamoi, P.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) field campaign an X-band dual-polarization Doppler radar was deployed in Benin, West-Africa, in 2006 and 2007, together with a reinforced rain gauge network and several optical disdrometers. Based on this data set, a comparative study of several rainfall estimators that use X-band polarimetric radar data is presented. In tropical convective systems as encountered in Benin, microwave attenuation by rain is significant and quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) at X-band is a challenge. Here, several algorithms based on the combined use of reflectivity, differential reflectivity and differential phase shift are evaluated against rain gauges and disdrometers. Four rainfall estimators were tested on twelve rainy events: the use of attenuation corrected reflectivity only (estimator R(ZH)), the use of the specific phase shift only R(KDP), the combination of specific phase shift and differential reflectivity R(KDP,ZDR) and an estimator that uses three radar parameters R(ZH,ZDR,KDP). The coefficients of the power law relationships between rain rate and radar variables were adjusted either based on disdrometer data and simulation, or on radar-gauges observations. The three polarimetric based algorithms with coefficients predetermined on observations outperform the R(ZH) estimator for rain rates above 10 mm/h which explain most of the rainfall in the studied region. For the highest rain rates (above 30 mm/h) R(KDP) shows even better scores, and given its performances and its simplicity of implementation, is recommended. The radar based retrieval of two parameters of the rain drop size distribution, the normalized intercept parameter NW and the volumetric median diameter Dm was evaluated on four rainy days thanks to disdrometers. The frequency distributions of the two parameters retrieved by the radar are very close to those observed with the disdrometer. NW retrieval based on a combination of ZH

  20. The metabolic, stress axis, and hematology response of zilpaterol hydrochloride supplemented beef heifers when exposed to a dual corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge.

    PubMed

    Buntyn, J O; Burdick Sanchez, N C; Schmidt, T B; Erickson, G E; Sieren, S E; Jones, S J; Carroll, J A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the metabolic, stress, and hematology response of beef heifers supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) when exposed to an endocrine stress challenge. Heifers ( = 20; 556 ± 7 kg BW) were randomized into 2 treatment groups: 1) control (CON), no ZH supplementation, and 2) zilpaterol (ZIL), supplemented with ZH at 8.33 mg/kg (DM basis). The ZIL group was supplemented ZH for 20 d, with a 3-d withdrawal period. On d 24, heifers received an intravenous bolus of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH; 0.3 µg/kg BW) and arginine vasopressin (VP; 1.0 µg/kg BW) to activate the stress axis. Blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals for serum and 60-min intervals for plasma and whole blood, from -2 to 8 h relative to the challenge at 0 h (1000 h). Samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin, NEFA, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and complete blood cell counts. Following the challenge, cattle were harvested over a 3-d period. Liver, LM, and biceps femoris (BF) samples were collected and analyzed for glucose, lactate, and glycolytic potential (GP). There was a treatment ( ≤ 0.001) effect for vaginal temperature (VT), with ZIL having a 0.1°C decrease in VT when compared with CON. A treatment × time effect ( = 0.002) was observed for NEFA. A treatment effect was observed for BUN; ZIL had decreased BUN concentrations compared with CON ( < 0.001) prior to the challenge; however, no treatment × time effect was observed. There was also a treatment effect for cortisol ( ≤ 0.01) and epinephrine ( = 0.003); ZIL had decreased cortisol and epinephrine during the CRH/VP challenge when compared with CON. There was a time effect for total white blood cells, lymphocytes, and monocytes; each variable increased ( ≤ 0.01) 2 h postchallenge. Additionally, neutrophil counts decreased ( ≤ 0.01) in response to CRH/VP challenge in both treatment groups. Glucose concentrations within the LM were

  1. Atmospheric Turbulence Within and above a Coniferous Forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Xuhui

    An experiment to study the exchange processes within and above an extensive coniferous forest of Douglas -fir trees was conducted on Vancouver Island during a two -week rainless period in July and August 1990. The stand, which was planted in 1962, thinned and pruned uniformly in 1988, had a (projected) leaf area index of 5.4 and a height of h = 16.7 m. The experimental site was located on a 5^circ>=ntle slope. The primary instrumentation included two eddy correlation units which were operated in the daytime to measure the fluctuations in the three velocity components, air temperature and water vapour density. One unit was mounted permanently at a height of 23.0 m (z/h = 1.38) and the other at various heights of (z/h in brackets) 2.0 (0.12), 7.0 (0.42), 10.0 (0.60), and 16.7 m (1.00) with two to three 8-hour periods of measurement at each level. Profiles of wind speed and air temperature were measured continuously during the experimental period at heights of 0.9, 2.0, 4.6, 7.0, 10.0, 12.7, 16.7 and 23.0 m using sensitive cup anemometers and fine wire thermocouples, respectively. Radiation regimes and air humidity were measured both above and beneath the overstory of the stand. The vertical structure of the stand affected, to a great extent, the vertical distributions of the velocity statistics (wind speed, variance, turbulence intensity, Reynolds stress, skewness and kurtosis), air temperature, sensible and latent heat fluxes. The effect was also evident in the quadrant representation of the fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and water vapour. Negative Reynolds stress persistently occurred at the lower heights of the stand (z/h = 0.12 and 0.42). The negative values were related to the local wind speed gradients and it is believed that the longitudinal pressure gradient due to land-sea/upslope -downslope circulations was the main factor responsible for the upward transport of the momentum at these heights. Energy budget was examined both above and beneath the

  2. Effects of dietary ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on performance, carcass traits, and carcass cutability in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Arp, T S; Howard, S T; Woerner, D R; Scanga, J A; McKenna, D R; Kolath, W H; Chapman, P L; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E

    2014-02-01

    British × Continental steers (initial BW = 484.6 kg) were fed at a commercial feed yard to evaluate the effects of β-agonists on live performance, carcass characteristics, and carcass subprimal yield. Weights and ultrasonic measurements were used to allocate steers to pens (n = 40) divided equally into 4 blocks, with 2 treatment replicates per block. Pens were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatments: control; ractopamine-HCl (RH) fed at 200 or 300 mg • steer(-1) • d(-1), or 400 mg • steer(-1) • d(-1) top dress for the final 30 d of feeding; or zilpaterol-HCl (ZH) fed at 7.5 mg/kg beginning 23 d before slaughter with a 3-d withdrawal period. Steers were harvested by block at a commercial facility over 4 wk. Carcass based performance measures were calculated using initial pen weights and actual DMI. From each pen, eight carcasses that were within ± 13.6 kg of the mean pen HCW were selected such that two carcasses were within each of the following four Yield Grade (YG) ranges: YG ≤ 2.8; 2.9-3.2; 3.3-3.5; YG > 3.5. Carcasses were fabricated by plant personnel to determine subprimal yield. Steers fed ZH had higher carcass-based ADG and carcass-based G:F compared with all other treatments (P < 0.05). Carcass-based ADG and carcass-based G:F were higher in RH treatments compared with controls (P < 0.05). Steers fed ZH had higher dressing percentages (1.0 to 1.6%) and larger LM area (4.3 to 6.7 cm(2)) than all other treatments (P < 0.05). Use of RH 400 and ZH increased HCW 6.3 and 11.1 kg, respectively compared with controls (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, RH 300 and ZH decreased marbling score and the frequency of carcasses qualifying for upper 2/3 Choice premiums (P < 0.05). Beta-agonists increased subprimal yield from the round and loin; however, blade meat was the only cut from the rib or chuck affected by β-agonists. Results from this study indicated improvements in performance and carcass traits as a result of β-agonist use; however, differences

  3. Cytokine response in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages after infection with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kimberly K; Hill, Terence E; Davis, Melissa N; Holbrook, Michael R; Freiberg, Alexander N

    2015-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is the most pathogenic member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, and can cause severe disease in humans and livestock. Until recently, limited information has been published on the cellular host response elicited by RVFV, particularly in macrophages and dendritic cells, which play critical roles in stimulating adaptive and innate immune responses to viral infection. In an effort to define the initial response of host immunomodulatory cells to infection, primary mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were infected with the pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501, or attenuated strains MP-12 or MP-12 based Clone13 type (rMP12-C13 type), and cytokine secretion profiles examined. The secretion of T helper (Th)1-associated antiviral cytokines, chemokines and various interleukins increased rapidly after infection with the attenuated rMP12-C13 type RVFV, which lacks a functional NSs virulence gene. In comparison, infection with live-attenuated MP-12 encoding a functional NSs gene appeared to cause a delayed immune response, while pathogenic ZH501 ablates the immune response almost entirely. These data demonstrate that NSs can inhibit components of the BMDM antiviral response and supports previous work indicating that NSs can specifically regulate the type I interferon response in macrophages. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that genetic differences between ZH501 and MP-12 reduce the ability of MP-12 to inhibit antiviral signalling and subsequently reduce virulence in BMDM, demonstrating that viral components other than NSs play a critical role in regulating the host response to RVFV infection.

  4. Cytokine response in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages after infection with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kimberly K.; Hill, Terence E.; Davis, Melissa N.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is the most pathogenic member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, and can cause severe disease in humans and livestock. Until recently, limited information has been published on the cellular host response elicited by RVFV, particularly in macrophages and dendritic cells, which play critical roles in stimulating adaptive and innate immune responses to viral infection. In an effort to define the initial response of host immunomodulatory cells to infection, primary mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were infected with the pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501, or attenuated strains MP-12 or MP-12 based Clone13 type (rMP12-C13 type), and cytokine secretion profiles examined. The secretion of T helper (Th)1-associated antiviral cytokines, chemokines and various interleukins increased rapidly after infection with the attenuated rMP12-C13 type RVFV, which lacks a functional NSs virulence gene. In comparison, infection with live-attenuated MP-12 encoding a functional NSs gene appeared to cause a delayed immune response, while pathogenic ZH501 ablates the immune response almost entirely. These data demonstrate that NSs can inhibit components of the BMDM antiviral response and supports previous work indicating that NSs can specifically regulate the type I interferon response in macrophages. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that genetic differences between ZH501 and MP-12 reduce the ability of MP-12 to inhibit antiviral signalling and subsequently reduce virulence in BMDM, demonstrating that viral components other than NSs play a critical role in regulating the host response to RVFV infection. PMID:25759029

  5. Chemotactic and inflammatory responses in the liver and brain are associated with pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever virus infection in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kimberly K; Worthy, Melissa N; Juelich, Terry L; Agar, Stacy L; Poussard, Allison; Ragland, Dan; Freiberg, Alexander N; Holbrook, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a major human and animal pathogen associated with severe disease including hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but there is significant concern regarding its introduction into non-endemic regions and the potentially devastating effect to livestock populations with concurrent infections of humans. To date, there is little detailed data directly comparing the host response to infection with wild-type or vaccine strains of RVFV and correlation with viral pathogenesis. Here we characterized clinical and systemic immune responses to infection with wild-type strain ZH501 or IND vaccine strain MP-12 in the C57BL/6 mouse. Animals infected with live-attenuated MP-12 survived productive viral infection with little evidence of clinical disease and minimal cytokine response in evaluated tissues. In contrast, ZH501 infection was lethal, caused depletion of lymphocytes and platelets and elicited a strong, systemic cytokine response which correlated with high virus titers and significant tissue pathology. Lymphopenia and platelet depletion were indicators of disease onset with indications of lymphocyte recovery correlating with increases in G-CSF production. RVFV is hepatotropic and in these studies significant clinical and histological data supported these findings; however, significant evidence of a pro-inflammatory response in the liver was not apparent. Rather, viral infection resulted in a chemokine response indicating infiltration of immunoreactive cells, such as neutrophils, which was supported by histological data. In brains of ZH501 infected mice, a significant chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine response was evident, but with little pathology indicating meningoencephalitis. These data suggest that RVFV pathogenesis in mice is associated with a loss of liver function due to liver necrosis and hepatitis yet the long-term course of disease for those that might survive the

  6. Chemotactic and Inflammatory Responses in the Liver and Brain Are Associated with Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Juelich, Terry L.; Agar, Stacy L.; Poussard, Allison; Ragland, Dan; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a major human and animal pathogen associated with severe disease including hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but there is significant concern regarding its introduction into non-endemic regions and the potentially devastating effect to livestock populations with concurrent infections of humans. To date, there is little detailed data directly comparing the host response to infection with wild-type or vaccine strains of RVFV and correlation with viral pathogenesis. Here we characterized clinical and systemic immune responses to infection with wild-type strain ZH501 or IND vaccine strain MP-12 in the C57BL/6 mouse. Animals infected with live-attenuated MP-12 survived productive viral infection with little evidence of clinical disease and minimal cytokine response in evaluated tissues. In contrast, ZH501 infection was lethal, caused depletion of lymphocytes and platelets and elicited a strong, systemic cytokine response which correlated with high virus titers and significant tissue pathology. Lymphopenia and platelet depletion were indicators of disease onset with indications of lymphocyte recovery correlating with increases in G-CSF production. RVFV is hepatotropic and in these studies significant clinical and histological data supported these findings; however, significant evidence of a pro-inflammatory response in the liver was not apparent. Rather, viral infection resulted in a chemokine response indicating infiltration of immunoreactive cells, such as neutrophils, which was supported by histological data. In brains of ZH501 infected mice, a significant chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine response was evident, but with little pathology indicating meningoencephalitis. These data suggest that RVFV pathogenesis in mice is associated with a loss of liver function due to liver necrosis and hepatitis yet the long-term course of disease for those that might survive the

  7. Genetic Evidence for an Interferon-Antagonistic Function of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nonstructural Protein NSs

    PubMed Central

    Bouloy, Michèle; Janzen, Christian; Vialat, Pierre; Khun, Huot; Pavlovic, Jovan; Huerre, Michel; Haller, Otto

    2001-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, is a major public health threat in Egypt and sub-Saharan Africa. The viral and host cellular factors that contribute to RVFV virulence and pathogenicity are still poorly understood. All pathogenic RVFV strains direct the synthesis of a nonstructural phosphoprotein (NSs) that is encoded by the smallest (S) segment of the tripartite genome and has an undefined accessory function. In this report, we show that MP12 and clone 13, two attenuated RVFV strains with mutations in the NSs gene, were highly virulent in IFNAR−/− mice lacking the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor but remained attenuated in IFN-γ receptor-deficient mice. Both attenuated strains proved to be excellent inducers of early IFN-α/β production. In contrast, the virulent strain ZH548 failed to induce detectable amounts of IFN-α/β and replicated extensively in both IFN-competent and IFN-deficient mice. Clone 13 has a defective NSs gene with a large in-frame deletion. This defect in the NSs gene results in expression of a truncated protein which is rapidly degraded. To investigate whether the presence of the wild-type NSs gene correlated with inhibition of IFN-α/β production, we infected susceptible IFNAR−/− mice with S gene reassortant viruses. When the S segment of ZH548 was replaced by that of clone 13, the resulting reassortants became strong IFN inducers. When the defective S segment of clone 13 was exchanged with the wild-type S segment of ZH548, the reassortant virus lost the capacity to stimulate IFN-α/β production. These results demonstrate that the ability of RVFV to inhibit IFN-α/β production correlates with viral virulence and suggest that the accessory protein NSs is an IFN antagonist. PMID:11152510

  8. The Road to the Higgs in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Facini, Gabriel

    2011-04-01

    Presented is a series of analyses which are central to the search for a low-mass Higgs boson. A search for ZZ production in the ZZ → ℓ-+v$\\bar{v}$ channel is introduced then the successful combination of this analysis with with the ZZ → ℓ+-ℓ'+ℓ'- search to produce the first observation of the ZZ process at a hadron collider is then detailed. The final analysis presented is the search for the Higgs in the ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ channel and the interpretation as a ZZ → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ search in order to validate the techniques. Common themes are discussed, such as multivariate techniques and instrumental backgrounds from energy measurement fluctuations and the tools used to combat them. The formalism of the statistical analysis of the final selected sample is introduced generally and demonstrated in the context of the above mentioned searches. The optimization of the selection through the identification of poorly reconstructed leptons is included as well as the utilization of b-quark identifying tools. Some space is given to jet reconstruction/identification and the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger. The efficient identification and calibration of jets is central to many physics analysis especially in the low mass higgs search. Another key component of the ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ search is the proficient identification of jets and an imbalance of transverse energy in the first level of the triggering system. Therefore, the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger, designed to achieve this, is a necessary component for a sensitive ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ search.

  9. DETECTION OF A DISTINCT METAL-POOR STELLAR HALO IN THE EARLY-TYPE GALAXY NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Strader, Jay; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2015-02-10

    We present the resolved stellar populations in the inner and outer halo of the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115. Using deep Hubble Space Telescope observations, we analyze stars 2 mag fainter than the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We study three fields along the minor axis of this galaxy, 19, 37, and 54 kpc from its center—corresponding to 7, 14, and 21 effective radii (r{sub e} ). Even at these large galactocentric distances, all of the fields are dominated by a relatively enriched population, with the main peak in the metallicity distribution decreasing with radius from [Z/H] ∼ –0.5 to –0.65. The fraction of metal-poor stars ([Z/H] < –0.95) increases from 17% at 16-37 kpc to 28% at ∼54 kpc. We observe a distinct low-metallicity population (peaked at [Z/H] ∼ –1.3 and with total mass 2 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} ∼ 14% of the galaxy's stellar mass) and argue that this represents the detection of an underlying low-metallicity stellar halo. Such halos are generally predicted by galaxy formation theories and have been observed in several late-type galaxies, including the Milky Way and M31. The metallicity and spatial distribution of the stellar halo of NGC 3115 are consistent with the galaxy's globular cluster system, which has a similar low-metallicity population that becomes dominant at these large radii. This finding supports the use of globular clusters as bright chemodynamical tracers of galaxy halos. These data also allow us to make a precise measurement of the magnitude of the TRGB, from which we derive a distance modulus of NGC 3115 of 30.05 ± 0.05 ± 0.10{sub sys} (10.2 ± 0.2 ± 0.5{sub sys} Mpc)

  10. Effect of zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation of beef steers and calf-fed Holstein steers on the color stability of top sirloin butt steaks.

    PubMed

    VanOverbeke, D L; Hilton, G G; Green, J; Hunt, M; Brooks, C; Killefer, J; Streeter, M N; Hutcheson, J P; Nichols, W T; Allen, D M; Yates, D A

    2009-11-01

    Top sirloin butt steaks were used to determine the effects on color stability of supplementing zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) to beef and calf-fed Holstein steers. This study compared the effects of dietary ZH supplementation for 0, 20, 30, or 40 d on feed. One-half of the top sirloin butts were enhanced and packaged in modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP); the remaining one-half were packaged in polyvinylchloride (PVC) film. Beef steaks packaged with PVC from cattle supplemented for 30 d had a tendency (P = 0.07) to produce a redder (a* = 18.31) steak than the control cattle (a* = 17.00) or cattle supplemented for 40 d (a* = 17.05). In beef steaks, ZH had no effect on subjective visual color (P = 0.15 to 0.27) and discoloration (P = 0.10 to 0.59) of steaks packaged with PVC when stratified by day of display, with the exception of visual color on d 5. Beef steaks under MAP from cattle supplemented for 20 d were redder (a* = 19.50, P < 0.05) than those from cattle supplemented for 30 (a* = 18.07) or 40 d (a* = 17.57), but were similar to the control steaks (a* = 18.68). There was no effect (P > 0.05) of retail display day and day of supplementation on objective or subjective color of calf-fed Holstein steaks packaged with PVC. Dietary supplementation for 20 d produced a greater (P < 0.05) b* value on d 1 of display in MAP-packaged steaks from calf-fed Holsteins. If recommending a period of dietary supplementation, 20 to 30 d would be suggested to result in, on average, the brightest, reddest sirloin butt steaks.

  11. A Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in CDF II Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents a search for the standard model Higgs boson in the associated production process p $\\bar{p}$ → ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$. Data amounting to an integrated luminosity of 7.5 fb-1 at √s = 1.96 TeV collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) at the Tevatron are analyzed. Two objectives are pursued in the methods applied: maximize acceptance, and distinguish the signal from background. The first aim is met by applying a neural-network-based electron identi cation and considering multiple electron triggers in an effort to improve Z acceptance. In an attempt to maximize the Higgs acceptance, three b quark identification schemes are used allowing for varying event conditions. The latter goal is met by employing more multivariate techniques. First, the dijet mass resolution is improved by a neural network. Then, both single variables and boosted decision tree outputs are fed into a segmented final discriminant simultaneously isolating the signal-like events from the Z with additional jets background and the kinematically di erent tt background. Good agreement is seen with the null hypothesis and upper production cross section ( ZH) times branching ratio (BR(H →b $\\bar{b}$)) limits are set for 11 mass hypotheses between 100 and 150 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2, this channel sets an observed (expected) upper limit of 3.9 (5.8) times the standard model value of ZH BR(H → b $\\bar{b}$). The inclusion of this channel within the combined CDF and Tevatron limits is discussed.

  12. Broad Spectrum Antiviral Activity of Favipiravir (T-705): Protection from Highly Lethal Inhalational Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Amy L.; Powell, Diana S.; Bethel, Laura M.; Oury, Tim D.; Reed, Douglas S.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705), which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV). RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. Methodology/Principal Findings Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92%) survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. Conclusions/Significance Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug. PMID:24722586

  13. Cross section and Higgs mass measurement with Higgsstrahlung at the CEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-Xing; Yang, Ying; Ruan, Man-Qi; Wang, Da-Yong; Li, Gang; Jin, Shan; Ban, Yong

    2017-02-01

    The Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) is a future Higgs factory proposed by the Chinese high energy physics community. It will operate at a center-of-mass energy of 240–250 GeV. The CEPC will accumulate an integrated luminosity of 5 ab‑1 over ten years of operation, producing one million Higgs bosons via the Higgsstrahlung and vector boson fusion processes. This sample allows a percent or even sub-percent level determination of the Higgs boson couplings. With GEANT4-based full simulation and a dedicated fast simulation tool, we have evaluated the statistical precisions of the Higgstrahlung cross section σ ZH and the Higgs mass m H measurement at the CEPC in the Z → μ+μ‑ channel. The statistical precision of σ ZH (m H) measurement could reach 0.97% (6.9 MeV) in the model-independent analysis which uses only the information from Z boson decays. For the standard model Higgs boson, the m H precision could be improved to 5.4 MeV by including the information from Higgs decays. The impact of the TPC size on these measurements is investigated. In addition, we studied the prospect of measuring the Higgs boson decaying into invisible final states at the CEPC. With the Standard Model ZH production rate, the upper limit of could reach 1.2% at 95% confidence level. Supported by the Joint Funds of the NSFC (U1232105) and CAS Hundred Talent Program (Y3515540U1)

  14. Comparison of two carbon analysis methods for monitoring diesel particulate levels in mines.

    PubMed

    Birch, M E; Dahmann, D; Fricke, H H

    1999-12-01

    Two carbon analysis methods are currently being applied to the occupational monitoring of diesel particulate matter. Both methods are based on thermal techniques for the determination of organic and elemental carbon. In Germany, method ZH 1/120.44 has been published. This method, or a variation of it, is being used for compliance measurements in several European countries, and a Comité Européen de Normalization Working Group was formed recently to address the establishment of a European measurement standard. In the USA, a 'thermal-optical' method has been published as Method 5040 by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. As with ZH 1/120.44, organic and elemental carbon are determined through temperature and atmosphere control, but different instrumentation and analysis conditions are used. Although the two methods are similar in principle, they gave statistically different results in a previous interlaboratory comparison. Because different instruments and operating conditions are used, between-method differences can be expected in some cases. Reasonable agreement is expected when the sample contains no other (i.e., non-diesel) sources of carbonaceous particulate and the organic fraction is essentially removed below about 500 degrees C. Airborne particulate samples from some mines may meet these criteria. Comparison data on samples from mines are important because the methods are being applied in this workplace for occupational monitoring and epidemiological studies. In this paper, results of a recent comparison on samples collected in a Canadian mine are reported. As seen in a previous comparison, there was good agreement between the total carbon results found by the two methods, with ZH 1/120.44 giving about 6% less carbon than Method 5040. Differences in the organic and elemental carbon results were again seen, but they were much smaller than those obtained in the previous comparison. The relatively small differences in the split between

  15. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis detects low body cell mass and dehydration in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Buffa, R; Mereu, R M; Putzu, P F; Floris, G; Marini, E

    2010-12-01

    This paper evaluates the nutritional status in patients with mild-moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA). Cross-sectional study. Alzheimer Center, SS. Trinita Hospital, Cagliari, and "Monsignor Angioni" Nursing Home, Quartu Sant'Elena (Cagliari, Italy). 83 free-living patients with mild-moderate Alzheimer's disease (29 men, 54 women), 9 institutionalized women in the severe stage; 468 age-matched controls (202 men, 266 women). Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), anthropometric (height, weight, BMI), bioelectrical (R, Xc) and biochemical variables (serum albumin) were assessed. Bioelectrical characteristics were significantly different in the patients with mild-moderate AD with respect to controls, indicating low body cell mass (men, T2= 12.8; women, T2=34.9; p < 0.01). Women with severe AD showed low body cell mass and dehydration with respect to patients with mild-moderate AD (T2=17.1; p < 0.01). The phase angle, R/H and Z/H were significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with MNA (phase: r = 0.31; R/H: r =-0.37; Z/H: r =-0.37) and albumin (phase: r=0.47; R/H: r=-0.36; Z/H: r=-0.36). Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a tendency to malnutrition, present even in the mild-moderate stages, and a tendency to dehydration that appears in the severe stage. The BIVA technique is a promising tool for the screening and monitoring of nutrition and hydration status in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Entropy reduction effect imposed by hydrogen bond formation on protein folding cooperativity: Evidence from a hydrophobic minimalist model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.; Garcia, Leandro G.; Pereira de Araújo, Antônio F.

    2005-11-01

    Conformational restrictions imposed by hydrogen bond formation during protein folding are investigated by Monte Carlo simulations of a non-native-centric, two-dimensional, hydrophobic model in which the formation of favorable contacts is coupled to an effective reduction in lattice coordination. This scheme is intended to mimic the requirement that polar backbone groups of real proteins must form hydrogen bonds concomitantly to their burial inside the apolar protein core. In addition to the square lattice, with z=3 conformations per monomer, we use extensions in which diagonal step vectors are allowed, resulting in z=5 and z=7 . Thermodynamics are governed by the hydrophobic energy function, according to which hydrophobic monomers tend to make contacts unspecifically while the reverse is true for hydrophilic monomers, with the additional restriction that only contacts between monomers adopting one of zhzh is the number of local conformations assumed to be compatible with hydrogen bond formation. The folding transition abruptness and van’t Hoff-to-calorimetric-enthalpy ratio are found to increase dramatically by this simple and physically motivated mechanism. The observed increase in folding cooperativity is correlated to an increase in the convexity of the underlying microcanonical conformational entropy as a function of energy. Preliminary simulations in three dimensions, even though using a smaller relative reduction in lattice effective coordination zh/z=4/5 , display a slight increase in cooperativity for a hydrophobic model of 40 monomers and a more pronounced increase in cooperativity for a native-centric Go-model with the same native conformation, suggesting that this purely entropic effect is not an artifact of dimensionality and is likely to be of fundamental importance in the theoretical understanding of folding cooperativity.

  17. Ages and metallicities for quiescent galaxies in the Shapley supercluster: driving parameters of the stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Hudson, Michael J.

    2009-12-01

    We use high signal-to-noise spectroscopy for a sample of 232 quiescent galaxies in the Shapley supercluster, to investigate how their stellar populations depend on velocity dispersion (σ), luminosity and stellar mass. The sample spans a large range in velocity dispersion (30-300kms-1) and in luminosity (MR from -18.7 to -23.2). Estimates of age, total metallicity (Z/H) and α-element abundance ratio (α/Fe) were derived from absorption-line analysis, using single-burst models of Thomas and collaborators. Using the Rose CaII index, we conclude that recent star formation (frosting) events are not responsible for the intermediate ages observed in some of the galaxies. Age, Z/H and α/Fe are correlated positively with velocity dispersion, but we also find significant residual trends with luminosity: at given σ, the brighter galaxies are younger, less α-enriched and have higher Z/H. At face value, these results might suggest that the stellar populations depend on stellar mass as well as on velocity dispersion. However, we show that the observed trends can be reproduced by models in which the stellar populations depend systematically only on σ, and are independent of stellar mass M*. For age, the observed luminosity correlation arises because young galaxies are brighter, at fixed M*. For metallicity, the observed luminosity dependence arises because metal-rich galaxies, at fixed mass, tend also to be younger, and hence brighter. We find a good match to the observed luminosity correlations with age ~σ+0.40, Z/H~σ+0.35,α/Fe ~σ+0.20, where the slopes are close to those found when fitting traditional scaling relations. We conclude that the star formation and enrichment histories of galaxies are determined primarily by the depth of their gravitational potential wells. The observed residual correlations with luminosity do not imply a corresponding dependence on stellar mass.

  18. Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cadmium Tolerance-Associated miRNAs and Their Targets in Two Soybean Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qibin; Huang, Yian; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Jie; Nian, Hai; Yang, Cunyi

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in regulating the expression of various stress responses genes in plants. To investigate soybean (Glycine max) miRNAs involved in the response to cadmium (Cd), microarrays containing 953 unique miRNA probes were employed to identify differences in the expression patterns of the miRNAs between different genotypes, Huaxia3 (HX3, Cd-tolerant) and Zhonghuang24 (ZH24, Cd-sensitive). Twenty six Cd-responsive miRNAs were identified in total. Among them, nine were detected in both cultivars, while five were expressed only in HX3 and 12 were only in ZH24. The expression of 16 miRNAs was tested by qRT-PCR and most of the identified miRNAs were found to have similar expression patterns with microarray. Three hundred and seventy six target genes were identified for 204 miRNAs from a mixture degradome library, which was constructed from the root of HX3 and ZH24 with or without Cd treatment. Fifty five genes were identified to be cleaved by 14 Cd-responsive miRNAs. Gene ontology (GO) annotations showed that these target transcripts are implicated in a broad range of biological processes. In addition, the expression patterns of ten target genes were validated by qRT-PCR. The characterization of the miRNAs and the associated target genes in response to Cd exposure provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanism of heavy metal tolerance in plants. PMID:24363811

  19. Globally Optimal Path Planning with Anisotropic Running Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    gradient vector differential operator, ∇ = ∑n i=1 ei ∂ ∂zi h triangulation diameter Xh triangulated mesh of diameter h xi a mesh point in Xh Ωh...grid spacing Z set of integers (i, j) integer mesh co-ordinate x(i, j) mesh point in Ωh with integer mesh co-ordinate (i, j) ΩZh set of integer mesh...may not converge to the optimal path as the computational mesh is refined. The final point primarily arises in graph-based methods, and has profound

  20. Scalable Effective Approaches for Quadratic Assignment Problems Based on Conic Optimization and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-09

    For this, we consider the splitting B=B1-B2, where both B1 and B2 are positive semi - definite . We then introduced a new notion called non-redundant...Volume 20(6), pp. 3408-3426, 2010. [3] J. Peng, T. Zhu, H.Zh. Luo and K.Ch. Toh. Semi - definite Relaxation of Quadratic Assignment Problems based on...Government position , policy or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 14. ABSTRACT This project deals with quadratic assignment problems

  1. MP-12 virus containing the clone 13 deletion in the NSs gene prevents lethal disease when administered after Rift Valley fever virus infection in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Brian B; Westover, Jonna B; Sefing, Eric J; Bailey, Kevin W; Nishiyama, Shoko; Wandersee, Luci; Scharton, Dionna; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) causes a range of illnesses that include retinitis, fulminant hepatitis, neurologic disease, and hemorrhagic fever. In hospitalized individuals, case fatality rates can be as high as 10-20%. There are no vaccines or antivirals approved for human use to prevent or treat severe RVFV infections. We previously tested the efficacy of the MP-12 vaccine strain and related variants with NSs truncations as a post-exposure prophylaxis in mice infected with wild-type pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501. Post-exposure efficacy of the rMP12-C13type, a recombinant MP-12 vaccine virus which encodes an in-frame truncation removing 69% of the NSs protein, resulted in 30% survival when administering the virus within 30 min of subcutaneous ZH501 challenge in mice, while the parental MP-12 virus conferred no protection by post-exposure vaccination. Here, we demonstrate uniform protection of hamsters by post-exposure vaccination with rMP12-C13type administered 6 h post-ZH501 infection while no efficacy was observed with the parental MP-12 virus. Notably, both the MP-12 and rMP12-C13type viruses were highly effective (100% protection) when administered 21 days prior to challenge. In a subsequent study delaying vaccination until 8, 12, and 24 h post-RVFV exposure, we observed 80, 70, and 30% survival, respectively. Our findings indicate that the rapid protective innate immune response elicited by rMP12-C13type may be due to the truncated NSs protein, suggesting that the resulting functional inactivation of NSs plays an important role in the observed post-exposure efficacy. Taken together, the data demonstrate that post-exposure vaccination with rMP12-C13type is effective in limiting ZH501 replication and associated disease in standard pre-exposure vaccination and post-challenge treatment models of RVFV infection, and suggest an extended post-exposure prophylaxis window beyond that initially observed in mice.

  2. MP-12 virus containing the clone 13 deletion in the NSs gene prevents lethal disease when administered after Rift Valley fever virus infection in hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Brian B.; Westover, Jonna B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Nishiyama, Shoko; Wandersee, Luci; Scharton, Dionna; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) causes a range of illnesses that include retinitis, fulminant hepatitis, neurologic disease, and hemorrhagic fever. In hospitalized individuals, case fatality rates can be as high as 10–20%. There are no vaccines or antivirals approved for human use to prevent or treat severe RVFV infections. We previously tested the efficacy of the MP-12 vaccine strain and related variants with NSs truncations as a post-exposure prophylaxis in mice infected with wild-type pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501. Post-exposure efficacy of the rMP12-C13type, a recombinant MP-12 vaccine virus which encodes an in-frame truncation removing 69% of the NSs protein, resulted in 30% survival when administering the virus within 30 min of subcutaneous ZH501 challenge in mice, while the parental MP-12 virus conferred no protection by post-exposure vaccination. Here, we demonstrate uniform protection of hamsters by post-exposure vaccination with rMP12-C13type administered 6 h post-ZH501 infection while no efficacy was observed with the parental MP-12 virus. Notably, both the MP-12 and rMP12-C13type viruses were highly effective (100% protection) when administered 21 days prior to challenge. In a subsequent study delaying vaccination until 8, 12, and 24 h post-RVFV exposure, we observed 80, 70, and 30% survival, respectively. Our findings indicate that the rapid protective innate immune response elicited by rMP12-C13type may be due to the truncated NSs protein, suggesting that the resulting functional inactivation of NSs plays an important role in the observed post-exposure efficacy. Taken together, the data demonstrate that post-exposure vaccination with rMP12-C13type is effective in limiting ZH501 replication and associated disease in standard pre-exposure vaccination and post-challenge treatment models of RVFV infection, and suggest an extended post-exposure prophylaxis window beyond that initially observed in mice. PMID:26175722

  3. The Structure and Dynamics of Tropical-Midlatitude Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    computed I via D = ¢o - D ), where j represents the contribution to the i difference field from vertical mode f removed in steps (2) and (4). Figure 2.10...is an associated Legendre polynomial) and applying the definition (3.7), then performing the integration over longitude to obtain , f ZH ,j, D D ’ aja... F , (3.39) where " is the absolute vertical vorticity, D is the horizontal divergence, v is the 3 horizontal wind velocity and F is the frictional

  4. Sodium Sulfate Corrosion of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Calcium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    NaAISiO4), Wollastonite ( CaSiO3 ), Rankinite (Ca3Si 2 0 7 ), Albite (NaAISi3O,) and glassy phases. In the argon atmosphere fiber degradation was present...Wollastonite ( CaSiO3 ) and a glassy region were present. Minimal fiber and matrix degradation was observed in the uncoated sample heat treated in air. 14...corroded the silicon fiber resulting in a silica zj.zh, Nepheline (NaAlSiO4 ), Wollastonite ( CaSiO3 ), Rankinite (Ca3Si 207 ), Albite (NaAISi 308 ) and

  5. A Finite Point Process Approach to Multi-Target Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    82) Thus Q ( T |T(n) ) = N∑ i=1 Qi ( Ti |T (n) ) + Qcl ( T(n) ) (83) where Qi ( Ti |T (n) ) = s∑ ℓ=1 [ mℓ∑ j=1 log pD(Ti)N ( z (ℓ) j |h(Ti, Sℓ), Σw...pD(T (n) i )N ( z (ℓ) j |h(T (n) i , Sℓ), Σw ) ν(ℓ) ( z (ℓ) j |T (n) ) − ∫ T pD(Ti)N (z|h (Ti, Sℓ ) ,Σw) dz ] (84) and Qcl ( T(n) ) = s∑ ℓ=1

  6. Where boosted significances come from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plehn, Tilman; Schichtel, Peter; Wiegand, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In an era of increasingly advanced experimental analysis techniques it is crucial to understand which phase space regions contribute a signal extraction from backgrounds. Based on the Neyman-Pearson lemma we compute the maximum significance for a signal extraction as an integral over phase space regions. We then study to what degree boosted Higgs strategies benefit ZH and tt¯H searches and which transverse momenta of the Higgs are most promising. We find that Higgs and top taggers are the appropriate tools, but would profit from a targeted optimization towards smaller transverse momenta. MadMax is available as an add-on to MadGraph 5.

  7. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 49, September-October 1980

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    luminescence spectra of an electroluminescent diode. Jemna mechanika a optika , no. 5, 1980, 131-134. (RZhF, 10/80, 10D952) 2 5. Semiconductor: Mixed...beats of optical frequencies. Jemna mechanika a optika , no. 4. 1980, 91-92. (RZhF, 9/80, 9D1177) 423. Gavrilov, V.N., T.P. Telegina, and A.A. Chastov (0...tube. ZhTF P, no. 18, 1980, 1135-1139. 99 4 III. MOVOGRAPHS, BOOKS, CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS 673. Aktinometriya, atmosfernaya optika i ozonometriya

  8. In Situ Studies of Energy Deposition by Ion Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-14

    34, Akus;t. Zh. 26, 804 (l980);( Sov . Phys . Aco us t ics- 2 6, 454 (1981). .S. .ione liunas, L.. Pranyavichyus, and R. \\alatka,"Surface acoustic waves in...United Technologies Research Center East Hartford, CT 06108 June 14, 1985 * .. LI- U ~00 01 O"" ...................- i -2- -SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...ICONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS III. REPORT DATE Office of Naval Research June 14- 1985 Physics Division Office (Code 412) I3. NUMBER Of PAGES 800 North

  9. Remote Tropospheric Radio Communication,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-19

    LU wi Zh J~R Y, y XI i Th c.., Kr , k )7 A l * M A , m b -, H m n - 0 00 0, 10 /0 A ~~** ~ ly afa ~-ter vowels , and after b, ~ .swee ..nwr e as ’~in...aistance expcnentially or, if is expressed in the decibels , then it is possible tc speak atcut lineiar drop . e with the distarce. Linear attenuation...Fig. 1.11 is used the scale, which corresionds to rormal law, and along the axis of ordinates value V is de csited ir the decibels ; therefore

  10. Evaluating the Performance of Multiple Classifier Systems: A Matrix Algebra Representation of Boolean Fusion Rules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Suredelolwlhv Pdwul{ Frpsrvhg iurp 5 5 FSPv1 1 1 1 1 5< ə Uhvxow Diwhu Srvw0Pxowlso|lqj d MVSP e| d Wuxwk Pdwul{1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 63 yll... MVSP ,1 Li zh ghqrwh wkh frpsohphqw ri { dv { @ +4 {,/ wkh MVSP iru wzr 5 5 MSPv lv ehorz1 M M @ 5 9 9 7 +4 , +4 S , +4 S...Dv wkh urzv dqg froxpqv ri wkh FSP dqg MSP fruuhvsrqg zlwk odehov dqg wuxwk/ uhvshfwlyho|/ wkh urzv ri wkh MVSP fruuhvsrqg zlwk vshflf sdluv ri

  11. The Inner Rim Of 51 Haebe Protoplanetary Disks. A Vlti-Pionier Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazareff, B.

    2016-07-01

    We establish the following results: (a) Dust Tsub 1800K. (b) Ring structure. (c) 1.65µm emission region is wide (Delta_r/r 0.5), favoring recent physical rim models. (d) Disk thickness z/h 0.2, larger than hydrostatic scaleheight (e) Extended (>>1AU) flux component; correlated with disk flaring indicators and group status. (f) Confirm and extend the size-luminosity relationship. (1) Authorship: B. Lazareff, J.-P. Berger , J. Kluska, J.-B. Le Bouquin, C. Pinte, W.-F. Thi, and 15 more co-authors.

  12. Control of the Composition of Electrodeposited Alloys by the Use of Certain Types of Additives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-13

    The concentration of zinc nitrate and cadmium sulfate in the solution was O .01M. The deposits were analyzed using a Norelco X-ray spectrometer...sodium hydroxide. The ability of the surfactant to protect the oxide film and allow it to build o -n the surface should be reflected in the current...V.P. Grigor’ev, S.N. Svirskaya and, A.I. Makhan’ks. Zh. Prkl. Khim. 53(1980) 1303. 12. I.L. Rozenfel’d, L.V. Frolova , V.M. Brusnikina, N.E. Legezin and

  13. Impact of health management, health treatments, and zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on carcass quality, color, and palatability traits in heifers.

    PubMed

    Bloomberg, B D; Mafi, G G; Pye, B J; Wahrmund, J L; Richards, C J; Morgan, J B; Vanoverbeke, D L

    2013-07-01

    Two hundred sixty-eight strip loins were collected from heifers fed at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, OK. In Exp. 1, heifers (n = 127) were assigned to 1 of 3 health management treatment groups: antimicrobial administrations were given based on standard feedlot protocol (SFP) or ruminal temperature (RT) or given a metaphylactic treatment of tulathromycin (MT) followed by visual assessment (VA). In Exp. 2, heifers (n = 155) were assigned to the same treatment groups as above and were supplemented zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) or control (CON). Three steaks were collected from each strip loin, 1 each for retail display, sensory evaluation, and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF). Color was evaluated from the retail display steak using a trained color panel and objectively using a HunterLab Miniscan XE. An Instron Universal Testing Machine with a Warner-Bratzler head was used for evaluation of instrumental tenderness, and a trained sensory panel was used to assess palatability traits. Heifers treated by VA had the least number of antimicrobial administrations and lowest yield grade and also had the lightest HCW (P < 0.05) compared with the heifers treated by the other health management protocols. There were no subjective color attribute differences or sensory panel differences (P > 0.05) across all health management systems or antimicrobial administrations. There were no differences in carcass and performance traits for any antimicrobial administrations treatment groups (P > 0.05). Heifers who had 0 or 1 antimicrobial administrations had lower (P < 0.05) a* (redness/greenness: positive values = red and negative values = green), and b* (yellowness/blueness: positive values = yellow and negative values = blue) values compared with those who had 2 antimicrobial administrations. In Exp. 2, heifers treated by VA had the least number (P < 0.05) of antimicrobial administrations when compared with MT and RT. Health management group did not have any other effects on

  14. Solvent extraction of Li+, H3O+ and NH4+ into nitrobenzene by using sodium dicarbollylcobaltate and calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6)

    SciTech Connect

    Makrlik, Emanuel; Selucky, P.; Vanura, Petr; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    From extraction experiments and c-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+ (aq) + NaL+ (nb) , ML+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) taking place in the two-phase water nitrobenzene system (M+ = Li+, H3O+, NH+4; L = calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complexes in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: zH3O+ < Li+ < NH+4.

  15. Analytic treatment of complete and incomplete geodesics in Taub-NUT space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Kagramanova, Valeria; Kunz, Jutta; Hackmann, Eva; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    2010-06-15

    We present the complete set of analytical solutions of the geodesic equation in Taub-NUT space-times in terms of the Weierstrass elliptic functions. We systematically study the underlying polynomials and characterize the motion of test particles by its zeros. Since the presence of the 'Misner string' in the Taub-NUT metric has led to different interpretations, we consider these in terms of the geodesics of the space-time. In particular, we address the geodesic incompleteness at the horizons discussed by Misner and Taub [C. W. Misner and A. H. Taub, Sov. Phys. JETP 28, 122 (1969) [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 55, 233 (1968)

  16. Development and research of a rhenium-free high-temperature nickel superalloy for the turbine rotor blades in aviation GTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmotin, Yu. N.; Logunov, A. V.; Leshchenko, I. A.; Danilov, D. V.

    2016-12-01

    The studies directed on designing an advanced rhenium-free nickel superalloy, which is an analog of ZhS32VI alloy, are performed. The chemical composition of the alloy has been found and an experimental alloy batch has been melted (10 kg). Microstructural and metallographic studies and strength tests are carried out. The new single-crystal superalloy has a long-term strength σ1000 100= 238-248 MPa at a density of 8.87 g/cm3.

  17. Characterization of the Human Proteomic Response to Hydrocodone: A Preliminary Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    analysis of rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum after exposure to morphine , In! J Mol Med 18 (2006) 775-784. [50] Z.H. Wen, G.J. Wu, L.C...Coles, M.M. Kushnir, G.J. Nelson, G.A. McMillin, F.M. Urry, Simultaneous determination of codeine, morphine , hydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxycodone...Jiang, M. Wehling , J.D. Hulse, P.P. Lin, Simultaneous assay of morphine , morphine -3-glucuronide and morphine -6-glucuronide in human plasma using

  18. Hormonal Involvement in Breast Cancer Gene Amplification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Sazer S. and Kelly T.J. (2001). Redundant control of rereplication in fission yeast . Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci 98: 13114-13119. Green B.M. and Li J.J...increases in MCM proteins and Cdt1 have been shown to induce DNA amplification in yeast (Gopalakrishnan et al., 2001; Nguyen et al., 2001; Green et al...replication profiles of S-phase checkpoint mutants reveal fragile sites in yeast . EMBO J. 25: 3627-3639. Shi Y-K., Yu Y.P., Zhu Z-H., Han Y-C., Rec B

  19. Modeling Regional Seismic Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-25

    Monographs on Geology and Geophysics, 3, Clarendon Press, Oxford. Zhang, Zh. M., J. G. Liou , and R. G. Coleman, 1984. An outline of the plate tec...4.7 -1.0 JER 6.2 499.0 502.5 500.3 500.4 -2.2 1.3 KBL 40.8 41.1 233.6 237.1 237.9 238.0 -4.2 -0.7 KEV 54.9 55.0 547.7 551.2 551.4 551.2 -4.0 0.4 KTG

  20. Boosting Higgs CP properties via VH production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rohini; Miller, David J.; Mohan, Kirtimaan; White, Chris D.

    2014-03-01

    We consider ZH and WH production at the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs decays to a bbbar pair. We use jet substructure techniques to reconstruct the Higgs boson and construct angular observables involving leptonic decay products of the vector bosons. These efficiently discriminate between the tensor structure of the HVV vertex expected in the Standard Model and that arising from possible new physics, as quantified by higher dimensional operators. This can then be used to examine the CP nature of the Higgs as well as CP mixing effects in the HZZ and HWW vertices separately.

  1. Z-scanning under monochromatic laser pumping: a study of saturatable absorption in a suspension of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Krivenkov, R. Yu; Mikheev, K. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Mogileva, T. N.

    2016-08-01

    A system has been developed and designed based on a single-mode single-frequency passive Q-switched pulsed YAG : Nd3+ laser to investigate with high accuracy the nonlinear optical properties of a liquid placed in an optical cell with uncoated input windows. The efficiency of this system is demonstrated by examples of studying the saturable absorption of an aqueous suspension of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and the nonlinear absorption of a colour glass filter ZhS18 at a wavelength of 532 nm.

  2. Analysis of Electrical Transport and Noise Mechanisms in Amorphous Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-23

    CdSe Quantum Dots (ES→Mott) [22]  Hydrogenated Graphene (ES) [23]  Carbon Nanotubes (Mott) [24 3. Organic Semiconductors e.g.P3HT...2012) 905–908. 24. Z.H. Khan, S. Husain, M. Husain, “Variable range hopping in carbon nanotubes ,” Current Nanoscience, 2010, 6, 626-641. 25. Aleshin...pixel,  is the fill factor,  is the emissivity , Adet is the area, Vdet is the detector bias voltage, and TCR is the thermal coefficient of resistance

  3. One-dimensional intense laser pulse solitons in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Dimant, Y.S.; Shiryaev, O.B.

    1997-05-01

    A general analytical framework is developed for the nonlinear dispersion relations of a class of large amplitude one-dimensional isolated envelope solitons for modulated light pulse coupled to electron plasma waves, previously investigated numerically [Kozlov {ital et al.}, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. {bold 76}, 148 (1979); Kaw {ital et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 68}, 3172 (1992)]. The analytical treatment of weakly nonlinear solitons [Kuehl and Zhang, Phys. Rev. E {bold 48}, 1316 (1993)] is extended to the strongly nonlinear limit. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Wavelet analysis of fine-scale structures in the Saturnian B and C rings using data from the Cassini spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Postnikov, E. B. Loskutov, A. Yu.

    2007-03-15

    A continuous wavelet transform with a complex Morlet basis offers an effective method for the analysis of an instant variable periodicity in the spatially inhomogeneous matter density in the radial structure of Saturn's rings. An original algorithm that reduces the integral transform to solving a Cauchy problem for a partial differential equation is used for an analysis of the images of Saturn's B and C rings, which were obtained in the second half of 2004 from the Cassini spacecraft. This paper is a continuation of our preceding study of the fine-scale structure of Saturn's rings reported in Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 128, 752 (2005) [JETP 101, 646 (2005)].

  5. Bremsstrahlung in the presence of a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondera, M.; Florescu, Viorica

    2006-10-01

    For the process of spontaneous one photon emission by an electron scattered on a potential in the presence of a monochromatic laser field, we review the formalism and the approximations on which the existing nonrelativistic calculations are based, in classical and quantum descriptions. In the case of the Coulomb potential, we give new numerical results for the radiation spectrum, using either the Born approximation [Karapetyan, P.V., Fedorov, M.V., 1978. Spontaneous electron bremmstrahlung in the field of an intense electromagnetic wave. Zh. Teor. Fiz. 75, 816-826 [Sov. Phys. JETP 48, 412 (1979)

  6. Research on Novel High-Power Microwave/Millimeter Wave Sources and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-28

    Y. Lau, and N. Jordan, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 164105 2006. 12N. P. Venediktov, M. Yu . Glyavin, A. L. Goldenberg, V . E. Zapevalov, A. N. Kuftin, and...A. S. Postnikova, Tech. Phys. 45, 476 2000 translated from Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 70, 95 2000. 13M. Yu . Glyavin, A. L. Goldenberg, A. N. Kuftin, V . K...4760 (1998). 13. G. G. Denisov , V . L. Bratman, A. W. Gross, W. He, A. D. R. Phelps, K. Ronald, S. V . Samsonov, and C. G. Whyte, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81

  7. A Novel System for Identification of Inhibitors of Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a human and livestock pathogen endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. We have developed a T7-dependent system for the efficient production of RVFV-like particles (RVF-VLPs) based on the virulent ZH-501 strain of RVFV. The RVF-VLPs are capable of performing a single round of infection, allowing for the study of viral replication, assembly, and infectivity. We demonstrate that these RVF-VLPs are antigenically indistinguishable from authentic RVFV and respond similarly to a wide array of known and previously unknown chemical inhibitors. This system should be useful for screening for small molecule inhibitors of RVFV replication. PMID:21994655

  8. Morphology, spatial pattern and sediment of Nitraria tangutorum nebkhas in barchans interdune areas at the southeast margin of the Badain Jaran Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, YanYan; Liu, LianYou; Shi, PeiJun; Zhang, GuoMing; Qu, ZhiQiang; Tang, Yan; Lei, Jie; Wen, HaiMing; Xiong, YiYing; Wang, JingPu; Shen, LingLing

    2015-03-01

    To understand the characteristics of the nebkhas in barchan interdune areas, isolated barchan dunes at the southeast margin of the Badain Jaran Desert in China and Nitraria tangutorun nebkhas in the interdune areas were selected, and the morphometric parameters, spatial patterns, and granulometric characteristics of the nebkhas in various interdune zones were compared. According to the locations relative to barchan dunes, the interdune areas were divided into three zones: the windward interdune zone (Zw), the leeward interdune zone (Zl), and the horn interdune zone (Zh). The zone that is proximal to barchan dunes and has never been disturbed by barchan dunes was also selected (Zi). The morphometric parameters were measured through a satellite image and field investigation. The population density and spatial patterns were analyzed using the satellite image, and surface sediment samples of the nebkhas and barchan dunes were collected for grain size analysis. The morphometric parameters of Nitraria tangutorun nebkhas in the interdune zones differ significantly. The nebkhas in Zh are larger than those observed in the other zones, and the nebkhas are the smallest in Zl. In all of the zones, the long-axis orientation of the nebkhas is perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. The population density of the nebkhas in Zw is relatively higher, whereas the density in Zh and Zl becomes obviously lower. The spatial distribution of nebkhas in all of the zones can be categorized as a dispersed pattern. The sediments of the nebkhas are coarsest in Zh and finest in Zl. In addition, the sediments of the nebkhas in all of the zones are finer than those of barchan dunes. The amount of sand captured by the nebkhas in the interdune areas is approximately 20% of the volume of barchan dunes. The variations of the nebkhas' sizes, spatial pattern and sediment are subjected to migration, flow field and sand transport of barchan dunes and sand accumulation with plant growth in the

  9. Symmetric Charge Transfer in Low-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-09

    38. J. A. Rutherfo^a, R. F. Mathis, B. R. Turner and D. A. Vroom , J. CLam. Hiys. ^7, 3087 (1972). 39. G. S . Gaev and 0. B. Shpenik, zh. Eksp. Teor...Research 9 February 1975 DISTRIBUTED BY: KJÜl National Technical Information Service U. S . DEPARTHTcNT OF COMMERCE — mm...the polarltablllta« ii.c": s ;Jief2r,trlft ***tr,mafer of thm ^^ ^ *-> *- s ** i? A^;. UNCLASSIFIBD srcunirv CLAIüFICATION or THIS natommm*— tni,r,d

  10. Stable Integrated Microwave to Optical Modulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    SOA p#-G Aj cd~V ,rc f-,Yr’ 16 p- Ald.7 6r 4. As~ ceAd e.. - 2cWvA Figure 1. Proposed MBE Layers for Both MESFET and Laser ... Fabrication . 4348/Jea w W ~0 U: J -j 0 Il W Igo-,- WU)W co V)H 0 3 o cm ZH 019 rz4 ta W A is mfz0 zLI- g CM Zlu a + J 0(L.- ) U) C) , - - . 0ZW0Z ZCA

  11. Higgs boson hunting

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Haber, H.E.; Rindani, S.D.

    1989-05-01

    This is the summary report of the Higgs Boson Working Group. We discuss a variety of search techniques for a Higgs boson which is lighter than the Z. The processes K /yields/ /pi/H, /eta//prime/ /yields/ /eta/H,/Upsilon/ /yields/ H/gamma/ and e/sup +/e/sup /minus// /yields/ ZH are examined with particular attention paid to theoretical uncertainties in the calculations. We also briefly examine new features of Higgs phenomenology in a model which contains Higgs triplets as well as the usual doublet of scalar fields. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Chronicle: All-Union Scientific Session Dedicated to 100th Anniversary Since the Birth of the Radio Inventor A. S. Popov

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    A, a P p p p R, r 5 B 6 B, b Cc Cc S s BB Ba V$ v T T Tm T t F r r a G, yy Y y U, U A A D, d 0o F, f E e E a Ye, ye; E, e* X x X x Kh, kh Sm AV Zh...channel. 3 ’I .... .. ._. - - S. . . . . [ - -.-. -. -liB-- ill- - -. -- - Sixteen reports were presented in the section of ferrite SHF devices. The... ferrite devices with a low level of interferen- ces. The new results in this regaro are the elucidation of the problems connected with the theory and

  13. An Analysis of Smooth and Axially Finned, Rotating Heat Pipe Condensers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    izac H> t-H. t- ZLUO cozaa o UHO! OUJ OUJ xo —«—i^i o o o Z 122 XZ rxu. UJ -I JitU...8217« •«- UJ — UC —< >»* KIO »«3C ZH-<-«l-OXUJ|->st-Z t-ZUJXZI- I- or<i-<<i>»oo< »<Of-<oo-^ae< < 3a:- izac »zzooxoooz

  14. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 39, January - February 1979.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    Conversion.................................28 2. Parametric Processes.................................29 3. Stimulated Scattering a.* Rawn n ...selector. KE, no. 2, 1979, 386-387. 19. Dyupi, R.D., P.D. Dapkus, N . Golon’yak, R.M. Kolbas, V.D. Leydig, and B.A. Voyak (0). Al xGa _As-GaAs heterolaser...Nazaryan, and G.B. Torgomyan (0). Study of the lasing characteristics of l,4-bis(2,5-dimethylstyryl) benzene excited by a UV N - laser. ZhPS, v. 30, no. 1

  15. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 37, September - October 1978

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    high- pressure Q-switched CO laser. KE, no. 9, 1978, 2029-2031. 56. Dumitras, D.C., N . Comaniciu, and D.C. Dutu (NS). Pulsed operation of a C02...tem- perature for describing the lasing characteristics of a short-pulse C02- N -He laser. Sb 2, 44-45. (RZhRadiot, 10/78,10Ye78) 65. Rubinov...argon ion laser. ZhTF, no. 9, 1815-1818. d. N2 78. Sviridov, A.N., and Yu.D. Tropikhin (0). Kinetics of N laser generation in a pulsed-periodic

  16. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Political Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-12

    JPRS-UPA-89-057 12 OCTOBER 1989 /#Jii\\ !■■■■■ !■■■«! A%1 P##i FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE -/P/? S Report— Approved 1MJ ■’ :M:^i3d...Akmuradov, S . Oveznepesov; TURKMENSKAYA ISKRA, 26 Aug89] 2 CULTURE Russian Culture Movement ’Yedinstvo’ Issues Declaration [L1TERATURNAYA...4 Apr 89] 32 Ingush National Autonomy Within Historical Borders Requested [ S . Lorsanukayev; SELSKAYA ZH1ZN, 14 Sep 89] 33 Students Warned

  17. Constraints on models for the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity in $$\\boldsymbol{VH\\rightarrow Vb\\bar{b}}$$ final states

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-10-16

    In this study, we present constraints on models containing non-standard model values for the spinmore » $J$ and parity $P$ of the Higgs boson, $H$, in up to 9.7~fb$$^{-1}$$ of $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 1.96~TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These are the first studies of Higgs boson $$J^{P}$$ with fermions in the final state. In the $$ZH\\rightarrow \\ell\\ell b\\bar{b}$$, $$WH\\rightarrow \\ell\

  18. Constraints on models for the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity in $\\boldsymbol{VH\\rightarrow Vb\\bar{b}}$ final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-10-16

    In this study, we present constraints on models containing non-standard model values for the spin $J$ and parity $P$ of the Higgs boson, $H$, in up to 9.7~fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 1.96~TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These are the first studies of Higgs boson $J^{P}$ with fermions in the final state. In the $ZH\\rightarrow \\ell\\ell b\\bar{b}$, $WH\\rightarrow \\ell\

  19. Evaluation of two "integrated" polarimetric Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) algorithms at C-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabary, Pierre; Boumahmoud, Abdel-Amin; Andrieu, Hervé; Thompson, Robert J.; Illingworth, Anthony J.; Le Bouar, Erwan; Testud, Jacques

    2011-08-01

    SummaryTwo so-called "integrated" polarimetric rate estimation techniques, ZPHI ( Testud et al., 2000) and ZZDR ( Illingworth and Thompson, 2005), are evaluated using 12 episodes of the year 2005 observed by the French C-band operational Trappes radar, located near Paris. The term "integrated" means that the concentration parameter of the drop size distribution is assumed to be constant over some area and the algorithms retrieve it using the polarimetric variables in that area. The evaluation is carried out in ideal conditions (no partial beam blocking, no ground-clutter contamination, no bright band contamination, a posteriori calibration of the radar variables ZH and ZDR) using hourly rain gauges located at distances less than 60 km from the radar. Also included in the comparison, for the sake of benchmarking, is a conventional Z = 282 R1.66 estimator, with and without attenuation correction and with and without adjustment by rain gauges as currently done operationally at Météo France. Under those ideal conditions, the two polarimetric algorithms, which rely solely on radar data, appear to perform as well if not better, pending on the measurements conditions (attenuation, rain rates, …), than the conventional algorithms, even when the latter take into account rain gauges through the adjustment scheme. ZZDR with attenuation correction is the best estimator for hourly rain gauge accumulations lower than 5 mm h -1 and ZPHI is the best one above that threshold. A perturbation analysis has been conducted to assess the sensitivity of the various estimators with respect to biases on ZH and ZDR, taking into account the typical accuracy and stability that can be reasonably achieved with modern operational radars these days (1 dB on ZH and 0.2 dB on ZDR). A +1 dB positive bias on ZH (radar too hot) results in a +14% overestimation of the rain rate with the conventional estimator used in this study (Z = 282R1.66), a -19% underestimation with ZPHI and a +23

  20. Searches for the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Kilminster, Ben; /Ohio State U.

    2007-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron are currently the only capable of searching for the Standard Model Higgs boson. This article describes their most sensitive searches in the expected Higgs mass range, focusing on advanced methods used to extract the maximal sensitivity from the data. CDF presents newly updated results for H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and Zh {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}b{bar b}. D0 presents two new searches for WH {yields} lvb{bar b}. These new analyses use the same 1 fb{sup -1} dataset as previous searches, but with improved techniques resulting in markedly improved sensitivity.

  1. SSPARAMA: A Nonlinear, Wave Optics Multipulse (and CW) Steady-State Propagation Code with Adaptive Coordinates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-10

    new values can then be used to propagate O(x, y, z:) to ’(x, y, zh + Az’), where now so’ < so + Ax < so + Az’. The process of alternatively...are initially assigned the values O(x, y, 0), the process of propagating one array past the other cannot begin until after the first propagation step...for later data processing . NID. Up to six characters can be used to identify a run or a series of runs on both the printed and punched output. Second

  2. Fundamentals of Magnetic Interactions: New Approaches to Theory and Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    Appendix A. 9. V. G. Veselago, I. A. Damaskin , S. L. Pyshkin, S. I. Radautsan, V. E. T~z1~van, JETP Lett. 20, 149 (1974). 10. V. G. Veselago, Colloq...Solid State 21, 1875 (1979). 8. V.G. Veselago, I.A. Damaskin , S.L. Pyshkin, S.I. Radautsan, V.E. Te’zle’van, JETP Lett. 20, 149 (1974). 9. T. Kambara...1975) 331 [Sov. Phys. Solid State 17 (1975) 205]. [6] V.G. Veselago, I.A. Damaskin , S.L. Pyshkin, S.I. Radautsan, and V.E. Tezlevan, Pis’ma Zh. Eksp

  3. Study of (W/Z)H production and Higgs boson couplings using H→ W W * decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-27

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a W or Z boson, in the H→ W W * decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies \\( \\sqrt{s}=7 \\) TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb-1 and 20.3 fb-1, respectively. The WH production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two- lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the ZH production mode. The observed significance, for the combined W H and ZH production, is 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined W H and ZH signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, μV H , is found to be μ V H = 3.0-1.1+1.3 (stat.)-0.7 +1.0 (sys.) for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The W H and ZH production modes are also combined with the gluon fusion and vector boson fusion production modes studied in the H → W W * → ℓνℓν decay channel, resulting in an overall observed significance of 6.5 standard deviations and μggF + VBF + VH = 1.16-0.15+0.16 (stat.) -0.15+0.18 (sys.). The results are interpreted in terms of scaling factors of the Higgs boson couplings to vector bosons (κV ) and fermions (κF ); the combined results are: |κ V | = 1.06-0.10+0.10, |κ F| = 0.85-0.20+0.26.

  4. Western bioethics on the Navajo reservation. Benefit or harm?

    PubMed

    Carrese, J A; Rhodes, L A

    1995-09-13

    To understand the Navajo perspective regarding the discussion of negative information and to consider the limitations of dominant Western bioethical perspectives. Focused ethnography. Navajo Indian reservation in northeast Arizona. Thirty-four Navajo informants, including patients, biomedical health care providers, and traditional healers. Informants explained that patients and providers should think and speak in a positive way and avoid thinking or speaking in a negative way; 86% of those questioned considered advance care planning a dangerous violation of traditional Navajo values. These findings are consistent with hózhó, the most important concept in traditional Navajo culture, which combines the concepts of beauty, goodness, order, harmony, and everything that is positive or ideal. Discussing negative information conflicts with the Navajo concept hózhó and was viewed as potentially harmful by these Navajo informants. Policies complying with the Patient Self-determination Act, which are intended to expose all hospitalized Navajo patients to advance care planning, are ethically troublesome and warrant reevaluation.

  5. MicroRNA393 is involved in nitrogen-promoted rice tillering through regulation of auxin signal transduction in axillary buds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xia, Kuaifei; Liang, Zhen; Chen, Kunling; Gao, Caixia; Zhang, Mingyong

    2016-08-01

    Rice tillering has an important influence on grain yield, and is promoted by nitrogen (N) fertilizer. Several genes controlling rice tillering, which are regulated by poor N supply, have been identified. However, the molecular mechanism associated with the regulation of tillering based on N supply is poorly understood. Here, we report that rice microRNA393 (OsmiR393) is involved in N-mediated tillering by decreasing auxin signal sensitivity in axillary buds. Expression analysis showed that N fertilizer causes up-regulation of OsmiR393, but down-regulation of two target genes (OsAFB2 and OsTB1). In situ expression analysis showed that OsmiR393 is highly expressed in the lateral axillary meristem. OsmiR393 overexpression mimicked N-mediated tillering in wild type Zhonghua 11 (ZH11). Mutation of OsMIR393 in ZH11 repressed N-promoted tillering, which simulated the effects of limited N, and this could not be restored by supplying N fertilizer. Western blot analysis showed that OsIAA6 was accumulated in both OsmiR393-overexpressing lines and N-treated wild type rice, but was reduced in the OsMIR393 mutant. Therefore, we deduced that N-induced OsmiR393 accumulation reduces the expression of OsTIR1 and OsAFB2, which alleviates sensitivity to auxin in the axillary buds and stabilizes OsIAA6, thereby promoting rice tillering.

  6. Measurement of Resonance Vibrations of Turbine Blades with the Elura Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-15

    Block Italic Transliteration A a A a A, a P p p p R, r 6 6 f 6 B, b C c C c S, s B 1 B 8 V, v T T T m T, t F r r a G, g Y y y y U, u A A 7 a D, d ) ¢ 0...Go F, f E e E # Ye, ye; E, e* X x X x Kh, kh hi m A x Zh, zh [ 4 U L Ts, ts 3 3 3 s Z, z Hf Ch, ch H " I m I, i W w LU w Sh, sh k R a Y, y [4 I AN...Shch, shch HK K x K9 k b 2p & it i n J A L, 1 bI m Y, y Vi ,I M A M , m bb b & I H H H N N, n 3 3 a i E, e 0 o 0 0 0, o hJ ia so Yu, yu nl n 17 n P, p F1

  7. The effect of medicinal plants of Islamabad and Murree region of Pakistan on insulin secretion from INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zakir; Waheed, Abdul; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem; Burdi, Dadu Khan; Verspohl, Eugen J; Khan, Naeema; Hasan, Mashooda

    2004-01-01

    In vitro testing of the extracts of medicinal plants collected from Islamabad and the Murree region on insulin secretagogue activity was carried out. Dried ethanol extracts of all plants (ZH1-ZH19) were dissolved in ethanol and DMSO, and tested at various concentrations (between 1 and 40 microg/mL) for insulin release from INS-1 cells in the presence of 5.5 mM glucose. Glibenclamide was used as a control. Promising insulin secretagogue activity in various plant extracts at 1, 10, 20 and 40 microg/mL was found, while in some cases a decrease in insulin secretion was also observed. Artemisia roxburghiana, Salvia coccinia and Monstera deliciosa showed insulin secretagogue activity at 1 microg/mL (p < 0.05) while Abies pindrow, Centaurea iberica and Euphorbia helioscopia were active at 10 microg/mL (p < 0.05). Extracts of Bauhinia variegata and Bergenia himalacia showed effects at 20 microg/mL (p < 0.05), and Taraxacum officinale and Viburnum foetens at 40 microg/mL (p < 0.05). Insulin secretagogue activity could not be detected in the extracts of Adhatoda vasica, Cassia fistula, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum, Morus alba, Plectranthus rugosus, Peganum harmala and Olea ferruginea. The results suggest that medicinal plants of Islamabad and the Murree region of Pakistan may be potential natural resources for antidiabetic compounds.

  8. Application of activated M/ZnO (M = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag) in photocatalytic degradation of diazo textile coloring dye.

    PubMed

    Milenova, K; Avramova, I; Eliyas, A; Blaskov, V; Stambolova, I; Kassabova, Nikoleta

    2014-11-01

    Activated ZnO powder has been prepared by procedures involving first its dissolution in nitric acid, then simultaneous treatment by adding NH4OH and CO2 bubbling leading to precipitation as Zn(OH)CO3 (ZH) and further thermal decomposition of ZH at 400 °C. The gas evolution leads to formation of pores and increase in the specific surface area. Chemically activated M/ZnO powders doped with Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Ag have been obtained by the impregnation method. The samples have been characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance (DR) UV-Vis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), single point Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods. The experiments have shown that metal-doped activated ZnO powders possess higher photocatalytic activities in oxidative discoloration of model contaminant textile coloring dye Reactive Black 5 in slurry reactor compared to that of the pure ZnO. The XRD and XPS data have shown the presence of defects, nonstoichiometricity implying the formation of solid solutions. Copper-doped (1.5 wt%) activated ZnO (Cu(2+) replaces Zn(2+)) is outstanding in its photocatalytic performance in discoloration of the dye due to the higher specific surface area and improved charge carrier separation.

  9. Chemical composition and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferation activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) flowers.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Vicendo, Patricia; Fterrich, Amira; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-06-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS assays), anti-inflammatory (5-LOX), and cytotoxic (MCF-7) activities from flowers of seven pomegranate varieties (Punica granatum) were investigated. The highest phenolics (330.9±11.3 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight (dw)), flavonoids (29.5±0.8 mg quercetin equivalent/g dw), tannins (30.6±0.6 mg catechin equivalent/g dw), and anthocyanins (0.70±0.03 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dw) content were determined in the Chetoui (CH) variety. It was found that Garsi (GR) (IC₅₀=4.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) and Zaghwani (ZG) (IC₅₀=3.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) varieties exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. For the anti-inflammatory activity, all varieties were active; the ZH variety was the strongest (2.5±0.1 mg/L). The CH, ES, and RA pomegranate varieties were not active against human breast cancer cells MCF-7, whereas inhibition was more evident with extracts from ZH and GR varieties (IC₅₀=33.00±2.64 and 35.00±4.58 mg/L, respectively). Statistical analysis showed that the variety factor influenced significantly (P<.01) the chemical composition and biological activities of pomegranate flowers.

  10. Organic carbon mass accumulation rate regulates the flux of reduced substances from the sediments of deep lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinsberger, Thomas; Schmid, Martin; Wüest, Alfred; Schwefel, Robert; Wehrli, Bernhard; Müller, Beat

    2017-07-01

    The flux of reduced substances, such as methane and ammonium, from the sediment to the bottom water (Fred) is one of the major factors contributing to the consumption of oxygen in the hypolimnia of lakes and thus crucial for lake oxygen management. This study presents fluxes based on sediment porewater measurements from different water depths of five deep lakes of differing trophic states. In meso- to eutrophic lakes Fred was directly proportional to the total organic carbon mass accumulation rate (TOC-MAR) of the sediments. TOC-MAR and thus Fred in eutrophic lakes decreased systematically with increasing mean hypolimnion depth (zH), suggesting that high oxygen concentrations in the deep waters of lakes were essential for the extent of organic matter mineralization leaving a smaller fraction for anaerobic degradation and thus formation of reduced compounds. Consequently, Fred was low in the 310 m deep meso-eutrophic Lake Geneva, with high O2 concentrations in the hypolimnion. By contrast, seasonal anoxic conditions enhanced Fred in the deep basin of oligotrophic Lake Aegeri. As TOC-MAR and zH are based on more readily available data, these relationships allow estimating the areal O2 consumption rate by reduced compounds from the sediments where no direct flux measurements are available.

  11. MicroRNA393 is involved in nitrogen-promoted rice tillering through regulation of auxin signal transduction in axillary buds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Xia, Kuaifei; Liang, Zhen; Chen, Kunling; Gao, Caixia; Zhang, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    Rice tillering has an important influence on grain yield, and is promoted by nitrogen (N) fertilizer. Several genes controlling rice tillering, which are regulated by poor N supply, have been identified. However, the molecular mechanism associated with the regulation of tillering based on N supply is poorly understood. Here, we report that rice microRNA393 (OsmiR393) is involved in N-mediated tillering by decreasing auxin signal sensitivity in axillary buds. Expression analysis showed that N fertilizer causes up-regulation of OsmiR393, but down-regulation of two target genes (OsAFB2 and OsTB1). In situ expression analysis showed that OsmiR393 is highly expressed in the lateral axillary meristem. OsmiR393 overexpression mimicked N-mediated tillering in wild type Zhonghua 11 (ZH11). Mutation of OsMIR393 in ZH11 repressed N-promoted tillering, which simulated the effects of limited N, and this could not be restored by supplying N fertilizer. Western blot analysis showed that OsIAA6 was accumulated in both OsmiR393-overexpressing lines and N-treated wild type rice, but was reduced in the OsMIR393 mutant. Therefore, we deduced that N-induced OsmiR393 accumulation reduces the expression of OsTIR1 and OsAFB2, which alleviates sensitivity to auxin in the axillary buds and stabilizes OsIAA6, thereby promoting rice tillering. PMID:27574184

  12. Bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cell using natural microflora and isolated pure culture bacteria from anaerobic palm oil mill effluent sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor, Muhamad Hanif Md; Mubarak, Mohd Fahmi Muhammad; Elmi, Hassan Sh Abdirahman; Ibrahim, Norahim; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abdul; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2015-08-01

    A double-chambered membrane microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the potential use of natural microflora anaerobic palm oil mill effluent (POME) sludge and pure culture bacteria isolated from anaerobic POME sludge as inoculum for electricity generation. Sterilized final discharge POME was used as the substrate with no addition of nutrients. MFC operation using natural microflora anaerobic POME sludge showed a maximum power density and current density of 85.11mW/m(2) and 91.12mA/m(2) respectively. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the pure culture isolated from the biofilm on the anode MFC was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZH1. The electricity generated in MFC using P. aeruginosa strain ZH1 showed maximum power density and current density of 451.26mW/m(2) and 654.90mA/m(2) respectively which were five times higher in power density and seven times higher in current density compared to that of MFC using anaerobic POME sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Ab Initio Calculations of Phosphoric Acid Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavanant, Hélène; Tognetti, Vincent; Afonso, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    Positive and negative ion electrospray mass spectra obtained from 50 mM phosphoric acid solutions presented a large number of phosphoric acid clusters: [(H3PO4)n + zH] z+ or [(H3PO4)n - zH] z- , with n up to 200 and z up to 4 for positively charged clusters, and n up to 270 and z up to 7 for negatively charged cluster ions. Ion mobility experiments allowed very explicit separation of the different charge states. Because of the increased pressures involved in ion mobility experiments, dissociation to smaller clusters was observed both in the trap and transfer areas. Voltages along the ion path could be optimized so as to minimize this effect, which can be directly associated with the cleavage of hydrogen bonds. Having excluded the ion mobility times that resulted from dissociated ions, each cluster ion appeared at a single drift time. These drift times showed a linear progression with the number of phosphoric atoms for cluster ions of the same charge state. Cross section calculations were carried out with MOBCAL on DFT optimized geometries with different hydrogen locations and with three types of atomic charges. DFT geometry optimizations yielded roughly spherical structures. Our results for nitrogen gas interaction cross sections showed that values were dependent on the atomic charges definition used in the MOBCAL calculation. This pinpointed the necessity to define a clear theoretical framework before any comparative interpretations can be attempted with uncharacterized compounds.

  14. Modeling of the biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop models of the hand-arm system in the three orthogonal directions (xh, yh , and zh ) and to enhance the understanding of the hand vibration dynamics. A four-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model and 5-DOF model were used in the simulation for each direction. The driving-point mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand reported in a previous study were used to determine the parameters of the models. The 5-DOF models were generally superior to the 4-DOF models for the simulation. Hence, as examples of applications, the 5-DOF models were used to predict the transmissibility of a vibration-reducing glove and the vibration transmissibility on the major substructures of the hand-arm system. The model-predicted results were also compared with the experimental data reported in two other recent studies. Some reasonable agreements were observed in the comparisons, which provided some validation of the developed models. This study concluded that the 5-DOF models are acceptable for helping to design and analyze vibrating tools and anti-vibration devices. This study also confirmed that the 5-DOF model in the zh direction is acceptable for a coarse estimation of the biodynamic responses distributed throughout the major substructures of the hand-arm system. Some interesting phenomena observed in the experimental study of the biodynamic responses in the three directions were also explained in this study.

  15. Modeling of the biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop models of the hand–arm system in the three orthogonal directions (xh, yh, and zh) and to enhance the understanding of the hand vibration dynamics. A four-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model and 5-DOF model were used in the simulation for each direction. The driving-point mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand reported in a previous study were used to determine the parameters of the models. The 5-DOF models were generally superior to the 4-DOF models for the simulation. Hence, as examples of applications, the 5-DOF models were used to predict the transmissibility of a vibration-reducing glove and the vibration transmissibility on the major substructures of the hand-arm system. The model-predicted results were also compared with the experimental data reported in two other recent studies. Some reasonable agreements were observed in the comparisons, which provided some validation of the developed models. This study concluded that the 5-DOF models are acceptable for helping to design and analyze vibrating tools and anti-vibration devices. This study also confirmed that the 5-DOF model in the zh direction is acceptable for a coarse estimation of the biodynamic responses distributed throughout the major substructures of the hand–arm system. Some interesting phenomena observed in the experimental study of the biodynamic responses in the three directions were also explained in this study. PMID:26609187

  16. Modeling of the biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop models of the hand-arm system in the three orthogonal directions (xh, yh, and zh) and to enhance the understanding of the hand vibration dynamics. A four-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model and 5-DOF model were used in the simulation for each direction. The driving-point mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand reported in a previous study were used to determine the parameters of the models. The 5-DOF models were generally superior to the 4-DOF models for the simulation. Hence, as examples of applications, the 5-DOF models were used to predict the transmissibility of a vibration-reducing glove and the vibration transmissibility on the major substructures of the hand-arm system. The model-predicted results were also compared with the experimental data reported in two other recent studies. Some reasonable agreements were observed in the comparisons, which provided some validation of the developed models. This study concluded that the 5-DOF models are acceptable for helping to design and analyze vibrating tools and anti-vibration devices. This study also confirmed that the 5-DOF model in the zh direction is acceptable for a coarse estimation of the biodynamic responses distributed throughout the major substructures of the hand-arm system. Some interesting phenomena observed in the experimental study of the biodynamic responses in the three directions were also explained in this study.

  17. Detection of QTLs for Yield Heterosis in Rice Using a RIL Population and Its Testcross Population.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu-Jun; Huang, De-Run; Fan, Ye-Yang; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Ying, Jie-Zheng; Zhuang, Jie-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the genetic basis of yield heterosis in rice was conducted by quantitative trait locus mapping using a set of 204 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), its testcross population, and mid-parent heterosis dataset (HMP). A total of 39 QTLs for six yield traits were detected, of which three were detected in all the datasets, ten were common to the RIL and testcross populations, six were common to the testcross and HMP, and 17, 2, and 1 were detected for RILs, testcrosses, and HMP, respectively. When a QTL was detected in both the RIL and testcross populations, the difference between TQ and IR24 and that between Zh9A/TQ and Zh9A/IR24 were always in the same direction, providing the potential to increase the yield of hybrids by increasing the yield of parental lines. Genetic action mode of the 39 QTLs was inferred by comparing their performances in RILs, testcrosses, and HMP. The genetic modes were additive for 17 QTLs, dominance for 12 QTLs, and overdominance for 10 QTLs. These results suggest that dominance and overdominance are the most important contributor to yield heterosis in rice, in which the accumulative effects of yield components play an important role.

  18. Detection of QTLs for Yield Heterosis in Rice Using a RIL Population and Its Testcross Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu-Jun; Huang, De-Run; Fan, Ye-Yang; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Ying, Jie-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the genetic basis of yield heterosis in rice was conducted by quantitative trait locus mapping using a set of 204 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), its testcross population, and mid-parent heterosis dataset (HMP). A total of 39 QTLs for six yield traits were detected, of which three were detected in all the datasets, ten were common to the RIL and testcross populations, six were common to the testcross and HMP, and 17, 2, and 1 were detected for RILs, testcrosses, and HMP, respectively. When a QTL was detected in both the RIL and testcross populations, the difference between TQ and IR24 and that between Zh9A/TQ and Zh9A/IR24 were always in the same direction, providing the potential to increase the yield of hybrids by increasing the yield of parental lines. Genetic action mode of the 39 QTLs was inferred by comparing their performances in RILs, testcrosses, and HMP. The genetic modes were additive for 17 QTLs, dominance for 12 QTLs, and overdominance for 10 QTLs. These results suggest that dominance and overdominance are the most important contributor to yield heterosis in rice, in which the accumulative effects of yield components play an important role. PMID:28101503

  19. The Phase Stabilities of Magnesium Hydroxychlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bakker, Jan; LaMarre, Joshua; Peacey, John; Davis, Boyd

    2012-08-01

    This work presents experimental determinations of oxide phase stabilities in the MgCl2-MgO-H2O system. Magnesium hydroxychlorides are compounds with the overall stoichiometry xMgO· yMgCl2· zH2O, which form from the reaction of MgO with MgCl2 brines. They have historically been of importance as the components of Sorel cements; they also have a central role in proposed flowsheets for chloride leaching of laterite nickel ores (among others) and treatment of waste liquors from carnallite processing. A phase diagram of the MgCl2-MgO-H2O system is presented, incorporating both this investigation's results and the values from the literature. Thermochemical values of the 2-form and 3-form hydroxychlorides are estimated from the phase diagram. In addition, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph of the hydroxychloride precipitate is presented. The highlights of this article are as follows: Precipitates of stoichiometry xMgO· yMgCl2· zH2O were obtained by adding MgO to MgCl2 solutions.

  20. C-band polarimetric radar identification of hail: An observation and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew E.

    Many studies have demonstrated that dual-polarimetric radar is an effective tool for hail detection. Studies employing radar at S-band frequencies have found that hail is characterized by high reflectivity (Zh > 50 dBZ) and near zero differential reflectivity (-1 < Zdr < 1 dB). Several studies have hypothesized that hail signatures observed by higher frequency radars, such as C-band, should be similar. To test the hypothesis, the dual-polarimetric radar signatures of nine hail events are carefully documented using C-band observations from the Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Unlike previous results at the S-band, this study shows that hail is characterized by high Zh (> 50 dBZ) and high Z dr (3 --- 8 dB) at the C-band. In addition, a radar model is used to investigate the physical nature of the C-band hail signature and a hydrometeor identification algorithm is tested to evaluate its ability to detect hail at the C-band.

  1. Searches for heavy Higgs bosons in two-Higgs-doublet models and for $t→ch$ decay using multilepton and diphoton final states in $pp$ collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-12-23

    Searches are presented for heavy scalar (H) and pseudoscalar (A) Higgs bosons posited in the two doublet model (2HDM) extensions of the standard model (SM). These searches are based on a data sample of pp collisions collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. The decays H→hh and A→Zh, where h denotes an SM-like Higgs boson, lead to events with three or more isolated charged leptons or with a photon pair accompanied by one or more isolated leptons. Our search results are presented inmore » terms of the H and A production cross sections times branching fractions and are further interpreted in terms of 2HDM parameters. We place 95% C.L. cross section upper limits of approximately 7 pb on σB for H→hh and 2 pb for A→Zh. Furthermore, the results of a search for the rare decay of the top quark are presented; this results in a charm quark and an SM Higgs boson,t→ch, the existence of which would indicate a nonzero flavor-changing Yukawa coupling of the top quark to the Higgs boson. We place a 95% C.L. upper limit of 0.56% on B(t→ch).« less

  2. Modifying structure and properties of nickel alloys by nanostructured composite powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, A. N.; Ovcharenko, V. E.; Liu, G.; Cao, L.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of powder nanomodifiers of refractory compounds on the mechanical properties, macro- and microstructure of heat-resistant alloys ZhS-6K and Inconel 718. It is shown that the introduction of nanomodifiers into the melt leads to the refinement of the alloy structure: the average grain size decreases 1.5-2 times, and their morphology becomes similar to equiaxial at significant reduction of the particle size in the carbide phase. The service life of ZhS-6K alloy under cyclic loading at 600°C increases 2.7 times, and at 975 °C by 40 %, and relative elongation increases more than twice. The mechanical properties of Inconel 718 significantly increase: long-term strength at 650 °C increases 1.5-2 times, and the number of cycles before the collapse at 482 °C grows more than three times. It has been found out that addition of nanomodifiers to the melt, in alloys, forms clusters of particles of refractory compounds at borders and joints of the formed grain structure that may help slowing down the processes of recrystallization (prevents the increase in the size of the contacting grains by their associations) and stabilizes the strength properties of the alloys at higher temperatures.

  3. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Derivatives Harboring Defined aroC and Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 Type III Secretion System (ssaV) Mutations by Immunization of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Zoë; Chatfield, Steven N.; Phillimore, Jo; Bentley, Matthew; Johnson, Julie; Cosgrove, Catherine A.; Ghaem-Maghami, Marjan; Sexton, Amy; Khan, Mohammad; Brennan, Frank R.; Everest, Paul; Wu, Tao; Pickard, Derek; Holden, David W.; Dougan, Gordon; Griffin, George E.; House, Deborah; Santangelo, Joseph D.; Khan, Shahid A.; Shea, Jaqueline E.; Feldman, Robert G.; Lewis, David J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The attenuation and immunogenicity of two novel Salmonella vaccine strains, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Ty2 ΔaroC ΔssaV, designated ZH9) and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (TML ΔaroC ΔssaV, designated WT05), were evaluated after their oral administration to volunteers as single escalating doses of 107, 108, or 109 CFU. ZH9 was well tolerated, not detected in blood, nor persistently excreted in stool. Six of nine volunteers elicited anti-serovar Typhi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses, with three of three vaccinees receiving 108 and two of three receiving 109 CFU which elicited high-titer LPS-specific serum IgG. WT05 was also well tolerated with no diarrhea, although the administration of 108 and 109 CFU resulted in shedding in stools for up to 23 days. Only volunteers immunized with 109 CFU of WT05 mounted detectable serovar Typhimurium LPS-specific ASC responses and serum antibody responses were variable. These data indicate that mutations in type III secretion systems may provide a route to the development of live vaccines in humans and highlight significant differences in the potential use of serovars Typhimurium and Typhi. PMID:12065485

  4. Control and pH dependence of ligand binding to heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Doster, W; Beece, D; Bowne, S F; DiIorio, E E; Eisenstein, L; Frauenfelder, H; Reinisch, L; Shyamsunder, E; Winterhalter, K H; Yue, K T

    1982-09-28

    The recombination after flash photolysis of dioxygen and carbon monoxide with sperm whale myoglobin (Mb), and separated beta chains of human hemoglobin (beta A) and hemoglobin Zürich (beta ZH), has been studied as a function of pH and temperature from 300 to 60 K. At physiological temperatures, a preequilibrium is established between the ligand molecules in the solvent and in the heme pocket. The ligand in the pocket binds to the heme iron by overcoming a barrier at the heme. The association rate is controlled by this final binding step. The association rate of CO to Mb and beta A is modulated by a single titratable group with a pK at 300 K of 5.7. The binding of CO to beta ZH, in which the distal histidine is replaced by arginine, does not depend on pH. Oxygen recombination is independent of pH in all three proteins. Comparison of the binding of CO at 300 K and at low temperatures shows that pH does not affect the preequilibrium but changes the barrier height at the heme. The pH dependence and the difference between O2 and CO binding can be explained by a charge-dipole interaction between the distal histidine and CO.

  5. Interaction between organic vapors and clinoptilolite-mordenite rich tuffs in parent, decationized, and lead exchanged forms.

    PubMed

    Elizalde-González, M P; Pérez-Cruz, M A

    2007-08-15

    Scientific interest in adsorption phenomena of organic vapors has concentrated on synthetic zeolites. Solid-vapor systems containing natural zeolites deserve special attention due to their abundance and environmental applications. Adsorption thermodynamic characteristics for benzene, toluene, n-hexane, and CCl(4) were measured on clinoptilolite-rich zeolitic tuffs from Mexico (ZE) and Hungary (ZH) on parent, decationized, dealuminated, and lead-exchanged samples. The clinoptilolite structure released Na(+) and Ca(2+) by acid treatment and this was accompanied by dealumination to a greater extent on ZE than on ZH. The exchange isotherm of Pb(2+) on ZE exhibited a concave type "a" form and accomplished 95% exchange and the tuff was selective at X(i(s))<0.25. The pattern of adsorption isotherms was the same on all tuffs: benzene>toluene>n-hexane>carbon tetrachloride. The -DeltaH values were higher for toluene than for the other adsorbates. Curves of q(isost) vs coverage decreased with the increment of the adsorbed amount in practically all studied systems. The contributions to the solid-vapor interaction potential were examined using inverse gas chromatography. The specific interaction energy G(sp) was primarily due to adsorbate-framework and adsorbate-cation interactions at low adsorbate pressures producing low surface coverage.

  6. References to contemporary papers on acoustics.

    PubMed

    White, F E; Teas, D C

    1983-01-01

    In most of the following references, the author's name is followed by the title of the paper or book in boldface, the journal, the volume number in boldface, the issue number in parentheses, the page reference, and lastly, in parentheses, the year. Where reference is made to abstract journals that number their abstracts, the abstract number is given instead of a page reference. Abstracts in Annales des Tèlècommunications are in French and those for Referativnyi Zhurnal, Fizika (three series, E, I, Zh) are in Russian [where, e.g., Ref. Zh. Fiz. 7 E425 (1979) means: July issue, E, abstract no. 425, year 1979.] When possible, the abbreviations for the names of the journals follow those in Bibliographic Guide for Editors & Authors (1974). A number preceded by the letters AD, DE, PB, or N refers to the accession/report number of the Government Reports Announcements & Index. The numbers to the left of the sections and sub-sections in this volume correspond to those that appear in the Classification of Subjects preceding the index in the June 1983 issue of JASA. Compiled from various sources. For many of the journals referred to here, those interested will find their addresses in either the semi-annual Author Index of Physics Abstracts or the annual Physics Briefs: List of Abstracted Periodical and Serial Publications.

  7. Using Person Fit Statistics to Detect Outliers in Survey Research.

    PubMed

    Felt, John M; Castaneda, Ruben; Tiemensma, Jitske; Depaoli, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Context: When working with health-related questionnaires, outlier detection is important. However, traditional methods of outlier detection (e.g., boxplots) can miss participants with "atypical" responses to the questions that otherwise have similar total (subscale) scores. In addition to detecting outliers, it can be of clinical importance to determine the reason for the outlier status or "atypical" response. Objective: The aim of the current study was to illustrate how to derive person fit statistics for outlier detection through a statistical method examining person fit with a health-based questionnaire. Design and Participants: Patients treated for Cushing's syndrome (n = 394) were recruited from the Cushing's Support and Research Foundation's (CSRF) listserv and Facebook page. Main Outcome Measure: Patients were directed to an online survey containing the CushingQoL (English version). A two-dimensional graded response model was estimated, and person fit statistics were generated using the Zh statistic. Results: Conventional outlier detections methods revealed no outliers reflecting extreme scores on the subscales of the CushingQoL. However, person fit statistics identified 18 patients with "atypical" response patterns, which would have been otherwise missed (Zh > |±2.00|). Conclusion: While the conventional methods of outlier detection indicated no outliers, person fit statistics identified several patients with "atypical" response patterns who otherwise appeared average. Person fit statistics allow researchers to delve further into the underlying problems experienced by these "atypical" patients treated for Cushing's syndrome. Annotated code is provided to aid other researchers in using this method.

  8. Integrated and comparative proteomics of high-oil and high-protein soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu Ping; Liu, Hui; Tian, Lihong; Dong, Xiang Bai; Shen, Shi Hua; Qu, Le Qing

    2015-04-01

    We analysed the global protein expression in seeds of a high-oil soybean cultivar (Jiyu 73, JY73) by proteomics. More than 700 protein spots were detected and 363 protein spots were successfully identified. Comparison of the protein profile of JY73 with that of a high-protein cultivar (Zhonghuang 13, ZH13) revealed 40 differentially expressed proteins, including oil synthesis, redox/stress, hydrolysis and storage-related proteins. All redox/stress proteins were less or not expressed in JY73, whereas the expression of the major storage proteins, nitrogen and carbon metabolism-related proteins was higher in ZH13. Biochemical analysis of JY73 revealed that it was in a low oxidation state, with a high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E. Vitamin E was more active than antioxidant enzymes and protected the soybean seed in a lower oxidation state. The characteristics of high oil and high protein in soybean, we revealed, might provide a reference for soybean nutrition and soybean breeding.

  9. Anomalous ULF signals and their possibility to estimate the earthquake magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armansyah, Ahadi, Suadi

    2017-07-01

    Ultra Low Frequency geomagnetic data were observed for several days prior to the occurance of an earthquake. The earthquake investigated was located within Indonesian territory, Jayapura Regency-Papua Province, with the distance from the epicenter and depth less than 50 km. The magnitude of the earthquake investigated was 4Z/H method to detect ULF anomalies as earthquake precursors. The research yielded interesting processing and analysis results showing that there was a strong correlation between the earthquake magnitude and ULF amplitude anomalies by 0.852. This correlation suggests that there is a possibility of estimating the magnitude of an earthquake that is going to occur based on the power ratio Z/H amplitude anomalies detected.

  10. The Search for VH → VWW standard model higgs production in the trilepton signature with 5.9fb-1 of data from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s=1.96 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nett, Jason Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present here the search for Standard Model V H → VWW → lll + ET (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the V H → VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH ≥ 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional 5.8% (for mH = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H → WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV–a ± 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. TheWH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H → WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level (“C.L.”) on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a StandardModel Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At mH = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH ≥ 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined trilepton analysis is set

  11. Coproduction of Acetaldehyde and Hydrogen during Glucose Fermentation by Escherichia coli ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huilin; Gonzalez, Ramon; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 was engineered to coproduce acetaldehyde and hydrogen during glucose fermentation by the use of exogenous acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) reductase (for the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde) and the native formate hydrogen lyase. A putative acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA reductase from Salmonella enterica (SeEutE) was cloned, produced at high levels, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. In vitro assays showed that this enzyme had both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (68.07 ± 1.63 μmol min−1 mg−1) and the desired acetyl-CoA reductase activity (49.23 ± 2.88 μmol min−1 mg−1). The eutE gene was engineered into an E. coli mutant lacking native glucose fermentation pathways (ΔadhE, ΔackA-pta, ΔldhA, and ΔfrdC). The engineered strain (ZH88) produced 4.91 ± 0.29 mM acetaldehyde while consuming 11.05 mM glucose but also produced 6.44 ± 0.26 mM ethanol. Studies showed that ethanol was produced by an unknown alcohol dehydrogenase(s) that converted the acetaldehyde produced by SeEutE to ethanol. Allyl alcohol was used to select for mutants with reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Three allyl alcohol-resistant mutants were isolated; all produced more acetaldehyde and less ethanol than ZH88. It was also found that modifying the growth medium by adding 1 g of yeast extract/liter and lowering the pH to 6.0 further increased the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Under optimal conditions, strain ZH136 converted glucose to acetaldehyde and hydrogen in a 1:1 ratio with a specific acetaldehyde production rate of 0.68 ± 0.20 g h−1 g−1 dry cell weight and at 86% of the maximum theoretical yield. This specific production rate is the highest reported thus far and is promising for industrial application. The possibility of a more efficient “no-distill” ethanol fermentation procedure based on the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen is discussed. PMID:21803884

  12. The Nature of Damped Lyα Systems and Their Hosts in the Standard Cold Dark Matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue

    2012-04-01

    Using adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with a physically motivated supernova feedback prescription, we show that the standard cold dark matter model can account for extant observed properties of damped Lyα systems (DLAs). With detailed examination of DLAs identified for each redshift snapshot through ray tracing through the simulation volumes containing thousands of galaxies, we find the following: (1) While DLA hosts roughly trace the overall population of galaxies at all redshifts, they are always gas-rich and have tendencies of being slightly smaller and bluer. (2) The history of DLA evolution is cosmological in nature and reflects primarily the evolution of the underlying cosmic density, galaxy size, and galaxy interactions. With higher density and more interactions at high redshift the size of DLAs is a larger fraction of their virial radius. (3) The variety of DLAs at high redshift is richer with a large contribution coming from galactic aqueducts, created through close galaxy interactions. The portion of gaseous disks of galaxies where most stars reside makes a relatively small contribution to DLA incidence at z = 3-4. (4) The majority of DLAs arise in halos of mass Mh = 1010-1012 M ⊙ at z = 1.6-4, as these galaxies dominate the overall population of galaxies then. At z = 3-4, 20%-30% of DLA hosts are Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), 10%-20% are due to galaxies more massive than LBGs, and 50%-70% are from smaller galaxies. (5) Galactic winds play an indispensable role in shaping the kinematic properties of DLAs. Specifically, the high velocity width DLAs are a mixture of those arising in high-mass, high velocity dispersion halos and those arising in smaller mass systems where cold gas clouds are entrained to high velocities by galactic winds. (6) In agreement with observations, we see a weak but noticeable evolution in DLA metallicity. The metallicity distribution centers at [Z/H] = -1.5 to -1 and spans more than three decades at

  13. Coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen during glucose fermentation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huilin; Gonzalez, Ramon; Bobik, Thomas A

    2011-09-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 was engineered to coproduce acetaldehyde and hydrogen during glucose fermentation by the use of exogenous acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) reductase (for the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde) and the native formate hydrogen lyase. A putative acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA reductase from Salmonella enterica (SeEutE) was cloned, produced at high levels, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. In vitro assays showed that this enzyme had both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (68.07 ± 1.63 μmol min(-1) mg(-1)) and the desired acetyl-CoA reductase activity (49.23 ± 2.88 μmol min(-1) mg(-1)). The eutE gene was engineered into an E. coli mutant lacking native glucose fermentation pathways (ΔadhE, ΔackA-pta, ΔldhA, and ΔfrdC). The engineered strain (ZH88) produced 4.91 ± 0.29 mM acetaldehyde while consuming 11.05 mM glucose but also produced 6.44 ± 0.26 mM ethanol. Studies showed that ethanol was produced by an unknown alcohol dehydrogenase(s) that converted the acetaldehyde produced by SeEutE to ethanol. Allyl alcohol was used to select for mutants with reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Three allyl alcohol-resistant mutants were isolated; all produced more acetaldehyde and less ethanol than ZH88. It was also found that modifying the growth medium by adding 1 g of yeast extract/liter and lowering the pH to 6.0 further increased the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Under optimal conditions, strain ZH136 converted glucose to acetaldehyde and hydrogen in a 1:1 ratio with a specific acetaldehyde production rate of 0.68 ± 0.20 g h(-1) g(-1) dry cell weight and at 86% of the maximum theoretical yield. This specific production rate is the highest reported thus far and is promising for industrial application. The possibility of a more efficient "no-distill" ethanol fermentation procedure based on the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen is discussed.

  14. Cost-effective river rehabilitation planning: optimizing for morphological benefits at large spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Simone D; Hermoso, Virgilio; Linke, Simon; Bunn, Stuart E; Possingham, Hugh P

    2014-01-01

    River rehabilitation aims to protect biodiversity or restore key ecosystem services but the success rate is often low. This is seldom because of insufficient funding for rehabilitation works but because trade-offs between costs and ecological benefits of management actions are rarely incorporated in the planning, and because monitoring is often inadequate for managers to learn by doing. In this study, we demonstrate a new approach to plan cost-effective river rehabilitation at large scales. The framework is based on the use of cost functions (relationship between costs of rehabilitation and the expected ecological benefit) to optimize the spatial allocation of rehabilitation actions needed to achieve given rehabilitation goals (in our case established by the Swiss water act). To demonstrate the approach with a simple example, we link costs of the three types of management actions that are most commonly used in Switzerland (culvert removal, widening of one riverside buffer and widening of both riversides) to the improvement in riparian zone quality. We then use Marxan, a widely applied conservation planning software, to identify priority areas to implement these rehabilitation measures in two neighbouring Swiss cantons (Aargau, AG and Zürich, ZH). The best rehabilitation plans identified for the two cantons met all the targets (i.e. restoring different types of morphological deficits with different actions) rehabilitating 80,786 m (AG) and 106,036 m (ZH) of the river network at a total cost of 106.1 Million CHF (AG) and 129.3 Million CH (ZH). The best rehabilitation plan for the canton of AG consisted of more and better connected sub-catchments that were generally less expensive, compared to its neighbouring canton. The framework developed in this study can be used to inform river managers how and where best to spend their rehabilitation budget for a given set of actions, ensures the cost-effective achievement of desired rehabilitation outcomes, and helps

  15. Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine Is Fully Attenuated by a Combination of Partial Attenuations in the S, M, and L Segments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Terence E.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L.; Gong, Bin; Slack, Olga A. L.; Ly, Hoai J.; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to Africa and characterized by a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus), which has a tripartite negative-stranded RNA genome (consisting of the S, M, and L segments). Further spread of RVF into countries where the disease is not endemic may affect the economy and public health, and vaccination is an effective approach to prevent the spread of RVFV. A live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is one of the best-characterized RVF vaccines for safety and efficacy and is currently conditionally licensed for use for veterinary purposes in the United States. Meanwhile, as of 2015, no other RVF vaccine has been conditionally or fully licensed for use in the United States. The MP-12 strain is derived from wild-type pathogenic strain ZH548, and its genome encodes 23 mutations in the three genome segments. However, the mechanism of MP-12 attenuation remains unknown. We characterized the attenuation of wild-type pathogenic strain ZH501 carrying a mutation(s) of the MP-12 S, M, or L segment in a mouse model. Our results indicated that MP-12 is attenuated by the mutations in the S, M, and L segments, while the mutations in the M and L segments confer stronger attenuation than those in the S segment. We identified a combination of 3 amino acid changes, Y259H (Gn), R1182G (Gc), and R1029K (L), that was sufficient to attenuate ZH501. However, strain MP-12 with reversion mutations at those 3 sites was still highly attenuated. Our results indicate that MP-12 attenuation is supported by a combination of multiple partial attenuation mutations and a single reversion mutation is less likely to cause a reversion to virulence of the MP-12 vaccine. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease that is endemic to Africa and that has the potential to

  16. First measurement of unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from a 3He target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liu, T.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J.-C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L.-G.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wang, Y.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) differential cross sections in 3He(e ,e'π±)X have been measured for the first time in Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 with a 5.9 GeV e- beam on a 3He gas target. The experiment focuses on the valence quark region, covering a kinematic range 0.12 zh<0.65 , and 0.05

  17. FLIR Stabilization Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Z ~ Va Lu 1= " I- a:~~ Ci) - wm Q LOLJLL O> C-)i35 IO IzC)W IA i ( A i ZhI 3C2 Lu 3 o0LAJ LnAJ aM L Igoeu L-J z Z ~ -CA cmM C.)3 ’Se I...LL z tz - CIO -c < LLJ LII LAI Z -J 2EC-)>c (A - >- QA V) V)(A 0 LL0 z LU 0 - -;_ C: QLLJ ce z Lz 0L C~=I LL.J V) C0.DA 1 LLU he 0= c- C-) C.)LAJJ...autocorrelation curve samples and the I IL ID IDD 0E 4) t z IL a: __ 0 IV ) I I.- =zJ 0: ILI LJ ~LLJ 0 0z C.)J z CDD

  18. Search for associated Higgs boson production using like charge dilepton events in p p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-11-04

    We present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process pp→ W/ZH → ell± ell± + X in ee, eμ, and μμ final states. The search is based on data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We require two isolated leptons (electrons or muons) with the same electric charge and additional kinematic requirements. No significant excess above background is observed, and we set 95% C.L. observed (expected) upper limits on ratio of the production cross sectin to the standard model expectation ofmore » 6.4 (7.3) for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV and 13.5 (19.8) for a mass of 115 GeV.« less

  19. Nodal resonance in a strong standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández C., David J.; Mielnik, Bogdan

    1990-06-01

    The motion of charged particles in a standing electromagnetic wave is considered. For amplitudes that are not too high, the wave causes an effect of attraction of particles to the nodal points, resembling the channeling effect reported by Salomon, Dalibard, Aspect, Metcalf, and Cohen-Tannoudji [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1659 (1987)] consistent with the ``high-frequency potential'' of Kapitza [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 21, 588 (1951)]. For high-field intensities, however, the nodal points undergo a qualitative metamorphosis, converting themselves from particle attractors into resonant centers. Some chaotic phenomena arise and the description of the oscillating field in terms of an ``effective potential'' becomes inappropriate. The question of a correct Floquet Hamiltonian that could describe the standing wave within this amplitude and frequency regime is open.

  20. Demkov-Osherov model reformulated in terms of conventional scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H.; Macek, J.H.; Cavagnero, M.J.; Cavagnero, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    One of the few exactly solvable time-dependent quantum-mechanics problems was first analyzed by Demkov and Osherov 30 years ago {bold (}Zh. {acute E}ksp. Teor. Fiz. {bold 53}, 1589 (1967) [Sov. Phys. JETP {bold 26}, 916 (1968)]{bold )}. This model problem describes the interaction of a set of approximate stationary states with an additional state whose energy, in zeroth approximation, is a linear function of time. The Demkov-Osherov model is reexamined here using conventional Fourier transform methods. Emphasis on forward propagation in time eliminates the need for a Laplace transform of the wave function, as well as the resultant choice of contours for the evaluation of transition amplitudes. The evolution operator for the model Hamiltonian is expressed in terms of a single, frequency-dependent Sturmian. Such Sturmian functions are of considerable current interest in the analysis of nonadiabatic phenomena. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Demkov-Osherov model reformulated in terms of conventional scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, J. H.; Cavagnero, M. J.

    1998-07-01

    One of the few exactly solvable time-dependent quantum-mechanics problems was first analyzed by Demkov and Osherov 30 years ago (Zh. Éksp. Teor. Fiz. 53, 1589 (1967) [Sov. Phys. JETP 26, 916 (1968)]). This model problem describes the interaction of a set of approximate stationary states with an additional state whose energy, in zeroth approximation, is a linear function of time. The Demkov-Osherov model is reexamined here using conventional Fourier transform methods. Emphasis on forward propagation in time eliminates the need for a Laplace transform of the wave function, as well as the resultant choice of contours for the evaluation of transition amplitudes. The evolution operator for the model Hamiltonian is expressed in terms of a single, frequency-dependent Sturmian. Such Sturmian functions are of considerable current interest in the analysis of nonadiabatic phenomena.

  2. Nuclear data sheets for A = 195

    SciTech Connect

    Chunmei, Zhou

    1999-03-01

    The 1994 version of Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 195 (94Zh15) has been updated on the basis of the experimental results from reactions and decays leading to nuclides of mass number A = 195 by the cutoff date noted below. The detailed level schemes and decay schemes, and experimental reaction and decay data on which they are based are summarized and presented for all nuclides with mass number A = 195. The experimental data are evaluated; the inconsistencies and discrepancies are noted; and adopted values for levels and {gamma}-ray energies, {gamma}-ray intensities, as well as for other nuclear properties, are presented. The references, J{pi} arguments, and necessary comments are given in the text.

  3. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 198

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xiaolong

    2009-10-15

    The 2002 version of Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 198 (2002Zh04) has been updated and revised on the basis of the experimental results from various decay and reaction studies before June 2008. The experimental data for all known nuclei of A = 198 (Ir,Pt,Au,Hg, Tl,Pb,Bi,Po,At,Rn) have been reevaluated. The experimental methods, references, J{pi} arguments, and necessary comments are given in the text. The theoretical internal conversion coefficient (ICC) (and its associated uncertainty) for {gamma}-rays have been interpolated from theoretical values based on the 'Frozen Orbital' approximation (2002Ba85) using the BRICC(v2.2) computer program. Summary band-structure drawings and level schemes from both radioactive decay and reaction studies are presented. Also of special interest are the new levels of {sup 198}Ir, {sup 198}Tl nuclei and identification of new superdeformed bands in {sup 198}Pb and {sup 198}Po.

  4. ILS Glide Slope Performance Prediction Multipath Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    simple image theory to obtain the image field Ha(r): " .. e i k JA A ( 1 0 ) -H: a r) - - - 2- [ xe-(.h)e J where D2 is the distance from the image of...the transmitting dipole to the field point r: D2 x2 + (y-ya) + (z+h) The total field intensity H. at r is just the sum of the direct (Aa and ground...a _ [1+1 213+1 3 (14) where 11 F1 eik(R 1 +D1) ds (15) ,s. DZ-l KD Is(S - F 2 e ik(R I+ D2 ) ds (I ) 2 D, R1 6i 13 / I ik(R2+DI) SD1zR2 ds (17) 14

  5. Superdense massive galaxies in the nearby universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    At high-z the most superdense massive galaxies are supposed to be the result of gas-rich mergers resulting in compact remnant (Khochfar & Silk (2006); Naab et al. (2007)). After this, dry mergers are expected to be the mechanism that moves these very massive galaxies towards the current stellar mass size relation. Whitin these merging scenarios, a non-negligible fraction (1-10%) of these galaxies is expected to survive since that epoch retaining their compactness and presenting old stellar populations in the past universe.Using the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog (DR6), we find only a tiny fraction of galaxies (~0.03%) with re ≤ 1.5 kpc and M* ≥ 8x1010M⊙ in the local Universe (z~0.2). Surprisingly, they are relatively young (~2Gyr) and metal rich ([Z/H]~0.2) These results have been published in Trujillo et al. (2009)

  6. Measurement of the Ratio of Inclusive Cross Sections σ(pp¯→Z+b jet)/σ(pp¯→Z+jet) at √(s)=1.96 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beauceron, S.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Butler, J. M.; Bystricky, J.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golling, T.; Gómez, B.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kau, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, K. H.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lueking, L.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; Mattingly, S. E.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Oshima, N.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.; Parashar, N.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Phaf, L.; Piegaia, R.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rani, K. J.; Rapidis, P. A.; Ratoff, P. N.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schukin, A. A.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shephard, W. D.; Shpakov, D.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Smolek, K.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Song, Y.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stanton, N. R.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thomas, E.; Thooris, B.; Tomoto, M.; Toole, T.; Torborg, J.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vlimant, J.-R.; von Toerne, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Wahl, H. D.; Walker, R.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Warsinsky, M.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wegner, M.; Wermes, N.; White, A.; White, V.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wittlin, J.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xu, Q.; Xuan, N.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yen, Y.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabi, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zitoun, R.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2005-04-01

    Using the data collected with the D0 detector at √(s)=1.96 TeV, for integrated luminosities of about 180 pb-1, we have measured the ratio of inclusive cross sections for pp¯→Z+b jet to pp¯→Z+jet production. The inclusive Z+b-jet reaction is an important background to searches for the Higgs boson in associated ZH production at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Our measurement is the first of its kind, and relies on the Z→e+e- and Z→μ+μ- modes. The combined measurement of the ratio yields 0.021±0.005 for hadronic jets with transverse momenta pT>20 GeV/c and pseudorapidities |η|<2.5, consistent with next-to-leading-order predictions of the standard model.

  7. Giant H i hole inside the 3 kpc ring and the North Polar Spur—The Galactic crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Applying a newly developed tangent-circle method (TCM), we derive a volume density map of H i gas in the inner Galaxy as a function of galactocentric distance R and height Z. The H i hole around the Galactic Center (GC) is shown to have a crater-shaped wall, which coincides with the brightest ridge of the North Polar Spur and emanates from the 3 kpc expanding ring. The crater structure is explained by sweeping of the halo gas by a shock-wave from the GC. The unperturbed H i halo outside 3 kpc is shown to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, obeying the sech2Z/h density law with a scale height h ˜ 450 pc.

  8. Probing the Higgs self coupling via single Higgs production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Degrassi, G.; Giardino, P. P.; Maltoni, F.; Pagani, D.

    2016-12-16

    Here, we propose a method to determine the trilinear Higgs self coupling that is alternative to the direct measurement of Higgs pair production total cross sections and differential distributions. Furthermore, the method relies on the effects that electroweak loops featuring an anomalous trilinear coupling would imprint on single Higgs production at the LHC. We first calculate these contributions to all the phenomenologically relevant Higgs production (ggF, VBF, WH, ZH, t$\\bar{t}$ ) and decay (γγ,WW*/ZZ*→ 4f, b$\\bar{b}$,ττ) modes at the LHC and then estimate the sensitivity to the trilinear coupling via a one-parameter fit to the single Higgs measurements at the LHC 8 TeV. We also found that the bounds on the self coupling are already competitive with those from Higgs pair production and will be further improved in the current and next LHC runs.

  9. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 195

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaolong; Kang, Mengxiao

    2014-09-15

    Experimental structure and decay data for all nuclides with mass number A=195 (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn) have been revised, updated, and incorporated into the ENSDF data file. All literature available by March 2014 has been considered. This evaluation supersedes the previous one for this mass chain (Zhou Chunmei, Nuclear Data Sheets 86, 645 (1999), 1999Zh11). The detailed level schemes, decay schemes, experimental reaction and decay data on which they are based are summarized and presented here. References, Jπ arguments, and comments are given in the text. No excited state data are yet available for {sup 195}Re and {sup 195}Rn. The adopted levels for {sup 195}At are firstly presented in this evaluation. In addition, Q values have been updated based on 2012Wa38.

  10. An Aerothermal Flexible Mode Analysis of a Hypersonic Vehicle (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    altitude of h1 to an altitude of h2, giving us ln ( W2 W1 ) = hscT ( D L cot γ + 1 )( 1 V (h2) − 1 V (h1) ) + cT 2g ( V (h2)− V (h1) ) (19) More accurate...given by A = ⎡ ⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎢⎣ Xv Xα 0 Xh −g Xη1 0 Xη2 · · · 0 Zv VT0 Zα VT0 1−Zq VT0 Zh VT0 0 Zη1 0 Zη2 · · · 0 Mv Mα Mq Mh 0 Mη1 0 Mη2 · · · 0 0

  11. Search for an Invisible Decaying Higgs Boson in Dilepton Events at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principato, C.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    A direct search at CDF for an exotic Higgs boson that decays to invisible particles is reported. The simplest H→ invisible Standard Model (SM) process has a branching ratio of 10-3. However, Higgs boson decays to invisible particles can be significantly enhanced in many BSM models. One of the cleanest signatures in searching for this process is when the Higgs boson is produced in association with a Z boson that decays to a charged dilepton pair. In this analysis we model the ZH signal assuming the SM production cross section and a H→ invisible branching ratio of 100%. We investigate several Higgs mass hypotheses from 115 to 150 Gev/c2, and place 95% credibility level limits on Higgs boson production in this final state. The results here use the full CDF data set corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of luminosity.

  12. Unitarity sum rules, three-site moose model, and the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Nagai, Ryo; Okawa, Shohei; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    We investigate W' interpretations for the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies. The roles of the unitarity sum rules, which ensure the perturbativity of the longitudinal vector boson scattering amplitudes, are emphasized. We find the unitarity sum rules and the custodial symmetry are powerful enough to predict various nontrivial relations among W W Z', W Z W', W W h , W W'h and Z Z'h coupling strengths in a model independent manner. We also perform surveys in the general parameter space of W' models and find the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies may be interpreted as a W' particle of the three-site moose model, i.e., a Kaluza-Klein like particle in a deconstructed extra dimension model. It is also shown that the nonstandard-model-like Higgs boson is favored by the present data to interpret the ATLAS diboson anomalies as the consequences of the W' and Z' bosons.

  13. Investigation of the Optical and Electronic Properties of Crystalline Organic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-14

    S The Schrodinger equation can then be solved by the variational principle using the following trial wavefunction: Ttot = We(ze)Wh(Zh) Vls(P,Z) (5.17...aw ’Yoon"i. inludn" ;.re ta~tt r""WWi4 .A"ti%&=oft Mwar=10 euvurng " CAt lourt qauwn arw 160 mstuw"q me, data neea". arwe czmenveaq arnvww...q C...34 C011OCU0Of atIfltMAUon. SW"~ CaMmnf qagr430 V UCI b, e, or SM tav, S aW atPMn toIlecOon at mfomn=o@n. i nau~ ta aqqc,,u tO reaionq amn Oura*,. to Way

  14. Probing the Higgs self coupling via single Higgs production at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Degrassi, G.; Giardino, P. P.; Maltoni, F.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Here, we propose a method to determine the trilinear Higgs self coupling that is alternative to the direct measurement of Higgs pair production total cross sections and differential distributions. Furthermore, the method relies on the effects that electroweak loops featuring an anomalous trilinear coupling would imprint on single Higgs production at the LHC. We first calculate these contributions to all the phenomenologically relevant Higgs production (ggF, VBF, WH, ZH, tmore » $$\\bar{t}$$ ) and decay (γγ,WW*/ZZ*→ 4f, b$$\\bar{b}$$,ττ) modes at the LHC and then estimate the sensitivity to the trilinear coupling via a one-parameter fit to the single Higgs measurements at the LHC 8 TeV. We also found that the bounds on the self coupling are already competitive with those from Higgs pair production and will be further improved in the current and next LHC runs.« less

  15. Wavelength and Intensity Dependence of Short Pulse Laser Xenon Double Ionization between 500 and 2300 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingras, G.; Tripathi, A.; Witzel, B.

    2009-10-01

    The wavelength and intensity dependence of xenon ionization with 50 fs laser pulses has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We compare the ion yield distribution of singly and doubly charged xenon with the Perelomov-Popov-Terent’ev (PPT) theory, Perelomov, Popov, and Terent’ev, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz.ZETFA70044-4510 50, 1393 (1966) PerelomovPopovTerent’ev[Sov. Phys. JETPSPHJAR0038-5646 23, 924 (1966)], in the regime between 500 and 2300 nm. The intensity dependence for each wavelength is measured in a range between 1×1013 and 1×1015W/cm2. The Xe+-ion signal is in good agreement with the PPT theory at all used wavelengths. In addition we demonstrate that ionic 5s5p6 S2 state is excited by an electron impact excitation process and contributes to the nonsequential double ionization process.

  16. Wavelength and intensity dependence of short pulse laser xenon double ionization between 500 and 2300 nm.

    PubMed

    Gingras, G; Tripathi, A; Witzel, B

    2009-10-23

    The wavelength and intensity dependence of xenon ionization with 50 fs laser pulses has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We compare the ion yield distribution of singly and doubly charged xenon with the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (PPT) theory, Perelomov, Popov, and Terent'ev, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 50, 1393 (1966) [Sov. Phys. JETP 23, 924 (1966)], in the regime between 500 and 2300 nm. The intensity dependence for each wavelength is measured in a range between 1 x 10(13) and 1 x 10(15) W/cm2. The Xe+-ion signal is in good agreement with the PPT theory at all used wavelengths. In addition we demonstrate that ionic 5s5p6 2S state is excited by an electron impact excitation process and contributes to the nonsequential double ionization process.

  17. ``Robinson's sum rule'' revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Yuri F.

    2010-02-01

    This discussion revisits two articles on synchrotron radiation damping published in 1958, one by this author and Evgeny K. Tarasov [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 34, 651 (1958)ZETFA70044-4510; Sov. Phys. JETP 34, 449 (1958)SPHJAR0038-5646], and one by Kenneth W. Robinson [Phys. Rev. 111, 373 (1958)PHRVAO0031-899X10.1103/PhysRev.111.373]. The latter is the source of what is known as “Robinson’s sum rule.” Both present the familiar rule, but with very different proofs and calculations of concrete damping decrements. Comparative analysis of these differences reveals serious flaws in Robinson’s proof and calculations.

  18. Analysis of Vertical Profiles of Reflectivity and Doppler Velocity from ER2-HIWRAP in Convective Clouds During MC3E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Heymsfield, G. M.; Liao, L.; Meneghini, R.; Grecu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Retrieval of precipitation in mixed-phase region in convection over land is a challenging problem in GPM DPR algorithm. Dual-wavelength (Ku/Ka band) airborne radar observations from the NASA's ER2-HIWRAP radar system in deep convections during MC3E provide observations that can be used to test assumptions in the algorithm for retrievals in the mixed-phase region. In this study, we use the reflectivity and Doppler velocity from ER2-HIWRAP, and Zh and ZDR from ground-based polarimetric radar to show that the present of mixed-phased hydrometeor (e.g., water-coated hail/graupel) produces a scattering signature similar to the bright band in stratiform rain. Such signature may be used to identify the mixed phased region in deep convective storm. We will also discuss implications of using this information for the GPM radar and radiometer retrieval algorithms.

  19. The Altshuler-Shklovskii Formulas for Random Band Matrices I: the Unimodular Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdős, László; Knowles, Antti

    2015-02-01

    We consider the spectral statistics of large random band matrices on mesoscopic energy scales. We show that the correlation function of the local eigenvalue density exhibits a universal power law behaviour that differs from the Wigner-Dyson- Mehta statistics. This law had been predicted in the physics literature by Altshuler and Shklovskii in (Zh Eksp Teor Fiz (Sov Phys JETP) 91(64):220(127), 1986); it describes the correlations of the eigenvalue density in general metallic sampleswith weak disorder. Our result rigorously establishes the Altshuler-Shklovskii formulas for band matrices. In two dimensions, where the leading term vanishes owing to an algebraic cancellation, we identify the first non-vanishing term and show that it differs substantially from the prediction of Kravtsov and Lerner in (Phys Rev Lett 74:2563-2566, 1995). The proof is given in the current paper and its companion (Ann. H. Poincaré. arXiv:1309.5107, 2014).

  20. pp(macro)-->tt(macro)H: a discovery mode for the Higgs boson at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J; Hill, C S; Incandela, J; Parke, S; Rainwater, D; Stuart, D

    2001-02-26

    The production of a standard model Higgs boson in association with a top quark pair at the upcoming high luminosity run ( 15 fb(-1) integrated luminosity) of the Fermilab Tevatron ( square root of s = 2.0 TeV) is revisited. For Higgs masses below 140 GeV we demonstrate that the production cross section times branching ratio for H-->bb macro decays yields a significant number of events and that this mode is competitive with and complementary to the searches using pp(macro) -->WH,ZH associated production. For higher mass Higgs bosons the H-->W(+)W(-) decays are more difficult but have the potential to provide a few spectacular events.

  1. Measurement of the ratio of inclusive cross sections sigma(pp --> Z + b jet)/sigma(pp --> Z + jet) at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-04-29

    Using the data collected with the D0 detector at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV, for integrated luminosities of about 180 pb(-1), we have measured the ratio of inclusive cross sections for pp --> Z + b jet to pp --> Z + jet production. The inclusive Z + b-jet reaction is an important background to searches for the Higgs boson in associated ZH production at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Our measurement is the first of its kind, and relies on the Z --> e+ e- and Z --> mu+ mu- modes. The combined measurement of the ratio yields 0.021+/-0.005 for hadronic jets with transverse momenta pT > 20 GeV/c and pseudorapidities absolute value(eta) < 2.5, consistent with next-to-leading-order predictions of the standard model.

  2. Crystalline, mixed-valence manganese analogue of prussian blue: magnetic, spectroscopic, X-ray and neutron diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Franz, Patrick; Ambrus, Christina; Hauser, Andreas; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Hostettler, Marc; Hauser, Jürg; Keller, Lukas; Krämer, Karl; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen; Pattison, Philip; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Decurtins, Silvio

    2004-12-22

    The compound of stoichiometry Mn(II)3[Mn(III)(CN)6]2.zH2O (z = 12-16) (1) forms air-stable, transparent red crystals. Low-temperature single crystal optical spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction provide compelling evidence for N-bonded high-spin manganese(II), and C-bonded low-spin manganese(III) ions arranged in a disordered, face-centered cubic lattice analogous to that of Prussian Blue. X-ray and neutron diffraction show structured diffuse scattering indicative of partially correlated (rather than random) substitutions of [Mn(III)(CN)6] ions by (H2O)6 clusters. Magnetic susceptibility measurements and elastic neutron scattering experiments indicate a ferrimagnetic structure below the critical temperature Tc = 35.5 K.

  3. User’s Guide for an Optical Contrast Seeker Monte Carlo Terminal Homing Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-14

    PSD) of the pitch rate gyro output, Figure 2.15, has distinct frequencies; the pitching moment was modeled as a harmonic forcing function and is...Mounted Captive Flight Test 19 It can be shown that with an ideal bandpass filter of bandwidth, BW, we can relate the autocorrelation values, A1 , to...W", j zh 258a i I N N P.o us wt U% w I 94 L o I I I I .~ I 0 w 0 % w: 0 LL cI W ~ ,y I z Li-0 w Ar Lci ~ W ’ J 0, 0~A-~ 0 Z I CL - Iof c 10 C.) Z z

  4. Microwave Emission From Relativistic Electron Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-12

    V.L. Bratman, N.S. Ginzburg, G.S. Nusinovich, M.I. Petelin and P.S. Strelkov, Int. J. Electron., 51, 541-567 (1981). 3. K.D. Pendergast, B.G. Danly, R.J...Kol’chugin, M.M. Ofitserov, and M.I. Petelin , Pis’ma Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., 35, 418-420 (1982). 7. I.E. Botvinnik, V.L. Bratman, A.B. Volkov, G. Denisov...1049-1080 (1986). [21 V.L. Bratman, N.S. Ginzburg, G.S. Nusinovich, M.I. Petelin and P.S. Strelkov, Int. J. Elec- tron., 51, 541-567 (1981). [31 K.D

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a new aluminium-based compound.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Cosp, José; Artiaga, Ramón; Corpas-Iglesias, Francisco; Benítez-Guerrero, Mónica

    2009-08-28

    A new aluminium polynuclear crystalline species, Al(13)(OH)(30)(H(2)O)(15)Cl(9) has been synthesized and characterized. It is a particular case of the Al(13)(OH)(30-y)(H(2)O)(18-x)Cl(9) x zH(2)O family. It has been obtained from aluminium waste cans treated with HCl solution in strong acid media, followed by an ageing period. The crystalline structure of the complex was determined by XRD spectroscopy. Twelve reflections were found and indexed with the DICVOL04 software. Morphologically, a flattened preferred orientation was observed by SEM and FESEM. The chemical structure was studied by several absorption spectroscopy techniques: FTIR, ATR-FTIR and Raman dispersion spectroscopy. The coordination of the aluminium nuclei was determined by Al-MAS-NMR. Only octahedral sites were observed. Thermal characterization of the compound was performed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to simultaneous TGA-DSC.

  6. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the missing energy and acoplanar b-jet topology at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Devaughan, K; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-12-19

    We report a search for the standard model Higgs boson in the missing energy and acoplanar b-jet topology, using an integrated luminosity of 0.93 fb;{-1} recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp[over ] Collider. The analysis includes signal contributions from pp[over ]-->ZH-->nunu[over ]bb[over ], as well as from WH production in which the charged lepton from the W boson decay is undetected. Neural networks are used to separate signal from background. In the absence of a signal, we set limits on sigma(pp[over ]-->VH)xB(H-->bb[over ]) at the 95% C.L. of 2.6-2.3 pb, for Higgs boson masses in the range 105-135 GeV, where V=W, Z. The corresponding expected limits range from 2.8 to 2.0 pb.

  7. Three-dimensional elasticity solution of an infinite plate with a circular hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The elasticity problem for a thick plate with a circular hole is formulated in a systematic fashion by using the z-component of the Galerkin vector and that of Muki's harmonic vector function. The problem was originally solved by Alblas. The reasons for reconsidering it are to develop a technique which may be used in solving the elasticity problem for a multilayered plate and to verify and extend the results given by Alblas. The problem is reduced to an infinite system of algebraic equations which is solved by the method of reduction. Various stress components are tabulated as functions of a/h, z/h, r/a, and nu, a and 2h being the radius of the hole and the plate thickness and nu, the Poisson's ratio. The significant effect of the Poisson's ratio on the behavior and the magnitude of the stresses is discussed.

  8. Redetermination of the crystal structure of K2Hg(SCN)4

    PubMed Central

    Bandemehr, Jascha; Conrad, Matthias; Kraus, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Single crystals of K2Hg(SCN)4 [dipotassium tetra­thio­cyanato­mercurate(II)] were grown from aqueous solutions of potassium thio­cyanate and mercury(II) thio­cyanate and studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In comparison with the previously reported structure model [Zvonkova (1952 ▸). Zh. Fiz. Khim. 26, 1798–1803], all atoms in the crystal structure were located, with lattice parameters and fractional coordinates determined to a much higher precision. In the (crystal) structure, the HgII atom is located on a twofold rotation axis and is coordinated in the form of a distorted tetra­hedron by four S atoms of the thio­cyanate anions. The K+ cation shows a coordination number of eight. PMID:28775886

  9. A tale of two portals: testing light, hidden new physics at future e + e - colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Felix

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the prospects for producing new, light, hidden states at a future e + e - collider in a Higgsed dark U(1) D model, which we call the Double Dark Portal model. The simultaneous presence of both vector and scalar portal couplings immediately modifies the Standard Model Higgsstrahlung channel, e + e - → Zh, at leading order in each coupling. In addition, each portal leads to complementary signals which can be probed at direct and indirect detection dark matter experiments. After accounting for current constraints from LEP and LHC, we demonstrate that a future e + e - Higgs factory will have unique and leading sensitivity to the two portal couplings by studying a host of new production, decay, and radiative return processes. Besides the possibility of exotic Higgs decays, we highlight the importance of direct dark vector and dark scalar production at e + e - machines, whose invisible decays can be tagged from the recoil mass method.

  10. Determination of the quantum yields of photodissociation of aniline derivitives

    SciTech Connect

    Ruziev, Sh.

    1986-09-01

    The quantum yields of the photodecomposition of aniline and its derivatives in heptane, the formation of hydrogen, and the formation of aminyl radicals and their dependence on the excitation energy were determined. A table shows the intensity of light falling on the cell under measurement conditions, and a figure illustrates absorption of aniline in heptane, transmission of filter with Cl/sub 2/ for separation of the lambda= 254 nm line, transmission of the combination of UFS-5 and ZhS-20 filters for separation of the lambda=300 nm line, and absorption of the Aberchrome540 actinometer. It was concluded that cleavage of the N-H bond with the formation of H atoms and aminyl radicals is the only photochemical process in the irradiation of an ilines in heptane with light. The quantum yields were determined, and it was found that the quantum yields of photodissociation increase sharply with an increase in the excitation energy.

  11. Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine Is Fully Attenuated by a Combination of Partial Attenuations in the S, M, and L Segments.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Hill, Terence E; Smith, Jennifer K; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L; Gong, Bin; Slack, Olga A L; Ly, Hoai J; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N

    2015-07-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to Africa and characterized by a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus), which has a tripartite negative-stranded RNA genome (consisting of the S, M, and L segments). Further spread of RVF into countries where the disease is not endemic may affect the economy and public health, and vaccination is an effective approach to prevent the spread of RVFV. A live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is one of the best-characterized RVF vaccines for safety and efficacy and is currently conditionally licensed for use for veterinary purposes in the United States. Meanwhile, as of 2015, no other RVF vaccine has been conditionally or fully licensed for use in the United States. The MP-12 strain is derived from wild-type pathogenic strain ZH548, and its genome encodes 23 mutations in the three genome segments. However, the mechanism of MP-12 attenuation remains unknown. We characterized the attenuation of wild-type pathogenic strain ZH501 carrying a mutation(s) of the MP-12 S, M, or L segment in a mouse model. Our results indicated that MP-12 is attenuated by the mutations in the S, M, and L segments, while the mutations in the M and L segments confer stronger attenuation than those in the S segment. We identified a combination of 3 amino acid changes, Y259H (Gn), R1182G (Gc), and R1029K (L), that was sufficient to attenuate ZH501. However, strain MP-12 with reversion mutations at those 3 sites was still highly attenuated. Our results indicate that MP-12 attenuation is supported by a combination of multiple partial attenuation mutations and a single reversion mutation is less likely to cause a reversion to virulence of the MP-12 vaccine. Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease that is endemic to Africa and that has the potential to spread into other

  12. Beyond Higgs couplings: Probing the Higgs with angular observables at future e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Nathaniel; Gu, Jiayin; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Kechen

    2016-03-09

    Here, we study angular observables in the $ {e}^{+}{e}^{-}\\to ZH\\to {\\ell}^{+}{\\ell}^{-}b\\overline{b} $ channel at future circular e$^{+}$ e$^{-}$ colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy $ \\sqrt{s}=240 $ GeV and 5 (30) ab$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for he Higgs-strahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of both probing BSM corrections to the HZγ coupling and constraining the “blind spot” in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners.

  13. Direct counterfactual communication via quantum Zeno effect.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Cao, Zhu; Yin, Juan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Ma, Xiongfeng; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-05-09

    Intuition from our everyday lives gives rise to the belief that information exchanged between remote parties is carried by physical particles. Surprisingly, in a recent theoretical study [Salih H, Li ZH, Al-Amri M, Zubairy MS (2013) Phys Rev Lett 110:170502], quantum mechanics was found to allow for communication, even without the actual transmission of physical particles. From the viewpoint of communication, this mystery stems from a (nonintuitive) fundamental concept in quantum mechanics-wave-particle duality. All particles can be described fully by wave functions. To determine whether light appears in a channel, one refers to the amplitude of its wave function. However, in counterfactual communication, information is carried by the phase part of the wave function. Using a single-photon source, we experimentally demonstrate the counterfactual communication and successfully transfer a monochrome bitmap from one location to another by using a nested version of the quantum Zeno effect.

  14. Improved Search for a Higgs Boson Produced in Association with Z->l+l- in proton antiproton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced with a Z boson in 4.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. In events consistent with the decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair and the Z boson to electrons or muons, we set 95% credibility level upper limits on the ZH production cross section times the H {yields} b{bar b} branching ratio. Improved analysis methods enhance signal sensitivity by 20% relative to previous searches beyond the gain due to the larger data sample. At a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2} we set a limit of 5.9 times the standard model value.

  15. Interpreting the 3 TeV WH resonance as a W' boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman; Keung, Wai-Yee; Lu, Chih-Ting; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by a local 3 .2 - 3 .4 sigma resonance in WH and ZH in the ATLAS Run 2 data, we attempt to interpret the excess in terms of a W' boson in a SU(2)1 × SU(2)2×U(1)X model. We stretch the deviation from the alignment limit of the Equivalence Theorem, so as to maximize WH production while keeping the WZ production rate below the experimental limit. We found a viable though small region of parameter space that satisfies all existing constraints on {W}^'\\to jj,t\\overline{b},WZ , as well as the precision Higgs data. The cross section of W' → WH that we obtain is about 5 - 6 fb.

  16. Standard model Higgs boson searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    We present recent results from searches for a standard model Higgs boson by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider with the full Run II data set. An excess of events above the expected background is observed and is the strongest in the associated production search channels where the Higgs is produced together with a W or Z boson, and then decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair, with a global significance of 2.5$\\sigma$. Both limits and best fit values of the Higgs production cross section are presented. For a Higgs mass of 125~GeV/c$^2$, the best agreement with data in the $(\\sigma_{WH}+\\sigma_{ZH})\\times Br(H\\rightarrow b\\overline{b})=291\\pm^{118}_{113}$~fb.

  17. Search for associated Higgs boson production using like charge dilepton events in p p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-11-04

    We present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process pp→ W/ZH → ell± ell± + X in ee, eμ, and μμ final states. The search is based on data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We require two isolated leptons (electrons or muons) with the same electric charge and additional kinematic requirements. No significant excess above background is observed, and we set 95% C.L. observed (expected) upper limits on ratio of the production cross sectin to the standard model expectation of 6.4 (7.3) for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV and 13.5 (19.8) for a mass of 115 GeV.

  18. Crystal structure of Li3Ga(BO3)2

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert W.; Holman, Darien; Villa, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of trilithium gallium bis­(orthoborate), Li3Ga(BO3)2, is isotypic with Li3Al(BO3)2 in a triclinic cell in space-group type P-1. The three Li and the unique Ga atom are coordinated by four O atoms each in tetra­hedra, and the two B atoms are coordinated by three O atoms in orthoborate triangles. Chains with composition [Ga2(BO3)4]6− extend along the a axis. The Li atoms inter­leave these chains in tetra­hedral inter­stices. A comparison is made between the structure model of the title compound and that of a previously reported model for a compound with the same composition [Abdullaev & Mamedov (1972 ▸). Zh. Strukt. Khim. 13, 943–946.] PMID:28316831

  19. Probing the Higgs self coupling via single Higgs production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrassi, G.; Giardino, P. P.; Maltoni, F.; Pagani, D.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a method to determine the trilinear Higgs self coupling that is alternative to the direct measurement of Higgs pair production total cross sections and differential distributions. The method relies on the effects that electroweak loops featuring an anomalous trilinear coupling would imprint on single Higgs production at the LHC. We first calculate these contributions to all the phenomenologically relevant Higgs production ( ggF, VBF, WH, ZH, toverline{t}H ) and decay (γ γ, W{W}^{ast }/Z{Z}^{ast}to 4f,boverline{b},τ τ ) modes at the LHC and then estimate the sensitivity to the trilinear coupling via a one-parameter fit to the single Higgs measurements at the LHC 8 TeV. We find that the bounds on the self coupling are already competitive with those from Higgs pair production and will be further improved in the current and next LHC runs.

  20. Search for a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in p anti-p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Northeastern U.

    2007-04-01

    We describe a search for the standard model Higgs boson with a mass of 105 GeV/c{sup 2} to 145 GeV/c{sup 2} in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 450 pb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Higgs boson is required to be produced in association with a Z boson, and the Z boson is required to decay to either electrons or muons with the Higgs boson decaying to a b{bar b} pair. The data are well described by the expected background, leading to 95% confidence level cross section upper limits {sigma}p{bar p} {yields} ZH x B(H {yields} b{bar b}) in the range of 3.1 pb to 4.4 pb.

  1. Direct counterfactual communication via quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Cao, Zhu; Yin, Juan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Ma, Xiongfeng; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Intuition from our everyday lives gives rise to the belief that information exchanged between remote parties is carried by physical particles. Surprisingly, in a recent theoretical study [Salih H, Li ZH, Al-Amri M, Zubairy MS (2013) Phys Rev Lett 110:170502], quantum mechanics was found to allow for communication, even without the actual transmission of physical particles. From the viewpoint of communication, this mystery stems from a (nonintuitive) fundamental concept in quantum mechanics—wave-particle duality. All particles can be described fully by wave functions. To determine whether light appears in a channel, one refers to the amplitude of its wave function. However, in counterfactual communication, information is carried by the phase part of the wave function. Using a single-photon source, we experimentally demonstrate the counterfactual communication and successfully transfer a monochrome bitmap from one location to another by using a nested version of the quantum Zeno effect.

  2. Crystal structure of Li3Ga(BO3)2.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert W; Holman, Darien; Villa, Eric M

    2017-03-01

    The crystal structure of trilithium gallium bis-(orthoborate), Li3Ga(BO3)2, is isotypic with Li3Al(BO3)2 in a triclinic cell in space-group type P-1. The three Li and the unique Ga atom are coordinated by four O atoms each in tetra-hedra, and the two B atoms are coordinated by three O atoms in orthoborate triangles. Chains with composition [Ga2(BO3)4](6-) extend along the a axis. The Li atoms inter-leave these chains in tetra-hedral inter-stices. A comparison is made between the structure model of the title compound and that of a previously reported model for a compound with the same composition [Abdullaev & Mamedov (1972 ▸). Zh. Strukt. Khim. 13, 943-946.].

  3. A kinetic model of the plasma flow at the magnetic z-pinch and the plasmoid structure. Part 2 (in English)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubes, P.; Prykarpatsky, A. K.; Zagrodzinski, J.; Prykarpatsky, Y. A.

    In this article we will follow the approach developed in articles N.~N.~Bogoliubov, V.~Hr.~Samoilenko, Ukr. Fiz. Zh., 37, 147 (1992); J.~Gibbon, Physica D, 3, 503 (1981) using modern Lie--algebraic and symplectic geometry methods. It is devoted to the description of Boltzman--Vlasov type kinetic equations and some two--dimensional hydrodynamic Benney type flows associated with them. In our case of the cylindrical symmetry taking place at the interrupted magnetic z--pinch in plasma we used intensively the corresponding two--dimensionality of the plasma flow under consideration which made it possible to build a kinetic model of the plasmoid vortex structure with a conserved number of linkages of vortex lines. The latter can be used to explain the observed earlier stability of the plasmoid structure at the magnetic z--pinch.

  4. Correlation between ¹⁹⁵Pt chemical shifts and the electronic transitions among d orbitals in pincer NCN Pt(II) complexes: A theoretical study and application of Ramsey's equation.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Majid

    2015-12-05

    The chemical potentials for two series of [PtCl(NCN-Z-4)] (NCN=2,6-bis[(dimethylamino)methyl]phenyl, Z=H, CHO, COOH, NH2, OH, NO2, SiMe3, I, t-Bu) and [PtCl(NCN-4-CHN-C6H4-Z'-4')] (Z'=NMe2, Me, H, Cl, CN) were calculated. The energies of platinum d orbitals were calculated by NBO analysis. Good correlations were obtained between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the spectral parameters obtained from the energies of electronic transitions between Pt d orbitals in these complexes. The correlations between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the chemical potentials were also good. The correlations were discussed based on Ramsey's equation.

  5. Femtosecond transparency in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Greene, Chris H.

    2012-06-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency-like behavior in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) is studied theoretically, including the effect of intense 800nm laser dressing of He 2s2p(^1P^o) and 2p^2(^2S^e) autoionizing states. We present an ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation in an LS-coupling configuration interaction basis set. The method enables a rigorous treatment of optical field ionization of these coupled autoionizing states into the N = 2 continuum in addition to N = 1. Our calculated transient absorption spectra show the formation of the Autler-Townes doublet in the presence of the dressing laser field. The presented results are in encouraging agreement with experiment [1]. [4pt] [1] Z.H. Loh, C.H. Greene, and S. R. Leone, Chem. Phys. 350, 7 (2008)

  6. Search for the Higgs boson produced in association with Z→ℓ+ℓ- using the matrix element method at CDF II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shekhar, R.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-10-01

    We present a search for associated production of the standard model Higgs boson and a Z boson where the Z boson decays to two leptons and the Higgs decays to a pair of b quarks in pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. We use event probabilities based on standard model matrix elements to construct a likelihood function of the Higgs content of the data sample. In a CDF data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7fb-1 we see no evidence of a Higgs boson with a mass between 100GeV/c2 and 150GeV/c2. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section for ZH production as a function of the Higgs boson mass mH; the limit is 8.2 times the standard model prediction at mH=115GeV/c2.

  7. Superdense Massive Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Cenarro, A. Javier; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana; Vazdekis, Alexandre; de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; Cava, Antonio

    2009-02-01

    Superdense massive galaxies (re ~ 1 kpc; M ~ 1011 M sun) were common in the early universe (z gsim 1.5). Within some hierarchical merging scenarios, a non-negligible fraction (1%-10%) of these galaxies is expected to survive since that epoch, retaining their compactness and presenting old stellar populations in the present universe. Using the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6, we find only a tiny fraction of galaxies (~0.03%) with re lsim 1.5 kpc and M sstarf gsim 8 × 1010 M sun in the local universe (z < 0.2). Surprisingly, they are relatively young (~2 Gyr) and metal-rich ([Z/H] ~0.2). The consequences of these findings within the current two competing size evolution scenarios for the most massive galaxies ("dry" mergers vs. "puffing up" due to quasar activity) are discussed.

  8. Department of Defense Data Model, Version 1, Fy 1998, Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-31

    tDC ^Sg ujs-ijg ^ ^ Z uj UJ ooätb UJ UJ X DC DC a a v> a a o o o XXX LU LU LU > > > ODD LU LU LU z z z OO o x x UJ x LU UJ Q LU D...oog 00=3 * I- U-.Z ^ Tm UJ uj u. UJ PX z2 UJ < 96 HZ Zh Ul o E< UJ DC UJ I- oc z oo < o 1- uj! ps s< l-O ZC3 O UJ oz _l _l...zzi => = b o o z EEg <ɡ Q UI I- LUOO b > s < OcLbz EazO << = o UI Ul Ul UI ui l- D X OS "z Eil ?u «ES

  9. Bioleaching of heavy metals from sewage sludge using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ye-Ming; Lin, Hong-Yan; Wang, Qing-Ping; Chen, Zu-Liang

    2010-11-01

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was isolated from sewage sludge using the incubation in the Waksman liquor medium and the inoculation in Waksman solid plate. It was found that the optimum conditions of the bioleaching included solid concentration 2%, sulfur concentration 5 gṡL-1 and cell concentration 10%. The removal efficiency of Cr, Cu, Pb and Zh in sewage sludge, which was obtained from waste treatment plant, Jinshan, Fuzhou, was 43.65%, 96.24%, 41.61% and 96.50% in the period of 4˜10 days under the optimum conditions, respectively. After processing using the proposed techniques, the heavy metals in sewage sludge did meet the requirement the standards of nation.

  10. Search for new resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓ+ℓ-bb¯, ℓνbb¯, and νν¯bb¯ channels with pp collisions at s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-11-28

    A search is presented for new resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓ + ℓ - bmore » $$\\bar{b}$$, ℓνb$$\\bar{b}$$, and ν$$\\bar{v}$$b$$\\bar{b}$$ channels in pp collisions at s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider using a total integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb -1 . The search is conducted by looking for a localized excess in the WH/ZH invariant or transverse mass distribution. No significant excess is observed, and the results are interpreted in terms of constraints on a simplified model based on a phenomenological Lagrangian of heavy vector triplets.« less

  11. Probing the fermionic Higgs portal at lepton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian -Tao

    2016-04-26

    Here, we study the sensitivity of future electron-positron colliders to UV completions of the fermionic Higgs portal operator HHχ¯χ. Measurements of precision electroweak S and T parameters and the e+eZh cross-section at the CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC are considered. The scalar completion of the fermionic Higgs portal is closely related to the scalar Higgs portal, and we summarize existing results. We devote the bulk of our analysis to a singlet-doublet fermion completion. Assuming the doublet is sufficiently heavy, we construct the effective field theory (EFT) at dimension-6 in order to compute contributions to the observables. We also provide full one-loop results for S and T in the general mass parameter space. In both completions, future precision measurements can probe the new states at the (multi-)TeV scale, beyond the direct reach of the LHC.

  12. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a bb pair in events with two oppositely charged leptons using the full CDF data set.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M E; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D T; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-09-14

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45  fb(-1). In events consistent with the decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair and the Z boson to electron or muon pairs, we set 95% credibility level upper limits on the ZH production cross section times the H→bb branching ratio as a function of Higgs boson mass. At a Higgs boson mass of 125  GeV/c(2), we observe (expect) a limit of 7.1 (3.9) times the standard model value.

  13. Search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν + bb¯ final states with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-06-16

    A search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν+bb¯ final states is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data recorded at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The search is conducted by examining the WH / ZH invariant mass distribution for a localized excess. Thus, no significant deviation from the Standard Model background prediction is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on the Minimal Walking Technicolor model and on a simplified approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian of Heavy Vector Triplets.

  14. Improved search for a Higgs boson produced in association with Z → l+ l- in pp collisions sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; 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Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-12-17

    We search for the standard model Higgs boson produced with a Z boson in 4.1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. In events consistent with the decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair and the Z boson to electrons or muons, we set 95% credibility level upper limits on the ZH production cross section multiplied by the H → bb branching ratio. Improved analysis methods enhance signal sensitivity by 20% relative to previous searches. At a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2 we set a limit of 5.9 times the standard model cross section.

  15. Search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν + bb¯ final states with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-06-16

    A search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν+bb¯ final states is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data recorded at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The search is conducted by examining the WH / ZH invariant mass distribution for a localized excess. Thus, no significant deviation from the Standard Model background prediction is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on the Minimal Walking Technicolor model and on a simplified approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian ofmore » Heavy Vector Triplets.« less

  16. Search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the [Formula: see text] final states with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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    A search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the [Formula: see text] final states is performed using 20.3 fb[Formula: see text] of pp collision data recorded at [Formula: see text] 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The search is conducted by examining the WH / ZH invariant mass distribution for a localized excess. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background prediction is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on the Minimal Walking Technicolor model and on a simplified approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian of Heavy Vector Triplets.

  17. Probing the fermionic Higgs portal at lepton colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian -Tao

    2016-04-26

    Here, we study the sensitivity of future electron-positron colliders to UV completions of the fermionic Higgs portal operator H†Hχ¯χ. Measurements of precision electroweak S and T parameters and the e+e– → Zh cross-section at the CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC are considered. The scalar completion of the fermionic Higgs portal is closely related to the scalar Higgs portal, and we summarize existing results. We devote the bulk of our analysis to a singlet-doublet fermion completion. Assuming the doublet is sufficiently heavy, we construct the effective field theory (EFT) at dimension-6 in order to compute contributions to the observables. We also providemore » full one-loop results for S and T in the general mass parameter space. In both completions, future precision measurements can probe the new states at the (multi-)TeV scale, beyond the direct reach of the LHC.« less

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a $Z$ Boson in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson, using up to 7.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We utilize several novel techniques, including multivariate lepton selection, multivariate trigger parametrization, and a multi-stage signal discriminant consisting of specialized functions trained to distinguish individual backgrounds. By increasing acceptance and enhancing signal discrimination, these techniques have significantly improved the sensitivity of the analysis above what was expected from a larger dataset alone. We observe no significant evidence for a signal, and we set limits on the ZH production cross section. For a Higgs boson with mass 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, we expect (observe) a limit of 3.9 (4.8) times the standard model predicted value, at the 95% credibility level.

  19. Disodium zinc bis­(sulfate) tetra­hydrate (zinc astrakanite) revisited

    PubMed Central

    Díaz de Vivar, M. Enriqueta; Baggio, Sergio; Ibáñez, Andrés; Baggio, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    We present a new low-temperature refinement of disodium zinc bis­(sulfate) tetra­hydrate {systematic name: poly[tetra-μ-aqua-di-μ-sulfato-zinc(II)disodium(I)]}, [Na2Zn(SO4)2(H2O)4]n or Zn astrakanite, which is an upgrade of previously reported data [Bukin & Nozik (1974 ▶). Zh. Strukt. Khim. 15, 712–716]. The compound is part of an isostructural family containing the Mg (the original astrakanite mineral), Co and Ni species. The very regular ZnO(aqua)4O(sulfate)2 octa­hedra lie on centres of symmetry, while the rather distorted NaO(aqua)2O(sulfate)4 octa­hedra appear at general positions, linked into a three-dimensional network by the bridging water mol­ecules and the fully coordinated sulfate groups. PMID:21202433

  20. Search for new resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓ+ℓ- b b bar , ℓνb b bar , and ν ν bar b b bar channels with pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. 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C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-02-01

    A search is presented for new resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓ+ℓ- b b bar , ℓνb b bar , and ν ν bar b b bar channels in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider using a total integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. The search is conducted by looking for a localized excess in the WH / ZH invariant or transverse mass distribution. No significant excess is observed, and the results are interpreted in terms of constraints on a simplified model based on a phenomenological Lagrangian of heavy vector triplets.

  1. Biological satellite scientific devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepech, B. L.; Rumiantsev, V. P.; Galkin, V. M.; Shakhvorostov, S. V.; Rvachev, S. S.

    1991-02-01

    The paper describes the NA SBS 9 systems developed for the ninth Cosmos-2044 biological test mission. The NA SBS 9 life support systems designed for monkeys and rats follow standard design of BIOS-Vivarium and BIOS-Primate units. The main features of NA SBS 9 include the use of a recently developed HF physiological data recorder Skat-3; the incorporation into BIOS-Primate of two units intended for biorhythmic studies (the BBI-Zh system for studying beetles and the VITALOG developed by NASA for studies on monkeys); and a new version of BIOS-Primate system incorporating a capacitance-link and an inductance-link temperature transmitters and a brain tissue oxygen tension control channel.

  2. Reverse-phase phosphoproteome analysis of signaling pathways induced by Rift valley fever virus in human small airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Popova, Taissia G; Turell, Michael J; Espina, Virginia; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kidd, Jessica; Narayanan, Aarthi; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Kashanchi, Fatah; Bailey, Charles; Popov, Serguei G

    2010-11-03

    Rift valley fever virus (RVFV) infection is an emerging zoonotic disease endemic in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa and in Egypt. In this study we show that human small airway epithelial cells are highly susceptible to RVFV virulent strain ZH-501 and the attenuated strain MP-12. We used the reverse-phase protein arrays technology to identify phosphoprotein signaling pathways modulated during infection of cultured airway epithelium. ZH-501 infection induced activation of MAP kinases (p38, JNK and ERK) and downstream transcriptional factors [STAT1 (Y701), ATF2 (T69/71), MSK1 (S360) and CREB (S133)]. NF-κB phosphorylation was also increased. Activation of p53 (S15, S46) correlated with the increased levels of cleaved effector caspase-3, -6 and -7, indicating activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. RVFV infection downregulated phosphorylation of a major anti-apoptotic regulator of survival pathways, AKT (S473), along with phosphorylation of FOX 01/03 (T24/31) which controls cell cycle arrest downstream from AKT. Consistent with this, the level of apoptosis inhibitor XIAP was decreased. However, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway marker, caspase-9, demonstrated only a marginal activation accompanied by an increased level of the inhibitor of apoptosome formation, HSP27. Concentration of the autophagy marker, LC3B, which often accompanies the pro-survival signaling, was decreased. Cumulatively, our analysis of RVFV infection in lung epithelium indicated a viral strategy directed toward the control of cell apoptosis through a number of transcriptional factors. Analyses of MP-12 titers in challenged cells in the presence of MAPK inhibitors indicated that activation of p38 represents a protective cell response while ERK activation controls viral replication.

  3. Evaluation of Commercial β-Agonists, Dietary Protein, and Shade on Fecal Shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Wells, James E; Berry, Elaine D; Kim, Minseok; Shackelford, Steven D; Hales, Kristin E

    2017-08-28

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a foodborne pathogen commonly associated with cattle feces. Diet, including dietary supplements such as β-agonists, may impact fecal shedding of this pathogen. A series of three experiments were conducted to determine if the β-agonists ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) or zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) would impact the level or prevalence of fecal E. coli O157:H7 shedding. In Experiment 1, dietary RAC did not impact fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 based on the level or prevalence, but the addition of dietary soybean meal (SBM) in the study did reduce E. coli O157:H7 shedding. In Experiments 2 and 3, dietary ZH did not affect fecal E. coli O157:H7 shedding as determined by enumeration or prevalence, but in Experiment 2 the addition of 30% (dry matter basis) wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in the diet tended to increase E. coli O157:H7 shedding. Shade is a potential management tool to reduce heat stress in cattle, and in Experiment 3 the presence of shade over the feedlot pens did not affect E. coli O157:H7 shedding. The use of β-agonists in cattle diets did not significantly affect fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7, and in particular the percentage of animals shedding enumerable levels of the pathogen did not change, indicating that there was not a change in colonization. As has been reported previously and indicated again in this study, the use of WDGS in the diet may increase E. coli O157:H7 shedding. In contrast, the addition of SBM to cattle diets, to increase the dietary crude protein, appeared to reduce E. coli O157:H7 shedding, but this potential dietary intervention needs to be confirmed with additional research.

  4. First confirmed ultra-compact dwarf galaxy in the NGC 5044 group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faifer, Favio R.; Escudero, Carlos G.; Scalia, María C.; Smith Castelli, Analía V.; Norris, Mark; De Rossi, María E.; Forte, Juan C.; Cellone, Sergio A.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) are stellar systems displaying colours and metallicities between those of globular clusters (GCs) and early-type dwarf galaxies, as well as sizes of Reff ≲ 100 pc and luminosities in the range -13.5 Z/H] = -0.79 ± 0.04 dex, respectively, as well as [α/ Fe] = 0.30 ± 0.06. From the full spectral fitting technique, we measured a lower age (8.52 Gyr) and a similar total metallicity ([Z/H] = -0.86 dex). Conclusions: Our results indicate that NGC 5044-UCD1 is most likely an extreme GC (MV -12.5 mag) belonging to the GC system of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5044.

  5. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold.

    PubMed

    Hai-Long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory ( zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type ( fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type ( fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type ( shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions ( zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied.

  6. Identification and Evaluation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Allotetraploid Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Based on Amplicon Sequencing Combined with High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yanbin; Pandey, Manish K; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Hong; Varshney, Rajeev K; Liang, Xuanqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an allotetraploid (AABB) species derived from the A-genome (Arachis duranensis) and B-genome (Arachis ipaensis) progenitors. Presence of two versions of a DNA sequence based on the two progenitor genomes poses a serious technical and analytical problem during single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and analysis. In this context, we have analyzed 200 amplicons derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genome survey sequences (GSS) to identify SNPs in a panel of genotypes consisting of 12 cultivated peanut varieties and two diploid progenitors representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 18 EST-SNPs and 44 genomic-SNPs were identified in 12 peanut varieties by aligning the sequence of A. hypogaea with diploid progenitors. The average frequency of sequence polymorphism was higher for genomic-SNPs than the EST-SNPs with one genomic-SNP every 1011 bp as compared to one EST-SNP every 2557 bp. In order to estimate the potential and further applicability of these identified SNPs, 96 peanut varieties were genotyped using high resolution melting (HRM) method. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for EST-SNPs ranged between 0.021 and 0.413 with a mean of 0.172 in the set of peanut varieties, while genomic-SNPs ranged between 0.080 and 0.478 with a mean of 0.249. Total 33 SNPs were used for polymorphism detection among the parents and 10 selected lines from mapping population Y13Zh (Zhenzhuhei × Yueyou13). Of the total 33 SNPs, nine SNPs showed polymorphism in the mapping population Y13Zh, and seven SNPs were successfully mapped into five linkage groups. Our results showed that SNPs can be identified in allotetraploid peanut with high accuracy through amplicon sequencing and HRM assay. The identified SNPs were very informative and can be used for different genetic and breeding applications in peanut.

  7. Polarimetric radar characteristics of storms with and without lightning activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Williams, Earle R.; Albrecht, Rachel I.

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyzes the cloud microphysics in different layers of storms as a function of three-dimensional total lightning density. A mobile X-band polarimetric radar and very high frequency (VHF) sources from Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations during the 2011/2012 Brazil spring-summer were used to determine the microphysical signatures of radar vertical profiles and lightning density. This study quantified the behavior of 5.3 million vertical profiles of the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and correlation coefficient (ρHV). The principal changes in the polarimetric variables occurred only for VHF source rate density greater than 14 VHF sources per km2 in 4 min. These storms showed an enhanced positive KDP in the mixed 1 layer (from 0 to -15°C) probably associated with supercooled liquid water signatures, whereas regions with negative ZDR and KDP and moderate ZH in the mixed 2 layer (from -15 to -40°C) were possibly associated with the presence of conical graupel. The glaciated (above -40°C) and upper part of the mixed 2 layers showed a significant trend to negative KDP with an increase in lightning density, in agreement with vertical alignment of ice particle by the cloud electric field. A conceptual model that presents the microphysical signatures in storms with and without lightning activity was constructed. The observations documented in this study provide an understanding of how the combinations of polarimetric variables could help to identify storms with different lightning density and vice versa.

  8. Comparison of segmental with whole-body impedance measurements in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Nescolarde, Lexa; Doñate, Teresa; Piccoli, Antonio; Rosell, Javier

    2008-09-01

    Segmental impedance measurements were obtained using nine electrode configurations in 21 male patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis PD before and after the fluid drainage. For each segment we analyzed the impedance Z and the impedance divided by the height H of the patient Z/H. Our objective was to compare different segmental measurements with whole-body measurements in peritoneal dialysis. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the change in impedance produced by a PD session. Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients were used for continuous or discrete variables, respectively. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Similar results were obtained for Z and Z/H. The correlation coefficients between the real R and imaginary X(c) parts of segmental impedances after drainage were within the expected range for healthy population (0.46-0.70), but not before drainage for the abdomen (0.34) and the upper part of the leg (0.24). The correlation between the real part of whole-body and the real part of longitudinal segments in the limbs was high (r=0.807-0.879). Furthermore, the imaginary part of whole-body showed a high correlation with the imaginary part of all longitudinal segments (r=0.856-0.931). The high contribution of arm and leg impedances in the whole-body impedance produced high correlation between whole-body and segmental measurements in legs and arms. In agreement with other previous studies, a significant increase of the arm resistance was detected after fluid drainage. The drainage of fluids in PD patients produced significant changes in the measured real parts of impedance in all measured segments, but only the measurement in the abdomen showed a significant positive correlation (r=0.533) with the extracted fluid volume. This low correlation indicates that the individual assessment of fluid volumes using segmental measurements will be highly inaccurate.

  9. Micromonospora taraxaci sp. nov., a novel endophytic actinomycete isolated from dandelion root (Taraxacum mongolicum Hand.-Mazz.).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junwei; Guo, Lifeng; He, Hairong; Liu, Chongxi; Zhang, Yuejing; Li, Chuang; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2014-10-01

    A novel actinomycete, designated strain NEAU-P5(T), was isolated from dandelion root (Taraxacum mongolicum Hand.-Mazz.). Strain NEAU-P5(T) showed closest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Micromonospora chokoriensis 2-19/6(T) (99.5%), and phylogenetically clustered with Micromonospora violae NEAU-zh8(T) (99.3%), M. saelicesensis Lupac 09(T) (99.0%), M. lupini Lupac 14N(T) (98.8%), M. zeae NEAU-gq9(T) (98.4%), M. jinlongensis NEAU-GRX11(T) (98.3%) and M. zamorensis CR38(T) (97.9%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the gyrB gene sequence also indicated that the isolate clustered with the above type strains except M. violae NEAU-zh8(T). The cell-wall peptidoglycan consisted of meso-diaminopimelic acid and glycine. The major menaquinones were MK-9(H8), MK-9(H6) and MK-10(H2). The phospholipid profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The major fatty acids were C(16:0), iso-C(15:0) and C(17:0). Furthermore, some physiological and biochemical properties and low DNA-DNA relatedness values enabled the strain to be differentiated from members of closely related species. Therefore, it is proposed that strain NEAU-P5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Micromonospora, for which the name Micromonospora taraxaci sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-P5(T) (=CGMCC 4.7098(T) = DSM 45885(T)).

  10. Cryptosporidiosis: a neglected infection and its association with nutritional status in schoolchildren in northwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; Lugo-Flores, Carmen M; Ponce-Martínez, Jose A; Morales-Figueroa, Gloria G

    2015-08-29

    Undernutrition is a recognized public health problem in Mexican children and cryptosporidiosis is probably a factor contributing to this problem. However, it remains a neglected and poorly attended infection in Mexico. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum and to establish its association with the nutritional status in schoolchildren of northwestern Mexico. A total of 405 schoolchildren between 6 and 13 years of age were included in this study. Weight-for-age (W/A), height-for-age (H/A) and body mass index-for-age (BMI/A) Z scores were calculated. The Faust technique was used to detect intestinal parasites in stool samples and C. parvum coproantigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The overall prevalence of C. parvum was 28.4%. Some of the study children were C. parvum free (n = 86) and some were C. parvum infected (n = 77). The prevalences of risk of undernutrition found in both groups of children for H/A, W/A, and BMI/A Z scores were 18%, 21% and 28%, respectively. Weight, ZW/A, and ZH/A were significantly higher in the C. parvum-free group compared to the C. parvum-infected group (p ≤ 0.05). The children with cryptosporidiosis were 2.7 times more likely to be at risk of undernutrition by W/A Z score and 2.9 times more likely to be at risk of undernutrition by ZH/A than were the C. parvum-free children. Cryptosporidiosis may be a contributing factor to childhood undernutrition in northwestern Mexico. The proper authorities must implement control and prevention measurements in Mexico and other developing countries.

  11. Identification and Evaluation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Allotetraploid Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Based on Amplicon Sequencing Combined with High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanbin; Pandey, Manish K.; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Hong; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Liang, Xuanqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an allotetraploid (AABB) species derived from the A-genome (Arachis duranensis) and B-genome (Arachis ipaensis) progenitors. Presence of two versions of a DNA sequence based on the two progenitor genomes poses a serious technical and analytical problem during single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and analysis. In this context, we have analyzed 200 amplicons derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genome survey sequences (GSS) to identify SNPs in a panel of genotypes consisting of 12 cultivated peanut varieties and two diploid progenitors representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 18 EST-SNPs and 44 genomic-SNPs were identified in 12 peanut varieties by aligning the sequence of A. hypogaea with diploid progenitors. The average frequency of sequence polymorphism was higher for genomic-SNPs than the EST-SNPs with one genomic-SNP every 1011 bp as compared to one EST-SNP every 2557 bp. In order to estimate the potential and further applicability of these identified SNPs, 96 peanut varieties were genotyped using high resolution melting (HRM) method. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for EST-SNPs ranged between 0.021 and 0.413 with a mean of 0.172 in the set of peanut varieties, while genomic-SNPs ranged between 0.080 and 0.478 with a mean of 0.249. Total 33 SNPs were used for polymorphism detection among the parents and 10 selected lines from mapping population Y13Zh (Zhenzhuhei × Yueyou13). Of the total 33 SNPs, nine SNPs showed polymorphism in the mapping population Y13Zh, and seven SNPs were successfully mapped into five linkage groups. Our results showed that SNPs can be identified in allotetraploid peanut with high accuracy through amplicon sequencing and HRM assay. The identified SNPs were very informative and can be used for different genetic and breeding applications in peanut. PMID:26697032

  12. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold

    PubMed Central

    Hai-long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (感冒gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory (中醫理論 zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type (風寒型 fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type (風熱型 fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type (暑熱型 shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; 補充與替代醫學 bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions (中國民間處方 zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied. PMID:26151024

  13. MEAT SCIENCE AND MUSCLE BIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM--implant and beta agonist impacts on beef palatability.

    PubMed

    Garmyn, A J; Miller, M F

    2014-01-01

    The use of anabolic implants has a long-standing place in the cattle feeding industry, due to their positive impact on growth performance and subsequent profitability. However, implants can have adverse effects on carcass quality, shear force, and eating quality depending on the dose and frequency, or what some refer to as the aggressiveness of the implant regimen administered. Within the past decade, a new class of growth promotants, known as β-adrenergic agonists (βAA), has emerged in the beef feeding industry in the United States. Currently, 2 have gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use in beef finishing diets to improve performance and carcass yields. Much like anabolic implants, these repartitioning agents can have negative effects on Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), but the differences do not necessarily translate directly to consumer responses for palatability and acceptance in some instances, especially when tenderness is managed through proper postmortem aging. As researchers continued to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the impact of βAA, inevitably this led to consideration of the interaction between βAA and anabolic implants. Early work combining zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) with anabolic implants improved performance, carcass yield, and meat yield with additive negative effects on WBSF. Similar results were produced when pairing ZH with anabolic steroids equipped with various release patterns. As with any tool, the key to success is proper management. Certain cattle populations may be better suited to receive growth promotants such as implants and βAA, and postmortem management of subprimal cuts becomes vital when producers take more aggressive approaches to improve performance and yield. The objective of this review is to overview research findings related to the impact of growth promotant technologies on beef palatability, focusing specifically on the role of implants and βAA on carcass quality, beef tenderness

  14. GmPAP4, a novel purple acid phosphatase gene isolated from soybean (Glycine max), enhanced extracellular phytate utilization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kong, Youbin; Li, Xihuan; Ma, Jun; Li, Wenlong; Yan, Guijun; Zhang, Caiying

    2014-04-01

    GmPAP4 , a novel plant PAP gene in soybean, has phytase activity. Over-expressing GmPAP4 can enhance Arabidopsis growth when phytate is the sole P source in culture. Phosphorus (P) is an important macronutrient for plant growth and development. However, most of the total P in soils is fixed into organic phosphate (Po). Purple acid phosphatase (PAP) can hydrolyze Po in the soil to liberate inorganic phosphate and enhance plant P utilization. We isolated a novel PAP gene, GmPAP4, from soybean (Glycine max). It had an open reading frame of 1,329 bp, encoding 442 amino acid residues. Sequence alignment and phylogenetics analysis indicated that GmPAP4 was similar to other plant PAPs with large molecular masses. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the induced expression of GmPAP4 was greater in P-efficient genotype Zhonghuang15 (ZH15) than in P-inefficient genotype Niumaohuang (NMH) during the periods of flowering (28-35 days post phytate stress; DPP) and pod formation (49-63 DPP). Moreover, peak expression, at 63 DPP, was about 3-fold higher in 'ZH15' than in 'NMH'. Sub-cellular localization showed that GmPAP4 might be on plasma membrane or in cytoplasm. Over-expressing GmPAP4 in Arabidopsis resulted in significant rises in P acquisition and utilization compared with the wild-type (WT). Under phytate condition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed increases of approximately 132.7 % in dry weight and 162.6 % in shoot P content compared with the WT. Furthermore, when phytate was added as the sole P source in cultures, the activity of acid phosphatase was significantly higher in transgenic plants. Therefore, GmPAP4 is a novel PAP gene that functions in plant's utilization of organic phosphate especially under phytate condition.

  15. Constraints on models for the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity in VH → Vbb final states.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2014-10-17

    We present constraints on models containing non-standard-model values for the spin J and parity P of the Higgs boson H in up to 9.7 fb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These are the first studies of Higgs boson J(P) with fermions in the final state. In the ZH → ℓℓbb, WH → ℓνbb, and ZH → ννbb final states, we compare the standard model (SM) Higgs boson prediction, J(P) = 0(+), with two alternative hypotheses, J(P) = 0(-) and J(P) = 2(+). We use a likelihood ratio to quantify the degree to which our data are incompatible with non-SM J(P) predictions for a range of possible production rates. Assuming that the production rate in the signal models considered is equal to the SM prediction, we reject the J(P) = 0(-) and J(P) = 2(+) hypotheses at the 97.6% CL and at the 99.0% CL, respectively. The expected exclusion sensitivity for a J(P) = 0(-) (J(P) = 2(+)) state is at the 99.86% (99.94%) CL. Under the hypothesis that our data are the result of a combination of the SM-like Higgs boson and either a J(P) = 0(-) or a J(P) = 2(+) signal, we exclude a J(P) = 0(-) fraction above 0.80 and a J(P) = 2(+) fraction above 0.67 at the 95% CL. The expected exclusion covers J(P) = 0(-) (J(P) = 2(+)) fractions above 0.54 (0.47).

  16. THE NATURE OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS AND THEIR HOSTS IN THE STANDARD COLD DARK MATTER UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Cen Renyue

    2012-04-01

    Using adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with a physically motivated supernova feedback prescription, we show that the standard cold dark matter model can account for extant observed properties of damped Ly{alpha} systems (DLAs). With detailed examination of DLAs identified for each redshift snapshot through ray tracing through the simulation volumes containing thousands of galaxies, we find the following: (1) While DLA hosts roughly trace the overall population of galaxies at all redshifts, they are always gas-rich and have tendencies of being slightly smaller and bluer. (2) The history of DLA evolution is cosmological in nature and reflects primarily the evolution of the underlying cosmic density, galaxy size, and galaxy interactions. With higher density and more interactions at high redshift the size of DLAs is a larger fraction of their virial radius. (3) The variety of DLAs at high redshift is richer with a large contribution coming from galactic aqueducts, created through close galaxy interactions. The portion of gaseous disks of galaxies where most stars reside makes a relatively small contribution to DLA incidence at z = 3-4. (4) The majority of DLAs arise in halos of mass M{sub h} = 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} at z = 1.6-4, as these galaxies dominate the overall population of galaxies then. At z = 3-4, 20%-30% of DLA hosts are Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), 10%-20% are due to galaxies more massive than LBGs, and 50%-70% are from smaller galaxies. (5) Galactic winds play an indispensable role in shaping the kinematic properties of DLAs. Specifically, the high velocity width DLAs are a mixture of those arising in high-mass, high velocity dispersion halos and those arising in smaller mass systems where cold gas clouds are entrained to high velocities by galactic winds. (6) In agreement with observations, we see a weak but noticeable evolution in DLA metallicity. The metallicity distribution centers at [Z/H] = -1.5 to -1 and

  17. Determining the vertical carbon dioxide source/sink distribution in a mountain pine beetle attacked forest: A comparison of eddy-covariance and ecophysiological approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, C.; Bowler, R.; Black, T. A.; Christen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Disturbance of forests caused by insect attacks, such as the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, MPB) outbreak in Western North America may lead to a conversion of affected forests from a net carbon dioxide (CO2) sink to a net source. Informed management of forests can help reduce the associated CO2 emissions. The objective of this study is to determine the vertical distribution of sources and sinks of CO2 in an open MPB attacked lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) canopy (stand height h = 17 m, leaf areas index LAI = 0.55 m2 m-2) in the Interior of British Columbia. The stand has a considerable living secondary structure with a maximum height of 12 m while 99% of the mature pine trees composing the upper canopy are dead. We compared two different methods to accomplish the goal of determining the vertical divergence of the CO2 flux and relate it to the different vegetation layers. Data from a field campaign in July / August 2010 were used. The first method employs eddy-covariance (EC) measurements to determine the vertical source/sink distribution within and above the canopy. The instrumentation included open-path infrared gas analyzers and 3D ultrasonic anemometers. With simultaneous EC measurements at seven heights (z/h = 0.05, 0.15, 0.40, 0.60, 0.85, 1.05 and 1.30) we determined the CO2 uptake or release of the layers between the measurement levels by calculating the flux density divergence and the CO2 storage change in the air of each layer. The second method uses an ecophysiological approach developing a canopy CO2 exchange model. CO2 exchange was directly measured on tree boles and the soil using a portable non-steady-state CO2 chamber system and on leaves using a LI-COR LI-6400 photosynthesis system. Measurements were made during different times of the day and under varying temperature and moisture conditions over the course of the campaign. Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) measurements, and vertical, horizontal and species

  18. Study of open clusters within 1.8 kpc and understanding the Galactic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Y. C.; Dambis, A. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Joshi, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Significant progress has been made in recent years to understand the formation and evolution of our Galaxy, but we still lack a complete understanding of the Galaxy and its structure. Aims: Using an almost complete sample of Galactic open star clusters within 1.8 kpc, we aim to understand the general properties of the open cluster system in the Galaxy and probe the Galactic structure. Methods: We first extracted 1241 open clusters within 1.8 kpc of the Sun from the Milky Way Star Clusters (MWSC) catalog. Considering it an almost complete sample of clusters within this distance, we performed a comprehensive statistical analysis of various cluster parameters such as spatial position, age, size, mass, and extinction. Results: We find an average cluster scale height of zh = 60 ± 2 pc for clusters younger than 700 Myr, which increases to 64 ± 2 pc when we include all the clusters. The zh is found to be strongly dependent on RGC and age, and on an average, zh is more than twice as large as in the outer region than in the inner region of the solar circle, except for the youngest population of clusters. The solar offset is found to be 6.2 ± 1.1 pc above the formal Galactic plane. We derive a local mass density of ρ0 = 0.090 ± 0.005 M⊙/ pc3 and estimate a negligibly small amount of dark matter in the solar neighborhood. The reddening in the direction of clusters suggests a strong correlation with their vertical distance from the Galactic plane with a respective slope of dE(B-V) / dz = 0.40 ± 0.04 and 0.42 ± 0.05 mag/kpc below and above the Galactic plane. We observe a linear mass-radius and mass-age relations in the open clusters and derive the slopes of dR/ d(log M) = 2.08 ± 0.10 and d(log M) / d(log T) = -0.36 ± 0.05, respectively. Conclusions: The dependence of the spatial distribution of clusters on their age points to a complex interplay between cluster formation and survivability within the Galaxy. The geometrical characteristics of a significant

  19. Magnetic fields and star formation: New techniques and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezareh, Talayeh

    Understanding the process of star formation is one of the fundamental challenges of modern astrophysics. Theoretical studies suggest that magnetic fields may play an important role in the formation and fragmentation of molecular clouds as well as for the support of clouds against gravitational collapse. Confirmation of these theoretical predictions can only be made through observations of magnetic field strengths and morphologies in star-forming regions. This thesis covers observational and instrumentation projects aimed at measuring the strength of the magnetic field in DR21(OH), an active star-forming region in the Galaxy. Chapter 1 provides an introduction on the physical conditions in molecular clouds and the problem of inefficient star formation observed in galaxies. Basics of astronomical polarimetry and its applications in magnetic field measurements are also discussed. Chapter 2 presents a new method for the simultaneous determination of the cosmic ray ionization rate of hydrogen molecules, zH2 , and the ionization fraction, chie, in DR21(OH) since the determination of the latter is essential in precisely estimating the magnetic strength. A simple network of chemical reactions dominant in the creation and destruction of two coexistent ions, HCNH+ and HCO +, is used in conjunction with observed pairs of rotational transitions of several molecular species in order to determine the electron and the H 3+ abundances. The cosmic ray ionization rate is then calculated knowing that in dark clouds it governs the rate of creation of H3+. The significance of our method lies in the ability to determine the H3+ abundance and chi e directly from observations, and estimate zH2 accordingly. Our results, zH2 = 3.1 x 10-18 s-1 and chi e = 3.2 x 10-8, are consistent with recent results in other objects. Chapter 3 presents a study based on a new method by Li & Houde (2008) towards measuring the strength of interstellar magnetic fields in turbulent clouds. We investigate the

  20. Fishing for New Physics with Massive Neutral Dibosons: Measurements of ZZ Production Cross Section and the Search for Invisible Higgs Boson Decays Beyond the Standard Model with the CMS Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasco, Matthew Ervin

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a theory describing the fundamental interactions and properties of subatomic particles. A key feature is its ability to explain particle mass through the Higgs mechanism, and a by-product of this mechanism is the Higgs boson. The discovery of the Higgs boson, in 2012 at CERN, completed the Standard Model particle zoo, but observed phenomena, like dark matter, remain unexplained. The analyses presented explore proton-proton collison events resulting in a Z boson plus missing transverse energy (MET). The motivation for this is to investigate two processes: Standard Model (SM) ZZ production, and beyond Standard Model (BSM) ZH production, in particular the ZZ to 2l2nu and ZH to 2l + H(inv) channels. The place-holder H(inv) is for all Higgs boson decay modes resulting in undetected "invisible" particles, which may branch to new physics, like dark matter particles. The data used are from Run 1 (2011--2012) of CMS, where proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV were delivered by the LHC. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector located along the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is a particle accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. To extract these signals containing real MET from background containing fake mismeasured MET, a new "reduced MET" variable is constructed and optimized. This assists in the measurement of the ZZ production cross section. The results of the exclusive ZZ to 2l2nu cross section measurement are 201+82/-69 fb and 264+81/-64 fb from the 7 and 8 TeV portions of Run 1 data, respectively. Bayesian unfolding is used to measure a cross section of 224+68/-70 fb from the 8 TeV data. These results both agree with next-to-leading order predictions from the Standard Model. The differential cross section as a function of transverse momentum of the Z boson is also measured from unfolding, for the purpose of providing a way to compare data to new theories. To distinguish ZH to 2l + H(inv) from

  1. Using reverse genetics to manipulate the NSs gene of the Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 strain to improve vaccine safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Indran, Sabarish V; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2011-11-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which causes hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate abortion and fetal malformation in ruminants, has been classified as a HHS/USDA overlap select agent and a risk group 3 pathogen. It belongs to the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae and is one of the most virulent members of this family. Several reverse genetics systems for the RVFV MP-12 vaccine strain as well as wild-type RVFV strains, including ZH548 and ZH501, have been developed since 2006. The MP-12 strain (which is a risk group 2 pathogen and a non-select agent) is highly attenuated by several mutations in its M- and L-segments, but still carries virulent S-segment RNA, which encodes a functional virulence factor, NSs. The rMP12-C13type (C13type) carrying 69% in-frame deletion of NSs ORF lacks all the known NSs functions, while it replicates as efficient as does MP-12 in VeroE6 cells lacking type-I IFN. NSs induces a shut-off of host transcription including interferon (IFN)-beta mRNA and promotes degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) at the post-translational level. IFN-beta is transcriptionally upregulated by interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), NF-kB and activator protein-1 (AP-1), and the binding of IFN-beta to IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) stimulates the transcription of IFN-alpha genes or other interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), which induces host antiviral activities, whereas host transcription suppression including IFN-beta gene by NSs prevents the gene upregulations of those ISGs in response to viral replication although IRF-3, NF-kB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) can be activated by RVFV7. Thus, NSs is an excellent target to further attenuate MP-12, and to enhance host innate immune responses by abolishing the IFN-beta suppression function. Here, we describe a protocol for generating a recombinant MP-12 encoding mutated NSs, and provide an example of a screening method to identify

  2. Scaling features of polarimetric radar parameters retrieved from 3 disdrometers and an X-band radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall fields exhibit scaling features over wide range of spatio-temporal scales. The only device providing high resolution rainfall fields in space and time is radar which does not measure rainfall directly. Here we suggest to investigate scaling features of quantities directly observed with polarimetric radars such as the horizontal reflectivity (Zh) and specific differential phase (Kdp). Results will be interpreted in light of the commonly used power-law relations between these quantities and rainfall rate which interests hydro-meteorologist. DSD parameters such as the total drop concentration (Nt) and the mass-weighted diameter (Dm) will also be investigated Two types of data from devices installed in the vicinity of Ecole des Ponts ParisTech are used: (i) outputs from three optical disdrometers of two different types (Campbell Scientific PWS100 and OTT Parsivel2) from which radar parameters are computed with the help of a T-Matrix code, providing 30 s time steps series since September 2013; (ii) outputs of a dual polarization X band radar (METEOR 60DX) installed in December of 2014, providing fields with a resolution of 100 m in space and 2.5 min in time. Analyses are performed in the Universal Multifractal framework which has been extensively used to analyse and simulate geophysical fields extremely variable over wide ranges of scales. Only three parameters are used to characterize variability across scales: C1 the mean intermittency, alpha the multifractality index and H the non-conservative exponent. Event based analyses are carried out and it appears that the studied Kdp time series exhibit a unique scaling regime on the whole range of available scales (30s-2h) with UM parameters consistent with values reported in the literature for rainfall. The results are more contrasted for Zh whose scaling is worse. The scaling of DSD parameters series only holds down to few minutes. Finally these results are compared with the observations in space provide by the X

  3. Air Parcel Residence Times within Tropical Forest Canopies and Implications for Reactive Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Chamecki, M.; Fuentes, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon rainforest is the world's largest natural emitter of reactive trace gases. Due to its dense vegetation (leaf area index > 4), turbulence fluctuations are highly attenuated deep inside the canopy. However, strong coherent eddies that penetrate the upper portion of the canopy can be very effective in transporting gases. Sweeps and ejections act in the order of seconds and transport air parcels into or out of the canopy. The effects of coherent structures on the air parcel residence times and associated chemical processing of reactive gases remain largely unquantified in tropical forests. We combine canopy resolving Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and field observations in the Brazilian Amazon to study residence times of air parcels in the rainforest as a function of canopy structure and height (h). Good agreement is obtained between simulated and observed turbulence statistics within and above the forest. Coherent structure properties obtained from quadrant analysis are also well reproduced. A Lagrangian particle tracking algorithm is used to quantify the distribution of residence times of air parcels "released" at different heights. Canopy residence times were determined from the particle trajectories. The resulting probability density function (PDF) strongly depended on the particle release height (z). For particles released in the upper canopy (at z/h=0.75) the most frequent residence times were in the order of 30s, with 50% of all particles ejected from the canopy after ~2 minutes. The mean residence time was close to 5 minutes, indicating a very skewed PDF. At z/h=0.25 the PDF was more evenly distributed with its median and mean in the order of ~10 minutes. Due to sweeps, both simulations had a non- negligible fraction of particles transported deep into the canopy, thus increasing greatly their residence times. As the reaction timescales of many biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are in the order of seconds to minutes, significant chemical

  4. Dual polarization radar rainfall estimation using the mean linear raindrop shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgucci, E.; Baldini, L.; Romaniello, V.

    2009-04-01

    Information about the shape of raindrops is critical for estimating rainfall rate with dual polarization radar. As described in the literature, the relation describing drop oblateness as a function of its equivolumetric diameter is nonlinear. In fact, there is still no consensus regarding the most appropriate equation to use to describe the shape-size relation. However, while these non-linear equations are important for studying raindrop shape, it is not clear whether they are needed to estimate an integral quantity such as rainfall rate. A rain algorithm using Zh, and Zdr and an equivalent linear shape-size model with variable slope (β) that can be determined from an equation relating it to Zh, Zdr, and Kdp measurements is analyzed. To test its performance realistic rain and radar measurement profiles reconstructed from real radar observations were used. Starting from radar profiles collected by the NCAR S-POL dual polarization radar, two different sets of radar profiles were obtained for S-, C-, and X-band assuming the raindrop shape-size relations of Pruppacher and Beard (1970) and Beard and Chuang (1986). The first model is linear and the second is a non-linear one, expressed by a fourth order polynomial. The performance of the proposed rain algorithms based on β is compared with that of algorithms derived assuming two drop shape relations expressed by a fourth order polynomial recently proposed. The simulation procedure allows the study of the influence of DSD variability as well as the effect of measurement errors on rain rate estimations. In general, it is possible to conclude that the rain algorithm based on an equivalent linear shape-size model performs better than the THBRS and BZV algorithms, since in worst cases, the performance of the β algorithm is not too far from the performance of the standard rain algorithm obtained assuming the two non-linear shape size relations. In summary, although the literature indicates that the relation between

  5. Alternative hydrogen bond implementations produce opposite effects on collapse cooperativity of lattice homopolypeptide models.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Gustavo M N; Barbosa, Marco A A; Pereira de Araújo, Antônio F

    2007-11-01

    We use complete enumeration of self-avoiding chains of up to N=26 monomers in two-dimensional lattices to investigate the effect of alternative implementations of backbone hydrogen bonds on the cooperativity of homopolypeptide collapse. Following a recent study on protein folding models, we use the square lattice with z=3 local conformations per monomer and lattice extensions containing diagonal steps which result in z=5 or z=7 and assume that only a subset of zhzh combinations the energy distribution is bimodal at the collapse transition temperature. The situation can be regarded as if all hydrophobic contacts actually decrease the energy by the same amount, 2h , with the addition of an energetic increase, epsilon2=h, as a penalty for each contacting monomer not satisfying the hydrogen bond condition. Cooperativity is little affected and might even decrease, however, when hydrogen bonds produce a decrease in energy by the same amount, epsilon1=h, for each bonding monomer. For the more general situation when the hydrogen bond effect is not equal, in modulus, to the hydrophobic interaction, i.e., epsilon2 not equalh or epsilon1 not equal h, we observe a pronounced increase in kappa2 for small epsilon2, with a maximum around epsilon2/h approximately 1.5, followed by a gradual decrease to a limiting value at large epsilon2. The opposite behavior is observed when epsilon1 is varied. The observed qualitative difference is shown to arise from opposite effects on the convexity of the total density of states of the system when subdensities corresponding to different numbers of

  6. Comparison of Accumulated Rainfall Using a Blended Polarimetric and NEXRAD Z-R Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, R.; Kennedy, P. C.; Rutledge, S. A.; Carey, L.; Gimmestad, C.; Barjenbruch, D.

    2004-05-01

    Following the devastating Fort Collins flash flood in 1997, an algorithm was developed at Colorado State University (CSU) to estimate rainfall from CSU-CHILL dual-polarization radar data. The algorithm first attempts to remove ground clutter using thresholds on the correlation coefficient RHOHV and standard deviation of the total differential phase PHIDP. Specific differential phase KDP is then calculated from PHIDP. The radar data are interpolated to a Cartesian grid and rainfall estimates at each grid point are determined using an optimization procedure. The procedure picks the "best" estimate of rainfall based on measurement thresholds of KDP, ZDR, and ZH. During the summers of 2002 and 2003, a UCAR-COMET grant provided an opportunity to apply the polarimetric algorithm in a real-time environment and quantitatively evaluate the performance in comparison to the standard NWS Z-R technique on selected rainfall events in northeast Colorado. Validation of the rainfall algorithms was made using 24-hour accumulated precipitation data from the Community Collaborative Rain and Hail Study (CoCoRaHS), which includes hundreds of volunteers across northeast Colorado. Verification was also achieved with available automated rain guage data (e.g., ASOS). This study focuses on a rainfall event that occurred during the afternoon and early evening hours of 19 June 2003 in the vicinity of Denver International Airport (DIA) as well as regions south and east of DIA. Comparisons of the radar and ASOS gauge rainfall total at DIA showed that the CSU-CHILL blended algorithm was in very good agreement with the gauge total; however, the CSU-CHILL estimate using the standard NEXRAD Z-R greatly overestimated the rainfall total compared to the ASOS gauge. Ground observations at DIA and a CSU-CHILL hydrometeor identification (HID) algorithm indicated that the presence of hail in the vicinity of the DIA ASOS was the likely cause of the overestimate by the NEXRAD Z-R method. Comparisons of

  7. The Ages, Metallicities, and Element Abundance Ratios of Massive Quenched Galaxies at z ≥ 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Renzini, A.; Cappellari, M.; Mancini, C.; Arimoto, N.; Daddi, E.; Gobat, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Tacchella, S.; Yamada, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the stellar population properties of a sample of 24 massive quenched galaxies at 1.25< zspec< 2.09 identified in the COSMOS field with our Subaru/Multi-object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph near-IR spectroscopic observations. Tracing the stellar population properties as close to their major formation epoch as possible, we try to put constraints on the star formation history, post-quenching evolution, and possible progenitor star-forming populations for such massive quenched galaxies. By using a set of Lick absorption line indices on a rest-frame optical composite spectrum, the average age, metallicity [Z/H], and α-to-iron element abundance ratio [α/Fe] are derived as log(age/Gyr)=0.04-0.08+0.10, [Z/H]=0.24-0.14+0.20, and [α /Fe]=0.31-0.12+0.12, respectively. If our sample of quenched galaxies at < z≥1.6 is evolved passively to z = 0, their stellar population properties will align in excellent agreement with local counterparts at similar stellar velocity dispersions, which qualifies them as progenitors of local massive early-type galaxies. Redshift evolution of stellar population ages in quenched galaxies combined with low redshift measurements from the literature suggests a formation redshift of zf∼ 2.3, around which the bulk of stars in these galaxies have been formed. The measured [α/Fe] value indicates a star formation timescale of ≲ 1 Gyr, which can be translated into a specific star formation rate of ≃ 1 Gyr-1 prior to quenching. Based on these findings, we discuss identifying possible progenitor star-forming galaxies at z≃ 2.3. We identify normal star-forming galaxies, i.e., those on the star-forming main sequence, followed by a rapid quenching event, as likely precursors of the quenched galaxies at < z≥1.6 presented here. Based on data collected at the Subaru telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. (Proposal IDs: S09A-043, S10A-058, and S11A-075.)

  8. Azimuthal Asymmetry and Transverse Momentum of Hadrons in Deep Inelastic Muon Scattering at 490 GEV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Mark David

    The forward charged hadrons produced in deep inelastic scattering of 490 GeV muons from deuterium were studied. The data were taken by the E665 collaboration during the 1987 -1988 Fermilab fixed target run. 3 times 10^4 events (6 times 10^4 hadrons) were collected over a large range of kinematic variables: 100 GeV < nu < 500 GeV, 2 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV ^2, 0.003 < x_{Bj } < 0.2, and 0.2 < y_ {Bj} < 0.9. Using the virtual photon axis as the z-axis, the distributions of the produced hadrons in azimuthal angle and in transverse momentum are examined. The primordial k_{|} of the struck patron and {cal O}(alpha _{S}) QCD effects are expected to contribute to an azimuthal asymmetry and to an increase in the average transverse momentum. Some theoretical work in the literature concerning these effects is described and some original results are derived concerning the effects of primordial k_{|} on the azimuthal distribution. A Monte Carlo program is described which includes these theoretical effects and models fragmentation, the detector response, and the event reconstruction. The data exhibit several surprising effects. First, the phi asymmetry in the data is independent of Q ^2, while theoretically it should be more pronounced at low Q^2 and vanish at high Q^2. Second, the phi asymmetry is carried by the most energetic particle in each event, which we call the Rank 1 particle, and there is very little phi asymmetry of the other charged hadrons. Third, this phi asymmetry in the Rank 1 particle is independent of the hadron energy fraction z_{h} . The Monte Carlo predicts a strong z_ {h} dependence and little rank dependence. Finally, the seagull plot shows an unexpected increase in transverse momentum p_{T} for high energy hadrons (z_{h} > 0.4) as a function of Q^2. It is clear from these results that more theoretical work is needed in order to understand primordial k_ {|} and the azimuthal asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering. (Copies available exclusively from MIT

  9. Measurement of Production Cross Section Times Branching Ratio for W Boson + Photon and Z Boson + Photon and Search for Anomalous W Boson-Photon and Z Boson-Photon Couplings at 1.8 Tev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondracek, Mark Frank

    Measurements of the production cross section times branching ratio for W + gamma and Z + gamma processes, where the W decays into a muon and neutrino and the Z decays into a muon pair, have been made from the analysis of 18.6 +/- 0.7 pb^{-1} of high-P_{T} muon data from proton-antiproton (pp) collisions. The data were collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during the 1992-93 run. In a search for central photons (|eta| < 1.1) with transverse energy above 7 GeV and angular separation from the muon by at least Delta R = 0.7 we find 7 Wgamma and 4 Z gamma candidates. This translates into cross section times branching ratios of 9.0 +/- 6.4 pb for the Wgamma process and 6.6 +/- 3.4 pb for the Z gamma process. Separate measurements were made for photon E_{T} values above 11 GeV and 15 GeV. The cross section times branching ratio results were used to calculate a series of cross section ratios. An analysis designed to search for anomalous couplings between the gauge bosons was also carried out using these results. Assuming only one anomalous coupling to be non-zero at a time, the 95% CL limits on Wgamma anomalous couplings are, -3.7 < Deltakappa < 3.7, -1.2 < lambda < 1.2, -3.8 < ~kappa < 3.8 and -1.2 < ~lambda < 1.2. For ZZgamma anomalous couplings the experimental limits are measured to be, at the 95% CL, -4.6 < h_sp{30}{Z}(h _sp{10}{Z}) < 4.6 and -1.1 < h_sp{40}{Z}(h _sp{20}{Z}) < 1.1. For Zgammagamma anomalous couplings the experimental limits are measured to be, at, the 95% CL, -4.9 < h_sp{30}{gamma }(h_sp{10}{gamma}) < 4.9 and -1.2 < h_sp{40} {gamma}(h_sp{20}{ gamma}) < 1.2. Limits are placed on electromagnetic multipole moments for both the W and Z bosons using the measured limits of the anomalous couplings, and are presented in this thesis. All of the measurements presented in this thesis are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  10. Assimilation of Dual-Polarimetric Radar Observations with WRF 3DVAR and its Impact on Ice Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Mecikalski, J. R.; Fehnel, T.; Posselt, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Studies have shown that radar data assimilation can help with short-term prediction of convective weather by providing more accurate initial condition. However, it remains a big challenge to accurately describe the moist convective processes, especially the ice microphysics of convection, which is crucial for the modeling of quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF). Dual-polarimetric (dual-pol) radar typically transmits both horizontally and vertically polarized radio wave pulses. From the two different reflected power returns, information on the type, shape, size, and orientation of cloud and precipitation microphysical particles are obtained, more accurate measurement of liquid and solid cloud and precipitation particles can be provided. The assimilation of dual-pol radar data is however, challenging work as few guidelines have been provided on dual-pol radar data assimilation research. It is our goal to examine how to use dual-pol radar data to improve forecast initialization for microphysical properties. This presentation will demonstrate our recent work on developing the forward operators for ice processes with assimilating dual-pol radar data for real case storms. In this study, high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its 3-Dimensional Variational (3DVAR) data assimilation system are used for real convective storms. Our recent research explores the use of the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and radial velocity (VR) data for initializing convective storms and snowfall events, with a significant focus on improving representation of ice hydrometeors. Our previous research indicated that the use of ZDR can bring additional benefit into the hydrometeor fields than the use of ZH only. Furthermore, the combination of KDP and ZDR data provide the best initialization for precipitation particles with warm-rain radar data assimilation. Our ongoing work includes the development of

  11. The SAURON Project - XIV. No escape from Vesc: a global and local parameter in early-type galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Bacon, R.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; Pipino, Antonio; Sarzi, Marc; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van de Ven, Glenn; van Scherpenzeel, Eveline

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the local escape velocity (Vesc) - line strength index relationship for 48 early-type galaxies from the SAURON sample, the first such study based on a large sample of galaxies with both detailed integral field observations and extensive dynamical modelling. Values of Vesc are computed using multi-Gaussian expansion (MGE) photometric fitting and axisymmetric, anisotropic Jeans' dynamical modelling simultaneously on Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based images. We determine line strengths and escape velocities at multiple radii within each galaxy, allowing an investigation of the correlation within individual galaxies as well as amongst galaxies. We find a tight correlation between Vesc and the line-strength indices. For Mgb, we find that this correlation exists not only between different galaxies but also inside individual galaxies - it is both a local and global correlation. The Mgb-Vesc relation has the form: log(Mgb/4Å) = (0.32 +/- 0.03) log(Vesc/500km s-1) - (0.031 +/- 0.007) with an rms scatter σ = 0.033. The relation within individual galaxies has the same slope and offset as the global relation to a good level of agreement, though there is significant intrinsic scatter in the local gradients. We transform our line strength index measurements to the single stellar population (SSP) equivalent ages (t), metallicity ([Z/H]) and enhancement ([α/Fe]) and carry out a principal component analysis of our SSP and Vesc data. We find that in this four-dimensional parameter space the galaxies in our sample are to a good approximation confined to a plane, given by log (V esc/500 kms -1) = 0.85 [Z/H] + 0.43 log (t/Gyr) - 0.29. It is surprising that a combination of age and metallicity is conserved; this may indicate a `conspiracy' between age and metallicity or a weakness in the SSP models. How the connection between stellar populations and the gravitational potential, both locally and globally, is preserved as galaxies

  12. Traditional Chinese medicine in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; 中醫 zhōng yī) influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (膝關節炎 xī guān jié yán). A systematic review of randomized control trials was conducted. Searches for studies in PubMed that were performed between 1965 and August 2013, and retrieved studies were subjected to reference screening. The types of studies included in our review were 1) placebo-based or comparative studies; 2) open label, single-blinded or double-blinded studies; 3) studies evaluating the efficacy of TCM for treating OA of the knee; and 4) studies evaluating only TCM or combination preparations. Trials were conducted with participants over 18 years of age with knee pain and at least three of the following characteristics: 1) an age greater than 50 years; 2) morning stiffness lasting for fewer than 30 min; 3) a crackling or grating sensation; 4) bony tenderness of the knee; 5) bony enlargement of the knee; or 6) no detectable warmth of the joint to the touch. Studies were rated for risk of bias and graded for quality. After screening, 104 studies that satisfied the eligibility requirements were identified, and only 18 randomized control trials were included in the quantitative and qualitative synthesis. Upon review, we found “moderate-quality” evidence of effects from acupuncture (針灸 zhēn jiǔ) on pain, which was measured using a visual analogue scale, and physical function, which was measured using qigong (氣功 qì gōng) with motion. “Low-quality” evidence was found regarding the effects of acupuncture on physical function, and no evidence was found regarding the effects of herbal medicine on pain or physical function. Herbal patches (藥布 yào bù) appeared to affect pain and physical and function, but these effects were not found to be significant. The initial findings included in this review suggest that acupuncture is a promising intervention

  13. The SAURON project - XXI. The spatially resolved UV-line strength relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Bureau, Martin; Davies, Roger L.; Bacon, Roland; Cappellari, Michele; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Emsellem, Eric; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; Sarzi, Marc; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van de Ven, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    The unexpected rising flux of early-type galaxies at decreasing ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths is a long-standing mystery. One important observational constraint is the correlation between UV-optical colours and Mg2 line strengths found by Burstein et al. The simplest interpretation of this phenomenon is that the UV strength is related to the Mg line strength. Under this assumption, we expect galaxies with larger Mg gradients to have larger UV colour gradients. By combining UV imaging from GALEX, optical imaging from MDM and SAURON integral-field spectroscopy, we investigate the spatially resolved relationships between UV colours and stellar population properties of 34 early-type galaxies from the SAURON survey sample. We find that galaxies with old stellar populations show tight correlations between the far-UV (FUV) colours (FUV -V and FUV - NUV) and the Mg b index, Hβ index and metallicity [Z/H]. The equivalent correlations for the Fe5015 index, α-enhancement [α/Fe] and age are present but weaker. We have also derived logarithmic internal radial colour, measured line strength and derived stellar population gradients for each galaxy and again found a strong dependence of the FUV -V and FUV - NUV colour gradients on both the Mg b line strength and the metallicity gradients for galaxies with old stellar populations. In particular, global gradients of Mg b and [Z/H] with respect to the UV colour [e.g. Δ(Mg b)/Δ(FUV - NUV) and Δ[Z/H]/Δ(FUV - NUV)] across galaxies are consistent with their local gradients within galaxies, suggesting that the global correlations also hold locally. From a simple model based on multiband colour fits of UV upturn and UV-weak galaxies, we have identified a plausible range of parameters that reproduces the observed radial colour profiles. In these models, the centres of elliptical galaxies, where the UV flux is strong, are enhanced in metals by roughly 60 per cent compared to UV-weak regions.

  14. Supersymmetric exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinrui; Liu, Tao; Wang, Lian-Tao; Yu, Felix

    2014-06-06

    We reveal a set of novel decay topologies for the 125 GeV Higgs boson in supersymmetry which are initiated by its decay into a pair of neutralinos, and discuss their collider search strategies. This category of exotic Higgs decays is characterized by the collider signature: visible objects+E_{T}, with E_{T} dominantly arising from escaping dark matter particles. Their benchmark arises naturally in the Peccei-Quinn symmetry limit of the minimal supersymmetric standard model singlet extensions, which is typified by the coexistence of three light particles: singletlike scalar h_{1} and pseudoscalar a_{1}, and singlinolike neutralino χ_{1}, all with masses of ≲10  GeV, and the generic suppression of the exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson h_{2}→h_{1}h_{1}, a_{1}a_{1} and χ_{1}χ_{1}, however. As an illustration, we study the decay topology: h_{2}→χ_{1}χ_{2}, where the binolike χ_{2} decays to h_{1}χ_{1} or a_{1}χ_{1}, and h_{1}/a_{1}→ff[over ¯], with ff[over ¯]=μ^{+}μ^{-}, bb[over ¯]. In the dimuon case (m_{h_{1}/a_{1}}∼1  GeV), a statistical sensitivity of S/sqrt[B]>6σ can be achieved easily at the 8 TeV LHC, assuming σ(pp→Wh_{2})/σ(pp→Wh_{SM})Br(h_{2}→μ^{+}μ^{-}χ_{1}χ_{1})=0.1. In the bb[over ¯] case (m_{h_{1}/a_{1}}∼45  GeV), 600  fb^{-1} data at the 14 TeV LHC can lead to a statistical sensitivity of S/sqrt[B]>5σ, assuming σ(pp→Zh_{2})/σ(pp→Zh_{SM})Br(h_{2}→bb[over ¯]χ_{1}χ_{1})=0.5. These exotic decays open a new avenue for exploring new physics couplings with the 125 GeV Higgs boson at colliders.

  15. Analytic treatment of complete and incomplete geodesics in Taub-NUT space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagramanova, Valeria; Kunz, Jutta; Hackmann, Eva; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2010-06-01

    We present the complete set of analytical solutions of the geodesic equation in Taub-NUT space-times in terms of the Weierstrass elliptic functions. We systematically study the underlying polynomials and characterize the motion of test particles by its zeros. Since the presence of the “Misner string” in the Taub-NUT metric has led to different interpretations, we consider these in terms of the geodesics of the space-time. In particular, we address the geodesic incompleteness at the horizons discussed by Misner and Taub [C. W. Misner and A. H. Taub, Sov. Phys. JETP 28, 122 (1969)SPHJAR0038-5646 [C. W. MisnerA. H. TaubZh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 55, 233 (1968)]ZETFA70044-4510], and the analytic extension of Miller, Kruskal and Godfrey [J. G. Miller, M. D. Kruskal, and B. Godfrey, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 4, 2945 (1971)10.1103/PhysRevD.4.2945], and compare with the Reissner-Nordström space-time.

  16. OsRRMh, a Spen-like gene, plays an important role during the vegetative to reproductive transition in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derui; Cai, Xiuling

    2013-09-01

    OsRRMh, a homologue of OsRRM, encodes a Spen-like protein, and is composed of two N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRM) and one C-terminal Spen paralogue and an orthologue C-terminal domain (SPOC). The gene has been found to be constitutively expressed in the root, stem, leaf, spikelet, and immature seed, and alternative splicing patterns were confirmed in different tissues, which may indicate diverse functions for OsRRMh. The OsRRMh dsRNAi lines exhibited late-flowering and a larger panicle phenotype. When full-length OsRRMh and/or its SPOC domain were overexpressed, the fertility rate and number of spikelets per panicle were both markedly reduced. Also, overexpression of OsRRMh in the Arabidopsis fpa mutant did not restore the normal flowering time, and it delayed flowering in Col plants. Therefore, we propose that OsRRMh may confer one of its functions in the vegetative-to-reproductive transition in rice (Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica cv. Zhonghua No. 11 (ZH11)).

  17. Cloning of TPS gene from eelgrass species Zostera marina and its functional identification by genetic transformation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Li, Qiuying; Weng, Manli; Wang, Xiuliang; Guo, Baotai; Wang, Li; Wang, Wei; Duan, Delin; Wang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence (2613 bp) of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) gene of eelgrass Zostera marina (ZmTPS) was identified and cloned. Z. marina is a kind of seed-plant growing in sea water during its whole life history. The open reading frame (ORF) region of ZmTPS gene encodes a protein of 870 amino acid residues and a stop codon. The corresponding genomic DNA sequence is 3770 bp in length, which contains 3 exons and 2 introns. The ZmTPS gene was transformed into rice variety ZH11 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. After antibiotic screening, molecular characterization, salt-tolerance and trehalose content determinations, two transgenic lines resistant to 150 mM NaCL solutions were screened. Our study results indicated that the ZmTPS gene was integrated into the genomic DNA of the two transgenic rice lines and could be expressed well. Moreover, the detection of the transformed ZmTPS gene in the progenies of the two transgenic lines was performed from T1 to T4 generations; and results suggested that the transformed ZmTPS gene can be transmitted from parent to the progeny in transgenic rice. © 2013.

  18. Application of solid-phase microextraction to the determination of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles in Bohai Sea crude oils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baijuan; Hou, Wei; Zhang, Kuiying; Wang, Xiaoru

    2013-08-01

    A simple and rapid solid-phase microextraction approach for the isolation of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles from the aromatic fraction of crude oil is described. 8-Hydroxyquinoline silica gel impregnated with palladium chloride was used as a sorbent material for extraction. Operational parameters of the extraction solvents have been evaluated and optimized. Benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and benzo[b]naphtho[1,2-d]thiophene and their C1-C4 alkyl derivatives were identified and quantified by GC-MS. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detection for benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and benzo[b]naphtho[1,2-d]thiophene were 0.277, 0.193, and 0.597 μg/g oil, respectively. The recoveries for the polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles ranged from 81.5 to 92.1%, and the linear dynamic range was from 10 to 1000 ng/mL. The developed methodology was tested in the characterization of crude oil samples collected at the DY, SZ, ZH, and HC petroleum oil fields of the Bohai Sea. The results proved that SPE coupled with GC-MS is a promising tool for the quantitative analysis of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles in crude oils, especially for oil samples with low concentrations of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles.

  19. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: implications from other RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae). Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the U.S. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype and does not replicate at 41°C. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF. PMID:26322023

  20. Inflammatory Biomarkers Associated with Lethal Rift Valley Fever Encephalitis in the Lewis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Amy L.; Kujawa, Michael R.; Oury, Tim D.; Reed, Douglas S.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging viral disease that causes significant human and veterinary illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Encephalitis is one of the severe complications arising from RVF virus (RVFV) infection of people, and the pathogenesis of this form of RVF is completely unknown. We use a novel reproducible encephalitic disease model in rats to identify biomarkers of lethal infection. Lewis rats were infected with RVFV strain ZH501 by aerosol exposure, then sacrificed daily to determine the course of infection and evaluation of clinical, virological, and immunological parameters. Weight loss, fever, and clinical signs occurred during the last 1–2 days prior to death. Prior to onset of clinical indications of disease, rats displayed marked granulocytosis and thrombocytopenia. In addition, high levels of inflammatory chemokines (MCP-1, MCS-F, Gro/KC, RANTES, and IL-1β) were detected first in serum (3–5 dpi) followed by brain (5–7 dpi). The results of this study are consistent with clinical data from human RVF patients and validate Lewis rats as an appropriate small animal model for RVF encephalitis. The biomarkers we identified here will be useful in future studies evaluating the efficacy of novel vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26779164

  1. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: implications from other RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae). Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the U.S. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype and does not replicate at 41°C. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF.

  2. Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Scharton, Dionna; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Vest, Zachary; Westover, Jonna B.; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a formidable pathogen that causes severe disease and abortion in a variety of livestock species and a range of disease in humans that includes hemorrhagic fever, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis and blindness. The natural transmission cycle involves mosquito vectors, but exposure can also occur through contact with infected fluids and tissues. The lack of approved antiviral therapies and vaccines for human use underlies the importance of small animal models for proof-of-concept efficacy studies. Several mouse and rat models of RVFV infection have been well characterized and provide useful systems for the study of certain aspects of pathogenesis, as well as antiviral drug and vaccine development. However, certain host-directed therapeutics may not act on mouse or rat pathways. Here, we describe the natural history of disease in golden Syrian hamsters challenged subcutaneously with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Peracute disease resulted in rapid lethality within 2 to 3 days of RVFV challenge. High titer viremia and substantial viral loads were observed in most tissues examined; however, histopathology and immunostaining for RVFV antigen were largely restricted to the liver. Acute hepatocellular necrosis associated with a strong presence of viral antigen in the hepatocytes indicates that fulminant hepatitis is the likely cause of mortality. Further studies to assess the susceptibility and disease progression following respiratory route exposure are warranted. The use of the hamsters to model RVFV infection is suitable for early stage antiviral drug and vaccine development studies. PMID:25607955

  3. Use of reassortant viruses to map attenuating and temperature-sensitive mutations of the Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Saluzzo, J F; Smith, J F

    1990-08-01

    A live-attenuated vaccine for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), MP-12, has been developed recently by undirected, serial mutagenesis of a RVFV strain (ZH548) isolated during the 1977 epidemic in Egypt. In the present study, the mutations responsible for attenuation of this virus have been examined by analysis of reassortant viruses generated between the vaccine strain and a wild RVFV strain isolated in Senegal. Reassortant viruses were generated efficiently in multiply infected Vero cells, and were readily isolated without application of selective pressures. The origin of the S and M genomic RNA segments in each cloned reassortant virus was determined with monoclonal antibodies capable of differentiating the nucleocapsid protein (S segment marker) or G1 glycoprotein (M segment marker) of the parental strains. The L segment of the vaccine strain was found to contain a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutation, and the origin of the L segment in most reassortants could be inferred by analysis of their ts phenotype. Analysis of the virulence properties of selected reassortant viruses in mice demonstrated that virulence characteristics were under polygenic control, and that at least one mutation capable of independently attenuating the virus existed on each genome segment. The L and M RNA segments were also found to contain ts mutations. These findings suggest that reversion to virulence is unlikely, and further indicate that genetic reassortment with wild-type viruses during a vaccination programme in endemic areas would also be expected to yield attenuated variants.

  4. Changes in record-breaking temperature events in China and projections for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hanqing; Liu, Chun; Lu, Yanyu; He, Dongyan; Tian, Hong

    2017-06-01

    As global warming intensifies, more record-breaking (RB) temperature events are reported in many places around the world where temperatures are higher than ever before http://cn.bing.com/dict/search?q=.&FORM=BDVSP6&mkt=zh-cn. The RB temperatures have caused severe impacts on ecosystems and human society. Here, we address changes in RB temperature events occurring over China in the past (1961-2014) as well as future projections (2006-2100) using observational data and the newly available simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The number of RB events has a significant multi-decadal variability in China, and the intensity expresses a strong decrease from 1961 to 2014. However, more frequent RB events occurred in mid-eastern and northeastern China over last 30 years (1981-2010). Comparisons with observational data indicate multi-model ensemble (MME) simulations from the CMIP5 model perform well in simulating RB events for the historical run period (1961-2005). CMIP5 MME shows a relatively larger uncertainty for the change in intensity. From 2051 to 2100, fewer RB events are projected to occur in most parts of China according to RCP 2.6 scenarios. Over the longer period from 2006 to 2100, a remarkable increase is expected for the entire country according to RCP 8.5 scenarios and the maximum numbers of RB events increase by approximately 600 per year at end of twenty-first century.

  5. Dissipation in ferrofluids: mesoscopic versus hydrodynamic theory.

    PubMed

    Müller, H W; Engel, A

    1999-12-01

    Part of the field dependent dissipation in ferrofluids occurs due to the rotational motion of the ferromagnetic grains relative to the viscous flow of the carrier fluid. The classical theoretical description due to Shliomis (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 61, 2411 (1971) [Sov. Phy JETP 34, 1291 (1972)]) uses a mesoscopic treatment of the particle motion to derive a relaxation equation for the nonequilibrium part of the magnetization. Complementary, the hydrodynamic approach of Liu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3580 (1993)] involves only macroscopic quantities and results in dissipative Maxwell equations for the magnetic fields in the ferrofluid. Different stress tensors and constitutive equations lead to deviating theoretical predictions in those situations, where the magnetic relaxation processes cannot be considered instantaneous on the hydrodynamic time scale. We quantify these differences for two situations of experimental relevance, namely, a resting fluid in an oscillating oblique field and the damping of parametrically excited surface waves. The possibilities of an experimental differentiation between the two theoretical approaches is discussed.

  6. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the missing energy topology with DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Christoudias, Theodoros

    2009-06-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the missing energy and acoplanar b-jet topology is reported, using an integrated luminosity of 0.93 fb-1 recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ Collider. The analysis includes signal contributions from p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$, as well as from WH production in which the charged lepton from the W boson decay is undetected. Neural networks are used to separate signal from background. In the absence of a signal, limits are set on σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → VH) x B(H → b$\\bar{b}$) at the 95% C.L. of 2.6-2.3 pb, for Higgs boson masses in the range 105-135 GeV, where V = W, Z. The corresponding expected limits range from 2.8 to 2.0 pb. Potential improvements to the analysis with an extended dataset totalling 4 fb-1 are also discussed. Essential maintenance related to the increased luminosity and RunIIb upgrade was carried out on the impact parameter (IP) based b-tagging trigger tool and the effect of the changes on the b-tagger's performance was investigated.

  7. Protocol for a prospective, controlled, observational study to evaluate the influence of hypoxia on healthy volunteers and patients with inflammatory bowel disease: the Altitude IBD Study

    PubMed Central

    Vavricka, Stephan; Ruiz, Pedro A; Scharl, Sylvie; Biedermann, Luc; Scharl, Michael; de Vallière, Cheryl; Lundby, Carsten; Wenger, Roland H; Held, Leonhard; Merz, Tobias M; Gassmann, Max; Lutz, Thomas; Kunz, Andres; Bron, Denis; Fontana, Adriano; Strauss, Laura; Weber, Achim; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal disorder, often leading to an impaired quality of life in affected patients. The importance of environmental factors in the pathogenesis of IBD, including their disease-modifying potential, is increasingly recognised. Hypoxia seems to be an important driver of inflammation, as has been reported by our group and others. The aim of the study is to evaluate if hypoxia can alter disease activity of IBD measured by Harvey-Bradshaw Activity Index in Crohn's disease (increase to ≥5 points) and the partial Mayo Score for ulcerative colitis (increase to ≥2 points). To test the effects of hypoxia under standardised conditions, we designed a prospective and controlled investigation in healthy controls and patients with IBD in stable remission. Methods and analysis This is a prospective, controlled and observational study. Participants undergo a 3-hour exposure to hypoxic conditions simulating an altitude of 4000 metres above sea level (m.a.s.l.) in a hypobaric pressure chamber. Clinical parameters, as well as blood and stool samples and biopsies from the sigmoid colon are collected at subsequent time points. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Kanton Zurich (reference KEK-ZH-number 2013-0284). The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and shared with the worldwide medical community. Trials registration number NCT02849821; Pre-results. PMID:28057654

  8. Search for heavy neutral CP-even Higgs within lepton-specific 2HDM at a future linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Majid; Haghighat, Gholamhossein

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the production process $e^- e^+ \\rightarrow A H$ is analyzed in the context of the type IV 2HDM and the question of observability of a neutral CP-even Higgs boson $H$ at a linear collider operating at $\\sqrt{s}=1$ TeV is addressed. The CP-odd Higgs is assumed to experience a gauge-Higgs decay as $A\\rightarrow ZH$ with hadronic decay of $Z$ boson as the signature of signal events. The production chain is thus $e^+e^- \\rightarrow AH \\rightarrow ZHH \\rightarrow jj\\ell\\ell\\ell\\ell$ where $\\ell$ is a $\\tau$ or $\\mu$. Four benchmark points with different mass hypotheses are assumed for the analysis. The Higgs mass $m_H$ is assumed to vary within the range 150-300 GeV in increments of 50 GeV. The anti-$k_t$ algorithm is used to perform the jet reconstruction. Results indicate that the neutral CP-even Higgs $H$ is observable through this production mechanism using the di-muon invariant mass distribution with possibility of mass measurement. The corresponding signal significances exceed $5\\sigma$ at integrated luminosity of 3000 $fb^{-1}$.

  9. A Search for the Higgs Boson Produced in Association with $Z\\to \\ell^+\\ell^-$ Using the Matrix Element Method at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-08-01

    We present a search for associated production of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson and a Z boson where the Z boson decays to two leptons and the Higgs decays to a pair of b quarks in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. We use event probabilities based on SM matrix elements to construct a likelihood function of the Higgs content of the data sample. In a CDF data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} we see no evidence of a Higgs boson with a mass between 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. We set 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the cross-section for ZH production as a function of the Higgs boson mass m{sub H}; the limit is 8.2 times the SM prediction at m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. CDF's Higgs sensitivity status

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, Tom; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-10-01

    The combined sensitivity of CDF's current Standard Model Higgs boson searches is presented. The expected 95% CL limits on the production cross section times the relevant Higgs boson branching ratios are computed for the W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{nu}b{bar b}, ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}, gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} W{sup {+-}}H {yields} W{sup {+-}}W{sup +}W{sup -} channels as they stand as of the October 2005, using results which were prepared for Summer 2005 conferences and a newer result form the gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} channel. Correlated and uncorrelated systematic uncertainties are taken into account, and the luminosity requirements for 95% CL exclusion, 3{sigma} evidence, and 5{sigma} discovery are computed for median experimental outcomes. A list of improvements required to achieve the sensitivity to a SM Higgs boson as quantified in the Higgs Sensitivity Working Group's report is provided.

  11. Ice particle type identification for shallow Arctic mixed-phase clouds using X-band polarimetric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guang; Oue, Mariko; Protat, Alain; Verlinde, Johannes; Xiao, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Ice particle type identification for shallow Arctic mixed-phase clouds is studied using X-band polarimetric radar variables: horizontal reflectivity factor Zh, differential reflectivity Zdr, specific differential phase Kdp, and cross-correlation coefficient ρhv The problem is formulated in a Bayesian classification framework, which consists of a probability density function (PDF) and a prior probability. The PDF is approximated using a Gaussian mixture model with parameters obtained by a clustering technique. The prior probability is constructed with the spatial contextual information based on a Markov random field. The PDF and prior probability are incorporated to produce the posterior probability, the maximum of which indicates the most likely particle type. The proposed algorithm is used to first derive the PDFs for the X-band polarimetric radar observations, and then identify the particle types within Arctic precipitating cloud cases sampled in Barrow, Alaska. The results are consistent with ground-based observations and the technique is capable of detecting and characterizing the variability of cloud microphysics in Arctic clouds.

  12. Modeling indoor air pollution of outdoor origin in homes of SAPALDIA subjects in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Meier, Reto; Schindler, Christian; Eeftens, Marloes; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Ineichen, Alex; Davey, Mark; Phuleria, Harish C; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Künzli, Nino

    2015-09-01

    Given the shrinking spatial contrasts in outdoor air pollution in Switzerland and the trends toward tightly insulated buildings, the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) needs to understand to what extent outdoor air pollution remains a determinant for residential indoor exposure. The objectives of this paper are to identify determining factors for indoor air pollution concentrations of particulate matter (PM), ultrafine particles in the size range from 15 to 300nm, black smoke measured as light absorbance of PM (PMabsorbance) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and to develop predictive indoor models for SAPALDIA. Multivariable regression models were developed based on indoor and outdoor measurements among homes of selected SAPALDIA participants in three urban (Basel, Geneva, Lugano) and one rural region (Wald ZH) in Switzerland, various home characteristics and reported indoor sources such as cooking. Outdoor levels of air pollutants were important predictors for indoor air pollutants, except for the coarse particle fraction. The fractions of outdoor concentrations infiltrating indoors were between 30% and 66%, the highest one was observed for PMabsorbance. A modifying effect of open windows was found for NO2 and the ultrafine particle number concentration. Cooking was associated with increased particle and NO2 levels. This study shows that outdoor air pollution remains an important determinant of residential indoor air pollution in Switzerland.

  13. Measuring the CP property of Higgs coupling to tau leptons in the VBF channel at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tao; Mukhopadhyay, Satyanarayan; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; ...

    2017-05-23

    Here, we study the prospects of measuring the CP property of the Higgs (h) coupling to tau leptons using the vector boson fusion (VBF) production mode at the high-luminosity LHC. Utilizing the previously proposed angle between the planes spanned by the momentum vectors of the (π+π0) and (π-π0) pairs originating in τ± decays as the CP-odd observable, we perform a detailed Monte Carlo analysis, taking into account the relevant standard model backgrounds, as well as detector resolution effects. We then found that excluding a pure CP-odd coupling hypothesis requires O(400 fb-1) luminosity at the 14TeV LHC, and values of themore » CP-mixing angle larger than about 25° can be excluded at 95% confidence level using 3 ab-1 data. It is observed that the uncertainty in the angular resolution of the neutral pion momenta does not constitute a significant hurdle. Achieving a signal to background ratio (S=B) close to one, while keeping a high enough signal yield required to study the angular distributions selects out VBF as a promising mode to probe the CP nature of the hττ coupling, with gluon fusion suffering from a low S=B, and the W±h=Zh mode (with leptonically decaying W±=Z) having a much smaller signal rate.« less

  14. Tetrel bond-σ-hole bond as a preliminary stage of the SN2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Sławomir J

    2014-02-07

    MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations were carried out on complexes of ZH4, ZFH3 and ZF4 (Z = C, Si and Ge) molecules with HCN, LiCN and Cl(-) species acting as Lewis bases through nitrogen centre or chlorine ion. Z-Atoms in these complexes usually act as Lewis acid centres forming σ-hole bonds with Lewis bases. Such noncovalent interactions may adopt a name of tetrel bonds since they concern the elements of the group IV. There are exceptions for complexes of CH4 and CF4, as well as for the F4SiNCH complex where the tetrel bond is not formed. The energetic and geometrical parameters of the complexes were analyzed and numerous correlations between them were found. The Quantum Theory of 'Atoms in Molecules' and Natural Bonds Orbital (NBO) method used here should deepen the understanding of the nature of the tetrel bond. An analysis of the electrostatic potential surfaces of the interacting species is performed. The electron charge redistribution, being the result of the tetrel bond formation, is the same as that of the SN2 reaction. The energetic and geometrical parameters of the complexes analyzed here correspond to different stages of the SN2 process.

  15. The Luminosity Function of Quasars (active Galactic Nuclei) in a Merging Model with the Eddington Limit Taken Into Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontorovich, V. M.; Krivitsky, D. S.

    The influence of Eddington's limit on the active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity function within the framework of a phenomenological activity model (Kats and Kontorovich, 1990, 1991) based on angular momentum compensation in the process of galaxy merging is investigated. In particular, it is shown that in spite of the essential dependence of the galaxy merging probability on their masses in the most important and interesting case it behaves effectively as a constant, so that the abovementioned (Kats and Kontorovich, 1991) correspondence between the observed galaxy mass function (Binggeli et al., 1988) and quasar luminosity function power exponents (Boyle et al., 1988; Koo and Kron, 1988; Cristiani et al., 1993) for a constant merger probability takes place in reality. A break in the power-law dependence of the luminosity function due to Eddington's restriction (cf. Dibai, 1981; Padovani and Rafanelli, 1988) is obtained in certain cases. Possible correlation between masses of black holes in AGN and masses of their host galaxies is discussed. A more detailed paper containing the results presented at this conference was published in Pis'ma v Astron. Zh. (Kontorovich and Krivitsky, 1995). Here we have added also some additional notes and references.

  16. Theoretical tissue compartment inert gas pressures during a deep dive with and without deep decompression stops: a case analysis.

    PubMed

    Buzzacott, Peter; Papadopoulou, Virginie; Baddeley, Adrian; Petri, Nadan M; Lind, Folke

    2015-01-01

    Deep decompression stops are increasingly common in recreational technical diving. Concerns exist that they shift decompression stress back into slower tissues. A diver recorded an exceptional exposure dive, with deeps stops, on a commercially available dive computer. Using the R package SCUBA tissue inert gas pressures in 17 Bühlmann (ZH-L16A) compartments were estimated from the dive computer recorded profile. The RGBM dive plan generated by the diver's software was similarly interrogated, as was a third profile with reduced deep stops generated using the VPM-B/E model. In this dive the combination of 5 gas switches appeared to ameliorate the effect of deep stops from 76 m depth. A higher-than-anticipated inert gas content in a decompression mixture, coupled with climbing 200 stairs post-decompression, appear possible risk factors for decompression sickness. Nonetheless, the physiological effect of deep decompression stops during exceptional exposure, even when diving with gas switches, remains urgently to be determined to improve safe decompression following exceptional exposures. Until algorithms utilising deep decompression stops are validated with human data, dive profiles incorporating deep decompression stops should be considered experimental.

  17. On the convergence of implicit iteration process with error for a finite family of asymptotically nonexpansive mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. S.; Tan, K. K.; Lee, H. W. J.; Chan, Chi Kin

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the weak and strong convergence of implicit iteration process with errors to a common fixed point for a finite family of asymptotically nonexpansive mappings and nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces. The results presented in this paper extend and improve the corresponding results of [H. Bauschke, The approximation of fixed points of compositions of nonexpansive mappings in Hilbert space, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 202 (1996) 150-159; B. Halpern, Fixed points of nonexpansive maps, Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 73 (1967) 957-961; P.L. Lions, Approximation de points fixes de contractions, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. A 284 (1977), 1357-1359; S. Reich, Strong convergence theorems for resolvents of accretive operators in Banach spaces, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 75 (1980) 287-292; Z.H. Sun, Strong convergence of an implicit iteration process for a finite family of asymptotically quasi-nonexpansive mappings, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 286 (2003) 351-358; R. Wittmann, Approximation of fixed points of nonexpansive mappings, Arch. Math. 58 (1992) 486-491; H.K. Xu, M.G. Ori, An implicit iterative process for nonexpansive mappings, Numer. Funct. Anal. Optimiz. 22 (2001) 767-773; Y.Y. Zhou, S.S. Chang, Convergence of implicit iterative process for a finite family of asymptotically nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces, Numer. Funct. Anal. Optimiz. 23 (2002) 911-921].

  18. First measurement of unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from a He3 target [First measurement of unpolarized SIDIS cross section from a 3He target

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; ...

    2017-03-24

    Here, the unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) differential cross sections in 3He(e,e'π±)X have been measured for the first time in Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 with a 5.9 GeV e– beam on a 3He gas target. The experiment focuses on the valence quark region, covering a kinematic range 0.12 < xbj < 0.45,1 < Q2 < 4(GeV/c)2,0.45 < zh < 0.65, and 0.05 < Pt < 0.55GeV/c. The extracted SIDIS differential cross sections of π± production are compared with existing phenomenological models while the 3He nucleus approximated as two protons and one neutron in a plane-wave picture, in multidimensional bins. Withinmore » the experimental uncertainties, the azimuthal modulations of the cross sections are found to be consistent with zero.« less

  19. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep.

    PubMed

    Weingartl, Hana M; Nfon, Charles K; Zhang, Shunzhen; Marszal, Peter; Wilson, William C; Morrill, John C; Bettinger, George E; Peters, Clarence J

    2014-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory and thus the need exists to develop safe and efficacious vaccines that can be used outside the endemic zones. Commercial RVFV vaccines are available but have limitations that prevent their use in disease-free countries. Consequently, there are ongoing efforts to develop and/or improve RVFV vaccines with global acceptability. In this study a previously developed MP-12-derived vaccine candidate with a large deletion of the NSm gene in the pre Gn region of the M segment (arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384) developed by T. Ikegami, that was already shown to be safe in pregnant sheep causing neither abortion nor fetal malformation was further evaluated. This vaccine was tested for protection of sheep from viremia and fever following challenge with virulent RVFV ZH501 strain. A single vaccination with arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384 fully protected sheep when challenged four weeks post vaccination, thereby demonstrating that this vaccine is efficacious in protecting these animals from RVFV infection.

  20. Rift Valley fever virus infection in golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Scharton, Dionna; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Bailey, Kevin W; Vest, Zachary; Westover, Jonna B; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a formidable pathogen that causes severe disease and abortion in a variety of livestock species and a range of disease in humans that includes hemorrhagic fever, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis and blindness. The natural transmission cycle involves mosquito vectors, but exposure can also occur through contact with infected fluids and tissues. The lack of approved antiviral therapies and vaccines for human use underlies the importance of small animal models for proof-of-concept efficacy studies. Several mouse and rat models of RVFV infection have been well characterized and provide useful systems for the study of certain aspects of pathogenesis, as well as antiviral drug and vaccine development. However, certain host-directed therapeutics may not act on mouse or rat pathways. Here, we describe the natural history of disease in golden Syrian hamsters challenged subcutaneously with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Peracute disease resulted in rapid lethality within 2 to 3 days of RVFV challenge. High titer viremia and substantial viral loads were observed in most tissues examined; however, histopathology and immunostaining for RVFV antigen were largely restricted to the liver. Acute hepatocellular necrosis associated with a strong presence of viral antigen in the hepatocytes indicates that fulminant hepatitis is the likely cause of mortality. Further studies to assess the susceptibility and disease progression following respiratory route exposure are warranted. The use of the hamsters to model RVFV infection is suitable for early stage antiviral drug and vaccine development studies.

  1. Influence of hot isostatic pressing on the structure and properties of an innovative low-alloy high-strength aluminum cast alloy based on the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni-Fe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopyan, T. K.; Padalko, A. G.; Belov, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is applied for treatment of castings of innovative low-ally high-strength aluminum alloy, nikalin ATs6N0.5Zh based on the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni-Fe system. The influence of HIP on the structure and properties of castings is studied by means of three regimes of barometric treatment with different temperatures of isometric holding: t 1 = 505 ± 2°C, p 1 = 100 MPa, τ1 = 3 h (HIP1); t 2 = 525 ± 2°C, p 2 = 100 MPa, τ2 = 3 h (HIP2); and t 3 = 545 ± 2°C, p 3 = 100 MPa, τ3 = 3 h (HIP3). It is established that high-temperature HIP leads to actually complete elimination of porosity and additional improvement of the morphology of second phases. Improved structure after HIP provides improvement properties, especially of plasticity. In particular, after heat treatment according of regime HIP2 + T4 (T4 is natural aging), the alloy plasticity is improved by about two times in comparison with the initial state (from ~6 to 12%). While applying regime HIP3 + T6 (T6 is artificial aging for reaching the maximum strength), the plasticity has improved by more than three times in comparison with the initial state, as after treatment according to regimes HIP1 + T6 and HIP2 + T6 (from ~1.2 to ~5.0%), which are characterized by a lower HIP temperature.

  2. Neutron activation analysis of some building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salagean, M. N.; Pantelica, A. I.; Georgescu, I. I.; Muntean, M. I.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U. Yb, W and Zn in seven Romanian building materials were determined by the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) method using the VVR-S Reactor of NIPNE- Bucharest. Raw matarials used in cement obtaining ≈ 75% of limestone and ≈ 25% of clay, cement samples from three different factories, furnace slag, phosphogypsum, and a type of brick have been analyzed. The brick was compacted from furnace slay, fly coal ash, phosphogypsum, lime and cement. The U, Th and K concentrations determined in the brick are in agreement with the natural radioactivity measurements of226Ra,232Th and40K. These specific activities were found about twice and 1.5 higher than the accepted levels in the case of226Ra and232Th, as well as40K, respectively. By consequence, the investigated brick is considered a radioactive waste. The rather high content of Co, Cr, K, Th, and Zh in the brick is especially due to the slag and fly ash, the main componets. The presence of U, Th and K in slag is mainly correlated with the limestone and dolomite as fluxes in matallurgy.

  3. Influence of substrate bias voltage on the microstructure of nc-SiOx:H film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Min; Yu, Wei; Xu, Yan-Mei; Ji, Yun; Jiang, Zhao-Yi; Wang, Xin-Zhan; Li, Xiao-Wei; Fu, Guang-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Amorphous silicon oxide containing nanocrystalline silicon grain (nc-SiOx:H) films are prepared by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique at different negative substrate bias voltages. The influence of the bias voltage applied to the substrate on the microstructure is investigated. The analysis of x-ray diffraction spectra evidences the in situ growth of nanocrystalline Si. The grain size can be well controlled by varying the substrate bias voltage, and the largest size is obtained at 60 V. Fourier transform infrared spectra studies on the microstructure evolutions of the nc-SiOx:H films suggest that the absorption peak intensities, which are related to the defect densities, can be well controlled. It can be attributed to the fact that the negative bias voltage provides a useful way to change the energies of the particles in the deposition process, which can provide sufficient driving force for the diffusion and movement for the species on the growing surface and effectively passivate the dangling bonds. Also the larger grain size and lower band gap, which will result in better photosensitivity, can also be obtained with a moderate substrate bias voltage of 60 V. Project supported by the Key Basic Research Project of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. 12963930D), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. F2013201250), and the Science and Technology Research Projects of the Educational Department of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. ZH2012030).

  4. Rift Valley Fever Virus Structural and Nonstructural Proteins: Recombinant Protein Expression and Immunoreactivity Against Antisera from Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William; McVey, D. Scott; Drolet, Barbara S.; Weingartl, Hana; Madden, Daniel; Young, Alan; Ma, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) encodes the structural proteins nucleoprotein (N), aminoterminal glycoprotein (Gn), carboxyterminal glycoprotein (Gc), and L protein, 78-kD, and the nonstructural proteins NSm and NSs. Using the baculovirus system, we expressed the full-length coding sequence of N, NSs, NSm, Gc, and the ectodomain of the coding sequence of the Gn glycoprotein derived from the virulent strain of RVFV ZH548. Western blot analysis using anti-His antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against Gn and N confirmed expression of the recombinant proteins, and in vitro biochemical analysis showed that the two glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, were expressed in glycosylated form. Immunoreactivity profiles of the recombinant proteins in western blot and in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against a panel of antisera obtained from vaccinated or wild type (RVFV)-challenged sheep confirmed the results obtained with anti-His antibodies and demonstrated the suitability of the baculo-expressed antigens for diagnostic assays. In addition, these recombinant proteins could be valuable for the development of diagnostic methods that differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). PMID:23962238

  5. A second triclinic polymorph of (1-ammonio-1-phosphono­eth­yl)phospho­nate

    PubMed Central

    Tsaryk, Natalia V.; Dudko, Anatolij V.; Kozachkova, Alexandra N.; Pekhnyo, Vasily I.

    2011-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the second polymorph of the title compound, C2H9NO6P2, contains one mol­ecule existing as a zwitterion. The N atom of the ammonio group is protonated and one of the phospho­nic acid groups is deprotonated. Bond lengths and angles are similar in both polymorphs. Besides the differences in cell parameters, the most significant structural difference between this structure and that of the first polymorph [Dudko, Bon, Kozachkova, Tsarik & Pekhno (2008 ▶), Ukr. Khim. Zh. 74, 104–106] is the presence of strong symmetric hydrogen bonds between neighbouring phospho­nate groups. H atoms involved in these hydrogen bonds are located at inversion centres and O⋯O distances are observed in the range 2.458 (5)–2.523 (5) Å. These bonds and additional O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds inter­link the mol­ecules, giving a three-dimensional supromolecular network. PMID:21837054

  6. Searches for new particles produced in Z boson decay

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kooten, R.; Jung, C.K.; Komamiya, S.

    1990-05-01

    Searches for events with new particle topologies in 455 hadronic Z decays with the Mark 2 detector at SLC are presented. 95% confidence level lower limits of 40.7 GeV/c{sup 2} for the top quark mass and 42.0 GeV/c{sup 2} for the mass of a fourth generation charge - 1/3 quark, regardless of decay mode, are obtained. For a fourth generation sequential Dirac neutrino {nu}{sub 4} mass up to 43 GeV/c{sup 2}. Decays of the Z boson to a pair of non-minimal Higgs bosons (Z {yields} H{sub s}{sup 0}H{sub p}{sup 0}), where one of them is relatively light ({approx lt} 10 GeV/c{sup 2}), are also considered. Limits are obtained on the ZH{sub s}{sup 0}H{sub p}{sup 0} coupling as a function of the Higgs boson masses. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Source Header List. Volume 2. L through Z

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    WO WU W uWU. WI1- 4 z W .( 4 > Z U 4 Z - 1D I- 4 I-U I- <I-0 I-Z I- I- I-x W 4 W Win 4 3 01M 0 HU4 HH HO " ~ H4 H" H H-. HO U IX WC M I - I-. in ZH...w- z M i i WED Ji m. U 4 D wWmEV w 0- 8 -1 W>0 ( z z u A0 :3l m-U 0 ED 1D 2D2 I- O w "--. ’- iD u’ u )En 44( C) mD ED ED ED LI ED Mi - i W 0 0 .I- 0-I...Nl co 10 C0 0) In 0 10 Cl 02) r- V * - 00 10 - 10 q Cl c0 V 10 C0 1- 10 co 1 r- U N 02) 02)0 M2 020 CV)Nl M2 1D 10 02) c 0 M2 Nl 10 N M 00 1- u z U 2

  8. Interactions between edge lattice dislocations and Σ11 symmetrical tilt grain boundary: comparisons among several FCC metals and interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenshan; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between edge dislocations and a ? symmetrical tilt grain boundary (GB) in face-centred cubic metals of Ni and Al are studied via a quasicontinuum method (QCM). A variety of embedding atom method potentials are used, and the results are compared to previous studies of Cu [W.S. Yu, Z.Q. Wang, Acta Mater., 60 (2012) 5010]. Different potentials do not significantly affect the edge dislocation-GB interactions in these metals. Edge dislocations can easily transmit across grain boundaries in Ni and Cu, even for a single incoming dislocation. However, slip-transmission in Al occurs only after the GB absorbs many incoming dislocations. Stable nucleation of grain boundary dislocations (GBD) in Cu and Ni plays an important role in the slip-transmissions. The slip transmission in Al is found to be difficult due to the metastable nucleation of GBD. The incoming leading and trailing partials in Al are absorbed together by the GB because of the larger values of ? (?, ? and ? are the shear modulus, magnitude of Burgers vector of a partial dislocation and the stable stacking fault (SF) energy, respectively). The parameter ? (? as the unstable SF energy) [Z.H. Jin et al., Acta. Mater. 56 (2008) 1126] incorporates ? and ?, and can be used to measure the slip transmission ability of an edge dislocation in these metals. It is also shown that certain loading conditions can help enhance the nucleation of GBDs and GBD dipoles in Al, such that the incoming, leading and trailing partial dislocations can be absorbed separately.

  9. Clumps of z 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Giavalisco, M.; Cassata, P.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    We study the properties of red clumps of star-forming galaxies at z 2. A sample of 15 galaxies with spectroscopic redshift is selected from the HUDF, where ultra--deep and high- resolution optical (HST/ACS) and near--IR (HST/WFC3 IR) images are available to resolve the internal structure of z 2 galaxies at the kpc scale. We generate rest-frame UV-optical color maps of these galaxies after carefully matching image PSFs. Clumps are identified through visual inspection on the (z-H) maps. We run SED-fitting using the seven-band BVizYJH HST photometry of each pixel and measure the spatial distributions of stellar population parameters, such as stellar mass, star-formation rate, age and obscuration. In order to understand the origin of sub-galactic structures, we study the distributions of these properties of the pixels that are part of clumps and compare them with those of the surrounding disks. Our results help answer two questions: (1) whether the clumps are the progenitor of bulges and (2) whether old stellar populations (with age of a few Gyr) exist in star-forming galaxies at z 2.

  10. Identification of Genomic Insertion and Flanking Sequence of G2-EPSPS and GAT Transgenes in Soybean Using Whole Genome Sequencing Method

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bingfu; Guo, Yong; Hong, Huilong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of sequence flanking exogenous fragment insertion is essential for safety assessment and labeling of genetically modified organism (GMO). In this study, the T-DNA insertion sites and flanking sequences were identified in two newly developed transgenic glyphosate-tolerant soybeans GE-J16 and ZH10-6 based on whole genome sequencing (WGS) method. More than 22.4 Gb sequence data (∼21 × coverage) for each line was generated on Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. The junction reads mapped to boundaries of T-DNA and flanking sequences in these two events were identified by comparing all sequencing reads with soybean refe